Science.gov

Sample records for chronic dietary exposure

  1. Effects of chronic dietary copper exposure on growth and reproduction of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    De Schamphelaere, Karel A C; Janssen, Colin R

    2004-08-01

    A matter of current, intense debate with regard to the effects of metals on biological systems is the potential toxicity of metals associated with food particles. Recently developed biotic ligand models (BLM), which predict the toxicity of waterborne metals, may not be valid if the dietary exposure route contributes to metal toxicity. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first that investigates the potential toxicity of dietary copper to a freshwater invertebrate (i.e., Daphnia magna) feeding on a live diet (i.e., the green alga Pseudokircheneriella subcapitata). Algae were exposed for 3 d to different copper concentrations, resulting in algal copper burdens between approximately 6.2 X 10(-16) and 250 x 10(-16) g cell(-1). These algae were then used as food in chronic, 21-d D. magna toxicity tests in which growth, reproduction, and copper accumulation were assessed. Three exposure scenarios were tested: A waterborne exposure, a dietary exposure, and a combined waterborne and dietary exposure. Although exposure to dietary copper resulted in an increased copper body burden of the adult daphnids, it did not contribute to toxicity and did not affect the 21-d effect concentrations expressed as waterborne copper, indicating that the previously established good predictive capacity of the chronic D. magna BLM is not affected. On the contrary, exposure to the highest dietary copper levels resulted in an increase of as much as 75% in growth and reproduction. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that dietary copper exposure of a freshwater invertebrate feeding on a live diet resulted in a beneficial effect.

  2. Histopathologic Alterations Associated with Global Gene Expression Due to Chronic Dietary TCDD Exposure in Juvenile Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Cariou, Ronan; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Nan; Goetz, Giles; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Tonellato, Peter J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the effects and possible developmental disease implication of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on global gene expression anchored to histopathologic analysis in juvenile zebrafish by functional genomic, histopathologic and analytic chemistry methods. Specifically, juvenile zebrafish were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb, and fish were sampled following 0, 7, 14, 28 and 42 d after initiation of the exposure. TCDD accumulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner and 100 ppb TCDD caused TCDD accumulation in female (15.49 ppb) and male (18.04 ppb) fish at 28 d post exposure. Dietary TCDD caused multiple lesions in liver, kidney, intestine and ovary of zebrafish and functional dysregulation such as depletion of glycogen in liver, retrobulbar edema, degeneration of nasal neurosensory epithelium, underdevelopment of intestine, and diminution in the fraction of ovarian follicles containing vitellogenic oocytes. Importantly, lesions in nasal epithelium and evidence of endocrine disruption based on alternatively spliced vasa transcripts are two novel and significant results of this study. Microarray gene expression analysis comparing vehicle control to dietary TCDD revealed dysregulated genes involved in pathways associated with cardiac necrosis/cell death, cardiac fibrosis, renal necrosis/cell death and liver necrosis/cell death. These baseline toxicological effects provide evidence for the potential mechanisms of developmental dysfunctions induced by TCDD and vasa as a biomarker for ovarian developmental disruption. PMID:24988445

  3. Reproductive toxicity assessment of chronic dietary exposure to soy isoflavones in male rats.

    PubMed

    Faqi, Ali S; Johnson, William D; Morrissey, Robert L; McCormick, David L

    2004-06-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data suggest that consumption of diets that are rich in isoflavones may decrease cancer risk in the breast, prostate, and other tissues. Isoflavones such as genistein and daidzein are structurally similar to endogenous estrogens, and demonstrate both estrogenic and weak anti-estrogenic activities; these activities may underlie the impaired fertility and reproductive tract disorders reported in animals exposed to high doses of isoflavones. To identify possible effects of isoflavones on male fertility, we evaluated reproductive parameters in Wistar-Unilever rats receiving dietary exposure to PTI G-2535, a characterized mixture of soy-derived isoflavones containing 45% genistein, 23% daidzein, and 4% glycitein. Beginning at 10 weeks of age, rats received chronic dietary exposure to the soy isoflavone mixture (200 or 2000 mg/kg diet) for a minimum of 12 months. Controls received unsupplemented chow diet only for the same period. Dietary exposure to isoflavones induced no gross toxicity or alterations in body weight gain. Absolute and relative weights of the testis and epididymis in groups receiving high or low doses of isoflavones were comparable to those of controls, and histopathologic evaluations demonstrated that testicular morphology was similar in all study groups. Isoflavone exposure had no significant effects on spermatid count, sperm production, or sperm morphology in any group. These data suggest that the reproductive system of adult male rats is relatively insensitive to isoflavone toxicity at dose levels that demonstrate significant activity in cancer chemoprevention, and that male reproductive function is unlikely to be affected by long-term administration of isoflavones for cancer prevention or other purposes. The results of this study conducted in adult male rats differ from the significant alterations in reproductive parameters that have been reported in female rats receiving prenatal or juvenile exposure to isoflavones.

  4. Considerations when using longitudinal cohort studies to assess dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic and chronic health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Scrafford, Carolyn G; Barraj, Leila M; Tsuji, Joyce S

    2016-07-01

    Dietary arsenic exposure and chronic health outcomes are of interest, due in part to increased awareness and data available on inorganic arsenic levels in some foods. Recent concerns regarding levels of inorganic arsenic, the primary form of arsenic of human health concern, in foods are based on extrapolation from adverse health effects observed at high levels of inorganic arsenic exposure; the potential for the occurrence of these health effects from lower levels of dietary inorganic arsenic exposure has not been established. In this review, longitudinal cohort studies are evaluated for their utility in estimating dietary inorganic arsenic exposure and quantifying statistically reliable associations with health outcomes. The primary limiting factor in longitudinal studies is incomplete data on inorganic arsenic levels in foods combined with the aggregation of consumption of foods with varying arsenic levels into a single category, resulting in exposure misclassification. Longitudinal cohort studies could provide some evidence to evaluate associations of dietary patterns related to inorganic arsenic exposure with risk of arsenic-related diseases. However, currently available data from longitudinal cohort studies limit causal analyses regarding the association between inorganic arsenic exposure and health outcomes. Any conclusions should therefore be viewed with knowledge of the analytical and methodological limitations.

  5. Effects of chronic dietary petroleum exposure on reproductive development in polar cod (Boreogadus saida).

    PubMed

    Bender, Morgan Lizabeth; Frantzen, Marianne; Vieweg, Ireen; Falk-Petersen, Inger-Britt; Johnsen, Helge Kreutzer; Rudolfsen, Geir; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Dubourg, Paul; Nahrgang, Jasmine

    2016-11-01

    Increasing human activities in the Arctic raise the risk of petroleum pollution, thus posing an elevated risk for Arctic organisms to be chronically exposed to petroleum compounds. The endocrine disrupting properties of some of these compounds (i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs]) present in crude oil may have negative effects on the long and energy intensive reproductive development of polar cod (Boreogadus saida), an Arctic keystone species. In the present study, selected reproductive parameters were examined in feral polar cod exposed to crude oil via a natural diet (0.11, 0.57 and 1.14μg crude oil/g fish/day [corresponding to low, medium and high treatments, respectively]) for 31 weeks prior to spawning. Fish maturing in the current reproductive period made up 92% of the experimental population while 5% were immature and 3% were identified as resting fish. Phase I metabolism of PAHs, indicated by ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, showed a dose-dependent increase in high and medium crude oil treatments at week 6 and 22, respectively. Decreasing EROD activity and increasing PAH bile metabolite concentrations over the experimental period may be explained by reproductive maturity stage. Significant alterations in sperm motility were observed in crude oil exposed males compared to the controls. The investigated somatic indices (gonad and hepatic), germ cell development and plasma steroid levels (estradiol-17β [females], testosterone [males and females] and 11-ketotestosterone [males]) were not significantly altered by chronic dietary exposure to crude oil. The environmentally realistic doses polar cod were chronically exposed to in this study were likely not high enough to induce adverse effects in this ecologically important fish species. This study elucidated many baseline aspects of polar cod reproductive physiology and emphasized the influence of maturation state on biomarkers of PAH biotransformation (EROD and PAH bile metabolites).

  6. Resistance of developing honeybee larvae during chronic exposure to dietary nicotine.

    PubMed

    Human, H; Archer, C R; du Rand, E E; Pirk, C W W; Nicolson, S W

    2014-10-01

    The effects of pesticides on honeybee larvae are less understood than for adult bees, even though larvae are chronically exposed to pesticide residues that accumulate in comb and food stores in the hive. We investigated how exposure to a plant alkaloid, nicotine, affects survival, growth and body composition of honeybee larvae. Larvae of Apis mellifera scutellata were reared in vitro and fed throughout development on standard diets with nicotine included at concentrations from 0 to 1000μg/100g diet. Overall mortality across all nicotine treatments was low, averaging 9.8% at the prepupal stage and 18.1% at the white-eyed pupal stage, but survival was significantly reduced by nicotine. The mass of prepupae and white-eyed pupae was not affected by nicotine. In terms of body composition, nicotine affected water content but did not influence either protein or lipid stores of white-eyed pupae. We attribute the absence of consistent negative effects of dietary nicotine to detoxification mechanisms in developing honeybees, which enable them to resist both natural and synthetic xenobiotics.

  7. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Rise, Matthew L.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Hori, Tiago S.; Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven; McGraw, Joseph E.; Goetz, Giles; Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD / g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days (d) after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 d. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD / g fish) in whole fish at 28 d. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 d and 42 d revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 d. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down-regulated gene among each group based on microarray data, and their QPCR validations are consistent with microarray data for the 10 and 100 ppb TCDD treatment groups after 28-d exposure (p< 0.05). In addition, in the 100 ppb group at 28d, expression of complement component C3-1 and trypsin-1 precursor have a more than 10-fold induction from the microarray experiments

  8. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Rise, Matthew L; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Hori, Tiago S; Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven; McGraw, Joseph E; Goetz, Giles; Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J; Carvan, Michael J

    2013-09-15

    The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ngTCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ngTCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down-regulated gene among each group based on microarray data, and their QPCR validations are consistent with microarray data for the 10 and 100 ppb TCDD treatment groups after 28 days exposure (p<0.05). In addition, in the 100 ppb group at 28 days, expression of complement component C3-1 and trypsin-1 precursor have a more than 10-fold induction from the microarray

  9. Effects of chronic dietary and waterborne cadmium exposures on the contamination level and reproduction of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Geffard, Olivier; Geffard, Alain; Chaumot, Arnaud; Vollat, Bernard; Alvarez, Cathy; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène; Garric, Jeanne

    2008-05-01

    Regulatory assessments of metal toxicity on freshwater organisms assume that toxic effects are caused by dissolved metals. In aquatic systems, organisms are exposed to both dissolved and particulate-bound metals. In this study, the chronic toxicity of dietary cadmium (Cd) on the reproduction and Cd body burden of Daphnia magna was investigated. Daphnids (<24 h) were successively exposed to dissolved Cd (8 h) and then to uncontaminated or contaminated algae (16 h) for 21 d. The results show a higher Cd burden in daphnids because of the addition of contaminated food and reveal that Cd uptake by D. magna from water and food was additive for the lowest Cd concentrations tested. Similar Cd distributions (cytosolic and insoluble fractions) were observed in the two groups of organisms, showing similar potential toxicity of Cd accumulated from the two exposure routes. Dietary Cd induces deleterious effects on D. magna reproduction. On the basis of Cd body burden of daphnids, the results support the claim that waterborne and dietary Cd exposures were additive in causing toxicity for Cd concentrations lower than 25 microg/L. At the highest Cd concentrations, the importance of dietary Cd on the daphnid contamination level decreases and confounding factors such as feeding rate reduction seem to appear, which induce an effect on neonate reproduction. In this study, we illustrate the need to take the dietary pathway into account in regulatory assessments and to establish effective concentrations with particulate-bound metals.

  10. Chronic exposure to dietary selenomethionine increases gonadal steroidogenesis in female rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Steve; Thomas, Jith K; Higley, Eric; Hursky, Olesya; Pietrock, Michael; Raine, Jason C; Giesy, John P; Janz, David M; Hecker, Markus

    2011-10-01

    Selenomethionine (Se-Met) is the major dietary form of selenium (Se). Detrimental effects have been associated with exposure to elevated dietary selenium. Previous studies have demonstrated effects of Se on the endocrine system, in particular effects on cortisol and thyroid hormones. However, no information is available regarding effects of Se on sex steroid hormones. In the present study, effects of dietary exposure to an environmentally relevant concentration (4.54 mg/kg wet weight (ww)) of Se-Met for 126 days on concentrations of sex steroid hormones in blood plasma of female rainbow trout were determined. Furthermore, the molecular basis for effects of Se-Met on plasma sex steroid hormone concentrations was investigated. Concentrations of androstenedione (A), estrone (E1), and estradiol (E2) were 39.5-, 3.8-, and 12.7-fold greater in plasma of treated females than the untreated controls, respectively. Testosterone (T) was detected only in plasma of treated females. The greater E2 concentration stimulated greater transcript abundance of vitellogenin (vtg) and zona-radiata protein (zrp). Female rainbow trout exposed to Se-Met had greater transcript abundance of key steroidogenic proteins and enzymes, including peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (pbr), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-hsd). Exposure to Se-Met did not affect transcript abundance of luteinizing hormone (lh) or follicle stimulating hormone (fsh). Similarly, there was no change in transcript abundance of luteinizing hormone receptor (lhr) or follicle stimulating hormone receptor (fshr). Long-term exposure to dietary Se-Met has the potential to stimulate vitellogenesis in female rainbow trout by directly stimulating ovarian tissue steroidogenesis. This is the first study to report effects of Se on sex steroid hormone production in fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. THERMOREGULATION IN THE RAT DURING CHRONIC, DIETARY EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS, AN ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of chlorpyrifos (CHP) at a dose of 25 to 80 mg/kg (p.o.) To rats results in hypothermia followed by a fever lasting for several days. To understand if chronic, low level exposure to CHP affects thermoregulation in a comparable manner to acute administration, male L...

  12. THERMOREGULATION IN THE RAT DURING CHRONIC, DIETARY EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS, AN ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of chlorpyrifos (CHP) at a dose of 25 to 80 mg/kg (p.o.) To rats results in hypothermia followed by a fever lasting for several days. To understand if chronic, low level exposure to CHP affects thermoregulation in a comparable manner to acute administration, male L...

  13. Accumulation and effects of Cr(VI) in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) during chronic dissolved and dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxing; Mu, Lei; Cao, Jinling; Mu, Jingli; Klerks, Paul L; Luo, Yongju; Guo, Zhongbao; Xie, Lingtian

    2016-07-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an essential metal and a nutritional supplement for both human and agricultural uses. It is also a pollutant from a variety of industrial uses. These uses can lead to elevated Cr levels in aquatic environments, where it can enter and affect aquatic organisms. Its accumulation and subsequent effects in fish have received relatively little attention, especially for chronic exposure. In the present study, Japanese medaka were chronically exposed to dissolved or dietary Cr(VI) for 3 months. Cr accumulation in liver, gills, intestine, and brain was evaluated. Effects on the antioxidant system, nervous system (acetylcholinesterase, AChE), digestive system (α-glucosidase, α-Glu), and tissue histology (liver and gills) were also assessed. Cr accumulation was observed in the intestine and liver of fish exposed to Cr-contaminated brine shrimp. However, chronic dissolved Cr exposure led to significant Cr accumulation in all organs tested. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of Cr in medaka livers revealed that 37% of the Cr was present in the heat stable protein fraction. The dissolved Cr exposure had pronounced effects on the antioxidant system in the liver, with an elevated ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) and decreases in GSH and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The α-Glu activity in the intestine was significantly inhibited. In addition, Cr exposure caused histopathological alterations in the gills and liver. In general, the effects of dietary Cr were relatively minor, possible due to the much lower accumulation in the fish. Our results imply that Japanese medaka accumulate Cr mainly via uptake of dissolved Cr(VI). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER FLASH OR PATTERN REVERSAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Visual disturbances are often reported following exposure to xenobiotics, and cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds have been reported to alter visual functi...

  15. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED RESPONSE (BAERS) IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Cholinergic transmission is involved in auditory structures in the periphery and the brainstem and is altered following chlorpyrifos exposure. This study e...

  16. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER FLASH OR PATTERN REVERSAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Visual disturbances are often reported following exposure to xenobiotics, and cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds have been reported to alter visual functi...

  17. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED RESPONSE (BAERS) IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Cholinergic transmission is involved in auditory structures in the periphery and the brainstem and is altered following chlorpyrifos exposure. This study e...

  18. Chronic dietary exposure to environmental organochlorine contaminants induces thyroid gland lesions in Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Wolkers, Hans; Leifsson, Pall S; Iburg, Tine; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Oystein; Dietz, Rune; Kirkegaard, Maja; Muir, Derek C G; Jørgensen, Even H

    2009-08-01

    The impact of dietary organochlorine (OC) exposure on thyroid gland pathology was studied in farmed male Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus). The exposed group (n=16) was fed a diet based on wild minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) blubber as a main fat source in order to mimic the exposure to OC cocktails in the Artic environment. This resulted in an exposure of approximately 17 microg Sigma OC/kg day and a Sigma OC residue adipose tissue and liver concentration of 1700 and 4470 ng/gl.w., respectively, after 16 months of exposure. Control foxes (n=13) were fed a diet with pork (Sus scrofa) fat as a main fat source containing significantly lower OC concentrations. The food composition fed to the control and exposed group was standardized for nutrient contents. Four OC-related histopathological changes were found: (1) flat-epithelial-cell true thyroid cysts (TC) characterized by neutral content; (2) remnants of simple squamous epithelial-cell embryonic ducts containing neutral debris (EDN); (3) remnants of stratified squamous epithelial-cell embryonic ducts containing acid mucins often accompanied with debris of leukocyte inflammatory nature (EDM) and (4) disseminated thyroid C-cell hyperplasia (HPC). Of these, the prevalence of TC, EDN and HPC was significantly highest in the exposed group (chi(2) test: all p<0.04). The study shows that the OC mixture in minke whale blubber may cause development of thyroid gland cysts, C-cell hyperplasia and increase the prevalence of cystic remnants of embryonic ducts. The mechanism causing these effects could include endocrine disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, a disturbance of the calcium homeostasis/metabolism or energy metabolism or immune suppression. Because concentrations of OCs are higher in wild Arctic foxes, it is likely that these animals could suffer from similar OC-induced thyroid gland pathological and functional changes.

  19. Effects of Chronic Dietary Selenomethionine Exposure on the Visual System of Adult and F1 Generation Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Raine, Jason C; Lallemand, Lise; Pettem, Connor M; Janz, David M

    2016-09-01

    The effects of chronic dietary selenomethionine (SeMet) exposure on the visual system of adult zebrafish and their progeny were investigated. Adult zebrafish were exposed to measured concentrations of 1.1 (control) and 10.3 µg Se/g dry mass as SeMet for 57 days, then encouraged to breed. Progeny were reared to swim-up and differences in mortality, eye size and visual behaviour were determined. Adult vision was also investigated using behavioural assays. Adults fed the SeMet-spiked diet exhibited significantly fewer positive reactions in the escape response assay when compared to controls. Larvae from adults fed elevated SeMet had smaller eyes and a lower proportion of positive responses in phototaxis, oculomotor and optokinetic response assays compared to controls. These results demonstrate that environmentally relevant elevated dietary SeMet exposure can affect the visual system of both exposed adult zebrafish and their progeny, which could affect fitness and survivability.

  20. Hepatic and renal trace element concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) following chronic dietary exposure to coal fly ash contaminated prey.

    PubMed

    Tuberville, Tracey D; Scott, David E; Metts, Brian S; Finger, John W; Hamilton, Matthew T

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the propensity of crocodilians to bioaccumulate trace elements as a result of chronic dietary exposure. We exposed 36 juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to one of four dietary treatments that varied in the relative frequency of meals containing prey from coal combustion waste (CCW)-contaminated habitats vs. prey from uncontaminated sites, and evaluated tissue residues and growth rates after 12 mo and 25 mo of exposure. Hepatic and renal concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and selenium (Se) varied significantly among dietary treatment groups in a dose-dependent manner and were higher in kidneys than in livers. Exposure period did not affect Se or As levels but Cd levels were significantly higher after 25 mo than 12 mo of exposure. Kidney As and Se levels were negatively correlated with body size but neither growth rates nor body condition varied significantly among dietary treatment groups. Our study is among the first to experimentally examine bioaccumulation of trace element contaminants in crocodilians as a result of chronic dietary exposure. A combination of field surveys and laboratory experiments will be required to understand the effects of different exposure scenarios on tissue residues, and ultimately link these concentrations with effects on individual health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of chronic dietary selenomethionine exposure on repeat swimming performance, aerobic metabolism and methionine catabolism in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jith K; Wiseman, Steve; Giesy, John P; Janz, David M

    2013-04-15

    In a previous study we reported impaired swimming performance and greater stored energy in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) after chronic dietary exposure to selenomethionine (SeMet). The goal of the present study was to further investigate effects of chronic exposure to dietary SeMet on repeat swimming performance, oxygen consumption (MO2), metabolic capacities (standard metabolic rate [SMR], active metabolic rate [AMR], factorial aerobic scope [F-AS] and cost of transport [COT]) and gene expression of energy metabolism and methionine catabolism enzymes in adult zebrafish. Fish were fed SeMet at measured concentrations of 1.3, 3.4, 9.8 or 27.5 μg Se/g dry mass (d.m.) for 90 d. At the end of the exposure period, fish from each treatment group were divided into three subgroups: (a) no swim, (b) swim, and (c) repeat swim. Fish from the no swim group were euthanized immediately at 90 d and whole body triglycerides, glycogen and lactate, and gene expression of energy metabolism and methionine catabolism enzymes were determined. Individual fish from the swim group were placed in a swim tunnel respirometer and swimming performance was assessed by determining the critical swimming speed (U(crit)). After both Ucrit and MO2 analyses, fish were euthanized and whole body energy stores and lactate were determined. Similarly, individual fish from the repeat swim group were subjected to two U(crit) tests (U(crit-1) and U(crit-2)) performed with a 60 min recovery period between tests, followed by determination of energy stores and lactate. Impaired swim performance was observed in fish fed SeMet at concentrations greater than 3 μg Se/g in the diet. However, within each dietary Se treatment group, no significant differences between single and repeat U(crits) were observed. Oxygen consumption, SMR and COT were significantly greater, and F-AS was significantly lesser, in fish fed SeMet. Whole body triglycerides were proportional to the concentration of SeMet in the diet. While

  2. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED TOXICOKINETIC MODEL TO SIMULATE CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model was developed to describe dietary uptake of hydrophobic organic chemicals by fish. The GI tract was modeled as four compartments corresponding to the stomach, pyloric ceca, upper intestine, and lower intestine. Partitioning coeff...

  3. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED TOXICOKINETIC MODEL TO SIMULATE CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model was developed to describe dietary uptake of hydrophobic organic chemicals by fish. The GI tract was modeled as four compartments corresponding to the stomach, pyloric ceca, upper intestine, and lower intestine. Partitioning coeff...

  4. Chronic dietary exposure to pyrolytic and petrogenic mixtures of PAHs causes physiological disruption in zebrafish--part II: behavior.

    PubMed

    Vignet, Caroline; Le Menach, Karyn; Lyphout, Laura; Guionnet, Tiphaine; Frère, Laura; Leguay, Didier; Budzinski, Hélène; Cousin, Xavier; Bégout, Marie-Laure

    2014-12-01

    In the last 10 years, behavior assessment has been developed as an indicator of neurotoxicity and an integrated indicator of physiological disruption. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) release into the environment has increased in recent decades resulting in high concentrations of these compounds in the sediment of contaminated areas. We evaluated the behavioral consequences of long-term chronic exposure to PAHs, by exposing zebrafish to diets spiked with three PAH fractions at environmentally relevant concentrations. Fish were exposed to these chemicals from their first meal (5 days postfertilization) until they became reproducing adults (at 6 months old). The fractions used were representative of PAHs of pyrolytic (PY) origin and of two oils differing in composition (a heavy fuel oil (HO) and a light crude oil (LO)). Several tests were carried out to evaluate circadian spontaneous swimming activity, responses to a challenge (photomotor response), exploratory tendencies, and anxiety levels. We found that dietary PAH exposure was associated with greater mobility, lower levels of exploratory activity, and higher levels of anxiety, particularly in fish exposed to the HO fraction and, to a lesser extent, the LO fraction. Finally, our results indicate that PAH mixtures of different compositions, representative of situations encountered in the wild, can induce behavioral disruptions resulting in poorer fish performance.

  5. NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL ACUTE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lots of information is available surrounding the acute toxicity of anticholinesterase pesticides, but these have been very few detailed studies on the chronic effects of these pesticides. Humans are exposed on a chronic basis and some humans believe that have been affected advers...

  6. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult rats were maintained on a chlorpyrifos-containing diet to p...

  7. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350g body weight by...

  8. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult rats were maintained on a chlorpyrifos-containing diet to p...

  9. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350g body weight by...

  10. Effects of chronic exposure to dietary selenomethionine on the physiological stress response in juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus).

    PubMed

    Patterson, Sarah; Zee, Jenna; Wiseman, Steve; Hecker, Markus

    2017-05-01

    dose WS. Exposure to an acute handling stressor elicited a typical cortisol response, but the magnitude of the response appeared to be significantly lower than those typically observed in teleosts. SeMeth also did not appear to modulate the cortisol response to a secondary stressor. However, WS exposed to 22.4μg Se/g dm and sampled 2h post-stressor, had significantly higher concentrations of muscle glycogen compared to controls, indicating effects on their ability to utilize muscle glycogen for energy. Overall, the results indicate that chronic exposure to dietary SeMeth concentrations >22.4μg/g can affect cortisol dynamics and mobilization of energy substrates in juvenile WS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute and chronic dietary exposure to domoic acid in recreational harvesters: A survey of shellfish consumption behavior.

    PubMed

    Ferriss, Bridget E; Marcinek, David J; Ayres, Daniel; Borchert, Jerry; Lefebvre, Kathi A

    2017-04-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxin that is naturally produced by phytoplankton and accumulates in seafood during harmful algal blooms. As the prevalence of DA increases in the marine environment, there is a critical need to identify seafood consumers at risk of DA poisoning. DA exposure was estimated in recreational razor clam (Siliqua patula) harvesters to determine if exposures above current regulatory guidelines occur and/or if harvesters are chronically exposed to low levels of DA. Human consumption rates of razor clams were determined by distributing 1523 surveys to recreational razor clam harvesters in spring 2015 and winter 2016, in Washington, USA. These consumption rate data were combined with DA measurements in razor clams, collected by a state monitoring program, to estimate human DA exposure. Approximately 7% of total acute exposures calculated (including the same individuals at different times) exceeded the current regulatory reference dose (0.075mgDA·kgbodyweight(-1)·d(-1)) due to higher than previously reported consumption rates, lower bodyweights, and/or by consumption of clams at the upper range of legal DA levels (maximum 20mg·kg(-1) wet weight for whole tissue). Three percent of survey respondents were potentially at risk of chronic DA exposure by consuming a minimum of 15 clams per month for at 12 consecutive months. These insights into DA consumption will provide an additional tool for razor clam fishery management.

  12. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FALLS TO ALTER SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS, COMPOUND NERVE ACTION POTENTIALS, OR NERVE CONDUCTION VELOCITY IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Cholinergic transmission is involved in sensory modulation in the cortex and cerebellum, and therefore may be altered following chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure...

  13. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FALLS TO ALTER SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS, COMPOUND NERVE ACTION POTENTIALS, OR NERVE CONDUCTION VELOCITY IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Cholinergic transmission is involved in sensory modulation in the cortex and cerebellum, and therefore may be altered following chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure...

  14. Food selection, growth and physiology in relation to dietary sodium chloride content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under chronic waterborne Cu exposure.

    PubMed

    Niyogi, S; Kamunde, C N; Wood, C M

    2006-05-01

    Waterborne Cu is toxic to Na(+) and Cl(-) regulation in freshwater fish, and Cu is taken up, at least in part, via the Na(+)-transport pathway in the gills. Therefore, we hypothesized that freshwater fish may mitigate the toxic effects of waterborne Cu by selecting a NaCl-enriched diet over a normal diet. We tested this hypothesis in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by offering them the choice between NaCl-enriched (1.9 mmol g(-1)Na(+)) and normal (0.2 mmol g(-1)Na(+)) diets under a chronic waterborne Cu exposure of 55 microg L(-1) for a period of 28 days. Contrary to expectation, trout exhibited a preference for NaCl-enriched diet under control conditions, while exposure to chronic waterborne Cu severely disrupted their normal feeding pattern with an accompanying loss of preference for the NaCl-enriched diet. Waterborne Cu exposure also severely affected appetite and growth. Both appetite and growth gradually recovered with time, but remained significantly impaired relative to Cu-unexposed fish until the end of the exposure. Waterborne Cu exposure also significantly increased Cu accumulations in target organs (gill, liver, and gut), plasma and whole body. However, Cu accumulation decreased substantially towards the end of the exposure in target organs and whole body as well as in plasma in Cu-exposed fish with dietary choice relative to Cu-exposed fish with normal diet. These adjustments were concurrent with the gradual recovery of appetite, which also led to increased ingestion of the NaCl-enriched diet. Interestingly, this elevated dietary uptake of NaCl produced significant stimulation of Na(+) efflux in Cu-exposed fish. Subsequently, it also led to significant elevation of Na(+) levels in target organs and whole body, and restored the decrease of plasma Na(+) and Cl(-) levels in Cu-exposed fish. The NaCl supplemented diet appeared to be beneficial in compensating Na(+) and Cl(-) losses from the body induced by waterborne Cu. Overall, these results

  15. Chronic Responses of Daphnia magna Under Dietary Exposure to Leaves of a Transgenic (Event MON810) Bt–Maize Hybrid and its Conventional Near-Isoline

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Holderbaum, Daniel; Cuhra, Marek; Wickson, Fern; Orth, Afonso Inácio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Bøhn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Insect resistance is the second most common trait globally in cultivated genetically modified (GM) plants. Resistance is usually obtained by introducing into the plant’s genome genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) coding for insecticidal proteins (Cry proteins or toxins) that target insect pests. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that a chronic, high-dose dietary exposure to leaves of a Bt–maize hybrid (GM event MON810, expressing a transgenic or recombinant Cry1Ab toxin), exerted no adverse effects on fitness parameters of the aquatic nontarget organism Daphnia magna (water flea) when compared to an identical control diet based on leaves of the non-GM near-isoline. Cry1Ab was immunologically detected and quantified in GM maize leaf material used for Daphnia feed. A 69-kD protein near Bt’s active core-toxin size and a 34-kD protein were identified. The D. magna bioassay showed a resource allocation to production of resting eggs and early fecundity in D. magna fed GM maize, with adverse effects for body size and fecundity later in life. This is the first study to examine GM-plant leaf material in the D. magna model, and provides of negative fitness effects of a MON810 maize hybrid in a nontarget model organism under chronic, high dietary exposure. Based upon these results, it is postulated that the observed transgenic proteins exert a nontarget effect in D. magna and/or unintended changes were produced in the maize genome/metabolome by the transformation process, producing a nutritional difference between GM-maize and non-GM near-isoline. PMID:26262442

  16. Effects of chronic dietary exposure to monosodium glutamate on feeding behavior, adiposity, gastrointestinal motility, and cardiovascular function in healthy adult rats.

    PubMed

    López-Miranda, V; Soto-Montenegro, M L; Uranga-Ocio, J A; Vera, G; Herradón, E; González, C; Blas, C; Martínez-Villaluenga, M; López-Pérez, A E; Desco, M; Abalo, R

    2015-11-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor-enhancer widely used as a food additive. However, its safe dietary concentration and its toxicity, including its possible implication in the recent metabolic syndrome pandemia, is still a controversial issue. Therefore, a deep knowledge of its effects upon regular dietary use is needed. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to MSG on feeding behavior, abdominal fat, gastrointestinal motility, and cardiovascular function in rats. Two groups of adult male Wistar rats were used: control and treated with MSG (4 g/L in drinking water) for 6 weeks. Different functional parameters were determined and the histological structure was analyzed in tissues of interest. Compared to control animals, chronic MSG increased water intake but did not modify food ingestion or body weight gain. Neither the abdominal fat volume nor the fat fraction, measured by magnetic resonance imaging, was modified by MSG. Monosodium glutamate did not alter general gastrointestinal motility, but significantly increased the colonic response to mechanical stimulation. It slightly reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation in aorta, without significantly modifying any other cardiovascular parameters. No significant histological alterations were detected in salivary glands, intestinal wall, aorta, heart, and kidney. Chronic treatment with MSG in the adult rat increased water intake. This supports its potential to improve acceptance of low-fat regimens and to increase hydration in the elderly and sportspeople, often at risk of dehydration. Changes in colonic contractility and cardiovascular function could have some long-term repercussions warranting further research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Fish life-history traits are affected after chronic dietary exposure to an environmentally realistic marine mixture of PCBs and PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Horri, Khaled; Alfonso, Sébastien; Cousin, Xavier; Munschy, Catherine; Loizeau, Véronique; Aroua, Salima; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Ernande, Bruno

    2017-08-18

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent organic pollutants that have been shown to affect fish life-history traits such as reproductive success, growth and survival. At the individual level, their toxicity and underlying mechanisms of action have been studied through experimental exposure. However, the number of experimental studies approaching marine environmental situations is scarce, i.e., in most cases, individuals are exposed to either single congeners, or single types of molecules, or high concentrations, so that results can hardly be transposed to natural populations. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of chronic dietary exposure to an environmentally realistic marine mixture of PCB and PBDE congeners on zebrafish life-history traits from larval to adult stage. Exposure was conducted through diet from the first meal and throughout the life cycle of the fish. The mixture was composed so as to approach environmentally relevant marine conditions in terms of both congener composition and concentrations. Life-history traits of exposed fish were compared to those of control individuals using several replicate populations in each treatment. We found evidence of slower body growth, but to a larger asymptotic length, and delayed spawning probability in exposed fish. In addition, offspring issued from early spawning events of exposed fish exhibited a lower larval survival under starvation condition. Given their strong dependency on life-history traits, marine fish population dynamics and associated fisheries productivity for commercial species could be affected by such individual-level effects of PCBs and PBDEs on somatic growth, spawning probability and larval survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CHILDREN'S DIETARY EXPOSURES TO CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 requires EPA to more accurately assess children's aggregate exposures to environmental contaminants. Children have unstructured eating behaviors which cause excess exposures as a result of their activities. Determining total dietary intak...

  19. CHILDREN'S DIETARY EXPOSURES TO CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 requires EPA to more accurately assess children's aggregate exposures to environmental contaminants. Children have unstructured eating behaviors which cause excess exposures as a result of their activities. Determining total dietary intak...

  20. Histopathological changes in the epithelial cells of rat duodenum following chronic dietary exposure to cadmium, with particular reference to Paneth cells.

    PubMed Central

    Phillpotts, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Male and female rats 8 weeks old were exposed for 360 days to a sole source of drinking water containing 0.2 g/l cadmium as the chloride salt. Control rats were exposed for the same period to deionized water. At 90, 180, 270 and 360 day intervals a proportion of the rats from both test and control groups were killed and the duodenums removed. The histopathology was assessed by both light and electron microscopy. In cadmium treated rats the duodenums were enlarged and there was a significant reduction in the percentage of crypts containing Paneth cells. Remaining Paneth cells appeared vacuolated. By both light and electron microscopy changes were noted in the epithelial cells covering the villus tips. These were swollen and protruded towards the duodenal lumen to give a 'cobblestone' appearance by scanning electron microscopy. It is suggested that these histopathological appearances will be seen in chronic dietary exposure to cadmium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 3 Fig. 8 PMID:3741776

  1. RECENT ENHANCEMENTS TO THE DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation describes recent enhancements & new applications of the Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM), a model developed to assist in design & interpretation of dietary exposure measurements. Model is an interactive system that provides dietary exposure estimates using dat...

  2. RECENT ENHANCEMENTS TO THE DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation describes recent enhancements & new applications of the Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM), a model developed to assist in design & interpretation of dietary exposure measurements. Model is an interactive system that provides dietary exposure estimates using dat...

  3. Chronic Dietary Exposure to Aristolochic Acid and Kidney Function in Native Farmers from a Croatian Endemic Area and Bosnian Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Jelaković, Bojan; Karanović, Sandra; Dika, Živka; Kos, Jelena; Dickman, Kathleen; Šekoranja, Maja; Poljičanin, Tamara; Mišić, Maja; Premužić, Vedran; Abramović, Mirta; Matijević, Vesna; Miletić Medved, Marica; Cvitković, Ante; Edwards, Karen; Fuček, Mirjana; Leko, Ninoslav; Teskera, Tomislav; Laganović, Mario; Čvorišćec, Dubravka; Grollman, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Improvements in agricultural practices in Croatia have reduced exposure to consumption of aristolochic acid-contaminated flour and development of endemic (Balkan) nephropathy. Therefore, it was hypothesized that Bosnian immigrants who settled in an endemic area in Croatia 15–30 years ago would be at lower risk of developing endemic nephropathy because of reduced exposure to aristolochic acid. To test this hypothesis, past and present exposure to aristolochic acid, proximal tubule damage as a hallmark of endemic nephropathy, and prevalence of CKD in Bosnian immigrants were analyzed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this cross-sectional observational study from 2005 to 2010, 2161 farmers were divided into groups: indigenous inhabitants from endemic nephropathy and nonendemic nephropathy villages and Bosnian immigrants; α-1 microglobulin-to-creatinine ratio >31.5 mg/g and eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 were considered to be abnormal. Results CKD and proximal tubule damage prevalence was significantly lower in Bosnian immigrants than inhabitants of endemic nephropathy villages (6.9% versus 16.6%; P<0.001; 1.3% versus 7.3%; P=0.003, respectively); 20 years ago, Bosnian immigrants observed fewer Aristolochia clematitis in cultivated fields (41.9% versus 67.8%) and fewer seeds among wheat seeds (6.1% versus 35.6%) and ate more purchased than homemade bread compared with Croatian farmers from endemic nephropathy villages (38.5% versus 14.8%, P<0.001). Both Croatian farmers and Bosnian immigrants observe significantly fewer Aristolochia plants growing in their fields compared with 15–30 years ago. Prior aristolochic acid exposure was associated with proximal tubule damage (odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 2.58; P=0.02), whereas present exposure was not (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 2.30; P=0.33). Furthermore, immigrant status was an independent negative predictor of proximal tubule damage

  4. Chronic dietary exposure to aristolochic acid and kidney function in native farmers from a Croatian endemic area and Bosnian immigrants.

    PubMed

    Jelaković, Bojan; Vuković Lela, Ivana; Karanović, Sandra; Dika, Živka; Kos, Jelena; Dickman, Kathleen; Šekoranja, Maja; Poljičanin, Tamara; Mišić, Maja; Premužić, Vedran; Abramović, Mirta; Matijević, Vesna; Miletić Medved, Marica; Cvitković, Ante; Edwards, Karen; Fuček, Mirjana; Leko, Ninoslav; Teskera, Tomislav; Laganović, Mario; Čvorišćec, Dubravka; Grollman, Arthur P

    2015-02-06

    Improvements in agricultural practices in Croatia have reduced exposure to consumption of aristolochic acid-contaminated flour and development of endemic (Balkan) nephropathy. Therefore, it was hypothesized that Bosnian immigrants who settled in an endemic area in Croatia 15-30 years ago would be at lower risk of developing endemic nephropathy because of reduced exposure to aristolochic acid. To test this hypothesis, past and present exposure to aristolochic acid, proximal tubule damage as a hallmark of endemic nephropathy, and prevalence of CKD in Bosnian immigrants were analyzed. In this cross-sectional observational study from 2005 to 2010, 2161 farmers were divided into groups: indigenous inhabitants from endemic nephropathy and nonendemic nephropathy villages and Bosnian immigrants; α-1 microglobulin-to-creatinine ratio >31.5 mg/g and eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) were considered to be abnormal. CKD and proximal tubule damage prevalence was significantly lower in Bosnian immigrants than inhabitants of endemic nephropathy villages (6.9% versus 16.6%; P<0.001; 1.3% versus 7.3%; P=0.003, respectively); 20 years ago, Bosnian immigrants observed fewer Aristolochia clematitis in cultivated fields (41.9% versus 67.8%) and fewer seeds among wheat seeds (6.1% versus 35.6%) and ate more purchased than homemade bread compared with Croatian farmers from endemic nephropathy villages (38.5% versus 14.8%, P<0.001). Both Croatian farmers and Bosnian immigrants observe significantly fewer Aristolochia plants growing in their fields compared with 15-30 years ago. Prior aristolochic acid exposure was associated with proximal tubule damage (odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 2.58; P=0.02), whereas present exposure was not (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 2.30; P=0.33). Furthermore, immigrant status was an independent negative predictor of proximal tubule damage (odds ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.19 to 0.86; P=0.02). Bosnian immigrants

  5. Dietary supplements for chronic gout.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Mariano; Sivera, Francisca; Falzon, Louise; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Carmona, Loreto

    2014-10-07

    Dietary supplements are frequently used for the treatment of several medical conditions, both prescribed by physicians or self administered. However, evidence of benefit and safety of these supplements is usually limited or absent. To assess the efficacy and safety of dietary supplementation for people with chronic gout. We performed a search in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL on 6 June 2013. We applied no date or language restrictions. In addition, we performed a handsearch of the abstracts from the 2010 to 2013 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) conferences, checked the references of all included studies and trial registries. We considered all published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs that compared dietary supplements with no supplements, placebo, another supplement or pharmacological agents for adults with chronic gout for inclusion. Dietary supplements included, but were not limited to, amino acids, antioxidants, essential minerals, polyunsaturated fatty acids, prebiotic agents, probiotic agents and vitamins. The main outcomes were reduction in frequency of gouty attacks and trial participant withdrawal due to adverse events. We also considered pain reduction, health-related quality of life, serum uric acid (sUA) normalisation, function (i.e. activity limitation), tophus regression and the rate of serious adverse events. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We identified two RCTs (160 participants) that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. As these two trials evaluated different diet supplements (enriched skim milk powder (SMP) and vitamin C) with different outcomes (gout flare prevention for enriched SMP and sUA reduction for vitamin C), we reported the results separately.One trial including 120 participants, at moderate risk of bias, compared SMP enriched with glycomacropeptides (GMP) with

  6. Chronic dietary exposure to branched chain amino acids impairs glucose disposal in vegans but not in omnivores.

    PubMed

    Gojda, J; Rossmeislová, L; Straková, R; Tůmová, J; Elkalaf, M; Jaček, M; Tůma, P; Potočková, J; Krauzová, E; Waldauf, P; Trnka, J; Štich, V; Anděl, M

    2017-05-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are among nutrients strongly linked with insulin sensitivity (IS) measures. We investigated the effects of a chronic increase of BCAA intake on IS in two groups of healthy subjects differing in their basal consumption of BCAA, that is, vegans and omnivores. Eight vegans and eight matched omnivores (five men and three women in each group) received 15 g (women) or 20 g (men) of BCAA daily for 3 months. Anthropometry, blood analyses, glucose clamp, arginine test, subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (AT) and skeletal muscle (SM) biopsies (mRNA levels of selected metabolic markers, respiratory chain (RC) activity) were performed at baseline, after the intervention and after a 6 month wash-out period. Compared with omnivores, vegans had higher IS at baseline (GIR, glucose infusion rate: 9.6±2.4 vs 7.1±2.4 mg/kg/min, 95% CI for difference: 0.55 to 5.82) that declined after the intervention and returned to baseline values after the wash-out period (changes in GIR with 95% CI, 3-0 months: -1.64 [-2.5; -0.75] and 9-3 months: 1.65 [0.75; 2.54] mg/kg/min). No such change was observed in omnivores. In omnivores the intervention led to an increased expression of lipogenic genes (DGAT2, FASN, PPARγ, SCD1) in AT. SM RC activity increased in both groups. Negative impact of increased BCAA intake on IS was only detected in vegans, that is, subjects with low basal amino acids/BCAA intake, which appear to be unable to induce sufficient compensatory changes within AT and SM on a BCAA challenge.

  7. DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY EXPOSURE WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dermal and non-dietary ingestion exposure workshop was sponsored by U.S. EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) on September 17,1998. The purpose of this workshop was to gather information on the state-of-the-art in measuring and assessing children's exposures to ...

  8. Chronic Exposure to Dietary Sterol Glucosides is Neurotoxic to Motor Neurons and Induces an ALS-PDC Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, R. C.; Wilson, J. M. B.; Ly, P.; Zwiegers, P.; Kwok, D.; Van Kampen, J. M.; Cashman, N.; Shaw, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of the Guamanian variants of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS-PDC), have shown a positive correlation between consumption of washed cycad seed flour and disease occurrence. Previous in vivo studies by our group have shown that the same seed flour induces ALS and PDC phenotypes in out bred adult male mice. In vitro studies using isolated cycad compounds have also demonstrated that several of these are neurotoxic, specifically, a number of water insoluble phytosterol glucosides of which β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG) forms the largest fraction. BSSG is neurotoxic to motor neurons and other neuronal populations in culture. The present study shows that an in vitro hybrid motor neuron (NSC-34) culture treated with BSSG undergoes a dose-dependent cell loss. Surviving cells show increased expression of HSP70, decreased cytosolic heavy neurofilament expression, and have various morphological abnormalities. CD-1 mice fed mouse chow pellets containing BSSG for 15 weeks showed motor deficits and motor neuron loss in the lumbar and thoracic spinal cord, along with decreased glutamate transporter labelling, and increased glial fibrillary acid protein reactivity. Other pathological outcomes included increased caspase-3 labelling in the striatum and decreased tyrosine-hydroxylase labelling in the striatum and substantia nigra. C57BL/6 mice fed BSSG-treated pellets for 10 weeks exhibited progressive loss of motor neurons in the lumbar spinal cord that continued to worsen even after the BSSG exposure ended. These results provide further support implicating sterol glucosides as one potential causal factor in the motor neuron pathology previously associated with cycad consumption and ALS-PDC. PMID:18196479

  9. Dietary cadmium exposure assessment among the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Wang, Yibana; Mao, Weifeng; Sui, Haixia; Yong, Ling; Yang, Dajin; Jiang, Dingguo; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Yunyun

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, is widely present in food. It has been reported that chronic cadmium exposure is associated with kidney disease, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the dietary cadmium exposure and potential health risk in different age-sex groups of the Chinese population (children aged 4-11 years, young people aged 12-17 years and adults aged over 18 years), and in the southern and northern population using a semi-probabilistic method. Cadmium was detected in 228,687 food samples from 32 food categrories by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The dietary cadmium exposures were estimated by combining the cadmium concentration data with food consumption data derived from the China National Nutrient and Health Survey 2002, and evaluated against the Provisional Tolerable Monthly Intake (PTMI) of 25 μg/kg BW/month established by the Joint FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives (JECFA). The mean dietary cadmium exposure of the general Chinese population (15.3 μg/kg BW/month) was below the PTMI. The high consumer exposures (95th percentile, P95) for the general population and different sub-groups were higher than the PTMI. The dietary cadmium exposure of the southern population was apparently higher than that of the northern population. Rice was the most important contributor to cadmium exposure for Chinese people, especially those living in the southern areas of China. These findings indicated that the health risk from dietary cadmium exposure of the general Chinese people was low, but the health risk of cadmium exposure of certain sub-groups should be of concern.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL FOR EVALUATING DIETARY EXPOSURE TO CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM) is a computer-based model developed for estimating dietary exposure to chemical residues in food. The DEPM is based on food consumption data from the 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey (NFCS) administered by the United States ...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL FOR EVALUATING DIETARY EXPOSURE TO CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM) is a computer-based model developed for estimating dietary exposure to chemical residues in food. The DEPM is based on food consumption data from the 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey (NFCS) administered by the United States ...

  12. Dietary patterns: biomarkers and chronic disease risk.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ashima K

    2010-04-01

    With increasing appreciation of the complexity of diets consumed by free-living individuals, there is interest in the assessment of the overall diet or dietary patterns in which multiple related dietary characteristics are considered as a single exposure. The 2 most frequently used methods to derive dietary patterns use (i) scores or indexes based on prevailing hypotheses about the role of dietary factors in disease prevention; and (ii) factors and clusters from exploration of available dietary data. A third method, a hybrid of the hypothesis-driven and data-driven methods, attempts to predict food combinations related to nutrients or biomarkers with hypothesized associations with particular health outcomes. Dietary patterns derived from the first 2 approaches have been examined in relation to nutritional and disease biomarkers and various health outcomes, and generally show the desirable dietary pattern to be consistent with prevalent beliefs about what constitutes a healthful diet. Results from observational studies suggest that the healthful dietary patterns were associated with significant but modest risk reduction (15%-30%) for all-cause mortality and coronary heart disease. Findings for various cancers have been inconsistent. The available randomized controlled intervention trials with a long-term follow-up to examine dietary patterns in relation to health outcome have generally produced null findings. Novel findings with the potential to change existing beliefs about diet and health relationships are yet to emerge from the dietary patterns research. The field requires innovation in methods to derive dietary patterns, validation of prevalent methods, and assessment of the effect of dietary measurement error on dietary patterns.

  13. ESTIMATING EXCESS DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine children in a daycare that routinely applied the pesticide, esfenvalerate, were studied to assess excess dietary exposures. Surface wipes, a standard food item of processed American cheese slice pressed on the surface and handled by the child, an accelerometer reading, and ...

  14. MEASURING DIETARY EXPOSURE OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children do not consume foods in a structured manner. Their foods contact surfaces (hands, floors, eating surfaces, etc.) that may be contaminated while they are eating them. Thus, dietary exposures of young children are difficult to accurately assess or measure. A recen...

  15. ESTIMATING EXCESS DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine children in a daycare that routinely applied the pesticide, esfenvalerate, were studied to assess excess dietary exposures. Surface wipes, a standard food item of processed American cheese slice pressed on the surface and handled by the child, an accelerometer reading, and ...

  16. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART 3: MODELLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was used to model dietary exposure of young children. Parameters included pesticide residue on food before handling, surface pesticide loading, transfer efficiencies and children's activity patterns. Three components of dietary pesticide exposure were includ...

  17. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART 3: MODELLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was used to model dietary exposure of young children. Parameters included pesticide residue on food before handling, surface pesticide loading, transfer efficiencies and children's activity patterns. Three components of dietary pesticide exposure were includ...

  18. Chronic Dietary Exposure to a Low-Dose Mixture of Genistein and Vinclozolin Modifies the Reproductive Axis, Testis Transcriptome, and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Eustache, Florence; Mondon, Françoise; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie Chantal; Lesaffre, Corinne; Fulla, Yvonne; Berges, Raymond; Cravedi, Jean Pierre; Vaiman, Daniel; Auger, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background The reproductive consequences and mechanisms of action of chronic exposure to low-dose endocrine disruptors are poorly understood. Objective We assessed the effects of a continuous, low-dose exposure to a phytoestrogen (genistein) and/or an antiandrogenic food contaminant (vinclozolin) on the male reproductive tract and fertility. Methods Male rats were exposed by gavage to genistein and vinclozolin from conception to adulthood, alone or in combination, at low doses (1 mg/kg/day) or higher doses (10 and 30 mg/kg/day). We studied a number of standard reproductive toxicology end points and also assessed testicular mRNA expression profiles using long-oligonucleotide microarrays. Results The low-dose mixture and high-dose vinclozolin produced the most significant alterations in adults: decreased sperm counts, reduced sperm motion parameters, decreased litter sizes, and increased post implantation loss. Testicular mRNA expression profiles for these exposure conditions were strongly correlated. Functional clustering indicated that many of the genes induced belong to the “neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions” family encompassing several hormonally related actors (e.g., follicle-stimulating hormone and its receptor). All exposure conditions decreased the levels of mRNAs involved in ribosome function, indicating probable decreased protein production. Conclusions Our study shows that chronic exposure to a mixture of a dose of a phytoestrogen equivalent to that in the human diet and a low dose—albeit not environmental—of a common anti-androgenic food contaminant may seriously affect the male reproductive tract and fertility. PMID:19672408

  19. Chronic dietary oxalate nephropathy after intensive dietary weight loss regimen

    PubMed Central

    Khneizer, Gebran; Al-Taee, Ahmad; Mallick, Meher S; Bastani, Bahar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hyperoxaluria has been associated with nephrolithiasis as well as acute and chronic kidney disease. We present a case of end stage renal failure caused by excessive dietary oxalate intake in a dietary weight loss regimen. Case Presentation: A 51-year-old Caucasian male with the past medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, gout, hypertension and morbid obesity was referred to the primary care clinic after being found pale and easily fatigued. The patient had lost 36 kg over a 7-month period by implementing exercise and intense dietary measures that included 6 meals of spinach, kale, berries, and nuts. Physical examination revealed a blood pressure of 188/93 mm Hg with sunken eyes and dry mucus membranes. Laboratory workup was notable for blood urea nitrogen of 122 mg/dL, creatinine of 12 mg/dL, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 4.4 mL/min/1.73m2. Patient denied any history of renal disease or renal stones, or taking herbal products, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), or any type of "diet pills." Family history was unremarkable for any renal diseases. After failing intravenous fluid resuscitation, patient was started on maintenance hemodialysis. Abdominal imaging was consistent with chronic renal parenchymal disease with no evidence of nephrolithiasis. Renal biopsy revealed numerous polarized oxalate crystal deposition and diabetic nephropathy class IIA. At this point the patient was instructed to adopt a low oxalate diet. A 24-hour urine collection was remarkable for pH 4.7, citrate <50 mg, and oxalate 46 mg. Importantly, serum oxalate level was undetectable. Repeat renal biopsy 5 months later while patient was still on maintenance hemodialysis revealed persistence of extensive oxalate crystal deposition. Patient has been referred for evaluation for renal transplantation. Conclusions: Clinicians need to maintain a high index of suspicion for dietary hyperoxaluria as a potential etiology for acute or

  20. Chronic dietary exposure to pyrolytic and petrogenic mixtures of PAHs causes physiological disruption in zebrafish--part I: Survival and growth.

    PubMed

    Vignet, Caroline; Le Menach, Karyn; Mazurais, David; Lucas, Julie; Perrichon, Prescilla; Le Bihanic, Florane; Devier, Marie-Hélène; Lyphout, Laura; Frère, Laura; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Zambonino-Infante, José-Luis; Budzinski, Hélène; Cousin, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    The release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into the environment has increased very substantially over the last decades leading to high concentrations in sediments of contaminated areas. To evaluate the consequences of long-term chronic exposure to PAHs, zebrafish were exposed, from their first meal at 5 days post fertilisation until they became reproducing adults, to diets spiked with three PAH fractions at three environmentally relevant concentrations with the medium concentration being in the range of 4.6-6.7 μg g(-1) for total quantified PAHs including the 16 US-EPA indicator PAHs and alkylated derivatives. The fractions used were representative of PAHs of pyrolytic (PY) origin or of two different oils of differing compositions, a heavy fuel (HO) and a light crude oil (LO). Fish growth was inhibited by all PAH fractions and the effects were sex specific: as determined with 9-month-old adults, exposure to the highest PY inhibited growth of females; exposure to the highest HO and LO inhibited growth of males; also, the highest HO dramatically reduced survival. Morphological analysis indicated a disruption of jaw growth in larvae and malformations in adults. Intestinal and pancreatic enzyme activities were abnormal in 2-month-old exposed fish. These effects may contribute to poor growth. Finally, our results indicate that PAH mixtures of different compositions, representative of situations encountered in the wild, can promote lethal and sublethal effects which are likely to be detrimental for fish recruitment.

  1. ADVANCES IN DIETARY EXPOSURE RESEARCH AT THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency-National Exposure Research Laboratory's (USEPA-NERL)dietary exposure research program investigates the role of diet, including drinking water, as a potential pathway of human exposure to environmental contaminants. A primary progr...

  2. Adaptation in Caco-2 human intestinal cell differentiation and phenolic transport with chronic exposure to phenolic-rich blackberry (Rubus sp.) extract

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As evidence mounts for a health-protective role of dietary phenolics, the importance of understanding factors influencing bioavailability increases. Recent evidence has suggested chronic exposure may impact phenolic absorption and metabolism. To explore alterations occurring from chronic dietary e...

  3. Indirect Dietary Residential Exposure Assessment Model (IDREAM) Implementation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Indirect Dietary Residential Exposure Assessment Model (IDREAM) estimates indirect ingestion exposure to disinfectants used in residential settings on hard surfaces where there may be inadvertent transfer to edible items prepared on those surfaces.

  4. EXPOSURE OF RAINBOW TROUT TO DIETARY METALS USING LIVE PREY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary exposure to CD, Cu, ZN, and Pb has been shown to cause accumulatioin of metal in fish and other aquatic organisms...In this study the toxicity of dietary metal exposure was evaluated using an experimental food chain of sediment from oligochaetes to fish...Relationships am...

  5. Cumulative dietary exposure of the population of Denmark to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bodil Hamborg; Petersen, Annette; Nielsen, Elsa; Christensen, Tue; Poulsen, Mette Erecius; Andersen, Jens Hinge

    2015-09-01

    We used the Hazard Index (HI) method to carry out a cumulative risk assessment after chronic dietary exposure to all monitored pesticides in fruit, vegetables and cereals for various consumer groups in Denmark. Residue data for all the pesticides were obtained from the Danish monitoring programme during the period 2004-2011. Food consumption data were obtained from DANSDA (the DAnish National Survey of Diet and physical Activity) for the period 2005-2008. The calculations were made using three different models to cope with residues below the limit of reporting (LOR). We concluded that a model that included processing factors and set non-detects to ½ LOR, but limited the correction (Model 3), gave the most realistic exposure estimate. With Model 3 the HI was calculated to be 0.44 for children and 0.18 for adults, indicating that there is no risk of adverse health effects following chronic cumulative exposure to the pesticides found in fruit, vegetables and cereals on the Danish market. The HI was below 1 even for consumers who eat more than 550 g of fruit and vegetables per day, corresponding to 1/3 of the population. Choosing Danish-produced commodities whenever possible could reduce the HI by a factor of 2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Short-Term and Sub-Chronic Dietary Exposure to Aspalathin-Enriched Green Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) Extract Affects Rat Liver Function and Antioxidant Status.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Johanna Debora; de Beer, Dalene; Joubert, Elizabeth; Gelderblom, Wentzel C A

    2015-12-18

    An aspalathin-enriched green rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) extract (GRE) was fed to male Fischer rats in two independent studies for 28 and 90 days. The average dietary total polyphenol (TP) intake was 756 and 627 mg Gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/kg body weight (bw)/day over 28 and 90 days, respectively, equaling human equivalent doses (HEDs) of 123 and 102 GAE mg/kg bw/day. Aspalathin intake of 295 mg/kg bw/day represents a HED of 48 mg/kg bw/day (90 day study). Consumption of GRE increased feed intake significantly (p < 0.05) compared to the control after 90 days, but no effect on body and organ weight parameters was observed. GRE significantly (p < 0.05) reduced serum total cholesterol and iron levels, whilst significantly (p < 0.05) increasing alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity after 90 days. Endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver, i.e., catalase and superoxide dismutase activity, was not adversely affected. Glutathione reductase activity significantly (p < 0.05) increased after 28 days, while glutathione (GSH) content was decreased after 90 days, suggesting an altered glutathione redox cycle. Quantitative Real Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed altered expression of certain antioxidant defense and oxidative stress related genes, indicative, among others, of an underlying oxidative stress related to changes in the GSH redox pathway and possible biliary dysfunction.

  7. DIETARY EXPOSURE TO PYRETHROIDS IN THE U.S POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the contribution of pyrethroid residues in food as an important driver of exposure. The levels of urinary metabolites of pyrethroids reported in NHANES were used as a general estimate of population exposure to pyrethroids. Dietary exposure to pyrethroids was estimat...

  8. DIETARY EXPOSURE TO PYRETHROIDS IN THE U.S POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the contribution of pyrethroid residues in food as an important driver of exposure. The levels of urinary metabolites of pyrethroids reported in NHANES were used as a general estimate of population exposure to pyrethroids. Dietary exposure to pyrethroids was estimat...

  9. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  10. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  11. Evaluation onto life cycle parameters of Ceriodaphnia silvestrii submitted to 36 days dietary copper exposure.

    PubMed

    Rodgher, Suzelei; Lombardi, Ana Teresa; Gama Melão, Maria da Graça

    2009-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the response of several life history parameters (body length and age of primipara, duration of embryonic development, maximum body length, reproduction and survival) of the zooplankton Ceriodaphnia silvestrii while exposed to copper contaminated algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. In order to evaluate chronic exposure on the animal's life history, long-term experimental design was used. Cladocerans were fed with a dietary copper concentration ranging from 3 to 68 fg Cu cell(-1). Low waterborne copper exposure (around 10(-10)molL(-1) free Cu(2+) ions) was kept in the experiments. The results showed that by exposure of cladocerans during 7 days to contaminated food with 68 fg Cu cell(-1), a significant reduction in neonate production, survival and body size were obtained. Inhibition on egg production of zooplankton at 38 fg Cu cell(-1) were observed in 36 days chronic dietary copper exposure. The importance of entire life cycle study to better evaluate cladoceran responses to chronic dietary metal exposure was demonstrated.

  12. Reduced Foodborne Toxin Exposure Is a Benefit of Improving Dietary Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia; Mitchell, Nicole J.; Male, Denis; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring foodborne toxins are common in subsistence diets of low-income human populations worldwide. Often, these populations rely on one or two staple foods for the bulk of their calories, making them more susceptible to chronic intake of certain toxins. Exposure to common foodborne toxins is associated with diverse conditions such as cancer, immunotoxicity, growth impairment, and neurological deficits. Interventions focused solely on reducing toxin levels have proven difficult to sustain. Using case studies of two foodborne toxins, aflatoxin and cassava cyanide, this article addresses the heightened risk of particular diseases from eating monotonous diets based in maize, groundnuts, and cassava: common in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. We also discuss the potential role of increased dietary diversity in counteracting these diseases. Increased dietary diversity can reduce consumption of toxins and increase intake of nutrients that could counteract the toxicity of such chemicals. In Qidong, China, a population that previously consumed a monotonous maize-based diet and increased dietary diversity since the 1980s has experienced a dramatic reduction in liver cancer mortalities. That liver cancer decreased as dietary diversity increased is the catalyst for the hypothesis that dietary diversity could have a direct impact on reducing health effects of foodborne toxins. Future research, agricultural development, and food policy reforms should take into consideration the multifaceted benefits associated with improved dietary diversity. Collaborations between toxicologists, nutritionists, and policymakers are important to development of sustainable interventions to reduce foodborne toxin exposure and promote health through increased dietary diversity. PMID:25015663

  13. Comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) for food additives.

    PubMed

    Tennant, David R

    2016-05-01

    European methods for assessing dietary exposures to nutrients, additives and other substances in food are limited by the availability of detailed food consumption data for all member states. A proposed comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) applies summary data published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in a deterministic model based on an algorithm from the EFSA intake method for food additives. The proposed approach can predict estimates of food additive exposure provided in previous EFSA scientific opinions that were based on the full European food consumption database.

  14. Dietary aflatoxin exposure and chemoprevention of cancer: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Sudakin, Daniel L

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to dietary aflatoxins is considered to be an important risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in certain regions of the world. Significant advances have recently been made in understanding the clinical toxicology of aflatoxins. These include the development and validation of biomarkers of exposure and genotoxic effect. These biomarkers are currently being utilized to explore the potential that pharmaceutical interventions may have in modifying the toxicokinetics of dietary aflatoxin exposure. Preliminary results of clinical trials with the drug oltipraz suggest that it may modify the genotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1 by inhibiting bioactivation pathways and stimulating detoxification pathways. More recent results of a clinical trial with chlorophyllin suggest that this drug may have a role in preventing dietary exposure to aflatoxin B1 by reducing its oral bioavailability. The preliminary results of these chemoprevention studies may ultimately have implications for cancer prevention in high-risk populations in the future.

  15. Effects of chronic dietary exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on survival, growth, reproduction and biochemical responses of female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giesy, John P.; Jones, Paul D.; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Newsted, John L.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Williams, Lisa L.

    2002-01-01

    Adult female rainbow trout were exposed to dietary 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) at concentrations of 1.8, 18 and 90 ng TCDD/kg (ww) food for up to 300 day. At the end of the exposure fish were spawned and the reproductive outcomes were assessed. TCDD was accumulated into tissues and eggs in a dose-dependent manner with steady state being achieved after 50–100 day of exposure. Biochemical and hematological parameters were monitored at 50, 100, 150, and 200 day after the beginning of exposure. The survival of adult female trout was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by exposure to TCDD in the diet. Fish fed 1.8 ng TCDD/kg, moist weight of diet, showed significantly reduced survival compared with those fed the control diet. TCDD also affected survival of fry from females fed 1.8 ng TCDD/kg. Observed adverse effects in adult fish were as sensitive as early life-stage endpoints. Liver EROD activity was only moderately increased in all exposure groups after 250+ day of exposure. Low rates of edema and deformities were observed in fry from all treatment groups including controls. This study has demonstrated adverse effects of TCDD to both adults and fry at concentrations comparable to current environmental concentrations. This suggests that direct adult toxicity as well as reproductive endpoints need to be incorporated in the current risk assessment paradigm for these compounds.

  16. Health risks of dietary exposure to perfluorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L

    2012-04-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) form a diverse group of chemicals with surface-active properties manufactured for over 50 years. In recent years, a number of studies have reported the ubiquitous distribution of PFCs in human tissues and wildlife. Although the relative importance of the routes of human exposure to these compounds is not well established yet, it has been suggested that food intake and packaging, water, house dust, and airborne are all potentially significant sources. However, dietary intake is probably the main route of exposure to these compounds, including perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), the most extensively investigated PFCs. This paper reviews the state of the science regarding the concentrations of PFCs in foodstuffs, human dietary exposure to these compounds and their health risks. The influence of processing, cooking and packaging on the PFCs levels in food is also discussed. Because of the rather limited information about human dietary exposure, studies to determine exposure to PFCs through the diet for the general population of a number of countries are clearly necessary. The correlation of PFCs body burdens and dietary intake of PFCs should be also established. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exposure apportionment: ranking food items by their contribution to dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Moschandreas, D J; Karuchit, S; Berry, M R; O'Rourke, M K; Lo, D; Lebowitz, M D; Robertson, G

    2002-07-01

    This paper identifies and ranks food items by estimating their contribution to the dietary exposure of the US population and 19 subpopulation groups. Contributions to dietary exposures to arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, benzene, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon are estimated using either the Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM) approach, the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey Arizona (NHEXAS-AZ) approach or the combination of the two. The DEPM is a computer model that uses several national databases of food consumption and residue concentrations for estimating dietary. The DEPM approach ranks the contribution of food items to the total dietary exposure using two methods, the direct method that ranks contributions by population exposure magnitude and the weighted method that ranks by subpopulation exposure magnitude. The DEPM approach identifies highly exposed subpopulations and a relatively small number of food items contributing the most to dietary exposure. The NHEXAS-AZ approach uses the NHEXAS-AZ database containing food consumption data for each subject and chemical residues of a composite of food items consumed by each subject in 1 day during the sampling week. These data are then modeled to obtain estimates of dietary exposure to chemical residues. The third approach uses the NHEXAS-AZ consumption data with residue values from the national residue database. This approach also estimates percent contributions to exposure of each ranked food item for the Arizona population. Dietary exposures estimated using the three approaches are compared. The DEPM results indicate groups with highest dietary exposures include Nonnursing Infants, Children 1-6, Hispanic, Non-Hispanic White, Western, Northeast and Poverty 0-130%. The use of the Combined National Residue Database (CNRD) identifies 43 food items as primary contributors to total dietary exposure; they contribute a minimum of 68% of the total dietary exposure to each of the eight chemical residues

  18. Risks from occupational and dietary exposure to mevinphos.

    PubMed

    Cochran, R C; Formoli, T A; Silva, M H; Kellner, T P; Lewis, C M; Pfeifer, K F

    1996-01-01

    Mevinphos (trade name, Phosdrin), a category 1 organophosphorus insecticide, has been used mainly as a cleanup pesticide for vegetable crops. A risk assessment for occupational and dietary exposure to mevinphos was initiated because of the high acute toxicity of the compound. Repetitive dosing with mevinphos did not cause any discernible histopathological effects in mice or rats, nor was it oncogenic in either species. The principal toxic effects of mevinphos, both short- and long term, were due to inhibition of cholinesterase activity. Consequently, potential adverse effects from short-term exposures were the primary concern. A human no-observed-effect level (0.025 mg/kg) for cholinergic signs was used as the regulatory basis for calculating margins of safety (MOSs) for potential acute dietary and short-term occupational exposures. Estimates of exposure to mixer/loaders, pilots, and flaggers associated with aerial application of mevinphos were based on passive dosimetry. Because no acceptable exposure studies for work tasks associated with ground application of mevinphos were available, surrogate data based on ground application of oxydemeton-methyl were used. Exposure estimates for field workers and harvesters relied on measured dislodgeable foliar residues of mevinphos and transfer factors generated from studies of other active ingredients. MOSs for mean acute occupational exposure of mixer/loader/applicators associated with ground application and of harvesters working in fruit trees were less than the value conventionally recommended to protect people from the toxic effects of mevinphos. MOSs for the 95th percentile of short-term worker exposure for all mixer/loader work categories associated with mevinphos application were also inadequate. Calculated MOSs for potential acute dietary exposure to measured residue levels of mevinphos were adequate for the various population subgroups. However, 25 of the USEPA tolerances for mevinphos on agricultural commodities

  19. UNDERSTANDING CHILDREN'S TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent residential monitoring studies have demonstrated that significant portion of total exposure of infants and children to environmental contaminants can result from contamination of food in the home. Children's foods become contaminated through handling and contact with surf...

  20. Circulating lysozyme and hepatic CYP1A activities during a chronic dietary exposure to tributyltin (TBT) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126) mixtures in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Burton, Jana E; Dorociak, Ian R; Schwedler, Thomas E; Rice, Charles D

    2002-04-26

    Exposure to planar congeners of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) leads to a myriad of toxicities, including developmental, reproductive, and immunotoxic effects. Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons possessing structural similarity to TCDD, such as 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126), are more prevalent in the environment than TCDD, and they elicit similar toxic effects, primarily through the cytosolic aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). While polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous pollutants, they rarely exist alone in the environment. The aquatic biocide tributyltin (TBT) is also a widespread environmental contaminant, and numerous studies indicate that it has reproductive, developmental, and immunotoxic effects in a variety of organisms. Unlike planar HAHs, TBT is not associated with any known cellular receptor. The induction of cytochrome P-4501A (CYP1A) activity in most vertebrates is a classical physiological response to planar HAH exposure. TBT has been shown to inhibit the induction of cytochrome P-4.50s at high doses. Recent studies demonstrate that low levels of TBT potentiate PCB-126-associated CYP1A induction in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, and in rodents following intraperitoneal injections. In this study, the effects of dietary exposures to TBT, PCB-126, and mixtures of the two on channel catfish hepatic CYP1A activity, as well as plasma lysozyme activity, were examined. Circulating lysozyme, a marker of proinflammatory responses, was monitored to determine the relative specificity of treatments for CYP1A induction. Plasma lysozyme levels were examined along with hepatic CYP1A protein induction and EROD activity following exposure to nominal doses of 1 and 100 ppb dietary TBT, PCB-126, or mixtures of the two. As expected, the highest level of PCB-126 induced CYP1A, and TBT did not. In mixtures, the low level of TBTpotentiated the ability of the high PCB-126 dose to induce CYP1A. Plasma lysozyme levels were suppressed by

  1. How EPA Uses Dietary data from USDA for Exposure Assessments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: To present the procedures the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) uses to update the estimates of dietary exposure to pesticides using the consumption data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey, What We Eat in America and methodology a...

  2. Statistical analysis of a dynamic model for dietary contaminant exposure.

    PubMed

    Bertail, P; Clémençon, S; Tressou, J

    2010-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the statistical analysis of a stochastic model introduced in [P. Bertail, S. Clémençon, and J. Tressou, A storage model with random release rate for modelling exposure to food contaminants, Math. Biosci. Eng. 35 (1) (2008), pp. 35-60] for describing the phenomenon of exposure to a certain food contaminant. In this modelling, the temporal evolution of the contamination exposure is entirely determined by the accumulation phenomenon due to successive dietary intakes and the pharmacokinetics governing the elimination process inbetween intakes, in such a way that the exposure dynamic through time is described as a piecewise deterministic Markov process. Paths of the contamination exposure process are scarcely observable in practice, therefore intensive computer simulation methods are crucial for estimating the time-dependent or steady-state features of the process. Here we consider simulation estimators based on consumption and contamination data and investigate how to construct accurate bootstrap confidence intervals (CI) for certain quantities of considerable importance from the epidemiology viewpoint. Special attention is also paid to the problem of computing the probability of certain rare events related to the exposure process path arising in dietary risk analysis using multilevel splitting or importance sampling (IS) techniques. Applications of these statistical methods to a collection of data sets related to dietary methyl mercury contamination are discussed thoroughly.

  3. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN TO LEAD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because 1) they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities, 2) lead adsorption occurs more readily in a child as compared to an adult, and 3) the child's development is more vulnerable ...

  4. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN TO LEAD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because 1) they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities, 2) lead adsorption occurs more readily in a child as compared to an adult, and 3) the child's development is more vulnerable ...

  5. Dietary Mutagen Exposure and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui; Sue Day, Rena; Bondy, Melissa L.; Sinha, Rashmi; Nguyen, Nga T.; Evans, Douglas B.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Hassan, Manal M.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the association between dietary exposure to food mutagens and risk of pancreatic cancer, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center during June 2002 to May 2006. Atotal of 626 cases and 530 noncancer controls were frequency matched for race, sex and age (±5 years). Dietary exposure information was collected via personal interview using a meat preparation questionnaire. A significantly greater portion of the cases than controls showed a preference to well-done pork, bacon, grilled chicken, and pan-fried chicken, but not to hamburger and steak. Cases had a higher daily intake of food mutagens and mutagenicity activity (revertants per gram of daily meat intake) than controls did. The daily intakes of 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5—f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), as well as the mutagenic activity, were significant predictors for pancreatic cancer (P = 0.008, 0.031, and 0.029, respectively) with adjustment of other confounders. A significant trend of elevated cancer risk with increasing DiMeIQx intake was observed in quintile analysis (Ptrend= 0.024). Ahigher intake of dietary mutagens (those in the two top quintiles) was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer among those without a family history of cancer but not among those with a family history of cancer. Apossible synergistic effect of dietary mutagen exposure and smoking was observed among individuals with the highest level of exposure (top 10%) to PhIP and BaP, Pinteraction= 0.09 and 0.099, respectively. These data support the hypothesis that dietary mutagen exposure alone and in interaction with other factors contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer. PMID:17416754

  6. Measured versus modeled dietary arsenic and relation to urinary arsenic excretion and total exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; O’Rourke, Mary Kay; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Hartz, Vern; Harris, Robin B.; Burgess, Jefferey L.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) in food and water is a significant public health problem. Person-specific aggregate exposure is difficult to collect, and modeling based on limited food As residue databases is of uncertain reliability. Two, cross-sectional, population exposure studies—the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS)-Arizona and the Arizona Border Survey (ABS)— had a total of 252 subjects with diet, water, and urinary As data. Total As was measured in 24-hour duplicate diet samples and modeled using 24-hour diet diaries in conjunction with several published food surveys of As. Two-stage regression was used to assess the effects of dietary As on urinary total As (uAs): 1) generalized linear mixed models of uAs above versus below the limit of detection (LOD); and 2) restricted models limited to those subjects with uAs > LOD, using bootstrap sampling and mixed models adjusted for age, sex, BMI, ethnicity, current smoking, and As intake from drinking and cooking water. In restricted models, measured and modeled estimates were significant predictors of uAs. Modeled dietary As based on Total Diet Study mean residues greatly underestimated dietary intake. In households with tap water As ≤ 10 ppb, over 93% of total As exposure was attributable to diet. PMID:23321855

  7. Dietary exposure to lead of adults in Shenzhen city, China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liubo; Wang, Zhou; Peng, Zhaoqiong; Liu, Guihua; Zhang, Huimin; Zhang, Jinzhou; Jiang, Jie; Pathiraja, Nimal; Xiao, Ying; Jiao, Rui; Huang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Lead, a ubiquitous heavy metal, can be found in the environment and food. The present study is the first to estimate the lead dietary exposure of Shenzhen adults (≥ 20 years old) in various age-gender subgroups, and to assess the associated health risk. Food samples that represented the Shenzhen people's dietary pattern were collected and prepared for analysis. Lead was determined in 13 food groups using 276 individual cooked samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Dietary exposures were estimated by combining the analytical results with the local food consumption data of Shenzhen adults. The mean and 95th percentile lead exposure of Shenzhen adults were 0.59-0.73 and 0.75-0.94 μg kg(-1) bw day(-1), respectively. In all food groups, the highest lead exposure was from 'Eggs and their products' (42.4-51.6% of the total exposure); preserved eggs being the main contributor. The other major contributors to lead exposure of Shenzhen adults were 'Fish and seafood, and their products' (14.3-16.7% of the total exposure) and 'Vegetables and their products' (15.5-16.2% of the total exposure). The margin of exposure (MOE) approach was used for the risk assessment of lead, and the results showed that the risk was considered to be low in all age-gender groups for Shenzhen adults. However, having considered a number of toxic effects of lead, it is suggested that more efforts should be made to reduce the lead levels in foodstuff for Shenzhen adults.

  8. Dietary sodium in chronic kidney disease: a comprehensive approach.

    PubMed

    Wright, Julie A; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake.

  9. Dietary Sodium in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Comprehensive Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Julie A.; Cavanaugh, Kerri L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake. PMID:20557489

  10. Chronic dietary toxicity of methylmercury in the zebra finch, Poephila guttata

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuhammer, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination of the environment through anthropogenic activity continues to be significant, and has resulted in the accumulation of elevated levels of Hg in invertebrates, fish and wildlife in certain Hg contaminated habitats. In addition, the availability of methylmercury (MeHg), a highly toxic and readily absorbable form of Hg, to the food chain is enhanced at low pH, an this has resulted in higher concentrations of Hg in various biota which inhabit environments sensitive to acid precipitation. The chronic dietary toxicity of MeHg has been investigated in a number of bird species including mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos, black ducks, pheasants, quail, and chickens. Except for a subchronic feeding study, the effects of MeHg on small passerines have not been studied. The present report describes the tissue accumulation and toxicity of MeHg in zebra finches (Poephila guttata) in response to chronic dietary exposure.

  11. Health Effects of Chronic Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young-Seoub; Song, Ki-Hoon; Chung, Jin-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a unique element with distinct physical characteristics and toxicity whose importance in public health is well recognized. The toxicity of arsenic varies across its different forms. While the carcinogenicity of arsenic has been confirmed, the mechanisms behind the diseases occurring after acute or chronic exposure to arsenic are not well understood. Inorganic arsenic has been confirmed as a human carcinogen that can induce skin, lung, and bladder cancer. There are also reports of its significant association to liver, prostate, and bladder cancer. Recent studies have also suggested a relationship with diabetes, neurological effects, cardiac disorders, and reproductive organs, but further studies are required to confirm these associations. The majority of research to date has examined cancer incidence after a high exposure to high concentrations of arsenic. However, numerous studies have reported various health effects caused by chronic exposure to low concentrations of arsenic. An assessment of the health effects to arsenic exposure has never been performed in the South Korean population; thus, objective estimates of exposure levels are needed. Data should be collected on the biological exposure level for the total arsenic concentration, and individual arsenic concentration by species. In South Korea, we believe that biological exposure assessment should be the first step, followed by regular health effect assessments. PMID:25284195

  12. The chronic effects of sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Mike; Kehe, Kai; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst

    2009-09-01

    Whilst the acute effects of sulfur mustard have been relatively well characterised, the chronic effects of short term but significant exposures are still evolving. The approximately 30,000 Iranian victims of CW exposure from the 1980 to 1988 Iran-Iraq war who are currently being followed form a key population who are now 20 years post-exposure. The key chronic findings in this population reflect the common acute effects of sulfur mustard, and are related to the skin, eye and respiratory system. Excluding pruritus, skin changes appear to settle. Eye symptoms are slowly progressive, however a severe, rapid onset form of keratitis is seen to develop in a number of patients after a latent period of 15-20 years. The respiratory tract also shows progressive deterioration, with bronchiolitis obliterans now being considered the main pathological feature of "mustard lung". In addition, there are other potential effects of sulfur mustard exposure which become evident only in the longer term and which are being investigated, including the development of cancer, immunological and neuropsychiatric changes, and reproductive effects. Finally, a chronic effect of sulfur mustard exposure that is now becoming apparent is the wider long-term social and economic effects of these illnesses on individuals and their families.

  13. Reduced foodborne toxin exposure is a benefit of improving dietary diversity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Mitchell, Nicole J; Male, Denis; Kensler, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    Naturally occurring foodborne toxins are common in subsistence diets of low-income human populations worldwide. Often, these populations rely on one or two staple foods for the bulk of their calories, making them more susceptible to chronic intake of certain toxins. Exposure to common foodborne toxins is associated with diverse conditions such as cancer, immunotoxicity, growth impairment, and neurological deficits. Interventions focused solely on reducing toxin levels have proven difficult to sustain. Using case studies of two foodborne toxins, aflatoxin and cassava cyanide, this article addresses the heightened risk of particular diseases from eating monotonous diets based in maize, groundnuts, and cassava: common in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. We also discuss the potential role of increased dietary diversity in counteracting these diseases. Increased dietary diversity can reduce consumption of toxins and increase intake of nutrients that could counteract the toxicity of such chemicals. In Qidong, China, a population that previously consumed a monotonous maize-based diet and increased dietary diversity since the 1980s has experienced a dramatic reduction in liver cancer mortalities. That liver cancer decreased as dietary diversity increased is the catalyst for the hypothesis that dietary diversity could have a direct impact on reducing health effects of foodborne toxins. Future research, agricultural development, and food policy reforms should take into consideration the multifaceted benefits associated with improved dietary diversity. Collaborations between toxicologists, nutritionists, and policymakers are important to development of sustainable interventions to reduce foodborne toxin exposure and promote health through increased dietary diversity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

  15. Dietary exposure to aflatoxin and fumonisin among Tanzanian children as determined using biomarkers of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Shirima, Candida P.; Kimanya, Martin E.; Kinabo, Joyce L.; Routledge, Michael N.; Srey, Chou; Wild, Christopher P.; Gong, Yun Yun

    2014-01-01

    Scope The study aims to evaluate the status of dietary exposure to aflatoxin and fumonisin in young Tanzanian children, using previously validated biomarkers of exposure. Methods and results A total of 148 children aged 12 to 22 months, were recruited from three geographically distant villages in Tanzania; Nyabula, Kigwa and Kikelelwa. Plasma aflatoxin-albumin adducts (AF-alb) and urinary fumonisin B1 (UFB1) were measured by ELISA and LC-MS, respectively. AF-alb was detectable in 84% of children, was highest in fully weaned children (p<0.01) with higher levels being associated with higher maize intake (p<0.05). AF-alb geometric mean (95% CI) was 43.2 (28.7–65.0), 19.9 (13.5–29.2) and 3.6 (2.8–4.7) pg/mg albumin in children from Kigwa, Nyabula and Kikelelwa, respectively. UFB1 was detectable in 96% of children and the level was highest in children who had been fully weaned (p<0.01). The geometric UFB1 mean (95% CI) was 327.2 (217.1–493.0), 211.7 (161.1–278.1) and 82.8 (58.3–117.7) pg/ml in Kigwa, Nyabula and Kikelelwa, respectively. About 82% of all the children were exposed to both mycotoxins. Conclusion Young children in Tanzania are chronically exposed to both aflatoxin and fumonisin through contaminated diet, although the level of exposure varies markedly between the three villages studied. PMID:23776058

  16. Biomass smoke exposure and chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Assad, Nour A; Kapoor, Vidit; Sood, Akshay

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 3 billion people worldwide rely on coal and biomass fuel for cooking and heating. Biomass smoke exposure is associated with several chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, usual interstitial pneumonitis, hut lung, and bronchial anthracofibrosis. Household air pollution primarily from biomass smoke is the biggest risk factor for COPD worldwide. Despite the significant burden of biomass smoke-related respiratory disease, the exposure is still underappreciated worldwide, especially in high-income countries. Recent literature highlights the immunoinflammatory differences between biomass smoke-related COPD and tobacco smoke-related COPD that may lead to better understanding of the differences in the clinical phenotypes between the two entities, suggests an association with the recently recognized asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and elucidates the burden of disease in high-income countries. The current review focuses on the association between biomass smoke and common chronic respiratory diseases, discuss differences between biomass smoke-related COPD and tobacco smoke-related COPD, highlights chronic respiratory diseases that are specific for biomass smoke exposure such as hut lung and bronchial anthracofibrosis, and discusses the known impact of beneficial interventions.

  17. Hydrocarbon exposure and chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Asal, N R; Cleveland, H L; Kaufman, C; Nsa, W; Nelson, D I; Nelson, R Y; Lee, E T; Kingsley, B

    1996-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate further the potential role of long-term exposure to hydrocarbons (HCs) in the development of idiopathic chronic glomerulopathy (ICG) using a more refined measurement of HC exposure. A total of 321 pairs of cases and controls, matched by age, gender, and geographical area, were assembled. A detailed questionnaire was blindly administered to cases and controls to collect information on occupational and medical history and sociodemographic data. By integrating quantified measurements of HC exposure from a variety of sources with each subject's occupational history, a lifetime HC exposure score could be estimated and expressed in parts per million (ppm). Cases had an hydrocarbon exposure mean score of 165 ppm (median 48 ppm) as compared to 162 ppm (median 43 ppm) for controls (P = 0.757). When using hydrocarbon exposure as a dichotomous variable with a cutoff point at 100 ppm, cases had a higher proportion of exposed than controls, but the difference was not statistically significant at the 0.05 level, even after controlling for possible confounders through logistic regression. Subgroup analyses showed mixed results. In most subgroups differences between cases and controls tended to become significant when hydrocarbon was used as a dichotomous variable. Results from this study do not sufficiently support the hypothesized association of HC exposure and ICG in general. Subgroup analyses need further investigations. Efforts to generate accurate estimates of lifetime HC exposure should be emphasized for future investigations.

  18. Pathology related to chronic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Jose A; Mullick, Florabel G; Martinez, Leonor; Page, Norbert P; Gibb, Herman; Longfellow, David; Thompson, Claudia; Ladich, Elena R

    2002-01-01

    Millions now suffer the effects of chronic arseniasis related to environmental arsenic exposure. The biological mechanisms responsible for arsenic-induced toxicity and especially chronic effects, including cancer, are not well known. The U.S. Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) is participating in an international research effort to improve this understanding by the development of the International Tissue and Tumor Repository for Chronic Arsenosis (ITTRCA). The ITTRCA obtains, archives, and makes available for research purposes, tissues from subjects exposed to arsenic. We provide here a short overview of arsenic-induced pathology, briefly describe arsenic-induced lesions in the skin and liver, and present five case reports from the ITTRCA. Arsenic-induced skin pathology includes hyperkeratosis, pigmentation changes, Bowen disease, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinomas. A unique spectrum of skin lesions, known as arsenical keratosis, is rather characteristic of chronic arseniasis. Bowen disease, or squamous cell carcinoma in situ of the skin, has been well documented as a consequence of arsenical exposure. A spectrum of liver lesions has also been attributed to chronic arseniasis. Of these, hepatocellular carcinoma, angiosarcoma, cirrhosis, and hepatoportal sclerosis have been associated with arsenic exposure. We present case reports that relate to these health conditions, namely, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and Bowen disease of the skin and hepatocellular carcinoma and angiosarcoma of the liver. Four patients had been treated with arsenical medications for such conditions as asthma, psoriasis, and syphilis, and one case occurred in a boy chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water. PMID:12426152

  19. Modeling chronic dietary cadmium bioaccumulation and toxicity from periphyton to Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Golding, Lisa A; Borgmann, Uwe; Dixon, D George

    2011-07-01

    A chronic (28-d) Cd saturation bioaccumulation model was developed to quantify the Cd contribution from a natural periphyton diet to Cd in the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Bioaccumulation was then linked to chronic toxic effects. Juvenile H. azteca were exposed to treatments of Cd in water (3.13-100 nmol/L nominal) and food (389-26,300 nmol/g ash-free dry mass). Cadmium bioaccumulation, survival, and growth were recorded. Dietary Cd was estimated to contribute 21 to 31, 59 to 94, and 40 to 55% to bioaccumulated Cd in H. azteca exposed to treatments of Cd primarily in water, food, and food + water, respectively. Survival as a function of Cd lethal body concentration (679 nmol/g; 95% confidence limits, 617-747) was the most robust endpoint. Body concentration integrated all exposure routes. Based on the lethal body concentration, dietary Cd was predicted to contribute markedly (26-90%) to Cd in H. azteca. Cadmium concentration and food nutritional quality (biomass, chlorophyll a, total lipid, fatty acids, total protein) had no effect on H. azteca nutritional quality (total lipid, fatty acids, total protein) but did influence H. azteca dry weight. This research highlighted the importance of including a dietary component when modeling chronic effects of Cd and when refining endpoints for use in ecological risk assessment and water quality guidelines.

  20. Dietary change, nutrition education and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Brug, Johannes; Schols, Annemie; Mesters, Ilse

    2004-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent and serious condition. Nutrition might play a role in COPD prevention and is definitely important in COPD management. There are some indications from epidemiological studies that dietary factors such as ample consumption of fruit and fish may decrease COPD risk. The available evidence is, however, not substantial enough to warrant dietary recommendations for primary prevention of COPD. Substantial evidence does point to the conclusion that, regardless of disease severity, weight loss is related to decreased exercise capacity, health status and mortality as well as to increased morbidity among patients with moderate to severe COPD. Current nutritional support strategies have primarily focussed on treatment of severely underweight and disabled patients. In an in-patient setting or when incorporated in a pulmonary rehabilitation programme, nutritional support has proved effective in inducing weight gain and related functional improvements. However, such interventions are only feasible for a selected group of patients and are very laborious. Therefore, opportunities for dietary and nutrition interventions in COPD management should be explored, aiming at early detection, prevention and early treatment of involuntary weight loss. This means expanding the target group to include COPD out-patients and primary care patients before they have become underweight, and putting more emphasis on dietary change than on medically prescribed supplementation. Successful intervention assumes (voluntary) adjustment of dietary behaviour, and health professionals may play an essential role in encouraging patients to make and maintain these changes. Achieving dietary change among COPD patients may require a combination of diet counselling and self-management. A model for such a combination is presented.

  1. Treatment of chronic renal failure with dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Rampton, D S; Cohen, S L; Crammond, V D; Gibbons, J; Lilburn, M F; Rabet, J Y; Vince, A J; Wager, J D; Wrong, O M

    1984-03-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that dietary fiber, by inhibiting colonic bacterial ammonia generation and increasing fecal nitrogen excretion, might decrease hepatic urea synthesis and thereby reduce plasma urea in patients with chronic renal failure. Six and 8 week courses of two different hemicelluloses, arabinogalactan and ispaghula, reduced mean plasma urea in uremic subjects by 11% and 19% respectively. Ispaghula also reduced the rate of rise of plasma creatinine to zero and, in one formal balance study, increased fecal nitrogen excretion by 39%. Experiments in vitro showed that ispaghula depressed anaerobic fecal bacterial net ammonia generation by 30%, and adsorbed neither urea nor ammonia. The reduction in plasma urea caused by dietary fiber is likely to be due to inhibition of colonic bacterial production of ammonia; such therapy could conceivably alleviate some of the symptoms of uremia and postpone dialysis in patients with endstage renal disease.

  2. Dietary fiber mixture in pediatric patients with controlled chronic constipation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thabata K; Toporovski, Mauro S; Tahan, Soraia; Neufeld, Clarice B; de Morais, Mauro B

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to test the clinical efficacy and effect on colonic transit time (CTT) of a dietary fiber mixture given to children with controlled chronic constipation (CC) after the withdrawal of stool softeners and enemas. This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial involved 54 patients aged 4 to 12 years and had CC that was controlled by the use of low-dose stool softeners. The use of these softeners was discontinued when the patients were admitted to the clinical trial. The patients were randomized into 2 groups for the 4-week study period. One group received a dietary fiber mixture and the other group received a placebo (maltodextrin). The primary outcome was therapeutic failure (oral stool softeners or enemas was required to prescribe during the trial). Secondary outcomes included defecation frequency, stool consistency (measured using the Bristol Stool Form Scale), and CTT. Therapeutic failure was observed in 34.6% (9/26) of the patients in the dietary fiber mixture group and in 35.7% (10/28) in the control group (P = 0.933). The mean increase in daily bowel movements was 0.53 in the dietary fiber mixture group and 0.23 in the control group (P = 0.014). The patients in the dietary fiber mixture group (60.0%) passed nonhardened stools more frequently than did those in the control group (16.7%, P = 0.003). The CTT was similar for both groups. The fiber mixture did not prevent the suspension of stool softeners or lead to reduced CTT; however, the mixture promoted an increased frequency of defecation and an improvement in the stool consistency.

  3. Assessment of human dietary exposure to arsenic through rice.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew A; Signes-Pastor, Antonio J; Argos, Maria; Slaughter, Francis; Pendergrast, Claire; Punshon, Tracy; Gossai, Anala; Ahsan, Habibul; Karagas, Margaret R

    2017-05-15

    Rice accumulates 10-fold higher inorganic arsenic (i-As), an established human carcinogen, than other grains. This review summarizes epidemiologic studies that examined the association between rice consumption and biomarkers of arsenic exposure. After reviewing the literature we identified 20 studies, among them included 18 observational and 2 human experimental studies that reported on associations between rice consumption and an arsenic biomarker. Among individuals not exposed to contaminated water, rice is a source of i-As exposure - rice consumption has been consistently related to arsenic biomarkers, and the relationship has been clearly demonstrated in experimental studies. Early-life i-As exposure is of particular concern due to its association with lifelong adverse health outcomes. Maternal rice consumption during pregnancy also has been associated with infant toenail total arsenic concentrations indicating that dietary exposure during pregnancy results in fetal exposure. Thus, the collective evidence indicates that rice is an independent source of arsenic exposure in populations around the world and highlights the importance of investigating its affect on health.

  4. Associations of dietary indices with biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular status among adolescents in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adolescence is an important life stage for the development of dietary preferences and health behaviour. Longitudinal studies indicated that cardiovascular status in adolescence predicts cardiovascular risk marker values in adulthood. Several diet quality indices for adolescents have been developed in the past, but literature concerning associations between indices and biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular status is rather sparse. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyse associations of dietary indices with biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular status. Methods For the present analysis, data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS 2003–2006) were used. The analysis included 5,198 adolescents, aged 12 to 17 years. The Healthy Food Diversity Index (HFD), the Healthy Nutrition Score for Kids and Youth (HuSKY), the Indicator Food Index (IFI) and a simple fruit/vegetable intake index were derived from food frequency questionnaire information to indicate a healthy diet. Adjusted mean values for homocysteine, uric acid, CRP, total cholesterol, HDL-C, ferritin, HbA1c, folate, vitamin B12 and BMI were calculated using complex-samples general linear models for quintiles of the different indices. Furthermore, the agreement in ranking between the different indices was calculated by weighted kappa. All statistical analyses were conducted for boys and girls separately, and were adjusted for potential confounders. Results Folate was positively associated with the HFD, the HuSKY, and fruit/vegetable intake for both boys and girls and with IFI for boys. Among girls, positive associations were seen between vitamin B12 and the IFI and between diastolic blood pressure and the IFI as well as fruit/vegetable intake. A negative association was found between homocysteine and the HFD, the HuSKY, and the IFI for both boys and girls and with fruit/vegetable intake for boys. Among boys, uric acid and

  5. Dietary exposure to copper in the European Union and its assessment for EU regulatory risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Sadhra, Steven S; Wheatley, Andrew D; Cross, Hilary J

    2007-03-15

    EU legislation requires a multimedia exposure assessment for substances supplied within the EU. Dietary intake is the main source of exposure for the majority of the population hence an essential component of the human risk assessment. This paper describes the available data for dietary copper and its use in estimating daily intake including variability and determinants of exposure. Typical and reasonable worst-case estimates are derived for the general population from the available peer reviewed literature. Intakes from drinking water are found to exhibit more variability than those from food. Therefore, different exposure scenarios are derived to reflect the range of acute and chronic exposures that may occur. Estimates of typical copper intakes for the EU population are in the range 0.8-1.8 mg/day. Typical copper intakes of men are higher than those of women while the intake among the general adult population is higher than that of the elderly. Intakes of both men and women are generally close to the WHO normative requirements but may be somewhat lower in specific locations where background levels of copper are unusually low. Alcoholic beverages represent minor contribution daily copper intakes. Intakes for children are rather variable ranging broadly from 0.7 to 1.5 mg/day and are somewhat age and sex dependent. Greater uncertainty applies to the assessment of local exposure incorporating food produced on land directly impacted by contemporary copper industry emissions. Specifically, the extent to which soil is enriched in copper in these conditions is unclear. However, effective homeostatic control mechanisms in plants limit uptake and transfer to the human food chain. A best estimate of 0.25 mg/day in addition to regional exposure was derived. Drinking water is estimated to contribute only marginally to total copper intake in most cases. Higher intakes may occur in areas of poor water quality and/or corroded distribution systems. Such elevated exposures

  6. Environmental and dietary exposure of young children to inorganic trace elements.

    PubMed

    Glorennec, Philippe; Lucas, Jean-Paul; Mercat, Anne-Camille; Roudot, Alain-Claude; Le Bot, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Children are exposed to toxic metals and metalloids via their diet and environment. Our objective was to assess the aggregate chronic exposure of children aged 3-6years, living in France, to As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, and V present in diet, tap water, air, soil and floor dust in the years 2007-2009. Dietary data came from the French Total Diet Study, while concentrations in residential tap water, soil and indoor floor dust came from the 'Plomb-Habitat' nationwide representative survey on children's lead exposure at home. Indoor air concentrations were assumed to be equal to outdoor air concentrations, which were retrieved from regulatory measurements networks. Human exposure factors were retrieved from literature. Data were combined with Monte Carlo simulations. Median exposures were 1.7, 0.3, 10.2, 34.1, 60.3, 0.7, 0.1, 44.3, 1.5 and 95th percentiles were 4.4, 0.5, 15.8, 61.3, 98.3, 2.5, 0.1, 111.1, 2.9μg/kgbw/d for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, and V respectively. Dietary exposures dominate aggregate exposures, with the notable exception of Pb - for which soils and indoor floor dust ingestion contribute most at the 95th percentile. The strengths of this study are that it aggregates exposures that are often estimated separately, and uses a large amount of representative data. This assessment is limited to main diet and residential exposure, and does not take into account the relative bioavailability of compounds. These results could be used to help target prevention strategies.

  7. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. )

    1990-08-01

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

  8. Retrospective dosimetry related to chronic environmental exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degteva, M. O.; Kozheurov, V. P.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Neta, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of the environment occurred in the early fifties as a result of the releases from the Mayak plutonium production complex (Southern Urals, Russia). The releases of liquid wastes into the Techa river resulted in chronic exposure of 30,000 residents of the riverside communities. Since 1951 90Sr body burdens have been measured for over half of this cohort. This paper presents the analysis of data on 90Sr in humans and describes the reconstruction of internal doses for these people.

  9. TESTING DUPLICATE DIET SAMPLE COLLECTION METHODS FOR MEASURING PERSONAL DIETARY EXPOSURES TO CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary ingestion may be a significant pathway of human exposure to many potentially toxic chemicals. The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency-National Human Exposure Laboratory has made the development of methods for measuring persoanl dietary exposures a high priority for its di...

  10. TESTING DUPLICATE DIET SAMPLE COLLECTION METHODS FOR MEASURING PERSONAL DIETARY EXPOSURES TO CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary ingestion may be a significant pathway of human exposure to many potentially toxic chemicals. The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency-National Human Exposure Laboratory has made the development of methods for measuring persoanl dietary exposures a high priority for its di...

  11. Dietary nitrate supplementation improves revascularization in chronic ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Luedike, Peter; Totzeck, Matthias; Kropp, Martina; Schicho, Andreas; Stock, Pia; Rammos, Christos; Niessen, Michael; Heiss, Christian; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2012-10-16

    Revascularization is an adaptive repair mechanism that restores blood flow to undersupplied ischemic tissue. Nitric oxide plays an important role in this process. Whether dietary nitrate, serially reduced to nitrite by commensal bacteria in the oral cavity and subsequently to nitric oxide and other nitrogen oxides, enhances ischemia-induced remodeling of the vascular network is not known. Mice were treated with either nitrate (1 g/L sodium nitrate in drinking water) or sodium chloride (control) for 14 days. At day 7, unilateral hind-limb surgery with excision of the left femoral artery was conducted. Blood flow was determined by laser Doppler. Capillary density, myoblast apoptosis, mobilization of CD34(+)/Flk-1(+), migration of bone marrow-derived CD31(+)/CD45(-), plasma S-nitrosothiols, nitrite, and skeletal tissue cGMP levels were assessed. Enhanced green fluorescence protein transgenic mice were used for bone marrow transplantation. Dietary nitrate increased plasma S-nitrosothiols and nitrite, enhanced revascularization, increased mobilization of CD34(+)/Flk-1(+) and migration of bone marrow-derived CD31(+)/CD45(-) cells to the site of ischemia, and attenuated apoptosis of potentially regenerative myoblasts in chronically ischemic tissue. The regenerative effects of nitrate treatment were abolished by eradication of the nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity through the use of an antiseptic mouthwash. Long-term dietary nitrate supplementation may represent a novel nutrition-based strategy to enhance ischemia-induced revascularization.

  12. Chronic Nephropathy from Dietary Hyperoxaluria: Sustained Improvement of Renal Function after Dietary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Servilla, Karen S; Fair, Joanna R; Vigil, Darlene; Ganta, Kavitha; Massie, Larry

    2017-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with stable chronic kidney disease (CKD) for two years following a single episode of calcium oxalate urolithiasis developed progressive elevation of his serum creatinine concentration. Urinalysis revealed pyuria and white cell casts, a few red blood cells, minimal proteinuria, and no crystals. Urine culture was sterile. Gallium scintigraphy was consistent with interstitial nephritis. Proton pump inhibitor intake was discontinued, and a short course of oral corticosteroids was initiated. Percutaneous kidney biopsy, performed because of the continued deterioration of renal function to a minimum estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) value of 15 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and persistent pyuria, revealed deposition of oxalate crystals in the tubules and interstitium, pronounced tubular changes, and interstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Urinary oxalate excretion was very high, in the range usually associated with primary hyperoxaluria. However, investigations for primary or enteric hyperoxaluria were negative. He reported a diet based on various nuts high in oxalate content. Estimated oxalate content in the diet was, for years, approximately four times higher than that in the average American diet. The institution of a diet low in oxalates resulted in the rapid normalization of urinary oxalate excretion and urinary sediment and in the slow, continuous improvement of renal function to near normal levels (eGFR 59 mL/min/1.73 m2) before his death from a brain malignancy 3.5 years later. The manifestations of nephropathy secondary to dietary hyperoxaluria, including the urine findings, can be indistinguishable from other types of interstitial nephritis. The diagnosis of dietary hyperoxaluria requires careful dietary history and a kidney biopsy. Identifying dietary hyperoxaluria as the cause of CKD is important because the decrease in dietary oxalate intake without any other measures can lead to sustained improvement in renal function. PMID:28435765

  13. Chronic Nephropathy from Dietary Hyperoxaluria: Sustained Improvement of Renal Function after Dietary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Servilla, Karen S; Fair, Joanna R; Vigil, Darlene; Ganta, Kavitha; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2017-03-20

    A 56-year-old man with stable chronic kidney disease (CKD) for two years following a single episode of calcium oxalate urolithiasis developed progressive elevation of his serum creatinine concentration. Urinalysis revealed pyuria and white cell casts, a few red blood cells, minimal proteinuria, and no crystals. Urine culture was sterile. Gallium scintigraphy was consistent with interstitial nephritis. Proton pump inhibitor intake was discontinued, and a short course of oral corticosteroids was initiated. Percutaneous kidney biopsy, performed because of the continued deterioration of renal function to a minimum estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) value of 15 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) and persistent pyuria, revealed deposition of oxalate crystals in the tubules and interstitium, pronounced tubular changes, and interstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Urinary oxalate excretion was very high, in the range usually associated with primary hyperoxaluria. However, investigations for primary or enteric hyperoxaluria were negative. He reported a diet based on various nuts high in oxalate content. Estimated oxalate content in the diet was, for years, approximately four times higher than that in the average American diet. The institution of a diet low in oxalates resulted in the rapid normalization of urinary oxalate excretion and urinary sediment and in the slow, continuous improvement of renal function to near normal levels (eGFR 59 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) before his death from a brain malignancy 3.5 years later. The manifestations of nephropathy secondary to dietary hyperoxaluria, including the urine findings, can be indistinguishable from other types of interstitial nephritis. The diagnosis of dietary hyperoxaluria requires careful dietary history and a kidney biopsy. Identifying dietary hyperoxaluria as the cause of CKD is important because the decrease in dietary oxalate intake without any other measures can lead to sustained improvement in renal function.

  14. Dietary selenomethionine exposure alters swimming performance, metabolic capacity and energy homeostasis in juvenile fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    McPhee, D Landon; Janz, David M

    2014-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is known to cause chronic toxicity in aquatic species. In particular, dietary exposure of fish to selenomethionine (SeMet), the primary form of Se in the diet, is of concern. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure to elevated dietary SeMet alters energy and endocrine homeostasis in adult fish. However, little is known about the direct effects of dietary SeMet exposure in juvenile fish. The objective of the present study was to investigate sublethal physiological effects of dietary SeMet exposure in juvenile fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Twenty days-post-hatch fathead minnow were exposed for 60 days to different measured concentrations (2.8, 5.4, 9.9, 26.5 μg Se/g dry mass [dm]) of Se in food in the form of SeMet. After exposure, samples were collected for Se analysis and fish were subjected to a swimming performance challenge to assess critical swim speed (Ucrit), tail beat frequency and tail beat amplitude, oxygen consumption (MO2), cost of transport (COT), standard metabolic rate (SMR), active metabolic rate (AMR), and factorial aerobic scope (F-AS). Ucrit was decreased in the 26.5 μg Se/g dm exposure group compared to the control group. Tail beat frequency and tail beat amplitude were significantly reduced in fish fed 9.9 and 26.5 μg Se/g. An increase in MO2 and COT was observed in the 9.9 and 26.5 μg Se/g exposure groups compared to the control group. While the AMR of the high dose group was increased relative to control, there were no significant differences in SMR and F-AS. Energy storage capacity was measured via whole body triglyceride and glycogen concentrations. Triglyceride concentrations in non-swam fish were elevated in the 5.4 μg Se/g group relative to controls. Fatigued (swam) fish had significantly lower whole body triglycerides than non-swam fish. All non-swam SeMet exposure groups had significantly decreased whole body glycogen concentrations compared to controls, while the 5.4 and 26.5 μg Se/g exposure groups had

  15. Tartrazine and benzoate challenge and dietary avoidance in chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Tarlo, S M; Broder, I

    1982-05-01

    This study undertook to determine the usefulness of tartrazine and benzoate challenge and dietary avoidance in the management of patients with chronic asthma. Double-blind ingestion-challenge tests were performed on separate days with lactose, tartrazine, benzoate and acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA). Of the twenty-eight subjects challenged, one responded to tartrazine and one to benzoate. Two additional subjects responded to ASA and a further eight were not tested with this material because of a definite history of sensitivity. Twenty-four subjects completed 1 month periods of observation while first on a normal diet and then while on a tartrazine-benzoate avoidance diet. No improvement occurred during the modified diet in anyone with positive challenge-tests or in all, but one, of those with a history of ASA idiosyncrasy; paradoxically, several of these subjects worsened during this period. We conclude that tartrazine-benzoate dietary avoidance was not of value in the management of the chronic asthmatic in this study, even among patients who respond to challenge with these substances or have ASA idiosyncrasy.

  16. Dietary exposure to an environmental toxin triggers neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid deposits in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Metcalf, James S.; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and β-amyloid plaques are the neurological hallmarks of both Alzheimer's disease and an unusual paralytic illness suffered by Chamorro villagers on the Pacific island of Guam. Many Chamorros with the disease suffer dementia, and in some villages one-quarter of the adults perished from the disease. Like Alzheimer's, the causal factors of Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC) are poorly understood. In replicated experiments, we found that chronic dietary exposure to a cyanobacterial toxin present in the traditional Chamorro diet, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), triggers the formation of both NFT and β-amyloid deposits similar in structure and density to those found in brain tissues of Chamorros who died with ALS/PDC. Vervets (Chlorocebus sabaeus) fed for 140 days with BMAA-dosed fruit developed NFT and sparse β-amyloid deposits in the brain. Co-administration of the dietary amino acid l-serine with l-BMAA significantly reduced the density of NFT. These findings indicate that while chronic exposure to the environmental toxin BMAA can trigger neurodegeneration in vulnerable individuals, increasing the amount of l-serine in the diet can reduce the risk. PMID:26791617

  17. Chronic boron exposure and human semen parameters.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; Jia, Juan; Kennedy, Nola; Elashoff, David A; Ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    Boron found as borates in soil, food, and water has important industrial and medical applications. A panel reviewing NTP reproductive toxicants identified boric acid as high priority for occupational studies to determine safe versus adverse reproductive effects. To address this, we collected boron exposure/dose measures in workplace inhalable dust, dietary food/fluids, blood, semen, and urine from boron workers and two comparison worker groups (n=192) over three months and determined correlations between boron and semen parameters (total sperm count, sperm concentration, motility, morphology, DNA breakage, apoptosis and aneuploidy). Blood boron averaged 499.2 ppb for boron workers, 96.1 and 47.9 ppb for workers from high and low environmental boron areas (p<0.0001). Boron concentrated in seminal fluid. No significant correlations were found between blood or urine boron and adverse semen parameters. Exposures did not reach those causing adverse effects published in animal toxicology work but exceeded those previously published for boron occupational groups.

  18. The food metabolome: a window over dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Scalbert, Augustin; Brennan, Lorraine; Manach, Claudine; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Dragsted, Lars O; Draper, John; Rappaport, Stephen M; van der Hooft, Justin J J; Wishart, David S

    2014-06-01

    The food metabolome is defined as the part of the human metabolome directly derived from the digestion and biotransformation of foods and their constituents. With >25,000 compounds known in various foods, the food metabolome is extremely complex, with a composition varying widely according to the diet. By its very nature it represents a considerable and still largely unexploited source of novel dietary biomarkers that could be used to measure dietary exposures with a high level of detail and precision. Most dietary biomarkers currently have been identified on the basis of our knowledge of food compositions by using hypothesis-driven approaches. However, the rapid development of metabolomics resulting from the development of highly sensitive modern analytic instruments, the availability of metabolite databases, and progress in (bio)informatics has made agnostic approaches more attractive as shown by the recent identification of novel biomarkers of intakes for fruit, vegetables, beverages, meats, or complex diets. Moreover, examples also show how the scrutiny of the food metabolome can lead to the discovery of bioactive molecules and dietary factors associated with diseases. However, researchers still face hurdles, which slow progress and need to be resolved to bring this emerging field of research to maturity. These limits were discussed during the First International Workshop on the Food Metabolome held in Glasgow. Key recommendations made during the workshop included more coordination of efforts; development of new databases, software tools, and chemical libraries for the food metabolome; and shared repositories of metabolomic data. Once achieved, major progress can be expected toward a better understanding of the complex interactions between diet and human health. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Effects of aqueous, dietary and combined exposures of cadmium to Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Sofyan, Agus; Price, David J; Birge, Wesley J

    2007-10-15

    While effects of water-borne metal exposures on freshwater animals have been well documented, the effect of dietary metal exposure is less understood but is gaining importance. However, little attention has been given to the importance of combining both exposure pathways. In this study, we compared effects of aqueous ('water only'), dietary ('food only') and combined ('water+food') exposures of cadmium to the freshwater cladocerans, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Major test endpoints included survival, feeding rate and reproduction. The C. dubia three-brood reproduction tests were conducted according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) methods. Three exposure scenarios were used: aqueous, dietary, and combined aqueous and dietary exposures. Results showed that all three exposures affected survival, feeding rate and reproduction of C. dubia. Interestingly, combined exposure showed contribution effects of aqueous and dietary exposures. Lower cadmium concentrations were needed in combined exposure to produce effects as compared to higher concentrations in aqueous or dietary exposure alone. These results demonstrated the potential importance of dietary and combined exposures for consideration of cadmium regulation and risk assessment of metals.

  20. Dietary exposure of 18-month-old Guadeloupian toddlers to chlordecone.

    PubMed

    Seurin, Sophie; Rouget, Florence; Reninger, Jean-Cédric; Gillot, Nadège; Loynet, Claire; Cordier, Sylvaine; Multigner, Luc; Leblanc, Jean-Charles; Volatier, Jean-Luc; Héraud, Fanny

    2012-08-01

    Chlordecone is an organochlorine insecticide used in the French West Indies until 1993. Toddlers are expected to be differently exposed than older children and adults. The dietary exposure to chlordecone of 18-month-old Guadeloupian toddlers was assessed through different scenarios depending on whether the subjects live on a soil-contaminated place or not and on their supply habits. Food contamination data came from the RESO study performed in 2005-2006. Consumption data derived from a dietary survey conducted in 2005-2008. Results were compared to those of other age groups. Chronic dietary exposures to chlordecone were estimated in a range of 0.018-0.051 μg/kg bw/day (P95: 0.044-0.096) for toddlers living in a non contaminated area and between 0.045-0.078 μg/kg bw/day (P95: 0.110-0.144) for toddlers living in a contaminated area. The probability of exceeding the chronic health-based value of 0.5 μg/kg bw/day was null. These results suggest that 18-month-old toddlers are less exposed than groups aged over 3 years old. This can be explained by their consumption pattern mostly based on milk and fruits, which are not highly contaminated by chlordecone. The acute health-based value of 10 μg/kg bw/day could be exceeded when consuming of highly contaminated taros, showing the importance of regulatory maximum limit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. THE THREE INTERACTING FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CHILDREN'S DIETARY EXPOSURES: ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS, FOOD CONTAMINATION, AND CHILDREN'S BEHAVIORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dietary contribution to an aggregate exposure assessment is potentially an important pathway of exposure especially for young children. Enviornmental contamination appearing in the child's diet can result from contamination in the food as purchased or due to preparing, servin...

  2. Simulating cholinesterase inhibition in birds caused by dietary insecticide exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corson, M.S.; Mora, M.A.; Grant, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a stochastic simulation model that simulates avian foraging in an agricultural landscape to evaluate factors affecting dietary insecticide exposure and to predict post-exposure cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. To evaluate the model, we simulated published field studies and found that model predictions of insecticide decay and ChE inhibition reasonably approximated most observed results. Sensitivity analysis suggested that foraging location usually influenced ChE inhibition more than diet preferences or daily intake rate. Although organophosphorus insecticides usually caused greater inhibition than carbamate insecticides, insecticide toxicity appeared only moderately important. When we simulated impact of heavy insecticide applications during breeding seasons of 15 wild bird species, mean maximum ChE inhibition in most species exceeded 20% at some point. At this level of inhibition, birds may experience nausea and/or may exhibit minor behavioral changes. Simulated risk peaked in April-May and August-September and was lowest in July. ChE inhibition increased with proportion of vegetation in the diet. This model, and ones like it, may help predict insecticide exposure of and sublethal ChE inhibition in grassland animals, thereby reducing dependence of ecological risk assessments on field studies alone.

  3. DIETARY SODIUM ADHERENCE IS POOR IN CHRONIC HEART FAILURE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Basuray, Anupam; Dolansky, Mary; Josephson, Richard; Sattar, Abdus; Grady, Ellen M.; Vehovec, Anton; Gunstad, John; Redle, Joseph; Fang, James; Hughes, Joel W.

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the rates and predictors of dietary sodium restriction, while evaluating the reliability of the 24-hour urine collection as a tool to estimate dietary sodium intake in heart failure (HF) patients. Methods and Results We evaluated the 24-hour urinary sodium excretion of 305 outpatients with HF and reduced ejection fraction who were educated on following a <2 gm sodium diet. The mean sodium excretion using a single sample from each participant was 3.15 ± 1.58 grams, and 23% were adherent to the <2 gm recommendation. 168 participants provided two samples with urinary creatinine excretion within normative range. Averaging both resulted in a mean sodium excretion of 3.21 ± 1.20 grams and lower adherence rates to the <2-gram diet: 14% versus 23% (p=0.019). Multivariate logistic regression showed only male sex and higher BMI was associated with non-adherence (OR male: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.25-3.88, OR one unit BMI: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.10). Bland-Altman plots of urinary sodium and creatinine showed poor reproducibility between samples. Conclusions In this chronic HF population, sodium consumption probably exceeds recommended amounts, particularly in men and those with higher BMI. Urine analyses were not highly reproducible, suggesting variation in both diet and urine collection. PMID:25576680

  4. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART 1: MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND STUDY DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children contact surfaces (hands, floors, etc.) that may be contaminated with pesticides. Thus, dietary exposures of young children are difficult to measure, but are needed to support the aggregate exposure assessments. Evaluation of dietary field protocols and a total die...

  5. Probabilistic Modeling of Dietary Arsenic Exposure and Dose and Evaluation with 2003-2004 NHANES Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary exposure from food to toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs) in the general U.S. population has not been well studied. The goal of this research was to quantify dietary arsenic As exposure and analyze the major contributors to total As (tAs) and iAs. Another objective was to com...

  6. Probabilistic Modeling of Dietary Arsenic Exposure and Dose and Evaluation with 2003-2004 NHANES Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary exposure from food to toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs) in the general U.S. population has not been well studied. The goal of this research was to quantify dietary arsenic As exposure and analyze the major contributors to total As (tAs) and iAs. Another objective was to com...

  7. Dietary intake of elderly outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Laudisio, Alice; Costanzo, Luisa; Di Gioia, Claudia; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Traballesi, Marco; Gemma, Antonella; Antonelli Incalzi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with malnutrition, which is in turn associated with poor outcomes. Accordingly, in COPD patients adequate nutrition might improve several clinical and functional outcomes. Nevertheless, information about nutrient intake of older populations with COPD is still scanty. We analysed data of 523 elderly attending a geriatric ambulatory. Of these, 165 had a diagnosis of COPD, while 358 were control participants, matched for demographic characteristics and free from respiratory diseases. COPD was diagnosed according to the global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) criteria. The intake of micro and macronutrients was recorded using the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) questionnaire. Nutrient intake of COPD patients was compared with that of the control group and with recommended dietary allowances RDA. COPD patients had a lower energy intake, as compared with control participants (29.4 vs 34.4 kcal/kg of ideal weight; P<.0001), due to reduced intake of carbohydrates and proteins. Accordingly, in the energy intake was lower than recommended in 52% of COPD patients, vs 30% of controls (P<.0001). The intake of calcium, potassium, folate, cholecalciferol, retinol, and thiamine was lower than RDA in over 75% of COPD patients. The diet of elderly COPD outpatients does not provide the recommended energy intake, nor does it meet the RDA for many micronutrients. Such deficits are more severe than in age matched non- respiratory subjects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary restraint moderates the effects of food exposure on women's body and weight satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Geschwind, Nicole; Roefs, Anne; Lattimore, Paul; Fett, Anne-Kathrin; Jansen, Anita

    2008-11-01

    The influence of dietary restraint and food exposure on body satisfaction was tested. Body and weight satisfaction were measured before and after exposure to either high- or low-caloric food, without actual eating. Independent of caloric condition, higher dietary restraint was associated with a decrease in body satisfaction after food exposure. With regard to weight satisfaction, however, the association between higher dietary restraint and decreased weight satisfaction was specific for the high-caloric condition. Thus, the actual eating of food is not necessary for decreased body and weight satisfaction to occur, suggesting an exposure-induced activation of dysfunctional cognitions in restrained eaters.

  9. Dietary exposure estimation of benzo[a]pyrene and cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Mu; Shim, Geun Ae

    2007-08-01

    Dietary benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) levels were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) in various foods (e.g., snack, potato chip, bread, vegetable oil, meat, cereal, etc.) to estimate dietary intake levels of BaP for the assessment of BaP related-cancer risk in Koreans. Higher levels of BaP were detected in fried chicken (5.25-5.55 BaP microg/kg) and smoked dried beef (5.47 microg/kg) compared to relatively lower levels measured in sesame oil (0.36 microg/kg) and peanut (0.44 microg/kg). The BaP levels in nonmeat items were generally low in detection, but certain potato chip products showed levels up to 4.06 BaP microg/kg. In terms of chronic daily intake of BaP, fried chicken was shown to be the highest (70.09 ng/person/d) and perilla oil was the lowest (0.05 ng/person/d). The total daily intake of BaP due to the consumption of various food items investigated was estimated to be 124.55 ng/person/d, based on daily food consumption and the contaminant level of BaP. The dietary BaP-related cancer risk using carcinogenic potency factor of BaP as 7.3E + 0 (mg/kg/d)(-1) was assessed to be 1.52 x 10(-5). These data suggest that cancer risk due to dietary exposure to BaP is of concern in Koreans and needs to be reduced either by regulatory efforts or by modifying food manufacturing procedures.

  10. Herbal and Dietary Supplement Disclosure to Health Care Providers by Individuals with Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula M.; Phillips, Russell S.; McCarthy, Ellen P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Very little is known about herbal and dietary supplement disclosure in adults with chronic medical conditions, especially on a national level. Objective To examine herbal and dietary supplement disclosure to conventional health care providers by adults with chronic medical conditions. Design Data on herbal and dietary supplement use (N = 5456 users) in the previous year were used from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. Bi-variable analyses compared characteristics between herbal and dietary supplement disclosers and nondisclosers. Multivariable logistic regression identified independent correlates of herbal and dietary supplement disclosure. Results Overall, only 33% of herbal and dietary supplement users reported disclosing use of herbal and dietary supplements to their conventional health care provider. Among herbal and dietary supplement users with chronic conditions, less than 51% disclosed use to their conventional health care provider. Hispanic (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 0.70 [0.52, 0.94]) and Asian American (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 0.54 [0.33, 0.89]) adults were much less likely than non-Hispanic white Americans to disclose herbal and dietary supplement use. Having less than a high school education (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 0.61 [0.45, 0.82]) and not having insurance (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 0.77 [0.59, 1.00]) were associated with being less likely to disclose herbal and dietary supplement use. Conclusion Herbal and dietary supplement disclosure rates are low, even among adults with chronic conditions. These findings raise concerns about the safety of herbal and dietary supplements in combination with allopathic care. Future studies should focus on educating physicians about crosscultural care as well as eliciting information about herbal and dietary supplement use. PMID:19032071

  11. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers: occurrence, dietary exposure, and toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Darnerud, P O; Eriksen, G S; Jóhannesson, T; Larsen, P B; Viluksela, M

    2001-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in plastics (concentration, 5--30%) and in textile coatings. Commercial products consist predominantly of penta-, octa-, and decabromodiphenyl ether mixtures, and global PBDE production is about 40,000 tons per year. PBDEs are bioaccumulated and biomagnified in the environment, and comparatively high levels are often found in aquatic biotopes from different parts of the world. During the mid-1970--1980s there was a substantial increase in the PBDE levels with time in both sediments and aquatic biota, whereas the latest Swedish data (pike and guillemot egg) may indicate that levels are at steady state or are decreasing. However, exponentially increasing PBDE levels have been observed in mother's milk during 1972--1997. Based on levels in food from 1999, the dietary intake of PBDE in Sweden has been estimated to be 0.05 microg per day. Characteristic end points of animal toxicity are hepatotoxicity, embryotoxicity, and thyroid effects as well as maternal toxicity during gestation. Recently, behavioral effects have been observed in mice on administration of PBDEs during a critical period after birth. Based on the critical effects reported in available studies, we consider the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) value of the PBDE group to be 1 mg/kg/day (primarily based on effects of pentaBDEs). In conclusion, with the scientific knowledge of today and based on Nordic intake data, the possible consumer health risk from PBDEs appears limited, as a factor of over 10(6) separates the estimated present mean dietary intake from the suggested LOAEL value. However, the presence of many and important data gaps, including those in carcinogenicity, reproduction, and developmental toxicity, as well as additional routes of exposure, make this conclusion only preliminary. Moreover, the time trend of PBDEs in human breast milk is alarming for the future. PMID:11250805

  12. Hormone Use in Food Animal Production: Assessing Potential Dietary Exposures and Breast Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Keeve E; Smith, Tyler J S

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the role of hormones in breast cancer etiology, following reports that heightened levels of endogenous hormones and exposure to exogenous hormones and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals through food and the environment are associated with increased breast cancer risk. Seven hormone drugs (testosterone propionate, trenbolone acetate, estradiol, zeranol, progesterone, melengestrol acetate, and bovine somatotropin) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in food animals. There is concern that these drugs or their biologically active metabolites may accumulate in edible tissues, potentially increasing the risk of exposure for consumers. To date, the potential for human exposure to residues of these compounds in animal products, as well as the risks that may result from this exposure, is poorly understood. In this paper, we discuss the existing scientific evidence examining the toxicological significance of exposure to hormones used in food animal production in relation to breast cancer risk. Through a discussion of U.S. federal regulatory programs and the primary literature, we interpret the state of surveillance for residues of hormone drugs in animal products and discuss trends in meat consumption in relation to the potential for hormone exposure. Given the lack of chronic bioassays of oral toxicity of the seven hormone compounds in the public literature and the limitations of existing residue surveillance programs, it is not currently possible to provide a quantitative characterization of risks that result from the use of hormonal drugs in food animal production, complicating our understanding of the role of dietary hormone exposure in the population burden of breast cancer.

  13. [Exposure assessment of liver cancer attributed to dietary aflatoxins exposure in Chinese residents].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the risk of liver cancer attributed to dietary aflatoxins exposure in Chinese residents. Mathematics model and "Margin of Exposure (MOE)" methods were employed in this study. The data used in mathematics model came from Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and the detection results of hepatitis B virus ( HBV) indicator in Chinese residents' blood sample in 2004. The data used in MOE model came from animal experiments, the fourth nutrition and health investigation among Chinese residents, and national inspection network for food contaminations. Mathematics model indicated that for those people who were exposed to aflatoxins at average level (665.43 ng/d), the liver cancer incidence rate resulting from aflatoxins exposure was 0.4033 per 100 thousand person years. For those people who were exposed to aflatoxins at a high level (97.5 percentile, 24 787.20 ng/d) the liver cancer incidence rate attributed to aflatoxins exposure was 15.0215 per 100 thousand person years. Results from the MOE method showed that for the people in whole country, urban and rural areas who were exposed to aflatoxins at average level (0.011 09, 0.008 13 and 0.012 49 microg x kg(-1) x d(-1) respectively), the MOE values for aflatoxins to cause liver cancer were 9017.1, 12 304.7 and 8006.4 respectively. For those people who were exposed to aflatoxins at a high level (97.5 percentile, 0.413 10, 0.289 30 and 0.489 50 microg x kg(-1) x d(-1) respectively), the MOE values for aflatoxins to cause liver cancer were 242.1, 345.7 and 204.3 for whole country, urban and rural areas, respectively. For the people whose dietary aflatoxins exposure at average level, the risk of liver cancer attributed to aflatoxins is middle. For the people whose dietary aflatoxins exposure at high level, this kind of risk should be high.

  14. Cumulative dietary exposure to a selected group of pesticides of the triazole group in different European countries according to the EFSA guidance on probabilistic modelling.

    PubMed

    Boon, Polly E; van Donkersgoed, Gerda; Christodoulou, Despo; Crépet, Amélie; D'Addezio, Laura; Desvignes, Virginie; Ericsson, Bengt-Göran; Galimberti, Francesco; Ioannou-Kakouri, Eleni; Jensen, Bodil Hamborg; Rehurkova, Irena; Rety, Josselin; Ruprich, Jiri; Sand, Salomon; Stephenson, Claire; Strömberg, Anita; Turrini, Aida; van der Voet, Hilko; Ziegler, Popi; Hamey, Paul; van Klaveren, Jacob D

    2015-05-01

    The practicality was examined of performing a cumulative dietary exposure assessment according to the requirements of the EFSA guidance on probabilistic modelling. For this the acute and chronic cumulative exposure to triazole pesticides was estimated using national food consumption and monitoring data of eight European countries. Both the acute and chronic cumulative dietary exposures were calculated according to two model runs (optimistic and pessimistic) as recommended in the EFSA guidance. The exposures obtained with these model runs differed substantially for all countries, with the highest exposures obtained with the pessimistic model run. In this model run, animal commodities including cattle milk and different meat types, entered in the exposure calculations at the level of the maximum residue limit (MRL), contributed most to the exposure. We conclude that application of the optimistic model run on a routine basis for cumulative assessments is feasible. The pessimistic model run is laborious and the exposure results could be too far from reality. More experience with this approach is needed to stimulate the discussion of the feasibility of all the requirements, especially the inclusion of MRLs of animal commodities which seem to result in unrealistic conclusions regarding their contribution to the dietary exposure.

  15. Assessment of dietary intake of children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hui, Wun Fung; Betoko, Aisha; Savant, Jonathan D; Abraham, Alison G; Greenbaum, Larry A; Warady, Bradley; Moxey-Mims, Marva M; Furth, Susan L

    2017-03-01

    Our aim was to characterize the nutrient intake of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) relative to recommended intake levels. We conducted a cross-sectional study of dietary intake assessed by Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) in The North American Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) prospective cohort study. Nutrient intake was analyzed to estimate the daily consumption levels of various nutrients and compared with national guidelines for intake. There were 658 FFQs available for analysis; 69.9 % of respondents were boys, with a median age [Interquartile range (IQR)] of 11 years (8-15). Median daily sodium, potassium, and phosphorus intake was 3089 mg (2294-4243), 2384 mg (1804-3076), and 1206 mg (894-1612) respectively. Sodium and phosphorus consumptions were higher than recommended in all age groups. Caloric intake decreased with dropping glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (p = 0.003). The median daily caloric intakes were 1307 kcal in male children 2-3 years old, 1875 kcal in children 4-8 years old, 1923 kcal in those 9-13 years old, and 2427 kcal in those 14-18 years old. Respective levels for girls were 1467 kcal, 1736 kcal, 1803 kcal, and 2281 kcal. Median protein intake exceeded recommended levels in all age groups, particularly among younger participants. Younger children were more likely than older children to exceed the recommended intakes for phosphorus (p < 0.001) and the age-specific recommended caloric intake (p < 0.001). Macronutrient distribution (carbohydrate:fat:protein) was consistent with recommendation. Children in the CKiD cohort consumed more sodium, phosphorus, protein, and calories than recommended. The gap between actual consumption and recommendations indicates a need for improved nutritional counseling and monitoring.

  16. Chronic dietary chlorpyrifos causes long-term spatial memory impairment and thigmotaxic behavior.

    PubMed

    López-Granero, Caridad; Ruiz-Muñoz, Ana M; Nieto-Escámez, Francisco A; Colomina, María T; Aschner, Michael; Sánchez-Santed, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the long-term effects of chronic exposure to low-level organophosphate (OP) pesticides, and the role of neurotransmitter systems, other than the cholinergic system, in mediating OP neurotoxicity. In this study, rats were administered 5mg/kg/day of chlorpyrifos (CPF) for 6 months commencing at 3-months-of-age. The animals were examined 7 months later (at 16-months-of-age) for spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) and locomotor activity. In addition, we assessed the chronic effects of CPF on glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) function using pharmacological challenges with dizocilpine (MK801) and diazepam. Impaired performance related to altered search patterns, including thigmotaxis and long-term spatial memory was noted in the MWM in animals exposed to CPF, pointing to dietary CPF-induced behavioral disturbances, such as anxiety. Twenty-four hours after the 31st session of repeated acquisition task, 0.1mg/kg MK801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist was intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected for 4 consecutive days. Decreased latencies in the MWM in the control group were noted after two sessions with MK801 treatment. Once the MWM assessment was completed, animals were administered 0.1 or 0.2mg/kg of MK801 and 1 or 3mg/kg of diazepam i.p., and tested for locomotor activity. Both groups, the CPF dietary and control, displayed analogous performance in motor activity. In conclusion, our data point to a connection between the long-term spatial memory, thigmotaxic response and CPF long after the exposure ended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Attenuation of the cortisol response to stress in female rainbow trout chronically exposed to dietary selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Steve; Thomas, Jith K; McPhee, Landon; Hursky, Olesya; Raine, Jason C; Pietrock, Michael; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Janz, David M

    2011-10-01

    were greater in muscle, but not liver. Concentrations of glycogen and triglycerides in muscle, but not in liver, were lesser following the handling stressor suggesting that the muscle energy reserves are an important source of energy required for recovery from the handling stressor. The results of the study demonstrate that chronic exposure to dietary Se-Met elicits a stress response, but prevents a cortisol response to a secondary handling stressor, most likely due to cortisol inactivation. Moreover, exposure to Se-Met has effects on concentrations of energy reserves that are important for providing the energy necessary to cope with a secondary stressor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Aluminum exposure for 60days at an equivalent human dietary level promotes peripheral dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Caroline Silveira; Vera, Gema; Ocio, José Antonio Uranga; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Miguel, Marta; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2017-08-25

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic associated with a number of chronic human diseases. We investigated the effects of Al exposure at doses similar to human dietary levels and at a high level exposure to Al on the peripheral nervous system. Wistar male rats were divided into two major groups and received orally: 1) First group - Low level - rats were subdivided and treated for 60days: a) Control - received ultrapure water; b) AlCl3 - received Al at 8.3mg/kg body weight (bw) for 60days; and 2) Second group - High level - rats were subdivided and treated for 42days: C) Control - received ultrapure water through oral gavage; d) AlCl3 - received Al at 100mg/kg bw for 42days. Von Frey hair test, plantar test, the presence of catalepsy and the spontaneous motor activity were investigated. Reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity, immunohistochemistry to investigate the nerve inflammation and, the specific presence of Al in the sciatic nerve fibers were investigated. Al exposure at a representative human dietary level promotes the development of mechanical allodynia, catalepsy, increased inflammation in the sciatic nerve, systemic oxidative stress and, is able to be retained in the sciatic nerve. The effects of low-dose Al were similar to those found in rats exposed to Al at a dose much higher (100mg/kg). Our findings suggest that Al may be considered toxic for the peripheral nervous system, thus inducing peripheral dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups ...

  20. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups ...

  1. Exposure assessment of adult intake of bisphenol A (BPA) with emphasis on canned food dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Matthew; Schecter, Arnold; Paepke, Olaf; Shropshire, William; Christensen, Krista; Birnbaum, Linda

    2015-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-volume, synthetic compound found in epoxy resins and plastics used in food packaging. Food is believed to be a major source of BPA intake. In this study, we measured the concentration of BPA in convenience samplings of foodstuffs purchased in Dallas, Texas. Sampling entailed collection of 204 samples of fresh, frozen, and canned foods in two rounds in 2010. BPA was positive in 73% of the canned food samples, while it was found in only 7% of non-canned foods at low concentrations. The results of this food sampling program were used to calculate adult dietary intakes of BPA. A pathway approach combined food intakes, a "canned fraction" parameter which described what portion of total intake of that food came from canned products, and measured food concentrations. Dietary intakes were calculated as 12.6 ng/kg-day, of which 12.4 ng/kg-day was from canned foods. Canned vegetable intakes alone were 11.9 ng/kg-day. This dietary intake was compared to total intakes of BPA estimated from urine measurements of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Total adult central tendency intakes ranged from 30 to 70 ng/kg-day for NHANES cycles between 2005 and 2010. Three possibilities were explored to explain the difference between these two approaches for intake estimation. Not all foods which may have been canned, particularly canned beverages such as soft drinks, were sampled in our food sampling program. Second, non-food pathways of exposure may be important for adults, including thermal paper exposures, and dust and air exposures. Finally, our canned food concentrations may not be adequately representative of canned foods in the United States; they were found to be generally lower compared to canned food concentrations measured in six other worldwide food surveys including three in North America. Our finding that canned food concentrations greatly exceeded non-canned concentrations was consistent with other studies, and

  2. Exposure assessment of adult intake of bisphenol A (BPA) with emphasis on canned food dietary exposures

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Matthew; Schecter, Arnold; Paepke, Olaf; Shropshire, William; Christensen, Krista; Birnbaum, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-volume, synthetic compound found in epoxy resins and plastics used in food packaging. Food is believed to be a major source of BPA intake. In this study, we measured the concentration of BPA in convenience samplings of foodstuffs purchased in Dallas, Texas. Sampling entailed collection of 204 samples of fresh, frozen, and canned foods in two rounds in 2010. BPA was positive in 73% of the canned food samples, while it was found in only 7% of non-canned foods at low concentrations. The results of this food sampling program were used to calculate adult dietary intakes of BPA. A pathway approach combined food intakes, a “canned fraction” parameter which described what portion of total intake of that food came from canned products, and measured food concentrations. Dietary intakes were calculated as 12.6 ng/kg-day, of which 12.4 ng/kg-day was from canned foods. Canned vegetable intakes alone were 11.9 ng/kg-day. This dietary intake was compared to total intakes of BPA estimated from urine measurements of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Total adult central tendency intakes ranged from 30 to 70 ng/kg-day for NHANES cycles between 2005 and 2010. Three possibilities were explored to explain the difference between these two approaches for intake estimation. Not all foods which may have been canned, particularly canned beverages such as soft drinks, were sampled in our food sampling program. Second, non-food pathways of exposure may be important for adults, including thermal paper exposures, and dust and air exposures. Finally, our canned food concentrations may not be adequately representative of canned foods in the United States; they were found to be generally lower compared to canned food concentrations measured in six other worldwide food surveys including three in North America. Our finding that canned food concentrations greatly exceeded non-canned concentrations was consistent with other studies, and

  3. PATTERN OF CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN ADULT, MALE RATS CHRONICALLY EXPOSED TO DIETARY CHLORPYRIFOS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very little is known about the effects of chronic exposure to relatively low levels of anticholinesterase insecticides or how the effects of chronic exposure compare to higher, intermittent exposure of the same compound for the same duration. To that end, we exposed adult male ra...

  4. Dietary nicotinic acid supplementation ameliorates chronic alcohol-induced fatty liver in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Zhang, Wenliang; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol abuse frequently causes niacin deficiency in association with the development of alcoholic liver disease. The objective of the present study was to determine whether dietary nicotinic acid (NA) deficiency exaggerates and whether dietary NA supplementation alleviates alcohol-induced fatty liver. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair-fed with 4 isocaloric liquid diets: control, ethanol (EtOH), EtOH with dietary NA deficiency, and EtOH with dietary NA supplementation, respectively, for 8 weeks. The control and EtOH diets contained normal levels of NA (7.5 mg/l). Dietary NA deficiency (0 mg NA/l) was achieved by removing NA from the vitamin mix, while NA was added to the liquid diet at 750 mg/l for dietary NA supplementation. Chronic EtOH feeding induced significant lipid accumulation in the liver, which was not worsened by dietary NA deficiency, but was ameliorated by dietary NA supplementation. Liver total NAD, NAD(+) , and NADH levels were remarkably higher in the NA supplemented group than the NA deficient or EtOH alone groups. Dietary NA supplementation to EtOH-fed rats increased the protein levels of hepatic cytochrome P450 4A1 (CYP4A1) and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 without affecting their mRNA levels. Interestingly, we found dietary NA supplementation reduced the ubiquitination level of CYP4A1. In addition, hepatic fatty acid synthase expression was reduced, while the serum β-hydroxybutyrate and adiponectin concentrations were significantly elevated by dietary NA supplementation. Moreover, dietary NA supplementation modulated EtOH-perturbed liver and serum metabolite profiles. These results demonstrate that alcoholic fatty liver was not exaggerated by dietary NA deficiency, but was ameliorated by dietary NA supplementation. Increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation and decreased hepatic de novo lipogenesis contribute to the effects of dietary NA supplementation. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Improving prediction of binge episodes by modelling chronicity of dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Millicent; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Skouteris, Helen; Broadbent, Jaclyn

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates the influences of chronicity of, and time lag between, dietary restriction and binge outcome for predicting binge episode onset. Sixty-two women aged 18 to 40 years old completed an online survey at random intervals seven times daily for a 7-day period. Participants self-reported engagement in dietary restriction and/or binging, and temptation to binge. Consecutive instances of reported dietary restriction better predicted subsequent binges than single instances. As the time lag between the first report of dietary restriction and binge onset increased, a clear linear trend emerged, such that the value of restriction for predicting binges increased with the number of consecutive assessments in which they reported dietary restriction. A similar pattern was found when predicting temptation to binge. Present findings suggest that duration of restriction is a crucial determinant of binge onset. These findings have implications for clinical practice by highlighting the time course from dietary restriction to binging.

  6. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Lisa Jo; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Zhilin; Xue, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups to acceptable daily intakes (ADI), characterize pesticide trends in exposures over different time periods, and determine commodities contributing to pesticide exposures. SHEDS was applied, using Pesticide Data Program (PDP) (1991-2011) and pesticide usage data on crops from USDA combined with NHANES dietary consumption data, to generate exposure estimates by age group. ADI data collected from EPA, WHO, and other sources were used to rank pesticides based on relativeness of the dietary exposure potential to ADI by age groups. Sensitivity analysis provided trends in pesticide exposures. Within SHEDS, commodities contributing the majority of pesticides with greatest exposure potential were determined. The results indicated that the highest ranking pesticides were methamidophos and diazinon which exceeded 100% of the ADI. Sensitivity analysis indicated that exposure to methamidophos, diazinon, malathion, ethion and formetanate hydrochloride had a marked decrease from 1991-1999 to 2000-2011. Contributions analysis indicated that apples, mushroom, carrots, and lettuce contributed to diazinon exposure. Beans and pepper contributed to methamidophos exposure. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Chronic lead exposure reduces junctional resistance at an electrical synapse.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T

    1984-01-01

    Both acute and chronic lead exposure have been found to inhibit transmission at chemical synapses, possibly by interfering with inward calcium current. We have found that chronic lead exposure slightly reduces input resistance and greatly reduces the junctional resistance between two strongly electrically coupled neurons in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. The net effect is to increase the strength of electrical coupling. A reduction in gap junctional resistance would also be expected to increase the flow of small molecules between cells. However, Lucifer Yellow injections did not reveal dye-coupling between the cells. Lead exposure also increases the capacitance of the neurons.

  8. A Dietary-Wide Association Study (DWAS) of Environmental Metal Exposure in US Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew A.; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Karagas, Margaret R.; Li, Zhigang; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.; Frost, H. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to toxic metals occurs through diet but few studies have comprehensively examined dietary sources of exposure in US populations. Purpose Our goal was to perform a novel dietary-wide association study (DWAS) to identify specific dietary sources of lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic exposure in US children and adults. Methods We combined data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with data from the US Department of Agriculture's Food Intakes Converted to Retail Commodities Database to examine associations between 49 different foods and environmental metal exposure. Using blood and urinary biomarkers for lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic, we compared sources of dietary exposure among children to that of adults. Results Diet accounted for more of the variation in mercury and arsenic than lead and cadmium. For instance we estimate 4.5% of the variation of mercury among children and 10.5% among adults is explained by diet. We identified a previously unrecognized association between rice consumption and mercury in a US study population – adjusted for other dietary sources such as seafood, an increase of 10 g/day of rice consumption was associated with a 4.8% (95% CI: 3.6, 5.2) increase in blood mercury concentration. Associations between diet and metal exposure were similar among children and adults, and we recapitulated other known dietary sources of exposure. Conclusion Utilizing this combination of data sources, this approach has the potential to identify and monitor dietary sources of metal exposure in the US population. PMID:25198543

  9. Exposure assessment of dietary cadmium: findings from shanghainese over 40 years, China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental exposure to cadmium causes renal dysfunction and bone damage. Cadmium contamination in food is regarded as the main environmental source of non-occupational exposure. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of dietary cadmium exposure in environmental cadmium exposure and its health risk among adults in Shanghai, China. Methods A cross-sectional survey about food consumption was conducted in 2008 among 207 citizens aged over 40 years in Shanghai, China. The food frequency questionnaire was combined with food, tobacco and water cadmium exposure to estimate the daily environmental cadmium exposure in both point and probabilistic estimations. Urine and blood samples of the participants were analyzed for internal exposure to total cadmium. Correlation analysis was conducted between the internal cadmium exposure and environmental cadmium exposure. Results According to the point estimation, average daily environmental cadmium exposure of the participants was 16.7 μg/day and approached 33.8% of the provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI). Dietary and tobacco cadmium exposure approached 25.8% and 7.9% of the PTDI, respectively. Males had higher levels of dietary cadmium exposure than females (p?=?0.002). The probabilistic model showed that 93.4% of the population did not have any health risks from dietary cadmium exposure. By sensitivity analysis, tobacco consumption, tobacco cadmium level, cadmium in vegetables and cadmium in rice accounted for 27.5%, 24.9%, 20.2% and 14.6% of the total cadmium exposure, respectively. The mean values of urinary and blood cadmium among the study population were 0.5 μg/L and 1.9 μg/L, respectively. Positive correlations were observed between environmental cadmium exposure and blood cadmium (R?=?0.52, P<0.01), tobacco cadmium intake and blood cadmium excluding non-smokers (R?=?0.26, P?=?0.049<0.05), and urine cadmium and age (R?=?0.15, P?=?0.037). Conclusions It has been suggested that there is no

  10. Dietary exposure to aluminium and health risk assessment in the residents of Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Jiang, Lixin; Huang, Huiping; Zeng, Shengbo; Qiu, Fen; Yu, Miao; Li, Xiaorong; Wei, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Although there are great changes of dietary in the past few decades in China, few are known about the aluminium exposure in Chinese diet. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the dietary aluminium intake level in residents of Shenzhen, China. A total of 853 persons from 244 household were investigated their diet by three days food records. Finally, 149 kinds of foods in 17 food groups were selected to be the most consumed foods. From them, 1399 food samples were collected from market to test aluminium concentration. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (median, 527.5 mg/kg), fried twisted cruller (median, 466.0 mg/kg), shell (median, 107.1 mg/kg). The Shenzhen residents' average dietary aluminium exposure was estimated at 1.263 mg/kg bw/week which is lower than the PTWI (provisional tolerable weekly intake). But 0-2 and 3-13 age groups have the highest aluminium intake exceeding the PTWI (3.356 mg/kg bw/week and 3.248 mg/kg bw/week) than other age groups. And the main dietary aluminium exposure sources are fried twisted cruller, leaf vegetables and bean products. Our study suggested that even three decades rapid economy development, children in Shenzhen still have high dietary aluminium exposure risk. How to control high dietary aluminium exposure still is a great public health challenge in Shenzhen, China.

  11. Dietary Exposure to Aluminium and Health Risk Assessment in the Residents of Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Jiang, Lixin; Huang, Huiping; Zeng, Shengbo; Qiu, Fen; Yu, Miao; Li, Xiaorong; Wei, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Although there are great changes of dietary in the past few decades in China, few are known about the aluminium exposure in Chinese diet. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the dietary aluminium intake level in residents of Shenzhen, China. A total of 853 persons from 244 household were investigated their diet by three days food records. Finally, 149 kinds of foods in 17 food groups were selected to be the most consumed foods. From them, 1399 food samples were collected from market to test aluminium concentration. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (median, 527.5 mg/kg), fried twisted cruller (median, 466.0 mg/kg), shell (median, 107.1 mg/kg). The Shenzhen residents' average dietary aluminium exposure was estimated at 1.263 mg/kg bw/week which is lower than the PTWI (provisional tolerable weekly intake). But 0–2 and 3–13 age groups have the highest aluminium intake exceeding the PTWI (3.356 mg/kg bw/week and 3.248 mg/kg bw/week) than other age groups. And the main dietary aluminium exposure sources are fried twisted cruller, leaf vegetables and bean products. Our study suggested that even three decades rapid economy development, children in Shenzhen still have high dietary aluminium exposure risk. How to control high dietary aluminium exposure still is a great public health challenge in Shenzhen, China. PMID:24594670

  12. FACTORS INFLUENCING TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURE OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was developed to identify critical input parameters to assess dietary intake of young children. The model was used as a framework for understanding important factors in data collection and analysis. Factors incorporated included transfer efficiencies of pest...

  13. FACTORS INFLUENCING TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURE OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was developed to identify critical input parameters to assess dietary intake of young children. The model was used as a framework for understanding important factors in data collection and analysis. Factors incorporated included transfer efficiencies of pest...

  14. Dietary restriction protects against chronic-ethanol-induced changes in exploratory behavior in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lucas S N M; Gualberto, Felipe A S; Pereira, Silvia R C; Barros, Paula A; Franco, Glaura C; Ribeiro, Angela M

    2006-03-17

    Chronic ethanol intake causes various types of neural damage and behavioral impairments, probably acting through oxidative stress and excitotoxicity, while dietary restriction is considered by some authors to protect the central nervous system from these kinds of damage. In the present study, a factorial experimental design was used to investigate the effects of chronic ethanol and dietary restriction treatments, associated or not, on Wistar rats' exploratory behavior, spatial memory aspects and cortical and hippocampal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Dietary restriction lasted for the whole experiment, while ethanol treatment lasted for only 3 weeks. Despite the short ethanol treatment duration, for two behavior categories assessed, moving and rearing, an interaction was observed between the effects of chronic ethanol and dietary restriction. There were no significant differences in AChE activities among the groups. Cerebellar neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOs) activity was measured as a first step to assess oxidative stress. Dietary restriction significantly reduced NO formation. The present results indicate that dietary restriction might exert a protective effect against chronic-ethanol-induced changes in exploratory behavior. It is hypothesized that the mechanisms underlying this protection can involve prevention of oxidative stress.

  15. Chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates acute renal ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Grifoni, Samira; Clark, Jeb S.; Csongradi, Eva; Maric, Christine; Juncos, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent epidemiological reports showed that smoking has a negative impact on renal function and elevates the renal risk not only in the renal patient but perhaps also in the healthy population. Studies suggested that nicotine, a major tobacco alkaloid, links smoking to renal dysfunction. While several studies showed that smoking/chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates the progression of chronic renal diseases, its impact on acute kidney injury is virtually unknown. Here, we studied the effects of chronic nicotine exposure on acute renal ischemic injury. We found that chronic nicotine exposure increased the extent of renal injury induced by warm ischemia-reperfusion as evidenced by morphological changes, increase in plasma creatinine level, and kidney injury molecule-1 expression. We also found that chronic nicotine exposure elevated markers of oxidative stress such as nitrotyrosine as well as malondialdehyde. Interestingly, chronic nicotine exposure alone increased oxidative stress and injury in the kidney without morphological alterations. Chronic nicotine treatment not only increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and injury but also exacerbated oxidative stress-induced ROS generation through NADPH oxidase and mitochondria in cultured renal proximal tubule cells. The resultant oxidative stress provoked injury through JNK-mediated activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 transcription factor in vitro. This mechanism might exist in vivo as phosphorylation of JNK and its downstream target c-jun, a component of the AP-1 transcription factor, is elevated in the ischemic kidneys exposed to chronic nicotine. Our results imply that smoking may sensitize the kidney to ischemic insults and perhaps facilitates progression of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney injury. PMID:21511693

  16. Chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates acute renal ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Arany, Istvan; Grifoni, Samira; Clark, Jeb S; Csongradi, Eva; Maric, Christine; Juncos, Luis A

    2011-07-01

    Recent epidemiological reports showed that smoking has a negative impact on renal function and elevates the renal risk not only in the renal patient but perhaps also in the healthy population. Studies suggested that nicotine, a major tobacco alkaloid, links smoking to renal dysfunction. While several studies showed that smoking/chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates the progression of chronic renal diseases, its impact on acute kidney injury is virtually unknown. Here, we studied the effects of chronic nicotine exposure on acute renal ischemic injury. We found that chronic nicotine exposure increased the extent of renal injury induced by warm ischemia-reperfusion as evidenced by morphological changes, increase in plasma creatinine level, and kidney injury molecule-1 expression. We also found that chronic nicotine exposure elevated markers of oxidative stress such as nitrotyrosine as well as malondialdehyde. Interestingly, chronic nicotine exposure alone increased oxidative stress and injury in the kidney without morphological alterations. Chronic nicotine treatment not only increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and injury but also exacerbated oxidative stress-induced ROS generation through NADPH oxidase and mitochondria in cultured renal proximal tubule cells. The resultant oxidative stress provoked injury through JNK-mediated activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 transcription factor in vitro. This mechanism might exist in vivo as phosphorylation of JNK and its downstream target c-jun, a component of the AP-1 transcription factor, is elevated in the ischemic kidneys exposed to chronic nicotine. Our results imply that smoking may sensitize the kidney to ischemic insults and perhaps facilitates progression of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney injury.

  17. TELOMERASE AND CHRONIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with increased risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer in humans. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not well understood. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein containing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of eukary...

  18. TELOMERASE AND CHRONIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with increased risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer in humans. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not well understood. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein containing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of eukary...

  19. Renal responses to chronic cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie; Zhang, Zhonge; Cade, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess our hypothesis that the release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH), the renal concentrating response to ADH, or both is decreased by prolonged cold exposure. Six groups (n = 6/group) of rats were used. Three groups were exposed to cold (5 degrees C), whilethe remaining three groups were kept at room temperature (25 degrees C). It was found that urine osmolality decreased significantly and serum osmolality increased significantly during cold exposure. The ratio of water/food intake was not affected by prolonged cold exposure. However, prolonged cold exposure increased the ratio of urine output/food intake in the cold-exposed rats, indicating that more urine flow is required by the cold-exposed rats to excrete the osmotic substance at a given food intake. The difference between water intake and urine output decreased significantly in the cold-exposed rats. Thus, prolonged cold exposure increases water loss from excretion. Renal concentrating responses to 24-h dehydration and Pitressin were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed rats. Plasma ADH levels remained unchanged, but renal ADH receptor (V2 receptor) mRNA was decreased significantly in the cold-exposed rats. The results strongly support the conclusion that cold exposure increases excretive water loss, and this may be due to suppression of renal V2 receptors rather than inhibition of ADH release.

  20. Dietary exposure to aluminium of urban residents from cities in South China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi; Wang, Jing; Li, Min; Liang, Xuxia; Dai, Guangwei; Hu, Zhikun; Wen, Jian; Huang, Qiong; Zhang, Yonghui

    2013-01-01

    A dietary survey was conducted over three consecutive days by using 24-hour dietary recall in the Pearl River Delta of South China to investigate the dietary consumption status. A total of 1702 food samples, 22 food groups, were collected, and aluminium concentrations of foods were determined by using ICP-MS. Weekly dietary exposure to aluminium of the average urban residents of South China was estimated to be 1.5 mg kg⁻¹ body weight, which amounted to 76% of the provisional tolerable weekly intake. Wheat-made products (53.5%) contributed most to the dietary exposure, followed by vegetables (12.2%). The high-level consumers' weekly exposure to aluminium was 11.1 mg kg⁻¹ body weight, which amounted to 407% of the provisional tolerable weekly intake. The results indicated that the general urban residents in South China might be safe from aluminium exposure, but the high-level consumers might be at some risk of aluminium exposure. The foods contributing to aluminium exposure were processed food with aluminium-containing food additives. It is necessary to take effective measures to control the overuse of aluminium-containing food additives.

  1. Regulation of adenosine transport by acute and chronic ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, L.E.; Casso, D.; Diamond, I.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1989-02-09

    Chronic exposure to ethanol results in a desensitization of adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP production. Since adenosine is released by cells and is known to desensitize its own as well as other receptors, it may be involved in ethanol-induced desensitization of adenosine receptor function. Therefore, we have examine the acute and chronic effects of ethanol on the transport of adenosine via the nucleoside transport. Acute exposure to ethanol caused an inhibition of adenosine uptake in S49 lymphoma cells. This decrease in uptake resulted in accumulation of extracellular adenosine after ethanol exposure. The effect of ethanol was specific to nucleoside transport. Uptake of uridine, also transported by the nucleoside transporter, was inhibited by ethanol to the same degree as adenosine uptake, while neither isoleucine nor deoxyglucose uptake was altered by ethanol treatment. Inhibition of adenosine uptake by ethanol was non-competitive and dependent on the concentration of ethanol. After chronic exposure to ethanol, cells became tolerant to the acute effects of ethanol. There was no longer an acute inhibition of adenosine uptake, nor was these accumulation of extracellular adenosine. Chronic ethanol exposure also resulted in a decrease in the absolute rate of adenosine uptake. Binding studies using a high affinity lignad for the nucleoside transporter, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), indicate that this decreased uptake was due to a decrease in the maximal number of binding sites. These ethanol-induced changes in adenosine transport may be important for the acute and chronic effects of ethanol.

  2. The role of dietary phosphorus restriction in the conservative management of chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barsotti, Giuliano; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2005-01-01

    Evidence exists that phosphate retention plays a major role in causing secondary hyperparathyroidism, cardiovascular morbidity, and loss of residual renal function in chronic renal disease patients, and that a subtle elevation in serum phosphate occurs at early stages in the course of renal insufficiency. The implementation of a low-phosphorus, low-protein dietary regimen plays a special role in the conservative management of chronic renal disease patients, for the prevention and correction of secondary hyperparathyroidism and for the renal and cardiovascular protection. However, the success and safety of dietary phosphate restriction largely depends on good compliance with dietary recommendations, which must represent a major goal to be regularly pursued in the clinical practice. To this aim, it is crucial that dietitians expert in renal nutrition give education and personalized dietary advice, with the aim of enhancing the patient's adherence to nutritional prescriptions.

  3. Exposure-response relationships between occupational exposures and chronic respiratory illness: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Christiani, D C; Dockery, D W; Wang, L

    1992-08-01

    Data from a random sample of 3,606 adults 40 to 69 yr of age residing in Beijing, China, were analyzed to investigate the association of reported occupational exposures to dusts and gases/fumes with the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and level of pulmonary function. The prevalence of occupational dust exposure was 32%, and gas or fume exposure, 19%. After we adjusted for age, sex, area of residence, smoking status, coal stove heating, and education, an increased prevalence of chronic phlegm and breathlessness was significantly related to both types of exposures. Chronic cough was significantly related only to dust exposure, and persistent wheeze only to fume exposure. The global estimates of the relative odds of the four symptoms were 1.30 (95% CI [confidence interval] 1.09 to 1.48) and 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), respectively, for dusts and for gases/fumes. These two occupational exposures are associated with chronic respiratory symptoms independent of smoking, gender, and each other. There was an increasing prevalence of each symptom with increasing dust and fume exposure, represented by the index of cumulative exposure duration and exposure intensity. Linear trends for increased prevalence of chronic bronchitis and breathlessness were significant for both exposures, while the linear trend for wheeze was only significant for gases/fumes. Among subjects who did not report using coal stove heating, dust exposure was a significant predictor for FEV1, FEV1/FVC, FEF25-75, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). There was also a significant decrease for FEV1 and FVC with increase of gas/fume exposure levels. Both current and former smokers appeared to be more susceptible to the effect of dusts than the never smokers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Challenges with using chronic disease endpoints in setting dietary reference intakes.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Paula R

    2008-08-01

    Since 1941, the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) in the United States have been based on the goal of maintaining health in the country's population. There has been a growing body of evidence to support the role of diet in reducing the risk of chronic diseases. For this reason, there has been recent emphasis on considering data on chronic disease endpoints for setting dietary reference intakes (DRIs). Despite this emphasis, none of the RDAs set during the DRI review were based on chronic disease risk. However, chronic disease risk was considered for determining adequate intakes and even some acceptable macronutrient distribution ranges. This article discusses the application of and challenges associated with using chronic disease endpoints in setting DRIs.

  5. Dietary phosphorus restriction in predialysis chronic kidney disease: time for a cease-fire?

    PubMed

    Evenepoel, Pieter; Vervloet, Marc G

    2016-01-01

    The increased awareness that disorders of phosphorus metabolism occur early in the course of chronic kidney disease fuels interest in early intervention strategies. A post hoc analysis of data from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study questions the clinical relevance of early dietary phosphate restriction, so far considered a mainstay in the prevention and treatment of mineral metabolism disorders. Still, on the basis of available evidence, a cease-fire in the war on dietary phosphate would be premature.

  6. Psychologic sequelae of chronic toxic waste exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Foulks, E.; McLellen, T. )

    1992-02-01

    Exposure to toxic industrial substances has been a topic of increasing concern to environmentalists, government agencies, industrial engineers, and medical specialists. Our study focuses on the psychologic symptom responses of a community to perceived long-term exposure to toxic waste products. We compared their symptom clusters, as shown by their responses to questions on the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-90 Item (SCL-90) and the Social Adjustment Scale (SAS), with symptom levels of normal and depressed subjects. Issues of media coverage, litigation, and potential for compensation complicate the psychiatric epidemiology of the subject.

  7. Re-exposure of mallards to selenium after chronic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, G.H. . Patuxent Wildlife Research Center)

    1993-09-01

    Adult male mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed a control diet or a diet containing 15 ppm selenium as seleno-D,L-methionine for 21 weeks. After this initial exposure, the mallards were fed untreated food for 12 weeks, then were re-exposed to selenium at 100 ppm for five weeks. During re-exposure to 100 ppm selenium, the birds that had previously been exposed to 15 ppm selenium and those that had not previously been exposed did not differ in percentage of mortality, weight loss in survivors, selenium concentrations in the livers of survivors, or selenium concentrations in the livers of birds that died. When the data from the birds that had previously been exposed to 15 ppm selenium were combined in the livers of birds that had died on the 100-ppm selenium treatment did not differ from the concentrations in the livers of birds that had survived.

  8. Risk assessment of dietary exposure to aluminium in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Zhao-Ping; Yang, Da-Jin; Liang, Jiang; Zhu, Jiang-Hui; Xu, Hai-Bin; Li, Feng-Qin; Li, Ning

    2016-10-01

    In order to address the issue of excessive intake of aluminium (Al) from Al-containing food additives in the Chinese diet, this study conducted a dietary exposure assessment of Al in the general population based on the national surveillance data of Al content in foods and national food consumption data. It was found that the mean dietary exposure of the whole Chinese population to Al from Al-containing food additives was 1.795 mg kg(‒1) bw week(‒1), not exceeding the PTWI, while high dietary exposures (e.g., 97.5(th) percentile) to Al were 7.660 and 2.103-2.903 mg kg(‒1) bw week(‒1) for children, respectively, both exceeding the PTWI. It was found that the dietary exposure to Al for 32.5% of the total Chinese population and 42.6% of children aged 4-6 years exceeded the PTWI. Wheat flour and wheat-based products are the main source of dietary A l exposure (85% of the total intake); and puffed foods are the major source of Al intake for children. These findings suggested that consumption of Al-containing food additives could be a health concern for consumers with high food consumption (97.5(th) percentile) and children under the age of 14 years.

  9. Dietary exposure to acrylamide from potato crisps to the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Arribas-Lorenzo, G; Morales, F J

    2009-03-01

    Potato crisps are one of the food commodities that contribute most to overall dietary human exposure of acrylamide. This investigation has estimated the dietary exposure to acrylamide form potato crisps in the Spanish population. Sampling of potato crisps (n = 36) from 16 different producers were carried out in March 2008. An average level of 740 microg kg(-1) (ranging from 81 to 2622 microg kg(-1); minimum to maximum) and a median of 592 microg kg(-1) were obtained. Acrylamide levels in marketed potato crisps have been significantly reduced (nearly to 50%) compared with a previous sampling performed 4 years earlier. The observed signal value (90th percentile) was 1377 microg kg(-1) with 86% of the samples with acrylamide levels lower than 1000 microg kg(-1). Dietary exposure to acrylamide from potato crisp consumption in the total Spanish population was estimated to be 0.042 microg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) by using a deterministic approach based on the National consumption database. In a second study, dietary exposure (based on a 3-day food record) was determined to be 0.053 microg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for the adult population (17-60 years) and 0.142 microg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for children (7-12 years). The contribution of potato crisps to the estimated dietary acrylamide exposure of the Spanish population is moderate as compared with other European Member States.

  10. FACTORS INFLUENCING TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was developed to identify the critical input parameters needed to assess dietary intakes of young children. The model was used as a framework for understanding the important factors in data collection and data analysis. Factors incorporated into the model i...

  11. FACTORS INFLUENCING TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was developed to identify the critical input parameters needed to assess dietary intakes of young children. The model was used as a framework for understanding the important factors in data collection and data analysis. Factors incorporated into the model i...

  12. Chronic Ambient Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure and Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Crane, Julian; Garrett, Nick; Woods, David L.; Bates, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposures to hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) have been inconclusively linked to a variety of negative cognitive outcomes. We investigated possible effects on cognitive function in an urban population with chronic, low-level exposure to H2S. Methods Participants were 1,637 adults, aged 18-65 years from Rotorua city, New Zealand, exposed to ambient H2S from geothermal sources. Exposures at homes and workplaces were estimated from data collected by summer and winter H2S monitoring networks across Rotorua in 2010/11. Metrics for H2S exposure at the time of participation and for exposure over the last 30 years were calculated. H2S exposure was modeled both as continuous variables and as quartiles of exposure covering the range of 0 – 64 ppb (0-88 μg/m3). Outcomes were neuropsychological tests measuring visual and verbal episodic memory, attention, fine motor skills, psychomotor speed and mood. Associations between cognition and measures of H2S exposure were investigated with multiple regression, while covarying demographics and factors known to be associated with cognitive performance. Results The consistent finding was of no association between H2S exposure and cognition. Quartiles of H2S exposure had a small association with simple reaction time: higher exposures were associated with faster response times. Similarly, for digit symbol, higher H2S exposures tended to be marginally associated with better performance. Conclusion The results provide evidence that chronic H2S exposure, at the ambient levels found in and around Rotorua, is not associated with impairment of cognitive function. PMID:24548790

  13. Chronic ambient hydrogen sulfide exposure and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Reed, Bruce R; Crane, Julian; Garrett, Nick; Woods, David L; Bates, Michael N

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) have been inconclusively linked to a variety of negative cognitive outcomes. We investigated possible effects on cognitive function in an urban population with chronic, low-level exposure to H2S. Participants were 1637 adults, aged 18-65 years from Rotorua city, New Zealand, exposed to ambient H2S from geothermal sources. Exposures at homes and workplaces were estimated from data collected by summer and winter H2S monitoring networks across Rotorua in 2010/11. Metrics for H2S exposure at the time of participation and for exposure over the last 30 years were calculated. H2S exposure was modeled both as continuous variables and as quartiles of exposure covering the range of 0-64 ppb (0-88 μg/m(3)). Outcomes were neuropsychological tests measuring visual and verbal episodic memory, attention, fine motor skills, psychomotor speed and mood. Associations between cognition and measures of H2S exposure were investigated with multiple regression, while covarying demographics and factors known to be associated with cognitive performance. The consistent finding was of no association between H2S exposure and cognition. Quartiles of H2S exposure had a small association with simple reaction time: higher exposures were associated with faster response times. Similarly, for digit symbol, higher H2S exposures tended to be marginally associated with better performance. The results provide evidence that chronic H2S exposure, at the ambient levels found in and around Rotorua, is not associated with impairment of cognitive function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dietary exposure to selected perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in four European regions.

    PubMed

    Klenow, Stefanie; Heinemeyer, Gerhard; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Dellatte, Elena; Herzke, Dorte; de Voogt, Pim

    2013-01-01

    The dietary exposure to selected PFAAs was estimated in four selected European states (Belgium, the Czech Republic, Italy and Norway) representing Western, Southern, Eastern and Northern Europe. The harmonised sampling programme designed in the European Union project PERFOOD was targeted at identifying seven selected PFAAs, including perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in food items that are most important both in terms of consumption and based on known high contamination patterns. The estimated average dietary exposure for adults (18-64 years) and children (3-9 years) is generally below or close to 1 ng kg⁻¹ BW day⁻¹ for all seven PFAAs. Considering the high consumption of food groups that contribute most to the exposure does not result in estimates exceeding 4 ng kg⁻¹ BW day⁻¹. Thus, based on the TDIs proposed by EFSA for PFOS (150 ng kg⁻¹ BW day⁻¹) and PFOA (1500 ng kg⁻¹ BW day⁻¹), no concern can be identified. There are distinct dietary exposure patterns from region to region as a result of different food consumption and contamination patterns. Foods of plant origin (e.g. fruit and vegetables) are most important for the dietary exposure to PFHxA, PFOA and PFHxS, while the consumption of foods of animal origin (particularly fish and seafood) mostly contributes to the dietary exposure to PFDA and PFUnDA. For the dietary exposure to PFNA and PFOS, food of animal and plant origin contributes with equal importance. In conclusion, region-to-region differences as well as the relative importance of food of different origin for each PFAA should be paid more attention in further research.

  15. Neurotoxicity From Chronic Exposure to Depleted Uranium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    these response magnitudes. This suggests that UO2 +2 does not possess Ca+2-mimetic properties, but it could also be explained if the...intrasynaptosomal UO2 +2 concentrations did not achieve sufficient levels during the acute exposure to manifest such an effect. The uranium species involved in the...effect on glutamate exocytosis is not known. Uranyl ion ( UO2 +2) – the most common form produced in the body from all forms of the metal – is

  16. Re-exposure of mallards to selenium after chronic exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Adult male mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed a control diet or a diet containing 15 ppm selenium as seleno-D,L-methionine for 21 weeks. After this initial exposure, the mallards were fed untreated food for 12 weeks, then were re-exposed to selenium at 100 ppm for five weeks. During re-exposure to 100 ppm selenium, the birds that had previously been exposed to 15 ppm selenium and those that had not previously been exposed did not differ in percentage of mortality (14.7 and 14.3%), weight loss in survivors (39.3 and 41.20%), selenium concentrations in the livers of survivors (35 and 53 ppm, wet weight), or selenium concentrations in the livers of birds that died (35 and 40 ppm, respectively). When the data from the birds that had previously been exposed to 15 ppm selenium were combined with the data from the birds that had not previously been exposed, selenium concentrations in the livers of birds that had died on the 100-ppm selenium treatment (38 ppm) did not differ from the concentrations in the livers of birds that had survived (43 ppm).

  17. Chronic dietary toxicity and carcinogenicity study with potassium perfluorooctanesulfonate in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Butenhoff, John L; Chang, Shu-Ching; Olsen, Geary W; Thomford, Peter J

    2012-03-11

    To investigate toxicity and neoplastic potential from chronic exposure to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), a two-year toxicity and cancer bioassay was conducted with potassium PFOS (K⁺ PFOS) in male and female Sprague Dawley rats via dietary exposure at nominal K⁺ PFOS concentrations of 0, 0.5, 2, 5, and 20 μg/g (ppm) diet for up to 104 weeks. Additional groups were fed 20 ppm for the first 52 weeks, after which they were fed control diet through study termination (20 ppm Recovery groups). Scheduled interim sacrifices occurred on Weeks 4, 14, and 53, with terminal sacrifice between Weeks 103 and 106. K⁺ PFOS appeared to be well-tolerated, with some reductions in body weight occurring in treated rats relative to controls over certain study periods. Male rats experienced a statistically significant decreased trend in mortality with significantly increased survival to term at the two highest treatment levels. Decreased serum total cholesterol, especially in males, and increased serum urea nitrogen were consistent clinical chemistry observations that were clearly related to treatment. The principal non-neoplastic effect associated with K⁺ PFOS exposure was in livers of males and females and included hepatocellular hypertrophy, with proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum, vacuolation, and increased eosinophilic granulation of the cytoplasm. Statistically significant increases in hepatocellular adenoma were observed in males (p=0.046) and females (p=0.039) of the 20 ppm treatment group, and all of these tumors were observed in rats surviving to terminal sacrifice. The only hepatocellular carcinoma observed was in a 20 ppm dose group female. There were no treatment-related findings for thyroid tissue in rats fed K⁺ PFOS through study termination; however, male rats in the 20 ppm Recovery group had statistically significantly increased thyroid follicular cell adenoma, which was considered spurious. There was no evidence of kidney or bladder effects. In rats, the

  18. Levels of preservatives (sulfite, sorbate and benzoate) in New Zealand foods and estimated dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Cressey, P; Jones, S

    2009-05-01

    Thirty foods assessed as being the likely major contributors to dietary preservative exposure were purchased, prepared as normally consumed and analyzed for sulfite, sorbate and benzoate. The majority of preservative concentrations (>98%) were within maximum permitted levels (MPLs) specified in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. Mean population level estimates of dietary exposure were well below the respective acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) for all age-gender groups for all preservatives at 7-27%, 1-4% and 1-8% of the ADI for sulfites, sorbates and benzoates, respectively. All population level 95th percentile estimates of dietary exposure were below the ADI, with the exception of estimates for sulfite exposure for 5-12-year-old boys. The results of the current survey indicate that dietary exposure to the preservatives, sulfite, sorbate and benzoate, represent a low level of public health risk. However, it should be noted that the exposure estimates determined in the current survey will be influenced by the assumptions made.

  19. Assessing and reporting uncertainties in dietary exposure analysis: Mapping of uncertainties in a tiered approach.

    PubMed

    Kettler, Susanne; Kennedy, Marc; McNamara, Cronan; Oberdörfer, Regina; O'Mahony, Cian; Schnabel, Jürgen; Smith, Benjamin; Sprong, Corinne; Faludi, Roland; Tennant, David

    2015-08-01

    Uncertainty analysis is an important component of dietary exposure assessments in order to understand correctly the strength and limits of its results. Often, standard screening procedures are applied in a first step which results in conservative estimates. If through those screening procedures a potential exceedance of health-based guidance values is indicated, within the tiered approach more refined models are applied. However, the sources and types of uncertainties in deterministic and probabilistic models can vary or differ. A key objective of this work has been the mapping of different sources and types of uncertainties to better understand how to best use uncertainty analysis to generate more realistic comprehension of dietary exposure. In dietary exposure assessments, uncertainties can be introduced by knowledge gaps about the exposure scenario, parameter and the model itself. With this mapping, general and model-independent uncertainties have been identified and described, as well as those which can be introduced and influenced by the specific model during the tiered approach. This analysis identifies that there are general uncertainties common to point estimates (screening or deterministic methods) and probabilistic exposure assessment methods. To provide further clarity, general sources of uncertainty affecting many dietary exposure assessments should be separated from model-specific uncertainties.

  20. [Dietary exposure assessment of aflatoxin of foodstuff and edible oil from Shenzhen residents].

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Qiu, Fen; Jiang, Lixin; Yang, Mei

    2014-07-01

    To assess the dietary exposure aflatoxin B1 and total aflatoxins of foodstuff and edible oil in Shenzhen residents. Aflatoxins in the samples were determined by the immuno-affinity column clean-up plus UPLC. The aflatoxin B1 and aflatoxins dietary exposure were calculated by the level of aflatoxins contamination in the food and consumption of dietary. The average diary aflatoxin B1 dietary exposure of the man of the 2 to 6, 7 to 14, 15 to 50 and > 50 age group in Shenzhen were 0.320, 0.385, 0.401 and 0.398 ng/(kg BW x d), the results of the woman were 0.282, 0.222, 0.367 and 0.470 ng/(kg BW x d) respectively. The total average daily dietary aflatoxin B1 exposure of the man were 0.012, 0.015, 0.016 and 0.016 ng/(kg BW x d) about each age group. The results of the woman were 78.4, 167, 113 and 103 ng/(kg BW d). According to the the average levels of consumption and the high levels of consumption, the risk of AFB, of the man were 0.012,0.015, 0.016, 0. 016 and 3.0, 8.2, 4.1, 4.4 cancer patient per one hundred thousand, respectively. The results of the woman were 0.010, 0.009, 0.014, 0.018 and 2.9, 6.7, 4.4, 4.0 cancer patient per one hundred thousand, respectively. 7 to 14 age group compared with adults age group face higher exposure levels. The rice and peanut oil are most primary aflatoxin dietary exposure sources in Shenzhen.

  1. Dietary zinc mediates inflammation and protects against wasting and metabolic derangement caused by sustained cigarette smoke exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Lang, Carol J; Hansen, Michelle; Roscioli, Eugene; Jones, Jessica; Murgia, Chiara; Leigh Ackland, Margaret; Zalewski, Peter; Anderson, Gary; Ruffin, Richard

    2011-02-01

    In mouse asthma models, inflammation can be modulated by zinc (Zn). Given that appetite loss, muscle wasting and poor nutrition are features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and that poor dietary Zn intake is in itself accompanied by growth retardation and appetite loss, we hypothesised that dietary Zn limitation would not only worsen airway inflammation but also exaggerate metabolic effects of cigarette smoke (CS) exposure in mice. Conversely, Zn supplementation would lessen inflammation. Mice were exposed to CS [2× 2RF, 3×/day; 15 min/cigarette] and fed diets containing 2, 20 or 140 mg/kg Zn ad libitum. Airway cells were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Plasma Zn was measured by fluorometric assay. Inflammatory, metabolic and Zn transport markers were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Mice fed low Zn diets had less plasma labile zinc (0-0.18 μM) than mice fed moderate (0.61-0.98 μM) or high (0.77-1.1 μM) Zn diets (SDs 0.1-0.4, n = 8-10). Smoke exposure increased plasma and BAL labile Zn (1.5-2.5 fold, P < 0.001), bronchoalveolar macrophages (2.0 fold, P < 0.0001) and MT-1 (1.5 fold), MIP-2 (2.3 fold) and MMP-12 (3.5 fold) mRNA. Zn supplementation reduced alveolar macrophage numbers by 62 and 52% in sham and smoke-exposed mice, respectively (Zn effect: P = 0.011). Gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior muscle mass were affected by both smoke and dietary Zn in the order of 3-7%. The 50-60% reduction in alveolar macrophages in Zn-supplemented mice supports our evolving hypothesis that Zn is an important anti-inflammatory mediator of airway inflammation. Restoring airway Zn levels through dietary supplementation may lessen the severity of lung inflammation when Zn intake is low.

  2. CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS. ME Gilbert1, ME Kelly2, S. Salant3, T Shafer1, J Goodman3 1Neurotoxicology Div, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, 2Children's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, 3Helen Hayes Hospital, Haverstraw, NY, 10993.
    ...

  3. Exposure to Chronic Community Violence: Resilience in African American Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Janine M.

    2007-01-01

    In many African American communities, violence and poverty are often part of daily living. As a result, children are at risk for difficulties in all aspect of their lives, particularly their emotional well-being. This study explored the relationship between exposure to chronic community violence and the development of complex post-traumatic stress…

  4. CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS. ME Gilbert1, ME Kelly2, S. Salant3, T Shafer1, J Goodman3 1Neurotoxicology Div, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, 2Children's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, 3Helen Hayes Hospital, Haverstraw, NY, 10993.
    ...

  5. Chronic dysphagia and trigeminal anesthesia after trichloroethylene exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.H.; Partyka, E.K.

    1981-12-01

    A patient is described who inhaled trichloroethylene fumes while working in a closed underground pit. At the time of exposure he developed dysphagia, dysarthria and dyspnea. Assessment of his condition 11 years after the incident indicated major damage of cranial nerves, particularly the trigeminal, chronic involvement of the bulbar cranial nerves, and resultant esophageal and pharnygeal motility impairment. (JMT)

  6. Low-level arsenic exposure: nutritional and dietary predictors in first-grade Uruguayan children

    PubMed Central

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Queirolo, Elena I; Mañay, Nelly; Peregalli, Fabiana; Hsiao, Pao Ying; Lu, Ying; Vahter, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure in children is a public health concern but is understudied in relation to the predictors, and effects of low-level exposure. We examined the extent and dietary predictors of exposure to inorganic arsenic in 5–8 year old children from Montevideo, Uruguay. Children were recruited at school; 357 were enrolled, 328 collected morning urine samples, and 317 had two 24-hour dietary recalls. Urinary arsenic metabolites, i.e. inorganic arsenic (iAs), methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-MS), and the sum concentration (U-As) used for exposure assessment. Proportions of arsenic metabolites (%iAs, %MMA and %DMA) in urine were modelled in OLS regressions as functions of food groups, dietary patterns, nutrient intake, and nutritional status. Exposure to arsenic was low (median U-As: 9.9 µg/L) and household water (water As: median 0.45 µg/L) was not a major contributor to exposure. Children with higher consumption of rice had higher U-As but lower %iAs, %MMA, and higher %DMA. Children with higher meat consumption had lower %iAs and higher %DMA. Higher scores on ”nutrient dense” dietary pattern were related to lower %iAs and %MMA, and higher %DMA. Higher intake of dietary folate was associated with lower %MMA and higher %DMA. Overweight children had lower %MMA and higher %DMA than normal-weight children. In summary, rice was an important predictor of exposure to inorganic arsenic and DMA. Higher meat and folate consumption, diet rich in green leafy and red-orange vegetables and eggs, and higher BMI contributed to higher arsenic methylation capacity. PMID:26828624

  7. Low-level arsenic exposure: Nutritional and dietary predictors in first-grade Uruguayan children.

    PubMed

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Queirolo, Elena I; Mañay, Nelly; Peregalli, Fabiana; Hsiao, Pao Ying; Lu, Ying; Vahter, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure in children is a public health concern but is understudied in relation to the predictors, and effects of low-level exposure. We examined the extent and dietary predictors of exposure to inorganic arsenic in 5-8 year old children from Montevideo, Uruguay. Children were recruited at school; 357 were enrolled, 328 collected morning urine samples, and 317 had two 24-h dietary recalls. Urinary arsenic metabolites, i.e. inorganic arsenic (iAs), methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-MS), and the sum concentration (U-As) used for exposure assessment. Proportions of arsenic metabolites (%iAs, %MMA and %DMA) in urine were modelled in OLS regressions as functions of food groups, dietary patterns, nutrient intake, and nutritional status. Exposure to arsenic was low (median U-As: 9.9µg/L) and household water (water As: median 0.45µg/L) was not a major contributor to exposure. Children with higher consumption of rice had higher U-As but lower %iAs, %MMA, and higher %DMA. Children with higher meat consumption had lower %iAs and higher %DMA. Higher scores on "nutrient dense" dietary pattern were related to lower %iAs and %MMA, and higher %DMA. Higher intake of dietary folate was associated with lower %MMA and higher %DMA. Overweight children had lower %MMA and higher %DMA than normal-weight children. In summary, rice was an important predictor of exposure to inorganic arsenic and DMA. Higher meat and folate consumption, diet rich in green leafy and red-orange vegetables and eggs, and higher BMI contributed to higher arsenic methylation capacity.

  8. Dietary protein metabolism by gut microbiota and its consequences for chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Denise; Barros, Amanda F; Fouque, Denis

    2013-10-01

    The breakdown of proteins and peptides by colonic microorganisms yields a great diversity of end products, including short-chain fatty acids, ammonia, amines, phenols, indoles, thiols, CO2, H2 and H2S, many of which have toxic properties. An increase of the dietary protein load in healthy individuals results in enhanced generation of these toxins, many of which are rapidly cleared by the kidneys. In this regard, the impact upon the colonic microbiota of controlled changes in the dietary protein has not been examined in chronic kidney disease patients. This review focuses on the impact of dietary proteins on the intestinal microbiota and its possible consequences for chronic kidney disease patients.

  9. Inhalation and Dietary Exposure to PCBs in Urban and Rural Cohorts via Congener-Specific Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of 209 persistent organic pollutants, whose documented carcinogenic, neurological, and respiratory toxicities are expansive and growing. However, PCB inhalation exposure assessments have been lacking for North American ambient conditions and lower-chlorinated congeners. We assessed congener-specific inhalation and dietary exposure for 78 adolescent children and their mothers (n = 68) in the Airborne Exposure to Semi-volatile Organic Pollutants (AESOP) Study. Congener-specific PCB inhalation exposure was modeled using 293 measurements of indoor and outdoor airborne PCB concentrations at homes and schools, analyzed via tandem quadrupole GS-MS/MS, combined with questionnaire data from the AESOP Study. Dietary exposure was modeled using Canadian Total Diet Survey PCB concentrations and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) food ingestion rates. For ∑PCB, dietary exposure dominates. For individual lower-chlorinated congeners (e.g., PCBs 40+41+71, 52), inhalation exposure was as high as one-third of the total (dietary+inhalation) exposure. ∑PCB inhalation (geometric mean (SE)) was greater for urban mothers (7.1 (1.2) μg yr–1) and children (12.0 (1.2) μg yr–1) than for rural mothers (2.4 (0.4) μg yr–1) and children (8.9 (0.3) μg yr–1). Schools attended by AESOP Study children had higher indoor PCB concentrations than did homes, and account for the majority of children’s inhalation exposure. PMID:25510359

  10. Dietary antioxidents and oxidative stress in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    L Gupta, Krishan; Sahni, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Context Dietary antioxidants are important in protecting against human diseases. Oxidative stress, a non- traditional risk factors of cardio-vascular disease is far more prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients than in normal subjects. Evidence Acquisitions Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Results Oxidative stress could be a consequence of an increase in reactive oxygen species as well as a decrease in antioxidant defenses. Among the important factors that can be involved in triggering oxidative stress is insufficient dietary intake of antioxidants. Malnourished CKD patients are reported to have more oxidative stress than well nourished ones. Conclusions Moving beyond the importance of assessment of dietary protein and energy in pre dialysis CKD patients to the assessment of dietary antioxidants is of utmost importance to help combat enhanced oxidative stress levels in such patients. PMID:24475404

  11. Dietary antioxidents and oxidative stress in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    L Gupta, Krishan; Sahni, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Dietary antioxidants are important in protecting against human diseases. Oxidative stress, a non- traditional risk factors of cardio-vascular disease is far more prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients than in normal subjects. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Oxidative stress could be a consequence of an increase in reactive oxygen species as well as a decrease in antioxidant defenses. Among the important factors that can be involved in triggering oxidative stress is insufficient dietary intake of antioxidants. Malnourished CKD patients are reported to have more oxidative stress than well nourished ones. Moving beyond the importance of assessment of dietary protein and energy in pre dialysis CKD patients to the assessment of dietary antioxidants is of utmost importance to help combat enhanced oxidative stress levels in such patients.

  12. Patterns of food avoidance in chronic fatigue syndrome: is there a case for dietary recommendations?

    PubMed

    Trabal, J; Leyes, P; Fernández-Solá, J; Forga, M; Fernández-Huerta, J

    2012-01-01

    To assess the dietary habits and food avoidance-behavior in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Cross-sectional pilot study with 28 patients diagnosed with severe CFS. Eating habits were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and 3-day food records. We analyzed variables related to dietary restrictions induced by symptoms or external information. The most prevalent restrictions were for dairy products and gluten-containing grains, with 22 and 15 restricting patients, respectively. Patients reported different digestive symptoms, which did not improve with the use of exclusion diets. Thirteen patients had received information against the intake of certain foods through different sources. Six cases of grains restriction and 11 of dairy were compatible with a counseling-induced pattern of exclusion. There is not a homogeneous pattern of food avoidance. Dietary restrictions should be based on a proven food allergy or intolerance. Dietary counseling should be based on sound nutritional knowledge.

  13. Arsenic exposure, dietary patterns, and skin lesion risk in bangladesh: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brandon L; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Melkonian, Stephanie; Parvez, Faruque; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Rathouz, Paul J; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-02-01

    Dietary factors are believed to modulate arsenic toxicity, potentially influencing risk of arsenical skin lesions. The authors evaluated associations among dietary patterns, arsenic exposure, and skin lesion risk using baseline food frequency questionnaire data collected in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh (2000-2009). They identified dietary patterns and estimated dietary pattern scores using factor analysis. Scores were tested for association with incident skin lesion risk and interaction with water arsenic exposure by using ∼6 years of follow-up data (814 events among 9,677 individuals) and discrete time hazards models (adjusting for key covariates). The authors identified 3 clear dietary patterns: the "gourd and root," "vegetable," and "animal protein" patterns. The gourd and root pattern score was inversely associated with skin lesion risk (P(trend) = 0.001), with hazard ratios of 0.86, 0.73, and 0.69 for the second, third, and fourth highest quartiles. Furthermore, the association between water arsenic and skin lesion incidence was stronger among participants with low gourd and root scores (multiplicative P(interaction) < 0.001; additive P(interaction) = 0.05). The vegetable pattern and animal protein pattern showed similar but weaker associations and interactions. Eating a diet rich in gourds and root vegetables and increasing dietary diversity may reduce arsenical skin lesion risk in Bangladesh.

  14. Arsenic Exposure, Dietary Patterns, and Skin Lesion Risk in Bangladesh: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brandon L.; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Melkonian, Stephanie; Parvez, Faruque; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Rathouz, Paul J.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-01-01

    Dietary factors are believed to modulate arsenic toxicity, potentially influencing risk of arsenical skin lesions. The authors evaluated associations among dietary patterns, arsenic exposure, and skin lesion risk using baseline food frequency questionnaire data collected in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh (2000–2009). They identified dietary patterns and estimated dietary pattern scores using factor analysis. Scores were tested for association with incident skin lesion risk and interaction with water arsenic exposure by using ∼6 years of follow-up data (814 events among 9,677 individuals) and discrete time hazards models (adjusting for key covariates). The authors identified 3 clear dietary patterns: the “gourd and root,” “vegetable,” and “animal protein” patterns. The gourd and root pattern score was inversely associated with skin lesion risk (Ptrend = 0.001), with hazard ratios of 0.86, 0.73, and 0.69 for the second, third, and fourth highest quartiles. Furthermore, the association between water arsenic and skin lesion incidence was stronger among participants with low gourd and root scores (multiplicative Pinteraction < 0.001; additive Pinteraction = 0.05). The vegetable pattern and animal protein pattern showed similar but weaker associations and interactions. Eating a diet rich in gourds and root vegetables and increasing dietary diversity may reduce arsenical skin lesion risk in Bangladesh. PMID:21178101

  15. Accumulation and toxicity of CuO and ZnO nanoparticles through waterborne and dietary exposure of goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Ates, Mehmet; Arslan, Zikri; Demir, Veysel; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and waterborne exposure to copper oxide (CuO) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) was conducted using a simplified model of an aquatic food chain consisting of zooplankton (Artemia salina) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) to determine bioaccumulation, toxic effects, and particle transport through trophic levels. Artemia contaminated with NPs were used as food in dietary exposure. Fish were exposed to suspensions of the NPs in waterborne exposure. ICP-MS analysis showed that accumulation primarily occurred in the intestine, followed by the gills and liver. Dietary uptake was lower, but was found to be a potential pathway for transport of NPs to higher organisms. Waterborne exposure resulted in about a 10-fold higher accumulation in the intestine. The heart, brain, and muscle tissue had no significant Cu or Zn. However, concentrations in muscle increased with NP concentration, which was ascribed to bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn released from NPs. Free Cu concentration in the medium was always higher than that of Zn, indicating CuO NPs dissolved more readily. ZnO NPs were relatively benign, even in waterborne exposure (p ≥ 0.05). In contrast, CuO NPs were toxic. Malondialdehyde levels in the liver and gills increased substantially (p < 0.05). Despite lower Cu accumulation, the liver exhibited significant oxidative stress, which could be from chronic exposure to Cu ions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Accumulation and Toxicity of CuO and ZnO Nanoparticles through Waterborne and Dietary Exposure of Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Mehmet; Arslan, Zikri; Demir, Veysel; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary and waterborne exposure to CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was conducted using a simplified model of an aquatic food chain consisting of zooplankton (Artemia salina) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) to determine bioaccumulation, toxic effects and particle transport through trophic levels. Artemia contaminated with NPs were used as food in dietary exposure. Fish were exposed to suspensions of the NPs in waterborne exposure. ICP-MS analysis showed that accumulation primarily occurred in the intestine, followed by the gills and liver. Dietary uptake was lower, but was found to be a potential pathway for transport of NPs to higher organisms. Waterborne exposure resulted in about a tenfold higher accumulation in the intestine. The heart, brain and muscle tissue had no significant Cu or Zn. However, concentrations in muscle increased with NP concentration, which was ascribed to bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn released from NPs. Free Cu concentration in the medium was always higher than that of Zn, indicating CuO NPs dissolved more readily. ZnO NPs were relatively benign, even in waterborne exposure (p≥0.05). In contrast, CuO NPs were toxic. Malondialdehyde levels in the liver and gills increased substantially (p<0.05). Despite lower Cu accumulation, the liver exhibited significant oxidative stress, which could be from chronic exposure to Cu ions. PMID:24860999

  17. PRN 2000-7: Non-Dietary Exposure Task Force

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This PR Notice announces an industry-wide task force to jointly develop residential indoor exposure data for pesticides containing one or more of the active ingredients synthetic pyrethroids, pyrethrum and synergists.

  18. Metal trophic transfer from algae to cladocerans and the relative importance of dietary metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Sofyan, Agus; Shaw, Joseph R; Birge, Wesley J

    2006-04-01

    We initially investigated effects and uptake of cadmium and copper on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (primary producer; formerly known as Selenastrum capricornutum). Our major efforts focused on the effects of metal-laden (i.e., Cd, Cu) P. subcapitata when used to provide dietary metal exposure to Ceriodaphnia dubia (primary consumer). Major test endpoints included feeding rate, survival, and reproduction. Metal body burden in C. dubia increased dose dependently at dietary exposure concentrations of 0.6 microg/g algal dry weight or less for cadmium and 74.7 microg/g algal dry weight or less for copper. However, it decreased sharply when dietary concentrations exceeded 0.6 microg/g algal dry weight for cadmium and 74.7 microg/g algal dry weight copper. Both dietary cadmium and copper affected all the major test endpoints. Whereas reproduction was observed to be the most sensitive endpoint, survival was observed to be the least sensitive endpoint. These results demonstrated the potential importance of dietary exposure for consideration in metal regulations or risk assessment.

  19. Effects of dietary nitrate on oesophageal motor function and gastro-oesophageal acid exposure in healthy volunteers and reflux patients.

    PubMed

    Bove, M; Lundell, L; Ny, L; Casselbrant, A; Fändriks, L; Pettersson, A; Ruth, M

    2003-01-01

    High concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), derived from dietary nitrite in an acid environment, have been demonstrated in the gastric fundus and in the oesophagus. The aim of this study was to investigate whether luminal NO can influence oesophageal smooth muscle performance, lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) function or gastric and oesophageal acid exposure. Eleven healthy volunteers and 9 patients with chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) received a diet deprived of nitrate/nitrite but supplemented with placebo or potassium nitrate for 4 days in a randomised order. On day 4 in each trial period, manometry was performed including a sleeve sensor registration of the LOS followed by a simultaneous 24-hour intra-gastric and oesophageal pH registration. Nitrate supplementation increased the proportion of effective peristalsis when analysed for the entire study population. No other significant effects of dietary nitrate were found on oesophageal motor variables, on the sphincter resting tone or on the number or duration of transient sphincter relaxations. No effect was found on either gastric acidity or gastro-oesophageal reflux variables. Major reflux symptoms were not influenced by nitrate administration. Dietary nitrate did not significantly affect oesophageal motor or LOS function, gastro-oesophageal acid reflux or reflux symptomatology either in healthy volunteers or in GORD patients. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Effects of dietary selenium exposure in captive American common eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Perry, M.C.; Bochsler, V.S.; Finley, D.L.; Flint, P.L.; Hollmen, T.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted two studies of Se exposure in captive common eiders (Somateria mollissima). In Study 1, eiders were fed diets with added Se (as L-selenomethionine) in concentrations increasing from 10 ppm to 80 ppm. In Study 2, eiders received control, low exposure (20 ppm Se), and high exposure (60 ppm Se) diets. One duck in the high exposure group in Study 2 died after 36 days. Remaining high exposure ducks in Study 2 and ducks in Study 1 were euthanized after losing 25-30% of their body weight, which occurred after 41 days and 60-78 days, respectively. Body weights did not differ between control and low exposure ducks in Study 2. At the end of Study 1, the mean Se concentration in blood was 32 ppm wet weight (ww). In Study 2, mean blood Se reached 14 ppm ww in the low exposure group and 17 ppm ww in high exposure ducks. Mean Se concentrations in liver were 1252 ppm dry weight (dw) in Study 1, and 351 and 735 ppm dw, respectively, in the low and high exposure groups of Study 2. Oxidative stress was evidenced by Se-associated effects on glutathione metabolism, but not entirely in the same manner as with previous laboratory studies in mallards. In plasma, activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase increased with time. As Se concentrations in liver increased, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, oxidized glutathione, and the ratio of hepatic oxidized to reduced glutathione increased. Total and protein bound sulfhydryl concentrations, reduced glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in liver were negatively correlated with Se concentrations in the liver. In Study 2, spleen weights were significantly lower in ducks receiving 60 ppm Se than in those receiving 20 ppm. Gross lesions associated with high Se exposure included emaciation, absence of thymus, loss of nails from digits, and alopecia. Microscopic lesions included severe depletion of lymphoid organs, hepatopathy, and necrosis of feather

  1. SHEDS-HT: an integrated probabilistic exposure model for prioritizing exposures to chemicals with near-field and dietary sources.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Kristin K; Glen, W Graham; Egeghy, Peter; Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; Smith, Luther; Vallero, Daniel; Brooks, Raina; Grulke, Christopher M; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2014-11-04

    United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) researchers are developing a strategy for high-throughput (HT) exposure-based prioritization of chemicals under the ExpoCast program. These novel modeling approaches for evaluating chemicals based on their potential for biologically relevant human exposures will inform toxicity testing and prioritization for chemical risk assessment. Based on probabilistic methods and algorithms developed for The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Multimedia, Multipathway Chemicals (SHEDS-MM), a new mechanistic modeling approach has been developed to accommodate high-throughput (HT) assessment of exposure potential. In this SHEDS-HT model, the residential and dietary modules of SHEDS-MM have been operationally modified to reduce the user burden, input data demands, and run times of the higher-tier model, while maintaining critical features and inputs that influence exposure. The model has been implemented in R; the modeling framework links chemicals to consumer product categories or food groups (and thus exposure scenarios) to predict HT exposures and intake doses. Initially, SHEDS-HT has been applied to 2507 organic chemicals associated with consumer products and agricultural pesticides. These evaluations employ data from recent USEPA efforts to characterize usage (prevalence, frequency, and magnitude), chemical composition, and exposure scenarios for a wide range of consumer products. In modeling indirect exposures from near-field sources, SHEDS-HT employs a fugacity-based module to estimate concentrations in indoor environmental media. The concentration estimates, along with relevant exposure factors and human activity data, are then used by the model to rapidly generate probabilistic population distributions of near-field indirect exposures via dermal, nondietary ingestion, and inhalation pathways. Pathway-specific estimates of near-field direct exposures from consumer products are also modeled

  2. The chronic effects of dietary lead in freshwater juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed elevated calcium diets.

    PubMed

    Alves, Lara C; Wood, Chris M

    2006-06-30

    This study examined the impact of elevated dietary Ca(2+) on the responses to chronic dietary Pb exposure in juvenile rainbow trout. Trout were fed reference (0.3microgPb/g, approximately 20mgCa(2+)/g) and Pb-enriched diets ( approximately 50 or 500microgPb/g) in the presence of background Ca(2+) ( approximately 20mgCa(2+)/g) or ( approximately 60mgCa(2+)/g) of added Ca(2+) (as CaCO(3)) for 42 days. The quantitative order of Pb accumulation in tissues reflected the exposure pathway of Pb via the diet (per tissue wet weight): gut>bone>kidney>liver>spleen>gill>carcass>brain>white muscle. The anterior intestine accumulated the most Pb per tissue wet weight, while the bone accumulated the most Pb per fish weight. Pb concentrations were much higher in the posterior kidney than the anterior kidney. Simultaneous addition of Ca(2+) to the diet had an overall protective effect in all the tissues analysed in reducing Pb accumulation. The RBCs accumulated 100 times more Pb when compared to the plasma, while the whole blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase was inhibited in the high treatment group without added Ca(2+), by the end of the exposure. Neither plasma Cl(-), K(+), Mg(2+) nor Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities in the gills, mid- and posterior intestine were affected. However, there were mild disruptions in plasma Na(+) and Ca(2+) levels in the elevated Pb and Ca(2+) treatment groups, and a significant up-regulation in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity at the anterior intestine in fish fed the high Pb diets with background or added Ca(2+). By day 42, Pb levels in most tissues had either stabilized or started to decrease, indicating some capacity for regulation of accumulated loads. We conclude that elevated dietary Ca(2+) levels will be protective in reducing Pb burdens in freshwater juvenile rainbow trout exposed to environments contaminated with waterborne Pb.

  3. Specific behavioral and cellular adaptations induced by chronic morphine are reduced by dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hakimian, Joshua; Minasyan, Ani; Zhe-Ying, Lily; Loureiro, Mariana; Beltrand, Austin; Johnston, Camille; Vorperian, Alexander; Romaneschi, Nicole; Atallah, Waleed; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Walwyn, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Opiates, one of the oldest known drugs, are the benchmark for treating pain. Regular opioid exposure also induces euphoria making these compounds addictive and often misused, as shown by the current epidemic of opioid abuse and overdose mortalities. In addition to the effect of opioids on their cognate receptors and signaling cascades, these compounds also induce multiple adaptations at cellular and behavioral levels. As omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) play a ubiquitous role in behavioral and cellular processes, we proposed that supplemental n-3 PUFAs, enriched in docosahexanoic acid (DHA), could offset these adaptations following chronic opioid exposure. We used an 8 week regimen of n-3 PUFA supplementation followed by 8 days of morphine in the presence of this diet. We first assessed the effect of morphine in different behavioral measures and found that morphine increased anxiety and reduced wheel-running behavior. These effects were reduced by dietary n-3 PUFAs without affecting morphine-induced analgesia or hyperlocomotion, known effects of this opiate acting at mu opioid receptors. At the cellular level we found that morphine reduced striatal DHA content and that this was reversed by supplemental n-3 PUFAs. Chronic morphine also increased glutamatergic plasticity and the proportion of Grin2B-NMDARs in striatal projection neurons. This effect was similarly reversed by supplemental n-3 PUFAs. Gene analysis showed that supplemental PUFAs offset the effect of morphine on genes found in neurons of the dopamine receptor 2 (D2)-enriched indirect pathway but not of genes found in dopamine receptor 1(D1)-enriched direct-pathway neurons. Analysis of the D2 striatal connectome by a retrogradely transported pseudorabies virus showed that n-3 PUFA supplementation reversed the effect of chronic morphine on the innervation of D2 neurons by the dorsomedial prefontal and piriform cortices. Together these changes outline specific behavioral and cellular effects

  4. Specific behavioral and cellular adaptations induced by chronic morphine are reduced by dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Mariana; Beltrand, Austin; Johnston, Camille; Vorperian, Alexander; Romaneschi, Nicole; Atallah, Waleed; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Opiates, one of the oldest known drugs, are the benchmark for treating pain. Regular opioid exposure also induces euphoria making these compounds addictive and often misused, as shown by the current epidemic of opioid abuse and overdose mortalities. In addition to the effect of opioids on their cognate receptors and signaling cascades, these compounds also induce multiple adaptations at cellular and behavioral levels. As omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) play a ubiquitous role in behavioral and cellular processes, we proposed that supplemental n-3 PUFAs, enriched in docosahexanoic acid (DHA), could offset these adaptations following chronic opioid exposure. We used an 8 week regimen of n-3 PUFA supplementation followed by 8 days of morphine in the presence of this diet. We first assessed the effect of morphine in different behavioral measures and found that morphine increased anxiety and reduced wheel-running behavior. These effects were reduced by dietary n-3 PUFAs without affecting morphine-induced analgesia or hyperlocomotion, known effects of this opiate acting at mu opioid receptors. At the cellular level we found that morphine reduced striatal DHA content and that this was reversed by supplemental n-3 PUFAs. Chronic morphine also increased glutamatergic plasticity and the proportion of Grin2B-NMDARs in striatal projection neurons. This effect was similarly reversed by supplemental n-3 PUFAs. Gene analysis showed that supplemental PUFAs offset the effect of morphine on genes found in neurons of the dopamine receptor 2 (D2)-enriched indirect pathway but not of genes found in dopamine receptor 1(D1)-enriched direct-pathway neurons. Analysis of the D2 striatal connectome by a retrogradely transported pseudorabies virus showed that n-3 PUFA supplementation reversed the effect of chronic morphine on the innervation of D2 neurons by the dorsomedial prefontal and piriform cortices. Together these changes outline specific behavioral and cellular effects

  5. Long-term Adherence to Healthy Dietary Guidelines and Chronic Inflammation in the Prospective Whitehall II Study☆

    PubMed Central

    Akbaraly, Tasnime N.; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Virtanen, Marianna; Lowe, Gordon; Hamer, Mark; Kivimaki, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays an important role in the cause of cardiovascular diseases and may contribute to the association linking an unhealthy diet to chronic age-related diseases. However, to date the long-term associations between diet and inflammation have been poorly described. Our aim was to assess the extent to which adherence to a healthy diet and dietary improvements over a 6-year exposure period prevented subsequent chronic inflammation over a 5-year follow-up in a large British population of men and women. Methods Data were drawn from 4600 adults (mean ± standard deviation, age 49.6 ± 6.1 years, 28% were women) from the prospective Whitehall cohort II study. Adherence to a healthy diet was measured using Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) scores in 1991-1993 (50.7 ± 11.9 points) and 1997-1999 (51.6 ± 12.4 points). Chronic inflammation, defined as average levels of serum interleukin-6 from 2 measures 5 years apart, was assessed in 1997-1999 and 2002-2004. Results After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, health behaviors, and health status, participants who maintained a high AHEI score (ie, a healthy diet, n = 1736, 37.7%) and those who improved this score over time (n = 681, 14.8%) showed significantly lower mean levels of interleukin-6 (1.84 pg/mL, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-1.98 and 1.84 pg/mL, 95% CI, 1.70-1.99, respectively) than those who had a low AHEI score (n = 1594, 34.6%) over the 6-year exposure period (2.01 pg/mL, 95% CI, 1.87-2.17). Conclusions These data suggest that maintaining and improving adherence to healthy dietary recommendations may reduce the risk of long-term inflammation. PMID:25305231

  6. MEASURING EXCESS DIETARY EXPOSURES CAUSED BY EATING ACTIVITIES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to measure dietary exposures of young children which included contamination of foods while eating. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of a pesticide recently applied within the home which was transferred from contaminated surfa...

  7. ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE AND DOSE WITH EPA'S SHEDS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model (SHEDS) has been developed to estimate pesticide exposure and dose to children via dermal residue contact and non-dietary ingestion. Time-location-activity data are sampled from national survey results to generate a population of simulated ch...

  8. MEASURING EXCESS DIETARY EXPOSURES CAUSED BY EATING ACTIVITIES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to measure dietary exposures of young children which included contamination of foods while eating. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of a pesticide recently applied within the home which was transferred from contaminated surfa...

  9. ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE AND DOSE WITH EPA'S SHEDS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model (SHEDS) has been developed to estimate pesticide exposure and dose to children via dermal residue contact and non-dietary ingestion. Time-location-activity data are sampled from national survey results to generate a population of simulated ch...

  10. Evaluation of arsenic speciation in rainbow trout and fathead minnows from dietary exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of total arsenic and various arsenic species were measured in food and fish tissue samples from two dietary arsenic exposures to juvenile fish. For arsenic speciation, samples were extracted with 10% MeOH and analyzed by HPLC/ICPMS. Total arsenic concentration...

  11. Evaluation of arsenic speciation in rainbow trout and fathead minnows from dietary exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of total arsenic and various arsenic species were measured in food and fish tissue samples from two dietary arsenic exposures to juvenile fish. For arsenic speciation, samples were extracted with 10% MeOH and analyzed by HPLC/ICPMS. Total arsenic concentration...

  12. Chronic exposure to volcanic environments and chronic bronchitis incidence in the Azores, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Amaral, André Filipe Santos; Rodrigues, Armindo Santos

    2007-03-01

    The village of Furnas, like other active volcanic areas in the world, exhibits high levels of hazardous gases. We aimed to investigate the existence of a possible association between chronic exposure to volcanic sulfur gases and chronic bronchitis. To investigate this, we used two populations, one exposed to active manifestations of volcanism (Furnas) and another from an area where no volcanic activity took place for over three million years (Santa Maria), both in the Azores. We used data on the incidence of chronic bronchitis among both populations (1991-2001), obtained from the records of each local health center, and population denominators from censuses carried out in 1991 and 2001, using five age-groups. We also estimated relative risks and mean annual age-standardized rates of chronic bronchitis incidence. Incidence rates were extremely higher in the volcanically active area for both sexes, and especially in the youngest groups. Accordingly, the risk of chronic bronchitis for the people living in the volcanically active area was extremely higher (males RR=3.99; females RR=10.74) when compared to those living in the volcanically inactive area. Comparison of chronic bronchitis incidence rates between both populations suggests an association between this disease and the chronic exposure to the volcanically active environment, with all its hazardous gases like hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. These findings may help health officials to better advice people inhabiting volcanic areas, or others with high levels of sulfur gases, on how to prevent and minimize the risks of chronic bronchitis.

  13. Methamphetamine exposure and chronic illness in police officers

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Gerald H; Sternquist, Marie C

    2012-01-01

    Background: The medical literature reports health hazards for law enforcement personnel from repeated exposure to methamphetamine and related chemical compounds. Most effects appear transitory, but some Utah police officers with employment-related methamphetamine exposures developed chronic symptoms, some leading to disability. This report is of an uncontrolled retrospective medical chart evaluation of symptomatic officers treated with a sauna detoxification protocol designed to reduce the chronic symptoms and improve the quality of life. Methods: Sixty-nine officers consecutively entering the Utah Meth Cops Project were assessed before and after a treatment program involving gradual exercise, comprehensive nutritional support and physical sauna therapy. Evaluations included pre- and post-treatment scores of the Research and Development Corporation (RAND) 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) in comparison with RAND population norms, pre- and post-treatment symptom score intensities, neurotoxicity scores, Mini-Mental Status Examination, presenting symptom frequencies and a structured evaluation of treatment program safety. Results: Statistically significant health improvements were seen in the SF-36 evaluations, symptom scores and neurotoxicity scores. The detoxification protocol was well tolerated, with a 92.8% completion rate. Conclusions: This investigation strongly suggests that utilizing sauna and nutritional therapy may alleviate chronic symptoms appearing after chemical exposures associated with methamphetamine-related law enforcement activities. This report also has relevance to addressing the apparent ill effects of other complex chemical exposures. In view of the positive clinical outcomes in this group, broader investigation of this sauna-based treatment regimen appears warranted. PMID:22089658

  14. Dietary mobile apps and their effect on nutritional indicators in chronic renal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lai, Janice; Porter, Judi

    2015-05-10

    Dietary apps for mobile technology are becoming increasingly available and can assist in recording food and fluid intake for nutrition assessment or monitoring. Patients with chronic renal disease, particularly those on dialysis, are required to make significant dietary changes. This study systematically reviews the current literature to assess whether dietary mobile apps improve dietary intake and clinical outcomes in the renal population, specifically those with Chronic Kidney Disease levels 3-5, including dialysis. A systematic search of Medline Complete, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library was performed and supplemented by manual searches of citation and reference lists. Of the 712 studies considered, five were eligible for inclusion in this review. The quality of each included study was assessed using a Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research. Among five studies (two RCTs and three case studies/reports), none found significant changes in nutrient intake, biochemical markers or intradialytic weight gain, through the use of dietary mobile apps. The included studies show potential for clinical benefits of mobile app interventions in a renal population. However there is a need for additional rigorous trials to demonstrate if there is a clinical benefit to mobile phone app interventions in this population.

  15. Exposome-Explorer: a manually-curated database on biomarkers of exposure to dietary and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, Vanessa; Moussy, Alice; Rouaix, Héloïse; Wedekind, Roland; Pon, Allison; Knox, Craig; Wishart, David S.; Scalbert, Augustin

    2017-01-01

    Exposome-Explorer (http://exposome-explorer.iarc.fr) is the first database dedicated to biomarkers of exposure to environmental risk factors. It contains detailed information on the nature of biomarkers, their concentrations in various human biospecimens, the study population where measured and the analytical techniques used for measurement. It also contains correlations with external exposure measurements and data on biological reproducibility over time. The data in Exposome-Explorer was manually collected from peer-reviewed publications and organized to make it easily accessible through a web interface for in-depth analyses. The database and the web interface were developed using the Ruby on Rails framework. A total of 480 publications were analyzed and 10 510 concentration values in blood, urine and other biospecimens for 692 dietary and pollutant biomarkers were collected. Over 8000 correlation values between dietary biomarker levels and food intake as well as 536 values of biological reproducibility over time were also compiled. Exposome-Explorer makes it easy to compare the performance between biomarkers and their fields of application. It should be particularly useful for epidemiologists and clinicians wishing to select panels of biomarkers that can be used in biomonitoring studies or in exposome-wide association studies, thereby allowing them to better understand the etiology of chronic diseases. PMID:27924041

  16. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Najafabadi, Mojgan Mortazavi; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g) was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P = 0.01). Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression.

  17. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Najafabadi, Mojgan Mortazavi; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g) was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P = 0.01). Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression. PMID:27819022

  18. Dietary exposure of Hong Kong secondary school students to total mercury and methylmercury from fish intake.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anna Shiu Ping; Kwong, Ka Ping; Chung, Stephen Wai Cheung; Ho, Yuk Yin; Xiao, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Fish is the main source of dietary exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), which is a public health concern owing to its potential neurotoxicity. To evaluate the public health risk, this study estimated the total mercury (tHg) and MeHg exposure from fish intake in Hong Kong secondary school students. Median tHg and MeHg concentrations of 280 samples purchased from different commercial outlets (covering 89 species of whole fish and three types of canned tuna), together with the local food consumption data of secondary school students obtained by semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire in 2000, were used to estimate dietary exposure from fish intake for the average and high consumer (95th percentile exposure). For tHg, the median concentration was 63 µg kg(-1) (range 3-1370 µg kg(-1)) and estimated exposures ranged 0.5-0.6 µg kg(-1) body weight (bw) week(-1) for an average consumer and 1.6-1.9 µg kg(-1) bw week(-1) for a high consumer. For MeHg, median concentration was 48 µg kg(-1) (range 3-1010 µg kg(-1)) and estimated dietary exposures were 0.4-0.5 µg kg(-1) bw week(-1) for an average consumer and 1.2-1.4 µg kg(-1) bw week(-1) for a high consumer. These values are below the respective provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) established by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). The health risk is greater for high consumers since MeHg exposures may approach or exceed the PTWI when other dietary sources are taken into account.

  19. Household dietary exposure to aflatoxins from maize and maize products in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kilonzo, Robert M; Imungi, Jasper K; Muiru, William M; Lamuka, Peter O; Njage, Patrick M Kamau

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxicosis has repeatedly affected Kenyans, particularly in the eastern region, due to consumption of contaminated maize. However, save for the cases of acute toxicity, the levels of sub-lethal exposure have not been adequately assessed. It is believed that this type of exposure does exist even during the seasons when acute toxicity does not occur. This study, therefore, was designed to assess the exposure of households to aflatoxins through consumption of maize and maize products. Twenty samples each of maize kernels, muthokoi and maize meal were randomly sampled from households in Kibwezi District of Makueni County in Eastern Kenya and analysed for aflatoxin contamination. The samples were quantitatively analysed for aflatoxin contamination using HPLC. The uncertainty and variability in dietary exposure was quantitatively modelled in Ms Excel using Monte Carlo simulation in @Risk software. Aflatoxins were found in 45% of maize kernels at between 18 and 480 μg kg⁻¹, 20% of muthokoi at between 12 and 123 μg kg⁻¹, and 35% of maize meal at between 6 and 30 μg kg⁻¹. The mean dietary exposure to aflatoxin in maize kernels was 292 ± 1567 ng kg⁻¹ body weight day⁻¹, while the mean dietary exposure to aflatoxin in maize meal and muthokoi were 59 ± 62 and 27 ± 154 ng kg⁻¹ body weight day⁻¹ respectively. The results showed that the amount and frequency of consumption of the three foods is the more important contributing factor than the mean aflatoxin concentration levels, to the risk of dietary exposure to aflatoxins.

  20. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN IN LEAD-LADEN ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because of three interacting factors; they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities, lead absorption occurs more readily in a child compared to an adult, and the child's development i...

  1. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN LIVING IN LEAD-LADEN ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because of three interacting factors: they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities; lead absorption occurs more readily in a child as compared to an adult; and the child's developmen...

  2. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN IN LEAD-LADEN ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because of three interacting factors; they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities, lead absorption occurs more readily in a child compared to an adult, and the child's development i...

  3. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN LIVING IN LEAD-LADEN ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because of three interacting factors: they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities; lead absorption occurs more readily in a child as compared to an adult; and the child's developmen...

  4. Dietary exposure to aluminium from wheat flour and puffed products of residents in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junfei; Peng, Shaojie; Tian, Mingsheng; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Bo; Wu, Min; He, Gengsheng

    2015-01-01

    A dietary survey of 3431 residents was conducted by a 24-h dietary recall method in Shanghai, China, quarterly from September 2013 to September 2014. A total of 400 food samples were tested for aluminium concentration, including wheat flour and puffed products from 2011 to 2013. Probabilistic analysis was used to estimate the dietary exposure to aluminium from wheat and puffed products. The means of dietary aluminium exposure for children (2-6 years old), juveniles (7-17 years old), adults (18-65 years old) and seniors (over 65 years old) were 1.88, 0.94, 0.44 and 0.42 mg kg(-1) body weight (bw) week(-1) respectively, with a population average of 0.51 mg kg(-1) bw week(-1). The proportions of those who had aluminium exposure from wheat and puffed products lower than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) were 77%, 90%, 97%, and 97% respectively from children to seniors. We estimated that the proportions of people at risk would decrease by 13%, 6%, 2% and 2% respectively under the new China National Standards - GB 2760-2014 National Food Safety for Standards for using food additives. The results indicated that aluminium from wheat flour and puffed products is unlikely to cause adverse health effects in the general population in Shanghai; however, children were at a higher risk of excess aluminium exposure. Significant improvements in reducing the dietary exposure to aluminium are expected in the population, especially for children after the implementation of GB 2760-2014.

  5. Assessing bisphenol A (BPA) exposure risk from long-term dietary intakes in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Shen, Yi-Pei; Chen, Szu-Chieh

    2016-02-01

    Dietary intake is the major bisphenol A (BPA) exposure route in humans, and is a cause of BPA-related adverse effects. The large-scale exposure risk of humans to BPA through dietary sources in Taiwan is less well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the average daily dose (ADD) and hazardous quotient (HQ) of BPA exposure risk from long-term dietary intake of BPA, as well as BPA concentrations in different age-sex groups in Taiwan. We reanalyzed the BPA concentrations of regular daily food sources (rice, poultry, livestock, seafood, protein, fruits, and vegetables) and used a national dietary survey to estimate the contribution of variance to ADDs and potential human health effect for different age-sex groups. This study found that the daily consumption of chicken, pork/beef, and seafood were estimated to be 33.77 (Male)/22.65 (Female), 91.70 (M)/66.35 (F), and 54.15 (M)/40.78 (F) g/day, respectively. The highest BPA ADD was found in the 6-9 years age group (95% CI=0.0006-0.0027 mg/kg-bw/day), whereas the lowest BPA ADD was in the ≥65 years age group (0.0002-0.0020 mg/kg-bw/day). Based on the latest EFSA guidelines (0.004 mg/kg-bw/day), the 97.5 percentile HQ of BPA intake in different age-sex groups in Taiwan posed no risks through dietary intake. However, a combination of multiple exposure routes and long-term exposure in specific populations may be of concern in the future.

  6. Chronic exposures and male fertility: the impacts of environment, diet, and drug use on spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, J S; Tanrikut, C

    2016-07-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that sperm concentrations and semen quality have been decreasing over the past several decades in many areas of the world. The etiology of these decreases is currently unknown. Acute events can have significant impacts on spermatogenesis and are often readily identified during the male fertility evaluation. The majority of male factor infertility, however, is idiopathic. Chronic, low-dose exposures to chemicals and nutrients are more difficult to identify, but are extremely prevalent. These exposures have been shown to have dramatic effects on both individual and community health and interest in the cumulative and synergistic impacts of such agents on spermatogenesis has been increasing. While our understanding of these potential hazards is evolving, it is clear that they may significantly influence male reproductive potential. This review explores the literature related to effects of chronic exposures from drug use, dietary intake, and the environment on spermatogenesis in humans and animals. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  7. Organic and inorganic dietary phosphorus and its management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Noori, Nazanin; Sims, John J; Kopple, Joel D; Shah, Anuja; Colman, Sara; Shinaberger, Christian S; Bross, Rachelle; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2010-04-01

    Dietary phosphorus control is often a main strategy in the management of patients with chronic kidney disease. Dietary protein is a major source of phosphorus intake. Recent data indicate that imposed dietary phosphorus restriction may compromise the need for adequate protein intake, leading to protein-energy wasting and possibly to increased mortality. The two main sources of dietary phosphorus are organic, including animal and vegetarian proteins, and inorganic, mostly food preservatives. Animal-based foods and plant are abundant in organic phosphorus. Usually 40% to 60% of animal-based phosphorus is absorbed; this varies by degree of gastrointestinal vitamin-D-receptor activation, whereas plant phosphorus, mostly associated with phytates, is less absorbable by human gastrointestinal tract. Up to 100% of inorganic phosphorus in processed foods may be absorbed; ie, phosphorus in processed cheese and some soda (cola) drinks. A recent study suggests that a higher dietary phosphorus-protein intake ratio is associated with incremental death risk in patients on long-term hemodialysis. Hence, for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease, in addition to absolute dietary phosphorus content, the chemical structure (inorganic versus organic), type (animal versus plant), and phosphorus-protein ratio should be considered. We recommend foods and supplements with no or lowest quantity of inorganic phosphorus additives, more plant-based proteins, and a dietary phosphorus-protein ratio of less than 10 mg/g. Fresh (nonprocessed) egg white (phosphorus-protein ratio less than 2 mg/g) is a good example of desirable food, which contains a high proportion of essential amino acids with low amounts of fat, cholesterol, and phosphorus.

  8. INSIGHT responsive parenting intervention is associated with healthier patterns of dietary exposures in infants.

    PubMed

    Hohman, Emily E; Paul, Ian M; Birch, Leann L; Savage, Jennifer S

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether a responsive parenting (RP) intervention affects infant dietary patterns. Primiparous mother-newborn dyads (n = 291) were randomized to the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) RP intervention or control. Curricula were delivered at nurse home visits at ages 3, 16, 28, and 40 weeks. RP group feeding guidance advised responsive feeding, delayed introduction of solids, repeated exposure to novel foods, and age-appropriate portion sizes. Latent class analysis identified patterns of dietary exposure at 9 months. Class membership at 9 months was used to predict BMI percentile at 2 years. Five dietary patterns were identified: "Breastfed, Fruits and Vegetables," "Breastfed, Low Variety," "Formula, Fruits and Vegetables," "Formula, Low Variety," and "Formula, High Energy Density." Over 60% of infants had patterns low in fruits and vegetables or high in energy-dense foods. RP group infants were less likely than control to be in the "Formula, Low Variety" class (OR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.23-0.71) or "Formula, High Energy Density" class (OR = 0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.61) relative to the "Formula, Fruits and Vegetables" class. Dietary pattern at 9 months was significantly associated with BMI percentile at 2 years. While a majority of infants consumed diets low in fruits and vegetables, the INSIGHT RP intervention was associated with healthier dietary patterns. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  9. Determination of caffeine and identification of undeclared substances in dietary supplements and caffeine dietary exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Neves, Diana Brito da Justa; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2017-07-01

    Caffeine is one of the most consumed stimulants in the world, and is a frequent ingredient of dietary supplements. The aims of this work were to validate a GC-MS method for the quantitation of caffeine and identification of other substances in supplements, mainly weight loss products, and to estimate the caffeine intake by consumers. Sample preparation included extraction with chloroform:water in ultrasonic bath, centrifugation and analysis of the organic layer for caffeine quantitation, and extraction with methanol for identification of other substances. A total of 213 samples of 52 supplement products not registered in Brazil and seized by the Brazilian Federal Police were analyzed. From the 109 samples that declared the amount of caffeine present, 26.6% contained more than 120% of the specified content. Considering the maximum recommended dose stated on the product labels, the consumption of 47.9% of the samples would lead to a daily intake of caffeine above the safe limit of 400 mg. Undeclared drugs, including sibutramine, phenolphthalein, amphepramone and femproporex were found in 28 samples. These results show that consumers of dietary supplements should be aware that these products might contain caffeine at levels that could represent potential health risks, in addition to undeclared pharmaceutical drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary exposure to aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and deoxynivalenol from a total diet study in an adult urban Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Raad, F; Nasreddine, L; Hilan, C; Bartosik, M; Parent-Massin, D

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins may be associated with carcinogenic, immunosuppressant and estrogenic effects. In the Middle-East, studies investigating food contamination and dietary exposure to mycotoxins are particularly scarce. This study aims at evaluating the dietary exposure of an adult Lebanese urban population to four mycotoxins (AFB1, AFM1, OTA, DON) classified as priority food contaminants by the WHO. Dietary exposure assessment was performed by means of the total diet study approach. Average and excessive consumer exposure estimates (p95) were calculated and compared with appropriate toxicological reference values (TRVs). Average dietary exposure levels to OTA and DON represented 29.9% and 156.8% of the respective TRVs, with the p95 exposure estimates approaching or exceeding the TRVs for these mycotoxins (95.1% and 355.8%, respectively). Based on the mean dietary exposure level to AFB1, cancer risk was estimated at 0.0527-0.0545cases/100,000persons/year, while mean exposure to AFM1 was associated with a population risk of 0.0018-0.0027cases/100,000persons/year. The study's findings place Lebanon among countries that are highly exposed to mycotoxins through the diet and call for larger-scale studies aiming at providing a comprehensive assessment of the dietary exposure of the Lebanese population to mycotoxins as well as to other food contaminants. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary exposure of the Italian population to inorganic arsenic: The 2012-2014 Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Cubadda, Francesco; D'Amato, Marilena; Aureli, Federica; Raggi, Andrea; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Dietary exposure of the Italian population to inorganic arsenic has been assessed in the national Total Diet Study (TDS) carried out in 2012-2014. Within the TDS, food samples (>3000) were collected to be representative of the whole diet of the population, prepared as consumed, and pooled into 51 food groups, thus modelling the Italian diet. Inorganic arsenic was determined by HPLC-ICP-MS after chemical extraction and quantified in all samples. Occurrence data were combined with national individual consumption data to estimate mean and high level dietary exposure of the general population and of population subgroups according to age and gender, both at the national level and for each of the four main geographical areas of Italy. The intakes assessed are in the lower range of iAs exposure estimates in other European countries carried out without the support of the TDS approach. However, taking the lower limit of the BMDL01 range established by the EFSA as reference point, the margins of exposure are <2 for the mean intake in infants and toddlers and <1 for the 95th percentile intakes in all younger age groups. Our results indicate the goal to check and further reduce the dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Does chronic exposure to mobile phones affect cognition?

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Mamta; Khaliq, Farah; Panwar, Aprajita; Vaney, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mobile phones form an integral part of our modern lifestyle. Following the drastic rise in mobile phone use in recent years, it has become important to study its potential public health impact. Amongst the various mobile phone health hazards, the most alarming is the possible effect on the brain. The aim of the present study was to explore whether chronic exposure to mobile phones affects cognition. Ninety subjects aged 17–25 years with normal hearing were recruited for the study and divided into three groups according to their duration of mobile phone use. No significant differences in N100, P200, N200, P300 latencies or N2-P300 amplitude were observed. Our results suggest that chronic mobile phone exposure does not have detrimental effects on cognition. PMID:27027894

  13. Does chronic exposure to mobile phones affect cognition?

    PubMed

    Mohan, Mamta; Khaliq, Farah; Panwar, Aprajita; Vaney, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones form an integral part of our modern lifestyle. Following the drastic rise in mobile phone use in recent years, it has become important to study its potential public health impact. Amongst the various mobile phone health hazards, the most alarming is the possible effect on the brain. The aim of the present study was to explore whether chronic exposure to mobile phones affects cognition. Ninety subjects aged 17-25 years with normal hearing were recruited for the study and divided into three groups according to their duration of mobile phone use. No significant differences in N100, P200, N200, P300 latencies or N2-P300 amplitude were observed. Our results suggest that chronic mobile phone exposure does not have detrimental effects on cognition.

  14. Dietary exposure assessment of streptomycin and tetracycline in food of animal origin on the Croatian market.

    PubMed

    Vragović, Natalija; Bažulić, Davorin; Jakupović, Emira; Zdolec, Nevijo

    2012-01-01

    Residual antibacterials in food constitute a risk to human health, particularly because they can contribute to the transmission of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria through the food chain. This paper presents dietary exposure assessment of streptomycin and tetracycline, based on combining food consumption data in Croatia with data on the concentration of veterinary drugs in analysed samples of food of animal origin. According to the median values, the estimated daily intake of streptomycin and tetracycline through food is 11.9 and 0.7 µg/person/day, respectively. The largest contribution to streptomycin intake comes from meat (4.8 µg/person/day, i.e. 41%), but milk is the largest source for tetracycline (0.3 µg/person/day, i.e. 46%). The estimated dietary exposure to these veterinary drugs does not exceed relevant toxicological reference values and the level of exposure is assessed to be acceptable.

  15. Reducing prenatal phthalate exposure through maternal dietary changes: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Emily S.; Velez, Marissa; Qiu, Xing; Chen, Shaw-Ree

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diet is a major source of exposure to certain phthalates, a class of environmental chemicals associated with endocrine disruption in animal models and humans. Several studies have attempted to lower phthalate exposure through carefully designed dietary interventions, with inconsistent results. We conducted a dietary intervention pilot study with the objective to lower phthalate exposure in low-income pregnant women, a particularly vulnerable population. Methods Ten pregnant women consumed a provided diet consisting of mostly fresh, organic foods for three days. We collected urine samples before, during, and after the intervention and conducted semi-structured interviews to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. We used repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-tests to assess differences in urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations across the study, focusing on the metabolites of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), a phthalate of particular interest, and their molar sum (∑DEHP). Results Phthalate metabolite concentrations did not change appreciably during the intervention period. We observed no significant difference in ∑DEHP metabolite concentrations across the three time periods (F=0.21; adjusted p-value=0.65), and no reduction during the intervention as compared to baseline (t=−1.07, adjusted p-value=0.51). Results of interviews indicated that participants were not motivated to make dietary changes to potentially reduce chemical exposures outside of the study. Conclusions Despite the small sample size, our results suggest that promoting dietary changes to lower phthalate exposure may not be an effective public health measure. Reducing the use of phthalates in food processing and packaging may be a better solution to lowering exposure on a population level. PMID:25652062

  16. Reducing Prenatal Phthalate Exposure Through Maternal Dietary Changes: Results from a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Emily S; Velez, Marissa; Qiu, Xing; Chen, Shaw-Ree

    2015-09-01

    Diet is a major source of exposure to certain phthalates, a class of environmental chemicals associated with endocrine disruption in animal models and humans. Several studies have attempted to lower phthalate exposure through carefully designed dietary interventions, with inconsistent results. We conducted a dietary intervention pilot study with the objective to lower phthalate exposure in low-income pregnant women, a particularly vulnerable population. Ten pregnant women consumed a provided diet consisting of mostly fresh, organic foods for 3 days. We collected urine samples before, during, and after the intervention and conducted semi-structured interviews to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. We used repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-tests to assess differences in urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations across the study, focusing on the metabolites of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), a phthalate of particular interest, and their molar sum (∑DEHP). Phthalate metabolite concentrations did not change appreciably during the intervention period. We observed no significant difference in ∑DEHP metabolite concentrations across the three time periods (F = 0.21; adjusted p value = 0.65), and no reduction during the intervention as compared to baseline (t = -1.07, adjusted p value = 0.51). Results of interviews indicated that participants were not motivated to make dietary changes to potentially reduce chemical exposures outside of the study. Despite the small sample size, our results suggest that promoting dietary changes to lower phthalate exposure may not be an effective public health measure. Reducing the use of phthalates in food processing and packaging may be a better solution to lowering exposure on a population level.

  17. Statistical analysis of honeybee survival after chronic exposure to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Dechaume Moncharmont, François-Xavier; Decourtye, Axel; Hennequet-Hantier, Christelle; Pons, Odile; Pham-Delègue, Minh-Hà

    2003-12-01

    Studies concerning long-term survival of honeybees raise the problem of the statistical analysis of mortality data. In the present study, we used a modeling approach of survival data of caged bees under chronic exposure to two pesticides (imidacloprid and deltamethrin). Our model, based on a Cox proportional hazard model, is not restricted to a specific hazard functional form, such as in parametric approaches, but takes into account multiple covariates. We consider not only the pesticide treatment but also a nuisance variable (variability between replicates). Moreover, considering the occurrence of social interactions, the model integrates the fact that bees do not die independently of each other. We demonstrate the chronic toxicity induced by imidacloprid and deltamethrin. Our results also underline the role of the replicate effect, the density-dependent effect, and their interactions with the treatment effect. None of these parameters can be neglected in the assessment of chronic toxicity of pesticides to the honeybee.

  18. Short diet history for assessing dietary exposure to N-nitrosamines in epidemiologic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, G.R.; Harrison, L.; Jain, M.

    1986-10-01

    A short diet history for use in assessing dietary nitrosamine exposure in epidemiologic studies has been developed by using data form a case-control study of diet and stomach cancer carried out in Ontario, Manitoba, and Newfoundland between 1979 and 1982. The method gives excellent correlations for seven dietary components with estimates based on a full diet history, and also performs well when tested on a different data set from a case-control study of diet and colorectal cancer carried out in Ontario and Alberta between 1976 and 1978.

  19. Assessment of dietary exposure to trace metals in Baffin Inuit food.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H M; Kim, C; Khoday, K; Receveur, O; Kuhnlein, H V

    1995-01-01

    Chronic metal toxicity is a concern in the Canadian Arctic because of the findings of high metal levels in wildlife animals and the fact that traditional food constitutes a major component of the diet of indigenous peoples. We examined exposure to trace metals through traditional food resources for Inuit living in the community of Qikiqtarjuaq on Baffin Island in the eastern Arctic. Mercury, cadmium, and lead were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Elevated concentrations of mercury ( > 50 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, narwhal mattak, beluga meat, and beluga mattak, and relatively high concentrations of cadmium and lead ( > 100 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, mussels, and kelp. Quantified dietary recalls taken seasonally reflected normal consumption patterns of these food resources by adult men and women ( > 20 years old) and children (3-12 years old). Based on traditional food consumption, the average daily intake levels of total mercury for both adults (65 micrograms for women and 97 micrograms for men) and children (38 micrograms) were higher than the Canadian average value (16 micrograms). The average weekly intake of mercury for all age groups exceeded the intake guidelines (5.0 micrograms/kg/day) established by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants. The primary foods that contributed to metal intake for the Baffin Inuit were ringed seal meat, caribou meat, and kelp. We review the superior nutritional benefits and potential health risks of traditional food items and implications for monitoring metal contents of food, clinical symptoms, and food use. Images Figure 1. PMID:7588487

  20. Excretion Profiles and Half-Lives of Ten Urinary Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolites after Dietary Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa; Bartell, Scott; Pittman, Erin N.; Trinidad, Debra A.; McClean, Michael; Webster, Thomas F.; Sjödin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be assessed by biomonitoring of their urinary mono-hydroxylated metabolites (OH-PAHs). Limited information exists on the human pharmacokinetics of OH-PAHs. This study aimed to investigate the excretion half-life of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-PYR), the most used biomarker for PAH exposure, and 9 other OH-PAHs following a dietary exposure in 9 non-smoking volunteers with no occupational exposure to PAHs. Each person avoided food with known high PAH-content during the study period, except for a high PAH-containing lunch (barbecued chicken) on the first day. Individual urine samples (n = 217) were collected from 15 hours before to 60 hours following the dietary exposure. Levels of all OH-PAHs in all subjects increased rapidly by 9–141 fold after the exposure, followed by a decrease consistent with first order kinetics, and returned to background levels 24–48 hours after the exposure. The average time to reach maximal concentration ranged from 3.1 h (1-naphthol) to 5.5 h (1-PYR). Creatinine-adjusted urine concentrations for each metabolite were analyzed using a non-linear mixed effects model including a term to estimate background exposure. The background-adjusted half-life estimate was 3.9 h for 1-PYR and ranged 2.5–6.1 h for the other 9 OH-PAHs, which in general, were shorter than those previously reported. The maximum concentrations after the barbecued chicken consumption were comparable to the levels found in reported occupational settings with known high PAH exposures. It is essential to consider the relatively short half-life, the timing of samples relative to exposures, and the effect of diet when conducting PAH exposure biomonitoring studies. PMID:22663094

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and occupational exposure to silica.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high levels of silica has long been known to cause silicosis This paper evaluates the evidence for an increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in occupations and industries in which exposure to crystalline silica is the primary exposure, with a focus on the magnitude of risks and levels of exposure causing disabling health effects. The literature suggests consistently elevated risks of developing COPD associated with silica exposure in several occupations, including the construction industry; tunneling; cement industry; brick manufacturing; pottery and ceramic work; silica sand, granite and diatomaceous earth industries; gold mining; and iron and steel founding, with risk estimates being high in some, even after taking into account the effect of confounders like smoking. Average dust levels vary from about 0.5 mg.m3 to over 10 mg.m3 and average silica levels from 0.04 to over 5 mg.m3, often well above occupational standards. Factors influencing the variation from industry to industry in risks associated with exposure to silica-containing dusts include (a) the presence of other minerals in the dust, particularly when associated with clay minerals; (b) the size of the particles and percentage of quartz; (c) the physicochemical characteristics, such as whether the dust is freshly fractured. Longitudinal studies suggest that loss of lung function occurs with exposure to silica dust at concentrations of between 0.1 and 0.2 mg.m3, and that the effect of cumulative silica dust exposure on airflow obstruction is independent of silicosis. Nevertheless, a disabling loss of lung function in the absence of silicosis would not occur until between 30 and 40 years exposure.

  2. Welding fume exposure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in welders.

    PubMed

    Koh, D-H; Kim, J-I; Kim, K-H; Yoo, S-W

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure is estimated to contribute 15% to the burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Welding fumes are suspected to accelerate the decline of lung function and development of COPD. To examine the relationship between welding fume exposure and COPD in Korean shipyard welders. The study involved a group of male welders working at two shipyards who underwent an annual health examination in 2010. Subjects completed a questionnaire about smoking habits and occupational history and a pulmonary function test (PFT) was carried out with strict quality control measures. Welding fume exposure concentrations were estimated using 884 measurements taken between 2002 and 2009 in one of the shipyards. Multiple linear and logistic regression was employed to evaluate the association between cumulative fume exposure and lung function parameters, controlling for age, height and cigarette smoking. Two hundred and forty subjects participated, with a mean age of 48 and mean work duration of 15 years. The mean cumulative fume exposure was 7.7mg/m(3). The prevalence of COPD was 15%. FEV1 and FVC showed non-significant negative correlations with cumulative fume exposure. Odds ratios of COPD were significantly elevated for the middle (3.9; 95% CI 1.4-13.3) and high exposure groups (3.8; 95% CI 1.03-16.2) compared with the low fume exposure group. Our findings support an association between welding fume exposure and increased risk of COPD. Further prospective study is needed to investigate whether this is a causal relationship. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Dietary exposure assessment of Danish consumers to dithiocarbamate residues in food: a comparison of the deterministic and probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Jensen, B H; Andersen, J H; Petersen, A; Christensen, T

    2008-06-01

    Probabilistic and deterministic estimates of the acute and chronic exposure of the Danish populations to dithiocarbamate residues were performed. The Monte Carlo Risk Assessment programme (MCRA 4.0) was used for the probabilistic risk assessment. Food consumption data were obtained from the nationwide dietary survey conducted in 2000--02. Residue data for 5721 samples from the monitoring programme conducted in the period 1998--2003 were used for dithiocarbamates, which had been determined as carbon disulphide. Contributions from 26 commodities were included in the calculations. Using the probabilistic approach, the daily acute intakes at the 99.9% percentile for adults and children were 11.2 and 28.2 microg kg(-1) body weight day(-1), representing 5.6% and 14.1% of the ARfD for maneb, respectively. When comparing the point estimate approach with the probabilistic approach, the outcome of the point estimate calculations was generally higher or comparable with the outcome of the probabilistic approach at the 99.9 percentile (consumers only). The chronic exposures for adults and children were 0.35 and 0.76 microg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) at the 99.9 percentile, representing 0.7% and 1.5%, respectively, of the acceptable daily intake for mancozeb and maneb at 50 microg kg(-1) body weight.

  4. Parental Whole Life Cycle Exposure to Dietary Methylmercury in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Affects the Behavior of Offspring.

    PubMed

    Mora-Zamorano, Francisco X; Klingler, Rebekah; Murphy, Cheryl A; Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica; Carvan, Michael J

    2016-05-03

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an established neurotoxicant of concern to fish-eating organisms. While most studies have focused on the fish consumers, much less is known about the effects of MeHg on the fish themselves, especially following exposures to chronic and environmentally relevant scenarios. Here we evaluated the behavioral effects of developmental MeHg insult by exposing parental generations of zebrafish to an environmentally realistic MeHg dietary concentration (1 ppm) and two higher concentrations (3 and 10 ppm) throughout their whole life span. Upon reaching adulthood, their offspring were analyzed through a series of behavioral tests, including the visual-motor response (VMR) assay, analysis of spontaneous swimming and evaluation of foraging efficiency. The VMR assay identified decreased locomotor output in the 6 day postfertilization (dpf) offspring of fish exposed to 3 and 10 ppm MeHg. However, in a second test 7 dpf fish revealed an increase in locomotor activity in all MeHg exposures tested. Increases in locomotion continued to be observed until 16 dpf, which coincided with increased foraging efficiency. These results suggest an association between MeHg and hyperactivity, and imply that fish chronically exposed to MeHg in the wild may be vulnerable to predation.

  5. Chronic exposure to ELF fields may induce depression

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Exposure to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric or magnetic fields has been postulated as a potentially contributing factor in depression. Epidemiologic studies have yielded positive correlations between magnetic- and/or electric-field strengths in local environments and the incidence of depression-related suicide. Chronic exposure to ELF electric or magnetic fields can disrupt normal circadian rhythms in rat pineal serotonin-N-acetyltransferase activity as well as in serotonin and melatonin concentrations. Such disruptions in the circadian rhythmicity of pineal melatonin secretion have been associated with certain depressive disorders in human beings. In the rat, ELF fields may interfere with tonic aspects of neuronal input to the pineal gland, giving rise to what may be termed functional pinealectomy. If long-term exposure to ELF fields causes pineal dysfunction in human beings as it does in the rat, such dysfunction may contribute to the onset of depression or may exacerbate existing depressive disorders. 85 references.

  6. Effects of Mild Chronic Intermittent Cold Exposure on Rat Organs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Che, Honglei; Zhang, Wenbin; Wang, Jiye; Ke, Tao; Cao, Rui; Meng, Shanshan; Li, Dan; Weiming, Ouyang; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Cold adaptation is a body's protective response to cold stress. Mild chronic intermittent cold (CIC) exposure has been used to generate animal models for cold adaptation studies. However, the effects of mild CIC exposure on vital organs are not completely characterized. In the present study, we exposed rats to mild CIC for two weeks, and then measured the body weights, the weights of brown adipose tissue (BAT), the levels of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brains, livers, hearts, muscles and BATs. Rats formed cold adaptation after exposure to CIC for two weeks. Compared to rats of the control group that were hosted under ambient temperature, rats exposed to mild CIC showed a lower average body weight, but a higher weight of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Rats exposed to CIC for two weeks also exhibited higher levels of ATP and ROS in all examined organs as compared to those of the control group. In addition, we determined the expression levels of cold-inducible RNA binding protein (Cirbp) and thioredoxin (TRX) in rat tissues after 2 weeks of CIC exposure. Both Cirbp and TRX were increased, suggesting a role of these two proteins for establishment of cold adaptation. Together, this study reveals the effects of mild CIC exposure on vital organs of rats during CIC exposure. PMID:26327811

  7. Understanding sources of dietary phosphorus in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Gutekunst, Lisa; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Bross, Rachelle; Shinaberger, Christian S; Noori, Nazanin; Hirschberg, Raimund; Benner, Debbie; Nissenson, Allen R; Kopple, Joel D

    2010-03-01

    In individuals with chronic kidney disease, high dietary phosphorus (P) burden may worsen hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy, promote vascular calcification and cardiovascular events, and increase mortality. In addition to the absolute amount of dietary P, its type (organic versus inorganic), source (animal versus plant derived), and ratio to dietary protein may be important. Organic P in such plant foods as seeds and legumes is less bioavailable because of limited gastrointestinal absorption of phytate-based P. Inorganic P is more readily absorbed by intestine, and its presence in processed, preserved, or enhanced foods or soft drinks that contain additives may be underreported and not distinguished from the less readily absorbed organic P in nutrient databases. Hence, P burden from food additives is disproportionately high relative to its dietary content as compared with natural sources that are derived from organic (animal and vegetable) food proteins. Observational and metabolic studies indicate nutritional and longevity benefits of higher protein intake in dialysis patients. This presents challenges to providing appropriate nutrition because protein and P intakes are closely correlated. During dietary counseling of patients with chronic kidney disease, the absolute dietary P content as well as the P-to-protein ratio in foods should be addressed. Foods with the least amount of inorganic P, low P-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content that are consistent with acceptable palatability and enjoyment to the individual patient should be recommended along with appropriate prescription of P binders. Provision of in-center and monitored meals during hemodialysis treatment sessions in the dialysis clinic may facilitate the achievement of these goals.

  8. Dietary exposure to cadmium, lead and nickel among students from south-east Poland.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Zbigniew; Koch, Wojciech; Marzec, Agnieszka; Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Wioletta

    2014-01-01

    The dietary intake of cadmium, lead and nickel was determined among students from three universities in the city of Lublin in south-east Poland to assess the levels of exposure to these contaminants, compared to PTWI and TDI values. The study was performed in 2006–2010 and involved 850 daily food rations of students. The technique of 24-hour dietary recall and diet duplicates was used. Cadmium, lead and nickel complexes with ammonium-pyrrolidindithiocarbamate were formed and extracted to the organic phase with 4-methylpentan-2-one–MIBK, in which their content was measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The highest intake of the elements studied was observed in 2008. The data show that in none of the cases, the level of intake reached 70% of PTWI/TDI values, and thus the risk of developing diseases related to high exposure to these toxic metals absorbed from foodstuffs was low. The parameters of methods were checked during determinations by adding standard solutions to the samples before mineralization and by using two reference materials: Total diet ARC/CL HDP and Bovine muscle RM NIST 8414. The dietary exposure to lead and cadmium has significantly decreased in recent years, whereas the exposures to nickel remains on a stable level.

  9. A chronic disease dietary consultation system using OWL-based ontologies and semantic rules.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu-Liang; Chen, Tsang-Yao; Tsai, Wan-Ting

    2015-02-01

    Chronic diseases patients often require constant dietary control that involves complicated interaction among factors such as the illness stage, the patient's physical condition, the patient's activity level, the amount of food intake, and key nutrient restrictions. This study aims to integrate multiple knowledge sources for problem solving modeling and knowledge-based system (KBS) development. A chronic kidney disease dietary consultation system is constructed by using Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) to demonstrate how a KBS approach can achieve sound problem solving modeling and effective knowledge inference. For system evaluation, information from 84 case patients is used to evaluate the performance of the system in recommending appropriate food serving amounts from different food groups for balanced key nutrient ingestion. The results show that, excluding interference factors, the OWL-based KBS can achieve accurate problem solving reasoning while maintaining knowledge base shareability and extensibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary exposure to mycotoxins of the Hong Kong adult population from a Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Yau, Arthur Tin-Chung; Chen, Melva Yung-Yung; Lam, Chi-Ho; Ho, Yuk-Yin; Xiao, Ying; Chung, Stephen Wai-Cheung

    2016-06-01

    Dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to mycotoxins and their metabolites including aflatoxins (AFs), ochratoxin A (OTA), fumonisins (FNs), deoxynivalenol (DON), acetyldeoxynivalenols (AcDONs) and zearalenone (ZEA) was estimated using the Total Diet Study (TDS) approach to assess the associated health risk to the local people. Sixty commonly consumed food items, collected in four seasons, were sampled and prepared as consumed. These mycotoxins were primarily found at low levels. The highest mean levels (upper bound) were: AFs, 1.50 µg kg(-)(1) in legumes, nuts and seed; OTA, 0.22 µg kg(-)(1) in sugars and confectionery; FNs, 9.76 µg kg(-)(1) in cereals and their products; DON and AcDONs, 33.1 µg kg(-)(1) in cereals and their products; and ZEA, 53.8 µg kg(-)(1) in fats and oils. The estimated dietary exposures of Hong Kong adults to the mycotoxins analysed were well below the respective health-based guidance values, where available. For AFs, the upper-bound exposure for high consumers is 0.0049 µg kg bw(-)(1) day(-)(1), which was estimated to contribute to about 7.7 (< 1%) of liver cancer cases when compared with 1222 liver cancer cases per year in Hong Kong. The percentage contributions of the estimated 95th percentile dietary exposures (lower and upper bound) to the health-based guidance values of individual mycotoxins were: ochratoxin A, 3.6-9.2%; fumonisins, 0.04-8.5%; deoxynivalenol and acetyldeoxynivalenols, 21.7-28.2%; and zearalenone 3.3-34.5%. The findings indicate that dietary exposures to all the mycotoxins analysed in this study were unlikely to pose an unacceptable health risk to the Hong Kong population.

  11. [DIETARY SUPPLEMENT REKECEN IMPROVES SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF CHRONIC PROSTATITIS ANTIBACTERIAL THERAPY].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V F; Davidov, M I; Sokolov, A P; Kuznetsov, S V

    2015-01-01

    This randomized comparative study was carried out to estimate efficacy and safety of the natural complex of fermented food fibers and short chain fatty acids (dietary supplement rekicen-RD®) in antibacterial therapy of 64 patients with chronic infectious prostatitis. 32 patients of the treatment group received 8 week standard antibacterial therapy for chronic prostatitis in combination with dietary supplement rekicen-RD® and 32 patients of the control group were treated only with antibacterial therapy. Short-term and long-term results were estimated after 8 weeks and 6 months follow-up, respectively. It was found, that addition of dietary supplement rekicen- RD® to antibacterial therapy resulted in statistically significant improvement of the treatment efficacy. Compared to patients of the control group, patients of the treatment group had more pronounced positive changes of all indicators of treatment efficacy (NIH-CPSI total score, quality of life, echo-structure of prostate, the number of leukocytes in prostatic secretions). Long-term (after 6 months) clinical efficacy of the combination of antibacterial therapy with dietary supplement rekicen-RD® was 96,9%, bacteriological efficacy after 8 weeks - 87,5%, after 6 months - 81%. Notably, there was 4,5-fold reduction in the rate of antibiotics adverse side effects in the treatment group patients without a single gastro-intestinal side effect.

  12. [Dietary exposure assessment of some important Fusarium toxins in cereal-based products in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Shao, Bing; Zhu, Jianghui; Yu, Hongxia; Li, Fengqin

    2010-11-01

    To elucidate the dietary exposure of Chinese populations to deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV) and zearalenone (ZEN). Ten Fusarium toxins including DON, NIV, ZEN in domestic wheat flour and corn-based products harvested and collected in 2009 were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. Dietary intake assessments of human exposure to DON, NIV and ZEN were carried out in combination of national food consumption data with toxin concentration data by deterministic estimate method. (1) There are 2.5% adults and 10% children with the dietary exposure to DON exceeding the tolerable daily intake (TDI) on the basis of the average food consumption. At the 75th percentile food consumption level, the dietary exposure of populations to DON was higher than its TDI, 1.72 and 2.02 times (adults) as well as 1.19 and 1.09 times higher than TDI (children), respectively, based on the higher DON exposure (adults : P90 for wheat flour and P97. 5 for corn-based products, children: P50 for wheat flour and P75 for corn-based products). At the average toxin concentration, children with the high consumption level (90th, 97. 5th and 99th percentile) of either wheat flour or corn-based products, the dietary exposure to DON exceed the TDI, 1.81 to 3.17 times (wheat flour) and 1.47 - 3.97 times (corn-based products) higher than TDI, respectively. The dietary exposure of adults to ZEN exceed the TDI, based on the average food consumption data and higher ZEN level (P99), the 75th consumption data combined with P97. 5th toxin concentration, as well as 90th percentile of both food consumption data and ZEN concentration, respectively. There are 1%, 2.5%, 25%, 25% and 50% populations of children exposed ZEN higher than TDI, respectively at the 50th, 75th, 90th, 97. 5th and 99th percentile of food consumption data. (2) The level of concern (LOC) of DON in wheat flour calculated with high consumption data (90th, 97. 5th and 99th percentile) for all populations as well as DON and ZEN in corn-based products calculated

  13. Prolonged exposure to high dietary lipids is not associated with lipotoxicity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rennison, Julie H; McElfresh, Tracy A; Chen, Xiaoqin; Anand, Vijay R; Hoit, Brian D; Hoppel, Charles L; Chandler, Margaret P

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have reported that elevated myocardial lipids in a model of mild-to-moderate heart failure increased mitochondrial function, but did not alter left ventricular function. Whether more prolonged exposure to high dietary lipids would promote a lipotoxic phenotype in mitochondrial and myocardial contractile function has not been determined. We tested the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to high dietary lipids, following coronary artery ligation, would preserve myocardial and mitochondrial function in heart failure. Rats underwent ligation or sham surgery and were fed normal (10% kcal fat) (SHAM, HF) or high fat diet (60% kcal saturated fat) (SHAM+FAT, HF+FAT) for sixteen weeks. Although high dietary fat was accompanied by myocardial tissue triglyceride accumulation (SHAM 1.47+/-0.14; SHAM+FAT 2.32+/-0.14; HF 1.34+/-0.14; HF+FAT 2.21+/-0.20 micromol/gww), fractional shortening was increased 16% in SHAM+FAT and 28% in HF+FAT compared to SHAM and HF, respectively. Despite increased medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) activity in interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) of both SHAM+FAT and HF+FAT, dietary lipids also were associated with decreased state 3 respiration using palmitoylcarnitine (SHAM 369+/-14; SHAM+FAT 307+/-23; HF 354+/-13; HF+FAT 366+/-18 nAO min(-1) mg(-1)) in SHAM+FAT compared to SHAM and HF+FAT. State 3 respiration in IFM also was decreased in SHAM+FAT relative to SHAM using succinate and DHQ. In conclusion, high dietary lipids promoted myocardial lipid accumulation, but were not accompanied by alterations in myocardial contractile function typically associated with lipotoxicity. In normal animals, high dietary fat decreased mitochondrial respiration, but also increased MCAD activity. These studies support the concept that high fat feeding can modify multiple cellular pathways that differentially affect mitochondrial function under normal and pathological conditions.

  14. Metabolic consequences of chronic intermittent mild stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Abigail K; Fourman, Sarah; Packard, Amy E B; Egan, Ann E; Ryan, Karen K; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M

    2015-10-15

    Chronic stress in humans has divergent effects on food intake, with some individuals reporting increased vs. decreased food intake during stress. This divergence may depend in part on stress intensity, with higher-intensity stressors preferentially promoting anorexia. Consistent with this idea, rodents given a high-intensity chronic variable stress paradigm have robustly decreased food intake and body weight gain. However, the metabolic effects of a less intense chronic stress paradigm are not clear. Thus in the present study, adult male rats were given chronic intermittent mild stress (CIMS) exposure (3 cycles, in which each cycle consists of once daily mild stress for 5 days/week for 2 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of no stress) vs. non-stress controls, combined with ongoing access to a palatable diet (PD; choice of chow, high-fat diet, 30% sucrose drink, and water) vs. control diet (chow and water). As expected, access to PD increased caloric intake, body weight gain, and adiposity, and impaired glucose tolerance. CIMS decreased body weight gain only during the first cycle of stress and did not affect body weight gain thereafter, regardless of diet. Moreover, CIMS did not alter total food intake, adiposity or glucose tolerance regardless of diet. Lastly, CIMS transiently increased high-fat diet preference in PD-fed rats during the first stress cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that CIMS has relatively modest metabolic effects that occur primarily during initial stress exposure. These results support the hypothesis that the metabolic consequences of chronic stress vary with stress intensity and/or frequency.

  15. Total diet study on pesticide residues in France: levels in food as consumed and chronic dietary risk to consumers.

    PubMed

    Nougadère, Alexandre; Sirot, Véronique; Kadar, Ali; Fastier, Antony; Truchot, Eric; Vergnet, Claude; Hommet, Frédéric; Baylé, Joëlle; Gros, Philippe; Leblanc, Jean-Charles

    2012-09-15

    Chronic dietary exposure to pesticide residues was assessed for the French population using a total diet study (TDS) to take into account realistic levels in foods as consumed at home (table-ready). Three hundred and twenty-five pesticides and their transformation products, grouped into 283 pesticides according to their residue definition, were sought in 1235 composite samples corresponding to 194 individual food items that cover 90% of the adult and child diet. To make up the composite samples, about 19,000 food products were bought during different seasons from 2007 to 2009 in 36 French cities and prepared according to the food preparation practices recorded in the individual and national consumption survey (INCA2). The results showed that 37% of the samples contained one or more residues. Seventy-three pesticides were detected and 55 quantified at levels ranging from 0.003 to 8.7mg/kg. The most frequently detected pesticides, identified as monitoring priorities in 2006, were the post-harvest insecticides pirimiphos-methyl and chlorpyrifos-methyl-particularly in wheat-based products-together with chlorpyrifos, iprodione, carbendazim and imazalil, mainly in fruit and fruit juices. Dietary intakes were estimated for each subject of INCA2 survey, under two contamination scenarios to handle left-censored data: lower-bound scenario (LB) where undetected results were set to zero, and upper-bound (UB) scenario where undetected results were set to the detection limit. For 90% of the pesticides, exposure levels were below the acceptable daily intake (ADI) under the two scenarios. Under the LB scenario, which tends to underestimate exposure levels, only dimethoate intakes exceeded the ADI for high level consumers of cherry (0.6% of children and 0.4% of adults). This pesticide, authorised in Europe, and its metabolite were detected in both cherries and endives. Under the UB scenario, that overestimates exposure, a chronic risk could not be excluded for nine other pesticides

  16. Dietary fat modification in patients with chronic kidney disease: n-3 fatty acids and beyond.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyan; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Replacement of dietary saturated fat with unsaturated fat has been recommended for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population. Less is known of the health risks in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), of a diet with an unhealthy fat profile, in general characterized by insufficient polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and excess satu-rated fatty acids (SFA). The dietary intake of PUFA, both the n-3 and n-6 subfamilies, is increasingly gaining attention in CKD, owing to its broad cardioprotective effects. Conversely, dietary SFA may promote CVD in this vulnerable population. This review discusses the potential benefits of dietary fat modification in CKD patients, including plausible effects on renal function, albuminuria, lipoproteins, nutritional status, inflammation, thrombosis and clinical outcomes. Increasing evidence supports the concept that n-3 PUFA might have therapeutic potential in reducing proteinuria in CKD and reducing triglycerides and inflammation in dialysis patients. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that linoleic acid, a major n-6 PUFA derived from vegetable oils, may be beneficial for a number of CVD risk factors. Increased consumption of oily fish as part of plant-based diets with low content of SFA is likely to benefit patients who have CKD, or are at risk of developing CKD. Such recommendations are in line with the concept of a healthy "Mediterranean diet" and are in line with current dietary recommendations for CVD prevention in the community.

  17. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  18. Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Colacino, Justin A.; Arthur, Anna E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Rozek, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized. We used data from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet's role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP. Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level. - Highlights: • Cadmium may cause chronic disease through oxidative stress or inflammation. • We developed a score to quantify dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake. • Cadmium was associated with markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake mitigated the effects of cadmium exposure. • Dietary interventions may be effective against chronic cadmium toxicity.

  19. Dietary exposure biomarker-lead discovery based on metabolomics analysis of urine samples.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Manfred; Lloyd, Amanda J; Haldar, Sumanto; Favé, Gaëlle; Seal, Chris J; Brandt, Kirsten; Mathers, John C; Draper, John

    2013-08-01

    Although robust associations between dietary intake and population health are evident from conventional observational epidemiology, the outcomes of large-scale intervention studies testing the causality of those links have often proved inconclusive or have failed to demonstrate causality. This apparent conflict may be due to the well-recognised difficulty in measuring habitual food intake which may lead to confounding in observational epidemiology. Urine biomarkers indicative of exposure to specific foods offer information supplementary to the reliance on dietary intake self-assessment tools, such as FFQ, which are subject to individual bias. Biomarker discovery strategies using non-targeted metabolomics have been used recently to analyse urine from either short-term food intervention studies or from cohort studies in which participants consumed a freely-chosen diet. In the latter, the analysis of diet diary or FFQ information allowed classification of individuals in terms of the frequency of consumption of specific diet constituents. We review these approaches for biomarker discovery and illustrate both with particular reference to two studies carried out by the authors using approaches combining metabolite fingerprinting by MS with supervised multivariate data analysis. In both approaches, urine signals responsible for distinguishing between specific foods were identified and could be related to the chemical composition of the original foods. When using dietary data, both food distinctiveness and consumption frequency influenced whether differential dietary exposure could be discriminated adequately. We conclude that metabolomics methods for fingerprinting or profiling of overnight void urine, in particular, provide a robust strategy for dietary exposure biomarker-lead discovery.

  20. Interventions to enhance adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Sophie; Lapointe, Annie; Ratté, Stéphane; Gravel, Karine; Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients, and greater adherence to dietary advice is a critical component in preventing and managing chronic diseases. Objectives To assess the effects of interventions for enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Search methods We searched the following electronic databases up to 29 September 2010: The Cochrane Library (issue 9 2010), PubMed, EMBASE (Embase.com), CINAHL (Ebsco) and PsycINFO (PsycNET) with no language restrictions. We also reviewed: a) recent years of relevant conferences, symposium and colloquium proceedings and abstracts; b) web-based registries of clinical trials; and c) the bibliographies of included studies. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that evaluated interventions enhancing adherence to dietary advice for preventing and managing chronic diseases in adults. Studies were eligible if the primary outcome was the client’s adherence to dietary advice. We defined ‘client’ as an adult participating in a chronic disease prevention or chronic disease management study involving dietary advice. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of the studies. They also assessed the risk of bias and extracted data using a modified version of the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group data extraction template. Any discrepancies in judgement were resolved by discussion and consensus, or with a third review author. Because the studies differed widely with respect to interventions, measures of diet adherence, dietary advice, nature of the chronic diseases and duration of interventions and follow-up, we conducted a qualitative analysis. We classified included studies according to the function of the intervention and present results in a narrative table using vote counting for each category of intervention. Main results

  1. Bioavailability evaluation, uptake of heavy metals and potential health risks via dietary exposure in urban-industrial areas.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Balal; Liu, Guijian; Wang, Ruwei; Imtiaz, Muhammad; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Munir, Mehr Ahmed Mujtaba; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2016-11-01

    A verity of human activities i.e. urbanization and industrialization have been resulted serious environmental contaminations by heavy metals in all over the world. The settlement of populations in urban and nearby industrial areas for economic development has significant share in their exposure to these metallic contaminants. Depending on the nature and type of the pollutants, targeted urban-industrial environments can have harmful and chronic health risk impacts on exposed local inhabitants and may require detoxification, healing and remedial therapy. Consequently, environmental monitoring as well as human health risk assessments of urban environments under industrial influence are key dominant features. We believe this work will provide new insights into the studies of metals exposure and associated health risks in emerging industrials cities of developing countries. Present study aimed to study the bioavailability of metals, quantify the changeability in soil and vegetable metal concentrations and estimation of human health risks via dietary exposure, focusing on urban-industrial environment. Soil and vegetable samples were collected in six random sites within the urban, periurban and industrial areas and analyzed for metal concentrations. In addition, risk assessment model proposed by US-EPA was employed to estimate the potential health risk of heavy metals via dietary intake. Results indicated that the heavy metal concentrations were noteworthy in periurban and urban-industrial areas. However, contamination levels varied with the type of vegetable, and the point source pollution such as traffic, urban wastes and industrial effluent. According to the estimated THQ and HI values for non-carcinogenic risk, little or no negative impact of heavy metals was observed on local inhabitants. However, the concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb and Ni were nearly closed to the permissible limits described by US-EPA in urban-industrial areas. Conclusively, some efficient remedial

  2. Chronic exposure to environmental levels of tribromophenol impairs zebrafish reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Liu Chunsheng; Yu Liqin; Zhou Bingsheng

    2010-02-15

    Tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP) is ubiquitously found in aquatic environments and biota. In this study, we exposed zebrafish embryos (F{sub 0}; 2'''' days post-fertilization, dpf) to environmental concentration (0.3 mug/L) and a higher concentration (3.0 mug/L) of TBP and assessed the impact of chronic exposure (120 dpf) on reproduction. TBP exposure did not cause a significant increase in the malformation and reduction in the survival in the F{sub 0}-generation fish. After TBP exposure, the plasma testosterone and estradiol levels significantly increased in males and decreased in females. The transcription of steroidogenic genes (3beta-HSD, 17beta-HSD, CYP17, CYP19A, CYP19B) was significantly upregulated in the brain and testes in males and downregulated in the brain and ovary in females. TBP exposure significantly downregulated and upregulated the expression of VTG in the liver of female and male fish, respectively. Meanwhile, TBP exposure altered the sex ratio toward a male-dominant state. The F{sub 1}-generation larvae exhibited increased malformation, reduced survival, and retarded growth, suggesting that TBP in the aquatic environment has significant adverse effects on fish population.

  3. Estimation of Chronic Personal Exposure to Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyunok; Zdeb, Michael; Perera, Frederica; Spengler, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) exposure from solid fuel burning represents an important public health issue for the majority of the global population. Yet, understanding of individual-level exposures remains limited. Objectives To develop regionally adaptable chronic personal exposure model to pro-carcinogenic PAH (c-PAH) for the population in Kraków, Poland. Methods We checked the assumption of spatial uniformity in eight c-PAH using the coefficients of divergence (COD), a marker of absolute concentration differences. Upon successful validation, we developed personal exposure models for eight pro-carcinogenic PAH by integrating individual-level data with area-level meteorological or pollutant data. We checked the resulting model for accuracy and precision against home outdoor monitoring data. Results During winter, COD of 0.1 for Kraków suggest overall spatial uniformity in the ambient concentration of the eight c-PAH. The three models that we developed were associated with index of agreement approximately equal to 0.9, root mean square error < 2.6 ng/m3, and 90th percentile of absolute difference ≤ 4 ng/m3 for the predicted and the observed concentrations for eight pro-carcinogenic PAH. Conclusions Inexpensive and logistically feasible information could be used to estimate chronic personal exposure to PAH profiles, in lieu of costly and labor-intensive personal air monitoring at wide scale. At the same time, thorough validation through direct personal monitoring and assumption checking are critical for successful model development. PMID:25965038

  4. Dietary exposure to persistent organochlorine pesticides in 2007 Chinese total diet study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pingping; Zhao, Yunfeng; Li, Jingguang; Wu, Guohua; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Qing; Fan, Sai; Yang, Xin; Li, Xiaowei; Wu, Yongning

    2012-07-01

    Dietary exposure to persistent organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) was assessed for Chinese populations, using the total diet study (TDS) approach in 2007. Multistage random cluster sampling method was used in this study. 108 composite samples, representative of foods "as consumed" by the Chinese were analyzed for residues of OCPs by a multi-residue method. The result showed that hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), chlordane compounds (CHLs), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and heptachlor could be detected in, respectively 84%, 39%, 37%, 13% and 5% of all samples. Concentrations of DDT in all samples ranged from undetectable levels to 72.2 μg/kg. Others were minor components in the OCPs profile. The residual levels of OCPs were significantly below the Extraneous Maximum Residue Limits (EMRLs). Based on the 2000 nationwide food consumption survey, the average dietary exposure of the Chinese to DDT, HCH, HCB, CHLs, and heptachlor was estimated to be 0.016, 0.002, 0.009, 0.006, and 0.001 μg/kg body weight per day respectively, showing a significant decrease trend compared with the past. The major food groups contributing to dietary OCPs were aquatic foods, meats, and cereals. The average and high end estimated daily intakes of different OCPs for the Chinese were both lower than the tolerable daily intake (TDI) suggested by authorities indicating low health risk of OCPs dietary exposure among Chinese adults at present. However, the risk of carcinogenicity of the OCPs should be concerned with if the carcinogenicity effects from the exposures to these OCPs were considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls is associated with increased risk of stroke in women.

    PubMed

    Bergkvist, C; Kippler, M; Larsson, S C; Berglund, M; Glynn, A; Wolk, A; Åkesson, A

    2014-09-01

    The potentially beneficial effects of fish consumption on stroke may be modified by major food contaminants in fish. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in particular are proposed to play a role in the aetiology of stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the association between dietary PCB exposure and stroke risk with the intake of long-chain omega-3 fish fatty acids and fish consumption. The prospective population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort was examined. It was comprised of 34,591 women free of cardiovascular diseases and cancer at baseline in 1997 and followed up for 12 years. Validated estimates of dietary PCB exposure were obtained via a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Incident cases of stroke were ascertained through register linkage. During 12 years of follow-up (397,309 person-years), there were 2015 incident cases of total stroke (1532 ischaemic strokes, 216 intracerebral haemorrhages, 94 subarachnoid haemorrhages and 173 unspecified strokes). Multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RR), controlled for known stroke risk factors and fish consumption, were 1.67 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.29-2.17] for total stroke, 1.61 (95% CI, 1.19-2.17) for ischaemic stroke and 2.80 (95% CI, 1.42-5.55) for haemorrhagic stroke for women in the highest quartile of dietary PCB exposure (median 288 ng day(-1) ) compared with women in the lowest quartile (median 101 ng day(-1) ). Dietary exposure to PCBs was associated with an increased stroke risk in women, especially haemorrhagic stroke. The results provide important information regarding the risk-benefit analysis of fish consumption, particularly for cerebrovascular disease prevention. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  6. Dietary cadmium exposure and prostate cancer incidence: a population-based prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Julin, B; Wolk, A; Johansson, J-E; Andersson, S-O; Andrén, O; Åkesson, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Experimental data convincingly propose the toxic metal cadmium as a prostate carcinogen. Cadmium is widely dispersed into the environment and, consequently, food is contaminated. Methods: A population-based cohort of 41 089 Swedish men aged 45–79 years was followed prospectively from 1998 through 2009 to assess the association between food frequency questionnaire-based estimates of dietary cadmium exposure (at baseline, 1998) and incidence of prostate cancer (3085 cases, of which 894 were localised and 794 advanced) and through 2008 for prostate cancer mortality (326 fatal cases). Results: Mean dietary cadmium exposure was 19 μg per day±s.d. 3.7. Multivariable-adjusted dietary cadmium exposure was positively associated with overall prostate cancer, comparing extreme tertiles; rate ratio (RR) 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03–1.24). For subtypes of prostate cancer, the RR was 1.29 (95% CI: 1.08–1.53) for localised, 1.05 (95% CI: 0.87–1.25) for advanced, and 1.14 (95% CI: 0.86–1.51) for fatal cases. No statistically significant difference was observed in the multivariable-adjusted risk estimates between tumour subtypes (Pheterogeneity=0.27). For localised prostate cancer, RR was 1.55 (1.16–2.08) among men with a small waist circumference and RR 1.45 (1.15, 1.83) among ever smokers. Conclusion: Our findings provide support that dietary cadmium exposure may have a role in prostate cancer development. PMID:22850555

  7. Dietary exposure assessments for children in europe (the EXPOCHI project): rationale, methods and design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background/purpose The number of dietary exposure assessment studies focussing on children is very limited. Children are however a vulnerable group due to their higher food consumption level per kg body weight. Therefore, the EXPOCHI project aims [1] to create a relational network of individual food consumption databases in children, covering different geographical areas within Europe, and [2] to use these data to assess the usual intake of lead, chromium, selenium and food colours. Methods EXPOCHI includes 14 food consumption databases focussed on children (1-14 y old). The data are considered representative at national/regional level: 14 regions covering 13 countries. Since the aim of the study is to perform long-term exposure assessments, only data derived from 24 hr dietary recalls and dietary records recorded on at least two non-consecutive days per individual were included in the dietary exposure assessments. To link consumption data and concentration data of lead, chromium and selenium in a standardised way, categorisation of the food consumption data was based on the food categorisation system described within the SCOOP Task report 3.2.11. For food colours, the food categorisation system specified in the Council Directive 94/36/EC was used. Conclusion The EXPOCHI project includes a pan-European long-term exposure assessment of lead, chromium, selenium and food colours among children living in 13 different EU countries. However, the different study methods and designs used to collect the data in the different countries necessitate an in-depth description of these different methods and a discussion about the resulting limitations. PMID:22958503

  8. Estimating Pesticide Exposure from Dietary Intake and Organic Food Choices: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Shirley A.A.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Lu, Chensheng; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Organophosphate pesticide (OP) exposure to the U.S. population is dominated by dietary intake. The magnitude of exposure from diet depends partly on personal decisions such as which foods to eat and whether to choose organic food. Most studies of OP exposure rely on urinary biomarkers, which are limited by short half-lives and often lack specificity to parent compounds. A reliable means of estimating long-term dietary exposure to individual OPs is needed to assess the potential relationship with adverse health effects. Objectives We assessed long-term dietary exposure to 14 OPs among 4,466 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and examined the influence of organic produce consumption on this exposure. Methods Individual-level exposure was estimated by combining information on typical intake of specific food items with average OP residue levels on those items. In an analysis restricted to a subset of participants who reported rarely or never eating organic produce (“conventional consumers”), we assessed urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) levels across tertiles of estimated exposure (n = 480). In a second analysis, we compared DAP levels across subgroups with differing self-reported organic produce consumption habits (n = 240). Results Among conventional consumers, increasing tertile of estimated dietary OP exposure was associated with higher DAP concentrations (p < 0.05). DAP concentrations were also significantly lower in groups reporting more frequent consumption of organic produce (p < 0.02). Conclusions Long-term dietary exposure to OPs was estimated from dietary intake data, and estimates were consistent with DAP measurements. More frequent consumption of organic produce was associated with lower DAPs. Citation Curl CL, Beresford SA, Fenske RA, Fitzpatrick AL, Lu C, Nettleton JA, Kaufman JD. 2015. Estimating pesticide exposure from dietary intake and organic food choices: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Environ

  9. Dietary exposure to aluminium in the popular Chinese fried bread youtiao.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge; Zhao, Xue; Wu, Shimin; Hua, Hongying; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiheng

    2017-06-01

    Youtiao is a typical, traditional and widely consumed fried food in China. Fermentation of youtiao involves the use of aluminium potassium sulphate (alum). There are health concerns related to the levels of aluminium in food; therefore, we aimed to determine the aluminium concentrations of youtiao from various locations, and to estimate the dietary exposure by different age groups in southern and northern China. The aluminium content of youtiao samples varied considerably (range = 4.46-852.69 mg kg(-1)). Both the mean and median aluminium contents of youtiao exceeded 100 mg kg(-1), which is the China National Standard (GB) 2760-2014 National Food Safety for Standards for food additives. However, the median and 97.5th percentile of weekly dietary exposure to aluminium from youtiao, estimated using Monte Carlo simulation, did not exceed the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) set by the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) for children, adolescents, adults and seniors. The weekly dietary exposure to aluminium would exceed the PTWI if children, adolescents, adults and seniors consumed 134.47, 260.98, 327.10 or 320.41 g of youtiao per week, respectively.

  10. Prenatal Exposure to Nitrosatable Drugs, Dietary Intake of Nitrites, and Preterm Birth.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Ann M; Shinde, Mayura U; Brender, Jean D; Shipp, Eva M; Huber, John C; Sharkey, Joseph R; McDonald, Thomas J; Werler, Martha M; Kelley, Katherine E; Griesenbeck, John S; Langlois, Peter H; Canfield, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Prenatal exposure to nitrosatable drugs, including secondary or tertiary amines, has been associated with preterm birth. Associations may be accentuated by higher intakes of dietary nitrites because of the increased formation of N-nitroso compounds. Using data from mothers of babies without major birth defects (controls) from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, we examined the relationship between nitrosatable drug exposure in conjunction with dietary nitrite intake and preterm birth among 496 mothers of preterm infants and 5,398 mothers with full-term deliveries in 1997-2005. A protective association was observed with a high intake of plant nitrites (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) = 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53, 0.97). Secondary amines in conjunction with high nitrite intake were associated with preterm birth during the first (AHR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.98), second (AHR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.17, 3.07), and third (AHR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.22, 3.29) trimesters. The adjusted hazard ratios for tertiary amine use in the third trimester by increasing tertiles of nitrite intake were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.35, 1.31), 1.25 (95% CI: 0.71, 2.19), and 2.02 (95% CI: 1.17, 3.49). Prenatal exposure to nitrosatable drugs, particularly secondary and tertiary amines, in conjunction with higher levels of dietary nitrite intake may increase the risk of preterm birth.

  11. Otitis media exposure associates with dietary preference and adiposity: a community-based observational study of at-risk preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Peracchio, Heather L; Henebery, Kerah E; Sharafi, Mastaneh; Hayes, John E; Duffy, Valerie B

    2012-05-15

    Chronic exposure to otitis media (OM) has been linked to risk of overweight/obesity. Here we tested if dietary behaviors explained some of the OM-adiposity relationship among 485 racially-diverse, low-income preschoolers (253 girls, mean age=45±7 months) enrolled in government-supported urban preschool programs. From measured weight/height, 4% were underweight, 17% were overweight and 13% were obese. OM exposure according to parent report varied across nearly equal quartiles-low (never, once) to high (3-5 times, 6+ times) exposure categories. Boys were more likely to be in the high exposure categories. Parents rated their child's liking/disliking of foods (high-fat/added sugar, fruits/juice, vegetables) and non-food activities. In analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), mean liking for vegetables and fruits/juice fell as OM exposure increased, with significant differences between lowest and highest exposure categories (p<.05). Food neophobic versus non-neophobic preschoolers also liked vegetables and fruits less (p<.001). In a two-way ANCOVA, main effects of OM and food neophobia independently predicted vegetable and fruit liking; preschoolers with more OM exposure and neophobia had the lowest liking. Although ANCOVA failed to reveal OM effects on mean liking for fat/sugar foods, the relative ranking of liking for these foods differed by OM category. Fat/sugar foods were ranked as most preferred for the high OM children, particularly the boys, surpassing the ranking of pleasurable non-food items. Conversely, low OM children ranked pleasurable non-food items and fruits/juice as more pleasurable than high OM children. BMI percentile varied with OM exposure, but not neophobia: preschoolers with the greatest exposure averaged the highest percentiles. In multiple regression analyses, liking for vegetables or fruits failed to associate significantly with BMI percentile. There was a small but significant association between greater fat/sugar liking and higher BMI percentile

  12. Relationships between children's exposure to ethnic produce and their dietary behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiong; Goto, Keiko; Wolff, Cindy; Zhao, Yanling

    2015-04-01

    The current study examined relationships between children's ethnic produce exposure and healthy dietary practices among Latino, Hmong and non-Hispanic white children. One hundred Latino, 100 Hmong, and 92 non-Hispanic white parents of children ages 5-8 years old in northern California completed a cross-sectional survey. Children's exposure to ethnic produce from Hmong and Latino cultures, overall fruit and vegetable consumption, and fast food and ethnic restaurant use were measured. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare variables across different ethnic groups. Spearman's correlation was used to assess the relationship between variables. Children's overall ethnic produce exposure, as well as exposure to produce from other cultures, was significantly correlated with overall fruit and vegetable consumption. There was a marginal (p = 0.053) negative association between ethnic produce exposure and fast food restaurant use among Latino children. These findings suggest that promoting ethnic produce is an effective strategy for enhancing healthy dietary practices among children.

  13. Assessing infant exposure to persistent organic pollutants via dietary intake in Australia.

    PubMed

    Toms, Leisa-Maree Leontjew; Hearn, Laurence; Mueller, Jochen F; Harden, Fiona A

    2016-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs); organochlorine pesticides (OCPs); and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, and pose a risk of causing adverse human health effects. Typically, exposure assessments undertaken by modeling existing intake data underestimate the concentrations of these chemicals in infants. This study aimed to determine concentrations of POPs in infant foods, assess exposure via dietary intake and compare this to historical exposure. Fruit purees, meat and vegetables, dairy desserts, cereals and jelly foods (n = 33) purchased in 2013 in Brisbane, Australia were analyzed. For OCPs and PCBs, concentrations ranged up to 95 pg/g fw and for PBDEs up to 32 pg/g fw with most analytes below the limit of detection. Daily intake is dependent on type and quantity of foods consumed. Consumption of a 140 g meal would result in intake ranging from 0 to 4.2 ng/day, 4.4 ng/day and 13.3 ng/day, for OCPs, PBDEs and PCBs, respectively. PBDEs were detected in 3/33 samples, OCPs in 9/33 samples and PCBs in 13/33 samples. Results from this study indicate exposure for infants via dietary (in contrast to dust and breast milk) intake in Australia contribute only a minor component to total exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An assessment of dietary exposure to glyphosate using refined deterministic and probabilistic methods.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, C L; Harris, C A

    2016-09-01

    Glyphosate is a herbicide used to control broad-leaved weeds. Some uses of glyphosate in crop production can lead to residues of the active substance and related metabolites in food. This paper uses data on residue levels, processing information and consumption patterns, to assess theoretical lifetime dietary exposure to glyphosate. Initial estimates were made assuming exposure to the highest permitted residue levels in foods. These intakes were then refined using median residue levels from trials, processing information, and monitoring data to achieve a more realistic estimate of exposure. Estimates were made using deterministic and probabilistic methods. Exposures were compared to the acceptable daily intake (ADI)-the amount of a substance that can be consumed daily without an appreciable health risk. Refined deterministic intakes for all consumers were at or below 2.1% of the ADI. Variations were due to cultural differences in consumption patterns and the level of aggregation of the dietary information in calculation models, which allows refinements for processing. Probabilistic exposure estimates ranged from 0.03% to 0.90% of the ADI, depending on whether optimistic or pessimistic assumptions were made in the calculations. Additional refinements would be possible if further data on processing and from residues monitoring programmes were available.

  15. TIM Version 3.0 beta Technical Description and User Guide - Appendix F - Approach for Calculating Juvenile Dietary Exposure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Use the available information on the relationship between juvenile body weights and energetic requirements to develop a general approach for calculating juvenile dietary exposure doses appropriate for a range of avian species.

  16. Bioaccumulation of silver in Daphnia magna: Waterborne and dietary exposure to nanoparticles and dissolved silver.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fabianne; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Pavlaki, Maria D; Azevedo, Sofia; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are incorporated into commercial products as antimicrobial agents, which potentiate their emission to the environment. The toxicity of Ag-NP has been associated with the release of Ag ions (Ag(+)), which are more toxic to aquatic organisms than Ag-NP. In this study, a toxicokinetics approach was applied to compare the potential of Daphnia magna to accumulate Ag from either Ag-NP or AgNO3 through different exposure routes: a) water, b) diet and c) water and diet. A one-compartment kinetics model was applied to describe the development of Ag body concentrations over time and derive uptake (k1w; k1d) and elimination (k2) rate constants. Under water-only exposure, AgNO3 induced higher Ag uptake rate constants and bioconcentration factors when compared to Ag-NP. For dietary exposure, no differences in Ag concentrations in D. magna, along with the kinetics parameters, were found for both Ag forms. Simultaneous water and dietary exposures to Ag-NP induced higher Ag concentrations in D. magna compared to AgNO3. In this combined exposure, uptake from water explains most for the increase in Ag body concentration in D. magna for Ag-NP exposure, whereas uptake from the diet was the major contributor for the increase in Ag concentration in D. magna under AgNO3 exposure. Biomagnification was not observed for any of the exposure routes applied in this study, neither for Ag-NP nor for AgNO3.

  17. Chronic Ethanol Exposure: Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Traphagen, Nicole; Tian, Zhi; Allen-Gipson, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) is the world’s most commonly used drug, and has been widely recognized as a risk factor for developing lung disorders. Chronic EtOH exposure affects all of the organ systems in the body and increases the risk of developing pulmonary diseases such as acute lung injury and pneumonia, while exacerbating the symptoms and resulting in increased mortality in many other lung disorders. EtOH and its metabolites inhibit the immune response of alveolar macrophages (AMs), increase airway leakage, produce damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupt the balance of antioxidants/oxidants within the lungs. In this article, we review the role of EtOH exposure in the pathogenesis and progression of pulmonary disease. PMID:26492278

  18. Chronic ethanol exposure during development: disturbances of breathing and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dubois, C J; Kervern, M; Naassila, M; Pierrefiche, O

    2013-11-01

    The effects of prenatal exposure to some drugs of abuse, such as nicotine, on breathing function have been clearly established. However, the case of alcohol (ethanol), the most widely consume drug of abuse, remains unknown. Prenatal ethanol consumption in humans may lead to fetal alcohol syndrome and although the effect of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) on cognitive function is frequently studied, nothing is known about CPEE's effects on breathing as compared with other drugs of abuse. The role of nicotine for example, in human neonatal pathology, such as sudden infant death syndrome, is acknowledged today, whereas the full scope of CPEE's role is only recently emerging. Here, we review preclinical investigations on the effects of CPEE on breathing in different animal models, including possible mechanisms of adaptation to CPEE. These recent preclinical studies shed new light on a widely used drug of abuse and should facilitate the understanding of the danger posed by alcohol consumption during pregnancy.

  19. A chronic eosinophilic pneumonia case with long exposure to isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Funda; Sak, Zafer Hasan Ali; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Gencer, Mehmet

    2014-10-01

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is a disease with unknown etiology, characterized by peripheral blood eosinophilia and abnormal eosinophil accumulation in the lungs. A 43-year-old male with 30 years history of exposure to isocyanates was admitted with the complaint of sputum, cough, progressive dyspnoea, and weight loss. Physical examination revealed bilaterally decreased breath sounds and extensive rales. On laboratory analysis; leukocytosis (12.3 10(3)/proportional variant L), hypereosinophilia (30%), elevated CRP and RF (1000 IU/ml), and IgE levels (1160 IU/ml) in the serum were observed. Chest radiograph and computed tomography on admission showed reticulonodular pattern at both lung fields. Pulmonary function tests assumed a restrictive pattern and a low diffusing capacity. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed a marked eosinophilia (50%). Transbronchial lung biopsy indicated eosinophilic pneumonia. In this case we aimed to describe a rare case of CEP probably caused by exposure to isocyanate.

  20. Responses of Hyalella azteca to acute and chronic microplastic exposures.

    PubMed

    Au, Sarah Y; Bruce, Terri F; Bridges, William C; Klaine, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    Limited information is available on the presence of microplastics in freshwater systems, and even less is known about the toxicological implications of the exposure of aquatic organisms to plastic particles. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of microplastic ingestion on the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. Hyalella azteca was exposed to fluorescent polyethylene microplastic particles and polypropylene microplastic fibers in individual 250-mL chambers to determine 10-d mortality. In acute bioassays, polypropylene microplastic fibers were significantly more toxic than polyethylene microplastic particles; 10-d lethal concentration 50% values for polyethylene microplastic particles and polypropylene microplastic fibers were 4.64 × 10(4) microplastics/mL and 71.43 microplastics/mL, respectively. A 42-d chronic bioassay using polyethylene microplastic particles was conducted to quantify effects on reproduction, growth, and egestion. Chronic exposure to polyethylene microplastic particles significantly decreased growth and reproduction at the low and intermediate exposure concentrations. During acute exposures to polyethylene microplastic particles, the egestion times did not significantly differ from the egestion of normal food materials in the control; egestion times for polypropylene microplastic fibers were significantly slower than the egestion of food materials in the control. Amphipods exposed to polypropylene microplastic fibers also had significantly less growth. The greater toxicity of microplastic fibers than microplastic particles corresponded with longer residence times for the fibers in the gut. The difference in residence time might have affected the ability to process food, resulting in an energetic effect reflected in sublethal endpoints. © 2015 SETAC.

  1. Impacts of chronic sublethal exposure to clothianidin on winter honeybees.

    PubMed

    Alkassab, Abdulrahim T; Kirchner, Wolfgang H

    2016-07-01

    A wide application of systemic pesticides and detection of their residues in bee-collected pollen and nectar at sublethal concentrations led to the emergence of concerns about bees' chronic exposure and possible sublethal effects on insect pollinators. Therefore, special attention was given to reducing unintentional intoxications under field conditions. The sensitivity of winter bees throughout their long lifespan to residual exposure of pesticides is not well known, since most previous studies only looked at the effects on summer bees. Here, we performed various laboratory bioassays to assess the effects of clothianidin on the survival and behavior of winter bees. Oral lethal and sublethal doses were administered throughout 12-day. The obtained LD50 values at 48, 72, 96 h and 10 days were 26.9, 18.0, 15.1 and 9.5 ng/bee, respectively. Concentrations <20 µg/kg were found to be sublethal. Oral exposure to sublethal doses was carried out for 12-day and, the behavioral functions were tested on the respective 13th day. Although slight reductions in the responses at the concentrations 10 and 15 µg/kg were observed, all tested sublethal concentrations had showed non-significant effects on the sucrose responsiveness, habitation of the proboscis extension reflex and olfactory learning performance. Nevertheless, chronic exposure to 15 µg/kg affected the specificity of the early long-term memory (24 h). Since the tested concentrations were in the range of field-relevant concentrations, our results strongly suggest that related-effects on winter and summer bees' sensitivity should also be studied under realistic conditions.

  2. Arsenic: bioaccessibility from seaweed and rice, dietary exposure calculations and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Esther F A; Janssen, Paul J C M; de Wit-Bos, Lianne

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid that occurs in food and the environment in different chemical forms. Inorganic arsenic is classified as a class I carcinogen. The inorganic arsenic intake from food and drinking water varies depending on the geographic arsenic background. Non-dietary exposure to arsenic is likely to be of minor importance for the general population within the European Union. In Europe, arsenic in drinking water is on average low, but food products (e.g. rice and seaweed) are imported from all over the world including from regions with naturally high arsenic levels. Therefore, specific populations living in Europe could also have a high exposure to inorganic arsenic due to their consumption pattern. Current risk assessment is based on exposure via drinking water. For a good estimation of the risks of arsenic in food, it is important to investigate if the bioavailability of inorganic arsenic from food is different from drinking water. The present study further explores the issue of European dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic via rice and seaweed and its associated health risks. The bioavailability of inorganic arsenic was measured in in vitro digestion experiments. The data indicate that the bioavailability of inorganic arsenic is similar for rice and seaweed compared with drinking water. The calculated dietary intake for specific European Union populations varied between 0.44 and 4.51 µg kg⁻¹ bw day⁻¹. The margins of exposure between the inorganic intake levels and the BMDL0.5 values as derived by JECFA are low. Decreasing the intake of inorganic arsenic via Hijiki seaweed could be achieved by setting legal limits similar to those set for rice by the Codex Alimentarius Commission in July 2014.

  3. Assessment of dietary exposure to organohalogen contaminants, legacy and emerging flame retardants in a Norwegian cohort.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuchao; Tay, Joo-Hui; Covaci, Adrian; Padilla-Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Papadopoulou, Eleni; Haug, Line Småstuen; Neels, Hugo; Sellström, Ulla; de Wit, Cynthia A

    2017-03-20

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), emerging halogenated flame retardants (EHFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) were detected in 24h duplicate diet samples from a Norwegian cohort (n=61), with concentrations ranging from dietary exposure assessment was conducted for each participant based on individual body weight and contaminant concentrations in their collected duplicate diet samples. The estimated median (95th percentile) dietary exposures for ΣPFR, ΣPCB, ΣOCP, ΣPBDE, and ΣEHFR were 87 (340), 5.8 (27), 11 (31), 1.3 (14), and <0.01 (3.4) ng/kgbw/day, respectively. The median and 95th percentile dietary exposures of most of the target analytes did not exceed the reference dose (RfD), except for PCBs where 16% of the participants exceeded the RfD. However, a relatively short period of such high intake is not expected to result in any adverse health effects. Participants of this cohort were exposed to higher levels of EHDPHP than any other FRs. Fish was the major dietary route for PCB, OCP and PBDE exposure, while meat was the main dietary exposure route for PFRs.

  4. The Effect of Chronic Arsenic Exposure in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hallauer, Janell; Geng, Xiangrong; Yang, Hung-Chi; Shen, Jian; Tsai, Kan-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arsenic is a prevalent environmental toxin and a Group one human carcinogenic agent. Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with many human diseases. The aim of this study is to evaluate zebrafish as an animal model to assess arsenic toxicity in elevated long-term arsenic exposure. With prolonged exposure (6 months) to various concentrations of arsenic from 50 ppb to 300 ppb, effects of arsenic accumulation in zebrafish tissues, and phenotypes were investigated. Results showed that there are no significant changes of arsenic retention in zebrafish tissues, and zebrafish did not exhibit any visible tumor formation under arsenic exposure conditions. However, the zebrafish demonstrate a dysfunction in their neurological system, which is reflected by a reduction of locomotive activity. Moreover, elevated levels of the superoxide dismutase (SOD2) protein were detected in the eye and liver, suggesting increased oxidative stress. In addition, the progenies of arsenic-treated parents displayed a smaller biomass (four-fold reduction in body weight) compared with those from their parental controls. This result indicates that arsenic may induce genetic or epigenetic changes that are then passed on to the next generation. Overall, this study demonstrates that zebrafish is a convenient vertebrate model with advantages in the evaluation of arsenic-associated neurological disorders as well as its influences on the offspring. PMID:27140519

  5. Chronic bronchiolitis in nonhuman primates after prolonged ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Eustis, S.L.; Schwartz, L.W.; Kosch, P.C.; Dungworth, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata) were exposed to 0.0, 0.5, or 0.8 ppm ozone for 7, 28, or 90 consecutive days, 8 hours per day. The pulmonary response was evaluated by means of pulmonary function testing, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission microscopy, autoradiography, and morphometry. Pulmonary function values obtained before exposure did not statistically differ from values obtained after exposure. A general trend of increased quasistatic compliance of the lung was observed in both groups of exposed monkeys. Morphologic changes were principally characterized as low-grade chronic respiratory bronchiolitis. Tritiated thymidine labeling and counts of respiratory bronchiolar epithelium demonstrated up to a 37-fold increase in labeling index at 7 days but only a sevenfold increase at 90 days. Differential cell counts demonstrated an increase in the proportion of cuboidal bronchiolar cells constituting the respiratory bronchiolar epithelium. In control monkeys, 60% of the epithelial cells were cuboidal bronchiolar cells. At 90 days of exposure, more than 90% of the respiratory bronchiolar cells were cuboidal in appearance. The cuboidal bronchiolar cell in control monkeys does not appear secretory, but membrane-bound electron-dense secretory granules are present in this cell type from exposed monkeys. Epithelial hyperplasia (increased number of cells per millimeter of airway length) persisted through 90 days of exposure at a level slightly above that present at 7 days.

  6. Chronic Alcohol Exposure Renders Epithelial Cells Vulnerable to Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Stephen; Pithadia, Ravi; Rehman, Tooba; Zhang, Lijuan; Plichta, Jennifer; Radek, Katherine A.; Forsyth, Christopher; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shafikhani, Sasha H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite two centuries of reports linking alcohol consumption with enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infections and in particular gut-derived bacteria, there have been no studies or model systems to assess the impact of long-term alcohol exposure on the ability of the epithelial barrier to withstand bacterial infection. It is well established that acute alcohol exposure leads to reduction in tight and adherens junctions, which in turn leads to increases in epithelial cellular permeability to bacterial products, leading to endotoxemia and a variety of deleterious effects in both rodents and human. We hypothesized that reduced fortification at junctional structures should also reduce the epithelial barrier’s capacity to maintain its integrity in the face of bacterial challenge thus rendering epithelial cells more vulnerable to infection. In this study, we established a cell-culture based model system for long-term alcohol exposure to assess the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on the ability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells to withstand infection when facing pathogenic bacteria under the intact or wounded conditions. We report that daily treatment with 0.2% ethanol for two months rendered Caco-2 cells far more susceptible to wound damage and cytotoxicity caused by most but not all bacterial pathogens tested in our studies. Consistent with acute alcohol exposure, long-term ethanol exposure also adversely impacted tight junction structures, but in contrast, it did not affect the adherens junction. Finally, alcohol-treated cells partially regained their ability to withstand infection when ethanol treatment was ceased for two weeks, indicating that alcohol’s deleterious effects on cells may be reversible. PMID:23358457

  7. Testing a cumulative and aggregate exposure model using biomonitoring studies and dietary records for Italian vineyard spray operators.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Marc C; Glass, C Richard; Fustinoni, Silvia; Moretto, Angelo; Mandic-Rajcevic, Stefan; Riso, Patrizia; Turrini, Aida; van der Voet, Hilko; Hetmanski, Michel T; Fussell, Richard J; van Klaveren, Jacob D

    2015-05-01

    The need for improved tools to estimate the cumulative and aggregate exposure to compounds such as plant protection products (PPPs) is recognised in the EU Regulation 1107/2009. A new model has been developed to estimate the exposure within a population to single compounds or compounds within a Cumulative Action Group, considering dietary and non-dietary sources and multiple exposure routes. To test the model a field study was carried out in Italy with operators applying tebuconazole fungicides, with measurements of dermal exposure collected. Whole urine samples were collected and analysed to provide values for the absorbed dose of tebuconazole, with duplicate diet samples collected and analysed as a measure of dietary exposures. The model provided predicted values of exposure for combined dietary and non-dietary routes of exposures which were compared to the measured absorbed dose values based on urinary analysis. The model outputs provided mean daily exposure values of 1.77 (± 1.96) µg a.s./kg BW which are comparable to measured mean values from the biomonitoring field study of 1.73 (± 1.31) µg a.s./kg BW. To supplement the limited measurement data available, comparisons against other models were also made and found to be comparable.

  8. Improvement in chronic muscle fasciculations with dietary change: a suspected case of gluten neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian; Pitsinger, Adam

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient with chronic, multisite muscle fasciculations who presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic and was treated with dietary modifications. A 28-year-old man had muscle fasciculations of 2 years. The fasciculations began in his eye and progressed to the lips and lower extremities. In addition, he had gastrointestinal distress and fatigue. The patient was previously diagnosed as having wheat allergy at the age of 24 but was not compliant with a gluten-free diet at that time. Food sensitivity testing revealed immunoglobulin G-based sensitivity to multiple foods, including many different grains and dairy products. The working diagnosis was gluten neuropathy. Within 6 months of complying with dietary restrictions based on the sensitivity testing, the patient's muscle fasciculations completely resolved. The other complaints of brain fog, fatigue, and gastrointestinal distress also improved. This report describes improvement in chronic, widespread muscle fasciculations and various other systemic symptoms with dietary changes. There is strong suspicion that this case represents one of gluten neuropathy, although testing for celiac disease specifically was not performed.

  9. Improvement in Chronic Muscle Fasciculations With Dietary Change: A Suspected Case of Gluten Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian; Pitsinger, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient with chronic, multisite muscle fasciculations who presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic and was treated with dietary modifications. Clinical features A 28-year-old man had muscle fasciculations of 2 years. The fasciculations began in his eye and progressed to the lips and lower extremities. In addition, he had gastrointestinal distress and fatigue. The patient was previously diagnosed as having wheat allergy at the age of 24 but was not compliant with a gluten-free diet at that time. Food sensitivity testing revealed immunoglobulin G–based sensitivity to multiple foods, including many different grains and dairy products. The working diagnosis was gluten neuropathy. Intervention and outcome Within 6 months of complying with dietary restrictions based on the sensitivity testing, the patient’s muscle fasciculations completely resolved. The other complaints of brain fog, fatigue, and gastrointestinal distress also improved. Conclusions This report describes improvement in chronic, widespread muscle fasciculations and various other systemic symptoms with dietary changes. There is strong suspicion that this case represents one of gluten neuropathy, although testing for celiac disease specifically was not performed. PMID:25225467

  10. Adaptation in Caco-2 Human Intestinal Cell Differentiation and Phenolic Transport with Chronic Exposure to Blackberry (Rubus sp.) Extract.

    PubMed

    Redan, Benjamin W; Albaugh, George P; Charron, Craig S; Novotny, Janet A; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2017-04-05

    As evidence mounts for a health-protective role of dietary phenolics, the importance of understanding factors influencing bioavailability increases. Recent evidence has suggested chronic exposure to phenolics may impact their absorption and metabolism. To explore alterations occurring from chronic dietary exposure to phenolics, Caco-2 cell monolayers were differentiated on Transwell inserts with 0-10 μM blackberry (Rubus sp.) total phenolics extracts rich in anthocyanins, flavonols, and phenolic acids. Following differentiation, apical to basolateral transport of phenolics was assessed from an acute treatment of 100 μM blackberry phenolics from 0 to 4 h. Additionally, differences in gene expression of transport and phase II metabolizing systems including ABC transporters, organic anion transporters (OATs), and uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP) glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) were probed. After 4 h, 1 μM pretreated monolayers showed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the percentage of cumulative transport including less epicatechin (42.1 ± 0.53), kaempferol glucoside (23.5 ± 0.29), and dicaffeoylquinic acid (31.9 ± 0.20) compared to control. Finally, significant (P < 0.05) alterations in mRNA expression of key phase II metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins were observed with treatment. Therefore, adaptation to blackberry extract exposure may impact intestinal transport and metabolism of phenolics.

  11. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenhua; Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A; Ke, Zun-Ji; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas.

  12. Gender differences in TBT accumulation and transformation in Thais clavigera after aqueous and dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhong; Fang, Chao; Hong, Huasheng; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2010-09-01

    In this study, female and male Thais clavigera whelks were exposed to aqueous and dietary (using oysters as the prey) tributyltin (TBT) for up to 45 days, followed by a 30-day depuration, in order to examine the gender differences in TBT accumulation and transformation. The metabolites of TBT [dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT)] were also measured in different tissues of the whelks (digestive, reproductive and remaining organs) during the exposure and depuration periods. By the end of the exposure period, all of the female whelks developed imposex after TBT exposure, and both the relative penis size index and the vas deferens sequence index were positively correlated with the tissue burden of TBT. However, biomagnification of TBT did not occur in the whelks. TBT was rapidly accumulated in their digestive and reproductive organs from both routes of exposure, and both elimination and biotransformation of TBT were also rapid. The redistribution of TBT among tissues was obvious during the exposure period but negligible during depuration. MBT was generally the major metabolite in each tissue, indicating a significant metabolism of TBT by the whelks. Accumulation, transformation, as well as elimination, were more significant following dietary exposure than following aqueous exposure. In particular, we observed gender-related differences in the biokinetics of TBT. Rapid biotransformation and elimination of TBT were detected in the male whelks, while the female whelks had higher bioaccumulation but lower elimination of TBT in their reproductive organs. Internal remobilization of TBT from digestive to reproductive organs was also more obvious in the females, indicating that the reproductive organs of females were the main targets of TBT accumulation.

  13. Dietary exposure to pesticide residues from foods of plant origin and drinks in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Nasreddine, Lara; Rehaime, Maria; Kassaify, Zeina; Rechmany, Roula; Jaber, Farouk

    2016-08-01

    This study assesses the dietary exposure of Lebanese adults to 47 pesticide residues from both foods of plant origin and drinks. The study was conducted using the Total Diet Study protocol in two different areas of Lebanon: Greater Beirut (urban) and Keserwan (semi-rural). A total of 1860 individual foods were collected, prepared, and cooked prior to analysis. Composite samples of similar foods were analyzed, following the QuEChERS Multiresidue method. Eighteen residues were detected/quantified on at least one composite sample, with 66.7 % of the results being quantifiable and 33.3 % detectable. Quantifiable levels ranged between 10.3 and 208 μg/kg. For the composite samples where residues were detected, 55 % had one residue, while 45 % had 2-4 residues. The most frequently detected/quantified pesticide residues included Chlorpyrifos, Procymidone, Primiphos methyl, Dimethoate, and Dieldrin. The dietary exposure assessment was conducted using the deterministic approach with two scenarios: (1) the lower bound (LB) approach and (2) the upper bound (UB) approach. Using the LB approach, mean estimated daily exposures were far below the acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) for all investigated residues. Using the UB approach, which tends to overestimate exposure, mean estimated daily exposures were below the ADIs for all residues except for Dieldrin (semi-rural: 128.7 % ADI; urban: 100.7 % ADI). Estimates of mean exposure to Diazinon reached 50.3 % of ADI in the urban diet and 61.9 % in the semi-rural diet. Findings of this study identify specific pesticide residues as monitoring priorities for which more comprehensive and sensitive analyses are needed in order to refine exposure assessment.

  14. Dietary intake and its contribution to longitudinal organophosphorus pesticide exposure in urban/suburban children.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chensheng; Barr, Dana B; Pearson, Melanie A; Waller, Lance A

    2008-04-01

    The widespread use of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides has led to frequent exposure in adults and children. Because such exposure may cause adverse health effects, particularly in children, the sources and patterns of exposure need to be studied further. We assessed young urban/suburban children's longitudinal exposure to OP pesticides in the Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (CPES) conducted in the greater Seattle, Washington, area, and used a novel study design that allowed us to determine the contribution of dietary intake to the overall OP pesticide exposure. Twenty-three children 3-11 years of age who consumed only conventional diets were recruited for this 1-year study conducted in 2003-2004. Children switched to organic diets for 5 consecutive days in the summer and fall sampling seasons. We measured specific urinary metabolites for malathion, chlorpyrifos, and other OP pesticides in urine samples collected twice daily for a period of 7, 12, or 15 consecutive days during each of the four seasons. By substituting organic fresh fruits and vegetables for corresponding conventional food items, the median urinary metabolite concentrations were reduced to nondetected or close to non-detected levels for malathion and chlorpyrifos at the end of the 5-day organic diet intervention period in both summer and fall seasons. We also observed a seasonal effect on the OP urinary metabolite concentrations, and this seasonality corresponds to the consumption of fresh produce throughout the year. The findings from this study demonstrate that dietary intake of OP pesticides represents the major source of exposure in young children.

  15. Chronic Exposure to Diquat Causes Reproductive Toxicity in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Gao, Bin-Wen; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xian-Wei; Ren, Qiao-Ling; Chen, Jun-Feng; Ma, Qiang; Xing, Bao-Song

    2016-01-01

    Diquat is a bipyridyl herbicide that has been widely used as a model chemical for in vivo studies of oxidative stress due to its generation of superoxide anions, and cytotoxic effects. There is little information regarding the toxic effects of diquat on the female reproductive system, particularly ovarian function. Thus, we investigated the reproductive toxic effects of diquat on female mice. Chronic exposure to diquat reduced ovary weights, induced ovarian oxidative stress, resulted in granulosa cell apoptosis, and disrupted oocyte developmental competence, as shown by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, decreased polar body extrusion rates and increased apoptosis-related genes expression. Additionally, after diquat treatment, the numbers of fetal mice and litter sizes were significantly reduced compared to those of control mice. Thus, our results indicated that chronic exposure to diquat induced reproductive toxicity in female mice by promoting the ROS production of gruanousa cells and ooctyes, impairing follicle development, inducing apoptosis, and reducing oocyte quality. In conclusion, our findings indicate that diquat can be used as a potent and efficient chemical for in vivo studies of female reproductive toxicity induced by oxidative stress. Moreover, the findings from this study will further enlarge imitative research investigating the effect of ovarian damage induced by oxidative stress on reproductive performance and possible mechanisms of action in large domestic animals.

  16. Alterations in splanchnic blood flow following chronic ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Piano, M R; Ferguson, J L; Melchior, C L

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether or not tolerance develops to the effect of 3.0 g/kg ethanol on total and regional splanchnic blood flow in male Wistar rats. The animals were given the Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet containing ethanol for 10 days; ethanol-fed animals were withdrawn 24 hr prior to experiments. Regional blood flow and cardiac output (CO) were measured by the reference microsphere technique after an intraperitoneal injection of 3.0 g/kg of ethanol. Acute ethanol administration produced early nonsustained increases in portal vein blood flow in animals fed ethanol for 10 days and withdrawn for 24 hr and in control animals. However, after chronic exposure to ethanol, the pattern of increase in blood flow in response to ethanol in the splanchnic organs was different between the ethanol-fed and control groups. Increases in portal vein flow in control groups were due to concomitant increases in small intestinal, colonic, and cecal blood flow while the increase in the ethanol-fed group was due to a rise in small intestinal and stomach blood flow. The increase in stomach blood flow that occurred in the animals treated chronically with ethanol may be viewed as a conditioned response to ethanol, since this was not found in the control group. These results, demonstrate that the pattern of increase in blood flow in the splanchnic organs produced by an acute dose of ethanol depends on the animal's previous exposure to ethanol.

  17. Chronic Exposure to Diquat Causes Reproductive Toxicity in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Gao, Bin-Wen; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xian-Wei; Ren, Qiao-Ling; Chen, Jun-Feng; Ma, Qiang; Xing, Bao-song

    2016-01-01

    Diquat is a bipyridyl herbicide that has been widely used as a model chemical for in vivo studies of oxidative stress due to its generation of superoxide anions, and cytotoxic effects. There is little information regarding the toxic effects of diquat on the female reproductive system, particularly ovarian function. Thus, we investigated the reproductive toxic effects of diquat on female mice. Chronic exposure to diquat reduced ovary weights, induced ovarian oxidative stress, resulted in granulosa cell apoptosis, and disrupted oocyte developmental competence, as shown by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, decreased polar body extrusion rates and increased apoptosis-related genes expression. Additionally, after diquat treatment, the numbers of fetal mice and litter sizes were significantly reduced compared to those of control mice. Thus, our results indicated that chronic exposure to diquat induced reproductive toxicity in female mice by promoting the ROS production of gruanousa cells and ooctyes, impairing follicle development, inducing apoptosis, and reducing oocyte quality. In conclusion, our findings indicate that diquat can be used as a potent and efficient chemical for in vivo studies of female reproductive toxicity induced by oxidative stress. Moreover, the findings from this study will further enlarge imitative research investigating the effect of ovarian damage induced by oxidative stress on reproductive performance and possible mechanisms of action in large domestic animals. PMID:26785375

  18. Estimation of dietary exposure to acrylamide of Polish teenagers from an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Wyka, Joanna; Tajner-Czopek, Agnieszka; Broniecka, Anna; Piotrowska, Ewa; Bronkowska, Monika; Biernat, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dietary exposure to acrylamide (AA) in a group of teenagers (n = 261) from an urban environment. The intake of AA from food was estimated based on a 7-day food record diary (consecutive days). The food rations obtained (n = 1827) were used to calculate the amounts of the consumed food products, which were the main sources of AA. In the case of girls, the estimated dietary intake of AA per kg body weight (BW) amounted to 0.09 µg/kg BW/day (50th percentile), 0.32 µg/kg BW/day (75th percentile) and 1.04 µg/kg BW/day (95th percentile), and among boys it was 0.13, 0.41, and 1.18 µg/kg BW/day, respectively. The main sources of AA exposure were French fries, potato crisps, corn flakes, bread and salty sticks. The lowest values for margin of exposure (MOE) were calculated for the P95th percentiles of exposure, and ranged from 152 to 173. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing dietary exposure to cadmium in a metal recycling community in Vietnam: age and gender aspects.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Duc Minh; Hough, Rupert Lloyd; Le, Thi Thuy; Nyberg, Ylva; Le, Bach Mai; Nguyen, Cong Vinh; Nguyen, Manh Khai; Oborn, Ingrid

    2012-02-01

    This study estimates the dietary exposure to cadmium (Cd), and associated potential health risks, for individuals living and working in a metal recycling community (n=132) in Vietnam in comparison to an agricultural (reference) community (n=130). Individual-level exposure to Cd was estimated through analysis of staple foodstuffs combined with information from a food frequency questionnaire. Individual-level exposure estimates were compared with published 'safe' doses to derive a Hazard Quotient (HQ) for each member of the study population. Looking at the populations as a whole, there were no significant differences in the diets of the two villages. However, significantly more rice was consumed by working age adults (18-60 years) in the recycling village compared to the reference village (p<0.001). Rice was the main staple food with individuals consuming 461±162g/d, followed by water spinach (103±51kg/d). Concentrations of Cd in the studied foodstuffs were elevated in the metal recycling village. Values of HQ exceeded unity for 87% of adult participants of the metal recycling community (39% had a HQ>3), while 20% of adult participants from the reference village had an HQ>1. We found an elevated health risk from dietary exposure to Cd in the metal recycling village compared to the reference community. WHO standard of 0.4mg Cd/kg rice may not be protective where people consume large amounts of rice/have relatively low body weight.

  20. Chronic Exposure to Low-Level Cadmium in Diabetes: Role of Oxidative Stress and Comparison with Polychlorinated Biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Adeline; Ounnas, Fayçal; Lénon, Marine; Arnaud, Josiane; Demeilliers, Christine; Moulis, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Among the most important physiological functions, maintenance of the oxidation reduction equilibrium in cells stands out as a major homeostatic event. Many environmental contaminants efficiently trap cellular reducing compounds, but the actual importance of this mode of toxicity is far from being precisely known. This statement applies to cases of slowly developing chronic diseases, such as neurodegenerations, diabetes, and many others. The involvement of oxidative challenge in diabetes is considered in connection with chronic dietary exposure to low-level concentrations of cadmium. Comparison is made with polychlorobiphenyl molecules (PCB): they are structurally unrelated to cadmium, they preferentially distribute into different organs than cadmium, and they follow different metabolic pathways. Yet, they have also pro-oxidative properties, and they are associated with diabetes. Since neither cadmium nor PCB is a direct oxidant, they both follow indirect pathways to shift the redox equilibrium. Thus, a difference must be made between the adaptable response of the organism, i.e. the anti-oxidant response, and the irreversible damage generated by oxidizing species, i.e. oxidative damage, when exposure occurs at low concentrations. The approximate border between high and low levels of exposure is estimated in this review from the available relevant data, and the strengths and weaknesses of experimental models are delineated. Eventually, chronic low level exposure to these contaminants sparks cellular responses setting ground for dysfunction and disease, such as diabetes: oxidative damage is an accompanying phenomenon and not necessarily an early mechanism of toxicity.

  1. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Truta-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-07

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival.To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  2. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TruÅ£ǎ-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-01

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival. To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  3. Violence exposure, a chronic psychosocial stressor, and childhood lung function

    PubMed Central

    Suglia, Shakira Franco; Ryan, Louise; Laden, Francine; Dockery, Douglas; Wright, Rosalind J

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic psychosocial stressors, including violence, have been linked to neuropsychological and behavioral development in children as well as physiologic alterations that may lead to broader health effects. Methods We examined the relationship between violence and childhood lung function in a prospective birth cohort of 313 urban children 6 and 7 years of age. Mothers reported on their child’s lifetime exposure to community violence (ETV) and interparental conflict in the home [Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS)] within one year of the lung function assessment. Results In linear regression analyses, adjusting for maternal education, child’s age, race, birthweight, tobacco smoke exposure, and medical history, girls in the highest CTS verbal aggression tertile had a 5.5% (95% CI: −9.6, −1.5) decrease in percent predicted FEV1 and a 5.4% (95% CI: −9.7, −1.1) decrease in FVC compared to girls in the lowest tertile. The CTS verbal aggression subscale was associated with lung function among boys in the same direction, albeit this was not statistically significant. Boys in the highest ETV tertile had a 3.4% (95% CI: −8.0, 1.1) lower FEV1 and 5.3% lower (95% CI: −10.2, −0.4) FVC compared to boys in the lowest tertile. The ETV score was not a significant predictor of girl’s lung function. Conclusions Interparental conflict, specifically verbal aggression, and exposure to community violence were associated with decreased childhood lung function independent of socioeconomic status, tobacco smoke exposure, birthweight and respiratory illness history. Gender differences were noted based on the type of violence exposure which may warrant further exploration. PMID:18158365

  4. Dietary exposure and risk assessment to lead of the population of Jiangsu province, China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yingliang; Liu, Pei; Sun, Jinfang; Wang, Cannan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Yafei; Wang, Shiyuan; Wu, Yongning

    2014-01-01

    The paper's main purpose is to estimate the dietary exposure to lead for the inhabitants of Jiangsu province, China. Lead concentration data were obtained from the national food contamination monitoring programme during 2007-10. Food samples (n = 2077) were collected from 23 food categories in Jiangsu province. Consumption data were derived from Chinese national nutrition and health survey in 2002, which included 3938 inhabitants from 1451 households in Jiangsu province. Concentration data were combined with consumption data to estimate the dietary intake for the inhabitants of 2-6, 7-17 and 18-80 years, respectively. The β-binomial-normal (BBN) model was used to estimate the long-term intake for the population in Jiangsu province. The distribution of individual margin of exposure (IMoE) was introduced to assess the health effect. Uncertainty of IMoE was quantified by Monte Carlo and bootstrap methods. The mean levels of dietary exposure to lead were estimated at 3.019 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for children aged 2-6 years, 2.104 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for teenagers aged 7-17 years, and 1.601 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for adults aged 18-80 years. The mean intakes for the urban and rural populations were 1.494 and 1.822 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1), respectively. From the 25th to 99.9th percentiles, IMoE was 0.125-2.057 for 2-6 years and 0.473-7.998 for 18-80 years, respectively. The distribution of IMoE could indicate a public health concern on lead for the Chinese population in Jiangsu. Control measures should be taken to reduce lead exposure in Jiangsu province.

  5. Tissue-specific selenium accumulation and toxicity in adult female Xenopus laevis chronically exposed to elevated dietary selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Massé, Anita J; Muscatello, Jorgelina R; Hogan, Natacha S; Janz, David M

    2017-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is a developmental toxicant that is also capable of altering the bioenergetic and endocrine status of adult fish. To date, aquatic ecotoxicological research has predominantly focused on the toxic effects of Se in fish, and minimal information has been published related to amphibians. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential toxicity associated with chronically elevated dietary Se consumption in adult female amphibians utilizing the model species Xenopus laevis. Adult X. laevis females were fed a diet augmented with L-selenomethionine at measured concentrations of 0.7 µg Se/g (control), 10.9 µg Se/g, 30.4 µg Se/g, or 94.2 µg Se/g dry mass for 68 d, after which they were bred with untreated males. Ovary, egg, liver, muscle, and blood samples were collected from female frogs after completion of the exposure period and subsequent breeding to ascertain Se tissue distribution, muscle and liver triglyceride and glycogen levels, and plasma cortisol concentrations. The concentrations of Se measured in female tissues excluding the liver were significantly increased in proportion with dietary intake. No significant differences were observed among treatment groups with respect to biometric indices, energy stores, or stress response of adult female X. laevis after Se exposure, which suggests that this amphibian species is capable of accumulating substantial quantities of this element in their tissues with no adverse effects on fitness. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1047-1055. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  6. Estimating pesticide exposure from dietary intake and organic food choices: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    PubMed

    Curl, Cynthia L; Beresford, Shirley A A; Fenske, Richard A; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Lu, Chensheng; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Joel D

    2015-05-01

    Organophosphate pesticide (OP) exposure to the U.S. population is dominated by dietary intake. The magnitude of exposure from diet depends partly on personal decisions such as which foods to eat and whether to choose organic food. Most studies of OP exposure rely on urinary biomarkers, which are limited by short half-lives and often lack specificity to parent compounds. A reliable means of estimating long-term dietary exposure to individual OPs is needed to assess the potential relationship with adverse health effects. We assessed long-term dietary exposure to 14 OPs among 4,466 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and examined the influence of organic produce consumption on this exposure. Individual-level exposure was estimated by combining information on typical intake of specific food items with average OP residue levels on those items. In an analysis restricted to a subset of participants who reported rarely or never eating organic produce ("conventional consumers"), we assessed urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) levels across tertiles of estimated exposure (n = 480). In a second analysis, we compared DAP levels across subgroups with differing self-reported organic produce consumption habits (n = 240). Among conventional consumers, increasing tertile of estimated dietary OP exposure was associated with higher DAP concentrations (p < 0.05). DAP concentrations were also significantly lower in groups reporting more frequent consumption of organic produce (p < 0.02). Long-term dietary exposure to OPs was estimated from dietary intake data, and estimates were consistent with DAP measurements. More frequent consumption of organic produce was associated with lower DAPs.

  7. Relation of dietary inorganic arsenic exposure and urinary inorganic arsenic metabolites excretion in Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Tomoko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Suzuki, Yayoi; Tao, Hiroaki; Nakazato, Tetsuya

    2017-06-03

    Inorganic arsenic (InAs) is a ubiquitous metalloid that has been shown to exert multiple adverse health outcomes. Urinary InAs and its metabolite concentration has been used as a biomarker of arsenic (As) exposure in some epidemiological studies, however, quantitative relationship between daily InAs exposure and urinary InAs metabolites concentration has not been well characterized. We collected a set of 24-h duplicated diet and spot urine sample of the next morning of diet sampling from 20 male and 19 female subjects in Japan from August 2011 to October 2012. Concentrations of As species in duplicated diet and urine samples were determined by using liquid chromatography-ICP mass spectrometry with a hydride generation system. Sum of the concentrations of urinary InAs and methylarsonic acid (MMA) was used as a measure of InAs exposure. Daily dietary InAs exposure was estimated to be 0.087 µg kg(-1) day(-1) (Geometric mean, GM), and GM of urinary InAs+MMA concentrations was 3.5 ng mL(-1). Analysis of covariance did not find gender-difference in regression coefficients as significant (P > 0.05). Regression equation Log 10 [urinary InAs+MMA concentration] = 0.570× Log 10 [dietary InAs exposure level per body weight] + 1.15 was obtained for whole data set. This equation would be valuable in converting urinary InAs concentration to daily InAs exposure, which will be important information in risk assessment.

  8. Dietary exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs in The Netherlands anno 2004.

    PubMed

    De Mul, Anika; Bakker, Martine I; Zeilmaker, Marco J; Traag, Wim A; Leeuwen, Stefan P J van; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; Boon, Polly E; Klaveren, Jacob D van

    2008-08-01

    In this study, representative occurrence data for PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs in food were obtained and used to estimate dietary exposure of the Dutch population. Food composite samples were analyzed as well as single fish and vegetables samples. Total dioxin concentrations in animal products ranged from 0.05 pg TEQ/g product in poultry to 2.5 pg TEQ/g product (using TEF(2006)) in fish (shrimp), with 0.12pg TEQ/g product being the lowest concentrations measured in fish (tuna). In vegetable products, concentrations ranged from 0.00002 pg TEQ/g product (white kale) to 0.19 pg TEQ/g (oils and fats). A long-term dietary exposure distribution was calculated using Monte Carlo Risk Assessment software. The lower bound median exposure of the Dutch population to PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs was estimated at 0.8 pg WHO-TEQ/kgbw/d, half of which were dioxin-like PCBs. Dairy was the main source (38%) due to its high consumption. Time-trend analysis shows that the exposure to dioxins has further decreased by 35% over the past five years. This is due to lower levels of dioxin-like compounds in most of the foods, mainly influenced by lower levels in meat and milk. The use of the new TEFs gives an exposure reduction of 10% with respect to TEF(1998). Still, 4% of the Dutch population exceeds the exposure limit of 14 pg/kgbw/week as set by the EU.

  9. Human Physiological Responses to Acute and Chronic Cold Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Jodie M.; Taylor, Nigel A. S.; Tipton, Michael J.; Greenleaf, John E.

    2001-01-01

    When inadequately protected humans are exposed to acute cold, excessive body heat is lost to the environment and unless heat production is increased and heat loss attenuated, body temperature will decrease. The primary physiological responses to counter the reduction in body temperature include marked cutaneous vasoconstriction and increased metabolism. These responses, and the hazards associated with such exposure, are mediated by a number of factors which contribute to heat production and loss. These include the severity and duration of the cold stimulus; exercise intensity; the magnitude of the metabolic response; and individual characteristics such as body composition, age, and gender. Chronic exposure to a cold environment, both natural and artificial, results in physiological alterations leading to adaptation. Three quite different, but not necessarily exclusive, patterns of human cold adaptation have been reported: metabolic, hypothermic, and insulative. Cold adaptation has also been associated with an habituation response, in which there is a desensitization, or damping, of the normal response to a cold stress. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the human physiological and pathological responses to cold exposure. Particular attention is directed to the factors contributing to heat production and heat loss during acute cold stress, and the ability of humans to adapt to cold environments.

  10. Human Physiological Responses to Acute and Chronic Cold Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Jodie M.; Taylor, Nigel A. S.; Tipton, Michael J.; Greenleaf, John E.

    2001-01-01

    When inadequately protected humans are exposed to acute cold, excessive body heat is lost to the environment and unless heat production is increased and heat loss attenuated, body temperature will decrease. The primary physiological responses to counter the reduction in body temperature include marked cutaneous vasoconstriction and increased metabolism. These responses, and the hazards associated with such exposure, are mediated by a number of factors which contribute to heat production and loss. These include the severity and duration of the cold stimulus; exercise intensity; the magnitude of the metabolic response; and individual characteristics such as body composition, age, and gender. Chronic exposure to a cold environment, both natural and artificial, results in physiological alterations leading to adaptation. Three quite different, but not necessarily exclusive, patterns of human cold adaptation have been reported: metabolic, hypothermic, and insulative. Cold adaptation has also been associated with an habituation response, in which there is a desensitization, or damping, of the normal response to a cold stress. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the human physiological and pathological responses to cold exposure. Particular attention is directed to the factors contributing to heat production and heat loss during acute cold stress, and the ability of humans to adapt to cold environments.

  11. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Angoorani, Pooneh; Asghari, Golaleh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the longitudinal association between dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a population-based study. In a longitudinal design study, participants were evaluated after approximately 3 years. Daily consumption of carboxymethyl lysine, a major type of dietary AGEs, was determined using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Estimated glomerular filtration rate in this study was calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) based on the national kidney foundation guidelines. A total of 1,692 participants, free of baseline CKD with complete follow-up data, out of 3,462 subjects, age ≥27 years of the third phase of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The association between dietary AGEs and CKD was assessed using the multivariate logistic regression models. The mean age of participants was 43.4 ± 11.4 years. The mean dietary intake of energy-adjusted AGEs was 8,336 ± 1,532 kU/day. By increasing trend of AGE consumption, the percentage of fat intake increased (P < .001), whereas the percentage of carbohydrates and total fiber intake decreased (P < .001). Longitudinal analysis indicated that compared to the first quartile category of AGE intakes from fat, in participants of the fourth quartile category, the risk of CKD increased (odds ratio: 2.02; 95% confidence interval: 1.16-3.54). The odds of CKD had increasing trends across increasing categories of AGE intakes from fat (P for trend <.05). Higher consumption of AGEs through dietary fat was associated with higher risk of CKD incidence. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Barriers and facilitators of dietary sodium restriction amongst Bangladeshi chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    de Brito-Ashurst, I; Perry, L; Sanders, T A B; Thomas, J E; Yaqoob, M M; Dobbie, H

    2011-02-01

    People of Bangladeshi origin have the highest mortality ratio from coronary heart disease of any minority ethnic group in UK and their rate of kidney disease is three- to five-fold higher than that of the European UK population. However, there is little information regarding their dietary customs or knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards health and nutrition. This multi-method qualitative study aimed to identify: (i) barriers and facilitators to dietary sodium restriction; (ii) traditional and current diet in the UK; and (iii) beliefs and attitudes towards development of hypertension, and the role of sodium. Methods included focus group discussions, vignettes and food diaries. Twenty female chronic kidney disease patients attended four focus group discussions and maintained food diaries; ten responded to vignettes during telephone interviews. Triangulation of the results obtained from the three methods identified categories and themes from qualitative thematic analysis. Identified barriers to sodium restriction were deeply-rooted dietary beliefs, attitudes and a culturally-established taste for salt. Facilitators of change included acceptable strategies for cooking with less salt without affecting palatability. Dietary practices were culturally determined but modified by participants' prosperity in the UK relative to their previous impoverished agrarian lifestyles in Bangladesh. Cultural background and orientation were strong determinants of the group's dietary practices and influenced their reception and response to health communication messages. Efforts to understand their cultural mores, interpret and convey health-promotion messages in culturally-appropriate ways met with a positive response. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  13. Dietary phosphorus intake and mortality in moderate chronic kidney disease: NHANES III.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, Maureen A; Filipowicz, Rebecca; Baird, Bradley C; Wei, Guo; Greene, Tom; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2012-03-01

    Dietary phosphorus intake is usually restricted in dialysis patients but the associations of dietary phosphorus intake with mortality in moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) are unknown. Therefore, we examined these associations in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. Dietary phosphorus intake was estimated from 24-h dietary recalls administered by trained personnel. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Time to mortality was examined by Cox regression models taking into account the complex survey design. 1105 adults with CKD were studied. Phosphorus intake was 1033 ± 482 mg/day (mean ± SD), eGFR was 49.3 ± 9.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and serum phosphorus was 3.5 ± 0.5 mg/dL. Compared to those in the lowest tertile of phosphorus intake (mean 532 ± 161 mg/day), those in the highest third (1478 ± 378 mg/day) had similar serum phosphorus levels (3.6 ± 0.5 versus 3.5 ± 0.6 mg/dL, P = 0.113) and modestly higher eGFR (50.0 ± 8.1 versus 47.5 ± 12.0 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P = 0.014). After adjustment for demographics, comorbidity, eGFR, physical activity, energy intake and nutritional variables, phosphorus intake was not associated with mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 0.98 per 100 mg/dL increase, 0.93-1.03]. High dietary phosphorus intake is not associated with increased mortality in moderate CKD, presumably because serum phosphorus levels are maintained in the normal range at this level of GFR. Interventional trials are needed to define optimal phosphorus intake in moderate CKD.

  14. Dietary phosphorus intake and mortality in moderate chronic kidney disease: NHANES III

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Maureen A.; Filipowicz, Rebecca; Baird, Bradley C.; Wei, Guo; Greene, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Background. Dietary phosphorus intake is usually restricted in dialysis patients but the associations of dietary phosphorus intake with mortality in moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) are unknown. Therefore, we examined these associations in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. Methods. Dietary phosphorus intake was estimated from 24-h dietary recalls administered by trained personnel. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Time to mortality was examined by Cox regression models taking into account the complex survey design. Results. 1105 adults with CKD were studied. Phosphorus intake was 1033 ± 482 mg/day (mean ± SD), eGFR was 49.3 ± 9.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 and serum phosphorus was 3.5 ± 0.5 mg/dL. Compared to those in the lowest tertile of phosphorus intake (mean 532 ± 161 mg/day), those in the highest third (1478 ± 378 mg/day) had similar serum phosphorus levels (3.6 ± 0.5 versus 3.5 ± 0.6 mg/dL, P = 0.113) and modestly higher eGFR (50.0 ± 8.1 versus 47.5 ± 12.0 mL/min/1.73 m2, P = 0.014). After adjustment for demographics, comorbidity, eGFR, physical activity, energy intake and nutritional variables, phosphorus intake was not associated with mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 0.98 per 100 mg/dL increase, 0.93–1.03]. Conclusions. High dietary phosphorus intake is not associated with increased mortality in moderate CKD, presumably because serum phosphorus levels are maintained in the normal range at this level of GFR. Interventional trials are needed to define optimal phosphorus intake in moderate CKD. PMID:21810769

  15. Results of a novel screening tool measuring dietary sodium knowledge in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wright Nunes, Julie A; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Greene, Jane H; Ikizler, Talat Alp; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2015-03-31

    Reducing dietary sodium has potential to benefit patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Little research is available defining dietary sodium knowledge gaps in patients with pre-dialysis CKD. We designed a brief screening tool to rapidly identify patient knowledge gaps related to dietary sodium for patients with CKD not yet on dialysis. A Short Sodium Knowledge Survey (SSKS) was developed and administered to patients with pre-dialysis CKD. We also asked patients if they received counseling on dietary sodium reduction and about recommended intake limits. We performed logistic regression to examine the association between sodium knowledge and patient characteristics. Characteristics of patients who answered all SSKS questions correctly were compared to those who did not. One-hundred fifty-five patients were surveyed. The mean (SD) age was 56.6 (15.1) years, 84 (54%) were men, and 119 (77%) were white. Sixty-seven patients (43.2%) correctly identified their daily intake sodium limit. Fifty-eight (37.4%) were unable to answer all survey questions correctly. In analysis adjusted for age, sex, race, education, health literacy, CKD stage, self-reported hypertension and attendance in a kidney education class, women and patients of non-white race had lower odds of correctly answering survey questions (0.36 [0.16,0.81]; p = 0.01 women versus men and 0.33 [0.14,0.76]; p = 0.01 non-white versus white, respectively). Our survey provides a mechanism to quickly identify dietary sodium knowledge gaps in patients with CKD. Women and patients of non-white race may have knowledge barriers impeding adherence to sodium reduction advice.

  16. Chronic escalating cocaine exposure, abstinence/withdrawal, and chronic re-exposure: Effects on striatal dopamine and opioid systems in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Schlussman, Stefan D.; Rabkin, Jacqui; Butelman, Eduardo R.; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic relapsing disease with periods of chronic escalating self-exposure, separated by periods of abstinence/withdrawal of varying duration. Few studies compare such cycles in preclinical models. This study models an “addiction-like cycle” in mice to determine neurochemical/molecular alterations that underlie the chronic, relapsing nature of this disease. Groups of male C57BL/6J mice received acute cocaine exposure (14-day saline/14-day withdrawal /13-day saline + 1-day cocaine), chronic cocaine exposure (14 day cocaine) or chronic re-exposure (14-day cocaine/14-day withdrawal /14-day cocaine). Escalating-dose binge cocaine (15-30 mg/kg/injection x 3/day, i.p. at hourly intervals) or saline (14-day saline) was administered, modeling initial exposure. In “re-exposure” groups, after a 14-day injection-free period (modeling abstinence/withdrawal), mice that had received cocaine were re-injected with 14-day escalating-dose binge cocaine, whereas controls received saline. Microdialysis was conducted on the 14th day of exposure or re-exposure to determine striatal dopamine content. Messenger RNA levels of preprodynorphin (Pdyn), dopamine D1 (Drd1) and D2 (Drd2) in the caudate putamen were determined by real-time PCR. Basal striatal dopamine levels were lower in mice after 14-day escalating exposure or re-exposure than in those in the acute cocaine group and controls. Pdyn mRNA levels were higher in the cocaine groups than in controls. Long-term adaptation was observed across the stages of this addiction-like cycle, in that the effects of cocaine on dopamine levels were increased after re-exposure compared to exposure. Changes in striatal dopaminergic responses across chronic escalating cocaine exposure and re-exposure are a central feature of the neurobiology of relapsing addictive states. PMID:23164614

  17. Risk assessment of dietary exposure to tryptamine for the Austrian population.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Nadja; Rauscher-Gabernig, Elke; Steinwider, Johann; Bauer, Friedrich; Paulsen, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Tryptamine acts as a neuromodulator and vasoactive agent in the human body. Dose-response data on dietary tryptamine are scarce and neither a toxicological threshold value nor tolerable levels in foods have been established so far. This paper reviews dose-response characteristics and toxicological effects of tryptamine as well as tryptamine contents in food, estimates dietary exposure of Austrian consumers, and calculates risk-based maximum tolerable limits for food categories. A dose without effect of 8 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) was derived from literature data. Dietary exposure via fish/seafood, beer, cheese and meat products was estimated for Austrian schoolchildren, female and male consumers, based on 543 food samples analysed in Austria 2010-15 and on food consumption data from 2008. Even worst-case estimates based on very high tryptamine contents reported in the literature did not exceed 5.9 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1), and thus were below the dose without effect. Maximum tolerable levels for food commodities were calculated for high-consumption scenarios (95th percentile of female Austrian consumers). For fresh/cooked fish, preserved fish, cheese, raw sausage, condiments, sauerkraut and fermented tofu, maximum tolerable levels were 1650, 3200, 2840, 4800, 14,120, 1740 and 2400 mg kg(-1), respectively. For beer, the maximum tolerable limit of 65 mg kg(-1) included an uncertainty factor of 10. None of the Austrian occurrence data exceeded these levels (in fact, only 3.3% of samples demonstrated measurable amounts of tryptamine), and just one report was found in the literature on a raw fish sample exceeding the respective tolerable level. In sum, dietary intake of tryptamine should not cause adverse health effects in healthy individuals. The assessment did not take into account the combined effects of simultaneously ingested biogenic amines, and increased susceptibility to tryptamine, e.g., due to reduced monoamine oxidase activity.

  18. Long-term low dose dietary resveratrol supplement reduces cardiovascular structural and functional deterioration in chronic heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmet, Ismayil; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Lakatta, Edward G; Talan, Mark

    2017-03-01

    A short-term exposure to resveratrol at high dosages exerts a remarkable cardioprotective effect. Whether a long-term exposure to resveratrol at low dosages that can be obtained through consumption of a resveratrol-rich diet is beneficial to heart diseases is unknown. We tested the effects of a resveratrol-enriched diet on cardiovascular remodeling of chronic heart failure (CHF) in rats resulting from permanent ligation of left coronary artery. Two weeks after surgery, rats were started on either a resveratrol-enriched (R; 5 mg/kg per day; n = 23) or normal (Control; n = 23) diet for next 10 months. Serial echocardiography in Control showed a significant decline in LV ejection fraction, increases in LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes, and expansion in myocardial infarct from pre-treatment values. In R, compared with Control, there were substantial improvements in those parameters. End-point LV pressure-volume loop analysis showed a significantly improved LV systolic function and AV-coupling, an index of energy transfer efficacy between the heart and aortic tree, in R compared with Control (p < 0.05). Aortic pulse wave velocity, a measure of arterial stiffness, was significantly lower in R (389 ± 15 cm/s; p < 0.05) compared with Control (489 ± 38 cm/s). These results demonstrated that long-term dietary resveratrol supplement reduces cardiovascular structural and functional deterioration in CHF.

  19. Chronic dietary risk characterization for pesticide residues: a ranking and scoring method integrating agricultural uses and food contamination data.

    PubMed

    Nougadère, Alexandre; Reninger, Jean-Cédric; Volatier, Jean-Luc; Leblanc, Jean-Charles

    2011-07-01

    A method has been developed to identify pesticide residues and foodstuffs for inclusion in national monitoring programs with different priority levels. It combines two chronic dietary intake indicators: ATMDI based on maximum residue levels and agricultural uses, and EDI on food contamination data. The mean and 95th percentile of exposure were calculated for 490 substances using individual and national consumption data. The results show that mean ATMDI exceeds the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for 10% of the pesticides, and the mean upper-bound EDI is above the ADI for 1.8% of substances. A seven-level risk scale is presented for substances already analyzed in food in France and substances not currently sought. Of 336 substances analyzed, 70 pesticides of concern (levels 2-5) should be particularly monitored, 22 of which are priority pesticides (levels 4 and 5). Of 154 substances not sought, 36 pesticides of concern (levels 2-4) should be included in monitoring programs, including 8 priority pesticides (level 4). In order to refine exposure assessment, analytical improvements and developments are needed to lower the analytical limits for priority pesticide/commodity combinations. Developed nationally, this method could be applied at different geographic scales.

  20. Probabilistic dietary exposure to ethyl carbamate from fermented foods and alcoholic beverages in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Choi, B; Ryu, D; Kim, C-I; Lee, J-Y; Choi, A; Koh, E

    2017-09-04

    The occurrence of ethyl carbamate was investigated in fermented foods and alcoholic beverages of the Korean total diet study. The concentrations of ethyl carbamate ranged from not detected to 166.5 μg kg(-1). Dietary exposure to ethyl carbamate was estimated by the probabilistic method. Estimated intakes of ethyl carbamate from foods and alcoholic beverages were 4.12 ng kg(-1) body weight (bw) per day for average consumers and 12.37 ng kg(-1) bw/day for 95th percentile high consumers. The major foods contributing to ethyl carbamate exposure were soy sauce (63%), followed by maesilju (plum liqueur, 30%), whisky (5%), and bokbunjaju (black raspberry wine, 2%). On the basis of the benchmark dose lower confidence limit 10% (BMDL10) of 0.3 mg kg(-1) bw/day, margins of exposure were 128,000 for mean exposure and 40,000 for 95th percentile exposure. This indicates that the exposure of the Korean general population for ethyl carbamate is of low concern. However, careful vigilance should be continued for high consumers of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages.

  1. Harmonisation of food categorisation systems for dietary exposure assessments among European children.

    PubMed

    De Neve, M; Sioen, I; Boon, P E; Arganini, C; Moschandreas, J; Ruprich, J; Lafay, L; Amiano, P; Arcella, D; Azpiri, M; Busk, L; Christensen, T; D'addezio, L; Fabiansson, S; Hilbig, A; Hirvonen, T; Kersting, M; Koulouridaki, S; Liukkonen, K-H; Oltarzewski, M; Papoutsou, S; Rehurkova, I; Ribas-Barba, L; Serra-Majem, L; Tornaritis, M; Trolle, E; Van Klaveren, J D; Verger, E; Walkiewicz, A; Westerlund, A; De Henauw, S; Huybrechts, I

    2010-12-01

    Within the European project called EXPOCHI (Individual Food Consumption Data and Exposure Assessment Studies for Children), 14 different European individual food consumption databases of children were used to conduct harmonised dietary exposure assessments for lead, chromium, selenium and food colours. For this, two food categorisation systems were developed to classify the food consumption data in such a way that these could be linked to occurrence data of the considered compounds. One system served for the exposure calculations of lead, chromium and selenium. The second system was developed for the exposure assessment of food colours. The food categories defined for the lead, chromium and selenium exposure calculations were used as a basis for the food colour categorisation, with adaptations to optimise the linkage with the food colour occurrence data. With this work, an initial impetus was given to make user-friendly food categorisation systems for contaminants and food colours applicable on a pan-European level. However, a set of difficulties were encountered in creating a common food categorisation system for 14 individual food consumption databases that differ in the type and number of foods coded and in level of detail provided about the consumed foods. The work done and the problems encountered in this project can be of interest for future projects in which food consumption data will be collected on a pan-European level and used for common exposure assessments.

  2. Acute exposure to UVB has a more profound effect on plant genome stability than chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Alex; Greer, Michael; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2006-12-01

    Environmental factors that damage DNA have various lengths of exposure and intensity levels. Although the results of increasing the intensity of a DNA damaging agent is often predictable, it is not clear whether the stage during development when the exposure is received has any influence on the amount of DNA damage. In this paper we analyzed the influence of UVB on the stability of Arabidopsis thaliana and the Nicotiana tabacum genomes. Our experiments showed that the acute exposure to UVB produces a significantly greater increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF) and recombination rate (RR) compared with that produced by chronic exposure. The increase in HRF showed a positive correlation with UVB dose and a negative correlation with plant age. In other words, as the UVB dose was increased, there was a concomitant increase in HRF. Conversely, older plants had a lower HRF increase as compared to younger plants. Our experiments suggest that exposure to UVB makes the most significant impact on genome stability during the early stages of plant development.

  3. Specific metabolic fingerprint of a dietary exposure to a very low dose of endosulfan.

    PubMed

    Canlet, Cécile; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Gautier, Roselyne; Molina, Jérôme; Métais, Benjamin; Blas-Y Estrada, Florence; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Like other persistent organochlorine pesticides, endosulfan residues have been detected in foods including fruit, vegetables, and fish. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of a dietary exposure to low doses of endosulfan from foetal development until adult age on metabolic homeostasis in mice and to identify biomarkers of exposure using an (1)H-NMR-based metabonomic approach in various tissues and biofluids. We report in both genders an increase in plasma glucose as well as changes in levels of factors involved in the regulation of liver oxidative stress, confirming the prooxidant activities of this compound. Some metabolic changes were distinct in males and females. For example in plasma, a decrease in lipid LDL and choline content was only observed in female. Lactate levels in males were significantly increased. In conclusion, our results show that metabolic changes in liver could be linked to the onset of pathologies like diabetes and insulin resistance. Moreover from our results it appears that the NMR-based metabonomic approach could be useful for the characterization in plasma of a dietary exposure to low dose of pesticide in human.

  4. Relation between dietary acrylamide exposure and biomarkers of internal dose in Canadian teenagers.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Benjamin; Ayotte, Pierre; Normandin, Louise; Gaudreau, Éric; Bienvenu, Jean-François; Fennell, Timothy R; Blanchet, Carole; Phaneuf, Denise; Lapointe, Caroline; Bonvalot, Yvette; Gagné, Michelle; Courteau, Marilène; Snyder, Rodney W; Bouchard, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a probable human carcinogen found in several foods. Little information is available regarding exposure of adolescents, a subgroup potentially consuming more AA-rich foods. We investigated the relationship between dietary AA intake and levels of biomarkers of exposure (urinary metabolites and hemoglobin adducts) in 195 non-smoking teenagers of Montreal Island aged 10-17 years. Dietary habits and personal characteristics were documented by questionnaire. AA and its metabolites were quantified in 12-h urine collections by LC-MS/MS. Hemoglobin adducts from 165 blood samples were also analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Most prevalent urinary metabolites were NACP and NACP-S, with respective geometric mean concentrations of 31.2 and 14.2 μmol/mol creatinine. Geometric mean concentrations of AAVal and GAVal (hemoglobin adducts of AA and glycidamide (GA) with N-terminal valine residues) were 45.4 and 45.6 pmol/g globin, respectively. AA intake during the 2 days before urine collection was a significant predictor of NACP+NACP-S urinary concentrations (P<0.0001). AA intakes during the month before blood collection (P<0.0001) and passive smoking (P<0.05) were associated with adduct levels. Levels of hemoglobin adducts were above biomonitoring equivalent values corresponding to a 1 × 10(-4) excess cancer risk, which may indicate the need to reduce AA exposure in the population.

  5. Organic Diets Significantly Lower Children’s Dietary Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chensheng; Toepel, Kathryn; Irish, Rene; Fenske, Richard A.; Barr, Dana B.; Bravo, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    We used a novel study design to measure dietary organophosphorus pesticide exposure in a group of 23 elementary school-age children through urinary biomonitoring. We substituted most of children’s conventional diets with organic food items for 5 consecutive days and collected two spot daily urine samples, first-morning and before-bedtime voids, throughout the 15-day study period. We found that the median urinary concentrations of the specific metabolites for malathion and chlorpyrifos decreased to the nondetect levels immediately after the introduction of organic diets and remained nondetectable until the conventional diets were reintroduced. The median concentrations for other organophosphorus pesticide metabolites were also lower in the organic diet consumption days; however, the detection of those metabolites was not frequent enough to show any statistical significance. In conclusion, we were able to demonstrate that an organic diet provides a dramatic and immediate protective effect against exposures to organophosphorus pesticides that are commonly used in agricultural production. We also concluded that these children were most likely exposed to these organophosphorus pesticides exclusively through their diet. To our knowledge, this is the first study to employ a longitudinal design with a dietary intervention to assess children’s exposure to pesticides. It provides new and persuasive evidence of the effectiveness of this intervention. PMID:16451864

  6. Dietary Phthalate Exposure in Pregnant Women and the Impact of Consumer Practices

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Samantha E.; Karr, Catherine J.; Seixas, Noah S.; Nguyen, Ruby H. N.; Barrett, Emily S.; Janssen, Sarah; Redmon, Bruce; Swan, Shanna H.; Sathyanarayana, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous endocrine-disrupting chemicals that are contaminants in food and contribute to significant dietary exposures. We examined associations between reported consumption of specific foods and beverages and first trimester urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in 656 pregnant women within a multicenter cohort study, The Infant Development and Environment Study (TIDES), using multivariate regression analysis. We also examined whether reported use of ecofriendly and chemical-free products was associated with lower phthalate biomarker levels in comparison to not following such practices. Consumption of one additional serving of dairy per week was associated with decreases of 1% in the sum of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolite levels (95% CI: −2.0, −0.2). Further, participants who reported sometimes eating homegrown food had monoisobutyl phthalate (MiBP) levels that were 16.6% lower (95% CI: −29.5, −1.3) in comparison to participants in the rarely/never category. In contrast to rarely/never eating frozen fruits and vegetables, participants who reported sometimes following this practice had monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP) levels that were 21% higher (95% CI: 3.3, 41.7) than rarely/ever respondents. Future study on prenatal dietary phthalate exposure and the role of consumer product choices in reducing such exposure is needed. PMID:24927036

  7. Estimated dietary dioxin exposure and breast cancer risk among women from the French E3N prospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Danjou, Aurélie M N; Fervers, Béatrice; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Philip, Thierry; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Dossus, Laure

    2015-03-17

    Dioxins are environmental and persistent pollutants mostly emitted from combustion facilities (e.g. waste incinerators, metal and cement industries). Known to be endocrine disrupting chemicals, dioxins are suspected to increase breast cancer (BC) risk. Although diet is considered the primary source of dioxin exposure, no previous study has been published on dietary dioxin exposure in relation to BC risk. We aimed to assess dietary dioxin exposure among women from the E3N cohort and estimate BC risk associated with this exposure. The study included 63,830 women from the E3N cohort who completed a diet history questionnaire (DHQ) in 1993 and were followed until 2008. Dietary dioxin exposure was estimated by combining consumption data from the E3N DHQ and food dioxin contamination data from a French national monitoring program. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox models adjusted for BC risk factors. Mean dietary dioxin exposure was estimated at 1.3 ± 0.4 pg/kg body weight (BW)/day. A 0.4 pg/kg BW/d increase in dioxin intake was not associated with overall BC risk (HR = 1.00; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.05). A significant decrease in risk of estrogen receptor negative (ER-)/progesterone receptor negative (PR-) tumors was observed among post-menopausal women in the upper quartile of estimated dioxin intake (HR for Q4 vs. Q1: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.45, 0.96; P for trend across quartiles = 0.0463). Overall, no association between estimated dietary dioxin exposure and BC risk was found among E3N women. Further studies should include both dietary and environmental exposures to determine whether low-dose dioxin exposure is associated with BC risk.

  8. Dietary exposure to aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A and fuminisins of adults in Lao Cai province, Viet Nam: A total dietary study approach.

    PubMed

    Huong, Bui Thi Mai; Tuyen, Le Danh; Tuan, Do Huu; Brimer, Leon; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2016-12-01

    Aflatoxins, fumonisins and ochratoxin A that contaminate various agricultural commodities are considered of significant toxicity and potent human carcinogens. This study took a total dietary study approach and estimated the dietary exposure of these mycotoxins for adults living in Lao Cai province, Vietnam. A total of 42 composite food samples representing 1134 individual food samples were prepared according to normal household practices and analysed for the three mycotoxins. Results showed that the dietary exposure to aflatoxin B1 (39.4 ng/kg bw/day) and ochratoxin A (18.7 ng/kg bw/day) were much higher than recommended provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI) values mainly due to contaminated cereals and meat. The exposure to total fumonisins (1400 ng/kg bw/day) was typically lower than the PTDI value (2000 ng/kg bw/day). The estimated risk of liver cancer associated with exposure to aflatoxin B1 was 2.7 cases/100,000 person/year. Margin of exposure (MOE) of renal cancer linked to ochratoxin A and liver cancer associated with fumonisins were 1124 and 1954, respectively indicating risk levels of public health concern. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficiency of technical solutions which could reduce mycotoxin contamination as well as to determine the health effects of the co-exposure to different types of mycotoxins.

  9. A META-ANALYSIS OF CHILDREN'S HAND-TO-MOUTH FREQUENCY DATA FOR ESTIMATING NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of their mouthing behaviors, children have a higher potential for exposure to available chemicals through the non-dietary ingestion route; thus, frequency of hand-to-mouth activity is an important variable for exposure assessments. Such data are limited and difficult to ...

  10. Pyranocoumarin Tissue Distribution, Plasma Metabolome and Prostate Transcriptome Impacts of Sub-Chronic Exposure to Korean Angelica Supplement in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Li, Li; Tang, Suni; Zhang, Yong; Markiewski, Maciej; Xing, Chengguo; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2016-01-01

    Herbal products containing Korean Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root extract are marketed as dietary supplements for memory enhancement, pain killing, and female menopausal symptom relief. We have shown the anticancer activities of AGN supplements in mouse models. To facilitate human anticancer translational research, we characterized the tissue distribution of AGN marker pyranocoumarin compounds decursin (D) and decursinol angelate (DA) ([Formula: see text]% in AGN) and their metabolite decursinol (DOH), assessed the safety of sub-chronic AGN dietary exposure in mice, and explored its impact on plasma aqueous metabolites and the prostate transcriptome. The data show that after a gavage dose, plasma contained readily detectable DOH, but little D and DA, mirroring patterns in the liver. Extra-hepatic tissues retained greater levels of DA and D than the liver did. For sub-chronic exposures, male mice were provided ad libitum AIN93M-pellet diets with 0.5 and 1% AGN for six weeks. No adverse effects were observed on the plasma biochemistry markers of liver and kidney integrity in spite of their enlargement. Histopathological examinations of the liver, kidney and other visceral organs did not reveal tissue abnormalities. Metabolomic assessment of plasma from mice fed the 1%-AGN diet suggested metabolic shifts of key amino acids especially in the methionine-cysteine cycle, purine cycle, and glycolysis-citrate cycle. Prostate transcriptomic profiling identified gene signature changes in the metabolisms of drugs, lipids and cellular energetics, neuro-muscular features, immunity and inflammation, and tumor suppressor/oncogene balance. The safety profile was corroborated with a daily [Formula: see text] injection of AGN extract (100-300[Formula: see text]mg/kg) for four weeks, which resulted in much greater systemic pyranocoumarin exposure than the dietary route did.

  11. Improving volume status by comprehensive dietary and dialytic sodium management in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Penne, E Lars; Levin, Nathan W; Kotanko, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Chronic volume overload is highly prevalent in chronic hemodialysis patients and leads to hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and increased hospitalization and mortality rates. Volume overload is caused primarily by a positive sodium balance and can be improved by sodium restriction. The main sources of sodium excess are a high-sodium diet in the interdialytic period and a positive sodium balance during dialysis. Here we discuss different approaches to achieve neutral or negative sodium balance, including reducing dietary sodium intake, individualizing dialysate sodium prescription, abandonment of sodium profiling, and reducing saline infusion for treatment of intradialytic symptoms and as part of dialyzer rinsing and priming procedures. All of these approaches should be combined for a maximal reduction of volume overload.

  12. Potential health risks to adults and children in the UK from exposure to dietary lead in gamebirds shot with lead ammunition.

    PubMed

    Green, R E; Pain, D J

    2012-11-01

    We estimate potential risks to human health in the UK from dietary exposure to lead from wild gamebirds killed by shooting. The main source of exposure to lead in Europe is now dietary. We used data on lead concentrations in UK gamebirds, from which gunshot had been removed following cooking to simulate human exposure to lead. We used UK food consumption and lead concentration data to evaluate the number of gamebird meals consumed weekly that would be expected, based upon published studies, to result in changes, over and above those resulting from exposure to lead in the base diet, in intelligence quotient (IQ), Systolic Blood Pressure and chronic kidney disease (CKD) considered in a recent opinion of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to be significant at a population level and also in SAT test scores and in rates of spontaneous abortion. We found the consumption of <1 meal of game a week may be associated with a one point reduction in IQ in children and 1.2-6.5 gamebird meals per week may be associated with the other effects. These results should help to inform the development of appropriate responses to the risks from ingesting lead from ammunition in game in the UK and European Union (EU).

  13. Unexpected results in a randomized dietary trial to reduce phthalate and bisphenol A exposures.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Alcedo, Garry; Saelens, Brian E; Zhou, Chuan; Dills, Russell L; Yu, Jianbo; Lanphear, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    Diet is a primary source of exposure for high-molecular-weight phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA), but little is known about the efficacy of various interventions to reduce exposures. We conducted a randomized trial with 10 families to test the efficacy of a 5-day complete dietary replacement (Arm 1; n=21) versus written recommendations to reduce phthalate and BPA exposures (Arm 2; n=19). We measured phthalate and BPA concentrations in urine samples at baseline, intervention, and post-intervention periods. We used Wilcoxon paired signed-rank tests to assess change in concentrations across time and multi-level mixed effects regression models to assess differences between Arms 1 and 2. Urinary di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolite concentrations increased unexpectedly from a median of 283.7 nmol/g at baseline to 7027.5 nmol/g during the intervention (P<0.0001) among Arm 1 participants, and no significant changes were observed for Arm 2 participants. We observed a statistically significant increase in total BPA concentration between baseline and intervention periods in Arm 1 but no significant changes in Arm 2. Arm 1 food ingredient testing for DEHP revealed concentrations of 21,400 ng/g in ground coriander and 673 ng/g in milk. Food contamination with DEHP led to unexpected increases in urinary phthalate concentrations in a trial intended to minimize exposure. In the absence of regulation to reduce phthalate and BPA concentrations in food production, it may be difficult to develop effective interventions that are feasible in the general population. An estimate of DEHP daily intake for children in the dietary replacement Arm was above the US Environmental Protection Agency oral reference dose and the European Food Safety Authority's tolerable daily intake, suggesting that food contamination can be a major source of DEHP exposure.

  14. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease and Exposure to Nephrotoxic Metals

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sarah E.; Bridges, Christy C.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common progressive disease that is typically characterized by the permanent loss of functional nephrons. As injured nephrons become sclerotic and die, the remaining healthy nephrons undergo numerous structural, molecular, and functional changes in an attempt to compensate for the loss of diseased nephrons. These compensatory changes enable the kidney to maintain fluid and solute homeostasis until approximately 75% of nephrons are lost. As CKD continues to progress, glomerular filtration rate decreases, and remaining nephrons are unable to effectively eliminate metabolic wastes and environmental toxicants from the body. This inability may enhance mortality and/or morbidity of an individual. Environmental toxicants of particular concern are arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury. Since these metals are present throughout the environment and exposure to one or more of these metals is unavoidable, it is important that the way in which these metals are handled by target organs in normal and disease states is understood completely. PMID:28498320

  16. Chronic cyanide exposure: a clinical, radioisotope, and laboratory study.

    PubMed Central

    El Ghawabi, S H; Gaafar, M A; El-Saharti, A A; Ahmed, S H; Malash, K K; Fares, R

    1975-01-01

    The effect of chronic cyanide exposure in the electroplating sections of three factories employing 36 workers was studied and compared with a control group. The concentration of cyanides to which the workers were exposed was measured. The regression line showing the relationship between thiocyanates in urine and the concentration of cyanides in the air was plotted. Increased percentages of haemoglobin and lymphocyte count were present in all exposed workers, in addition to punctate basophilia in 28 workers. Cyanmethaemoglobin was found to be characteristic. Apart from other complaints, two men with psychosis similar to one case reported in therapeutic thiocyanate intoxication were found. Twenty of the workers had thyroid enlargements to a variable degree and consistency, in two of whom it resembled lymphadenoid goitre. Thyroid 131I uptakes at 4 and 24 hours were significantly higher than in the controls, while 131PBI was unchanged. The reason for this iodine deficiency-like action is discussed. PMID:1156569

  17. Impact of Chronic Neonicotinoid Exposure on Honeybee Colony Performance and Queen Supersedure

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, Christoph; Tanadini, Matteo; Tanadini, Lorenzo G.; Fauser-Misslin, Aline; Potts, Simon G.; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Honeybees provide economically and ecologically vital pollination services to crops and wild plants. During the last decade elevated colony losses have been documented in Europe and North America. Despite growing consensus on the involvement of multiple causal factors, the underlying interactions impacting on honeybee health and colony failure are not fully resolved. Parasites and pathogens are among the main candidates, but sublethal exposure to widespread agricultural pesticides may also affect bees. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate effects of sublethal dietary neonicotinoid exposure on honeybee colony performance, a fully crossed experimental design was implemented using 24 colonies, including sister-queens from two different strains, and experimental in-hive pollen feeding with or without environmentally relevant concentrations of thiamethoxam and clothianidin. Honeybee colonies chronically exposed to both neonicotinoids over two brood cycles exhibited decreased performance in the short-term resulting in declining numbers of adult bees (−28%) and brood (−13%), as well as a reduction in honey production (−29%) and pollen collections (−19%), but colonies recovered in the medium-term and overwintered successfully. However, significantly decelerated growth of neonicotinoid-exposed colonies during the following spring was associated with queen failure, revealing previously undocumented long-term impacts of neonicotinoids: queen supersedure was observed for 60% of the neonicotinoid-exposed colonies within a one year period, but not for control colonies. Linked to this, neonicotinoid exposure was significantly associated with a reduced propensity to swarm during the next spring. Both short-term and long-term effects of neonicotinoids on colony performance were significantly influenced by the honeybees’ genetic background. Conclusions/Significance Sublethal neonicotinoid exposure did not provoke increased winter losses. Yet

  18. Impact of chronic neonicotinoid exposure on honeybee colony performance and queen supersedure.

    PubMed

    Sandrock, Christoph; Tanadini, Matteo; Tanadini, Lorenzo G; Fauser-Misslin, Aline; Potts, Simon G; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Honeybees provide economically and ecologically vital pollination services to crops and wild plants. During the last decade elevated colony losses have been documented in Europe and North America. Despite growing consensus on the involvement of multiple causal factors, the underlying interactions impacting on honeybee health and colony failure are not fully resolved. Parasites and pathogens are among the main candidates, but sublethal exposure to widespread agricultural pesticides may also affect bees. To investigate effects of sublethal dietary neonicotinoid exposure on honeybee colony performance, a fully crossed experimental design was implemented using 24 colonies, including sister-queens from two different strains, and experimental in-hive pollen feeding with or without environmentally relevant concentrations of thiamethoxam and clothianidin. Honeybee colonies chronically exposed to both neonicotinoids over two brood cycles exhibited decreased performance in the short-term resulting in declining numbers of adult bees (-28%) and brood (-13%), as well as a reduction in honey production (-29%) and pollen collections (-19%), but colonies recovered in the medium-term and overwintered successfully. However, significantly decelerated growth of neonicotinoid-exposed colonies during the following spring was associated with queen failure, revealing previously undocumented long-term impacts of neonicotinoids: queen supersedure was observed for 60% of the neonicotinoid-exposed colonies within a one year period, but not for control colonies. Linked to this, neonicotinoid exposure was significantly associated with a reduced propensity to swarm during the next spring. Both short-term and long-term effects of neonicotinoids on colony performance were significantly influenced by the honeybees' genetic background. Sublethal neonicotinoid exposure did not provoke increased winter losses. Yet, significant detrimental short and long-term impacts on colony performance and queen

  19. Dietary exposure of mink to carp from Saginaw Bay. 3. Characterization of dietary exposure to planar halogenated hydrocarbons, dioxin equivalents, and biomagnification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, Donald E.; Gale, Robert W.; Meadows, John C.; Zajicek, James L.; Peterman, Paul H.; Heaton, Silvia N.; Jones, Paul D.; Bursian, Steven J.; Kubiak, Timothy J.; Giesy, John P.; Aulerich, Richard J.

    1995-01-01

    Mink are known to be very sensitive to the toxic effects of planar polychlorinated biphenyls (pPCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), collectively known as planar halogenated hydrocarbons (PHHs). Previously, we reported the reproductive effects in mink fed a diet containing 10, 20, or 40% fish taken from Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron. The present study reports the chemical characterization of the diets and the adult mink livers, along with a comparison of an additive model of toxicity with the results of the H4IIE bioassay on these samples. The assessment of dietary or tissue-based exposure of the mink to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds revealed that TCDD equivalents of the PHH mixtures largely followed an additive model of toxicity as compared with the H4IIE bioassay. Consistent dietary and liver tissue-based threshold concentrations for reproductive toxicity in mink were determined regardless of whether PHHs were quantified as TEQs (additive toxicity) or TCDD-EQs (H4IIE bioassay). Significant reproductive effects were observed in the lowest treatment group (10% fish or 19.4 pg of H4IIE bioassay-derived TCDD-EQs/g). Consumption-normalized mink liver biomagnification factors (BMFs) were 6.4−74.2 for PCDDs, <1−75.8 for PCDFs, <1−15.9 for PCBs, and in general, increased with degree of chlorination within each class. Based on TEQs or TCDD-EQ, this study confirms that mink are among the most, if not the most, sensitive mammalian species to the reproductive toxicity of TCDD and related compounds.

  20. Applying research in nutrition education planning: a dietary intervention for Bangladeshi chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    de Brito-Ashurst, I; Perry, L; Sanders, T A B; Thomas, J E; Dobbie, H; Yaqoob, M M

    2013-08-01

    Effective nutrition health interventions are theory-based, as well as being drawn from practice and research, aiming to successfully accomplish dietary behavioural changes. However, the integration of theory, research and practice to develop community dietary educational programmes is a challenge that many interventionists feel ill equipped to achieve. In the present study, a community-based education programme was designed for Bangladeshi patients with chronic kidney disease and hypertension. The goal of this programme was to reduce dietary salt intake in this population group, with a view to reducing their blood pressure and slowing kidney disease progression. The present study sets out the first four steps of a six-step model for creating a behaviour change programme. These four steps were concerned with the translation of theory and evidence into intervention objectives, and illustrate how a practical, community-based intervention was developed from behavioural theory, relevant research, knowledge of practice and the target patient group. Steps 5 and 6, which are concerned with implementation and evaluation, will be reported separately. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  1. Dietary sodium restriction: a neglected therapeutic opportunity in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Navis, Gerjan

    2014-11-01

    Restriction of dietary sodium is recommended at a population level as well as for groups at high cardiovascular risk, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review addresses recent evidence for the protective effect of dietary sodium restriction in CKD patients specifically. Sodium intake in CKD populations is generally high, and often above population average. Recent data demonstrated that moderately lower sodium intake in CKD patients is associated with substantially better long-term outcome of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS)-blockade, in diabetic and nondiabetic CKD, related to better effects of RAAS-blockade on proteinuria, independent of blood pressure. This is in line with better short-term efficacy of RAAS-blockade during moderate sodium restriction in diabetic and nondiabetic CKD. This effect of sodium restriction is likely mediated by its effects on volume status. Sustainable sodium restriction can be achieved by approaches on the basis of behavioral sciences. Moderate restriction of dietary sodium can substantially improve the protective effects of RAAS-blockade in CKD, by specific renal effects apparent from proteinuria reduction. The latter precludes straightforward extrapolation of data from nonrenal populations to CKD. Concerns regarding the adverse effects of a very low sodium intake should not distract from the protective effects of moderate sodium restriction. Prospective studies should assess the efficacy and sustainability of different strategies to target high sodium intake in CKD, along with measures at population level. http://links.lww.com/CONH/A14.

  2. Dietary sodium restriction: a neglected therapeutic opportunity in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Humalda, Jelmer K.; Navis, Gerjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Restriction of dietary sodium is recommended at a population level as well as for groups at high cardiovascular risk, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review addresses recent evidence for the protective effect of dietary sodium restriction in CKD patients specifically. Recent findings Sodium intake in CKD populations is generally high, and often above population average. Recent data demonstrated that moderately lower sodium intake in CKD patients is associated with substantially better long-term outcome of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS)-blockade, in diabetic and nondiabetic CKD, related to better effects of RAAS-blockade on proteinuria, independent of blood pressure. This is in line with better short-term efficacy of RAAS-blockade during moderate sodium restriction in diabetic and nondiabetic CKD. This effect of sodium restriction is likely mediated by its effects on volume status. Sustainable sodium restriction can be achieved by approaches on the basis of behavioral sciences. Summary Moderate restriction of dietary sodium can substantially improve the protective effects of RAAS-blockade in CKD, by specific renal effects apparent from proteinuria reduction. The latter precludes straightforward extrapolation of data from nonrenal populations to CKD. Concerns regarding the adverse effects of a very low sodium intake should not distract from the protective effects of moderate sodium restriction. Prospective studies should assess the efficacy and sustainability of different strategies to target high sodium intake in CKD, along with measures at population level. Video abstract http://links.lww.com/CONH/A14 PMID:25222815

  3. Hepatitis caused by occupational chronic exposure to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, G; Sakorafas, G H; Grigoriadis, K; Margantinis, G; Kostopoulos, P; Tsiakos, S; Arvanitidis, D

    2004-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an organic solvent used in a variety of industries for more than 60 years. Several adverse events following acute or chronic exposure to trichloroethylene have been reported. However, TCE-induced hepatitis is very rare. We present the case of a 55-year old male who was presented with anorexia, fatigue and upper abdominal discomfort. Routine laboratory examination revealed marked elevation of liver enzyme values. All possible causes of hepatitis were ruled out. The patient has been working as a shoemaker, in a small room of a basement, with insufficient air-exchange; during the last 5 years he used daily a glue containing 1,1,1 trichloroethylene. The diagnosis of hepatitis was confirmed by liver biopsy. The offending agent was withdrawn. Three months later, he was "feeling well" and liver enzyme values had returned to normal. Six months after the initial biopsy, a second liver biopsy was performed and histology was markedly improved. Workers exposed to hazardous chemicals, such as trichloroethylene, must have periodic follow-up examinations. Good work practices are very important when using toxic substances. In patients whose initial diagnostic workout is negative for common causes of acute or chronic hepatitis, toxic causes should be considered, with emphasis on patient's job and working conditions.

  4. Memory Deficit Recovery after Chronic Vanadium Exposure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Folarin, Oluwabusayo; Olopade, Funmilayo; Onwuka, Silas; Olopade, James

    2016-01-01

    Vanadium is a transitional metal with an ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the biological system. This work was designed to assess memory deficits in mice chronically exposed to vanadium. A total of 132 male BALB/c mice (4 weeks old) were used for the experiment and were divided into three major groups of vanadium treated, matched controls, and animals exposed to vanadium for three months and thereafter vanadium was withdrawn. Animals were tested using Morris water maze and forelimb grip test at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age. The results showed that animals across the groups showed no difference in learning but had significant loss in memory abilities after 3 months of vanadium exposure and this trend continued in all vanadium-exposed groups relative to the controls. Animals exposed to vanadium for three months recovered significantly only 9 months after vanadium withdrawal. There was no significant difference in latency to fall in the forelimb grip test between vanadium-exposed groups and the controls in all age groups. In conclusion, we have shown that chronic administration of vanadium in mice leads to memory deficit which is reversible but only after a long period of vanadium withdrawal.

  5. Dietary acid load is associated with serum bicarbonate but not insulin sensitivity in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ikizler, H. Omer; Zelnick, Leila; Ruzinski, John; Curtin, Laura; Utzschneider, Kristina M.; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; de Boer, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dietary acid may promote metabolic acidosis and insulin resistance, which in turn may contribute to adverse clinical health outcomes. We examined associations between dietary acid load, serum bicarbonate, and insulin sensitivity in CKD. Design In a cross-sectional study, we collected 3-day prospective food diaries to quantify dietary acid load as net endogenous acid production (NEAP, the nonvolatile acid load produced by the diet’s acid balance) and potential renal acid load (PRAL). We measured urine net acid excretion (NAE) in 24-hour urine samples. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Subjects 42 patients with CKD stages 3–5 attending nephrology clinics in the Pacific Northwest and 21 control subjects (eGFR ≥60mL/min/1.73m2). Main outcome measures Serum bicarbonate and insulin sensitivity (SIclamp). Results Mean age was 60.8±13.6 years and 54% of participants were men. Mean eGFR and serum bicarbonate concentrations were 34.4±13.1 mL/min/1.73m2 and 24.1±2.9 mEq/L for participants with CKD and 88.6±14.5 mL/min/1.73m2 and 26.3±1.8 mEq/L for control subjects, respectively. Mean NEAP, PRAL, and NAE were 58.2±24.3, 9.7±18.4, and 32.1±19.8 mEq/day, respectively. Considering all participants, dietary acid load was significantly, inversely associated with serum bicarbonate, adjusting for age, sex, race, eGFR, BMI, and diuretic use: −1.2 mEq/L per SD NEAP (95% CI −1.8, −0.6, p<0.0001); −0.9 mEq/L bicarbonate per SD PRAL (95% CI −1.5, −0.4, p=0.0005); −0.7 mEq/L bicarbonate per SD NAE (95% CI −1.2, −0.1, p=0.01). These associations were similar in participants with and without CKD. However, neither NEAP, PRAL, nor NAE was significantly associated with SIclamp. Serum bicarbonate was also not significantly associated with SIclamp. Conclusions In CKD, dietary acid load is associated with serum bicarbonate, suggesting that acidosis may be improved by dietary changes, but

  6. Probabilistic acute dietary exposure assessment of the Chinese population to cypermethrin residues.

    PubMed

    Sun, J-F; Liu, P; Li, C-Y; Li, J-X; Wang, C-N; Min, J; Hu, D; Wu, Y-N

    2011-01-01

    A probabilistic estimation of dietary exposure to cypermethrin residues for the Chinese population was performed. Cypermethrin residue data were obtained from the national food contamination monitoring program for 2001-2006, encompassing 14,096 samples from 36 commodities with a detection rate of 10.4%. Food consumption data were gathered from the national nutrition and health survey conducted in 2002, comprising 65,915 consumers aged 2-100 years and 3701 children of 2-6 years old. The whole country was roughly divided into six regions and the ranges of the median and of P99.9 exposure estimated for these regions were 0.018-0.026 and 3.131-7.095 µg kg(-1 )bw day(-1), respectively. Pak-choi and Chinese cabbage contributed 33.9 and 13.2%, respectively, to the cypermethrin intake for the general population, while pak-choi and citrus covered 30.7 and 22.5% of the total intake for children, respectively. The exposure of the rural population was higher than urban populations. Rural areas mainly located in the plains of central China had among the highest exposure of the six regions, accounting for 17.7% of the ARfD at P99.9, while the 99.99th percentile of exposure for children, especially rural children, far exceeded the ARfD, which is a cause for concern.

  7. Table showing dietary phosphorus/protein ratio for the Spanish population. Usefulness in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Barril-Cuadrado, Guillermina; Puchulu, M Bernardita; Sánchez-Tomero, José A

    2013-01-01

    The K/DOQI guidelines recommend the use of phosphorus/protein food ratios for proper control of dietary phosphorus. Evidence exists from tables with phosphorus to protein ratios for common foods. No such table exists for common foods consumed by the Spanish population with ratio estimations. To estimate the phosphorus to protein ratio in foods commonly used by the Spanish population and to establish its usefulness in the selection of foods for patients with chronic kidney disease. Tables with the phosphorus to protein ratio were prepared from two data sources concerning Spanish food composition. We evaluated chemical composition per 100g of raw food. The tables do not include phosphorus additives. No foods with high ratio of phosphorus to protein were eliminated in order to allow comparisons between different foods from each group. Shown in the tables. The dietary prescription for patients with chronic kidney disease should take into consideration not only the absolute phosphorus value of food consumed, but also the phosphorus to protein ratio of each food and the total amount of phosphorus in the diet. The more "natural" a diet is, the more likely that the patient will reach an acceptable phosphorus to protein ratio of less than 16mg/g, which does not increase mortality. There is clearly a need for an educational program on nutrition and phosphorus sources in which food ratio tables could be a useful tool for the multidisciplinary teams caring for renal patients.

  8. Dietary exposure to short-chain chlorinated paraffins has increased in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kouji H; Takasuga, Takumi; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Wang, Peiyu; Matsukami, Hidenori; Koizumi, Akio

    2011-08-15

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) persist in the environment and bioaccumulate in biota and are under review by the Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants. SCCP levels were measured semiquantitatively in pooled 24 h food composite samples from Chinese (n = 10), Korean (n = 10), and Japanese (n = 40) adults in the 1990 s and 2007-2009. In Japan, SCCPs were detected in 14 of 20 pooled samples in the 1990 s and 13 of 20 pooled samples in 2009. Between these two time points, the geometric mean (GM) of the dietary intake of total SCCPs per body weight was comparable in Japan (54 ng kg-bw(-1) day(-1) in the 1990 s and 54 ng kg-bw(-1) day(-1) in the 2000s). In Beijing, SCCP levels were elevated by 2 orders of magnitude from 1993 to 2009 (GM: 620 ng kg-bw(-1) day(-1) in 2009). The 95th percentile estimate of the dietary intake was 1200 ng kg-bw(-1) day(-1) (>1% of tolerable daily intake). In Seoul, no samples in 1994 contained detectable SCCP levels and only one sample in 2007 showed trace levels of SCCPs. Preliminary evidence on the significant increase in SCCP exposure in Beijing in 2009 warrants urgent investigations to refine dietary intake estimates by targeting food types and source identification.

  9. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Susana; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Vaquero, María Pilar; Verdoy, Dolores; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Brenes, Agustín; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses.

  10. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Susana; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Vaquero, María Pilar; Verdoy, Dolores; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Brenes, Agustín; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-05-22

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses.

  11. Prepubertal gynecomastia and chronic lavender exposure: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Alejandro; Luque, Laura; Badar, Zain; Kornic, Steve; Danon, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Prepubertal gynecomastia is a rare condition characterized by the growth of breast tissue in males as a consequence of early exposure to sexual hormones. When this condition is present, pathological sources of testosterone/estrogen production, such as adrenal or gonadal tumors must be searched for. A few reports have described an association between gynecomastia and substances that produce stimulation of the estrogen receptor, such as lavender and tea tree oil. Here we describe the cases of three boys who presented with prepubertal gynecomastia and were chronically exposed to lavender. Two of these boys were exposed to a cologne, named agua de violetas, used by Hispanic communities in the US, and in their countries of origin. We studied a sample of the cologne used by one of the patients. Analysis of the chemical composition of the agua de violetas cologne was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography as well as off-line mass spectrometric detection. All these, combined with the physical appearance and the smell, determined that the cologne had lavender as an ingredient. Exposure to estrogenic substances, such as lavender, should be explored in children presenting with prepubertal gynecomastia/thelarche.

  12. Comparison of aquatic and dietary exposure of heavy metals Cd, Cu, and Zn to benthic ostracod Heterocypris incongruens.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Janice Beltran; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Kasuga, Ikuro

    2014-07-01

    The benthic ostracod Heterocypris incongruens is becoming an important tool for the ecotoxicological assessment of contaminated sediments. However, no study has yet explored solid-phase (dietary) exposure to ostracod. The present study examined the effects of metals on H. incongruens through aquatic and dietary exposures. The algal food Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to different concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn), and subcellular distributions of these metals in algal cells were determined. Parallel experiments were also performed to determine the toxic effects of dissolved metals on ostracod through aqueous exposure. Significant toxic effects on mortality were observed when ostracod were fed with Cd-contaminated (47-100%) and Cu-contaminated algae (55-100%). With increasing accumulated Zn in the algal cell, ostracod mortality also increased (20-83%). Aquatic exposure of ostracod to different concentrations of dissolved Cd (3.2-339 µg Cd/L) and Cu (260-2600 µg Cu/L) resulted in high observed mortalities (57-100% and 95-100%, respectively). Based on the results of aqueous and dietary exposure tests, it can be concluded that both exposure routes are important in evaluating the toxic effect of Cd on ostracod. Similar results were observed in tests using other metals (i.e., using Cu and Zn), thus emphasizing the importance of considering not only aquatic but also dietary exposure routes when evaluating metal toxicity to ostracod.

  13. High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Theriot, Corey A.; Wu, Honglu; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and increased iron (Fe) status independently cause oxidative damage that can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. During space flight astronauts are exposed to both increased radiation and increased Fe stores. Increased body Fe results from a decrease in red blood cell mass and the typically high Fe content of the food system. In this study we investigated the combined effects of radiation exposure (0.375 Gy of Cs-137 every other day for 16 days for a total of 3 Gy) and high dietary Fe (650 mg Fe/kg diet compared to 45 mg Fe/kg for controls) in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Liver and serum Fe were significantly increased in the high dietary Fe groups. Likewise, radiation treatment increased serum ferritin and Fe concentrations. These data indicate that total body Fe stores increase with both radiation exposure and excess dietary Fe. Hematocrit decreased in the group exposed to radiation, providing a possible mechanism for the shift in Fe indices after radiation exposure. Markers of oxidative stress were also affected by both radiation and high dietary Fe, evidenced by increased liver glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and serum catalase as well as decreased serum GPX. We thus found preliminary indications of synergistic effects of radiation exposure and increased dietary Fe, warranting further study. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Project.

  14. Dietary Acid Load is Associated With Serum Bicarbonate but not Insulin Sensitivity in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Ikizler, Halil O; Zelnick, Leila; Ruzinski, John; Curtin, Laura; Utzschneider, Kristina M; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; de Boer, Ian H

    2016-03-01

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dietary acid may promote metabolic acidosis and insulin resistance, which in turn may contribute to adverse clinical health outcomes. We examined associations between dietary acid load, serum bicarbonate, and insulin sensitivity in CKD. In a cross-sectional study, we collected 3-day prospective food diaries to quantify dietary acid load as net endogenous acid production (NEAP, the nonvolatile acid load produced by the diet's acid balance) and potential renal acid load (PRAL). We measured urine net acid excretion (NAE) in 24-hour urine samples. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Forty-two patients with CKD Stages 3 to 5 attending nephrology clinics in the Pacific Northwest and 21 control subjects (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥ 60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2)). Serum bicarbonate and insulin sensitivity (SIclamp). Mean age was 60.8 ± 13.6 years, and 54% of participants were men. Mean eGFR and serum bicarbonate concentrations were 34.4 ± 13.1 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) and 24.1 ± 2.9 mEq/L for participants with CKD and 88.6 ± 14.5 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) and 26.3 ± 1.8 mEq/L for control subjects, respectively. Mean NEAP, PRAL, and NAE were 58.2 ± 24.3, 9.7 ± 18.4, and 32.1 ± 19.8 mEq/day, respectively. Considering all participants, dietary acid load was significantly, inversely associated with serum bicarbonate, adjusting for age, gender, race, eGFR, body mass index, and diuretic use: -1.2 mEq/L per standard deviation (SD) NEAP (95% confidence interval [CI] -1.8 to -0.6, P < .0001); -0.9 mEq/L bicarbonate per SD PRAL (95% CI -1.5 to -0.4, P = .0005); -0.7 mEq/L bicarbonate per SD NAE (95% CI -1.2 to -0.1, P = .01). These associations were similar in participants with and without CKD. However, neither NEAP and PRAL nor NAE was significantly associated with SIclamp. Serum bicarbonate was also not significantly associated with SIclamp. In CKD, dietary acid load is associated with serum bicarbonate

  15. Dietary acid load and chronic kidney disease in elderly adults: Protein and potassium intake.

    PubMed

    Ko, Byung-Joon; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Kim, Eun Mi; Lee, Mi Yeon; Hyun, Young Youl; Lee, Kyu-Beck

    2017-01-01

    Dietary net endogenous acid production (NEAP), which represents total dietary load of nonvolatile acid, may affect kidney function. Estimated NEAP (eNEAP) is calculated indirectly by the ratio of protein and potassium intake. A few studies are available assessing the association between eNEAP and chronic kidney disease (CKD), and its relation to dietary protein and potassium intake in the elderly. A total 1,369 community-dwelling elderly Koreans in the Kangbuk Samsung Cohort Study (KSCS) were evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and comprehensive health examination. We evaluated the association between eNEAP and the CKD. We also examined their relation to protein and potassium intake. eNEAP was correlated with potassium intake (r = -0.410, P < 0.001), but was not correlated with protein intake (r = -0.004, P = 0.879). In a full multivariate adjustment for sociodemographic factors, dietary factors, and comorbidities, the participants with higher eNEAP quartiles (Q2, Q3, Q4) had higher odds of CKD compared to the lowest eNEAP quartile (Q1); OR (95% CI) were 1.47 (0.78-2.72), 1.66 (0.85-3.23), and 2.30 (1.16-4.60) respectively (P for trend = 0.019). The odds of CKD decreased for participants with higher potassium intake quartiles (Q2, Q3, Q4) compared to the lowest potassium intake quartile (Q1); OR (95% CI) were 0.52 (0.28-0.95), 0.50 (0.26-0.96), and 0.50 (0.21-0.99) respectively (P for trend = 0.050). Protein intake was not associated with CKD. The association between eNEAP and CKD was similar in subgroup analysis. Dietary acid load was associated with CKD. Among the nutrients related to dietary acid load, potassium intake was negatively associated with CKD, but protein intake was not associated with CKD in elderly adults.

  16. Prospective study of dietary patterns and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among US men

    PubMed Central

    Varraso, Raphaëlle; Fung, Teresa T; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter; Camargo, Carlos A

    2007-01-01

    Background Many foods are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms or lung function. Because foods are consumed together and nutrients may interact, dietary patterns are an alternative way of characterising diet. A study was undertaken to assess the relation between dietary patterns and newly diagnosed COPD in men. Methods Data were collected from a large prospective cohort of US men (Health Professionals Follow‐up Study). Using principal component analysis, two dietary patterns were identified: a prudent pattern (high intake of fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grain products) and a Western pattern (high intake of refined grains, cured and red meats, desserts and French fries). Dietary patterns were categorised into quintiles and Cox proportional hazards models were adjusted for age, smoking, pack‐years, (pack‐years)2, race/ethnicity, physician visits, US region, body mass index, physical activity, multivitamin use and energy intake. Results Between 1986 and 1998, 111 self‐reported cases of newly diagnosed COPD were identified among 42 917 men. The prudent pattern was inversely associated with the risk of newly diagnosed COPD (RR for highest vs lowest quintile 0.50 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.98), p for trend = 0.02), and the Western pattern was positively associated with the risk of newly diagnosed COPD (RR for highest vs lowest quintile 4.56 (95% CI 1.95 to 10.69), p for trend <0.001). Conclusions In men, a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and fish may reduce the risk of COPD whereas a diet rich in refined grains, cured and red meats, desserts and French fries may increase the risk of COPD. PMID:17504819

  17. Adolescent Dietary Vitamin D and Sun Exposure in Relation to Benign Breast Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boeke, Caroline E.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Berkey, Catherine S.; Colditz, Graham A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Malspeis, Susan; Willett, Walter C.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Vitamin D may reduce cell proliferation and tumor growth in breast tissue, and exposure may be most important during adolescence when breast tissue is developing. In the Nurses’ Health Study II, higher recalled adolescent vitamin D intake was associated with a lower risk of benign breast disease (BBD). Our study aim was to assess adolescent vitamin D exposure in relation to BBD in young women. Methods Vitamin D was assessed in 6,593 adolescent girls (9 to 15 years of age at baseline) in the prospective Growing Up Today Study cohort using the mean energy-adjusted intakes from food frequency questionnaires in 1996, 1997, and 1998. In 1999, 5286 girls reported skin color, sunscreen use, tanning bed use, and number of sunburns in the past year, and we used state of residence to assess low vs. high ultraviolet (UV) index. Biopsy-confirmed BBD was reported on questionnaires in 2005, 2007, and 2010 (n=122). Results Dietary vitamin D, tanning behaviors, and other sun exposure variables were not significantly associated with BBD in logistic regression models adjusted for age, family history of breast cancer or BBD, age at menarche, nulliparity, alcohol intake, body mass index, and physical activity. The relative risk for the top (>467 IU/day) vs. bottom (<243 IU/day) quartile of vitamin D intake was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.47, 1.23). Conclusions Sun exposure was not significantly associated with BBD in this prospective cohort study. However, a suggestive inverse association between dietary vitamin D and BBD was observed that merits further study. PMID:26084210

  18. Food Packaging and Bisphenol A and Bis(2-Ethyhexyl) Phthalate Exposure: Findings from a Dietary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Janet M.; Engel, Connie L.; Rawsthorne, Teresa W.; Dodson, Robin E.; Ackerman, Janet M.; Rizzo, Jeanne; Nudelman, Janet L.; Brody, Julia Green

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) are high-production-volume chemicals used in plastics and resins for food packaging. They have been associated with endocrine disruption in animals and in some human studies. Human exposure sources have been estimated, but the relative contribution of dietary exposure to total intake has not been studied empirically. Objectives: To evaluate the contribution of food packaging to exposure, we measured urinary BPA and phthalate metabolites before, during, and after a “fresh foods” dietary intervention. Methods: We selected 20 participants in five families based on self-reported use of canned and packaged foods. Participants ate their usual diet, followed by 3 days of “fresh foods” that were not canned or packaged in plastic, and then returned to their usual diet. We collected evening urine samples over 8 days in January 2010 and composited them into preintervention, during intervention, and postintervention samples. We used mixed-effects models for repeated measures and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests to assess change in urinary levels across time. Results: Urine levels of BPA and DEHP metabolites decreased significantly during the fresh foods intervention [e.g., BPA geometric mean (GM), 3.7 ng/mL preintervention vs. 1.2 ng/mL during intervention; mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxy hexyl) phthalate GM, 57 ng/mL vs. 25 ng/mL]. The intervention reduced GM concentrations of BPA by 66% and DEHP metabolites by 53–56%. Maxima were reduced by 76% for BPA and 93–96% for DEHP metabolites. Conclusions: BPA and DEHP exposures were substantially reduced when participants’ diets were restricted to food with limited packaging. PMID:21450549

  19. Adolescent dietary vitamin D and sun exposure in relation to benign breast disease.

    PubMed

    Boeke, Caroline E; Tamimi, Rulla M; Berkey, Catherine S; Colditz, Graham A; Giovannucci, Edward; Malspeis, Susan; Willett, Walter C; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin D may reduce cell proliferation and tumor growth in breast tissue, and exposure may be most important during adolescence when breast tissue is developing. In the Nurses' Health Study II, higher recalled adolescent vitamin D intake was associated with a lower risk of benign breast disease (BBD). Our study aimed to assess adolescent vitamin D exposure in relation to BBD in young women. Vitamin D was assessed in 6,593 adolescent girls (9-15 years of age at baseline) in the prospective Growing Up Today Study cohort using the mean energy-adjusted intakes from food frequency questionnaires in 1996, 1997, and 1998. In 1999, 5,286 girls reported skin color, sunscreen use, tanning bed use, and number of sunburns in the past year, and we used state of residence to assess low versus high ultraviolet index. Biopsy-confirmed BBD was reported on questionnaires in 2005, 2007, and 2010 (n = 122). Dietary vitamin D, tanning behaviors, and other sun exposure variables were not significantly associated with BBD in logistic regression models adjusted for age, family history of breast cancer or BBD, age at menarche, nulliparity, alcohol intake, body mass index, and physical activity. The relative risk for the top (>467 IU/day) versus bottom (<243 IU/day) quartile of vitamin D intake was 0.76 (95 % CI 0.47, 1.23). Sun exposure was not significantly associated with BBD in this prospective cohort. However, a suggestive inverse association between dietary vitamin D and BBD was observed that merits further study.

  20. Chronic vs. Short-Term Acute O 3 Exposure Effects on Nocturnal Transpiration in Two Californian Oaks

    Treesearch

    Nancy Grulke; E. Paoletti; R. L. Heath

    2007-01-01

    We tested the effect of daytime chronic moderate ozone (O3) exposure, short-term acute exposure, and both chronic and acute O3 exposure combined on nocturnal transpiration in California black oak and blue oak seedlings. Chronic O3 exposure (70 ppb for 8 h/day) was implemented in open-top chambers for...

  1. Dietary exposure to cadmium and health effects: impact of environmental changes.

    PubMed Central

    Piscator, M

    1985-01-01

    Cadmium exposure, metabolism, and effects are described especially in relation to dietary intakes. Data on dietary intakes in several countries have been complied from studies using the duplicate diet method or fecal analysis. These two methods seem to give more accurate data than estimates based on cadmium concentrations in food classes and food consumption (composite method). The present data on absorption and retention of ingested cadmium indicate that normally less than 5% is ingested, but absorption may increase in women who have iron deficiency. Earlier estimates of the critical concentration in renal cortex being about 200 mg/kg wet weight still seem to be valid. New information is available on present renal levels and their distribution in the general population. The present margin of safety with regard to risk for renal effects is small. To predict future health risks from increases in dietary cadmium due to environmental changes such as acid deposition, it is necessary that the models used are based on correct assumptions. Of interest are the distributions of dietary intake, gastrointestinal absorption, and renal cadmium concentrations. These distributions are normal or lognormal, and since standard deviations are used when estimating risks, it is of paramount importance that the standard deviations are estimated as accurately as possible. At present it is not possible to quantify the effects attributed to acid rain only; account must be also be taken of cadmium added to, e.g., soil by use of sewage sludge and other fertilizers. In addition to risks to human health, cadmium also poses a threat to horses, which generally have renal cadmium concentrations several times higher than adult humans. It is recommended that horses should be monitored in areas when acid deposition is high. Such monitoring might provide valuable information about impact of acid rain. PMID:4076079

  2. Dietary exposure to cadmium and health effects: impact of environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Piscator, M

    1985-11-01

    Cadmium exposure, metabolism, and effects are described especially in relation to dietary intakes. Data on dietary intakes in several countries have been complied from studies using the duplicate diet method or fecal analysis. These two methods seem to give more accurate data than estimates based on cadmium concentrations in food classes and food consumption (composite method). The present data on absorption and retention of ingested cadmium indicate that normally less than 5% is ingested, but absorption may increase in women who have iron deficiency. Earlier estimates of the critical concentration in renal cortex being about 200 mg/kg wet weight still seem to be valid. New information is available on present renal levels and their distribution in the general population. The present margin of safety with regard to risk for renal effects is small. To predict future health risks from increases in dietary cadmium due to environmental changes such as acid deposition, it is necessary that the models used are based on correct assumptions. Of interest are the distributions of dietary intake, gastrointestinal absorption, and renal cadmium concentrations. These distributions are normal or lognormal, and since standard deviations are used when estimating risks, it is of paramount importance that the standard deviations are estimated as accurately as possible. At present it is not possible to quantify the effects attributed to acid rain only; account must be also be taken of cadmium added to, e.g., soil by use of sewage sludge and other fertilizers. In addition to risks to human health, cadmium also poses a threat to horses, which generally have renal cadmium concentrations several times higher than adult humans. It is recommended that horses should be monitored in areas when acid deposition is high. Such monitoring might provide valuable information about impact of acid rain.

  3. Effects of Dietary Exposure to Zearalenone (ZEN) on Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Constanze; Kersten, Susanne; Valenta, Hana; Dänicke, Sven; Schulz, Carsten; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Junge, Ranka

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is frequently contaminating animal feeds including feed used in aquaculture. In the present study, the effects of dietary exposure to ZEN on carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) were investigated. ZEN at three different concentrations (low dose: 332 µg kg−1, medium dose: 621 µg kg−1 and high dose: 797 µg kg−1 final feed, respectively) was administered to juvenile carp for four weeks. Additional groups received the mycotoxin for the same time period but were fed with the uncontaminated diet for two more weeks to examine the reversibility of the ZEN effects. No effects on growth were observed during the feeding trial, but effects on haematological parameters occurred. In addition, an influence on white blood cell counts was noted whereby granulocytes and monocytes were affected in fish treated with the medium and high dose ZEN diet. In muscle samples, marginal ZEN and α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) concentrations were detected. Furthermore, the genotoxic potential of ZEN was confirmed by analysing formation of micronuclei in erythrocytes. In contrast to previous reports on other fish species, estrogenic effects measured as vitellogenin concentrations in serum samples were not increased by dietary exposure to ZEN. This is probably due to the fact that ZEN is rapidly metabolized in carp. PMID:26343724

  4. Dietary aflatoxin exposure and impaired growth in young children from Kisumu District, Kenya: Cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Okoth, Sheila Adhiambo; Ohingo, Mercy

    2004-01-01

    Cereal grains are the basis of weaning gruel in Kenya yet they run a high risk of mycotoxin contamination. Children could be at a higher risk of dietary mycotoxin exposure than the rest of the population. This paper presents information on the association between nutritional state of children and dietary exposure to aflatoxins in Kisumu District. Weaning flour samples were collected randomly from 242 households in Kisumu District, Kenya. A questionnaire was used to collect information, from mothers whose flour were sampled, on the types of weaning foods, handling and storage. The nutritional status of the children in question was assessed and their weight and height measured. The flour samples were analyzed for aflatoxins by thin layer chromatography. Cultural studies of the flour were also done. Thirty one percent of the children were malnourished. The number of children who were wasting and were being fed on flour contaminated with mycotoxins was highly significant (P = 0.002). Seventy samples (29 %) were positive for aflatoxins (concentration range 2-82 mg / kg), some exceeding the advisory limit.

  5. Dietary Exposure and Natural Occurrence of Total Aflatoxins in Basmati Rice of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Nighat; Tahira, Iffat; Kausar, Mumtaz; Hassan, Syed Mujahid; Hanif, Nafeesa Qudsia

    2017-02-01

    This study presents the assessment of total aflatoxins (TAFs) in basmati rice (brown, 1,081; white, 1,170) collected from different areas of Punjab, Pakistan, during 2010 to 2015. Due to the carcinogenicity of TAFs, daily dietary exposure is also evaluated based on rice consumption survey data. Methodology was standardized by matrix spike recoveries at four fortification levels (0.1, 0.5, 2.5, and 12.5 ng/g) for TAFs (aflatoxins B1 [AFB1], B2 [AFB2], G1 [AFG1], and G2 [AFG2]). The present study reveals that 1,750 samples (77.74%) were tainted with AFB1, whereas TAFs were detected in 370 samples (16.43%). Of positive samples, 854 brown rice samples (79%) were positive for AFB1, and 154 samples (14.24%) were contaminated with TAFs. For white rice, 896 samples (76.58%) were contaminated with AFB1, whereas 205 samples (18.46%) were found positive for TAFs. Study findings were used to construct a frequency distribution, and AFB1 levels were also compared against permissible levels of TAFs (10 ng/g) as legislated by the European Commission. Results further revealed that daily dietary exposure of TAFs ranged from 0.51 to 10.22 ng/kg of body weight per day, which exceeds the permissible limit of 1 ng/kg of body weight per day as defined by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

  6. Dietary exposure to non-dioxin-like PCBs of different population groups in Austria.

    PubMed

    Mihats, Daniela; Moche, Wolfgang; Prean, Michael; Rauscher-Gabernig, Elke

    2015-05-01

    The dietary exposure to the sum of the six indicator PCBs (Σ6 PCBs; PCB 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, and 180) across different Austrian population groups was assessed in this study by combining data on occurrence from food of the Austrian market (n=157) analysed during 2006-2011 with national food consumption data. The most contaminated food group was meat, poultry, game and offal with average levels of ndl-PCBs of 5.20 ng g(-1) fat. In fish and fish products and eggs, mean concentrations of 3.89 ng g(-1) fresh weight (fw) and 4.00 ng g(-1) fat, respectively, were found. In milk and dairy products average concentrations ranged from 3.07 to 4.44 ng g(-1) fat. The mean dietary intake of Σ6 PCBs was estimated to be 3.37 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for children (6-15 years old), 3.19 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for women (19-65 years) and 2.64 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for men (19-65 years). In all three population groups, milk and dairy products was the major contributing food group to the total dietary intake (50-55%) followed by fish and fish products (23-27%). The exposure of all Austrian population groups is well below the tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 10 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) proposed by WHO, accounting for 34% in children, 32% in women and 26% in men.

  7. Dietary BMAA Exposure in an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Cluster from Southern France

    PubMed Central

    Masseret, Estelle; Banack, Sandra; Boumédiène, Farid; Abadie, Eric; Brient, Luc; Pernet, Fabrice; Juntas-Morales, Raoul; Pageot, Nicolas; Metcalf, James; Cox, Paul; Camu, William

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary exposure to the cyanotoxin BMAA is suspected to be the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the Western Pacific Islands. In Europe and North America, this toxin has been identified in the marine environment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis clusters but, to date, only few dietary exposures have been described. Objectives We aimed at identifying cluster(s) of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the Hérault district, a coastal district from Southern France, and to search, in the identified area(s), for the existence of a potential dietary source of BMAA. Methods A spatio-temporal cluster analysis was performed in the district, considering all incident amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases identified from 1994 to 2009 by our expert center. We investigated the cluster area with serial collections of oysters and mussels that were subsequently analyzed blind for BMAA concentrations. Results We found one significant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cluster (p = 0.0024), surrounding the Thau lagoon, the most important area of shellfish production and consumption along the French Mediterranean coast. BMAA was identified in mussels (1.8 µg/g to 6.0 µg/g) and oysters (0.6 µg/g to 1.6 µg/g). The highest concentrations of BMAA were measured during summer when the highest picocyanobacteria abundances were recorded. Conclusions While it is not possible to ascertain a direct link between shellfish consumption and the existence of this ALS cluster, these results add new data to the potential association of BMAA with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, one of the most severe neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:24349504

  8. Dietary BMAA exposure in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cluster from southern France.

    PubMed

    Masseret, Estelle; Banack, Sandra; Boumédiène, Farid; Abadie, Eric; Brient, Luc; Pernet, Fabrice; Juntas-Morales, Raoul; Pageot, Nicolas; Metcalf, James; Cox, Paul; Camu, William

    2013-01-01

    Dietary exposure to the cyanotoxin BMAA is suspected to be the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the Western Pacific Islands. In Europe and North America, this toxin has been identified in the marine environment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis clusters but, to date, only few dietary exposures have been described. We aimed at identifying cluster(s) of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the Hérault district, a coastal district from Southern France, and to search, in the identified area(s), for the existence of a potential dietary source of BMAA. A spatio-temporal cluster analysis was performed in the district, considering all incident amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases identified from 1994 to 2009 by our expert center. We investigated the cluster area with serial collections of oysters and mussels that were subsequently analyzed blind for BMAA concentrations. We found one significant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cluster (p = 0.0024), surrounding the Thau lagoon, the most important area of shellfish production and consumption along the French Mediterranean coast. BMAA was identified in mussels (1.8 µg/g to 6.0 µg/g) and oysters (0.6 µg/g to 1.6 µg/g). The highest concentrations of BMAA were measured during summer when the highest picocyanobacteria abundances were recorded. While it is not possible to ascertain a direct link between shellfish consumption and the existence of this ALS cluster, these results add new data to the potential association of BMAA with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, one of the most severe neurodegenerative disorder.

  9. Telehealth methods to deliver dietary interventions in adults with chronic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jaimon T; Reidlinger, Dianne P; Hoffmann, Tammy C; Campbell, Katrina L

    2016-12-01

    The long-term management of chronic disease requires the adoption of complex dietary recommendations, which can be facilitated by regular coaching to support behavioral changes. Telehealth interventions can overcome patient-centered barriers to accessing face-to-face programs and provide feasible delivery methods, accessible regardless of geographic location. This systematic review assessed the effectiveness of telehealth dietary interventions at facilitating dietary change in chronic disease. A structured systematic search was conducted for all randomized controlled trials evaluating multifactorial dietary interventions in adults with chronic disease that provided diet education in an intervention longer than 4 wk. Meta-analyses that used the random-effects model were performed on diet quality, dietary adherence, fruit and vegetables, sodium intake, energy, and dietary fat intake. A total of 25 studies were included, involving 7384 participants. The telehealth dietary intervention was effective at improving diet quality [standardized mean difference (SMD): 0.22 (95% CI: 0.09, 0.34), P = 0.0007], fruit and vegetable intake [mean difference (MD) 1.04 servings/d (95% CI: 0.46, 1.62 servings/d), P = 0.0004], and dietary sodium intake [SMD: -0.39 (-0.58, -0.20), P = 0.0001]. Single nutrients (total fat and energy consumption) were not improved by telehealth intervention; however, after a telehealth intervention, important clinical outcomes were improved, such as systolic blood pressure [MD: -2.97 mm Hg (95% CI: -5.72, -0.22 mm Hg), P = 0.05], total cholesterol [MD: -0.08 mmol/L (95% CI: -0.16, -0.00 mmol/L), P = 0.04], triglycerides [MD: -0.10 mmol/L (95% CI: -0.19, -0.01 mmol/L), P = 0.04], weight [MD: -0.80 kg (95% CI: -1.61, 0 kg), P = 0.05], and waist circumference [MD: -2.08 cm (95% CI: -3.97, -0.20 cm), P = 0.03]. Telehealth-delivered dietary interventions targeting whole foods and/or dietary patterns can improve diet quality, fruit and vegetable intake, and

  10. Adherence to Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Dietary Pattern in Relation to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Mohammad Emami; Onvani, Shokouh; Esmailzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila

    2017-01-01

    This case-control study was designed to investigate the association between adherences to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in comparison to subjects without COPD. This is a case-control study. Usual dietary intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Lung function was evaluated with spirometry testing, and one of the researchers inquired about other respiratory symptoms, including chronic cough, sputum, and breathlessness. Adherence to the DASH dietary pattern was assessed according to the Fung method. This study was conducted at Alzahra University Hospital of Isfahan, Iran, in 2015. Eight-four patients with COPD and 80 subjects without a history of COPD participated in study. The mean age of participants was 57 years. Average smoking in the case group was about 27.5 pack-years. Spirometry tests including forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV1/FVC were significantly lower in patients with COPD (p = 0.0001). Among COPD symptoms, cough was significantly decreased across tertiles of DASH score (p = 0.03). Significant differences were found for DASH score between patients with COPD and control subjects (19.82 + 3.63 vs 21.13 + 3.82, p = 0.02). Vitamin C, vitamin E, and dietary fiber intake were lower in patients with COPD (144.32 + 70.51 vs 166.97 + 71.88, p = 0.04, 7.49 + 3.91 vs 8.72 + 3.21, p = 0.02 and 19.34 + 7.05 vs 22.19 + 7.87, p = 0.01, respectively). We observed that adherence to a DASH dietary pattern among patients with COPD was significantly lower compared to the control group. Cough was significantly decreased by increments in adherence to a DASH dietary pattern.

  11. Dietary exposure and neurotoxicity of the environmental free and bound toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Jorge; Negreira, Noelia; Carreira-Casais, Anxo; Pérez-Lamela, Conchi; Simal-Gándara, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    The growing evidence supporting a link between exposure to the naturally occurring toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and progressive neurodegenerative diseases, has recently arisen the interest of the scientific community. Latest investigations suggest that dietary exposure to this algal toxin may have been largely underestimated. This paper reviews the state of the art regarding BMAA, with special attention paid to its neurotoxicity, its concentration levels in food, and human exposure. As for other environmental toxins, dietary intake is most likely the main route of exposure to BMAA for the general population. However, data concerning BMAA levels in foodstuffs are still scarce. It is concluded that further investigations on dietary intake and potential human health effects are clearly necessary to assess the risks to public health associated with BMAA exposure. Some critical remarks and recommendations on future research in this area are provided, which may help to identify approaches to reduce dietary BMAA exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic Exposure to Combined Carcinogens Enhances Breast Cell Carcinogenesis with Mesenchymal and Stem-Like Cell Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in North America and Europe. More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to small quantities of multiple carcinogens. To understand how multiple carcinogens act together to induce cellular carcinogenesis, we studied the activity of environmental carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) using our breast cell carcinogenesis model. Our study revealed, for the first time, that combined NNK and B[a]P enhanced breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by PhIP in both non-cancerous and cancerous breast cells. Co-exposure was more potent than sequential exposure to combined NNK and B[a]P followed by PhIP in inducing carcinogenesis. Initiation of carcinogenesis was measured by transient endpoints induced in a single exposure, while progression of carcinogenesis was measured by acquisition of constitutive endpoints in cumulative exposures. Transient endpoints included DNA damage, Ras-Erk-Nox pathway activation, reactive oxygen species elevation, and increased cellular proliferation. Constitutive endpoints included various cancer-associated properties and signaling modulators, as well as enrichment of cancer stem-like cell population and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program. Using transient and constitutive endpoints as targets, we detected that a combination of the green tea catechins ECG and EGCG, at non-cytotoxic levels, was more effective than individual agents in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by combined NNK, B[a]P, and PhIP. Thus, use of combined ECG and EGCG should be seriously considered for early intervention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens. PMID:25372613

  13. Chronic exposure to combined carcinogens enhances breast cell carcinogenesis with mesenchymal and stem-like cell properties.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in North America and Europe. More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to small quantities of multiple carcinogens. To understand how multiple carcinogens act together to induce cellular carcinogenesis, we studied the activity of environmental carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) using our breast cell carcinogenesis model. Our study revealed, for the first time, that combined NNK and B[a]P enhanced breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by PhIP in both non-cancerous and cancerous breast cells. Co-exposure was more potent than sequential exposure to combined NNK and B[a]P followed by PhIP in inducing carcinogenesis. Initiation of carcinogenesis was measured by transient endpoints induced in a single exposure, while progression of carcinogenesis was measured by acquisition of constitutive endpoints in cumulative exposures. Transient endpoints included DNA damage, Ras-Erk-Nox pathway activation, reactive oxygen species elevation, and increased cellular proliferation. Constitutive endpoints included various cancer-associated properties and signaling modulators, as well as enrichment of cancer stem-like cell population and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program. Using transient and constitutive endpoints as targets, we detected that a combination of the green tea catechins ECG and EGCG, at non-cytotoxic levels, was more effective than individual agents in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by combined NNK, B[a]P, and PhIP. Thus, use of combined ECG and EGCG should be seriously considered for early intervention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens.

  14. Occurrence and human non-dietary exposure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils from Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shan-Ping; Ni, Hong-Gang; Qin, Pei-Heng; Zeng, Hui

    2010-07-08

    Twenty eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined for a total of 203 top soil samples collected from eight different land categories in Shenzhen, China during the winter of 2007. The concentrations, compositional profile, and the potential sources of PAHs in soil were discussed. Overall, PAH pollution in the soil of Shenzhen is still in the low-end of the world after 30 years rapid urbanization. Based on that, human exposure to soil PAHs via inhalation and soil particle intake were estimated as well. The concentrations of Sigma(28)PAHs in Shenzhen soil ranged from 2.68 to 17,767 ng g(-1) (average: 546 ng g(-1)). The highest levels of PAHs were found in the traffic land (average: 2104 ng g(-1)) and the lowest concentrations were detected in forest land (average: 144 ng g(-1)) in eight land categories. PAH isomeric ratios indicated that PAHs in Shenzhen soil were mainly derived from combustion. In the current pollution levels in Shenzhen, children aged 0 to 8 were the most sensitive sub-group of exposure to PAHs (59.2 ng (kg d)(-1)), and the exposure to PAHs for males (36.2 ng (kg d)(-1)) was more serious than for females (32.7 ng (kg d)(-1)). Inhalation was the major way of non-dietary exposure (over 96%).

  15. Concentrations of environmental organic contaminants in meat and meat products and human dietary exposure: A review.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L

    2017-09-01

    Meat and meat products is one of the most relevant food groups in an important number of human diets. Recently, the IARC, based on results of a number of epidemiological studies, classified the consumptions of red meat and processed meat as "probably carcinogenic to humans" and as "carcinogenic to humans", respectively. It was suggested that the substances responsible of the potential carcinogenicity would be mainly generated during meat processing, such as curing and smoking, or when meat is heated at high temperatures. However, the exposure to environmental pollutants through meat consumption was not discussed. The purpose of the present paper was to review recent studies reporting the concentrations of PCDD/Fs, DL-PCBs and PAHs in meat and meat products, as well as the human exposure to these pollutants through the diet. It is concluded that the health risks derived from exposure to carcinogenic environmental contaminants must be considered in the context of each specific diet, which besides meat and meat products, includes other foodstuffs containing also chemical pollutants, some of them with carcinogenic potential. Anyhow, meat and meat products are not the main food group responsible of the dietary exposure to carcinogenic (or probably carcinogenic) environmental organic pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantification of estragole in fennel herbal teas: implications on the assessment of dietary exposure to estragole.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; Nicoli, Stefano; Leclercq, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    Quantification of estragole content in commercial fennel herbal teas was carried out in order to allow for a more accurate estimate of the dietary exposure to estragole. A simple and rapid analytical method, based on Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction and GC-MS, was developed for this purpose. Fennel teas obtained from different types of commercial products were analysed. Concentration levels ranged from 241 to 2058 μg L(-1) in teas from teabags, from 9 to 912 μg L(-1) in diluted instant teas, from 251 to 1718 μg L(-1) in teas from not packaged seeds. Based on these data and considering the daily consumption of three portions of herbal tea, a maximum exposure to estragole for adults of 10 μg/kg bw/day was calculated. The relatively high level observed in diluted instant teas of some brands deserves attention since these products are designed for infant consumption. Estimated exposure in infants was up to 51 μg/kg bw/day for teas from teabags, and up to 23 μg/kg bw/day for instant teas. A generalization of the use of suitable technologies in production processes of instant teas could substantially reduce the exposure to estragole in the vulnerable population groups (infants, young children, pregnant and breastfeeding women) who consume these products.

  17. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: I. BIOMARKERS FOR ASSESSING EXPOSURE AND EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health Effects of Chronic Exposure to Arsenic via Drinking Water in Inner Mongolia: I. Biomarkers for Assessing Exposure and Effects

    Judy L. Mumford, Ph.D., Mike Schmitt, M.S.P.H., Richard K. Kwok, M.S.P.H., Rebecca Calderon, Ph.D., National Health and Environmental Effect...

  18. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: I. BIOMARKERS FOR ASSESSING EXPOSURE AND EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health Effects of Chronic Exposure to Arsenic via Drinking Water in Inner Mongolia: I. Biomarkers for Assessing Exposure and Effects

    Judy L. Mumford, Ph.D., Mike Schmitt, M.S.P.H., Richard K. Kwok, M.S.P.H., Rebecca Calderon, Ph.D., National Health and Environmental Effect...

  19. Dietary and waterborne exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to copper, cadmium, lead and zinc using a live diet

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Barth, A.K.; Garrison, T.D.; Barten, K.A.; Hockett, J.R. )

    1994-12-01

    In two 60-d exposures, rainbow trout fry were fed brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) enriched with Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn both individually and as a mixture combined with As. Dietary concentrations fed to trout were selected based on metal concentrations measured in invertebrates collected from the Clark Fork River (CFR), Montana. In addition to dietary exposure, treatments also included simultaneous exposure to a mixture of waterborne metals at sublethal concentrations. Fish in all treatments showed increased tissue metal concentrations from water and/or dietary exposure. Despite these accumulations, trout showed no effects on survival or growth from dietary concentrations as high as 55 [mu]g Cd/g dry weight, 170 [mu]g Pb/g dry weight, or 1,500 [mu]g Zn/g dry weight. Dietary Cu concentrations up to 350 [mu]g Cu/g dry weight did not reduce survival or growth. Fish fed Cu concentrations higher than those typical of CFR invertebrates showed about 30% mortality with no effect on growth; waterborne Cu released from Artemia may have contributed to this mortality. Trout exposed to diets with a mixture of Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, and As close to that measured in CFR invertebrates showed lower weight than did control fish after 35 d, but this difference was no longer present after 60 d.

  20. Impact of chronic lead exposure on selected biological markers.

    PubMed

    Jangid, Ambica P; John, P J; Yadav, D; Mishra, Sandhya; Sharma, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Lead poisoning remains a major problem in India due to the lack of awareness of its ill effects among the clinical community. Blood lead, δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentrations are widely used as biomarkers for lead toxicity The present study was designed to determine the impact of chronic lead exposure on selected biological markers. A total of 250 subjects, of both sexes, ranging in age from 20 to 70 years, were recruited. On the basis of BLLs, the subjects were categorized into four groups: Group A (BLL: 0-10 μg/dl), Group B (BLL: 10-20 μg/dl). Group C (BLL: 20-30 μg/dl) and Group D (BLL: 30-40 μg/dl) having BLLs of 3.60 ± 2.71 μg/dl, 15.21 ± 2.65 μg/dl, 26.82 ± 2.53 μg/dl and 36.38 ± 2.83 μg/dl, respectively. Significant changes in biological markers due to elevated BLLs were noted. The relation of BLL and biological markers to demographic characteristics such as sex, habits, diet and substances abuse (smoking effect) were also studied in the present investigation. Males, urban population, non-vegetarians, and smokers had higher blood lead levels. δ-ALAD activity was found to be significantly lower with increased BLL (P < 0.001), while the ZPP level was significantly higher with increased BLL (P < 0.001). Further, BLL showed a negative correlation with δ-ALAD (r = -0.425, P < 0.001, N = 250) and a positive correlations with ZPP (r = 0.669, P < 0.001, N = 250). Chronic lead exposure affects the prooxidant-antioxidant equilibrium leading to cellular oxidative stress.

  1. Dietary and pharmacological modification of fibroblast growth factor-23 in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Adema, Aaltje Y; de Borst, Martin H; Ter Wee, Piet M; Vervloet, Marc G

    2014-05-01

    Increased levels of phosphorus and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) are strong predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. From a physiological perspective and supported by some data, phosphorus is the main driver for FGF-23 secretion. Therefore, it is conceivable that interventions aiming at restriction of phosphorus uptake from the gastrointestinal tract may lower serum FGF-23 levels and improve cardiovascular risk and subsequently survival. It is not currently known to what extend phosphorus and FGF-23 are independent risk factors, and therefore both need to be targeted. However, their respective metabolisms are tightly connected. Control of phosphorus levels in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is attempted mainly by restriction of dietary intake and the use of phosphorus binders. In this review, it is outlined that not just the amount of dietary phosphorus intake is important but also its type (organic vs. inorganic), its source (animal vs. plant derived), and the protein-to-phosphorus ratio in the bioavailability of phosphorus from food. This qualitative aspect of diet is likely a neglected aspect of dietary counseling in CKD. However, in more advanced stages of CKD, dietary restriction of phosphorus alone is usually not sufficient to control hyperphosphatemia, and phosphorus binders are indicated. The inexpensive, calcium-containing dietary phosphorus binders are used commonly worldwide. However, they are not suitable for every patient because of the association with elevated serum calcium, increase in vascular and valvular calcification scores, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The calcium content itself in these binders has recently been implicated to upregulate FGF-23. For that reason, the noncalcium, aluminum-free agents such as sevelamer and lanthanum are being advocated. However, these drugs do not have a clearly defined effect on circulating levels of FGF-23. Although it is conceivable that targeting FGF-23 may lead to

  2. Vitamin D and UV exposure in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Rolfdieter

    2013-01-01

    With loss of renal function and decreasing glomerula filtration rate the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] as well as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25 (OH)2 D] often decrease simultaneously. In representative groups of German patients on renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplantation) our group retrospectively analyzed the vitamin D status over a period of 12 y (1995‒2006). Only 11% of patients had a serum level of 25(OH)D that was > 30 ng/ml, more than 70% had a level of 25(OH)D < 20 ng/ml. In clinical trials we used sun-simulating artificial lamps to produce vitamin D3 in the skin. Partial-body irradiation (15% of body surface) was used during the routine hemodialysis treatment. Whole-body UV exposure was done in a standing position three times a week before the hemodialysis treatment. With both procedures we observed an increase of the serum level of 25(OH)2D3 by approx. 35–50% over a period of 2‒3 mo, maintenance of trabecular bone mineral density and a normalization of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Heart rate variability improved during the whole-body radiation intervention period by 20‒25%. Patients who continued the whole-body irradiation regularly two or three times before starting the routine hemodialysis session had maintained normal levels of circulating 25(OH)D3 and of 1,25(OH)2D3. Therefore, from our data it can be recommended that intermittent suberythemal UVB exposure with a sun-simulation spectrum is effective to treat and/or protect against vitamin D deficiency in chronic and end-stage kidney disease patients. PMID:24494043

  3. Vitamin D and UV exposure in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Krause, Rolfdieter

    2013-01-01

    With loss of renal function and decreasing glomerula filtration rate the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] as well as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25 (OH)2 D] often decrease simultaneously. In representative groups of German patients on renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplantation) our group retrospectively analyzed the vitamin D status over a period of 12 y (1995‒2006). Only 11% of patients had a serum level of 25(OH)D that was > 30 ng/ml, more than 70% had a level of 25(OH)D < 20 ng/ml. In clinical trials we used sun-simulating artificial lamps to produce vitamin D3 in the skin. Partial-body irradiation (15% of body surface) was used during the routine hemodialysis treatment. Whole-body UV exposure was done in a standing position three times a week before the hemodialysis treatment. With both procedures we observed an increase of the serum level of 25(OH)2D3 by approx. 35-50% over a period of 2‒3 mo, maintenance of trabecular bone mineral density and a normalization of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Heart rate variability improved during the whole-body radiation intervention period by 20‒25%. Patients who continued the whole-body irradiation regularly two or three times before starting the routine hemodialysis session had maintained normal levels of circulating 25(OH)D3 and of 1,25(OH)2D3. Therefore, from our data it can be recommended that intermittent suberythemal UVB exposure with a sun-simulation spectrum is effective to treat and/or protect against vitamin D deficiency in chronic and end-stage kidney disease patients.

  4. Chronic fluoxetine ameliorates adolescent chronic nicotine exposure-induced long-term adult deficits in trace conditioning.

    PubMed

    Connor, David A; Gould, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Development of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, continues through adolescence. Chronic nicotine exposure during adolescence may contribute to long-term deficits in forebrain-dependent learning. It is unclear if these deficits emerge immediately after exposure and if they can be ameliorated. In this study, C57BL/6J mice were treated with chronic nicotine (6.3 or 12.6 mg/kg/day) over 12 days beginning at adolescence, postnatal day (PND) 38, or adulthood, PND 56-63 ± 3. We investigated the effects of short-term (24 h) abstinence on trace fear conditioning and found that adult treatment resulted in deficits (6.3 and 12.6 mg/kg/day), but adolescent chronic nicotine treatment had no effect. In contrast, adolescent treatment with chronic nicotine (12.6 mg/kg/day) elicited a long-term (30 days) learning deficit, but adult chronic nicotine treatment did not. Using the elevated plus maze (EPM) we found no long-term changes in anxiety-related behavior after chronic nicotine exposure at either time-point. We investigated if chronic fluoxetine (FLX) could ameliorate adolescent chronic nicotine-associated long-term deficits in trace conditioning. We found that chronic FLX (160 mg/L) in drinking water ameliorated the long-term deficit in trace fear conditioning associated with nicotine exposure during adolescence. Additionally, in the same animals, we examined changes in total BDNF protein in the dorsal hippocampus (DH), ventral hippocampus (VH), and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Chronic FLX increased DH BDNF. Our data indicate nicotine administration during adolescence leads to late onset, long-lasting deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning that chronic FLX treatment ameliorate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic cumulative risk assessment of the exposure to organophosphorus, carbamate and pyrethroid and pyrethrin pesticides through fruit and vegetables consumption in the region of Valencia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Quijano, Leyre; Yusà, Vicent; Font, Guillermina; Pardo, Olga

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the chronic cumulative exposure to organophosphorus (OPs), carbamates (CBs) and pyrethroid and pyrethrin (PPs) pesticides in the region of Valencia through fruit and vegetables consumption is presented. A total of 752 samples and 84 pesticides were studied of which, 52 were OPs, 23 CBs and 9 PPs. Residue data were derived from the Valencia Region monitoring program 2007-2011 and food consumption levels from a questionnaire-based dietary survey conducted in 2010 in the same area. The relative potency factor (RPFs) approach was used to estimate chronic cumulative dietary exposure to OPs, CBs and PPs using acephate, oxamyl and deltamethrin as index compounds, respectively. The exposure was estimated using a deterministic approach and two scenarios were assumed for left-censored results: the lower-bound (LB) scenario, in which unquantified results (below the limit of quantification (LOQ)) were set to zero and the upper-bound (UB) scenario, in which unquantified results were set to the LOQ. Results demonstrate that the chronic exposure of the young (<16 years) and adult (≥ 16 years) population to pesticides through fruits and vegetables is under control (even at high or frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables), for the three groups of pesticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute and chronic poisoning from residential exposures to elemental mercury--Michigan, 1989-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-14

    From May 1989 through November 1990, eight episodes of elemental mercury exposure in private residences or schools in the United States were reported to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The case studies in this report document two of these episodes (both in Michigan) of residential mercury poisoning--one involving acute mercury exposure, and the other, chronic exposure to elemental mercury. These episodes illustrate the differing clinical and toxicologic manifestations of acute and chronic mercury poisoning.

  7. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Rachel E.; Dordevic, Aimee L.; Tan, Sih Min; Ryan, Lisa; Coughlan, Melinda T.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) form during heating and processing of food products and are widely prevalent in the modern Western diet. Recent systematic reviews indicate that consumption of dietary AGEs may promote inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Experimental evidence indicates that dietary AGEs may also induce renal damage, however, this outcome has not been considered in previous systematic reviews. The purpose of this review was to examine the effect of consumption of a high AGE diet on biomarkers of chronic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), in human randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Six databases (SCOPUS, CINHAL, EMBASE, Medline, Biological abstracts and Web of Science) were searched for randomised controlled dietary trials that compared high AGE intake to low AGE intake in adults with and without obesity, diabetes or CKD. Twelve dietary AGE interventions were identified with a total of 293 participants. A high AGE diet increased circulating tumour necrosis factor-alpha and AGEs in all populations. A high AGE diet increased 8-isoprostanes in healthy adults, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in patients with diabetes. Markers of CKD were not widely assessed. The evidence presented indicates that a high AGE diet may contribute to risk factors associated with chronic disease, such as inflammation and oxidative stress, however, due to a lack of high quality randomised trials, more research is required. PMID:26938557

  8. Increased reproductive success in the white American mink (Neovison vison) with chronic dietary beta-sitosterol supplement.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Petteri; Pölönen, Ilpo; Mustonen, Anne-Mari

    2010-06-01

    Beta-sitosterol is a weakly estrogenic phytosterol used in functional foods to lower elevated serum cholesterol concentrations. It has been reported to cause reproductive disturbances in fish and lower the sperm count of rodents but, in contrast, there were indications of enhanced reproduction in a preliminary study on the brown American mink (Neovison vison). In the present experiment the effects of chronic dietary beta-sitosterol exposure on the reproduction of the American mink were evaluated with a large number of experimental animals. Male and female finnwhite mink (n=200)--a previously uninvestigated color type with lower reproductive success compared to brown mink--were exposed to 50 mg beta-sitosterol kg(-1)d(-1) for 10 months and compared with 200 control animals. After 3 months in November, 15 males per group were sacrificed and their biochemical variables determined. The serum glucose and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were lower in the beta-sitosterol-exposed group, while other effects were minor. The females were mated with the top-rated males (4-5:1) in March and their reproductive performance was determined. The reproductive success increased in the beta-sitosterol group with significantly fewer barren females and a higher number of successfully reproducing females than in the control group, which supports previous studies on brown mink and voles indicating that beta-sitosterol could be used to enhance the reproductive performance of these mammals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Diacylglycerol lipase disinhibits VTA dopamine neurons during chronic nicotine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Buczynski, Matthew W.; Herman, Melissa A.; Natividad, Luis A.; Irimia, Cristina; Polis, Ilham Y.; Pugh, Holly; Chang, Jae Won; Niphakis, Micah J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Roberto, Marisa; Parsons, Loren H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nicotine exposure (CNE) alters synaptic transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in a manner that enhances dopaminergic signaling and promotes nicotine use. The present experiments identify a correlation between enhanced production of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and diminished release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the VTA following CNE. To study the functional role of on-demand 2-AG signaling in GABAergic synapses, we used 1,2,3-triazole urea compounds to selectively inhibit 2-AG biosynthesis by diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL). The potency and selectivity of these inhibitors were established in rats in vitro (rat brain proteome), ex vivo (brain slices), and in vivo (intracerebroventricular administration) using activity-based protein profiling and targeted metabolomics analyses. Inhibition of DAGL (2-AG biosynthesis) rescues nicotine-induced VTA GABA signaling following CNE. Conversely, enhancement of 2-AG signaling in naïve rats by inhibiting 2-AG degradation recapitulates the loss of nicotine-induced GABA signaling evident following CNE. DAGL inhibition reduces nicotine self-administration without disrupting operant responding for a nondrug reinforcer or motor activity. Collectively, these findings provide a detailed characterization of selective inhibitors of rat brain DAGL and demonstrate that excessive 2-AG signaling contributes to a loss of inhibitory GABAergic constraint of VTA excitability following CNE. PMID:26755579

  10. Diacylglycerol lipase disinhibits VTA dopamine neurons during chronic nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Buczynski, Matthew W; Herman, Melissa A; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Natividad, Luis A; Irimia, Cristina; Polis, Ilham Y; Pugh, Holly; Chang, Jae Won; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Roberto, Marisa; Parsons, Loren H

    2016-01-26

    Chronic nicotine exposure (CNE) alters synaptic transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in a manner that enhances dopaminergic signaling and promotes nicotine use. The present experiments identify a correlation between enhanced production of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and diminished release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the VTA following CNE. To study the functional role of on-demand 2-AG signaling in GABAergic synapses, we used 1,2,3-triazole urea compounds to selectively inhibit 2-AG biosynthesis by diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL). The potency and selectivity of these inhibitors were established in rats in vitro (rat brain proteome), ex vivo (brain slices), and in vivo (intracerebroventricular administration) using activity-based protein profiling and targeted metabolomics analyses. Inhibition of DAGL (2-AG biosynthesis) rescues nicotine-induced VTA GABA signaling following CNE. Conversely, enhancement of 2-AG signaling in naïve rats by inhibiting 2-AG degradation recapitulates the loss of nicotine-induced GABA signaling evident following CNE. DAGL inhibition reduces nicotine self-administration without disrupting operant responding for a nondrug reinforcer or motor activity. Collectively, these findings provide a detailed characterization of selective inhibitors of rat brain DAGL and demonstrate that excessive 2-AG signaling contributes to a loss of inhibitory GABAergic constraint of VTA excitability following CNE.

  11. Chronic caffeine exposure potentiates nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, M; Swanner, L S; Yasar, S; Goldberg, S R

    1999-03-01

    The prevalence of tobacco smoking and coffee drinking place nicotine and caffeine among the most used licit drugs in many societies and their consumption is often characterised by concurrent use. The pharmacological basis for any putative interaction between these drugs remains unclear. Epidemiological reports support anecdotal evidence, which suggests that smokers consume caffeine to enhance the euphoric effects of nicotine. The aim of the present experiment was to examine effects of chronic exposure to caffeine on responding maintained by nicotine. Sprague-Dawley rats consuming caffeine (approximately 150-180 mg/kg per day) in their drinking water for 7 days prior to the beginning and throughout behavioural testing acquired intravenous nicotine self-administration (0.03 mg/kg per infusion) more rapidly than did controls. In a cross-over design, exclusion of caffeine brought levels of nicotine self-administration back to baseline, while adding caffeine to the drinking water of control rats increased responding maintained by nicotine over 90%. These findings strongly suggest that caffeine can potentiate the reinforcing properties of nicotine, thus highlighting the importance of environmental factors in shaping and maintaining tobacco smoking.

  12. Prospective study of dietary patterns and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among US women123

    PubMed Central

    Varraso, Raphaëlle; Fung, Teresa T; Barr, R Graham; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter; Camargo, Carlos A

    2009-01-01

    Background Although many foods and nutrients are associated with lung function or symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the relation between overall diet and newly diagnosed COPD is not known. Objective We assessed the relation between dietary patterns and newly diagnosed COPD in women. Design Data were collected from a large prospective cohort of US women (Nurses’ Health Study). Between 1984 and 2000, 754 self-reported confirmed cases of newly diagnosed COPD were identified among 72 043 women. With the use of principal component analysis, 2 dietary patterns were identified: a prudent pattern (fruit, vegetables, fish, whole-grain products) and a Western pattern (refined grains, cured and red meats, desserts, French fries). Patterns were categorized into quintiles, and the risk of COPD was compared between quintiles (lowest as reference) with the use of Cox proportional hazard models. Results After adjustments for 14 potential confounders, the prudent pattern was negatively associated with risk of newly diagnosed COPD [relative risk (RR) for highest compared with lowest quintile: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.98; P for trend = 0.02] whereas the Western pattern was positively associated with risk of COPD (RR for highest compared with lowest quintile: 1.31; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.82; P for trend = 0.02). In contrast with findings for COPD, dietary patterns were not associated with the risk of adult-onset asthma. Conclusion In women, a negative association was found between a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, and fish and the risk of COPD, whereas a positive association was found between a diet rich in refined grains, cured and red meats, desserts, and French fries and the risk of COPD. PMID:17684223

  13. The Changing Role of Dietary Protein Restriction in Management of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD).

    PubMed

    Shah, Bharat V

    2015-01-01

    In the last 5 to 6 decades there has been a marked variation in use of dietary protein restriction (DPR) in treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Before availability of renal replacement therapy (RRT), DPR restriction was widely practised in uraemic patients to reduce generation of nitrogenous waste products and ameliorate uraemic symptoms. With availability of RRT, the interest in DPR was lost. There was a resurgence of interest in DPR when animal experimental studies suggested that DPR can retard the progression of CKD. Then there was concern about worsening nutritional status with DPR. This article reviews how the role of DPR in treatment of CKD as perceived by physicians has varied over the years and suggests a strategy that should be followed in India considering that RRT is available to a very small percentage of cases developing end stage kidney disease (ESKD).

  14. Chronic particulate exposure, mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in the nurses health study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse health effects of exposures to acute air pollution have been well studied. Fewer studies have examined effects of chronic exposure. Previous studies used exposure estimates for narrow time periods and were limited by the geographic distribution of pollution monitors. This...

  15. Chronic particulate exposure, mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in the nurses health study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse health effects of exposures to acute air pollution have been well studied. Fewer studies have examined effects of chronic exposure. Previous studies used exposure estimates for narrow time periods and were limited by the geographic distribution of pollution monitors. This...

  16. A gut microbiota-targeted dietary intervention for amelioration of chronic inflammation underlying metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuiming; Fei, Na; Pang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Jian; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Baorang; Zhang, Menghui; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Chenhong; Li, Min; Sun, Lifeng; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Jingjing; Feng, Jie; Yan, Feiyan; Zhao, Naisi; Liu, Jiaqi; Long, Wenmin; Zhao, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by endotoxin from a dysbiotic gut microbiota contributes to the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. Modification of gut microbiota by a diet to balance its composition becomes a promising strategy to help manage obesity. A dietary scheme based on whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics (WTP diet) was designed to meet human nutritional needs as well as balance the gut microbiota. Ninety-three of 123 central obese volunteers (BMI ≥ 28 kg m−2) completed a self-controlled clinical trial consisting of 9-week intervention on WTP diet followed by a 14-week maintenance period. The average weight loss reached 5.79 ± 4.64 kg (6.62 ± 4.94%), in addition to improvement in insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. Pyrosequencing of fecal samples showed that phylotypes related to endotoxin-producing opportunistic pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were reduced significantly, while those related to gut barrier-protecting bacteria of Bifidobacteriaceae increased. Gut permeability, measured as lactulose/mannitol ratio, was decreased compared with the baseline. Plasma endotoxin load as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein was also significantly reduced, with concomitant decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and an increase in adiponectin. These results suggest that modulation of the gut microbiota via dietary intervention may enhance the intestinal barrier integrity, reduce circulating antigen load, and ultimately ameliorate the inflammation and metabolic phenotypes. PMID:24117923

  17. Dietary magnesium and copper affect survival time and neuroinflammation in chronic wasting disease

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Tracy A.; Spraker, Terry R.; Gidlewski, Thomas; Cummings, Bruce; Hill, Dana; Kong, Qingzhong; Balachandran, Aru; VerCauteren, Kurt C.; Zabel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic wasting disease (CWD), the only known wildlife prion disease, affects deer, elk and moose. The disease is an ongoing and expanding problem in both wild and captive North American cervid populations and is difficult to control in part due to the extreme environmental persistence of prions, which can transmit disease years after initial contamination. The role of exogenous factors in CWD transmission and progression is largely unexplored. In an effort to understand the influence of environmental and dietary constituents on CWD, we collected and analyzed water and soil samples from CWD-negative and positive captive cervid facilities, as well as from wild CWD-endozootic areas. Our analysis revealed that, when compared with CWD-positive sites, CWD-negative sites had a significantly higher concentration of magnesium, and a higher magnesium/copper (Mg/Cu) ratio in the water than that from CWD-positive sites. When cevidized transgenic mice were fed a custom diet devoid of Mg and Cu and drinking water with varied Mg/Cu ratios, we found that higher Mg/Cu ratio resulted in significantly longer survival times after intracerebral CWD inoculation. We also detected reduced levels of inflammatory cytokine gene expression in mice fed a modified diet with a higher Mg/Cu ratio compared to those on a standard rodent diet. These findings indicate a role for dietary Mg and Cu in CWD pathogenesis through modulating inflammation in the brain. PMID:27216881

  18. Vegetarian compared with meat dietary protein source and phosphorus homeostasis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Moe, Sharon M; Zidehsarai, Miriam P; Chambers, Mary A; Jackman, Lisa A; Radcliffe, J Scott; Trevino, Laurie L; Donahue, Susan E; Asplin, John R

    2011-02-01

    Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) are in positive phosphorus balance, but phosphorus levels are maintained in the normal range through phosphaturia induced by increases in fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) and parathyroid hormone (PTH). This provides the rationale for recommendations to restrict dietary phosphate intake to 800 mg/d. However, the protein source of the phosphate may also be important. We conducted a crossover trial in nine patients with a mean estimated GFR of 32 ml/min to directly compare vegetarian and meat diets with equivalent nutrients prepared by clinical research staff. During the last 24 hours of each 7-day diet period, subjects were hospitalized in a research center and urine and blood were frequently monitored. The results indicated that 1 week of a vegetarian diet led to lower serum phosphorus levels and decreased FGF23 levels. The inpatient stay demonstrated similar diurnal variation for blood phosphorus, calcium, PTH, and urine fractional excretion of phosphorus but significant differences between the vegetarian and meat diets. Finally, the 24-hour fractional excretion of phosphorus was highly correlated to a 2-hour fasting urine collection for the vegetarian diet but not the meat diet. In summary, this study demonstrates that the source of protein has a significant effect on phosphorus homeostasis in patients with CKD. Therefore, dietary counseling of patients with CKD must include information on not only the amount of phosphate but also the source of protein from which the phosphate derives.

  19. Benefits of dietary sodium restriction in the management of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Krikken, Jan A; Laverman, Gozewijn D; Navis, Gerjan

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the role of restricting dietary sodium intake in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications. A consistent line of evidence shows that high dietary sodium intake is a determinant of therapy resistance to blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Addition of sodium restriction to RAAS blockade or to RAAS blockade combined with a diuretic permits a further reduction in urinary protein excretion of approximately 30%, which could be expected to reduce long-term renal risk by 25%. High sodium intake increases blood pressure and proteinuria, induces glomerular hyperfiltration and blunts the response to RAAS blockade. Although recommended in international guidelines, sodium restriction is not a spearhead in treating renal patients. Sodium status is only rarely mentioned in recent large intervention studies in CKD. Sodium intake in CKD is similar to that in the general population. Reduction of sodium intake to the target of 50-85 mmol/24 h in patients with CKD reduces blood pressure and proteinuria, the latter by approximately 30%, and should be actively pursued to improve outcome in CKD.

  20. Dietary sodium adherence is poor in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Basuray, Anupam; Dolansky, Mary; Josephson, Richard; Sattar, Abdus; Grady, Ellen M; Vehovec, Anton; Gunstad, John; Redle, Joseph; Fang, James; Hughes, Joel W

    2015-04-01

    We sought to determine the rates and predictors of dietary sodium restriction and to evaluate the reliability of 24-hour urine collection as a tool to estimate dietary sodium intake in heart failure (HF) patients. We evaluated the 24-hour urinary sodium excretion of 305 outpatients with HF and reduced ejection fraction who were educated on following a <2 g sodium diet. The mean sodium excretion according to a single sample from each participant was 3.15 ± 1.58 g, and 23% were adherent to the <2 g recommendation. One hundred sixty-eight participants provided 2 samples with urinary creatinine excretion within normative range. Averaging both resulted in a mean sodium excretion of 3.21 ± 1.20 g and lower adherence rates to the <2-gram diet: 14% versus 23% (P = .019). Multivariate logistic regression showed only male sex and higher body mass index (BMI) to be associated with nonadherence (male: odds ratio [OR] 2.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-3.88; 1 unit BMI: OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10). Bland-Altman plots of urinary sodium and creatinine showed poor reproducibility between samples. In this chronic HF population, sodium consumption probably exceeds recommended amounts, particularly in men and those with higher BMI. Urine analyses were not highly reproducible, suggesting variation in both diet and urine collection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of a source-to-outcome model for the assessment of health impacts from dietary exposures to insecticide residues.

    PubMed

    Price, Paul S; Schnelle, Karl D; Cleveland, Cheryl B; Bartels, Michael J; Hinderliter, Paul M; Timchalk, Charles; Poet, Torka S

    2011-10-01

    The paper presents a case study of the application of a "source-to-outcome" model for the evaluation of the health outcomes from dietary exposures to an insecticide, chlorpyrifos, in populations of adults (age 30) and children (age 3). The model is based on publically-available software programs that characterize the longitudinal dietary exposure and anthropometry of exposed individuals. These predictions are applied to a validated PBPK/PD model to estimate interindividual and longitudinal variation in brain and RBC AChE inhibition (key events) and chlorpyrifos concentrations in blood and TCPy in urine (biomarkers of exposure). The predicted levels of chlorpyrifos and TCPy are compared to published measurements of the biomarkers. Predictions of RBC AChE are compared to levels of inhibition associated with reported exposure-related effects in humans to determine the potential for the occurrence of adverse cholinergic effects. The predicted distributions of chlorpyrifos in blood and TCPy in urine were found to be reasonably consistent with published values, supporting the predictive value of the exposure and PBPK portions of the source-to-outcome model. Key sources of uncertainty in predictions of dietary exposures were investigated and found to have a modest impact on the model predictions. Future versions of this source-to-outcome model can be developed that consider advances in our understanding of metabolism, to extend the approach to other age groups (infants), and address intakes from other routes of exposure.

  2. Effects of dietary polychlorinated biphenyl exposure on energetics of white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voltura, M.B.; French, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Energy budgets have provided physiological ecologists with a vital link between environmental variables and individual performance and should also prove useful to ecotoxicologists in understanding the effects of sublethal exposure in the field. Exposure to toxic compounds is likely to be metabolically expensive and may result in a trade-off between energy spent to detoxify and excrete contaminants and energy allocated to growth or reproduction. To quantify the energetic cost of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure, we fed captive white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) diets containing PCBs (2:1 Aroclor? 1242:1254) at levels of 0, 0.1, 10, and 25 ppm (mg PCBs/kg food). After six weeks on the diets, there were no differences in food intake (g/d), diet digestibility (%), or body mass related to the level of dietary PCBs. This indicated that short-term exposure to PCBs did not cause a detectable increase in energy need as measured by voluntary food intake. We continued to feed mice the PCB-containing diets for one year, at which time we repeated the food intake trial, and also measured oxygen consumption at 20 and 30 C. After one year, all mice had gained mass, but mice on the 25-ppm diet tended to be heavier than mice in the other groups. Compared to the control group, mice on the 25-ppm diet had higher food intake (4.1 vs 3.7 g/d; p = 0.06) and higher oxygen consumption at 30 C (40.1 vs 36.6 ml O2/h; p = 0.01). These results suggest that there is an energetic cost to long-term contaminant exposure that, when combined with other environmental stresses, may influence patterns of energy acquisition and allocation.

  3. Effects of chronic normobaric hypoxic and hypercapnic exposure in rats: Prevention of experimental chronic mountain sickness by hypercapnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, B.; Bonkovsky, H. L.; Ou, Lo-Chang

    1987-09-01

    A syndrome of experimental chronic mountain sickness can be produced in the Hilltop strain of Sprague-Dawley rats by chronic hypobaric hypoxic exposure. This syndrome is characterized by polycythemia, plasma hemoglobinemia, pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy with eventual failure and death. It has generally been assumed that these changes are caused by chronic hypoxemia, not by hypobaric exposure per se. We have now confirmed this directly by showing that chronic normobaric hypoxic exposure (10.5% O2) produces similar hematologic and hemodynamic changes. Further, the addition of hypercapnic exposure to the hypoxic exposure blunted or prevented the effects of the hypoxic exposure probably by stimulating respiration, thus increasing the rate of oxygen delivery to the cells. Changes in the rate-controlling enzymes of hepatic heme metabolism, 5-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase, and in cytochrome(s) P-450, the major hepatic hemoprotein(s), were also measured in hypoxic and hypercapnic rats. Hypoxia decreased 5-aminolevulinate synthase and increased cytochrome(s) P-450, probably by increasing the size of a “regulatory” heme pool within hepatocytes. These changes were also prevented by the addition of hypercapnic to hypoxic exposure.

  4. A framework to determine the effectiveness of dietary exposure mitigation to chemical contaminants.

    PubMed

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J Ine; Edwards, Simon G; Kennedy, Marc C; O'Hagan, Sue; O'Mahony, Cian; Scholz, Gabriele; Steinberg, Pablo; Chiodini, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    In order to ensure the food safety, risk managers may implement measures to reduce human exposure to contaminants via food consumption. The evaluation of the effect of a measure is often an overlooked step in risk analysis process. The aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for determining the effectiveness of mitigation measures to reduce dietary exposure to chemical contaminants. Based on expert opinion, a general framework for evaluation of the effectiveness of measures to reduce human exposure to food contaminants was developed. The general outline was refined by application to three different cases: 1) methyl mercury in fish and fish products, 2) deoxynivalenol in cereal grains, and 3) furan in heated products. It was found that many uncertainties and natural variations exist, which make it difficult to assess the impact of the mitigation measure. Whenever possible, quantitative methods should be used to describe the current variation and uncertainty. Additional data should be collected to cover natural variability and reduce uncertainty. For the time being, it is always better for the risk manager to have access to all available information, including an assessment of uncertainty; however, the proposed methodology provides a conceptual framework for addressing these systematically.

  5. Dietary exposure of acrylamide from the fifth Chinese Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Zhao, Yunfeng; Zhu, Feng; Ma, Yongjian; Li, Xiaowei; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2016-01-01

    The levels of acrylamide in 240 food composite samples from the 5th Chinese Total Diet Study (TDS) were measured using an LC-MS/MS method and the exposure estimates for the general population were evaluated. The samples were collected from 20 provinces in China, covering about two thirds of the Chinese population. Acrylamide was detected in 40.0% of composite samples with the concentrations ranged from 0.8 to 211.8 μg/kg. The average dietary intakes from the 5th Chinese TDS were 0.319 μg kg(-1) bw day(-1) and an increase with about 70% was observed from the 3rd Chinese TDS in 2000 to the 5th Chinese TDS between 2009 and 2012. The main food group contributors to acrylamide exposure were vegetables (35.2%), cereals (34.3%) and potatoes (15.7%). Based on the benchmark dose lower confidence limit at 10% risk (BMDL10) of 0.31 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for the induction of mammary tumors in rats and 0.18 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for Harderian gland tumors in mice, the margins of exposure (MOEs) were 973 and 565 for Chinese general population, respectively. These MOEs indicate a human health concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of dietary exposure of polycyclic musk HHCB on the metamorphosis of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Pablos, María Victoria; Jiménez, María Ángeles; San Segundo, Laura; Martini, Federica; Beltrán, Eulalia; Fernández, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The compound 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-[γ]-2-benzopyrane (HHCB; galaxolide, Chemical Abstracts Service number 1222-05-5) is a synthetic musk used extensively as a fragrance in many consumer products and classified as an emerging pollutant. The ecotoxicological information available for HHCB addresses exposure via water, but this compound is frequently adsorbed into particulate matter. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of dietary exposure to several environmentally relevant HHCB concentrations adsorbed in food during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis. The authors sought to determine if such exposure to this synthetic musk resulted in histological changes in the thyroid gland in conjunction with changes in development (staging, timing to metamorphosis), body weight, and length. Developmental acceleration on day 14, together with hypertrophy of the thyroid follicular epithelium in tadpoles, suggested a possible agonistic effect of HHCB, which would have been compensated after metamorphosis by regulatory mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. Further research into the potential thyroid-related mechanisms of action of HHCB should be conducted. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1428-1435. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  7. Assessment of dietary exposure and effect in humans: The role of NMR.

    PubMed

    van Duynhoven, John P M; Jacobs, Doris M

    2016-08-01

    In human nutritional science progress has always depended strongly on analytical measurements for establishing relationships between diet and health. This field has undergone significant changes as a result of the development of NMR and mass spectrometry methods for large scale detection, identification and quantification of metabolites in body fluids. This has allowed systematic studies of the metabolic fingerprints that biological processes leave behind, and has become the research field of metabolomics. As a metabolic profiling technique, NMR is at its best when its unbiased nature, linearity and reproducibility are exploited in well-controlled nutritional intervention and cross-sectional population screening studies. Although its sensitivity is less good than that of mass spectrometry, NMR has maintained a strong position in metabolomics through implementation of standardisation protocols, hyphenation with mass spectrometry and chromatographic techniques, accurate quantification and spectral deconvolution approaches, and high-throughput automation. Thus, NMR-based metabolomics has contributed uniquely to new insights into dietary exposure, in particular by unravelling the metabolic fates of phytochemicals and the discovery of dietary intake markers. NMR profiling has also contributed to the understanding of the subtle effects of diet on central metabolism and lipoprotein metabolism. In order to hold its ground in nutritional metabolomics, NMR will need to step up its performance in sensitivity and resolution; the most promising routes forward are the analytical use of dynamic nuclear polarisation and developments in microcoil construction and automated fractionation.

  8. Public health benefits of hair-mercury analysis and dietary advice in lowering methylmercury exposure in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Line E; Jørgensen, Jan S; Nielsen, Flemming; Grandjean, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate whether a public health intervention using focused dietary advice combined with a hair-mercury analysis can lower neurotoxic methylmercury exposure among pregnant women without decreasing their overall intake of seafood. A total of 146 pregnant women were consecutively recruited from the antenatal clinic at a Danish university hospital at their initial ultrasound scan. Dietary advice was provided on avoiding methylmercury exposure from large predatory fish and a hair sample from each participant was analysed for mercury, with the results being communicated shortly thereafter to the women. A dietary questionnaire was filled in. Follow-up three months later included a dietary questionnaire and a repeat hair-mercury analysis. In the follow-up group, 22% of the women had hair-mercury concentrations above a safe limit of 0.58 µg/g at enrolment, decreasing to 8% three months later. Average hair-mercury concentrations decreased by 21%. However, the total seafood intake remained at the same level after three months. Increased exposure to methylmercury among pregnant women is an important public health concern in Denmark. The observed lowering of hair-mercury concentrations associated with dietary advice corresponds to a substantial public health benefit that probably makes such an intervention highly profitable.

  9. Away from home meals: associations with biomarkers of chronic disease and dietary intake in American adults, NHANES 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Kant, A K; Whitley, M I; Graubard, B I

    2015-05-01

    Away from home (AFH) meals are known to be energy-dense and of poor diet quality. Both direct and indirect exposure (for example, neighborhood restaurant density) to AFH meals have been implicated as contributors to higher body weight and adverse health outcomes. To examine the association of frequency of eating AFH and fast-food meals with biomarkers of chronic disease and dietary intake. This cross-sectional study used frequency of AFH and fast-food meal and biomarker data from the NHANES 2005-2010. Information on weekly frequency of AFH and fast-food meals was collected via questionnaire during the household interview. The metabolic biomarkers examined included body mass index (BMI), serum cholesterol (total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)), triglycerides, glycohemoglobin and fasting glucose (n=8314, age⩾20, National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) 2007-2010). Biomarkers of dietary exposure included serum concentrations of vitamins A, D, E, C, B-6, B-12, folate and carotenoids (n=4162; 2005-2006). Multiple linear and logistic regression methods adjusted for complex survey methodology and covariates. American adults reported a mean of 3.9 (95% confidence interval 3.7, 4.0) AFH and 1.8 (1.6, 1.9) fast-food meals/week. Over 50% of adults reported ⩾3 AFH and >35% reported ⩾2 fast-food meals/week. The mean BMI of more frequent AFH or fast-food meal reporters was higher (Ptrend⩽0.0004). Serum concentrations of total, LDL and HDL-cholesterol were related inversely with frequency of AFH meals (P<0.05). Frequencies of fast-food meals and serum HDL-cholesterol were also related inversely (P=0.0001). Serum concentrations of all examined micronutrients (except vitamin A and lycopene) declined with increasing frequency of AFH meals (P<0.05); women and ⩾50-year olds were at higher risk. Reporters of frequent AFH and fast-food meals had higher BMI and lower concentrations of HDL-cholesterol; however, profiles of

  10. Away from home meals: associations with biomarkers of chronic disease and dietary intake in American adults, NHANES 2005-2010

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Ashima K.; Whitley, Melanie I.; Graubard, Barry I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Away from home (AFH) meals are known to be energy-dense and of poor diet quality. Both direct and indirect exposure (e.g., neighborhood restaurant density) to AFH meals have been implicated as contributors to higher body weight and adverse health outcomes. Objective To examine the association of frequency of eating AFH and fast-food meals with biomarkers of chronic disease and dietary intake. Design This cross-sectional study used frequency of AFH and fast-food meal and biomarker data from the NHANES 2005-2010. Information on weekly frequency of AFH and fast-food meals was collected via questionnaire during the household interview. The metabolic biomarkers examined included BMI, serum cholesterol (total, HDL, and LDL), triglycerides, glycohemoglobin, and fasting glucose (n=8314, age ≥20, NHANES 2007-2010). Biomarkers of dietary exposure included serum concentrations of vitamins A, D, E, C, B-6, B-12, folate, and carotenoids (n=4162; 2005-2006). Multiple linear and logistic regression methods adjusted for complex survey methodology and covariates. Results American adults reported a mean of 3.9 (95% CI 3.7, 4.0) AFH and 1.8 (1.6, 1.9) fast-food meals/week. Over 50% of adults reported ≥3 AFH and >35% reported ≥2 fast-food meals/week. Mean BMI of more frequent AFH or fast-food meal reporters was higher (Ptrend≤0.0004). Serum concentrations of total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol were related inversely with frequency of AFH meals (P<0.05). Frequency of fast-food meals and serum HDL-cholesterol were also related inversely (P=0.0001). Serum concentrations of all examined micronutrients (except vitamin A and lycopene) declined with increasing frequency of AFH meals (P<0.05); women and ≥50 y olds were at higher risk. Conclusions Reporters of frequent AFH and fast-food meals had higher BMI and lower concentrations of HDL cholesterol; but profiles of other biomarkers did not indicate higher metabolic risk. However, the serum concentrations of nutrients with

  11. Design, development and validation of software for modelling dietary exposure to food chemicals and nutrients.

    PubMed

    McNamara, C; Naddy, B; Rohan, D; Sexton, J

    2003-10-01

    The Monte Carlo computational system for stochastic modelling of dietary exposure to food chemicals and nutrients is presented. This system was developed through a European Commission-funded research project. It is accessible as a Web-based application service. The system allows and supports very significant complexity in the data sets used as the model input, but provides a simple, general purpose, linear kernel for model evaluation. Specific features of the system include the ability to enter (arbitrarily) complex mathematical or probabilistic expressions at each and every input data field, automatic bootstrapping on subjects and on subject food intake diaries, and custom kernels to apply brand information such as market share and loyalty to the calculation of food and chemical intake.

  12. Dietary exposure and human risk assessment of phthalate esters based on total diet study in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhang; Li, Han-Han; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Yasin, Mohamed Salleh Mohamed; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-10-01

    Phthalate esters are used in a wide variety of consumer products, and human exposure to this class of compounds is widespread. Nevertheless, studies on dietary exposure of human to phthalates are limited. In this study, to assess the daily intakes of phthalate esters and the possible adverse health impacts, different food samples were collected from three areas of Cambodia, one of the poorest countries in the world. The ∑phthalate ester concentrations in Kampong Cham, Kratie and Kandal provinces ranged from 0.05 to 2.34 (median 0.88) μgg(-1), 0.19-1.65 (median 0.86) μgg(-1) and 0.24-3.05 (median 0.59) μgg(-1) wet weight (ww), respectively. Di-2-Ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) were the predominant compounds among all foodstuffs. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of phthalate esters for the general population in Kampong Cham, Kratie and Kandal was 34.3, 35.6 and 35.8μgkg(-1) bw d(-1), respectively. The dietary daily intake of DEHP, benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) in Kampong Cham, Kratie and Kandal were below the tolerable daily intakes (TDI) imposed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and reference doses (RfD) imposed by The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Rice contributed the greatest quantity of DEHP to the daily intake in Cambodia so may deserve further exploration. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the occurrence and the daily intakes of phthalate esters in Cambodia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants and metals among Inuit and Chukchi in Russian Arctic Chukotka

    PubMed Central

    Dudarev, Alexey A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The general aim was to assess dietary exposure to selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals among Eskimo (Inuit) and Chukchi of the Chukotka Peninsula of the Russian Arctic, and to establish recommendations for exposure risk reduction. Study design A cross-sectional evaluation of nutritional patterns of coastal and inland indigenous peoples of the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug (in 2001–2003); assessment of the levels of persistent toxic substances (PTSs) in traditional foods and their comparison to Russian food safety limits; the identification of local sources of food contamination; and the recommendation and implementation of risk management measures. Methods Community-based dietary survey of self reported food frequencies (453 persons), chemical analyses (POPs and metals) of local foods and indoor matters (397 samples), substantiation of recommendations for daily (weekly, monthly) intakes of traditional food. Results POPs in traditional food items are generally below the Russian food safety limits except marine mammal fat, while Hg and Cd are high mainly in mammal viscera. Lead is relatively low in tissues of all animals studied. For the Chukotka coastal communities, seals constitute the principal source of the whole suite of PTSs considered. Consumption restrictions are recommended for marine and freshwater fish, some wild meats (waterfowl and seal), fats (whale and seal), liver (most animals) and kidney (reindeer, walrus and seal). Evidence is presented that contamination of foodstuffs may be significantly increased during storing/processing/cooking of food due to indoor and outdoor environmental conditions. Conclusions Based on the analytical findings and the local PTSs sources identified, guidelines on food safety are suggested, as well as measures to reduce food contamination and domestic and local sources. Important and urgent remedial actions are recommended to minimize PTSs environmental and domestic contamination. Waste clean

  14. Infant dietary exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in Greece.

    PubMed

    Costopoulou, Danae; Vassiliadou, Irene; Leondiadis, Leondios

    2013-09-01

    The dietary exposure of infants to polychlorinated dibenzo dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) is an issue of great social impact. We investigated for the first time the dietary intake of these compounds in infants living in Greece. We included in our study two age groups: 0-6 months, when infants are fed exclusively by human milk and/or formula milk, and 6 to 12 months, when solid food is introduced to nutrition. We took into consideration analytical results for PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs concentrations in the most popular infant formulae in the Greek market, previous data for mother milk concentrations of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs from Greece, and finally analytical data for fat-containing food products from the Greek market. In the first study group, it was found than in infants exclusively fed by breast milk, the calculated sum of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs (60.3-80.4 TEQ pg/kg body weight) was significantly higher than that of infants that consume a combination of human milk and formula (31.2-41.6 TEQ pg/kg body weight). In the second study group, separate daily intake estimations were performed for babies receiving human milk (estimated total daily intake 19.76-24.95 TEQ pg/kg body weight) and formula milk (estimated total daily intake 1.60-2.24 TEQ pg/kg body weight). The risks of this exposure should not be overestimated because nursing is restricted to a limited period of human life and besides, the potential consumption of higher levels of dioxin-like compounds is fully compensated by the significant benefits of breast-feeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Steroids in marine aquaculture farms surrounding Hailing Island, South China: occurrence, bioconcentration, and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Chen, Hui; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Sun, Kai-Feng; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence, bioconcentration, and human dietary exposure via seafood consumption of 24 steroids were investigated by rapid resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-MS/MS) in six typical marine aquaculture farms surrounding Hailing Island, South China. Ten, 9, 10, 15 of 24 steroids were detected at concentrations ranging from <0.1 (testosterone) to 40 ng/L (prednisolone), from 0.1 (4-androstene-3,17-dione) to 2.4 ng/g (progesterone), from 0.3 ng/g (testosterone) to 21.4 ng/g (epi-androsterone), and from <0.1 (testosterone) to 560 ng/g (cortisol) (wet weight) in the water, sediment, feed and biota samples, respectively. Synthetic steroids (androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, 17α-boldenone, 17β-boldenone, 17β-trenbolone, prednisolone, norgestrel) were detected in the feed samples, clearly demonstrating the illegal use of steroids in the feed. The field bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of steroids calculated in different aquatic organisms ranged from 93.8 to 4000. The estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of androgens, glucocorticoids, and progestagens via consumption of seafood (i.e., shrimps, crabs, mollusks, and fish) for different age groups were in the range of 33.4-134, 2061-8566, and 40.4-155 ng/d for children (2-5 years), youth (6-18 years), and adults (>18 years), respectively. Even though no significant risk from dietary exposure arises from individual steroid, elevated risk to humans can result from the occurrence of multiple steroids in the seafood raised in the aquaculture farms, especially for the sensitive populations, such as pregnant women and children.

  16. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in the Korean food basket and estimation of dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Barghi, Mandana; Shin, Eun-Su; Son, Min-Hui; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Pyo, Heesoo; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-06-01

    1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant that is used worldwide in expanded and extruded polystyrene foam and simultaneously emitted to the environment. HBCD can easily accumulate in animals and humans and cause neurotoxicity, thyroid hormone disruption, and reproductive disorders. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the HBCD concentrations in foods and estimate the human exposure through the diet. In this study a total of 521 food samples from eight food categories were sampled and analyzed for their HBCD content. Based on consumption data, the average dietary intake of the general Korean population and specific subgroups was calculated. The highest levels of HBCD were found in fish and shellfish (0.47 ng g(-1) ww), and this was attributed to natural exposure to the contaminated marine environments and the HBCD bioaccumulation. In addition, the use of expanded polystyrene buoys in aquaculture was also found to be a potential source of HBCD in bivalves. The high solubility of α-HBCD in water and the persistence of this diastereomer compared to β- and γ-HBCD in biological tissues, led to higher accumulation of α-HBCD in animal-based foods. In contrast, the diastereomeric selectivity and lower metabolic capacity in plants compared with animals led to the predominance of γ-HBCD in plant-based foods. The dietary intake of HBCD was estimated to be 0.82 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) in the general population and 2.89 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) in children up to 5 years of age. The high HBCD intake in children was found to be a result of their lower body weight and their high consumption of milk and homemade Korean baby foods that usually contain fish.

  17. Validation of a chronic dietary cadmium bioaccumulation and toxicity model for Hyalella azteca exposed to field-contaminated periphyton and lake water.

    PubMed

    Golding, Lisa A; Borgmann, Uwe; Dixon, D George

    2011-11-01

    A model previously developed in the laboratory to predict chronic bioaccumulation and toxicity of cadmium to Hyalella azteca from a diet of periphyton was validated by comparing predictions with measurements of Cd in two exposure scenarios: laboratory-cultured H. azteca exposed for 28 d to field-contaminated water and periphyton, and Cd measured in field-collected H. azteca. In both exposure scenarios, model predictions of bioaccumulation were shown to be robust; however, effects on Cd bioaccumulation from complexation with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and inhibition of Cd bioaccumulation by Ca²⁺ must be incorporated into the model to permit its wider application. The model predicted that 80 to 84% of Cd in H. azteca came from periphyton when H. azteca were chronically exposed to dissolved Cd in lake water at 2.63 to 3.01 nmol/L and periphyton at 1,880 to 2,630 nmol/g ash-free dry mass. Dietary Cd contributed markedly to the model-predicted decrease in 28-d survival to 74% at environmental Cd concentrations in food and water. In reality, survival decreased to 10%. The lower than predicted survival likely was due to the higher nutritional quality of periphyton used to develop the model in the laboratory compared with the field-collected periphyton. Overall, this research demonstrated that Cd in a periphyton diet at environmental concentrations can contribute to chronic toxicity in H. azteca.

  18. Multigenerational exposure to dietary nonylphenol has no severe effects on spatial learning in female rats.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Katherine M; Newbold, Retha R; Ferguson, Sherry A

    2002-05-01

    Nonylphenol is a common intermediate in the production of many consumer compounds and reportedly acts as an estrogen mimic. Because estrogen affects the spatial learning and memory in rats, the effects of nonylphenol exposure on the performance of female rats in the Morris water maze were investigated. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats (F0) consumed soy-free diets containing 0, 25, 200 or 750 ppm nonylphenol (0, 2, 16 or 60 mg/kg per day) beginning on postnatal day (PND) 42 and continuing for two generations (F1 and F2) with breeding occurring within treatments. Females to be behaviorally tested (n = 7-8 per treatment per generation) were ovariectomized at adulthood and assessed for spatial learning and memory between PND 125-150 (young adult age). Each rat was tested for four consecutive days (three trials per day) in the Morris water maze with the platform in a fixed location. One week later, each subject was primed with estrogen and progesterone and assessed on a single day (three trials). The F1 rats continued on the same diets until PND 380-395 (middle aged) when they were re-tested as above (four consecutive days followed 1 week later with hormonal priming and a single test day). Latency to find the platform, path length and swim speed were averaged over the three trials per day and analyzed using repeated measures analyses of variance. There were no consistent effects of dietary nonylphenol exposure and no interactions of nonylphenol exposure on any measure of performance in either generation at the young age nor at the middle age in the F1 generation. When tested at the young adult age, however, hormone priming resulted in latencies and path lengths that were significantly shorter than in those exhibited during the unprimed test days, and there was no such effect when tested at middle age. Middle aged rats exhibited better performance than the same animals tested at a young age, likely as a result of familiarity and practice with the test paradigm. These data

  19. Dietary Cadmium Exposure and Risk of Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Quraishi, Sabah M.; Shafer, Martin M.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Freney, Emily P.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Luo, Juhua; Meliker, Jaymie R.; Mu, Lina; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In vitro and animal data suggest that cadmium, a heavy metal that contaminates some foods and tobacco plants, is an estrogenic endocrine disruptor. Elevated estrogen exposure is associated with breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Objectives: We examined the association between dietary cadmium intake and risk of these cancers in the large, well-characterized Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). Methods: A total of 155,069 postmenopausal women, 50–79 years of age, who were enrolled in the WHI clinical trials or observational study, participated in this study. We estimated dietary cadmium consumption by combining baseline food frequency questionnaire responses with U.S. Food and Drug Administration data on food cadmium content. Participants reported incident invasive breast, endometrial, or ovarian cancer, and WHI centrally adjudicated all cases through August 2009. We applied Cox regression to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for each cancer, comparing quintiles of energy-adjusted dietary cadmium intake. Results: Over an average of 10.5 years, 6,658 invasive breast cancers, 1,198 endometrial cancers, and 735 ovarian cancers were reported. We observed no statistically significant associations between dietary cadmium and risk of any of these cancers after adjustment for potential confounders including total dietary energy intake. Results did not differ in any subgroup of women examined. Conclusions: We found little evidence that dietary cadmium is a risk factor for breast, endometrial, or ovarian cancers in postmenopausal women. Misclassification in dietary cadmium assessment may have attenuated observed associations. Citation: Adams SV, Quraishi SM, Shafer MM, Passarelli MN, Freney EP, Chlebowski RT, Luo J, Meliker JR, Mu L, Neuhouser ML, Newcomb PA. 2014. Dietary cadmium exposure and risk of breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative. Environ Health Perspect 122:594–600; http://dx.doi.org/10

  20. Plasticity of the responses to chronic hypoxia and dietary restriction in an aged organism: evidence from the Drosophila model.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Paul; Frelin, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Major cardiovascular diseases arise as consequences of a reduced blood flow to oxygen consuming organs such as the brain and the heart. Their incidence and consequences increase with ageing and inappropriate nutrition conditions. In this study we compared the responses of young (1 day old) or aged (1 month old) Drosophila to dietary restriction and chronic hypoxia. Changing the two major diet components (sucrose and yeast) had complex and non linear consequences on longevity. Ageing and hypoxia completely remodelled the longevity/nutrient reaction norm. Aged flies required more sucrose and less yeast than young flies and became insensitive to dietary restriction by food dilution. The responses to chronic hypoxia were largely age independent and strongly diet dependent. For instance rich diets sensitized Drosophila to chronic hypoxia and hypoxia increased the life span of starving flies (aged or young). The results highlight the importance of nutrition conditions when assessing ageing and hypoxic tolerance in the Drosophila system.

  1. Probabilistic dietary exposure to phycotoxins in a recreational shellfish harvester subpopulation (France).

    PubMed

    Picot, Cyndie; Limon, Gwendolina; Durand, Gaël; Parent-Massin, Dominique; Roudot, Alain-Claude

    2013-07-01

    Phycotoxins, secondary phytoplankton metabolites, are considered as an important food safety issue because their accumulation by shellfish may render them unfit for human consumption. However, the likely intakes of phycotoxins via shellfish consumption are almost unknown because both contamination and consumption data are very scarce. Thus, two 1-year surveys were conducted (through the same population: recreational shellfish harvesters and from the same geographical area) to assess: shellfish consumption and contamination by major toxins (domoic acid (DA) group, okadaic acid (OA) group and spirolides (SPXs)). Recreational shellfish harvesters had been targeted as an at-risk subpopulation because they consume more shellfish than general population and because they eat not only commercial shellfish species controlled by official authorities but also their own harvests of shellfish species may be in non-controlled areas and more over shellfish species non-considered in the official control species. Then, these two kinds of data were combined with deterministic and probabilistic approaches for both acute and chronic exposures, on considering the impact of shellfish species and cooking on phycotoxin levels. For acute risk, monitoring programs seem to be adequate for DAs, whereas OAs could be a matter of concern for high consumers (their acute intakes were up to ninefold the acute reference dose (ARfD)). About chronic risk, OAs are a matter of concern. The daily OAs intakes were close to the ARfD, which is, by definition, greater than the tolerable daily intake. Moreover, SPX contamination is low but regular, no (sub)chronic SPX toxicity data exist; but in case of (sub)chronic toxicity, SPX exposure should be considered.

  2. SPECIES SPECIFIC DIETARY ARSENIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: THE NEED TO ESTIMATE BIOACCESSIBILITY AND ASSESSING THE IMPLIED PRESYSTEMIC METABOLISM IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical form specific toxicity of arsenic dictates the need for species specific quantification in order to accurately assess the risk from an exposure. The literature has begun to produce preliminary species specific databases for certain dietary sources, but a quantitativ...

  3. MODELED RESIDENTIAL CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO CHILDREN VIA DERMAL SURFACE RESIDUE CONTACT AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model has been applied to estimate residential chlorpyrifos exposure and dace to children via the non-dietary ingestion and dermal residue contact pathways. Time-location-activity data for 2825 children were sampled from national surveys to generat...

  4. SPECIES SPECIFIC DIETARY ARSENIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: THE NEED TO ESTIMATE BIOACCESSIBILITY AND ASSESSING THE IMPLIED PRESYSTEMIC METABOLISM IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical form specific toxicity of arsenic dictates the need for species specific quantification in order to accurately assess the risk from an exposure. The literature has begun to produce preliminary species specific databases for certain dietary sources, but a quantitativ...

  5. Dietary predictors of young children’s exposures to chlorpyrifos, permethrin, and 2,4-D using urinary biomonitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few data exist on the association between dietary habits and urinary biomarker concentrations of pesticides in children. The objective was to examined the association between the weekly intake frequency of 65 food items and urinary biomarkers of exposure to chlorpyrifos (3,5,6-tr...

  6. MODELED RESIDENTIAL CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO CHILDREN VIA DERMAL SURFACE RESIDUE CONTACT AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model has been applied to estimate residential chlorpyrifos exposure and dace to children via the non-dietary ingestion and dermal residue contact pathways. Time-location-activity data for 2825 children were sampled from national surveys to generat...

  7. Dietary predictors of young children’s exposures to chlorpyrifos, permethrin, and 2,4-D using urinary biomonitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few data exist on the association between dietary habits and urinary biomarker concentrations of pesticides in children. The objective was to examined the association between the weekly intake frequency of 65 food items and urinary biomarkers of exposure to chlorpyrifos (3,5,6-tr...

  8. Energetic cost of dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) for white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voltura, M.B.; French, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    Contaminant exposure is an environmental factor often overlooked in ecological studies. Yet exposure to toxicants is likely to be metabolically expensive, and result in a trade-off between energy spent to detoxify an excrete contaminants, and energy allocated to growth or reproduction. To quantify the energetic cost of PCB exposure, we fed mice diets containing 0, 0.1, 10 and 25 ppm PCBs (mg PCBs/kg food). After 6 wks, there were no differences in food intake or body mass related to the level of dietary PCBs. We continued to feed mice the PCB diets for one year, and then measured food intake and resting metabolic rate. After one year, all mice had gained mass, but mice on the 25 ppm diet were significantly heavier than mice in the other groups. Mice on the 25 ppm diet also showed an increase in both food intake (p=0.06) and metabolic rate (p=0.01), after correction for differences in body mass. Food intake averaged 4.1 g/d for mice on the 25 ppm diet, compared to 3.7 gld for control mice. Oxygen consumption at 30°C averaged 40.1 ml O2/h for mice on the 25 ppm diet, compared to 36.6 ml O2/h for control mice. These results show that for white-footed mice, there is an energetic cost to contaminant exposure that when combined with other environmental stresses, will influence patterns of energy acquisition and allocation.

  9. Sudden Gains in Prolonged Exposure and Sertraline for Chronic PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Janie J.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sudden gains are significant, rapid improvements in symptoms, larger than typical between-session symptom reduction.[8] Sudden gains in a large sample of individuals with PTSD have not been studied, and only one study has looked at it in pharmacotherapy, but not in PTSD. In the present study, we examined the occurrence of sudden gains in psychotherapy, specifically prolonged exposure (PE), and pharmacotherapy, specifically sertraline, for chronic PTSD. Method Sudden gains in PTSD symptoms (PTSD Symptom Scale-Self-Report[23]) were assessed in 200 individuals with PTSD during 10 weeks of PE or sertraline. Results Individuals in both PE (42.2%) and sertraline (31%) exhibited sudden gains. Individuals in PE made more gains toward the end of treatment (7.2%) than sertraline (2%, OR = 3.82). However, individuals in sertraline made larger gains during early treatment (M = 18.35, SD = 8.15) than PE (M = 12.53, SD = 5.16, d = .85). Notably, those on sertraline were more likely to exhibit a reversal of sudden gains than those in PE (OR = .23). Pointing to clinical significance, the presence of a sudden gain was associated with better reduction in symptoms from pre- to post-treatment (β = -.49). Conclusions Individuals in both PE and sertraline experienced gains, though sertraline was associated with earlier large but reversible gains, and PE was associated with later gains. This differential pattern of discontinuous change highlights potential differential mechanism for these therapies and marks important transition points for further detailed analyses of change mechanisms. PMID:23633445

  10. Temperature modulates phototrophic periphyton response to chronic copper exposure.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Anne Sophie; Dabrin, Aymeric; Morin, Soizic; Gahou, Josiane; Foulquier, Arnaud; Coquery, Marina; Pesce, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Streams located in vineyard areas are highly prone to metal pollution. In a context of global change, aquatic systems are generally subjected to multi-stress conditions due to multiple chemical and/or physical pressures. Among various environmental factors that modulate the ecological effects of toxicants, special attention should be paid to climate change, which is driving an increase in extreme climate events such as sharp temperature rises. In lotic ecosystems, periphyton ensures key ecological functions such as primary production and nutrient cycling. However, although the effects of metals on microbial communities are relatively well known, there is scant data on possible interactions between temperature increase and metal pollution. Here we led a study to evaluate the influence of temperature on the response of phototrophic periphyton to copper (Cu) exposure. Winter communities, collected in a 8 °C river water, were subjected for six weeks to four thermal conditions in microcosms in presence or not of Cu (nominal concentration of 15 μg L(-1)). At the initial river temperature (8 °C), our results confirmed the chronic impact of Cu on periphyton, both in terms of structure (biomass, distribution of algal groups, diatomic composition) and function (photosynthetic efficiency). At higher temperatures (13, 18 and 23 °C), Cu effects were modulated. Indeed, temperature increase reduced Cu effects on algal biomass, algal class proportions, diatom assemblage composition and photosynthetic efficiency. This reduction of Cu effects on periphyton may be related to lower bioaccumulation of Cu and/or to selection of more Cu-tolerant species at higher temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure-induced atherosclerosis: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongmei; Fang, Guoqiang; Greenberg, Harly; Liu, Shu Fang

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the USA and is recognized as an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Identification of atherosclerosis risk factor attributable to OSA may provide opportunity to develop preventive measures for cardiovascular risk reduction. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a prominent feature of OSA pathophysiology and may be a major mechanism linking OSA to arteriosclerosis. Animal studies demonstrated that CIH exposure facilitated high-cholesterol diet (HCD)-induced atherosclerosis, accelerated the progression of existing atherosclerosis, and induced atherosclerotic lesions in the absence of other atherosclerosis risk factors, demonstrating that CIH is an independent causal factor of atherosclerosis. Comparative studies revealed major differences between CIH-induced and the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis. Systemically, CIH was a much weaker inducer of atherosclerosis. CIH and HCD differentially activated inflammatory pathways. Histologically, CIH-induced atherosclerotic plaques had no clear necrotic core, contained a large number of CD31+ endothelial cells, and had mainly elastin deposition, whereas HCD-induced plaques had typical necrotic cores and fibrous caps, contained few endothelial cells, and had mainly collagen deposition. Metabolically, CIH caused mild, but HCD caused more severe dyslipidemia. Mechanistically, CIH did not, but HCD did, cause macrophage foam cell formation. NF-κB p50 gene deletion augmented CIH-induced, but not HCD-induced atherosclerosis. These differences reflect the intrinsic differences between the two types of atherosclerosis in terms of pathological nature and underlying mechanisms and support the notion that CIH-induced atherosclerosis is a new paradigm that differs from the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis.

  12. Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity of dietary administered ammonium sulfate in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Ota, Y; Hasumura, M; Okamura, M; Takahashi, A; Ueda, M; Onodera, H; Imai, T; Mitsumori, K; Hirose, M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of ammonium sulfate, used as a food additive in fermentation, were performed in male and female Fisher 344 rats at dietary concentrations of 0%, 0.1%, 0.6% and 3.0% in a 52-week toxicity study and 0%, 1.5% and 3.0% in a 104-week carcinogenicity study. Treatment with ammonium sulfate caused significant increase in kidney and/or liver weights in males and females of the 3.0% diet group, but no effects were found on survival rate, body weights, and hematological, serum biochemical or histopathological parameters at any dose levels in the chronic toxicity study. Regarding carcinogenicity, ammonium sulfate did not exert any significant influence on the incidences of tumors in any of the organs and tissues examined. It was concluded that the no observed adverse effect level of ammonium sulfate was the 0.6% diet, which is equivalent to 256 and 284 mg/kg b.w./day in males and females, respectively, and the compound is non-carcinogenic under the conditions of the study.

  13. [The advance of model of action in low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Zhang, Zhengbao; Chen, Liping; Chen, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Benzene is classified as Group 1 carcinogen by IARC. It has been found that benzene induces hematotoxicity even in low dose exposure. The identification of key events during benzene induced hematotoxicty leads to adjustment of occupational exposure limits of benzene. In this review, we focus on the exposure, metabolism, target organs, key epigenetic changes, toxicty effects and end points of low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity and finally discuss the perspectives on the future study of this area.

  14. Dietary selenium protects against selected signs of aging and methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Heath, John C; Banna, Kelly M; Reed, Miranda N; Pesek, Erin F; Cole, Nathan; Li, Jun; Newland, M Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Acute or short-term exposure to high doses of methylmercury (MeHg) causes a well-characterized syndrome that includes sensory and motor deficits. The environmental threat from MeHg, however, comes from chronic, low-level exposure, the consequences of which are poorly understood. Selenium (Se), an essential nutrient, both increases deposition of mercury (Hg) in neurons and mitigates some of MeHg's neurotoxicity in the short term, but it is unclear whether this deposition produces long-term adverse consequences. To investigate these issues, adult Long-Evans rats were fed a diet containing 0.06 or 0.6 ppm of Se as sodium selenite. After 100 days on these diets, the subjects began consuming 0.0, 0.5, 5.0, or 15 ppm of Hg as methylmercuric chloride in their drinking water for 16 months. Somatosensory sensitivity, grip strength, hindlimb cross (clasping reflex), flexion, and voluntary wheel-running in overnight sessions were among the measures examined. MeHg caused a dose- and time-dependent impairment in all measures. No effects appeared in rats consuming 0 or 0.5 ppm of Hg. Somatosensory function, grip strength, and flexion were among the earliest signs of exposure. Selenium significantly delayed or blunted MeHg's effects. Selenium also increased running in unexposed animals as they aged, a novel finding that may have important clinical implications. Nerve pathology studies revealed axonal atrophy or mild degeneration in peripheral nerve fibers, which is consistent with abnormal sensorimotor function in chronic MeHg neurotoxicity. Lidocaine challenge reproduced the somatosensory deficits but not hindlimb cross or flexion. Together, these results quantify the neurotoxicity of long-term MeHg exposure, support the safety and efficacy of Se in ameliorating MeHg's neurotoxicity, and demonstrate the potential benefits of Se during aging.

  15. Transcriptional effects of dietary exposure of oil-contaminated Calanus finmarchicus in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus).

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Waagbø, Rune; Pedersen, Sindre A; Meier, Sonnich

    2011-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library construction and characterization was used to identify differentially regulated transcripts from oil exposure in liver of male Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) fed a diet containing 900 mg crude oil/kg for 2 mo. In total, 439 expressed sequence tags (EST) were sequenced, 223 from the forward subtracted library (enriched for genes putatively upregulated by oil exposure) and 216 from the reverse subtracted library (enriched for genes putatively downregulated by oil exposure). Follow-up reverse-transcription (RT) quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses of gene transcription were conducted on additional herring exposed to food containing 9 (low), 90 (medium), and 900 (high) mg crude oil/kg feed for 2 mo. Chronic exposure of Atlantic herring to an oil-contaminated diet mediated upregulation of transcripts encoding antifreeze proteins, proteins in the classical complement pathway (innate immunity), and iron-metabolism proteins. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that "cellular response to stress," "regulation to biological quality," "response to abiotic stimuli," and "temperature homeostasis" were the most affected go at the biological processes level, and "carbohydrate binding," "water binding," and "ion binding" at the molecular function level. Of the genes examined with RT-qPCR, CYP1A, antifreeze protein, retinol binding protein 1, deleted in malignant brain tumor 1, and ovary-specific C1q-like factor demonstrated a significant upregulation. Myeloid protein 1, microfibrillar-associated protein 4, WAP65, and pentraxin were downregulated in liver of fish from the high exposure group. In conclusion, this study suggests that 2 mo of oil exposure affected genes encoding proteins involved in temperature homeostasis and possible membrane stability in addition to immune-responsive proteins in Atlantic herring.

  16. Dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to pesticide residues: results of the first Hong Kong Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Waiky W K; Yau, Arthur T C; Chung, Stephen W C; Lam, Chi-ho; Ma, Stephanie; Ho, Y Y; Xiao, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The use of pesticides and other chemicals has become a common practice in modern agriculture to enhance and stabilise crop yield, protect the nutritional integrity of food, facilitate food storage to assure year-round supplies, and provide attractive and appealing food products. With the adoption of strict good agricultural practice (GAP), only minimal amounts of pesticide residues should remain on the crops or in connected foods of animal origin up the food chain. To assess their associated health risk to local people, the dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to residues of four groups of pesticides or their metabolites - organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), carbamates, pyrethrins and pyrethroids, and dithiocarbamate (DTC) metabolites - is estimated in the first Hong Kong Total Diet Study (TDS). A total of 150 commonly consumed food items were collected and prepared "as consumed". A total of 600 composite food samples were analysed for 85 pesticides or their metabolites by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These pesticides were primarily found at low levels (highest mean = 350 μg kg⁻¹) in food samples of plant origin such as vegetables and fruits. Dietary exposures to pesticide residues were estimated based on the analytical results and the food consumption data of the local residents. The estimated dietary exposures of Hong Kong adults to all individual pesticides were well below their respective acceptable daily intakes (ADIs). The percentage contributions of the estimated mean and 95th percentile dietary exposures to the ADIs of individual pesticides were <6% and <24% for the OPPs, <1% for the carbamates and pyrethrins and pyrethroids, and <1% and <4% for the DTC metabolites, respectively. The findings indicate that dietary exposures to all the pesticide residues analysed in this study were unlikely to pose unacceptable health risks to the Hong Kong population.

  17. Occupational airways diseases from chronic low-level exposures to irritants.

    PubMed

    Balmes, John R

    2002-12-01

    Short-term, high-level exposures to dusts, gases, mists, fumes, and smoke that are irritating to the respiratory tract are capable of inducing asthma, the so-called reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Such exposures, however, do not occur frequently; chronic or recurrent exposures to lower levels of irritants are much more common. This article reviews the evidence that supports the concept that low-level exposures to respiratory tract irritants can contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

  18. A novel approach reveals that zinc oxide nanoparticles are bioavailable and toxic after dietary exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Dybowska, A.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2011-01-01

    If engineered nanomaterials are released into the environment, some are likely to end up associated with the food of animals due to aggregation and sorption processes. However, few studies have considered dietary exposure of nanomaterials. Here we show that zinc (Zn) from isotopically modified 67ZnO particles is efficiently assimilated by freshwater snails when ingested with food. The 67Zn from nano-sized 67ZnO appears as bioavailable as 67Zn internalized by diatoms. Apparent agglomeration of the zinc oxide (ZnO) particles did not reduce bioavailability, nor preclude toxicity. In the diet, ZnO nanoparticles damage digestion: snails ate less, defecated less and inefficiently processed the ingested food when exposed to high concentrations of ZnO. It was not clear whether the toxicity was due to the high Zn dose achieved with nanoparticles or to the ZnO nanoparticles themselves. Further study of exposure from nanoparticles in food would greatly benefit assessment of ecological and human health risks. ?? 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  19. Dietary mercury exposure to endangered California Clapper Rails in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Michael L; Ricca, Mark A; Overton, Cory T; Takekawa, John Y; Merritt, Angela M; Ackerman, Joshua T

    2014-09-15

    California Clapper Rails (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) are an endangered waterbird that forage in tidal-marsh habitats that pose risks from mercury exposure. We analyzed total mercury (Hg) in six macro-invertebrate and one fish species representing Clapper Rail diets from four tidal-marshes in San Francisco Bay, California. Mercury concentrations among individual taxa ranged from lowest at Colma Creek (mean range: 0.09-0.2 μg/g dw) to highest at Cogswell (0.2-0.7), Laumeister (0.2-0.9) and Arrowhead Marshes (0.3-1.9). These spatial patterns for Hg matched patterns reported previously in Clapper Rail blood from the same four marshes. Over 25% of eastern mudsnails (Ilyanassa obsolete) and staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus) exceeded dietary Hg concentrations (ww) often associated with avian reproductive impairment. Our results indicate that Hg concentrations vary considerably among tidal-marshes and diet taxa, and Hg concentrations of prey may provide an appropriate proxy for relative exposure risk for Clapper Rails.

  20. Effects of dietary PCB exposure on adrenocortical function in captive American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    PubMed