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Sample records for chronic hypoxic mouse

  1. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases: novel vasoconstrictor pathways.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Simon C; Keane, Michael P; Gaine, Seán; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well recognised complication of chronic hypoxic lung diseases, which are among the most common causes of death and disability worldwide. Development of pulmonary hypertension independently predicts reduced life expectancy. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, long-term oxygen therapy ameliorates pulmonary hypertension and greatly improves survival, although the correction of alveolar hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension is only partial. Advances in understanding of the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone show that chronic vasoconstriction plays a more important part in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension than previously thought, and that structural vascular changes contribute less. Trials of existing vasodilators show that pulmonary hypertension can be ameliorated and systemic oxygen delivery improved in carefully selected patients, although systemic hypotensive effects limit the doses used. Vasoconstrictor pathways that are selective for the pulmonary circulation can be blocked to reduce hypoxic pulmonary hypertension without causing systemic hypotension, and thus provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  2. Improved tolerance of acute severe hypoxic stress in chronic hypoxic diaphragm is nitric oxide-dependent.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip; McMorrow, Clodagh; Bradford, Aidan; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2015-09-01

    The effects of chronic hypoxia (CH) on respiratory muscle performance have hardly been investigated, despite clinical relevance. Results from recent studies are indicative of unique adaptive strategies in hypoxic diaphragm. Respiratory muscle tolerance of acute severe hypoxic stress was examined in normoxic and CH diaphragm in the presence and absence of a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor. We tested the hypothesis that improved tolerance of severe hypoxic stress in CH diaphragm is NO-dependent. Wistar rats were exposed to normoxia (sea-level, n = 6) or CH (ambient pressure = 380 mmHg, n = 6) for 6 weeks. Diaphragm muscle functional properties were determined ex vivo under severe hypoxic conditions (gassed with 95%N2/5% CO2) with and without 1 mM L-N(G)-nitroarginine (L-NNA, nNOS inhibitor). Fatigue tolerance, but not force, was significantly improved in CH diaphragm (p = 0.008). CH exposure did not affect diaphragm muscle fibre oxidative capacity determined from cluster analysis of area-density plots of muscle fibre succinate dehydrogenase activity. Acute NOS inhibition reduced diaphragm peak tetanic force (p = 0.018), irrespective of gas treatment, and completely reversed improved fatigue tolerance of the CH diaphragm. We conclude that CH exposure improves fatigue tolerance during acute severe hypoxic stress in an NO-dependent manner, independent of muscle fibre oxidative capacity.

  3. Efferent inhibition of carotid body chemoreception in chronically hypoxic cats.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, S; Smatresk, N; Pokorski, M; Barnard, P; Mokashi, A

    1983-11-01

    The effects of chronic hypoxia on carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity before and after sectioning the carotid sinus nerves (CSN) were studied in cats exposed to 10% O2 for 21-49 days in a chamber at sea level. For comparison, chronically normoxic cats at sea level were also studied. The cats were anesthetized, paucifiber preparation for the measurement of carotid chemosensory activity from a small slip of CSN was made, and their steady-state responses to 4-5 levels of arterial pressure of O2 (PaO2) at a constant PaCO2 and to 3-4 levels of PaCO2 in hyperoxia were measured before and after sectioning the CSN. The chemosensory response to hypoxia in the cats with intact CSN after chronic exposure to hypoxia was not reduced relative to the cats that breathed room air at sea level. Sectioning the CSN significantly augmented the chemosensory responses to hypoxia in all the chronically hypoxic but not significantly in the normoxic cats. The responses to moderate hypercapnia during hyperoxia were not significantly changed by cutting the CSN in either group. We conclude that there is a significant CSN efferent inhibition of chemosensory activity due to chronic hypoxia in the cat. This implies that without the efferent inhibition the hypoxic chemosensitivity is increased by chronic hypoxia.

  4. Blunted Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Experimental Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Parra, Gloria Juliana; Archer, Stephen L.; Bland, Richard D.; Albertine, Kurt H.; Carlton, David P.; Cho, Soo-Chul; Kirby, Beth; Haromy, Al; Eaton, Farah; Wu, Xichen; Thébaud, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD), caused by prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) with O2-rich gas, is the most common cause of long-term hospitalization and recurrent respiratory illness in extremely premature infants. Recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and associated ventilator adjustments often lead to worsening CLD. The mechanism that causes these hypoxemic episodes is unknown. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which is partially controlled by O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, is an important adaptive response to local hypoxia that helps to match perfusion and ventilation in the lung. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that chronic lung injury (CLI) impairs HPV. Methods: We studied preterm lambs that had MV with O2-rich gas for 3 weeks and newborn rats that breathed 95%-O2 for 2 weeks, both of which resulted in airspace enlargement and pulmonary vascular changes consistent with CLD. Measurements and Main Results: HPV was attenuated in preterm lambs with CLI after 2 weeks of MV and in newborn rats with CLI after 2 weeks of hyperoxia. HPV and constriction to the Kv1.x-specific inhibitor, correolide, were preferentially blunted in excised distal pulmonary arteries (dPAs) from hyperoxic rats, whose dPAs exhibited decreased Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA and K+ current. Intrapulmonary gene transfer of Kv1.5, encoding the ion channel that is thought to trigger HPV, increased O2-sensitive K+ current in cultured smooth muscle cells from rat dPAs, and restored HPV in hyperoxic rats. Conclusions: Reduced expression/activity of O2-sensitive Kv channels in dPAs contributes to blunted HPV observed in neonatal CLD. PMID:18511704

  5. Effects of chronic normobaric hypoxic and hypercapnic exposure in rats: Prevention of experimental chronic mountain sickness by hypercapnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, B.; Bonkovsky, H. L.; Ou, Lo-Chang

    1987-09-01

    A syndrome of experimental chronic mountain sickness can be produced in the Hilltop strain of Sprague-Dawley rats by chronic hypobaric hypoxic exposure. This syndrome is characterized by polycythemia, plasma hemoglobinemia, pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy with eventual failure and death. It has generally been assumed that these changes are caused by chronic hypoxemia, not by hypobaric exposure per se. We have now confirmed this directly by showing that chronic normobaric hypoxic exposure (10.5% O2) produces similar hematologic and hemodynamic changes. Further, the addition of hypercapnic exposure to the hypoxic exposure blunted or prevented the effects of the hypoxic exposure probably by stimulating respiration, thus increasing the rate of oxygen delivery to the cells. Changes in the rate-controlling enzymes of hepatic heme metabolism, 5-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase, and in cytochrome(s) P-450, the major hepatic hemoprotein(s), were also measured in hypoxic and hypercapnic rats. Hypoxia decreased 5-aminolevulinate synthase and increased cytochrome(s) P-450, probably by increasing the size of a “regulatory” heme pool within hepatocytes. These changes were also prevented by the addition of hypercapnic to hypoxic exposure.

  6. Stiffening of the Extrapulmonary Arteries From Rats in Chronic Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, E. S; Bischoff, J. E; Slifka, A. J; McCowan, C. N; Quinn, T. P; Shandas, R; Ivy, D. D; Stenmark, K. R

    2008-01-01

    Changes in the compliance properties of large blood vessels are critical determinants of ventricular afterload and ultimately dysfunction. Little is known of the mechanical properties of large vessels exhibiting pulmonary hypertension, particularly the trunk and right main artery. We initiated a study to investigate the influence of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension on the mechanical properties of the extrapulmonary arteries of rats. One group of animals was housed at the equivalent of 5000 m elevation for three weeks and the other held at ambient conditions of ~1600 m. The two groups were matched in age and gender. The animals exposed to hypobaric hypoxia exhibited signs of pulmonary hypertension, as evidenced by an increase in the RV/(LV+S) heart weight ratio. The extrapulmonary arteries of the hypoxic animals were also thicker than those of the control population. Histological examination revealed increased thickness of the media and additional deposits of collagen in the adventitia. The mechanical properties of the trunk, and the right and left main pulmonary arteries were assessed; at a representative pressure (7 kPa), the two populations exhibited different quantities of stretch for each section. At higher pressures we noted less deformation among the arteries from hypoxic animals as compared with controls. A four-parameter constitutive model was employed to fit and analyze the data. We conclude that chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension is associated with a stiffening of all the extrapulmonary arteries. PMID:27096124

  7. Combination of nicotinamide and hyperthermia to eliminate radioresistant chronically and acutely hypoxic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Chaplin, D.J.; Overgaard, J. )

    1990-12-01

    The interaction among nicotinamide, radiation, and heat was studied in vivo using a C3H mouse mammary carcinoma grown in the feet of CDF1 mice. Response following local tumor treatment was assessed by tumor control and regrowth delay. Nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg i.p.) produced maximal radiosensitization when injected 30 min to 2 h before irradiation (enhancement ratios (ERs), 1.2-1.5). Radiation damage was also increased by heating tumors (43.5 degrees C for 60 min) 4 h after irradiation (ERs = 1.6-2.6). This combined radiation and heat treatment was enhanced by nicotinamide but the effect depended on the assay procedure, such that although a significant increase was observed with the tumor control assay, only a slight increase was seen using regrowth delay as the end point. The development of moist desquamation in normal feet was used to estimate skin damage after irradiation. Nicotinamide and heat both resulted in a small yet significant increase in skin damage (ERs less than 1.2 and 1.1, respectively). A combined treatment resulted in a greater ER of 1.7, but when compared to the tumor response it still gave a therapeutic gain. A histological fluorescent staining technique was used to assess functional tumor vasculature at two periods in time separated by 20 min. Under normal conditions 7.7% of the vessels in this tumor were functional at one time but not the other. This value was reduced to 2.8% after nicotinamide administration. Since these fluctuations in blood flow can result in acute hypoxia we conclude that while heat eliminates chronically hypoxic tumor cells, nicotinamide probably removes the presence of acute hypoxia.

  8. [Chronic administration of estradiol to ovariectomized female Wistar rats causes development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Iu O; Artem'eva, M M; Medvedev, O S; Medvedeva, N A

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the role of female sex hormone estradiol in the development of hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Previously, it was shown that the development of pulmonary hypertension in Wistar female rats is accompanied by a twofold increase in the estradiol level. Ovariectomy reduces the degree of pulmonary hypertension in these animals. In this work, the effect of various chronic doses of exogenous estradiol (5 and 15 microg/kg per day) on the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in Wistar female rats has been studied. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (10 h a day for 2 weeks) at simulated altitude of 5000 m (O2 concentration reduced to 10%). The administration of estradiol in different doses (5 and 15 microg/kg per day) for 21 day initiated the development of pulmonary hypertension in ovariectomized Wistar female rats.

  9. Hypoxic alligator embryos: chronic hypoxia, catecholamine levels and autonomic responses of in ovo alligators.

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Altimiras, Jordi; Hicks, James W; Crossley, Dane A

    2011-11-01

    Hypoxia is a naturally occurring environmental challenge for embryonic reptiles, and this is the first study to investigate the impact of chronic hypoxia on the in ovo development of autonomic cardiovascular regulation and circulating catecholamine levels in a reptile. We measured heart rate (f(H)) and chorioallantoic arterial blood pressure (MAP) in normoxic ('N21') and hypoxic-incubated ('H10'; 10% O(2)) American alligator embryos (Alligator mississippiensis) at 70, 80 and 90% of development. Embryonic alligator responses to adrenergic blockade with propranolol and phentolamine were very similar to previously reported responses of embryonic chicken, and demonstrated that embryonic alligator has α and β-adrenergic tone over the final third of development. However, adrenergic tone originates entirely from circulating catecholamines and is not altered by chronic hypoxic incubation, as neither cholinergic blockade with atropine nor ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium altered baseline cardiovascular variables in N21 or H10 embryos. In addition, both atropine and hexamethonium injection did not alter the generally depressive effects of acute hypoxia - bradycardia and hypotension. However, H10 embryos showed significantly higher levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline at 70% of development, as well as higher noradrenaline at 80% of development, suggesting that circulating catecholamines reach maximal levels earlier in incubation for H10 embryos, compared to N21 embryos. Chronically elevated levels of catecholamines may alter the normal balance between α and β-adrenoreceptors in H10 alligator embryos, causing chronic bradycardia and hypotension of H10 embryos measured in normoxia.

  10. Specific N-terminal CGRP fragments mitigate chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xin; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Keith, Ingegerd M

    2003-01-31

    Chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (P(PA)), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular remodeling, pulmonary edema and polycythemia. Currently, there is no safe and effective treatment for HPH. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is the most potent peptide vasodilator discovered thus far. We previously demonstrated that exogenous CGRP reversed HPH in rats. However, the CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37) and smaller inhibitory C-terminal CGRP fragments that can be formed by enzymatic cleavage in vivo may compromise the beneficial effects of endogenous or exogenous CGRP. We here examine the agonistic efficacy of N-terminal rat alpha-CGRP peptides containing the disulfide bridge (Cys(2)-Cys(7)) with amidated C-terminal in prevention of HPH. Chronic infusion of CGRP(1-8), CGRP(1-13), or CGRP(1-14) at 7 nmol/h/rat via the right jugular vein during 14 days of hypobaric hypoxia (10% inspired O(2)) significantly decreased the P(PA), RVH and pulmonary arterial medial thickness in comparison with controls, suggesting that these CGRP sequences can mitigate chronic HPH in rats. Systemic pressure was unchanged by infused peptides indicating no carry-over effect. In conclusion, N-terminal CGRP fragments (CGRP(1-8), CGRP(1-13) and CGRP(1-14)) may have a protective role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  11. Chronic hypoxic incubation blunts a cardiovascular reflex loop in embryonic American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Hicks, James W; Crossley, Dane A

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia is a naturally occurring environmental challenge for embryonic non-avian reptiles, and this study is the first to investigate the impact of chronic hypoxia on a possible chemoreflex loop in a developing non-avian reptile. We measured heart rate and blood pressure in normoxic and hypoxic-incubated (10% O(2)) American alligator embryos (Alligator mississippiensis) at 70 and 90/95% of development. We hypothesized that hypoxic incubation would blunt embryonic alligators' response to a reflex loop stimulated by phenylbiguanide (PBG), a 5-HT(3) receptor agonist that stimulates vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents. PBG injection caused a hypotensive bradycardia in 70 and 95% of development embryos (paired t tests, P < 0.05), a response similar to mammals breathing inspired air (all injections made through occlusive catheter in tertiary chorioallantoic membrane artery). Hypoxic incubation blunted the bradycardic response to PBG in embryos at 95% of development (two-way ANOVA, P < 0.01). We also demonstrated that the vagally mediated afferent limb of this reflex can be partially or completely blocked in ovo with a 5-HT(3) receptor blockade using ondansetron hydrochloride dihydrate (OHD), with a ganglionic blockade using hexamethonium, or with a cholinergic blockade using atropine. Atropine eliminated the hypotensive and bradycardic responses to PBG, and OHD and hexamethonium significantly blunted these responses. This cardiovascular reflex mediated by the vagus was affected by hypoxic incubation, suggesting that reptilian sympathetic and parasympathetic reflex loops have the potential for developmental plasticity in response to hypoxia. We suggest that the American alligator, with an extended length of time between each developmental stage relative to avian species, may provide an excellent model to test the cardiorespiratory effects of prolonged exposure to changes in atmospheric gases. This extended period allows for lengthy studies at each stage without the

  12. Contribution of maternal oxygenic state to the effects of chronic postnatal hypoxia on mouse body and brain development.

    PubMed

    Salmaso, Natalina; Dominguez, Moises; Kravitz, Jacob; Komitova, Mila; Vaccarino, Flora M; Schwartz, Michael L

    2015-09-14

    1-2% of live births are to very low birth weight, premature infants that often show a developmental trajectory plagued with neurological sequelae including ventriculomegaly and significant decreases in cortical volume. We are able to recapitulate these sequelae using a mouse model of hypoxia where early postnatal pups are exposed to chronic hypoxia for one week. However, because the timing of hypoxic exposure occurs so early in development, dams and pups are housed together in the hypoxic chamber, and therefore, dams are also subjected to the same hypoxic conditions as the pups. To understand the relative contribution of hypoxia directly on the pups as opposed to the indirect contribution mediated by the effects of hypoxia and potential alterations in the dam's care of the pups, we examined whether reducing the dams exposure to hypoxia may significantly increase pup outcomes on measures that we have found consistently changed immediately following chronic hypoxia exposure. To achieve this, we rotated dams between normoxic and hypoxic conditions, leaving the litters untouched in their respective conditions and compared gross anatomical measures of normoxic and hypoxic pups with non-rotating or rotating mothers. As we expected, hypoxic-rearing decreased pup body weight, brain weight and cortical volume. Reducing the dam's exposure to hypoxic conditions actually amplified the effects of hypoxia on body weight, such that hypoxic pups with rotating mothers showed significantly less growth. Interestingly, rotation of hypoxic mothers did not have the same deleterious effect on brain weight, suggesting the presence of compensatory mechanisms conserving brain weight and development even under extremely low body weight conditions. The factors that potentially contribute to these compensatory changes remain to be determined, however, nutrition, pup feeding/metabolism, or changes in maternal care are important candidates, acting either together or independently to change pup

  13. Chronic hypoxic incubation blunts thermally dependent cholinergic tone on the cardiovascular system in embryonic American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Marks, Chris; Eme, John; Elsey, Ruth M; Crossley, Dane A

    2013-10-01

    Environmental conditions play a major role in shaping reptilian embryonic development, but studies addressing the impact of interactions between chronic and acute environmental stressors on embryonic systems are lacking. In the present study, we investigated thermal dependence of cholinergic and adrenergic cardiovascular tone in embryonic American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and assessed possible phenotypic plasticity in a chronic hypoxic incubation treatment. We compared changes in heart rate (f H) and mean arterial blood pressure (P M) for chronically hypoxic and normoxic-incubated embryos after cholinergic and adrenergic blockade following three different acute temperature treatments: (1) 30 °C (control incubation temperature), (2) acute, progressive decrease 30-24 °C then held at 24 °C, and (3) acute, progressive increase 30-36 °C then held at 36 °C. f H progressively fell in response to decreasing temperature and rose in response to increasing temperature. P M did not significantly change with decreasing temperature, but was lowered significantly with increasing acute temperature in the normoxic group at 90 % of development only. Propranolol administration (β adrenergic antagonist) produced a significant f H decrease at 24, 30, and 36 °C that was similar at all temperatures for all groups. For normoxic-incubated embryos at 90 % of development, atropine administration (cholinergic antagonist) significantly increased f H in both 24 and 36 °C treatments, but not in the 30 °C control treatment. This atropine response at 24 and 36 °C demonstrated acute thermally dependent cholinergic tone on f H late in development for normoxic-incubated, but not chronically hypoxic-incubated embryos. Collectively, data indicated that cardiovascular control mechanisms in embryonic alligators may be activated by thermal extremes, and the maturation of control mechanisms was delayed by chronic hypoxia.

  14. Long term creatine monohydrate supplementation, following neonatal hypoxic ischemic insult, improves neuromuscular coordination and spatial learning in male albino mouse.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Shahid; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-04-07

    Creatine is known to rescue animals following brain damage. Present study was designed to demonstrate the effect of long term (15 week) supplementation of 2% creatine monohydrate (Cr), following neonatal hypoxic ischemic insult, on learning and memory formation in male albino mouse. Albino mice pups were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation followed by 8% hypoxia for 25 minutes. Following weaning, animals were separated and grouped on the basis of dietry supplementation for 15 weeks followed by a battery of neurological tests including Morris water maze, open field and rota rod. It was observed that HI mice fed on 2% Cr for 15 weeks performed better than their littermates mice on normal rodent diet during water maze (learning and memory) and rotating rod (neuro-muscular coordination and balance) test while the results of open field test remained unaffected. It was also observed that Cr treated animals had a reduced brain infarct volume than untreated but this difference did not reached statistical significance. We have also observed an overall increase in body weight in Cr treated mice during the study. Over all our results are indicating that long term Cr supplementation is beneficial for male albino following hypoxic ischemic insult.

  15. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  16. Sildenafil inhibits chronically hypoxic upregulation of canonical transient receptor potential expression in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenju; Zhang, Dandan; Peng, Gongyong; Li, Bing; Zhong, Nanshan

    2010-01-01

    In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), Ca2+ influx through store-operated Ca2+ channels thought to be composed of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) proteins is an important determinant of intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pulmonary vascular tone. Sildenafil, a type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor that increases cellular cGMP, is recently identified as a promising agent for treatment of pulmonary hypertension. We previously demonstrated that chronic hypoxia elevated basal [Ca2+]i in PASMCs due in large part to enhanced store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE); moreover, ex vivo exposure to prolonged hypoxia (4% O2 for 60 h) upregulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in PASMCs. We examined the effect of sildenafil on basal [Ca2+]i, SOCE, and the expression of TRPC in PASMCs under prolonged hypoxia exposure. We also examined the effect of sildenafil on TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle (PA) from rats that developed chronically hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (CHPH). Compared with vehicle control, treatment with sildenafil (300 nM) inhibited prolonged hypoxia induced increases of 1) basal [Ca2+]i, 2) SOCE, and 3) mRNA and protein expression of TRPC in PASMCs. Moreover, sildenafil (50 mg · kg−1 · day−1) inhibited mRNA and protein expression of TRPC1 and TRPC6 in PA from chronically hypoxic (10% O2 for 21 days) rats, which was associated with decreased right ventricular pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy. Furthermore, we found, in PASMCs exposed to prolonged hypoxia, that knockdown of TRPC1 or TRPC6 by their specific small interference RNA attenuated the hypoxic increases of SOCE and basal [Ca2+]i, suggesting a cause and effect link between increases of TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression and the hypoxic increases of SOCE and basal [Ca2+]i. These results suggest that sildenafil may alter basal [Ca2+]i in PASMCs by decreasing SOCE through downregulation of TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression, thereby contributing to

  17. Hypoxic Stress Facilitates Acute Activation and Chronic Down-Regulation of Fanconi Anemia Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Susan E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia induces genomic instability through replication stress and dysregulation of vital DNA repair pathways. The Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI, are key members of a DNA repair pathway that responds to replicative stress, suggesting that they undergo regulation by hypoxic conditions. Here acute hypoxic stress activates the FA pathway via ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI in an ATR-dependent manner. In addition, the presence of an intact FA pathway is required for preventing hypoxia-induced DNA damage measurable by the comet assay, limiting the accumulation of γH2AX (a marker of DNA damage or stalled replication), and protecting cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia induces transcriptional repression of FANCD2 in a manner analogous to the hypoxic down-regulation of BRCA1 and RAD51. Thus, hypoxia-induced FA pathway activation plays a key role in maintaining genome integrity and cell survival, while FA protein down-regulation with prolonged hypoxia contributes to genomic instability. PMID:24688021

  18. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jessica B.; Swarts, Jessica L.; Wilkins, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Green, Richard; Sekine, Aimee; Voss, Kathleen M.; Mooney, Michael; Choonoo, Gabrielle; Miller, Darla R.; Pardo Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Gale, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013)F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans. PMID:27806117

  19. Distal Hypoxic stroke: A new mouse model of stroke with high throughput, low variability and a quantifiable functional deficit

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Kristian P.; Fathali, Nancy; Siddiqui, Mohammad R; Buckwalter, Marion S.

    2012-01-01

    C57BL/6J are the most commonly used strain of mouse for stroke experiments but vascular anatomy of the Circle of Willis within this strain is extremely variable and the cortex has extensive collateralization. This causes large variability in stroke models that target the middle cerebral artery proximally and confers resistance to ischemia in those that target it distally. We tested the hypothesis that by combining distal middle cerebral artery occlusion with 1 hour of hypoxia, we could generate a large lesion that causes a behavioral deficit with low variability. We found that this new distal hypoxic (DH) model of stroke generates a lesion with a volume of 25% of the ipsilateral hemisphere, extends to the motor cortex and causes a behavioral deficit. It also has a very clear border, exceptionally low variability, and can be performed by a single surgeon on up to 30 animals a day. Moreover, survivability is 100% in young adult animals, the model can be performed on old animals, and therapeutic intervention can reduce infarct volume. Therefore DH stroke is an excellent complement to existing stroke models and could be used for preclinical studies in C57BL/6J mice. PMID:22465679

  20. Myocyte apoptosis during acute myocardial infarction in the mouse localizes to hypoxic regions but occurs independently of p53.

    PubMed Central

    Bialik, S; Geenen, D L; Sasson, I E; Cheng, R; Horner, J W; Evans, S M; Lord, E M; Koch, C J; Kitsis, R N

    1997-01-01

    Significant numbers of myocytes die by apoptosis during myocardial infarction. The molecular mechanism of this process, however, remains largely unexplored. To facilitate a molecular genetic analysis, we have developed a model of ischemia-induced cardiac myocyte apoptosis in the mouse. Surgical occlusion of the left coronary artery results in apoptosis, as indicated by the presence of nucleosome ladders and in situ DNA strand breaks. Apoptosis occurs mainly in cardiac myocytes, and is shown for the first time to be limited to hypoxic regions during acute infarction. Since hypoxia-induced apoptosis in other cell types is dependent on p53, and p53 is induced by hypoxia in cardiac myocytes, we investigated the necessity of p53 for myocyte apoptosis during myocardial infarction. Myocyte apoptosis occurs as readily, however, in the hearts of mice nullizygous for p53 as in wild-type littermates. These data demonstrate the existence of a p53-independent pathway that mediates myocyte apoptosis during myocardial infarction. PMID:9294101

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 dependant pathway contributes to protection by tetramethylpyrazine against chronic hypoxic injury on medulla oblongata in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Hou, Xuefei; Chen, Li; Zhou, Hua; Gong, Yanju; Dai, Liqun; Zheng, Yu

    2016-02-15

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), one of the active ingredients of the Chinese herb Lingusticum Wallichii (Chuan Xiong) has been proved to protect the medulla oblongata from chronic hypoxia injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the protective effects of TMP are associated with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) dependant pathway in adult rats. The morphological changes of neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (12N), the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) were investigated by Nissl staining; the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured to evaluate the anti-oxidant effect; some apoptosis parameters, Bax mRNA and Bcl-2 mRNA, were tested; and the double immunochemistry staining of active caspase-3/NeuN was performed. Meanwhile, the HO-1 protein expression and heme oxygenase (HO) activity were examined. Tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP), a potent inhibitor of HO, was used to further confirm the effect of HO-1. We found that TMP ameliorated the neuron loss in 12N, Amb and NTS, the decrease in SOD activity and the increase in MDA content, the decrease in Bcl-2 mRNA of medulla oblongata (P<0.05), and the increase in percentage of apoptotic neurons in Amb (P<0.05) induced by chronic hypoxia. Co-administration with SnPP abolished the beneficial effects above of TMP to some extent (P<0.05). Moreover, TMP significantly increased HO activity and HO-1 protein expression, which was most likely enhanced in the neurons (P<0.05), and co-administration of SnPP reduced these up-regulated effects (P<0.05). This study demonstrated that HO-1 dependant pathway may be involved in the protective action of TMP against chronic hypoxic damage on medulla oblongata in the rats.

  2. In Vivo Expression of Reprogramming Factors Increases Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Synaptic Plasticity in Chronic Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wi, Soohyun; Yu, Ji Hea; Kim, MinGi

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity can be stimulated in vivo in the brain. In this study, we hypothesized that in vivo expression of reprogramming factors such as Klf4, Sox2, Oct4, and c-Myc would facilitate endogenous neurogenesis and functional recovery. CD-1® mice were induced at 1 week of age by unilaterally carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia. At 6 weeks of age, mice were injected GFP only or both four reprogramming factors and GFP into lateral ventricle. Passive avoidance task and open field test were performed to evaluate neurobehavioral function. Neurogenesis and synaptic activity in the hippocampus were evaluated using immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, and/or western blot analyses. Whereas BrdU+GFAP+ cells in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus were not significantly different, the numbers of BrdU+βIII-tubulin+ and BrdU+NeuN+ cells were significantly higher in treatment group than control group. Expressions of synaptophysin and PSD-95 were also higher in treatment group than control group. Importantly, passive avoidance task and open field test showed improvement in long-term memory and decreased anxiety in treatment group. In conclusion, in vivo expression of reprogramming factors improved behavioral functions in chronic hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. The mechanisms underlying these repair processes included endogenous neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:27900211

  3. TRPV4 channel contributes to serotonin-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and the enhanced vascular reactivity in chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Fu, Zhenzhen; Hu, Jinxing; Huang, Chun; Paudel, Omkar; Cai, Shaoxi; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a mechanosensitive channel in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Its upregulation by chronic hypoxia is associated with enhanced myogenic tone, and genetic deletion of trpv4 suppresses the development of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (CHPH). Here we further examine the roles of TRPV4 in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and in the enhanced vasoreactivity in CHPH. Initial evaluation of TRPV4-selective antagonists HC-067047 and RN-1734 in KCl-contracted pulmonary arteries (PAs) of trpv4−/− mice found that submicromolar HC-067047 was devoid of off-target effect on pulmonary vasoconstriction. Inhibition of TRPV4 with 0.5 μM HC-067047 significantly reduced the sensitivity of serotonin (5-HT)-induced contraction in wild-type (WT) PAs but had no effect on endothelin-1 or phenylephrine-activated response. Similar shift in the concentration-response curve of 5-HT was observed in trpv4−/− PAs, confirming specific TRPV4 contribution to 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction. 5-HT-induced Ca2+ response was attenuated by HC-067047 in WT PASMCs but not in trpv4−/− PASMCs, suggesting TRPV4 is a major Ca2+ pathway for 5-HT-induced Ca2+ mobilization. Nifedipine also attenuated 5-HT-induced Ca2+ response in WT PASMCs but did not cause further reduction in the presence of HC-067047, suggesting interdependence of TRPV4 and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the 5-HT response. Chronic exposure (3–4 wk) of WT mice to 10% O2 caused significant increase in 5-HT-induced maximal contraction, which was partially reversed by HC-067047. In concordance, the enhancement of 5-HT-induced contraction was significantly reduced in PAs of CH trpv4−/− mice and HC-067047 had no further effect on the 5-HT induced response. These results suggest unequivocally that TRPV4 contributes to 5-HT-dependent pharmaco-mechanical coupling and plays a major role in the enhanced pulmonary vasoreactivity to 5-HT in CHPH. PMID

  4. Expression Profiling Reveals Novel Hypoxic Biomarkers in Peripheral Blood of Adult Mice Exposed to Chronic Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Ulrike; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia induces a myriad of changes including an increase in hematocrit due to erythropoietin (EPO) mediated erythropoiesis. While hypoxia is of importance physiologically and clinically, lacunae exist in our knowledge of the systemic and temporal changes in gene expression occurring in blood during the exposure and recovery from hypoxia. To identify these changes expression profiling was conducted on blood obtained from cohorts of C57Bl-10 wild type mice that were maintained at normoxia (NX), exposed for two weeks to normobaric chronic hypoxia (CH) or two weeks of CH followed by two weeks of normoxic recovery (REC). Using stringent bioinformatic cut-offs (0% FDR, 2 fold change cut-off), 230 genes were identified and separated into four distinct temporal categories. Class I) contained 1 transcript up-regulated in both CH and REC; Class II) contained 202 transcripts up-regulated in CH but down-regulated after REC; Class III) contained 9 transcripts down-regulated both in CH and REC; Class IV) contained 18 transcripts down-regulated after CH exposure but up-regulated after REC. Profiling was independently validated and extended by analyzing expression levels of selected genes as novel biomarkers from our profile (e.g. spectrin alpha-1, ubiquitin domain family-1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase-1) by performing qPCR at 7 different time points during CH and REC. Our identification and characterization of these genes define transcriptome level changes occurring during chronic hypoxia and normoxic recovery as well as novel blood biomarkers that may be useful in monitoring a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with hypoxia. PMID:22629407

  5. Withdrawal severity after chronic intermittent ethanol in inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Metten, Pamela; Sorensen, Michelle L.; Cameron, Andy Jade; Yu, Chia-Hua; Crabbe, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Background To study withdrawal, ethanol is usually administered chronically without interruption. However, interest has recurred in models of episodic exposure. Increasing evidence suggests that chronic intermittent exposure to ethanol leads to a sensitization effect in both withdrawal severity and in ethanol consumption. The goal of the present study was to examine mouse inbred strain differences in withdrawal severity following chronic intermittent exposure using the handling induced convulsion as the behavioral endpoint. We also sought to compare the withdrawal responses of inbred strains across acute, chronic continuous, and chronic intermittent exposure regimens. Methods Male mice from 15 standard inbred strains were exposed to ethanol vapor for 16 hours each day for 3 days and removed to an air chamber during the intervening 8 hours. Mice in the control groups were handled the same, except that they were exposed only to air. Daily blood ethanol concentrations were averaged for each mouse to estimate total dose of ethanol experienced. Results Across strains, mice had an average daily blood ethanol concentration (BEC) of 1.45 ± 0.02 mg/ml and we restricted the range of this value to 1.00 to 2.00 mg/ml. To evaluate strain differences, we divided data into two dose groups based on BEC, Low Dose (1.29 ± 0.1 mg/ml) and High Dose (1.71 ± 0.02 mg/ml). After the third inhalation exposure, ethanol- and air-exposed groups were tested hourly for handling-induced convulsions for 10 hr and at hr 24 and 25. Strains differed markedly in the severity of withdrawal (after subtraction of air control values) in both dose groups. Conclusion The chronic intermittent exposure paradigm is sufficient to elicit differential withdrawal responses across nearly all strains. Data from the High Dose groups correlated well with withdrawal data derived from prior acute (single high dose) and chronic continuous (for 72 hrs) ethanol withdrawal studies, supporting the influence of common

  6. Preinduction of HSP70 promotes hypoxic tolerance and facilitates acclimatization to acute hypobaric hypoxia in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhao-hui; Xiong, Lei; Li, Ming-ming; Wu, Li-ying; Zhao, Yong-qi

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that induction of HSP70 by administration of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) leads to protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury. The present study was performed to determine the effect of GGA on the survival of mice and on brain damage under acute hypobaric hypoxia. The data showed that the mice injected with GGA survived significantly longer than control animals (survival time of 9.55 ± 3.12 min, n = 16 vs. controls at 4.28 ± 4.29 min, n = 15, P < 0.005). Accordingly, the cellular necrosis or degeneration of the hippocampus and the cortex induced by sublethal hypoxia for 6 h could be attenuated by preinjection with GGA, especially in the CA2 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In addition, the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) of the hippocampus and the cortex was increased after exposure to sublethal hypoxia for 6 h but could be inhibited by the preinjection of GGA. Furthermore, the expression of HSP70 was significantly increased at 1 h after GGA injection. These results suggest that administration of GGA improved survival rate and prevented acute hypoxic damage to the brain and that the underlying mechanism involved induction of HSP70 and inhibition of NOS activity. PMID:19105051

  7. Intranasal C3a treatment ameliorates cognitive impairment in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Morán, Javier; Stokowska, Anna; Walker, Frederik R; Mallard, Carina; Hagberg, Henrik; Pekna, Marcela

    2017-04-01

    Perinatal asphyxia-induced brain injury is often associated with irreversible neurological complications such as intellectual disability and cerebral palsy but available therapies are limited. Novel neuroprotective therapies as well as approaches stimulating neural plasticity mechanism that can compensate for cell death after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) are urgently needed. We previously reported that single i.c.v. injection of complement-derived peptide C3a 1h after HI induction prevented HI-induced cognitive impairment when mice were tested as adults. Here, we tested the effects of intranasal treatment with C3a on HI-induced cognitive deficit. Using the object recognition test, we found that intranasal C3a treated mice were protected from HI-induced impairment of memory function assessed 6weeks after HI induction. C3a treatment ameliorated HI-induced reactive gliosis in the hippocampus, while it did not affect the extent of hippocampal tissue loss, neuronal cell density, expression of the pan-synaptic marker synapsin I or the expression of growth associated protein 43. In conclusion, our results reveal that brief pharmacological treatment with C3a using a clinically feasible non-invasive mode of administration ameliorates HI-induced cognitive impairment. Intranasal administration is a plausible route to deliver C3a into the brain of asphyxiated infants at high risk of developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  8. Hypotension in the chronically hypoxic chicken embryo is related to the β-adrenergic response of chorioallantoic and femoral arteries and not to bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Isa; Crossley, Dane; Villamor, Eduardo; Altimiras, Jordi

    2011-10-01

    Prolonged fetal hypoxia leads to growth restriction and can cause detrimental prenatal and postnatal alterations. The embryonic chicken is a valuable model to study the effects of prenatal hypoxia, but little is known about its long-term effects on cardiovascular regulation. We hypothesized that chicken embryos incubated under chronic hypoxia would be hypotensive due to bradycardia and βAR-mediated relaxation of the systemic and/or the chorioallantoic (CA) arteries. We investigated heart rate, blood pressure, and plasma catecholamine levels in 19-day chicken embryos (total incubation 21 days) incubated from day 0 in normoxia or hypoxia (14-15% O(2)). Additionally, we studied α-adrenoceptor (αAR)-mediated contraction, relaxation to the β-adrenoceptor (βAR) agonist isoproterenol, and relaxation to the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin in systemic (femoral) and CA arteries (by wire myography). Arterial pressure showed a trend toward hypotension in embryos incubated under chronic hypoxic conditions compared with the controls (mean arterial pressure 3.19 ± 0.18 vs. 2.59 ± 0.13 kPa, normoxia vs. hypoxia, respectively. P = 0.056), without an accompanied bradycardia and elevation in plasma norepinephrine and lactate levels. All vessels relaxed in response to βAR stimulation with isoproterenol, but the CA arteries completely lacked an αAR response. Furthermore, hypoxia increased the sensitivity of femoral arteries (but not CA arteries) to isoproterenol. Hypoxia also increased the responsiveness of femoral arteries to forskolin. In conclusion, we suggest that hypotension in chronic hypoxic chicken embryos is the consequence of elevated levels of circulating catecholamines acting in vascular beds with exclusive (CA arteries) or exacerbated (femoral arteries) βAR-mediated relaxation, and not a consequence of bradycardia.

  9. Chronic mouse model of TMA-induced contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Claudia; Döcke, Wolf-Dietrich F; Zollner, Thomas M; Röse, Lars

    2009-04-01

    Due to the steadily increasing incidence of atopic dermatitis (AD), especially in children, there is a high medical need for new therapies and improved animal models. In mice, trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is routinely used to trigger T-cell-dependent contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reactions. In this study, we compared the standard acute TMA-induced CHS in Balb/c mice with subacute and chronic models of TMA-induced ear inflammation. Compared to the acute model, the chronic CHS model more closely reflects characteristics of AD, such as typical morphological changes of the inflamed skin, strong infiltration with T cells, major histocompatibility complex II-positive cells, eosinophils, and mast cells, a T-helper cell-type (Th) 2 cytokine profile and a strong increase of serum IgE levels. Moreover, a strong lymph node involvement with T-helper cell dominance and a mixed Th1/Th2 T-cell differentiation and activation pattern was demonstrated. Importantly, as demonstrated by successful therapy with prednisolone, the chronic TMA-induced CHS model, in contrast to acute and subacute models, made prolonged therapeutic treatment of a pre-established skin inflammation possible. Altogether, we present an improved model of mouse T-cell-dependent skin inflammation for AD. We hope this model will enhance the predictive value of animal models for therapeutic treatment of atopic eczema.

  10. Neuroprotective and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Flavonoid-Enriched Fraction AF4 in a Mouse Model of Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Keddy, Paul G. W.; Dunlop, Kate; Warford, Jordan; Samson, Michel L.; Jones, Quinton R. D.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha; Robertson, George S.

    2012-01-01

    We report here neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of a flavonoid-enriched fraction isolated from the peel of Northern Spy apples (AF4) in a mouse of model of hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. Oral administration of AF4 (50 mg/kg, once daily for 3 days) prior to 50 min of HI completely prevented motor performance deficits assessed 14 days later that were associated with marked reductions in neuronal cell loss in the dorsal hippocampus and striatum. Pre-treatment with AF4 (5, 10, 25 or 50 mg/kg, p.o.; once daily for 3 days) produced a dose-dependent reduction in HI-induced hippocampal and striatal neuron cell loss, with 25 mg/kg being the lowest dose that achieved maximal neuroprotection. Comparison of the effects of 1, 3 or 7 doses of AF4 (25 mg/kg; p.o.) prior to HI revealed that at least 3 doses of AF4 were required before HI to reduce neuronal cell loss in both the dorsal hippocampus and striatum. Quantitative RT-PCR measurements revealed that the neuroprotective effects of AF4 (25 mg/kg; p.o.; once daily for 3 days) in the dorsal hippocampus were associated with a suppression of HI-induced increases in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. AF4 pre-treatment enhanced mRNA levels for pro-survival proteins such as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis and erythropoietin following HI in the dorsal hippocampus and striatum, respectively. Primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons incubated with AF4 (1 µg/ml), but not the same concentrations of either quercetin or quercetin-3-O-glucose or its metabolites, were resistant to cell death induced by oxygen glucose deprivation. These findings suggest that the inhibition of HI-induced brain injury produced by AF4 likely involves a transcriptional mechanism resulting from the co-operative actions of various phenolics in this fraction which not only reduce the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators but also enhance pro-survival gene signalling. PMID:23251498

  11. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of the flavonoid-enriched fraction AF4 in a mouse model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Keddy, Paul G W; Dunlop, Kate; Warford, Jordan; Samson, Michel L; Jones, Quinton R D; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Robertson, George S

    2012-01-01

    We report here neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of a flavonoid-enriched fraction isolated from the peel of Northern Spy apples (AF4) in a mouse of model of hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. Oral administration of AF4 (50 mg/kg, once daily for 3 days) prior to 50 min of HI completely prevented motor performance deficits assessed 14 days later that were associated with marked reductions in neuronal cell loss in the dorsal hippocampus and striatum. Pre-treatment with AF4 (5, 10, 25 or 50 mg/kg, p.o.; once daily for 3 days) produced a dose-dependent reduction in HI-induced hippocampal and striatal neuron cell loss, with 25 mg/kg being the lowest dose that achieved maximal neuroprotection. Comparison of the effects of 1, 3 or 7 doses of AF4 (25 mg/kg; p.o.) prior to HI revealed that at least 3 doses of AF4 were required before HI to reduce neuronal cell loss in both the dorsal hippocampus and striatum. Quantitative RT-PCR measurements revealed that the neuroprotective effects of AF4 (25 mg/kg; p.o.; once daily for 3 days) in the dorsal hippocampus were associated with a suppression of HI-induced increases in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. AF4 pre-treatment enhanced mRNA levels for pro-survival proteins such as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis and erythropoietin following HI in the dorsal hippocampus and striatum, respectively. Primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons incubated with AF4 (1 µg/ml), but not the same concentrations of either quercetin or quercetin-3-O-glucose or its metabolites, were resistant to cell death induced by oxygen glucose deprivation. These findings suggest that the inhibition of HI-induced brain injury produced by AF4 likely involves a transcriptional mechanism resulting from the co-operative actions of various phenolics in this fraction which not only reduce the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators but also enhance pro-survival gene signalling.

  12. Impaired gait pattern as a sensitive tool to assess hypoxic brain damage in a novel mouse model of atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lynn; Van Dam, Debby; Van der Donckt, Carole; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Lemmens, Katrien; Van Brussel, Ilse; De Deyn, Peter P; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2015-02-01

    Apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with a heterozygous mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene (Fbn1(C1039G+/-)) show spontaneous atherosclerotic plaque ruptures, disturbances in cerebral flow and sudden death when fed a Western-type diet (WD). The present study focused on motor coordination and spatial learning of ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD for 20 weeks (n=21). ApoE(-/-) mice on WD (n=24) and ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on normal diet (ND, n=21) served as controls. Starting from 10 weeks of diet, coordination was assessed every two weeks by the following tests: gait analysis, stationary beam, wire suspension and accelerating rotarod. The Morris water maze test was performed after 13 weeks of diet to study spatial learning. At the end of the experiment (20 weeks of WD), the mice were sacrificed and the brachiocephalic artery and brain were isolated. From 12 weeks onward, gait analysis of ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD revealed a progressive increase in track width as compared to ApoE(-/-) mice on WD and ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on ND (at 20 weeks: 29.8±0.6 mm vs. 25.8±0.4 mm and 26.0±0.5 mm). Moreover, the stationary beam test showed a decrease in motor coordination of ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD at 18 and 20 weeks. The wire suspension test and accelerating rotarod could not detect signs of motor impairment. Spatial learning was also not affected. Histological analysis of the brachiocephalic artery showed larger and more stenotic plaques in ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD. Furthermore, the parietal cortex of ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice on WD showed pyknotic nuclei as a sign of hypoxia and the percentage of pyknosis correlated with track width. In conclusion, gait analysis may be an efficient method for analyzing hypoxic brain damage in the ApoE(-/-) Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mouse model. This test could be of value to assess the effect of potential anti-atherosclerotic therapies in mice.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotype desaturator with hypoxic vascular remodelling and pulmonary hypertension obtained by cluster analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Significant heterogeneity of clinical presentation and disease progression exists within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article discusses and refines the concept of desaturator phenotypes in COPD with pulmonary hypertension (PH) obtained by cluster analysis and presents a pattern of phenotypic markers that could be used as a framework for future diagnosis and research. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation results in sleep disturbances which predispose to nocturnal cardiac dysrhythmias, PH and possibly nocturnal death, particularly during acute exacerbations. We assume that in patients with COPD at least two factors play a role in PH: the severity of pulmonary impairment, and the severity of systemic nocturnal hypoxaemia due to reduced pulmonary functions. Establishing a common language for future research will facilitate our understanding and management of such a disease. This knowledge could lead to different pharmacological treatments and other interventions directed at specific phenotypic groups. PMID:23127203

  14. Nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp: acute and chronic changes and utilization of ambient nitrite reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marie N; Gerber, Lucie; Jensen, Frank B

    2016-03-15

    Recent research suggest that anoxia-tolerant fish transfer extracellular nitrite into the tissues, where it is used for nitric oxide (NO) generation, iron-nitrosylation, and S-nitrosation of proteins, as part of the cytoprotective response toward prolonged hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation. We hypothesized that crucian carp take up ambient nitrite and use it as a source of cellular NO availability during hypoxia. Fish were exposed for 1 day to normoxia (Po2 > 140 mmHg) and deep hypoxia (1 < Po2 < 3 mmHg) at both low (< 0.2 μM) and moderately elevated (10 μM) ambient [nitrite] to decipher NO metabolites in plasma and several tissues. We also compared NO metabolite changes during acute (10 min) and chronic (1 day) exposures to three different O2 levels. Plasma [nitrite] decreased with decreasing [O2], while the cellular concentrations of nitrite and nitros(yl)ated compounds either increased or stayed constant, depending on O2 level and tissue type. Nitrite was notably increased in the heart during deep hypoxia, and the increase was amplified by elevated ambient [nitrite]. Raised nitrite also increased gill [nitrite] and decreased mRNA expression of an inducible nitric oxide synthase-2 gene variant. The data support that ambient nitrite is taken up across the gills to be distributed via the blood to the tissues, particularly the heart, where it assists in cytoprotection and other functions. Cardiac nitrite was not elevated in acutely exposed fish, revealing that the response requires time. NO metabolite levels were higher during acute than chronic exposures, possibly caused by increased swimming activity and stress in acutely exposed fish.

  15. Chronic hypercapnia alters lung matrix composition in mouse pups

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Gregory P.; Nguyen, Mary; Gavrialov, Orit; Haddad, Gabriel G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: permissive hypercapnia, a stretch-limiting ventilation strategy, often results in high PaCO2. This strategy is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in premature infants and its benefits have been attributed to diminished barotrauma. However, little is known about the independent effect of high CO2 levels during the lung development. Methods: mice were exposed to 8% CO2 or room air for 2 wk either from postnatal day 2 through 17 or as adults (∼2 mo of age). Lungs were excised and processed for protein, RNA, histology, and total lung volumes. Results: histologic analysis demonstrated that alveolar walls of CO2-exposed mouse pups were thinner than those of controls and had twice the total lung volume. Molecular analysis revealed that several matrix proteins in the lung were downregulated in mouse pups exposed to hypercapnia. Interstitial collagen type I α1, type III α1, elastin and fibronectin protein, and mRNA levels were less than half of controls while collagen IV α5 was unaffected. This decrease in interstitial collagen could thus account for the thinning of the interstitial matrix and the altered lung biomechanics. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8, a collagenase that has specificity for collagen types I and III, increased in hypercapnic mouse pups, suggesting increased collagen degradation. Moreover, tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1, a potent inhibitor of MMP-8, was significantly decreased. However, unlike pups, adult mice exposed to hypercapnia demonstrated only a mild increase in total lung volumes and did not exhibit similar molecular or histologic changes. Conclusions: although permissive hypercapnia may prevent lung injury from barotrauma, our study revealed that exposure to hypercapnia may be an important factor in lung remodeling and function, especially in early life. PMID:20360436

  16. Chronic ethanol exposure inhibits distraction osteogenesis in a mouse model: Role of the TNF signaling axis

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Elizabeth C.; Aronson, James; Liu, Lichu; Liu, Zhendong; Perrien, Daniel S.; Skinner, Robert A.; Badger, Thomas M.; Ronis, Martin J.J.; Lumpkin, Charles K. . E-mail: lumpkincharlesk@uams.edu

    2007-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) is an inflammatory cytokine that modulates osteoblastogenesis. In addition, the demonstrated inhibitory effects of chronic ethanol exposure on direct bone formation in rats are hypothetically mediated by TNF-{alpha} signaling. The effects in mice are unreported. Therefore, we hypothesized that in mice (1) administration of a soluble TNF receptor 1 derivative (sTNF-R1) would protect direct bone formation during chronic ethanol exposure, and (2) administration of recombinant mouse TNF-{alpha} (rmTNF-{alpha}) to ethanol naive mice would inhibit direct bone formation. We utilized a unique model of limb lengthening (distraction osteogenesis, DO) combined with liquid diets to measure chronic ethanol's effects on direct bone formation. Chronic ethanol exposure resulted in increased marrow TNF, IL-1, and CYP 2E1 RNA levels in ethanol-treated vs. control mice, while no significant weight differences were noted. Systemic administration of sTNF-R1 during DO (8.0 mg/kg/2 days) to chronic ethanol-exposed mice resulted in enhanced direct bone formation as measured radiologically and histologically. Systemic rmTNF-{alpha} (10 {mu}g/kg/day) administration decreased direct bone formation measures, while no significant weight differences were noted. We conclude that chronic ethanol-associated inhibition of direct bone formation is mediated to a significant extent by the TNF signaling axis in a mouse model.

  17. Synergistic deleterious effect of chronic stress and sodium azide in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Cortés, María José; Espinosa-Oliva, Ana M; Sarmiento, Manuel; Argüelles, Sandro; Herrera, Antonio J; Mauriño, Raquel; Villarán, Ruth F; Venero, José L; Machado, Alberto; de Pablos, Rocío M

    2015-04-20

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Although the primary cause of the disease is presently unknown, to date several risk factors have been described. Evidence suggests that one of these risk factors could be chronic stress. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that chronic stress is able to induce Alzheimer's disease features after the administration of nontoxic doses of sodium azide. We found that chronic stress increases the levels of several proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, such as presenilin 1, presenilin 2, and S100β, besides inducing the aggregation of Tau, ubiquitin, and β-amyloid proteins in the hippocampus. More important, our work shows a synergistic effect of stress and sodium azide treatment leading to significant neuronal death in the mouse hippocampus. Our results point out that chronic stress is a risk factor contributing to amplify and accelerate Alzheimer's disease features in the hippocampus.

  18. A mouse model for pathogen-induced chronic inflammation at local and systemic sites.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, George; Kramer, Carolyn D; Slocum, Connie S; Weinberg, Ellen O; Hua, Ning; Gudino, Cynthia V; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2014-08-08

    Chronic inflammation is a major driver of pathological tissue damage and a unifying characteristic of many chronic diseases in humans including neoplastic, autoimmune, and chronic inflammatory diseases. Emerging evidence implicates pathogen-induced chronic inflammation in the development and progression of chronic diseases with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Due to the complex and multifactorial etiology of chronic disease, designing experiments for proof of causality and the establishment of mechanistic links is nearly impossible in humans. An advantage of using animal models is that both genetic and environmental factors that may influence the course of a particular disease can be controlled. Thus, designing relevant animal models of infection represents a key step in identifying host and pathogen specific mechanisms that contribute to chronic inflammation. Here we describe a mouse model of pathogen-induced chronic inflammation at local and systemic sites following infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium closely associated with human periodontal disease. Oral infection of specific-pathogen free mice induces a local inflammatory response resulting in destruction of tooth supporting alveolar bone, a hallmark of periodontal disease. In an established mouse model of atherosclerosis, infection with P. gingivalis accelerates inflammatory plaque deposition within the aortic sinus and innominate artery, accompanied by activation of the vascular endothelium, an increased immune cell infiltrate, and elevated expression of inflammatory mediators within lesions. We detail methodologies for the assessment of inflammation at local and systemic sites. The use of transgenic mice and defined bacterial mutants makes this model particularly suitable for identifying both host and microbial factors involved in the initiation, progression, and outcome of disease. Additionally, the model can be used to screen for novel therapeutic strategies

  19. Chronic Toxoplasmosis Modulates the Induction of Contact Hypersensitivity by TNCB in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2015-12-01

    Mouse models of chronic toxoplasmosis and atopic dermatitis (AD) were combined to clarify the effect of opportunistic Toxoplasma gondii infection on the development of AD. AD was induced as a chronic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) with repeated challenge of 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on the dorsal skin of mice. TNCB induced skin thickness increases in both normal and toxoplasmic mice. The changing patterns were different from the sigmoidal which saturated at 20 days in normal mice to the convex saturated at 12 days in toxoplasmic mice with the crossing at 18 days. Compared to normal mice, toxoplasmic mice presented CHS more severely in earlier times and then moderately in later times. These data suggest that host immune modification by T. gondii infection enhances CHS in early times of atopic stimulation but soothes the reaction of CHS in later times in mouse model.

  20. Chronic nicotine blunts hypoxic sensitivity in perinatal rat adrenal chromaffin cells via upregulation of KATP channels: role of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Josef; Brown, Stephen; Holloway, Alison C; Nurse, Colin A

    2009-06-03

    Fetal nicotine exposure blunts hypoxia-induced catecholamine secretion from neonatal adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs), providing a link between maternal smoking, abnormal arousal responses, and risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Here, we show that the mechanism is attributable to upregulation of K(ATP) channels via stimulation of alpha7 nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs). These K(ATP) channels open during hypoxia, thereby suppressing membrane excitability. After in utero exposure to chronic nicotine, neonatal AMCs show a blunted hypoxic sensitivity as determined by inhibition of outward K(+) current, membrane depolarization, rise in cytosolic Ca(2+), and catecholamine secretion. However, hypoxic sensitivity could be unmasked in nicotine-exposed AMCs when glibenclamide, a blocker of K(ATP) channels, was present. Both K(ATP) current density and K(ATP) channel subunit (Kir 6.2) expression were significantly enhanced in nicotine-exposed cells relative to controls. The entire sequence could be reproduced in culture by exposing neonatal rat AMCs or immortalized fetal chromaffin (MAH) cells to nicotine for approximately 1 week, and was prevented by coincubation with selective blockers of alpha7 nicotinic AChRs. Additionally, coincubation with inhibitors of protein kinase C and CaM kinase, but not protein kinase A, prevented the effects of chronic nicotine in vitro. Interestingly, chronic nicotine failed to blunt hypoxia-evoked responses in MAH cells bearing short hairpin knockdown (>90%) of the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha), suggesting involvement of the HIF pathway. The therapeutic potential of K(ATP) channel blockers was validated in experiments in which hypoxia-induced neonatal mortality in nicotine-exposed pups was significantly reduced after pretreatment with glibenclamide.

  1. Effects of dietary creatine supplementation for 8 weeks on neuromuscular coordination and learning in male albino mouse following neonatal hypoxic ischemic insult.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Shahid; Ali, Muhammad; Akbar, Atif; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-05-01

    Creatine monohydrate (Cr) is a dietary supplement known to improve cognitive functions and has positive therapeutic results under various clinical conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 2 % Cr supplementation on learning, memory formation, neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and locomotory in male albino mice following hypoxic ischemic insult. At postnatal day, 10 male albino mice pups were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation followed by 8 % hypoxia for 25 min. On postnatal day 20, male mice were separated from the litter and divided into two groups on the basis of special diet supplementation. One group was supplemented with 2 % Cr in diet while the other group was raised on ordinary rodent chow for 8 weeks. Behavioral observations were made during rota rod, open field and Morris water maze test for both treatments. It was observed that supplementation with 2 % Cr for 8 weeks following neonatal brain damage resulted in enhanced muscular strength, neuromuscular coordination and improved body weight. In Morris water maze test, it was observed that Cr supplementation significantly improved mean swimming speed and mice on 2 % Cr diet covered more distance but the spatial memory was not improved significantly following hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy (HIE). Open field parameters and percentage of infarct volume remained unaffected following Cr supplementation. We concluded that 2 % dietary Cr supplementation has a potential to improve the muscle strength and body weight in male albino mice following (HIE) and should be considered for the treatment of neurological ailments.

  2. Chronic haloperidol increases voltage-gated Na+ currents in mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiqiang; Zhu, Fangfang; Guo, Jingfang; Sheng, Jiangtao; Li, Wenli; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Wang, Gefei; Li, Kangsheng

    2014-07-18

    Typical antipsychotics are characterized by extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS). Previous studies demonstrated that typical antipsychotics could inhibit neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC). However, EPS typically emerge only upon prolonged exposure. As a result, we examined effects of haloperidol, a prototype typical antipsychotic, on neuronal VGSC upon incubation for varying duration. Briefly, VGSC currents were activated and recorded using a whole-cell patch-clamp technique in primary culture of mouse cortical neurons. VGSC activity was inhibited by acute haloperidol exposure (for minutes), but enhanced in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by chronic haloperidol exposure (for hours). The effects of chronic haloperidol were associated with increased expression of VGSC subunits as well as corresponding electrophysiological channel properties. In summary, we found enhanced VGSC currents upon chronic haloperidol exposure in cortical neurons in contrast to inhibition by acute haloperidol exposure. Such a results may contribute to EPS of typical antipsychotics.

  3. Chronic Social Defeat Stress Modulates Dendritic Spines Structural Plasticity in Adult Mouse Frontal Association Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Chronic stress is associated with occurrence of many mental disorders. Previous studies have shown that dendrites and spines of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex undergo drastic reorganization following chronic stress experience. So the prefrontal cortex is believed to play a key role in response of neural system to chronic stress. However, how stress induces dynamic structural changes in neural circuit of prefrontal cortex remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of chronic social defeat stress on dendritic spine structural plasticity in the mouse frontal association (FrA) cortex in vivo using two-photon microscopy. We found that chronic stress altered spine dynamics in FrA and increased the connectivity in FrA neural circuits. We also found that the changes in spine dynamics in FrA are correlated with the deficit of sucrose preference in defeated mice. Our findings suggest that chronic stress experience leads to adaptive change in neural circuits that may be important for encoding stress experience related memory and anhedonia. PMID:28197343

  4. In vivo efficiency of targeted norfloxacin against persistent, isoniazid-insensitive, Mycobacterium bovis BCG present in the physiologically hypoxic mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Balazuc, A M; Lagranderie, M; Chavarot, P; Pescher, P; Roseeuw, E; Schacht, E; Domurado, D; Marchal, G

    2005-06-01

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a hypoxia-inducible state in which the bacteria are phenotypically insensitive to currently available antituberculous drugs. In humans, persistent M. tuberculosis is found in granulomatous lesions, either inside macrophages or in necrotic tissue, where the partial oxygen pressure (pO(2)) is very low. Persistent bacteria can remain silent for decades before overt tuberculosis develops. Due to insensitivity to classical drugs, M. tuberculosis persistence prevents rapid and definitive clearance of bacteria. Consequently, therapeutic molecules are required that are both active against persistent bacilli and able to reach their intramacrophagic location. In contrast to its native form, norfloxacin is active in vivo against Mycobacterium bovis BCG present in the lungs when temporarily linked to a macromolecular carrier targeted to macrophages. To study the efficiency of this macromolecular prodrug targeted to persistent mycobacteria confined inside macrophages, we established a short-term in vivo model based on the physiological pO(2) differences between lungs, spleen and liver. Whereas lungs and spleen are well oxygenated, the liver has a low pO(2) due to its portal irrigation. Therefore, studying mycobacteria in the liver yields information about in vivo persistent bacilli exposed to low pO(2). To our knowledge, no similar short-term in vivo model has been published to date. Using this model, we demonstrated the insensitivity to isoniazid of M. bovis BCG present in hypoxic sites, and showed that norfloxacin given as a mannosylated macrophage-targeted prodrug was able to kill these isoniazid-insensitive mycobacteria. This demonstrates that intracellular persistent mycobacteria are amenable to antibiotic treatment.

  5. PPARα Protein Expression Was Increased by Four Weeks of Intermittent Hypoxic Training via AMPKα2-Dependent Manner in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge; Wang, Jianxiong; Ye, Jianping; Zhang, Yimin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is critical for muscle endurance due to its role in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation. The 5’-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy sensor in cells, but its role in PPARα regulation in vivo remains unknown. In this study, we examined PPARα expression in the skeletal muscle of AMPKα2 overexpression (OE), knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice after four weeks of exercise under intermittent hypoxia. WT, OE and KO mice were used at 40 mice/strain and randomly subdivided into four subgroups: control (C), running (R), hypoxia (H), and running plus hypoxia (R+H) at 10 mice/group. The treadmill running was performed at the speed of 12 m/min, 60 min/day with a slope of 0 degree for four weeks. The hypoxia treatment was performed in daytime with normobaric hypoxia (11.20% oxygen, 8 hours/day). In the R+H group, the treadmill running was conducted in the hypoxic condition. AMPKα2, phosphor-AMPKα (p-AMPKα) (Thr172), nuclear PPARα proteins were measured by Western blot and the medium chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) mRNA, the key enzyme for fatty acid oxidation and one of the PPARα target genes, was also measured in skeletal muscles after the interventions. The results showed that nuclear PPARα protein was significantly increased by R+H in WT muscles, the increase was enhanced by 41% (p<0.01) in OE mice, but was reduced by 33% (p<0.01) in KO mice. The MCAD mRNA expression was increased after four weeks of R+H intervention. The change in MCAD mRNA followed a similar trend as that of PPARα protein in OE and KO mice. Our data suggest that the increase in nuclear PPARα protein by four-week exercise training under the intermittent hypoxia was dependent on AMPK activation. PMID:25923694

  6. Increased urinary lysophosphatidic acid in mouse with subtotal nephrectomy: potential involvement in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mirzoyan, Koryun; Baïotto, Anna; Dupuy, Aude; Marsal, Dimitri; Denis, Colette; Vinel, Claire; Sicard, Pierre; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P; Klein, Julie; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Increased incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with consecutive progression to end-stage renal disease represents a significant burden to healthcare systems. Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is a classical hallmark of CKD and is well correlated with the loss of renal function. The bioactive lysophospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting through specific G-protein-coupled receptors, was previously shown to be involved in TIF development in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Here, we study the role of LPA in a mouse subjected to subtotal nephrectomy (SNx), a more chronic and progressive model of CKD. Five months after surgical nephron reduction, SNx mice showed massive albuminuria, extensive TIF, and glomerular hypertrophy when compared to sham-operated animals. Urinary and plasma levels of LPA were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. LPA was significantly increased in SNx urine, not in plasma, and was significantly correlated with albuminuria and TIF. Moreover, SNx mice showed significant downregulation in the renal expression of lipid phosphate phosphohydrolases (LPP1, 2, and 3) that might be involved in reduced LPA bioavailability through dephosphorylation. We concluded that SNx increases urinary LPA through a mechanism that could involve co-excretion of plasma LPA with albumin associated with a reduction of its catabolism in the kidney. Because of the previously demonstrated profibrotic activity of LPA, the association of urinary LPA with TIF suggests the potential involvement of LPA in the development of advanced CKD in the SNx mouse model. Targeting LPA metabolism might represent an interesting approach in CKD treatment.

  7. Lipid Accumulation in Hypoxic Tissue Culture Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Gerald B.; Barcza, Maureen A.; Bush, Marilyn E.

    1977-01-01

    Lipid droplets have long been recognized by light microscopy to accumulate in hypoxic cells both in vivo and in vitro. In the present tissue culture experiments, correlative electron microscopic observations and lipid analyses were performed to determine the nature and significance of lipid accumulation in hypoxia. Strain L mouse fibroblasts were grown in suspension culture, both aerobically and under severe oxygen restriction obtained by gassing cultures daily with an 8% CO2-92% nitrogen mixture. After 48 hours, hypoxic cells showed an increase in total lipid/protein ratio of 42% over control cells. Most of this increase was accounted for by an elevation in the level of cellular triglyceride from 12.3 ± 0.9 μg/mg cell protein in aerobic cultures to 41.9 ± 0.7 in the hypoxic cultures, an increase of 240%. Levels of cellular free fatty acids (FFA) were 96% higher in the hypoxic cultures. No significant changes in the levels of cellular phospholipid or cholesterol were noted. Electron microscopic examination revealed the accumulation of homogeneous cytoplasmic droplets. The hypoxic changes were reversible upon transferring the cultures to aerobic atmospheres with disappearance of the lipid. These experiments indicate that hypoxic injury initially results in triglyceride and FFA accumulation from an inability to oxidize fatty acids taken up from the media and not from autophagic processes, as described in other types of cell injury associated with the sequestration of membranous residues and intracellular cholesterol and phospholipid accumulation. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 1Figure 2 PMID:196505

  8. Anticonvulsant effects of a triheptanoin diet in two mouse chronic seizure models

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Sarah; Stoll, James; Sweetman, Lawrence; Borges, Karin

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that in epileptic brains citric acid cycle intermediate levels may be deficient leading to hyperexcitability. Anaplerosis is the metabolic refilling of deficient metabolites. Our goal was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of feeding triheptanoin, the triglyceride of anaplerotic heptanoate. CF1 mice were fed 0-35% calories from triheptanoin. Body weights and dietary intake were similar in mice fed triheptanoin vs. standard diet. Triheptanoin feeding increased blood propionyl-carnitine levels, signifying its metabolism. 35%, but not 20%, triheptanoin delayed development of corneal kindled seizures. After pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), triheptanoin feeding increased the pentylenetetrazole tonic seizure threshold during the chronically epileptic stage. Mice in the chronically epileptic stage showed various changes in brain metabolite levels, including a reduction in malate. Triheptanoin feeding largely restored a reduction in propionyl-CoA levels and increased methylmalonyl-CoA levels in SE mice. In summary, triheptanoin was anticonvulsant in two chronic mouse models and increased levels of anaplerotic precursor metabolites in epileptic mouse brains. The mechanisms of triheptanoin's effects and its efficacy in humans suffering from epilepsy remain to be determined. PMID:20691264

  9. Post-hypoxic Myoclonus: Current Concepts, Neurophysiology, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Harsh V.; Caviness, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myoclonus may occur after hypoxia. In 1963, Lance and Adams described persistent myoclonus with other features after hypoxia. However, myoclonus occurring immediately after hypoxia may demonstrate different syndromic features from classic Lance–Adams syndrome (LAS). The aim of this review is to provide up-to-date information about the spectrum of myoclonus occurring after hypoxia with emphasis on neurophysiological features. Methods A literature search was performed on PubMed database from 1960 to 2015. The following search terms were used: “myoclonus,” “post anoxic myoclonus,” “post hypoxic myoclonus,” and “Lance Adams syndrome.” The articles describing clinical features, neurophysiology, management, and prognosis of post-hypoxic myoclonus cases were included for review. Results Several reports in the literature were separated clinically into “acute post-hypoxic myoclonus,” which occurred within hours of severe hypoxia, and “chronic post-hypoxic myoclonus,” which occurred with some recovery of mental status as the LAS. Acute post-hypoxic myoclonus was generalized in the setting of coma. Chronic post-hypoxic myoclonus presented as multifocal cortical action myoclonus that was significantly disabling. There was overlap of neurophysiological findings for these two syndromes but also different features. Treatment options for these two distinct clinical–neurophysiologic post-hypoxic myoclonus syndromes were approached differently. Discussion The review of clinical and neurophysiological findings suggests that myoclonus after hypoxia manifests in one or a combination of distinct syndromes: acute and/or chronic myoclonus. The mechanism of post-hypoxic myoclonus may arise either from cortical and/or subcortical structures. More research is needed to clarify mechanisms and treatment of post-hypoxic myoclonus. PMID:27708982

  10. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  11. Chronic in vivo imaging in the mouse spinal cord using an implanted chamber

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Matthew J.; Bernstein, Ida M.; Schlafer, Donald H.; Cleland, Thomas A.; Fetcho, Joseph R.; Schaffer, Chris B.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and treatment of spinal cord pathology is limited in part by a lack of longitudinal in vivo imaging strategies at the cellular level. We developed a chronically implanted spinal chamber and surgical procedure suitable for time-lapse in vivo multiphoton microscopy of mouse spinal cord without the need for repeat surgical procedures. Repeated imaging was routinely achieved for more than five weeks post-operatively with up to ten separate imaging sessions. We observed neither motor function deficit nor neuropathology in the spinal cord as a result of chamber implantation. Using this chamber we quantified microglia and afferent axon dynamics following a laser-induced spinal cord lesion and observed massive microglia infiltration within one day along with a heterogeneous dieback of axon stumps. By enabling chronic imaging studies over timescales ranging from minutes to months, our method offers an ideal platform for understanding cellular dynamics in response to injury and therapeutic interventions. PMID:22266542

  12. Scleral Permeability Varies by Mouse Strain and Is Decreased by Chronic Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pease, Mary E.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Cone-Kimball, Elizabeth; Jefferys, Joan L.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Kim, Anthony J.; Hanes, Justin; Quigley, Harry A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine differences in scleral permeability, as measured by diffusion of macromolecules, by using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), with reference to differences by mouse strain, scleral region, and the effect of experimental glaucoma. Methods. In three mouse strains (B6, CD1, and B6 mice with mutation in collagen 8α2 [Aca23]), we used FRAP to measure the diffusion of fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran, molecular weight 40 kDa, into a photobleached zone of sclera. Scleral regions near the optic nerve head (peripapillary) and two successively more anterior regions were compared. Sclera from mouse eyes subjected to chronically elevated intraocular pressure after bead injection into the anterior chamber were compared to fellow eye controls. FRAP data were compared against estimated retinal ganglion cell axon loss in glaucomatous eyes. Results. Diffusion rates of dextran molecules in the sclera were significantly greater in Aca23 and B6 mice than in CD1 mice in a multivariate model adjusted for region and axial length (P < 0.0001). Dextran diffusion significantly decreased in glaucomatous eyes, and the decline increased with greater axon loss (P = 0.0003, multivariable model). Peripapillary scleral permeability was higher in CD1 than B6 and Aca23 mice (P < 0.05, multivariable model, adjusted by Bonferroni). Conclusions. Measurement of the diffusion rates of dextran molecules in the sclera showed that glaucoma leads to decreased scleral permeability in all three mouse strains tested. Among mouse strains tested, those that were more susceptible to glaucomatous loss of retinal ganglion cells had a lower scleral permeability at baseline. PMID:24557355

  13. Hepatocyte Tissue Factor Contributes to the Hypercoagulable State in a Mouse Model of Chronic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tatsumi, Kohei; Antoniak, Silvio; Owens, A. Phillip; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Holle, Lori A.; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Kopec, Anna K.; Pawlinski, Rafal; Luyendyk, James P.; Mackman, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background & Aims Patients with chronic liver disease and cirrhosis have a dysregulated coagulation system and are prone to thrombosis. The basis for this hypercoagulable state is not completely understood. Tissue factor (TF) is the primary initiator of coagulation in vivo. Patients with cirrhosis have increased TF activity in white blood cells and circulating microparticles. The aim of our study was to determine the contribution of TF to the hypercoagulable state in a mouse model of chronic liver injury. Methods We measured levels of TF activity in the liver, white blood cells and circulating microparticles, and a marker of activation of coagulation [thrombinantithrombin complexes (TATc)] in the plasma of mice subjected to bile duct ligation for 12 days. We used wild-type mice, mice with a global TF deficiency (low TF mice), and mice deficient for TF in either myeloid cells (TFflox/flox, LysMCre mice) or in hepatocytes (TFflox/flox, AlbCre). Results Wild-type mice with liver injury had increased levels of white blood cell, microparticle TF activity and TATc compared to sham mice. Low TF mice and mice lacking TF in hepatocytes had reduced levels of TF in the liver and in microparticles and exhibited reduced activation of coagulation without a change in liver fibrosis. In contrast, mice lacking TF in myeloid cells had reduced white blood cell TF but no change in microparticle TF activity or TATc. Conclusions Hepatocyte TF activates coagulation in a mouse model of chronic liver injury. TF may contribute to the hypercoagulable state associated with chronic liver diseases in patients. PMID:26325534

  14. A novel mouse model identifies cooperating mutations and therapeutic targets critical for chronic myeloid leukemia progression

    PubMed Central

    Giotopoulos, George; van der Weyden, Louise; Osaki, Hikari; Rust, Alistair G.; Gallipoli, Paolo; Meduri, Eshwar; Horton, Sarah J.; Chan, Wai-In; Foster, Donna; Prinjha, Rab K.; Pimanda, John E.; Tenen, Daniel G.; Vassiliou, George S.; Koschmieder, Steffen; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of highly selective ABL-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has revolutionized therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, TKIs are only efficacious in the chronic phase of the disease and effective therapies for TKI-refractory CML, or after progression to blast crisis (BC), are lacking. Whereas the chronic phase of CML is dependent on BCR-ABL, additional mutations are required for progression to BC. However, the identity of these mutations and the pathways they affect are poorly understood, hampering our ability to identify therapeutic targets and improve outcomes. Here, we describe a novel mouse model that allows identification of mechanisms of BC progression in an unbiased and tractable manner, using transposon-based insertional mutagenesis on the background of chronic phase CML. Our BC model is the first to faithfully recapitulate the phenotype, cellular and molecular biology of human CML progression. We report a heterogeneous and unique pattern of insertions identifying known and novel candidate genes and demonstrate that these pathways drive disease progression and provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Our model greatly informs the biology of CML progression and provides a potent resource for the development of candidate therapies to improve the dismal outcomes in this highly aggressive disease. PMID:26304963

  15. Impact of an additional chronic BDNF reduction on learning performance in an Alzheimer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Psotta, Laura; Rockahr, Carolin; Gruss, Michael; Kirches, Elmar; Braun, Katharina; Lessmann, Volkmar; Bock, Jörg; Endres, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a crucial role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. A number of studies demonstrated that AD patients exhibit reduced BDNF levels in the brain and the blood serum, and in addition, several animal-based studies indicated a potential protective effect of BDNF against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. In order to further investigate the role of BDNF in the etiology of AD, we created a novel mouse model by crossing a well-established AD mouse model (APP/PS1) with a mouse exhibiting a chronic BDNF deficiency (BDNF+/−). This new triple transgenic mouse model enabled us to further analyze the role of BDNF in AD in vivo. We reasoned that in case BDNF has a protective effect against AD pathology, an AD-like phenotype in our new mouse model should occur earlier and/or in more severity than in the APP/PS1-mice. Indeed, the behavioral analysis revealed that the APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice show an earlier onset of learning impairments in a two-way active avoidance task in comparison to APP/PS1- and BDNF+/−-mice. However in the Morris water maze (MWM) test, we could not observe an overall aggrevated impairment in spatial learning and also short-term memory in an object recognition task remained intact in all tested mouse lines. In addition to the behavioral experiments, we analyzed the amyloid plaque pathology in the APP/PS1 and APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice and observed a comparable plaque density in the two genotypes. Moreover, our results revealed a higher plaque density in prefrontal cortical compared to hippocampal brain regions. Our data reveal that higher cognitive tasks requiring the recruitment of cortical networks appear to be more severely affected in our new mouse model than learning tasks requiring mainly sub-cortical networks. Furthermore, our observations of an accelerated impairment in active avoidance learning in APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice further supports the hypothesis that BDNF deficiency

  16. Simple platform for chronic imaging of hippocampal activity during spontaneous behaviour in an awake mouse

    PubMed Central

    Villette, Vincent; Levesque, Mathieu; Miled, Amine; Gosselin, Benoit; Topolnik, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Chronic electrophysiological recordings of neuronal activity combined with two-photon Ca2+ imaging give access to high resolution and cellular specificity. In addition, awake drug-free experimentation is required for investigating the physiological mechanisms that operate in the brain. Here, we developed a simple head fixation platform, which allows simultaneous chronic imaging and electrophysiological recordings to be obtained from the hippocampus of awake mice. We performed quantitative analyses of spontaneous animal behaviour, the associated network states and the cellular activities in the dorsal hippocampus as well as estimated the brain stability limits to image dendritic processes and individual axonal boutons. Ca2+ imaging recordings revealed a relatively stereotyped hippocampal activity despite a high inter-animal and inter-day variability in the mouse behavior. In addition to quiet state and locomotion behavioural patterns, the platform allowed the reliable detection of walking steps and fine speed variations. The brain motion during locomotion was limited to ~1.8 μm, thus allowing for imaging of small sub-cellular structures to be performed in parallel with recordings of network and behavioural states. This simple device extends the drug-free experimentation in vivo, enabling high-stability optophysiological experiments with single-bouton resolution in the mouse awake brain. PMID:28240275

  17. Simple platform for chronic imaging of hippocampal activity during spontaneous behaviour in an awake mouse.

    PubMed

    Villette, Vincent; Levesque, Mathieu; Miled, Amine; Gosselin, Benoit; Topolnik, Lisa

    2017-02-27

    Chronic electrophysiological recordings of neuronal activity combined with two-photon Ca(2+) imaging give access to high resolution and cellular specificity. In addition, awake drug-free experimentation is required for investigating the physiological mechanisms that operate in the brain. Here, we developed a simple head fixation platform, which allows simultaneous chronic imaging and electrophysiological recordings to be obtained from the hippocampus of awake mice. We performed quantitative analyses of spontaneous animal behaviour, the associated network states and the cellular activities in the dorsal hippocampus as well as estimated the brain stability limits to image dendritic processes and individual axonal boutons. Ca(2+) imaging recordings revealed a relatively stereotyped hippocampal activity despite a high inter-animal and inter-day variability in the mouse behavior. In addition to quiet state and locomotion behavioural patterns, the platform allowed the reliable detection of walking steps and fine speed variations. The brain motion during locomotion was limited to ~1.8 μm, thus allowing for imaging of small sub-cellular structures to be performed in parallel with recordings of network and behavioural states. This simple device extends the drug-free experimentation in vivo, enabling high-stability optophysiological experiments with single-bouton resolution in the mouse awake brain.

  18. Macrophage Depletion Attenuates Extracellular Matrix Deposition and Ductular Reaction in a Mouse Model of Chronic Cholangiopathies

    PubMed Central

    Syn, Wing-Kin; Lagaisse, Kimberly; van Hul, Noemi; Heindryckx, Femke; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Peeters, Liesbeth; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Leclercq, Isabelle A.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cholangiopathies, such as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis, are progressive disease entities, associated with periportal accumulation of inflammatory cells, encompassing monocytes and macrophages, peribiliary extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and ductular reaction (DR). This study aimed to elucidate the relevance of macrophages in the progression of chronic cholangiopathies through macrophage depletion in a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) mouse model. One group of mice received a single i.p. injection of Clodronate encapsulated liposomes (CLOLipo) at day 7 of a 14 day DDC treatment, while control animals were co-treated with PBSLipo instead. Mice were sacrificed after 7 or respectively 14 days of treatment for immunohistochemical assessment of macrophage recruitment (F4/80), ECM deposition (Sirius Red, Laminin) and DR (CK19). Macrophage depletion during a 14 day DDC treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of ECM deposition. Porto-lobular migration patterns of laminin-rich ECM and ductular structures were significantly attenuated and a progression of DR was effectively inhibited by macrophage depletion. CLOLipo co-treatment resulted in a confined DR to portal regions without amorphous cell clusters. This study suggests that therapeutic options selectively directed towards macrophages might represent a feasible treatment for chronic cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:27618307

  19. Limited Effect of Chronic Valproic Acid Treatment in a Mouse Model of Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sofia; Duarte-Silva, Sara; Naia, Luana; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Maciel, Patrícia

    2015-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease, caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the coding region of ATXN3 gene, and which currently lacks effective treatment. In this work we tested the therapeutic efficacy of chronic treatment with valproic acid (VPA) (200mg/kg), a compound with known neuroprotection activity, and previously shown to be effective in cell, fly and nematode models of MJD. We show that chronic VPA treatment in the CMVMJD135 mouse model had limited effects in the motor deficits of these mice, seen mostly at late stages in the motor swimming, beam walk, rotarod and spontaneous locomotor activity tests, and did not modify the ATXN3 inclusion load and astrogliosis in affected brain regions. However, VPA chronic treatment was able to increase GRP78 protein levels at 30 weeks of age, one of its known neuroprotective effects, confirming target engagement. In spite of limited results, the use of another dosage of VPA or of VPA in a combined therapy with molecules targeting other pathways, cannot be excluded as potential strategies for MJD therapeutics. PMID:26505994

  20. Mouse running activity is lowered by Brucella abortus treatment: a potential model to study chronic fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ottenweller, J E; Natelson, B H; Gause, W C; Carroll, K K; Beldowicz, D; Zhou, X D; LaManca, J J

    1998-03-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome, which can occur after acute infection and last for years, is characterized by severe and persistent fatigue. Others have reported decreases in mouse running activity following infection and have suggested this may provide an animal model for studying chronic fatigue. Voluntary running is a highly motivated activity in mice, which will often run 5-7 mi/day in our laboratory. Following 2 weeks of acclimation to running wheels with food and water available ad lib, female BALB/c mice received 0.2-mL tail vein injections of killed Brucella abortus (BA) or saline vehicle. Subsequently the effects on voluntary running and grooming behavior were determined. Injection of BA caused an immediate large decrease in running and a lack of grooming. Vehicle injections produced no changes in behavior. After the first several days of reduced running behavior, levels of running and grooming slowly returned back to normal over the next 2-4 weeks, with substantial individual differences in the rate of recovery. The pattern of running during recovery was intriguing in that BA mice first ran at normal levels just after the lights went out, but they stopped after only 1-2 h. As recovery proceeded, they gradually increased the duration of the running bout during the night. Because this model uses voluntary exertion and the ability to run for longer periods of time characterizes recovery, the model may be a good one for studying the biologic underpinnings of chronic fatigue.

  1. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Circulating exosomes potentiate tumor malignant properties in a mouse model of chronic sleep fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Almendros, Isaac; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Trzepizur, Wojciech; Mokhlesi, Babak; Huang, Lei; Andrade, Jorge; Farré, Ramon; Gozal, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) increases cancer aggressiveness in mice. Exosomes exhibit pleiotropic biological functions, including immune regulatory functions, antigen presentation, intracellular communication and inter-cellular transfer of RNA and proteins. We hypothesized that SF-induced alterations in biosynthesis and cargo of plasma exosomes may affect tumor cell properties. Results SF-derived exosomes increased tumor cell proliferation (~13%), migration (~2.3-fold) and extravasation (~10%) when compared to exosomes from SC-exposed mice. Similarly, Pre exosomes from OSA patients significantly enhanced proliferation and migration of human adenocarcinoma cells compared to Post. SF-exosomal cargo revealed 3 discrete differentially expressed miRNAs, and exploration of potential mRNA targets in TC1 tumor cells uncovered 132 differentially expressed genes that encode for multiple cancer-related pathways. Methods Plasma-derived exosomes from C57/B6 mice exposed to 6 wks of SF or sleep control (SC), and from adult human patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before (Pre) and after adherent treatment for 6 wks (Post) were co-cultured with mouse lung TC1 or human adenocarcinoma tumor cell lines, respectively. Proliferation, migration, invasion, endothelial barrier integrity and extravasation assays of tumor cells were performed. Plasma mouse exosomal miRNAs were profiled with arrays, and transcriptomic assessments of TC1 cells exposed to SF or SC exosomes were conducted to identify gene targets. Conclusions Chronic SF induces alterations in exosomal miRNA cargo that alter the biological properties of TC1 lung tumor cells to enhance their proliferative, migratory and extravasation properties, and similar findings occur in OSA patients, in whom SF is a constitutive component of their sleep disorder. Thus, exosomes could participate, at least in part, in the adverse cancer outcomes observed in OSA. PMID:27419627

  3. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in blast-exposed military veterans and a blast neurotrauma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Lee E; Fisher, Andrew M; Tagge, Chad A; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Velisek, Libor; Sullivan, John A; Upreti, Chirag; Kracht, Jonathan M; Ericsson, Maria; Wojnarowicz, Mark W; Goletiani, Cezar J; Maglakelidze, Giorgi M; Casey, Noel; Moncaster, Juliet A; Minaeva, Olga; Moir, Robert D; Nowinski, Christopher J; Stern, Robert A; Cantu, Robert C; Geiling, James; Blusztajn, Jan K; Wolozin, Benjamin L; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Stein, Thor D; Budson, Andrew E; Kowall, Neil W; Chargin, David; Sharon, Andre; Saman, Sudad; Hall, Garth F; Moss, William C; Cleveland, Robin O; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Stanton, Patric K; McKee, Ann C

    2012-05-16

    Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein-linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and correlated with impaired axonal conduction and defective activity-dependent long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Intracerebral pressure recordings demonstrated that shock waves traversed the mouse brain with minimal change and without thoracic contributions. Kinematic analysis revealed blast-induced head oscillation at accelerations sufficient to cause brain injury. Head immobilization during blast exposure prevented blast-induced learning and memory deficits. The contribution of blast wind to injurious head acceleration may be a primary injury mechanism leading to blast-related TBI and CTE. These results identify common pathogenic determinants leading to CTE in blast-exposed military veterans and head-injured athletes and additionally provide mechanistic evidence linking blast exposure to persistent impairments in neurophysiological function, learning, and memory.

  4. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Blast-Exposed Military Veterans and a Blast Neurotrauma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Lee E.; Fisher, Andrew M.; Tagge, Chad A.; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Velisek, Libor; Sullivan, John A.; Upreti, Chirag; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Ericsson, Maria; Wojnarowicz, Mark W.; Goletiani, Cezar J.; Maglakelidze, Giorgi M.; Casey, Noel; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Minaeva, Olga; Moir, Robert D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Cantu, Robert C.; Geiling, James; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Stein, Thor D.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Chargin, David; Sharon, Andre; Saman, Sudad; Hall, Garth F.; Moss, William C.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Stanton, Patric K.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein–linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and correlated with impaired axonal conduction and defective activity-dependent long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Intracerebral pressure recordings demonstrated that shock waves traversed the mouse brain with minimal change and without thoracic contributions. Kinematic analysis revealed blast-induced head oscillation at accelerations sufficient to cause brain injury. Head immobilization during blast exposure prevented blast-induced learning and memory deficits. The contribution of blast wind to injurious head acceleration may be a primary injury mechanism leading to blast-related TBI and CTE. These results identify common pathogenic determinants leading to CTE in blast-exposed military veterans and head-injured athletes and additionally provide mechanistic evidence linking blast exposure to persistent impairments in neurophysiological function, learning, and memory. PMID:22593173

  5. Interval hypoxic training.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, L

    2001-01-01

    Interval hypoxic training (IHT) is a technique developed in the former Soviet Union, that consists of repeated exposures to 5-7 minutes of steady or progressive hypoxia, interrupted by equal periods of recovery. It has been proposed for training in sports, to acclimatize to high altitude, and to treat a variety of clinical conditions, spanning from coronary heart disease to Cesarean delivery. Some of these results may originate by the different effects of continuous vs. intermittent hypoxia (IH), which can be obtained by manipulating the repetition rate, the duration and the intensity of the hypoxic stimulus. The present article will attempt to examine some of the effects of IH, and, whenever possible, compare them to those of typical IHT. IH can modify oxygen transport and energy utilization, alter respiratory and blood pressure control mechanisms, induce permanent modifications in the cardiovascular system. IHT increases the hypoxic ventilatory response, increase red blood cell count and increase aerobic capacity. Some of these effects might be potentially beneficial in specific physiologic or pathologic conditions. At this stage, this technique appears interesting for its possible applications, but still largely to be explored for its mechanisms, potentials and limitations.

  6. Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Humans: Tale or Myth

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, A.; Suleiman, M.S.; George, S.J.; Loubani, M.; Morice, A.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic Pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) describes the physiological adaptive process of lungs to preserves systemic oxygenation. It has clinical implications in the development of pulmonary hypertension which impacts on outcomes of patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery. This review examines both acute and chronic hypoxic vasoconstriction focusing on the distinct clinical implications and highlights the role of calcium and mitochondria in acute versus the role of reactive oxygen species and Rho GTPases in chronic HPV. Furthermore it identifies gaps of knowledge and need for further research in humans to clearly define this phenomenon and the underlying mechanism. PMID:28217180

  7. Chronic Cellular Imaging of Mouse Visual Cortex During Operant Behavior and Passive Viewing

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Mark L.; Kerlin, A. M.; Reid, R. C.

    2010-01-01

    Nearby neurons in mammalian neocortex demonstrate a great diversity of cell types and connectivity patterns. The importance of this diversity for computation is not understood. While extracellular recording studies in visual cortex have provided a particularly rich description of behavioral modulation of neural activity, new methods are needed to dissect the contribution of specific circuit elements in guiding visual perception. Here, we describe a method for three-dimensional cellular imaging of neural activity in the awake mouse visual cortex during active discrimination and passive viewing of visual stimuli. Head-fixed mice demonstrated robust discrimination for many hundred trials per day after initial task acquisition. To record from multiple neurons during operant behavior with single-trial resolution and minimal artifacts, we built a sensitive microscope for two-photon calcium imaging, capable of rapid tracking of neurons in three dimensions. We demonstrate stable recordings of cellular calcium activity during discrimination behavior across hours, days, and weeks, using both synthetic and genetically encoded calcium indicators. When combined with molecular and genetic technologies in mice (e.g., cell-type specific transgenic labeling), this approach allows the identification of neuronal classes in vivo. Physiological measurements from distinct classes of neighboring neurons will enrich our understanding of the coordinated roles of diverse elements of cortical microcircuits in guiding sensory perception and perceptual learning. Further, our method provides a high-throughput, chronic in vivo assay of behavioral influences on cellular activity that is applicable to a wide range of mouse models of neurologic disease. PMID:20407583

  8. Chronic Hypertension Leads to Neurodegeneration in the TgSwDI Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kruyer, Anna; Soplop, Nadine; Strickland, Sidney; Norris, Erin H

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies link vascular disorders, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hypertension, specifically, is an important modifiable risk factor for late-onset AD. To examine the link between midlife hypertension and the onset of AD later in life, we chemically induced chronic hypertension in the TgSwDI mouse model of AD in early adulthood. Hypertension accelerated cognitive deficits in the Barnes maze test (P<0.05 after 3 months of treatment; P<0.001 after 6 months), microvascular deposition of β-amyloid (P<0.001 after 3 months of treatment; P<0.05 after 6 months), vascular inflammation (P<0.05 in the dentate gyrus and P<0.001 in the dorsal subiculum after 6 months of treatment), blood-brain barrier leakage (P<0.05 after 3 and 6 months of treatment), and pericyte loss (P<0.05 in the dentate gyrus and P<0.01 in the dorsal subiculum after 6 months of treatment) in these mice. In addition, hypertension induced hippocampal neurodegeneration at an early age in this mouse line (43% reduction in the dorsal subiculum; P<0.05), establishing this as a useful research model of AD with mixed vascular and amyloid pathologies.

  9. Mechanism Underlying Linezolid-induced Thrombocytopenia in a Chronic Kidney Failure Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nishijo, Nao; Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Kutsukake, Masahiko; Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Fukumori, Shiro; Kasai, Hidefumi; Hiraki, Yoichi; Sakamaki, Ippei; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Karube, Yoshiharu; To, Hideto

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between renal function and linezolid (LZD)-induced thrombocytopenia and elucidate the underlying mechanism using a chronic renal disease (CRD) mouse model. Materials and Methods: CRD was induced in 5-week-old male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice by 5/6 nephrectomy. After this procedure, LZD (25 and 100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally once every day for 28 days. Platelet counts, white blood cell (WBC) counts, and hematocrit (HCT) levels were measured every 7 days. 2-14C-thymidine (0.185 MBq) was administrated intravenously to LZD-administered mice to evaluate the thymidine uptake ability of bone marrow. Results: Platelet counts were significantly lower in the LZD-administered CRD group than in the LZD-nonadministered groups at 14, 21, and 28 days (P < 0.05); however, these changes were not observed in LZD-administered mice with normal renal function, regardless of the duration of LZD administration. No significant changes were observed in WBC counts or HCT levels in any LZD-administered CRD mouse. Moreover, radioactive levels in bone marrow were not significantly different in each group. Conclusions: These results indicate that LZD-induced decreases in platelet counts were enhanced by renal impairment in vivo, suggesting that LZD-induced thrombocytopenia is not caused by nonimmune-mediated bone marrow suppression.

  10. Chronic mild stress damages mitochondrial ultrastructure and function in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Chai, Yi; Ding, Jian-Hua; Sun, Xiu-Lan; Hu, Gang

    2011-01-13

    Increasing evidence implicates mitochondrial failure as a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of mental disorders, such as depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS), a paradigm developed in the late 1980s as an animal model of depression, on the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial ultrastructure in the mouse brain. The results showed that the CMS regime induced depressive-like symptoms in mice characterized by reduced sucrose preference and body weight. Moreover, CMS exposure was associated with a significant increase in immobility time in the tail suspension test. Exposure to the CMS paradigm inhibited mitochondrial respiration rates and dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential in hippocampus, cortex and hypothalamus of mice. In addition, we found a damaged mitochondrial ultrastructure in brains of mice exposed to CMS. These findings provide evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural damage in a mouse model of depression. Moreover, these findings suggest that mitochondrial malfunction-induced oxidative injury could play a role in stress-related disorders such as depression.

  11. Transient and persistent metabolomic changes in plasma following chronic cigarette smoke exposure in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion I; Mahaffey, Spencer; Justice, Matthew J; Hughes, Grant; Armstrong, Michael; Bowler, Russell P; Reisdorph, Richard; Petrache, Irina; Reisdorph, Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is linked to the development of a variety of chronic lung and systemic diseases in susceptible individuals. Metabolomics approaches may aid in defining disease phenotypes, may help predict responses to treatment, and could identify biomarkers of risk for developing disease. Using a mouse model of chronic cigarette smoke exposure sufficient to cause mild emphysema, we investigated whether cigarette smoke induces distinct metabolic profiles and determined their persistence following smoking cessation. Metabolites were extracted from plasma and fractionated based on chemical class using liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction prior to performing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolites were evaluated for statistically significant differences among group means (p-value≤0.05) and fold change ≥1.5). Cigarette smoke exposure was associated with significant differences in amino acid, purine, lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolite levels compared to air exposed animals. Whereas 60% of the metabolite changes were reversible, 40% of metabolites remained persistently altered even following 2 months of smoking cessation, including nicotine metabolites. Validation of metabolite species and translation of these findings to human plasma metabolite signatures induced by cigarette smoking may lead to the discovery of biomarkers or pathogenic pathways of smoking-induced disease.

  12. Prostatic Inflammation Induces Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Chronic Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R.; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show–for the first time–that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  13. Chronic cannabinoid receptor stimulation selectively prevents motor impairments in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Bellocchio, Luigi; Ruiz-Calvo, Andrea; Cabanas, Magali; Du, Zhuowei; Guzmán, Manuel; Garret, Maurice; Cho, Yoon H

    2015-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive decline in motor abilities, as well as in cognitive and social behaviors. Most of these behavioral deficits are recapitulated in the R6/1 transgenic mouse, which can therefore be used as an experimental model to identify the neurobiological substrates of HD pathology and to design novel therapeutic approaches. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a relevant candidate to participate in the etiopathology of HD as it is a key modulator of brain function, especially in areas primarily affected by HD dysfunction such as the striatum. Thus, some studies have demonstrated an association between HD progression and alterations in the expression of several ECS elements, thereby suggesting that improving ECS function may constitute a useful strategy to eliminate or at least delay the appearance of HD symptoms. Here this hypothesis was specifically tested by evaluating whether the administration of a well-characterized cannabinoid receptor agonist (WIN 55,212), either acutely or chronically, improves the HD-like symptoms in R6/1 mice. While acute treatment did not change the behavioral phenotype of transgenic animals, chronic administration was able to prevent the appearance of motor deficits, to increase the number of striatal huntingtin inclusions and to prevent the loss of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons, without affecting the social or cognitive alterations. These findings suggest that prolonged administration of cannabinoid receptor agonists could be an appropriate strategy for selectively improving motor symptoms and stimulating neuroprotective processes in HD patients.

  14. EXERCISE PREVENTS DEVELOPMENT OF AUTONOMIC DYSREGULATION AND HYPERALGESIA IN A MOUSE MODEL OF CHRONIC MUSCLE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic function. Regular physical activity prevents development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function in sedentary mice with CMP, and if exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. CMP was induced by two intramuscular injections of pH 5 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24h after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia that can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP. PMID:26313406

  15. Immune System Modifications Induced in a Mouse Model of Chronic Exposure to (90)Sr.

    PubMed

    Synhaeve, Nicholas; Musilli, Stefania; Stefani, Johanna; Nicolas, Nour; Delissen, Olivia; Dublineau, Isabelle; Bertho, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    Strontium 90 ((90)Sr) remains in the environment long after a major nuclear disaster occurs. As a result, populations living on contaminated land are potentially exposed to daily ingesting of low quantities of (90)Sr. The potential long-term health effects of such chronic contamination are unknown. In this study, we used a mouse model to evaluate the effects of (90)Sr ingestion on the immune system, the animals were chronically exposed to (90)Sr in drinking water at a concentration of 20 kBq/l, for a daily ingestion of 80-100 Bq/day. This resulted in a reduced number of CD19(+) B lymphocytes in the bone marrow and spleen in steady-state conditions. In contrast, the results from a vaccine experiment performed as a functional test of the immune system showed that in response to T-dependent antigens, there was a reduction in IgG specific to tetanus toxin (TT), a balanced Th1/Th2 response inducer antigen, but not to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), a strong Th2 response inducer antigen. This was accompanied by a reduction in Th1 cells in the spleen, consistent with the observed reduction in specific IgG concentration. The precise mechanisms by which (90)Sr acts on the immune system remain to be elucidated. However, our results suggest that (90)Sr ingestion may be responsible for some of the reported effects of internal contamination on the immune system in civilian populations exposed to the Chernobyl fallout.

  16. Hormetic Effect of Chronic Hypergravity in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma and Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic hypergravity in a mouse model of allergic asthma and rhinitis. Forty BALB/c mice were divided as: group A (n = 10, control) sensitized and challenged with saline, group B (n = 10, asthma) challenged by intraperitoneal and intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) to induce allergic asthma and rhinitis, and groups C (n = 10, asthma/rotatory control) and D (n = 10, asthma/hypergravity) exposed to 4 weeks of rotation with normogravity (1G) or hypergravity (5G) during induction of asthma/rhinitis. Group D showed significantly decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in their BAL fluid compared with groups B and C (p < 0.05). In real-time polymerase chain reaction using lung homogenate, the expression of IL-1β was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) and IL-4 and IL-10 significantly downregulated (p < 0.05) in group D. Infiltration of inflammatory cells into lung parenchyma and turbinate, and the thickness of respiratory epithelium was significantly reduced in group D (p < 0.05). The expression of Bcl-2 and heme oxygenase-1 were significantly downregulated, Bax and extracellular dismutase significantly upregulated in Group D. Therefore, chronic hypergravity could have a hormetic effect for allergic asthma and rhinitis via regulation of genes involved in antioxidative and proapoptotic pathways. It is possible that we could use hypergravity machinery for treating allergic respiratory disorders. PMID:27251783

  17. Behavioural and EEG effects of chronic rapamycin treatment in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Magri, Laura; Castoldi, Valerio; Comi, Giancarlo; Minicucci, Fabio; Galli, Rossella; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-04-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a multisystem genetic disorder caused by mutation in either Tsc1 or Tsc2 genes that leads to the hyper activation of the mTOR pathway, a key signalling pathway for synaptic plasticity. TSC is characterized by benign tumors arising in different organs and severe neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as epilepsy, intellectual disability, autism, anxiety and depressive behaviour. Rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of mTOR and its efficacy in treating epilepsy and neurological symptoms remains elusive. In a mouse model in which Tsc1 has been deleted in embryonic telencephalic neural stem cells, we analyzed anxiety- and depression-like behaviour by elevated-plus maze (EPM), open-field test (OFT), forced-swim test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST), after chronic administration of rapamycin. In addition, spectral analysis of background EEG was performed. Rapamycin-treated mutant mice displayed a reduction in anxiety- and depression-like phenotype, as shown by the EPM/OFT and FST, respectively. These results were inline with EEG power spectra outcomes. The same effects of rapamycin were observed in wild-type mice. Notably, in heterozygous animals we did not observe any EEG and/or behavioural variation after rapamycin treatment. Together these results suggest that both TSC1 deletion and chronic rapamycin treatment might have a role in modulating behaviour and brain activity, and point out to the potential usefulness of background EEG analysis in tracking brain dysfunction in parallel with behavioural testing.

  18. Transient and Persistent Metabolomic Changes in Plasma following Chronic Cigarette Smoke Exposure in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion I.; Mahaffey, Spencer; Justice, Matthew J.; Hughes, Grant; Armstrong, Michael; Bowler, Russell P.; Reisdorph, Richard; Petrache, Irina; Reisdorph, Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is linked to the development of a variety of chronic lung and systemic diseases in susceptible individuals. Metabolomics approaches may aid in defining disease phenotypes, may help predict responses to treatment, and could identify biomarkers of risk for developing disease. Using a mouse model of chronic cigarette smoke exposure sufficient to cause mild emphysema, we investigated whether cigarette smoke induces distinct metabolic profiles and determined their persistence following smoking cessation. Metabolites were extracted from plasma and fractionated based on chemical class using liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction prior to performing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolites were evaluated for statistically significant differences among group means (p-value≤0.05) and fold change ≥1.5). Cigarette smoke exposure was associated with significant differences in amino acid, purine, lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolite levels compared to air exposed animals. Whereas 60% of the metabolite changes were reversible, 40% of metabolites remained persistently altered even following 2 months of smoking cessation, including nicotine metabolites. Validation of metabolite species and translation of these findings to human plasma metabolite signatures induced by cigarette smoking may lead to the discovery of biomarkers or pathogenic pathways of smoking-induced disease. PMID:25007263

  19. Hormetic Effect of Chronic Hypergravity in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma and Rhinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Tae Young; Jung, Ah-Yeoun; Kim, Young Hyo

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic hypergravity in a mouse model of allergic asthma and rhinitis. Forty BALB/c mice were divided as: group A (n = 10, control) sensitized and challenged with saline, group B (n = 10, asthma) challenged by intraperitoneal and intranasal ovalbumin (OVA) to induce allergic asthma and rhinitis, and groups C (n = 10, asthma/rotatory control) and D (n = 10, asthma/hypergravity) exposed to 4 weeks of rotation with normogravity (1G) or hypergravity (5G) during induction of asthma/rhinitis. Group D showed significantly decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in their BAL fluid compared with groups B and C (p < 0.05). In real-time polymerase chain reaction using lung homogenate, the expression of IL-1β was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) and IL-4 and IL-10 significantly downregulated (p < 0.05) in group D. Infiltration of inflammatory cells into lung parenchyma and turbinate, and the thickness of respiratory epithelium was significantly reduced in group D (p < 0.05). The expression of Bcl-2 and heme oxygenase-1 were significantly downregulated, Bax and extracellular dismutase significantly upregulated in Group D. Therefore, chronic hypergravity could have a hormetic effect for allergic asthma and rhinitis via regulation of genes involved in antioxidative and proapoptotic pathways. It is possible that we could use hypergravity machinery for treating allergic respiratory disorders.

  20. Nociceptive and Inflammatory Mediator Upregulation in a Mouse Model of Chronic Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erica S.; Xie, Amy; La, Jun-Ho; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, characterized by genitourinary pain in the pelvic region in the absence of an identifiable cause, is common in adult males. Surprisingly, the sensory innervation of the prostate and mediators that sensitize its innervation have received little attention. We thus characterized a mouse model of chronic prostatitis, focusing on the prostate innervation and how organ inflammation affects gene expression of putative nociceptive markers in prostate afferent somata in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and mediators in the prostate. Retrograde tracing (fast blue, FB) from the prostate revealed that thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) DRG are the principal sources of somata of prostate afferents. Nociceptive markers (e.g., TRP, TREK and P2X channels) were upregulated in FB-labeled TL and LS somata for up to four weeks after inflaming the prostate (intra-prostate injection of zymosan). Prostatic inflammation was evident histologically, by monocyte infiltration and a significant increase in mast cell tryptase activity 14, 21 and 28 days after zymosan injection. Interleukin-10 and NGF were also significantly upregulated in the prostate throughout the four weeks of inflammation. Open field pain-related behaviors (e.g., rearing) were unchanged in prostate-inflamed mice, suggesting the absence of ongoing nociception, but withdrawal thresholds to lower abdominal pressure were significantly reduced. The increases in IL-10, mast cell tryptase and NGF in the inflamed prostate were cotemporaneous with reduced thresholds to probing of the abdomen and upregulation of nociceptive markers in DRG somata innervating the prostate. The results provide insight and direction for study of mechanisms underlying pain in chronic prostatitis. PMID:25915147

  1. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP.

  2. Effects of chronic low-dose ultraviolet B radiation on DNA damage and repair in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D L; Greinert, R; de Gruijl, F R; Guikers, K L; Breitbart, E W; Byrom, M; Gallmeier, M M; Lowery, M G; Volkmer, B

    1999-06-15

    Chronic exposure to sunlight causes skin cancer in humans, yet little is known about how habitual exposure to low doses of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) affects DNA damage in the skin. We treated Skh-1 hairless mice with daily doses of suberythemal UVB for 40 days and analyzed the amount and distribution of DNA photodamage using RIAs and immunofluorescence micrography. We found that DNA damage accumulated in mouse skin as a result of chronic irradiation and that this damage persisted in the dermis and epidermis for several weeks after the chronic treatment was terminated. Although the persistent damage was evenly distributed throughout the dermis, it remained in the epidermis as a small number of heavily damaged cells at the dermal-epidermal boundary. Rates of DNA damage induction and repair were determined at different times over the course of chronic treatment in response to a higher challenge dose of UVB light. The amount of damage induced by the challenge dose increased in response to chronic exposure, and excision repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone dimers was significantly reduced. The sensitization of mouse epidermal DNA to photoproduct induction, the reduction in excision repair, and the accumulation of nonrepairable DNA damage in the dermis and epidermis suggest that chronic low-dose exposure to sunlight may significantly enhance the predisposition of mammalian skin to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis.

  3. Neonatal mouse assay for tumorigenicity: alternative to the chronic rodent bioassay.

    PubMed

    Flammang, T J; Tungeln, L S; Kadlubar, F F; Fu, P P

    1997-10-01

    The chronic rodent bioassay for tumors has been utilized systematically for 25 years to identify chemicals with carcinogenic potential in man. In general, those chemicals exhibiting tumorigenicity at multiple sites in both mice and rats have been regarded as possessing strong carcinogenic potential in humans. In comparison, the value of data collected for those test chemicals exhibiting more sporadic tumorigenicity results (e.g., single species/single sex or dose-independent) has been questioned. As knowledge of the carcinogenic process has increased, several alternative test systems, usually faster and less expensive than the 2-year bioassay, have been suggested for identification of the strongly acting, transspecies carcinogens. The International Conference on Harmonization for Technical Requirements for the Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use has proposed an international standard that allows for the use of one long-term rodent carcinogenicity study, plus one supplementary study to identify potential human pharmaceutical carcinogens. The neonatal mouse assay for tumorigenicity has been used since 1959; however, relative to other alternate tests, little has been written about this system. It is clear that this assay system successfully identifies transspecies carcinogens from numerous chemical classes, thus recommending itself as a strong candidate for a supplementary study to identify potential human carcinogens. In contrast, there are decidedly less data available from this assay in response to pharmaceuticals shown to exhibit weak and/or conflicting results in the 2-year bioassay, knowledge invaluable to the regulatory process. This paper reviews the historical development and our experience with the neonatal mouse assay and includes suggestions for a standardized protocol and strategies to document its response to "weak" and/or "nongenotoxic" carcinogens.

  4. PARP inhibition treatment in a nonconventional experimental mouse model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zaffini, Raffaela; Di Paola, Rosanna; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Menegazzi, Marta

    2016-12-01

    Allergic asthma is an immunological disease that occurs as a consequence of aeroallergen exposure. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) in conventional models of asthma-like reaction has emerged as an effective anti-inflammatory and airway remodeling intervention. In a house dust mite (HDM) exposure mouse model, we investigated the impact of PARP inhibition on allergic airway inflammation, sensitization, and remodeling. Mice were intranasally exposed to a HDM extract for 5 days per week for up to 5 weeks. Mice were administered, or not, by PARP inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide (3-ABA) or 5-aminoisoquinolinone (5-AIQ) during the last 2 weeks of HDM treatment. Mice treated with PARP inhibitors after HDM stimulation showed a significant decrease in the number of total cells and eosinophils detectable in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as compared with the HDM-stimulated ones. In vitro HDM-stimulated splenocyte culture produced considerable amounts of the Th2 cytokines that were not affected by treatment with PARP inhibitors. Immunoglobulin levels in the serum were also unchanged. In the lung tissue, collagen deposition was decreased, whereas α-smooth muscle actin thickening was not significantly affected. Moreover, in HDM-stimulated PARP inhibitor-treated groups, we found a downregulation in the activation of signal transducer and activator of trascription-6 (STAT-6) and a significant decrease in the mRNA levels of C-C motif chemokine 11 (CCL11). In this mouse model of chronic asthma PARP inhibition treatment, although it does not affect sensitization, it effectively reduces the allergic airway inflammation and affects the remodeling through a mechanism involving STAT6 and CCL11.

  5. Chronically ischemic mouse skeletal muscle exhibits myopathy in association with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Pipinos, Iraklis I; Swanson, Stanley A; Zhu, Zhen; Nella, Aikaterini A; Weiss, Dustin J; Gutti, Tanuja L; McComb, Rodney D; Baxter, B Timothy; Lynch, Thomas G; Casale, George P

    2008-07-01

    A myopathy characterized by mitochondrial pathology and oxidative stress is present in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Patients with PAD differ in disease severity, mode of presentation, and presence of comorbid conditions. In this study, we used a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia to isolate and directly investigate the effects of chronic inflow arterial occlusion on skeletal muscle microanatomy, mitochondrial function and expression, and oxidative stress. Hindlimb ischemia was induced by staged ligation/division of the common femoral and iliac arteries in C57BL/6 mice, and muscles were harvested 12 wk later. Muscle microanatomy was examined by bright-field microscopy, and mitochondrial content was determined as citrate synthase activity in muscle homogenates and ATP synthase expression by fluorescence microscopy. Electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I through IV were analyzed individually by respirometry. Oxidative stress was assessed as total protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) adducts and altered expression and activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Ischemic muscle exhibited histological features of myopathy and increased mitochondrial content compared with control muscle. Complex-dependent respiration was significantly reduced for ETC complexes I, III, and IV in ischemic muscle. Protein carbonyls, HNE adducts, and MnSOD expression were significantly increased in ischemic muscle. MnSOD activity was not significantly changed, suggesting MnSOD inactivation. Using a mouse model, we have demonstrated for the first time that inflow arterial occlusion alone, i.e., in the absence of other comorbid conditions, causes myopathy with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, recapitulating the muscle pathology of PAD patients.

  6. Syk Regulates Neutrophilic Airway Hyper-Responsiveness in a Chronic Mouse Model of Allergic Airways Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen; Scott, Jeremy A.; Chow, Chung-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airways hyper-responsiveness (AHR), reversible airway obstruction, and airway inflammation and remodeling. We previously showed that Syk modulates methacholine-induced airways contractility in naïve mice and in mice with allergic airways inflammation. We hypothesize that Syk plays a role in the pathogenesis of AHR; this was evaluated in a chronic 8-week mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airways inflammation. Methods We used the Sykflox/flox//rosa26CreERT2 conditional Syk knock-out mice to assess the role of Syk prior to HDM exposure, and treated HDM-sensitized mice with the Syk inhibitor, GSK143, to evaluate its role in established allergic airways inflammation. Respiratory mechanics and methacholine (MCh)-responsiveness were assessed using the flexiVent® system. Lungs underwent bronchoalveolar lavage to isolate inflammatory cells or were frozen for determination of gene expression in tissues. Results MCh-induced AHR was observed following HDM sensitization in the Syk-intact (Sykflox/flox) and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. MCh responsiveness was reduced to control levels in HDM-sensitized Sykdel/del mice and in BALB/c and Sykflox/flox mice treated with GSK143. Both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice mounted appropriate immune responses to HDM, with HDM-specific IgE levels that were comparable to Sykflox/flox and vehicle-treated BALB/c mice. HDM-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts were attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice, due primarily to decreased neutrophil recruitment. Gene expression analysis of lung tissues revealed that HDM-induced expression of IL-17 and CXCL-1 was significantly attenuated in both Sykdel/del and GSK143-treated mice. Conclusion Syk inhibitors may play a role in the management of neutrophilic asthma. PMID:28107345

  7. Chronic maternal morphine alters calbindin D-28k expression pattern in postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Fiorito, Filomena; Della Morte, Rossella; Maharajan, Veeramani; Costagliola, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The distribution pattern of calbindin (CB)-D28k-expressing neurons results to be altered in several brain regions of chronic morphine exposed adult mice. In this study, the influence of chronic maternal exposure to morphine on the distribution pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neurons in the brain of mouse offspring was investigated. Females of CD-1 mice were daily administered with saline or morphine for 7 days before mating, during the whole gestation period, and until 21 day post-partum. Their offspring were sacrificed on postnatal day 18, and the brains were examined by histology using cresyl violet and by immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal anti-CB-D28k antibody. Histology revealed no significant differences in the distribution pattern and the number of neurons between the offspring forebrain of the control group of mice and the two groups of mice treated with different doses of morphine. However, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the number of CB-D28k-immunoreactive neurons remarkably decreased in the cingulate cortex, in the layers II-IV of the parietal cortex and in all regions of the hippocampus, while it increased in the layers V-VI of the parietal cortex and in the subicular region of the offspring brain of morphine treated mice. Overall, our findings demonstrate that maternal exposure to morphine alters the pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neuron pattern in specific regions of murine developing brain, in a layer- and dose-dependent way, thus suggesting that these alterations might represent a mechanism by which morphine modifies the functional aspects of developing brain.

  8. Effect of Chronic Uremia on the Cell Surface Expression of B7 Family Costimulatory Molecules in an HLA-A2 Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Makidon, Paul E; Smith, Douglas M; Groom Ii, Jeffery V; Cao, Zhengyi; Landers, Jeffery J; Baker, James R

    2015-08-01

    Uremia due to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in humans is associated with immune dysfunction, increased susceptibility to infections, immune-activation-associated inflammation, and poor responses to vaccines. The pathophysiologic basis of these immune defects is hypothesized to be associated with a wide range of immunologic abnormalities, including an inability to sufficiently express the B7 family (B7-1, CD80; B7-2, CD86) of T-cell costimulatory molecules. However, testing the hypothesis that a state of chronic uremia contributes to attenuated expression of CD80 or CD86 has been difficult because few animal models faithfully recapitulate the immune defects observed in human CKD patients. We used a humanized mouse in a model of surgically induced renal failure and secondary chronic uremia to evaluate the effect of uremia on the expression of these markers. In a manner that resembles the changes observed in CKD patients, surgically induced CKD in mice resulted in decreased costimulatory CD86 expression compared with that in sham-operated controls. Immunodeficiency was functionally demonstrated in this mouse model by documenting an attenuated immune response to a cholera-toxin-based hepatitis B vaccine. This model will be useful for investigating the mechanisms involved in chronic uremia-associated immunodeficiency, poor response to vaccination, and problems associated with immunization of CKD patients.

  9. Connective tissue growth factor production by activated pancreatic stellate cells in mouse alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Alyssa; Brigstock, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, inflammation, and scarring, the latter of which is due to excessive collagen deposition by activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSC). The aim of this study was to establish a model of ACP in mice, a species that is usually resistant to the toxic effects of alcohol, and to identify the cell type(s) responsible for production of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a pro-fibrotic molecule. C57Bl/6 male mice received intraperitoneal ethanol injections for three weeks against a background of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Peak blood alcohol levels remained consistently high in ethanol-treated mice as compared to control mice. In mice receiving ethanol plus cerulein, there was increased collagen deposition as compared to other treatment groups as well as increased frequency of α-smooth muscle actin and desmin-positive PSC which also demonstrated significantly enhanced CTGF protein production. Expression of mRNA for collagen α1(I), α-smooth muscle actin or CTGF were all increased and co-localized exclusively to activated PSC in ACP. Pancreatic expression of mRNA for key profibrotic markers were all increased in ACP. In conclusion, a mouse model of ACP has been developed that mimics key pathophysiological features of the disease in humans and which shows that activated PSC are the principal producers of collagen and CTGF. PSC-derived CTGF is thus a candidate therapeutic target in anti-fibrotic strategies for ACP. PMID:20368699

  10. Effect of chronic valproic Acid treatment on hepatic gene expression profile in wfs1 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Punapart, Marite; Eltermaa, Mall; Oflijan, Julia; Sütt, Silva; Must, Anne; Kõks, Sulev; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Fernandes, Catherine; Vasar, Eero; Soomets, Ursel; Terasmaa, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug whose use is often associated with drug-induced weight gain. Treatment with VPA has been shown to upregulate Wfs1 expression in vitro. Aim of the present study was to compare the effect of chronic VPA treatment in wild type (WT) and Wfs1 knockout (KO) mice on hepatic gene expression profile. Wild type, Wfs1 heterozygous, and homozygous mice were treated with VPA for three months (300 mg/kg i.p. daily) and gene expression profiles in liver were evaluated using Affymetrix Mouse GeneChip 1.0 ST array. We identified 42 genes affected by Wfs1 genotype, 10 genes regulated by VPA treatment, and 9 genes whose regulation by VPA was dependent on genotype. Among the genes that were regulated differentially by VPA depending on genotype was peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (Ppard), whose expression was upregulated in response to VPA treatment in WT, but not in Wfs1 KO mice. Thus, regulation of Ppard by VPA is dependent on Wfs1 genotype.

  11. Chronic morphine administration induces over-expression of aldolase C with reduction of CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Yu; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2009-05-01

    In recent studies, alterations in the activity and expression of metabolic enzymes, such as those involved in glycolysis, have been detected in morphine-dependent patients and animals. Increasing evidence demonstrates that the hippocampus is an important brain region associated with morphine dependence, but the molecular events occurring in the hippocampus following chronic exposure to morphine are poorly understood. Aldolase C is the brain-specific isoform of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase which is a glycolytic enzyme catalyzing reactions in the glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and fructose metabolic pathways. Using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays, we found the expression of aldolase C was markedly increased in the mouse hippocampus following chronic morphine treatment. Naloxone pretreatment before morphine administration suppressed withdrawal jumping, weight loss, and overexpression of aldolase C. CREB is a transcription factor regulated through phosphorylation on Ser133, which is known to play a key role in the mechanism of morphine dependence. When detecting the expression of phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the mouse hippocampus using Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we found CREB phosphorylation was clearly decreased following chronic morphine treatment. Interestingly, laser-confocal microscopy showed that overexpression of aldolase C in mouse hippocampal neurons was concomitant with the decreased immunoreactivity of p-CREB. The results suggest potential links between the morphine-induced alteration of aldolase C and the regulation of CREB phosphorylation, a possible mechanism of morphine dependence.

  12. Soluble erythropoietin receptor is present in the mouse brain and is required for the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jorge; Gassmann, Max; Joseph, Vincent

    2007-08-15

    While erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR) have been widely investigated in brain, the expression and function of the soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR) remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that sEpoR, a negative regulator of Epo's binding to the EpoR, is present in the mouse brain and is down-regulated by 62% after exposure to normobaric chronic hypoxia (10% O2 for 3 days). Furthermore, while normoxic minute ventilation increased by 58% in control mice following hypoxic acclimatization, sEpoR infusion in brain during the hypoxic challenge efficiently reduced brain Epo concentration and abolished the ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH). These observations imply that hypoxic downregulation of sEpoR is required for adequate ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia, thereby underlying the function of Epo as a key factor regulating oxygen delivery not only by its classical activity on red blood cell production, but also by regulating ventilation.

  13. Chronic Unpredictable Stress Decreases Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Mouse Ovaries: Relationship to Oocytes Developmental Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xian-Hong; Han, Hui; Shen, Ni; Jin, Ren-Tao; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Gui-Xiang; He, Guo-Ping; Liu, Yu-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) was originally described in the nervous system but has been shown to be expressed in ovary tissues recently, acting as a paracrine/autocrine regulator required for developments of follicles and oocytes. Although it is generally accepted that chronic stress impairs female reproduction and decreases the expression of BDNF in limbic structures of central nervous system, which contributes to mood disorder. However, it is not known whether chronic stress affects oocytes developments, nor whether it affects expression of BDNF in ovary. Methods Mice were randomly assigned into control group, stressed group, BDNF-treated group and BDNF-treated stressed group. The chronic unpredictable mild stress model was used to produce psychosocial stress in mice, and the model was verified by open field test and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. The methods of immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to detect BDNF protein level and distribution. The number of retrieved oocytes, oocyte maturation, embryo cleavage and the rates of blastocyst formation after parthenogenetic activation were evaluated. Results Chronic unpredictable stress decreased the BDNF expression in antral follicles, but didn’t affect the BDNF expression in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. Chronic unpredictable stress also decreased the number of retrieved oocytes and the rate of blastocyst formation, which was rescued by exogenous BDNF treatment. Conclusion BDNF in mouse ovaries may be related to the decreased number of retrieved oocytes and impaired oocytes developmental potential induced by chronic unpredictable stress. PMID:23284991

  14. Chronic kidney disease accelerates cognitive impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, through angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yu; Uekawa, Ken; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant risk factor in the development of cognitive decline. However, the exact role of CKD in cognitive impairment or dementia is unclear. This work was performed to examine the potential impact of CKD on cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD), focusing on angiotensin II. (1) CKD was induced in 5XFAD mice, an AD model mouse, and wild-type mice by feeding an adenine-containing diet and the effect on cognitive function was compared between both strains. There was no significant difference regarding the severity of CKD induced by adenine between the strains. In 5XFAD mice, the CKD group exhibited significant cognitive impairment while the control group (control diet-fed group) did not, as evidenced by a passive avoidance test. On the other hand, in wild-type mice, neither the CKD group nor the control group showed cognitive impairment. Thus, CKD itself appears to accelerate cognitive impairment in AD mice. (2) We also examined the effect of olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, on 5XFAD mice with CKD to elucidate the potential involvement of angiotensin II. As evidenced by the findings of the water maze test, olmesartan treatment significantly ameliorated the impairment of spatial learning and memory function induced by CKD in 5XFAD mice. Olmesartan treatment significantly ameliorated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption induced by CKD in 5XFAD mice. Furthermore, olmesartan reduced hippocampal oxidative stress in 5XFAD with CKD to similar levels to the control group of 5XFAD fed standard diet. Hence, the amelioration of CKD-induced cognitive impairment in 5XFAD mice by olmesartan appears to be mediated by the suppression of BBB disruption or oxidative stress. In conclusion, we obtained the evidence suggesting that CKD itself accelerates cognitive impairment in AD mice, through angiotensin II. Thus, our work provides a novel insight into the underlying mechanism of the link

  15. Chronic hydroxychloroquine improves endothelial dysfunction and protects kidney in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Guzmán, Manuel; Jiménez, Rosario; Romero, Miguel; Sánchez, Manuel; Zarzuelo, María José; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; O'Valle, Francisco; López-Farré, Antonio José; Algieri, Francesca; Gálvez, Julio; Pérez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Sabio, José Mario; Duarte, Juan

    2014-08-01

    Hydroxychloroquine has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus. Hydroxychloroquine-treated lupus patients showed a lower incidence of thromboembolic disease. Endothelial dysfunction, the earliest indicator of the development of cardiovascular disease, is present in lupus. Whether hydroxychloroquine improves endothelial function in lupus is not clear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of hydroxychloroquine on hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and renal injury in a female mouse model of lupus. NZBWF1 (lupus) and NZW/LacJ (control) mice were treated with hydroxychloroquine 10 mg/kg per day by oral gavage, or with tempol and apocynin in the drinking water, for 5 weeks. Hydroxychloroquine treatment did not alter lupus disease activity (assessed by plasma double-stranded DNA autoantibodies) but prevented hypertension, cardiac and renal hypertrophy, proteinuria, and renal injury in lupus mice. Aortae from lupus mice showed reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilator responses to acetylcholine and enhanced contraction to phenylephrine, which were normalized by hydroxychloroquine or antioxidant treatments. No differences among all experimental groups were found in both the relaxant responses to acetylcholine and the contractile responses to phenylephrine in rings incubated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. Vascular reactive oxygen species content and mRNA levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits NOX-1 and p47(phox) were increased in lupus mice and reduced by hydroxychloroquine or antioxidants. Chronic hydroxychloroquine treatment reduced hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and organ damage in severe lupus mice, despite the persistent elevation of anti-double-stranded DNA, suggesting the involvement of new additional mechanisms to improve cardiovascular complications.

  16. Chronic alcohol intake promotes tumor growth in a diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis mouse model through increased Wnt/Beta-catenin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol (EtOH) metabolism is involved in both initiating and promoting mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma progression in chronic alcoholics. In this study, we developed a mouse model to test the hypothesis that chronic EtOH consumption promotes tumor growth irrespective of EtOH-related initiati...

  17. Chronic treatment with the GLP1 analogue liraglutide increases cell proliferation and differentiation into neurons in an AD mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parthsarathy, Vadivel; Hölscher, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis is a life long process, but the rate of cell proliferation and differentiation decreases with age. In Alzheimer's patients, along with age, the presence of Aβ in the brain inhibits this process by reducing stem cell proliferation and cell differentiation. GLP-1 is a growth factor that has neuroprotective properties. GLP1 receptors are present on neuronal progenitor cells, and the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide has been shown to increase cell proliferation in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. Here we investigated acute and chronic effects of liraglutide on progenitor cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and their subsequent differentiation into neurons in wild type and APP/PS-1 mice at different ages. APP/PS1 and their littermate controls, aged 3, 6, 12, 15 months were injected acutely or chronically with 25 nmol/kg liraglutide. Acute treatment with liraglutide showed an increase in cell proliferation in APP/PS1 mice, but not in controls whereas chronic treatment increased cell proliferation at all ages (BrdU and Ki67 markers). Moreover, numbers of immature neurons (DCX) were increased in both acute and chronic treated animals at all ages. Most newly generated cells differentiated into mature neurons (NeuN marker). A significant increase was observed with chronically treated 6, 12, 15 month APP/PS1 and WT groups. These results demonstrate that liraglutide, which is currently on the market as a treatment for type 2 diabetes (Victoza(TM)), increases neurogenesis, which may have beneficial effects in neurodegenerative disorders like AD.

  18. Inflammation Oxidative Stress and Preneoplasia in a Mouse Model of Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    2003;361:955-64. 31. Hopkins WJ, Gendron-Fitzpatrick A, Balish E, Uehling DT. Escherichia coli urinary tract infection in genetically distinct mouse...strains: Time-course and host responses to infection. Infect Immun. 1998;66:2798-2802. 32. Hopkins WJ. Mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection . Chapter

  19. Chronic calcium imaging of neurons in the mouse visual cortex using a troponin C-based indicator.

    PubMed

    Santos, Alexandre Ferrão; Hübener, Mark

    2014-05-01

    This protocol describes the use of the genetically encoded troponin C-based calcium indicator TN-XXL to chronically monitor the functional properties of single neocortical neurons in the mouse visual cortex. A cranial window is implanted over the brain of a mouse expressing TN-XXL in pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex. Several days later, the visual cortex is mapped and photographed to facilitate repeated imaging of the same region using two-photon microscopy. Initial two-photon imaging may be done ∼2 wk after the window is implanted. We show the application of this technique for long-term in vivo imaging of stimulus response properties. Beyond providing functional information, long-term imaging of TN-XXL-labeled neurons also enables the simultaneous monitoring of structural properties down to the level of single dendritic spines.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) but not HIF-2 is essential for hypoxic induction of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases in primary newborn mouse epiphyseal growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Aro, Ellinoora; Khatri, Richa; Gerard-O'Riley, Rita; Mangiavini, Laura; Myllyharju, Johanna; Schipani, Ernestina

    2012-10-26

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the master regulators of hypoxia-responsive genes. They play a critical role in the survival, development, and differentiation of chondrocytes in the avascular hypoxic fetal growth plate, which is rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) and in its main component, collagens. Several genes involved in the synthesis, maintenance, and degradation of ECM are regulated by HIFs. Collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (C-P4Hs) are key enzymes in collagen synthesis because the resulting 4-hydroxyprolines are necessary for the stability of all collagen molecules. The vertebrate C-P4Hs are α(2)β(2) tetramers with three isoforms of the catalytic α subunit, yielding C-P4Hs of types I-III. C-P4H-I is the main form in most cells, but C-P4H-II is the major form in chondrocytes. We postulated here that post-translational modification of collagens, particularly 4-hydroxylation of proline residues, could be one of the modalities by which HIF regulates the adaptive responses of chondrocytes in fetal growth plates. To address this hypothesis, we used primary epiphyseal growth plate chondrocytes isolated from newborn mice with conditionally inactivated genes for HIF-1α, HIF-2α, or the von Hippel-Lindau protein. The data obtained showed that C-P4H α(I) and α(II) mRNA levels were increased in hypoxic chondrocytes in a manner dependent on HIF-1 but not on HIF-2. Furthermore, the increases in the C-P4H mRNA levels were associated with both increased amounts of the C-P4H tetramers and augmented C-P4H activity in hypoxia. The hypoxia inducibility of the C-P4H isoenzymes is thus likely to ensure sufficient C-P4H activity for collagen synthesis occurring in chondrocytes in a hypoxic environment.

  1. Hypoxic radiosensitization: adored and ignored.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Jens

    2007-09-10

    Since observations from the beginning of the last century, it has become well established that solid tumors may contain oxygen-deficient hypoxic areas and that cells in such areas may cause tumors to become radioresistant. Identifying hypoxic cells in human tumors has improved by the help of new imaging and physiologic techniques, and a substantial amount of data indicates the presence of hypoxia in many types of human tumors, although with a considerable heterogeneity among individual tumors. Controlled clinical trials during the last 40 years have indicated that this source of radiation resistance can be eliminated or modified by normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen or by the use of nitroimidazoles as hypoxic radiation sensitizers. More recently, attention has been given to hypoxic cytotoxins, a group of drugs that selectively or preferably destroys cells in a hypoxic environment. An updated systematic review identified 10,108 patients in 86 randomized trials designed to modify tumor hypoxia in patients treated with curative attempted primary radiation therapy alone. Overall modification of tumor hypoxia significantly improved the effect of radiotherapy, with an odds ratio of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.86) for the outcome of locoregional control and with an associated significant overall survival benefit (odds ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80 to 0.95). No significant influence was found on the incidence of distant metastases or on the risk of radiation-related complications. Ample data exist to support a high level of evidence for the benefit of hypoxic modification. However, hypoxic modification still has no impact on general clinical practice.

  2. Effect of chronic HTO. beta. or /sup 60/Co. gamma. radiation on preimplantation mouse development in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Yukawa, O.; Asami, K.; Nakazawa, T.

    1982-11-01

    Response of pronuclear, early 2-cell, and late 2-cell mouse embryos to chronic HTO ..beta.. and /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. irradiation was investigated. The pronuclear embryos fertilized in vitro and 2-cell stage embryos of BC3F/sub 1/ (C3H/C57BL) mice were grown in vitro in chemically defined medically defied media containing tritium oxide. Activity levels ranged from 100 to 2000 ..mu..Ci/ml. With development to blastocyst as the end point, the LD/sub 50/ was determined to be 118, 230, and 426 ..mu..Ci/ml for pronuclear, early 2-cell, and late 2-cell embryos, respectively. Similar embryos were exposed in vitro to chronic ..gamma.. radiation from /sup 60/Co during the same period of development, and RBE values of HTO ..beta.. radiation relative to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays were calculated to be within the range of 1.0 to 1.7.

  3. Recapitulation of treatment response patterns in a novel humanized mouse model for chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Winer, Benjamin Y; Huang, Tiffany; Low, Benjamin E; Avery, Cindy; Pais, Mihai-Alexandru; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Siu, Evelyn; Chiriboga, Luis; Wiles, Michael V; Ploss, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    There are ~350 million chronic carriers of hepatitis B (HBV). While a prophylactic vaccine and drug regimens to suppress viremia are available, chronic HBV infection is rarely cured. HBV's limited host tropism leads to a scarcity of susceptible small animal models and is a hurdle to developing curative therapies. Mice that support engraftment with human hepatoctyes have traditionally been generated through crosses of murine liver injury models to immunodeficient backgrounds. Here, we describe the disruption of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase directly in the NOD Rag1(-/-) IL2RγNULL (NRG) background using zinc finger nucleases. The resultant human liver chimeric mice sustain persistent HBV viremia for >90 days. When treated with standard of care therapy, HBV DNA levels decrease below detection but rebound when drug suppression is released, mimicking treatment response observed in patients. Our study highlights the utility of directed gene targeting approaches in zygotes to create new humanized mouse models for human diseases.

  4. Squamosamide derivative FLZ protected tyrosine hydroxylase function in a chronic MPTP/probenecid mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiu-Qi; Wu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor impairments and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. FLZ (formulated as: N-2-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-2-(2, 5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenyl)-acrylamide) is a novel synthetic derivative of squamosamide from a Chinese herb and has been proven to protect dopaminergic neurons in subacute PD models. However, whether FLZ has a neuroprotective effect on chronic PD model is still unknown. The present study was designed to verify the neuroprotection of FLZ on chronic PD mouse model induced by MPTP combined with probenecid (MPTP/p). The results showed that treatment of mice with FLZ for 9 weeks significantly improved motor behavior and dopaminergic neuronal function of mice injected with MPTP/p. The beneficial effects of FLZ attributed to the elevation of dopaminergic neuron number, dopamine level, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity, as well as decrease of α-synuclein (α-Syn) expression, α-Syn phosphorylation, nitration, and aggregation. Moreover, FLZ decreased the interaction between α-Syn and TH, which eventually improved dopaminergic neuronal function. Mechanistic study demonstrated that FLZ increased Akt and mTOR phosphorylation, suggesting that FLZ activated Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and this might be involved in the neuroprotection of FLZ. The present results provided more elaborate in vivo evidences to support the neuroprotective effect of FLZ on dopaminergic neurons of chronic PD mouse model and the potential of FLZ to be developed as new drug to treat PD.

  5. Hypoxic Episodes in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Richard J.; Di Fiore, Juliann M.; Walsh, Michele C.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic episodes are troublesome components of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants. Immature respiratory control appears to be the major contributor, typically superimposed upon abnormal respiratory function. As a result, relatively short respiratory pauses may precipitate desaturation and accompanying bradycardia. As this population is predisposed to pulmonary hypertension, it is likely that pulmonary vasoconstriction may also play a role in hypoxic episodes. The natural history of intermittent hypoxic episodes has been well characterized in the preterm population at risk for BPD. However, the consequences of these episodes are less clear. Proposed associations of intermittent hypoxia include retinopathy of prematurity, sleep disordered breathing, and neurodevelopmental delay. Future study should address whether these associations are causal relationships. PMID:26593081

  6. Antidepressant-like effects of aqueous extract from Cecropia pachystachya leaves in a mouse model of chronic unpredictable stress.

    PubMed

    Gazal, Marta; Ortmann, Caroline Flach; Martins, Fernanda Amelia; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Quevedo, João; de Campos, Angela Machado; Stefanello, Francieli M; Kaster, Manuella P; Ghisleni, Gabriele; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Lencina, Claiton L

    2014-09-01

    Chronic stressful stimuli influence disease susceptibility to depression, cardiovascular, metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. The present work investigated antidepressant and antioxidant properties of the aqueous extract from Cecropia pachystachya in a mouse model of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Our results indicated that acute administration of the aqueous extract (AE) from C. pachystachya (200 and 400mg/kg, p.o.) produced an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST). The chronic treatment with C. pachystachya extract (200mg/kg, p.o., for 14 days) prevented the depressant-like effect but not the anxiogenic effect induced by CUS. In addition to the behavioral modifications, the 14 days of CUS increased lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus (HP) and prefrontal cortex (PFC), decreased total thiol content and glutathione peroxidase activity in the HP. C. pachystachya AE administration during CUS protocol was able to prevent the oxidative damage induced by stress. However, no changes were observed in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in the above cited brain areas after the stress protocol and treatment. Our results suggest that C. pachystachya prevented both depressive behavior and oxidative damage induced by CUS, supporting its neuroprotective potential against behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions induced by chronic stress.

  7. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  8. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:26788851

  9. Physiological biomarkers of hypoxic stress in red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii from field and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Bonvillain, Christopher P; Rutherford, D Allen; Kelso, William E; Green, Christopher C

    2012-09-01

    The crayfish industry in Louisiana is the largest in the United States, with crayfish frequently harvested from waters that experience episodic or chronic hypoxia (dissolved oxygen [DO]≤ 2 mg/l). We examined physiological biomarkers (hemolymph lactate, glucose, and protein concentrations) of hypoxic stress in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii from chronically hypoxic natural habitats and laboratory hypoxia experiments. P. clarkii from normoxic and hypoxic areas in the Atchafalaya River Basin were sampled monthly from April to July 2010. Laboratory experiments subjected P. clarkii to severe hypoxia (1 mg/l DO), moderate hypoxia (2 mg/l DO), or normoxic conditions (control: DO>7.5 mg/l) for 12, 24, and 48 h. P. clarkii from normoxic and hypoxic natural habitats did not display significantly different hemolymph lactate or glucose concentrations; however, mean hemolymph protein concentration was significantly lower in crayfish from hypoxic areas. P. clarkii exposed to severe hypoxia in laboratory experiments had significantly higher hemolymph lactate and glucose concentrations for all three exposure times, whereas large differences in protein concentrations were not observed. These results suggest that elevated hemolymph lactate and glucose concentrations are responses to acute hypoxia in P. clarkii, while differences in protein concentrations are the result of chronic hypoxic exposure.

  10. Time-course of neuronal death in the mouse pilocarpine model of chronic epilepsy using Fluoro-Jade C staining.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian; Liu, Yong-Hong; Huang, Yuan-Gui; Chen, Liang-Wei

    2008-11-19

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder in human beings and the long-term pathological events remain largely obscure. We are interested in elucidating long-term brain injury that may occur in the temporal lobe epilepsy, and time-course of neuronal death was examined in a mouse pilocarpine model of chronic epilepsy by Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) dye that can specifically stain the degenerative neurons in the central nervous system. The FJC stain combined with immunohistochemistry to neuronal nuclear specific protein revealed that pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) resulted in massive degenerative death of neuronal cells in brains with their dense distribution in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The FJC-positive degenerating neurons, most of them also expressed apoptosis signaling molecules such as caspase-9 and activated caspase-3, occurred at 4h, increased into peak levels at 12h-3d, and then gradually went down at 7d-14d after onset of SE. More interestingly, a large percentage (about 88%) of FJC-positive degenerative neurons were GABAergic as indicated with their immunoreactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase-67, implying that inhibitory function of GABAergic neural system might by seriously damaged in brains subject to SE attack in this mouse pilocarpine model. Taken together with previous studies, time-course of degenerative neurons in the mouse pilocarpine model by Fluoro-Jade C staining further benefits understanding of long-term brain pathological changes and recurrent seizure mechanism, and may also result in finding the most suitable time-window in therapeutic manipulation of the chronic epilepsy in human beings.

  11. Histopathological Analysis of Salmonella Chronic Carriage in the Mouse Hepatopancreatobiliary System

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; La Perle, Krista M. D.; Gunn, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Typhi asymptomatic chronic carriage represents a challenge for the diagnosis and prevention of typhoid fever in endemic areas. Such carriers are thought to be reservoirs for further spread of the disease. Gallbladder carriage has been demonstrated to be mediated by biofilm formation on gallstones and by intracellular persistence in the gallbladder epithelium of mice. In addition, both gallstones and chronic carriage have been associated with chronic inflammation and the development of gallbladder carcinoma. However, the pathogenic relationship between typhoid carriage and the development of pre-malignant and/or malignant lesions in the hepatopancreatobiliary system as well as the host-pathogen interactions occurring during chronic carriage remains unclear. In this study, we monitored the histopathological features of chronic carriage up to 1 year post-infection. Chronic cholecystitis and hepatitis ranging from mild to severe were present in infected mice regardless of the presence of gallstones. Biliary epithelial hyperplasia was observed more commonly in the gallbladder of mice with gallstones (uninfected or infected). However, pre-malignant lesions, atypical hyperplasia and metaplasia of the gallbladder and exocrine pancreas, respectively, were only associated with chronic Salmonella carriage. This study has implications regarding the role of Salmonella chronic infection and inflammation in the development of pre-malignant lesions in the epithelium of the gallbladder and pancreas that could lead to oncogenesis. PMID:24349565

  12. Initial genetic dissection of serum neuroactive steroids following chronic intermittent ethanol across BXD mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Patrizia; O'Buckley, Todd K; Lopez, Marcelo F; Becker, Howard C; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Morrow, A Leslie

    2017-02-01

    Neuroactive steroids modulate alcohol's impact on brain function and behavior. Ethanol exposure alters neuroactive steroid levels in rats, humans, and some mouse strains. We conducted an exploratory analysis of the neuroactive steroids (3α,5α)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP), (3α,5α)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THDOC), and pregnenolone across 126-158 individuals and 19 fully inbred strains belonging to the BXD family, which were subjected to air exposure, or chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure. Neuroactive steroids were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in serum following five cycles of CIE or air exposure (CTL). Pregnenolone levels in CTLs range from 272 to 578 pg/mL (strain variation of 2.1 fold with p = 0.049 for strain main effect), with heritability of 0.20 ± 0.006 (SEM), whereas in CIE cases values range from 304 to 919 pg/mL (3.0-fold variation, p = 0.007), with heritability of 0.23 ± 0.005. 3α,5α-THP levels in CTLs range from 375 to 1055 pg/mL (2.8-fold variation, p = 0.0007), with heritability of 0.28 ± 0.01; in CIE cases they range from 460 to 1022 pg/mL (2.2-fold variation, p = 0.004), with heritability of 0.23 ± 0.005. 3α,5α-THDOC levels in CTLs range from 94 to 448 pg/mL (4.8-fold variation, p = 0.002), with heritability of 0.30 ± 0.01, whereas levels in CIE cases do not differ significantly. However, global averages across all BXD strains do not differ between CTL and CIE for any of the steroids. 3α,5α-THDOC levels were lower in females than males in both groups (CTL -53%, CIE -55%, p < 0.001). Suggestive quantitative trait loci are identified for pregnenolone and 3α,5α-THP levels. Genetic variation in 3α,5α-THP was not correlated with two-bottle choice ethanol consumption in CTL or CIE-exposed animals. However, individual variation in 3α,5α-THP correlated negatively with ethanol consumption in both groups. Moreover, strain variation in neuroactive steroid levels

  13. Influence of the hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole on the proliferation of well-oxygenated cells in vitro during prolonged exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Deys, B. F.; Stap, J.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of time-lapse cinematographic film permitted the construction of pedigrees from 88 well oxygenated cells of a mouse osteosarcoma (MOS). These cells have been chronically treated with various concentrations of the hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole (MIS) over periods of up to 96 h. At concentrations of 0.5 and 7 mM there is a 2--3 h increase in cell-cycle time. Concentrations of 2 mM show an intermitotic time delay of 7.6--10.3 h. At 4 mM cells divided only once. With increasing drug concentration there was an increase in the number of abnormal mitoses. These results were compared with cloning efficiency (PE) experiments. PE at 0.5 mM is 80%, at 1 mM 40 and at 2 mM is reduced to 4%. Cells treated with 2mM MIS over a period of 28.6 h resume their normal cycle when the drug is washed from the culture. This may indicate that DNA is not a major target for MIS. It is concluded that this hypoxic cell sensitizer is also toxic for MOS cells in well oxygenated conditions. PMID:292453

  14. Mode of inhibitory actions of acute and chronic chloroquine administration on the electrically stimulated mouse diaphragm in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Okwuasaba, F. K.; Otubu, J. A.; Udoh, F. V.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of bath applied chloroquine (Chlo) and of acute and chronic Chlo administration on skeletal muscle reactivity to electrical stimulation and to drugs have been studied on mouse hemidiaphragm preparations in vitro. 2. Chlo (0.15-150 micrograms) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition twitch and tetanic contractions due to direct muscle stimulation (MS). Acute and chronic administration of Chlo (45 mg kg-1, i.p. daily, for 3-28 days) progressively shifted the concentration-response curve to bath-applied Chlo to the right, with maximum effect occurring from day 14 of Chlo pretreatment. 3. Acute and chronic administration of Chlo decreased the twitch and tetanus tension, raised the minimal fusion frequency (MFR) for tetanic contraction to occur and did not alter the twitch/tetanus tension ratio. Tetanus tension unlike twitch tension was not significantly decreased on day 3. 4. Caffeine (5-500 microM)--and isoprenaline (0.001-0.8 microM)-induced potentiations of twitch contraction were attenuated in a concentration-dependent manner by bath-applied Chlo and by acute and chronic administration of Chlo. Higher concentrations of caffeine (0.1-5 microM) and KCl (10 mM-130 mM) produced contracture of the muscle which was sensitive to inhibition by Chlo (50-150 microM). Moreover, the spike contractions superimposed on caffeine contracture were more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of Chlo than the contracture. 5. The inhibitory effects of dantrolene sodium and (+)-tubocurarine on MS and on indirectly stimulated hemidiaphragm respectively were not significantly altered by acute and chronic administration of Chlo. In contrast, the inhibitory concentration-response curve to procaine was shifted to the right.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2282456

  15. Chronic Subordinate Colony Housing Paradigm: A Mouse Model to Characterize the Consequences of Insufficient Glucocorticoid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Langgartner, Dominik; Füchsl, Andrea M.; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Slattery, David A.; Reber, Stefan O.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, in particular chronic psychosocial, stress is a burden of modern societies and known to be a risk factor for numerous somatic and affective disorders (in detail referenced below). However, based on the limited existence of appropriate, and clinically relevant, animal models for studying the effects of chronic stress, the detailed behavioral, physiological, neuronal, and immunological mechanisms linking stress and such disorders are insufficiently understood. To date, most chronic stress studies in animals employ intermittent exposure to the same (homotypic) or to different (heterotypic) stressors of varying duration and intensity. Such models are only of limited value, since they do not adequately reflect the chronic and continuous situation that humans typically experience. Furthermore, application of different physical or psychological stimuli renders comparisons to the mainly psychosocial stressors faced by humans, as well as between the different stress studies almost impossible. In contrast, rodent models of chronic psychosocial stress represent situations more akin to those faced by humans and consequently seem to hold more clinical relevance. Our laboratory has developed a model in which mice are exposed to social stress for 19 continuous days, namely the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) paradigm, to help bridge this gap. The main aim of the current review article is to provide a detailed summary of the behavioral, physiological, neuronal, and immunological consequences of the CSC paradigm, and wherever possible relate the findings to other stress models and to the human situation. PMID:25755645

  16. Early chronic blockade of NR2B subunits and transient activation of NMDA receptors modulate LTP in mouse auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuting; Zang, Shaoyun; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2006-02-16

    In the auditory cortex, the properties of NMDA receptors depend primarily on the ratio of NR2A and NR2B subunits. NR2B subunit expression is high at the beginning of critical period and lower in adulthood. Because NMDA receptors are crucial in triggering long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression, developmental or experience-dependent modification of NMDAR subunit composition is likely to influence synaptic plasticity. To examine how NMDA subunit change during postnatal development affect the adult synaptic plasticity, we employed chronic ifenprodil blockade of NR2B subunits and analyzed evoked field potentials in adult C57BL/6 mice auditory cortex (AC). We found that chronic loss of NR2B activity led to a decline in LTP magnitude in the AC of adult mice. Adding NMDA to the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in blocked mice had the opposite effect, producing LTP magnitudes at or exceeding those found in treated or untreated animals. These results suggest that, even in adulthood when NR2B expression is downregulated, these receptor subunits play an important role in experience-dependent plasticity of mouse auditory cortex. Blockade from P60 did not result in any decrease of LTP amplitude, suggesting that chronic block in postnatal period may permanently affect cortical circuits so that they cannot produce significant LTP in adulthood.

  17. Neuroprotective effect of long-term NDI1 gene expression in a chronic mouse model of Parkinson disorder.

    PubMed

    Barber-Singh, Jennifer; Seo, Byoung Boo; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Lau, Yuen-Sum; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2009-08-01

    Previously, we showed that the internal rotenone-insensitive nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-quinone oxidoreductase (NDI1) gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) can be successfully inserted into the mitochondria of mice and rats and the expressed enzyme was found to be fully functional. In this study, we investigated the ability of the Ndi1 enzyme to protect the dopaminergic neurons in a chronic mouse model of Parkinson disorder. After expression of the NDI1 gene in the unilateral substantia nigra of male C57BL/6 mice for 8 months, a chronic Parkinsonian model was created by administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) with probenecid and evaluated using neurochemical and behavioral responses 1-4 weeks post-MPTP/probenecid injection. We showed that expression of Ndi1 was able to significantly prevent the loss of dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase as well as the dopaminergic transporters in the striatum of the chronic Parkinsonian mice. Behavioral assessment based on a methamphetamine-induced rotation test and spontaneous swing test further supported neurological preservation in the NDI1-treated Parkinsonian mice. The data presented in this study demonstrate a protective effect of the NDI1 gene in dopaminergic neurons, suggesting its therapeutic potential for Parkinson-like disorders.

  18. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  19. Generation of Functional Neutrophils from a Mouse Model of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disorder Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sayandip; Santilli, Giorgia; Blundell, Michael P.; Navarro, Susana; Bueren, Juan A.; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2011-01-01

    Murine models of human genetic disorders provide a valuable tool for investigating the scope for application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Here we present a proof-of-concept study to demonstrate generation of iPSC from a mouse model of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), and their successful differentiation into haematopoietic progenitors of the myeloid lineage. We further demonstrate that additive gene transfer using lentiviral vectors encoding gp91phox is capable of restoring NADPH-oxidase activity in mature neutrophils derived from X-CGD iPSC. In the longer term, correction of iPSC from human patients with CGD has therapeutic potential not only through generation of transplantable haematopoietic stem cells, but also through production of large numbers of autologous functional neutrophils. PMID:21408614

  20. Activation of chronic toxoplasmosis by transportation stress in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bang; Yuan, Yuan; Cheng, Jianxi; Pan, Ming; Xia, Ningbo; Zhang, Weichao; Wang, Yifan; Zhou, Yanqin; Zhao, Junlong

    2016-12-27

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite infecting 25% of the world population and enormous number of animals. It can exist in two forms in intermediate hosts: the fast replicating tachyzoites responsible for acute infection and the slowly replicating bradyzoites responsible for life-long chronic infection. The interconversion between tachyzoites and bradyzoites plays critical roles in the transmission and pathogenesis of T. gondii. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern the interconversion are largely unknown. In this study, we established a chronic infection model in mice and examined the impact of transportation stress on the status of chronic infection. Our results demonstrated that, treating chronically infected mice with conditions mimicking transportation stress reduced the levels of several key cytokines that restrict the infection at chronic stage. Increased expression of the tachyzoite specific gene SAG1 (surface antigen 1) was detected in brain cysts of stress treated mice, indicating activation and conversion of bradyzoites to tachyzoites. Using this model, we identified fifteen toxoplasmic proteins that had significant abundance changes during stress induced cysts reactivation. These proteins serve as a basis for further investigation of the mechanisms governing bradyzoite conversion.

  1. An autoradiographic analysis of cholinergic receptors in mouse brain after chronic nicotine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, J.R.; Marks, M.J.; Gross, S.D.; Collins, A.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic procedures were used to examine the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on the number of central nervous system nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Female DBA mice were implanted with jugular cannulas and infused with saline or various doses of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg/hr) for 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and frozen in isopentane. Cryostat sections were collected and prepared for autoradiographic procedures as previously described. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were labeled with L-(3H)nicotine or alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin; (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding. Chronic nicotine infusion increased the number of sites labeled by (3H)nicotine in most brain areas. However, the extent of the increase in binding as well as the dose-response curves for the increase were widely different among brain regions. After the highest treatment dose, binding was increased in 67 of 86 regions measured. Septal and thalamic regions were most resistant to change. Nicotinic binding measured by alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin also increased after chronic treatment, but in a less robust fashion. At the highest treatment dose, only 26 of 80 regions were significantly changes. Muscarinic binding was not altered after chronic nicotine treatment. These data suggest that brain regions are not equivalent in the mechanisms that regulate alterations in nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding after chronic nicotine treatment.

  2. Activation of chronic toxoplasmosis by transportation stress in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bang; Yuan, Yuan; Cheng, Jianxi; Pan, Ming; Xia, Ningbo; Zhang, Weichao; Wang, Yifan; Zhou, Yanqin; Zhao, Junlong

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondiiis an obligate intracellular parasite infecting 25% of the world population and enormous number of animals. It can exist in two forms in intermediate hosts: the fast replicating tachyzoites responsible for acute infection and the slowly replicating bradyzoites responsible for life-long chronic infection. The interconversion between tachyzoites and bradyzoites plays critical roles in the transmission and pathogenesis of T. gondii. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern the interconversion are largely unknown. In this study, we established a chronic infection model in mice and examined the impact of transportation stress on the status of chronic infection. Our results demonstrated that, treating chronically infected mice with conditions mimicking transportation stress reduced the levels of several key cytokines that restrict the infection at chronic stage. Increased expression of the tachyzoite specific gene SAG1 (surface antigen 1) was detected in brain cysts of stress treated mice, indicating activation and conversion of bradyzoites to tachyzoites. Using this model, we identified fifteen toxoplasmic proteins that had significant abundance changes during stress induced cysts reactivation. These proteins serve as a basis for further investigation of the mechanisms governing bradyzoite conversion. PMID:27895319

  3. Transmission probabilities of mouse parvovirus 1 to sentinel mice chronically exposed to serial dilutions of contaminated bedding.

    PubMed

    Besselsen, David G; Myers, Erin L; Franklin, Craig L; Korte, Scott W; Wagner, April M; Henderson, Kenneth S; Weigler, Benjamin J

    2008-04-01

    Intermittent serodetection of mouse parvovirus (MPV) infections in animal facilities occurs frequently when soiled bedding sentinel mouse monitoring systems are used. We evaluated induction of seroconversion in naïve single-caged weanling ICR mice (n = 10 per group) maintained on 5-fold serially diluted contaminated bedding obtained from SCID mice persistently shedding MPV1e. Soiled bedding from the infected SCID mice was collected, diluted, and redistributed weekly to cages housing ICR mice to represent chronic exposure to MPV at varying prevalence in a research colony. Sera was collected every other week for 12 wk and evaluated for reactivity to MPV nonstructural and capsid antigens by multiplex fluorescent immunoassay. Mice were euthanized after seroconversion, and DNA extracted from lymph node and spleen was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Cumulative incidence of MPV infection for each of the 7 soiled bedding dilution groups (range, 1:5 to 1:78125 [v/v]) was 100%, 100%, 90%, 20%, 70%, 60%, and 20%, respectively. Most seropositive mice (78%) converted within the first 2 to 3 wk of soiled bedding exposure, correlating to viral exposure when mice were 4 to 7 wk of age. Viral DNA was detected in lymphoid tissues collected from all mice that were seropositive to VP2 capsid antigen, whereas viral DNA was not detected in lymphoid tissue of seronegative mice. These data indicate seroconversion occurs consistently in young mice exposed to high doses of virus equivalent to fecal MPV loads observed in acutely infected mice, whereas seroconversion is inconsistent in mice chronically exposed to lower doses of virus.

  4. A Chronic Longitudinal Characterization of Neurobehavioral and Neuropathological Cognitive Impairment in a Mouse Model of Gulf War Agent Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zakirova, Zuchra; Crynen, Gogce; Hassan, Samira; Abdullah, Laila; Horne, Lauren; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Crawford, Fiona; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania

    2016-01-01

    Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a chronic multisymptom illness with a central nervous system component that includes memory impairment as well as neurological and musculoskeletal deficits. Previous studies have shown that in the First Persian Gulf War conflict (1990–1991) exposure to Gulf War (GW) agents, such as pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and permethrin (PER), were key contributors to the etiology of GWI. For this study, we used our previously established mouse model of GW agent exposure (10 days PB+PER) and undertook an extensive lifelong neurobehavioral characterization of the mice from 11 days to 22.5 months post exposure in order to address the persistence and chronicity of effects suffered by the current GWI patient population, 24 years post-exposure. Mice were evaluated using a battery of neurobehavioral testing paradigms, including Open Field Test (OFT), Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), Three Chamber Testing, Radial Arm Water Maze (RAWM), and Barnes Maze (BM) Test. We also carried out neuropathological analyses at 22.5 months post exposure to GW agents after the final behavioral testing. Our results demonstrate that PB+PER exposed mice exhibit neurobehavioral deficits beginning at the 13 months post exposure time point and continuing trends through the 22.5 month post exposure time point. Furthermore, neuropathological changes, including an increase in GFAP staining in the cerebral cortices of exposed mice, were noted 22.5 months post exposure. Thus, the persistent neuroinflammation evident in our model presents a platform with which to identify novel biological pathways, correlating with emergent outcomes that may be amenable to therapeutic targeting. Furthermore, in this work we confirmed our previous findings that GW agent exposure causes neuropathological changes, and have presented novel data which demonstrate increased disinhibition, and lack of social preference in PB+PER exposed mice at 13 months after exposure. We also extended upon our previous work to

  5. A Chronic Longitudinal Characterization of Neurobehavioral and Neuropathological Cognitive Impairment in a Mouse Model of Gulf War Agent Exposure.

    PubMed

    Zakirova, Zuchra; Crynen, Gogce; Hassan, Samira; Abdullah, Laila; Horne, Lauren; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Crawford, Fiona; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania

    2015-01-01

    Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a chronic multisymptom illness with a central nervous system component that includes memory impairment as well as neurological and musculoskeletal deficits. Previous studies have shown that in the First Persian Gulf War conflict (1990-1991) exposure to Gulf War (GW) agents, such as pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and permethrin (PER), were key contributors to the etiology of GWI. For this study, we used our previously established mouse model of GW agent exposure (10 days PB+PER) and undertook an extensive lifelong neurobehavioral characterization of the mice from 11 days to 22.5 months post exposure in order to address the persistence and chronicity of effects suffered by the current GWI patient population, 24 years post-exposure. Mice were evaluated using a battery of neurobehavioral testing paradigms, including Open Field Test (OFT), Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), Three Chamber Testing, Radial Arm Water Maze (RAWM), and Barnes Maze (BM) Test. We also carried out neuropathological analyses at 22.5 months post exposure to GW agents after the final behavioral testing. Our results demonstrate that PB+PER exposed mice exhibit neurobehavioral deficits beginning at the 13 months post exposure time point and continuing trends through the 22.5 month post exposure time point. Furthermore, neuropathological changes, including an increase in GFAP staining in the cerebral cortices of exposed mice, were noted 22.5 months post exposure. Thus, the persistent neuroinflammation evident in our model presents a platform with which to identify novel biological pathways, correlating with emergent outcomes that may be amenable to therapeutic targeting. Furthermore, in this work we confirmed our previous findings that GW agent exposure causes neuropathological changes, and have presented novel data which demonstrate increased disinhibition, and lack of social preference in PB+PER exposed mice at 13 months after exposure. We also extended upon our previous work to cover

  6. A high bandwidth fully implantable mouse telemetry system for chronic ECG measurement.

    PubMed

    Russell, David M; McCormick, Daniel; Taberner, Andrew J; Malpas, Simon C; Budgett, David M

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of a novel system that enables the wireless transmission of high-bandwidth physiological data from a freely moving mouse. The system employs inductive power transfer (IPT) to continuously power a battery-less transmitter using an array of overlapping planar coils placed under the animal. This arrangement provides a minimum of 20 mW at all locations and orientations across the mouse cage by selecting a coil which will sufficiently power the transmitter. Coil selection is performed by feedback control across the 2.4 GHz wireless link. A device was constructed utilizing this novel IPT system and was used to capture high-fidelity electrocardiogram (ECG) signal sampled at 2 kHz in mice. Various attributes of the ECG signal such as QT, QRS, and PR intervals could be obtained with a high degree of accuracy. This system potentially provides lifetime continuous high bandwidth measurement of physiological signals from a fully implanted telemeter in a freely moving mouse.

  7. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K+ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin-B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (∼9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  8. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K⁺ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/ or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin- B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (~9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients.

  9. Physiological Responses to Two Hypoxic Conditioning Strategies in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chacaroun, Samarmar; Borowik, Anna; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Baillieul, Sébastien; Flore, Patrice; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Verges, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Hypoxic exposure can be used as a therapeutic tool by inducing various cardiovascular, neuromuscular, and metabolic adaptations. Hypoxic conditioning strategies have been evaluated in patients with chronic diseases using either sustained (SH) or intermittent (IH) hypoxic sessions. Whether hypoxic conditioning via SH or IH may induce different physiological responses remains to be elucidated. Methods: Fourteen healthy active subjects (7 females, age 25 ± 8 years, body mass index 21.5 ± 2.5 kg·m−2) performed two interventions in a single blind, randomized cross-over design, starting with either 3 x SH (48 h apart), or 3 x IH (48 h apart), separated by a 2 week washout period. SH sessions consisted of breathing a gas mixture with reduced inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2), continuously adjusted to reach arterial oxygen saturations (SpO2) of 70–80% for 1 h. IH sessions consisted of 5 min with reduced FiO2 (SpO2 = 70–80%), followed by 3-min normoxia, repeated seven times. During the first (S1) and third (S3) sessions of each hypoxic intervention, cardiorespiratory parameters, and muscle and pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy) were assessed continuously. Results: Minute ventilation increased significantly during IH sessions (+2 ± 2 L·min−1) while heart rate increased during both SH (+11 ± 4 bpm) and IH (+13 ± 5 bpm) sessions. Arterial blood pressure increased during all hypoxic sessions, although baseline normoxic systolic blood pressure was reduced from S1 to S3 in IH only (−8 ± 11 mmHg). Muscle oxygenation decreased significantly during S3 but not S1, for both hypoxic interventions (S3: SH −6 ± 5%, IH −3 ± 4%); pre-frontal oxygenation decreased in S1 and S3, and to a greater extent in SH vs. IH (−13 ± 3% vs. −6 ± 6%). Heart rate variability indices indicated a significantly larger increase in sympathetic activity in SH vs. IH (lower SDNN, PNN50, and RMSSD values in SH). From S1 to S3, further reduction in

  10. Effects of acute and chronic administration of venlafaxine and desipramine on extracellular monoamine levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosuke; Ago, Yukio; Umehara, Masato; Kita, Yuki; Fujita, Kazumi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-04-15

    Prefrontal catecholamine neurotransmission plays a key role in the therapeutic actions of drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have recently shown that serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine attenuated horizontal hyperactivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats, an animal model of ADHD, and that these drugs are potential pharmacotherapeutics for ADHD. In this study, we used in vivo microdialysis to study the effects of acute and chronic (once daily for 3 weeks) administration of the serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine on noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin levels, and the expression of the neuronal activity marker c-Fos in the mouse prefrontal cortex and striatum. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased prefrontal noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin levels and striatal noradrenaline and serotonin levels. Both acute and chronic desipramine administration increased prefrontal noradrenaline and dopamine levels and striatal noradrenaline levels, with chronic administration yielding stronger increase. Chronic desipramine did not affect striatal dopamine and serotonin levels. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex, whereas chronic, but not acute, desipramine administration increased the expression of c-Fos in the prefrontal cortex. Both acute and chronic venlafaxine administration increased the striatal c-Fos expression to some degree, whereas desipramine administration did not. These results suggest that acute and chronic venlafaxine and chronic desipramine administration maximally activate the prefrontal adrenergic and dopaminergic systems without affecting striatal dopaminergic systems in mice.

  11. Antidepressant-like effects of melatonin in the mouse chronic mild stress model.

    PubMed

    Detanico, Bernardo C; Piato, Angelo L; Freitas, Jennifer J; Lhullier, Francisco L; Hidalgo, Maria P; Caumo, Wolney; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Melatonin is a hormone primarily synthesized by the pineal gland and has been shown to govern seasonal and circadian rhythms, as well as the immune system, certain behaviours, and responses to stress. Chronic exposure to stress is involved in the etiology of human depression, and depressed patients present changes in circadian and seasonal rhythms. This study investigated the effects of daily exogenous melatonin (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) and imipramine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) on the changes in the coat state, grooming behaviour and corticosterone levels induced by the unpredictable chronic mild stress model of depression in mice. As expected, the 5 weeks of unpredictable chronic mild stress schedule induced significant degradation of the coat state, decreased grooming and increased serum corticosterone levels. All of these unpredictable chronic mild stress-induced changes were counteracted by melatonin (P<0.05) and imipramine (P<0.01). Especially in view of the relevance of stress as a major contributing factor in depression, as well as the alleged importance of normalizing a hyperfunctioning HPA axis and resynchronizing circadian rhythms for a successful treatment of depression, this study reassesses the potential of melatonin as an antidepressant.

  12. Marine Compound Xyloketal B Reduces Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ai-Jiao; Chen, Wenliang; Xu, Baofeng; Liu, Rui; Turlova, Ekaterina; Barszczyk, Andrew; Sun, Christopher Lf; Liu, Ling; Deurloo, Marielle; Wang, Guan-Lei; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy causes neurodegeneration and brain injury, leading to sensorimotor dysfunction. Xyloketal B is a novel marine compound isolated from a mangrove fungus Xylaria species (no. 2508) with unique antioxidant effects. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanism of xyloketal B on oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal cell death in mouse primary cortical culture and on hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal mice in vivo. We found that xyloketal B reduced anoxia-induced neuronal cell death in vitro, as well as infarct volume in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury model in vivo. Furthermore, xyloketal B improved functional behavioral recovery of the animals following hypoxic-ischemic insult. In addition, xyloketal B significantly decreased calcium entry, reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells, reduced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax proteins, and increased the level of Bcl-2 protein after the hypoxic-ischemic injury. Our findings indicate that xyloketal B is effective in models of hypoxia-ischemia and thus has potential as a treatment for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:25546517

  13. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE−/− Alzheimer's mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Stefan J.; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Braga-Tanaka, Ignacia; Tanaka, Satoshi; Neff, Frauke; Saran, Anna; Larsen, Martin R.; Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer's model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates. The radiation-induced changes in the phosphoproteome were associated with the control of synaptic plasticity, calcium-dependent signalling and brain metabolism. An inhibition of CREB signalling was found at both dose rates whereas Rac1-Cofilin signalling was found activated only at the lower dose rate. Similarly, the reduction in the number of activated microglia in the molecular layer of hippocampus that paralleled with reduced levels of TNFα expression and lipid peroxidation was significant only at the lower dose rate. Adult neurogenesis, investigated by Ki67, GFAP and NeuN staining, and cell death (activated caspase-3) were not influenced at any dose or dose rate. This study shows that several molecular targets induced by chronic low-dose-rate radiation overlap with those of Alzheimer's pathology. It may suggest that ionising radiation functions as a contributing risk factor to this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27708245

  14. Dynamic activation of basilar membrane macrophages in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration in aging mouse cochleae.

    PubMed

    Frye, Mitchell D; Yang, Weiping; Zhang, Celia; Xiong, Binbin; Hu, Bo Hua

    2017-02-01

    In the sensory epithelium, macrophages have been identified on the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. These basilar membrane macrophages are the spatially closest immune cells to sensory cells and are able to directly respond to and influence sensory cell pathogenesis. While basilar membrane macrophages have been studied in acute cochlear stresses, their behavior in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration is largely unknown. Here we report a systematic observation of the variance in phenotypes, the changes in morphology and distribution of basilar membrane tissue macrophages in different age groups of C57BL/6J mice, a mouse model of age-related sensory cell degeneration. This study reveals that mature, fully differentiated tissue macrophages, not recently infiltrated monocytes, are the major macrophage population for immune responses to chronic sensory cell death. These macrophages display dynamic changes in their numbers and morphologies as age increases, and the changes are related to the phases of sensory cell degeneration. Notably, macrophage activation precedes sensory cell pathogenesis, and strong macrophage activity is maintained until sensory cell degradation is complete. Collectively, these findings suggest that mature tissue macrophages on the basilar membrane are a dynamic group of cells that are capable of vigorous adaptation to changes in the local sensory epithelium environment influenced by sensory cell status.

  15. Elevation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in the Mouse Brain after Chronic Nonylphenol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Qiu; Mao, Zhen; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Han, Bao-Ping; Chen, Ling-Tong; Li, Jing; Li, Fei

    2008-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of nonylphenol (NP) on the expression of inflammation-related genes in the brains of mice. NP was given orally by gavages at 0, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/d. The expression of inflammatory enzymes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting assays. The nitric oxide (NO) level and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity were also measured by biochemical analyses. The results showed that NP at a high dose (200 mg/kg/d) significantly increased the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in both the hippocampus and cortex. In parallel with the increase in iNOS expression, the NO level was significantly greater at the dose of 200 mg/kg/d, compared to the control. The activity of NOS was also increased in the brain of mice at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg/d. These findings demonstrate that NP may have the potential to induce the chronic inflammation or cause neurotoxicity in the mouse brain. PMID:19325730

  16. Influence of chronic ethanol intake on mouse synaptosomal aspartyl aminopeptidase and aminopeptidase A: relationship with oxidative stress indicators.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Aminopeptidase A (APA) and aspartyl aminopeptidase (ASAP) not only act as neuromodulators in the regional brain renin-angiotensin system, but also release N-terminal acidic amino acids (glutamate and aspartate). The hyperexcitability of amino acid neurotransmitters is responsible for several neurodegenerative processes affecting the central nervous system. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence of chronic ethanol intake, a well known neurotoxic compound, on APA and ASAP activity under resting and K(+)-stimulated conditions at the synapse level. APA and ASAP activity were determined against glutamate- and aspartate-β-naphthylamide respectively in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and in their incubation supernatant in a Ca(2+)-containing or Ca(2+)-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The neurotoxic effects were analyzed by determining free radical generation, peroxidation of membrane lipids and the oxidation of synaptosomal proteins. In addition, the bioenergetic behavior of synaptosomes was analyzed under different experimental protocols. We obtained several modifications in oxidative stress parameters and a preferential inhibitor effect of chronic ethanol intake on APA and ASAP activities. Although previous in vitro studies failed to show signs of neurodegeneration, these in vivo modifications in oxidative stress parameters do not seem to be related to changes in APA and ASAP, invalidating the idea that an excess of free acidic amino acids released by APA and ASAP induces neurodegeneration.

  17. Astrocytic adaptation during cerebral angiogenesis follows the new vessel formation induced through chronic hypoxia in adult mouse cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2014-03-01

    We examined longitudinal changes of the neuro-glia-vascular unit during cerebral angiogenesis induced through chronic hypoxia in the adult mouse cortex. Tie2-GFP mice in which the vascular endothelial cells expressed green fluorescent proteins (GFP) were exposed to chronic hypoxia, while the spatiotemporal developments of the cortical capillary sprouts and the neighboring astrocytic remodeling were characterized with repeated two-photon microscopy. The capillary sprouts appeared at early phases of the hypoxia adaptation (1-2 weeks), while the morphological changes of the astrocytic soma and processes were not detected in this phase. In the later phases of the hypoxia adaptation (> 2 weeks), the capillary sprouts created a new connection with existing capillaries, and its neighboring astrocytes extended their processes to the newly-formed vessels. The findings show that morphological adaptation of the astrocytes follow the capillary development during the hypoxia adaptation, which indicate that the newly-formed vessels provoke cellular interactions with the neighboring astrocytes to strengthen the functional blood-brain barrier.

  18. Chronic copper exposure exacerbates both amyloid and tau pathology and selectively dysregulates cdk5 in a mouse model of AD.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Cheng, David; Laferla, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    Excess copper exposure is thought to be linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. However, the mechanism by which copper affects the CNS remains unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic copper exposure on both beta-amyloid and tau pathologies, we treated young triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper-containing water for a period of 3 or 9 months. Copper exposure resulted in altered amyloid precursor protein processing; increased accumulation of the amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic product, C99 fragment, along with increased generation of amyloid-beta peptides and oligomers. These changes were found to be mediated via up-regulation of BACE1 as significant increases in BACE1 levels and deposits were detected around plaques in mice following copper exposure. Furthermore, tau pathology within hippocampal neurons was exacerbated in copper-exposed 3xTg-AD group. Increased tau phosphorylation was closely correlated with aberrant cdk5/p25 activation, suggesting a role for this kinase in the development of copper-induced tau pathology. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic copper exposure accelerates not only amyloid pathology but also tau pathology in a mouse model of AD.

  19. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    MA, XIAOJUAN; MA, XIUMIN; MA, ZHIXING; WANG, JING; SUN, ZHAN; YU, WENYAN; LI, FENGSEN; DING, JIANBING

    2014-01-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation. PMID:25289025

  20. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Wang, Jing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-11-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation.

  1. The role of polyamines in protein-dependent hypoxic tolerance of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Vigne, Paul; Frelin, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic hypoxia is a major component of ischemic diseases such as stroke or myocardial infarction. Drosophila is more tolerant to hypoxia than most mammalian species. It is considered as a useful model organism to identify new mechanisms of hypoxic tolerance. The hypoxic tolerance of flies has previously been reported to be enhanced by low protein diets. This study analyses the mechanisms involved. Results Feeding adult Drosophila on a yeast diet dramatically reduced their longevities under chronic hypoxic conditions (5% O2). Mean and maximum longevities became close to the values observed for starving flies. The action of dietary yeast was mimicked by a whole casein hydrolysate and by anyone of the 20 natural amino acids that compose proteins. It was mimicked by amino acid intermediates of the urea cycle such as L-citrulline and L-ornithine, and by polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine). α-difluoromethylornithine, a specific inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, partially protected hypoxic flies from amino acid toxicity but not from polyamine toxicity. N1-guanyl-1,7 diaminoheptane, a specific inhibitor of eIF5A hypusination, partially relieved the toxicities of both amino acids and polyamines. Conclusion Dietary amino acids reduced the longevity of chronically hypoxic flies fed on a sucrose diet. Pharmacological evidence suggests that the synthesis of polyamines and the hypusination of eIF5A contributed to the life-shortening effect of dietary amino acids. PMID:19055734

  2. Cardiac fibrosis in mouse expressing DsRed tetramers involves chronic autophagy and proteasome degradation insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Hsien; Chen, Mei-Ru; Chen, Tzu-Yin; Wu, Tzu-Chin; Liu, Shan-Wen; Hsu, Ching-Han; Liou, Gan-Guang; Kao, Yu-Ying; Dong, Guo-Chung; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lin, Kurt Ming-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Proteinopathy in the heart which often manifests excessive misfolded/aggregated proteins in cardiac myocytes can result in severe fibrosis and heart failure. Here we developed a mouse model, which transgenically express tetrameric DsRed, a red fluorescent protein (RFP), in an attempt to mimic the pathological mechanisms ofcardiac fibrosis. Whilst DsRed is expressed and forms aggregation in most mouse organs, certain pathological defects are specifically recapitulated in cardiac muscle cells including mitochondria damages, aggresome-like residual bodies, excessive ubiquitinated proteins, and the induction of autophagy. The proteinopathy and cellular injuries caused by DsRed aggregates may be due to impaired or overburdened ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy-lysosome systems. We further identified that DsRed can be ubiquitinated and associated with MuRF1, a muscle-specific E3 ligase. Concomitantly, an activation of NF-κB signaling and a strong TIMP1 induction were noted, suggesting that RFP-induced fibrosis was augmented by a skewed balance between TIMP1 and MMPs. Taken together, our study highlights the molecular consequences of uncontrolled protein aggregation leading to congestive heart failure, and provides novel insights into fibrosis formation that can be exploited for improved therapy. PMID:27494843

  3. Metabolic profiles in serum of mouse after chronic exposure to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Shupei

    2011-08-01

    The toxicity of Nanjing drinking water on mouse (Mus musculus) was detected by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic method. Three groups of mice were fed with drinking water (produced by Nanjing BHK Water Plant), 3.8 μg/L benzo(a)pyrene as contrast, and clean water as control, respectively, for 90 days. It was observed that the levels of lactate, alanine, and creatinine in the mice fed with drinking water were increased and that of valine was decreased. The mice of drinking water group were successfully separated from control. The total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalates (PAEs), and other organic pollutants in the drinking water were 0.23 μg/L, 4.57 μg/L, and 0.34 μg/L, respectively. In this study, Nanjing drinking water was found to induce distinct perturbations of metabolic profiles on mouse including disorders of glucose-alanine cycle, branched-chain amino acid and energy metabolism, and dysfunction of kidney. This study suggests that metabonomic method is feasible and sensitive to evaluate potential toxic effects of drinking water.

  4. Gene expression profiles in liver of mouse after chronic exposure to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Dayong; Zhang, Xuxiang; Kong, Zhiming; Cheng, Shupei

    2009-10-01

    cDNA micorarray approach was applied to hepatic transcriptional profile analysis in male mouse (Mus musculus, ICR) to assess the potential health effects of drinking water in Nanjing, China. Mice were treated with continuous exposure to drinking water for 90 days. Hepatic gene expression was analyzed with Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 arrays, and pathway analysis was carried out by Molecule Annotation System 2.0 and KEGG pathway database. A total of 836 genes were found to be significantly altered (1.5-fold, P < or = 0.05), including 294 up-regulated genes and 542 down-regulated genes. According to biological pathway analysis, drinking water exposure resulted in aberration of gene expression and biological pathways linked to xenobiotic metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle and oxidative stress response. Further, deregulation of several genes associated with carcinogenesis or tumor progression including Ccnd1, Egfr, Map2k3, Mcm2, Orc2l and Smad2 was observed. Although transcription changes in identified genes are unlikely to be used as a sole indicator of adverse health effects, the results of this study could enhance our understanding of early toxic effects of drinking water exposure and support future studies on drinking water safety.

  5. ATM facilitates mouse gammaherpesvirus reactivation from myeloid cells during chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Kulinski, Joseph M; Darrah, Eric J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Mboko, Wadzanai P; Mounce, Bryan C; Malherbe, Laurent P; Corbett, John A; Gauld, Stephen B; Tarakanova, Vera L

    2015-09-01

    Gammaherpesviruses are cancer-associated pathogens that establish life-long infection in most adults. Insufficiency of Ataxia-Telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase leads to a poor control of chronic gammaherpesvirus infection via an unknown mechanism that likely involves a suboptimal antiviral response. In contrast to the phenotype in the intact host, ATM facilitates gammaherpesvirus reactivation and replication in vitro. We hypothesized that ATM mediates both pro- and antiviral activities to regulate chronic gammaherpesvirus infection in an immunocompetent host. To test the proposed proviral activity of ATM in vivo, we generated mice with ATM deficiency limited to myeloid cells. Myeloid-specific ATM deficiency attenuated gammaherpesvirus infection during the establishment of viral latency. The results of our study uncover a proviral role of ATM in the context of gammaherpesvirus infection in vivo and support a model where ATM combines pro- and antiviral functions to facilitate both gammaherpesvirus-specific T cell immune response and viral reactivation in vivo.

  6. The influence of chronic ibuprofen treatment on proteins expressed in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kenji; Otani, Mieko; Takano, Masaoki; Kadoyama, Keiichi; Matsuyama, Shogo

    2015-04-05

    Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), treatment with which has been shown to delay the onset, slows the cognitive decline, and decreases the incidence of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) in epidemiological and clinical studies. However, a comprehensive understanding of its mechanism of action remains unclear. To elucidate the prophylactic effect of ibuprofen on the onset of the learning and memory disturbances of AD, we performed proteomic analysis of the hippocampus of chronic ibuprofen-treated mice using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight proteins and seven phosphoproteins were identified to be significantly changed in the hippocampus of chronic ibuprofen-treated mice: translationally controlled tumor protein, thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase, and peroxiredoxin 6 were increased, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, EF-hand domain-containing protein D2, and 14-3-3ζ were decreased. These identified proteins and phosphoproteins could be classified as cytoskeletal, neuronal development, chaperone, metabolic, apoptosis, neurotransmitter release, ATP synthase, deubiquitination, proteasome, NOS inhibitor, adapter, vesicle transport, signal transduction, antioxidant enzyme, proton transport, synaptogenesis, and serine/threonine phosphatase types. Western blot analysis showed the changes in dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, heat shock protein 8, ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase PGP9.5, and γ-enolase levels in the hippocampus of chronic ibuprofen-treated mice. These findings showed that the chronic treatment with ibuprofen changed the levels of some proteins and phosphoproteins in the hippocampus. We propose that these identified proteins and phosphoproteins play an important role in decreasing the incidence of AD, especially impaired learning and memory functions.

  7. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eric, Erbs; Lauren, Faget; Alice, Ceredig Rhian; Audrey, Matifas; Jean-Luc, Vonesch; L., Kieffer Brigitte; Dominique, Massotte

    2015-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased delta opioid receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces delta opioid receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits. PMID:26480813

  8. CHRONIC INTERMITTENT ETHANOL EXPOSURE REDUCES PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE NEUROTRANSMISSION IN THE MOUSE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS

    PubMed Central

    Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Rose, Jamie H.; Huggins, Kimberly N.; Konstantopoulos, Joanne K.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Increasing evidence suggests that chronic ethanol exposure decreases dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), contributing to a hypodopaminergic state during withdrawal. However, few studies have investigated adaptations in presynaptic DA terminals after chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure. In monkeys and rats, chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been shown to increase DA uptake and D2 autoreceptor sensitivity. METHODS The current study examined the effects of ethanol on DA terminals in CIE exposed mice during two time-points after the cessation of CIE exposure. DA release and uptake were measured using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc core slices from C57BL/6J mice, 0 and 72 hours following three weekly cycles (4 days of 16 hrs ethanol vapor/8 hrs room air/day + 3 days withdrawal) of CIE vapor exposure. RESULTS Current results showed that DA release was reduced, uptake rates were increased, and inhibitory D2-type autoreceptor activity was augmented following CIE exposure in mice. CONCLUSIONS Overall, these CIE-induced adaptations in the accumbal DA system reduce DA signaling and therefore reveal several potential mechanisms contributing to a functional hypodopaminergic state during alcohol withdrawal. PMID:25765483

  9. Different microRNA profiles in chronic epilepsy versus acute seizure mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kretschmann, Anita; Danis, Benedicte; Andonovic, Lidija; Abnaof, Khalid; van Rikxoort, Marijke; Siegel, Franziska; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Godard, Patrice; Hanon, Etienne; Fröhlich, Holger; Kaminski, Rafal M; Foerch, Patrik; Pfeifer, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy affects around 50 million people worldwide, and in about 65% of patients, the etiology of disease is unknown. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that have been suggested to play a role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Here, we compared microRNA expression patterns in the hippocampus using two chronic models of epilepsy characterised by recurrent spontaneous seizures (pilocarpine and self-sustained status epilepticus (SSSE)) and an acute 6-Hz seizure model. The vast majority of microRNAs deregulated in the acute model exhibited increased expression with 146 microRNAs up-regulated within 6 h after a single seizure. In contrast, in the chronic models, the number of up-regulated microRNAs was similar to the number of down-regulated microRNAs. Three microRNAs-miR-142-5p, miR-331-3p and miR-30a-5p-were commonly deregulated in all three models. However, there is a clear overlap of differentially expressed microRNAs within the chronic models with 36 and 15 microRNAs co-regulated at 24 h and at 28 days following status epilepticus, respectively. Pathway analysis revealed that the altered microRNAs are associated with inflammation, innate immunity and cell cycle regulation. Taken together, the identified microRNAs and the pathways they modulate might represent candidates for novel molecular approaches for the treatment of patients with epilepsy.

  10. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Ceredig, R A; Matifas, A; Vonesch, J-L; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2016-01-28

    Delta opioid (DOP) receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor-positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased DOP receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline-treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces DOP receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypoxic injury to the murine placenta.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Tracy M; Garbow, Joel R; Anderson, Jeff R; Engelbach, John A; Nelson, D Michael; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2010-02-01

    We assessed the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define placental hypoxic injury associated with fetal growth restriction. On embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) we utilized dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI on a 4.7-tesla small animal scanner to examine the uptake and distribution of gadolinium-based contrast agent. Quantitative DCE parameter analysis was performed for the placenta and fetal kidneys of three groups of pregnant C57BL/6 mice: 1) mice that were exposed to Fi(O(2)) = 12% between E15.5 and E18.5, 2) mice in normoxia with food restriction similar to the intake of hypoxic mice between E15.5 and E18.5, and 3) mice in normoxia that were fed ad libitum. After imaging, we assessed fetoplacental weight, placental histology, and gene expression. We found that dams exposed to hypoxia exhibited fetal growth restriction (weight reduction by 28% and 14%, respectively, P < 0.05) with an increased placental-to-fetal ratio. By using MRI-based assessment of placental contrast agent kinetics, referenced to maternal paraspinous muscle, we found decreased placental clearance of contrast media in hypoxic mice, compared with either control group (61%, P < 0.05). This was accompanied by diminished contrast accumulation in the hypoxic fetal kidneys (23%, P < 0.05), reflecting reduced transplacental gadolinium transport. These changes were associated with increased expression of placental Phlda2 and Gcm1 transcripts. Exposure to hypoxia near the end of mouse pregnancy reduces placental perfusion and clearance of contrast. MRI-based DCE imaging provides a novel tool for dynamic, in vivo assessment of placental function.

  12. Endurance exercise promotes cardiorespiratory rehabilitation without neurorestoration in the chronic mouse model of parkinsonism with severe neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Al-Jarrah, M; Pothakos, K; Novikova, L; Smirnova, I V; Kurz, M J; Stehno-Bittel, L; Lau, Y-S

    2007-10-12

    Physical rehabilitation with endurance exercise for patients with Parkinson's disease has not been well established, although some clinical and laboratory reports suggest that exercise may produce a neuroprotective effect and restore dopaminergic and motor functions. In this study, we used a chronic mouse model of Parkinsonism, which was induced by injecting male C57BL/6 mice with 10 doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (25 mg/kg) and probenecid (250 mg/kg) over 5 weeks. This chronic parkinsonian model displays a severe and persistent loss of nigrostriatal neurons, resulting in robust dopamine depletion and locomotor impairment in mice. Following the induction of Parkinsonism, these mice were able to sustain an exercise training program on a motorized rodent treadmill at a speed of 18 m/min, 0 degrees of inclination, 40 min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. At the end of exercise training, we examined and compared their cardiorespiratory capacity, behavior, and neurochemical changes with that of the probenecid-treated control and sedentary parkinsonian mice. The resting heart rate after 4 weeks of exercise in the chronic parkinsonian mice was significantly lower than the rate before exercise, whereas the resting heart rate at the beginning and 4 weeks afterward in the control or sedentary parkinsonian mice was unchanged. Exercised parkinsonian mice also recovered from elevated electrocardiogram R-wave amplitude that was detected in the parkinsonian mice without exercise for 4 weeks. The values of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and body heat generation in the exercised parkinsonian mice before and during the Bruce maximal exercise challenge test were all significantly lower than that of their sedentary counterparts. Furthermore, the exercised parkinsonian mice demonstrated a greater mass in the left ventricle of the heart and an increased level of citrate synthase activity in the skeletal muscles. The amphetamine-induced, dopamine

  13. Hypoxic radiosensitizers: substituted styryl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, A; Falb, E; Odesa, Y; Shmueli-Broide, N

    1994-10-01

    A number of novel styryl epoxides, N-substituted-styryl-ethanolamines, N-mono and N,N'-bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-cinnamamides--analogues to the known radiosensitizers RSU-1069, pimonidazole and etanidazole--display selective hypoxic radiosensitizing activity. The styryl group, especially when substituted by electron withdrawing groups, was found to be bioisosteric to the nitroimidazolyl functionality. The most active derivative 2-(2'-nitrophenyl)ethen-1-yl-oxirane 8a displayed a sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of 5 relative to misonidazole.

  14. Physical activity: benefit or weakness in metabolic adaptations in a mouse model of chronic food restriction?

    PubMed

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Caron, Emilie; Zgheib, Sara; Stievenard, Aliçia; Zizzari, Philippe; Tolle, Virginie; Cortet, Bernard; Lucas, Stéphanie; Prévot, Vincent; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2015-02-01

    In restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, physical activity is usually associated with food restriction, but its physiological consequences remain poorly characterized. In female mice, we evaluated the impact of voluntary physical activity with/without chronic food restriction on metabolic and endocrine parameters that might contribute to AN. In this protocol, FRW mice (i.e., food restriction with running wheel) reached a crucial point of body weight loss (especially fat mass) faster than FR mice (i.e., food restriction only). However, in contrast to FR mice, their body weight stabilized, demonstrating a protective effect of a moderate, regular physical activity. Exercise delayed meal initiation and duration. FRW mice displayed food anticipatory activity compared with FR mice, which was strongly diminished with the prolongation of the protocol. The long-term nature of the protocol enabled assessment of bone parameters similar to those observed in AN patients. Both restricted groups adapted their energy metabolism differentially in the short and long term, with less fat oxidation in FRW mice and a preferential use of glucose to compensate for the chronic energy imbalance. Finally, like restrictive AN patients, FRW mice exhibited low leptin levels, high plasma concentrations of corticosterone and ghrelin, and a disruption of the estrous cycle. In conclusion, our model suggests that physical activity has beneficial effects on the adaptation to the severe condition of food restriction despite the absence of any protective effect on lean and bone mass.

  15. Chronic behavioral stress exaggerates motor deficit and neuroinflammation in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, E; Di Meco, A; Merali, S; Praticò, D

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressor exposure is associated with a variety of age-related diseases including neurodegeneration. Although the initial events of sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) are not known, consistent evidence supports the hypothesis that the disease results from the combined effect of genetic and environmental risk factors. Among them, behavioral stress has been shown to cause damage and neuronal loss in different areas of the brain, however, its effect on the dopaminergic system and PD pathogenesis remains to be characterized. The C57BL/6 mice underwent chronic restraint/isolation (RI) stress and were then treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), whereas the control mice were treated only with MPTP and the effect on the PD-like phenotype was evaluated. The mice that underwent RI before the administration of MPTP manifested an exaggerated motor deficit and impairment in the acquisition of motor skills, which were associated with a greater loss of neuronal tyrosine hydroxylase and astrocytes activation. By showing that RI influences the onset and progression of the PD-like phenotype, our study underlines the novel pathogenetic role that chronic behavioral stressor has in the disease process by triggering neuroinflammation and degeneration of the nigral dopaminergic system. PMID:26859816

  16. Chronic behavioral stress exaggerates motor deficit and neuroinflammation in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, E; Di Meco, A; Merali, S; Praticò, D

    2016-02-09

    Environmental stressor exposure is associated with a variety of age-related diseases including neurodegeneration. Although the initial events of sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) are not known, consistent evidence supports the hypothesis that the disease results from the combined effect of genetic and environmental risk factors. Among them, behavioral stress has been shown to cause damage and neuronal loss in different areas of the brain, however, its effect on the dopaminergic system and PD pathogenesis remains to be characterized. The C57BL/6 mice underwent chronic restraint/isolation (RI) stress and were then treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), whereas the control mice were treated only with MPTP and the effect on the PD-like phenotype was evaluated. The mice that underwent RI before the administration of MPTP manifested an exaggerated motor deficit and impairment in the acquisition of motor skills, which were associated with a greater loss of neuronal tyrosine hydroxylase and astrocytes activation. By showing that RI influences the onset and progression of the PD-like phenotype, our study underlines the novel pathogenetic role that chronic behavioral stressor has in the disease process by triggering neuroinflammation and degeneration of the nigral dopaminergic system.

  17. Chronic imaging of amyloid plaques in the live mouse brain using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacskai, Brian J.; Kajdasz, Stephen T.; Christie, R. H.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Kasischke, Karl A.; Webb, Watt W.; Hyman, B. T.

    2001-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) develop amyloid plaques as they age. These plaques resemble those found in the human disease. Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy combined with a novel surgical approach was used to measure amyloid plaque dynamics chronically in the cortex of living transgenic mice. Thioflavine S (thioS) was used as a fluorescent marker of amyloid deposits. Multiphoton excitation allowed visualization of amyloid plaques up to 200 micrometers deep into the brain. The surgical site could be imaged repeatedly without overt damage to the tissue, and individual plaques within this volume could be reliably identified over periods of several days to several months. On average, plaque sizes remained constant over time, supporting a model of rapid deposition, followed by relative stability. Alternative reporters for in vivo histology include thiazine red, and FITC-labeled amyloid-(Beta) peptide. We also present examples of multi-color imaging using Hoechst dyes and FITC-labeled tomato lectin. These approaches allow us to observe cell nuclei or microglia simultaneously with amyloid-(Beta) deposits in vivo. Chronic imaging of a variety of reporters in these transgenic mice should provide insight into the dynamics of amyloid-(Beta) activity in the brain.

  18. Chronic imaging of mouse visual cortex using a thinned-skull preparation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Emily A; Majewska, Ania K

    2010-10-25

    In vivo imaging using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) allows the study of living cells and neuronal processes in the intact brain. The technique presented here allows the imaging of the same area of the brain at several time points (chronic imaging) with microscopic resolution allowing the tracking of dendritic spines which are the small structures that represent the majority of postsynaptic excitatory sites in the CNS. The ability to clearly resolve fine cortical structures over several time points has many advantages, specifically in the study of brain plasticity in which morphological changes at synapses and circuit remodeling may help explain underlying mechanisms. In this video and supplementary material, we show a protocol for chronic in vivo imaging of the intact brain using a thinned-skull preparation. The thinned-skull preparation is a minimally invasive approach, which avoids potential damage to the dura and/or cortex, thus reducing the onset of an inflammatory response. When this protocol is performed correctly, it is possible to clearly monitor changes in dendritic spine characteristics in the intact brain over a prolonged period of time.

  19. Chronic tempol prevents hypertension, proteinuria, and poor feto-placental outcomes in BPH/5 mouse model of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Darren S; Weydert, Christine J; Lazartigues, Eric; Kutschke, William J; Kienzle, Martha F; Leach, Jenny E; Sharma, Jennifer A; Sharma, Ram V; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-04-01

    Recently we described a mouse model, BPH/5, that spontaneously develops the hallmark clinical features of preeclampsia. BPH/5 exhibit impaired placentation before the onset of hypertension and proteinuria, supporting a causal role for the placenta in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Here we tested the hypothesis that an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) early in pregnancy results in placental abnormalities leading to the maternal symptoms of preeclampsia. We further hypothesized that chronic antioxidant therapy would ameliorate both feto-placental abnormalities and maternal symptoms. ROS levels measured by dihydroethidium revealed significant increases in oxidative stress in BPH/5 placentas at midgestation compared with C57 controls. This increase in ROS was correlated with reduced expression and activity of cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase in early and midgestation BPH/5 placentas. These abnormalities in placental oxidant factors occurred before the onset of maternal symptoms, suggesting a possible causal link between increased ROS and maternal and feto-placental pathology in this model. In support of this, chronic treatment of BPH/5 with the superoxide dismutase-mimetic Tempol throughout gestation significantly improved fetal growth and survival. Furthermore, Tempol ameliorated pregnancy-induced increases in blood pressure and proteinuria in BPH/5 mothers. We confirmed that Tempol radical was present in plasma, and it normalized ROS levels in all placental zones in BPH/5. These data for the first time demonstrate an important causative role for increased ROS in the placenta in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia in a model that spontaneously develops the disease. The results also strongly suggest the potential utility of antioxidant therapy in treating preeclampsia.

  20. Evaluation of Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Function after Chronic Administration of Thymosin β-4 in the Dystrophin Deficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Spurney, Christopher F.; Cha, Hee-Jae; Sali, Arpana; Pandey, Gouri S.; Pistilli, Emidio; Guerron, Alfredo D.; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tβ4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ) and mdx mice, 8–10 weeks old, were treated with 150 µg of Tβ4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tβ4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tβ4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tβ4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tβ4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:20126456

  1. Chronic Contractile Dysfunction without Hypertrophy Does Not Provoke a Compensatory Transcriptional Response in Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, David R.; McMullen, Julie R.; Woodcock, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased myocardium from humans and experimental animal models shows heightened expression and activity of a specific subtype of phospholipase C (PLC), the splice variant PLCβ1b. Previous studies from our group showed that increasing PLCβ1b expression in adult mouse hearts by viral transduction was sufficient to cause sustained contractile dysfunction of rapid onset, which was maintained indefinitely in the absence of other pathological changes in the myocardium. We hypothesized that impaired contractility alone would be sufficient to induce a compensatory transcriptional response. Unbiased, comprehensive mRNA-sequencing was performed on 6 biological replicates of rAAV6-treated blank, PLCβ1b and PLCβ1a (closely related but inactive splice variant) hearts 8 weeks after injection, when reduced contractility was manifest in PLCβ1b hearts without evidence of induced hypertrophy. Expression of PLCβ1b resulted in expression changes in only 9 genes at FDR<0.1 when compared with control and these genes appeared unrelated to contractility. Importantly, PLCβ1a caused similar mild expression changes to PLCβ1b, despite a complete lack of effect of this isoform on cardiac contractility. We conclude that contractile depression caused by PLCβ1b activation is largely independent of changes in the transcriptome, and thus that lowered contractility is not sufficient in itself to provoke measurable transcriptomic alterations. In addition, our data stress the importance of a stringent control group to filter out transcriptional changes unrelated to cardiac function. PMID:27359099

  2. Toxicity of chronic high alcohol intake on mouse natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, R M; Starkey, J R; Meadows, G G

    1988-02-01

    The toxicity of chronic alcohol intake on natural killer (NK) cell activity of spleen cells from well-nourished, female C57BL/6 mice was studied in a 4-hour cytolytic chromium-release assay against YAC-1 lymphoma cells. Mice were fed a nutritionally complete crystalline amino acid diet and received 20% w/v alcohol solution for 12 weeks. Ad libitum and pair-fed control mice were given diet and either an isocaloric glucose solution or water. Decreased NK cell activity was observed in alcohol-consuming mice relative to all other control groups. NK cell activity was moderately decreased by feeding mice a high glucose diet, but more severely lowered in pair-fed groups compared to ad libitum control groups.

  3. Avian embryos in hypoxic environments.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, F; Monge-C, C

    2004-08-12

    Avian embryos at high altitude do not benefit of the maternal protection against hypoxia as in mammals. Nevertheless, avian embryos are known to hatch successfully at altitudes between 4,000 and 6,500 m. This review considers some of the processes that bring about the outstanding modifications in the pressure differences between the environment and mitochondria of avian embryos in hypoxic environments. Among species, some maintain normal levels of oxygen consumption ( VO2) have a high oxygen carrying capacity, lower the air cell-arterial pressure difference ( PAO2 - PaO2 ) with a constant pH. Other species decrease VO2, increase only slightly the oxygen carrying capacity, have a higher PAO2 - PaO2 difference than sea-level embryos and lower the PCO2 and pH. High altitude embryos, and those exposed to hypoxia have an accelerated decline of erythrocyte ATP levels during development and an earlier stimulation of 2,3-BPG synthesis. A higher Bohr effect may ensure high tissue PO2 in the presence of the high-affinity hemoglobin. Independently of the strategy used, they serve together to promote suitable rates of development and successful hatching of high altitude birds in hypoxic environments.

  4. Hypoxic Adaptation during Development: Relation to Pattern of Neurological Presentation and Cognitive Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkham, Fenella J.; Datta, Avijit K.

    2006-01-01

    Children with acute hypoxic-ischaemic events (e.g. stroke) and chronic neurological conditions associated with hypoxia frequently present to paediatric neurologists. Failure to adapt to hypoxia may be a common pathophysiological pathway linking a number of other conditions of childhood with cognitive deficit. There is evidence that congenital…

  5. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marielza Andrade; Schöwe, Natalia Mendes; Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained.

  6. Metabolomic identification of biochemical changes induced by fluoxetine and imipramine in a chronic mild stress mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Jung, Yang-Hee; Jang, Choon-Gon; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-03-09

    Metabolomics was applied to a C57BL/6N mouse model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS). Such mice were treated with two antidepressants from different categories: fluoxetine and imipramine. Metabolic profiling of the hippocampus was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis on samples prepared under optimized conditions, followed by principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, and pair-wise orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analyses. Body weight measurement and behavior tests including an open field test and the forced swimming test were completed with the mice as a measure of the phenotypes of depression and antidepressive effects. As a result, 23 metabolites that had been differentially expressed among the control, CMS, and antidepressant-treated groups demonstrated that amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, adenosine receptors, and neurotransmitters are commonly perturbed by drug treatment. Potential predictive markers for treatment effect were identified: myo-inositol for fluoxetine and lysine and oleic acid for imipramine. Collectively, the current study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of the antidepressant effects of two widely used medications.

  7. Metabolomic identification of biochemical changes induced by fluoxetine and imipramine in a chronic mild stress mouse model of depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Jung, Yang-Hee; Jang, Choon-Gon; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Kwon, Sung Won; Lee, Jeongmi

    2015-03-01

    Metabolomics was applied to a C57BL/6N mouse model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CMS). Such mice were treated with two antidepressants from different categories: fluoxetine and imipramine. Metabolic profiling of the hippocampus was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis on samples prepared under optimized conditions, followed by principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, and pair-wise orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analyses. Body weight measurement and behavior tests including an open field test and the forced swimming test were completed with the mice as a measure of the phenotypes of depression and antidepressive effects. As a result, 23 metabolites that had been differentially expressed among the control, CMS, and antidepressant-treated groups demonstrated that amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, adenosine receptors, and neurotransmitters are commonly perturbed by drug treatment. Potential predictive markers for treatment effect were identified: myo-inositol for fluoxetine and lysine and oleic acid for imipramine. Collectively, the current study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of the antidepressant effects of two widely used medications.

  8. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (1.2 mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained. PMID:26605788

  9. The importance of surface immunoglobulin, mouse rosettes, and CD5 in the immunophenotyping of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and reactive lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Batata, A; Shen, B

    1991-07-15

    Peripheral blood from 167 B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and 119 reactive lymphocytosis (RLC) patients were analyzed to evaluate the immunophenotypic diagnostic value of mouse rosettes (M-rosette), and weak expression of monoclonal surface immunoglobulin (SIg). In B-CLL, 145 cases were M-rosette+ (86.83%), 135 surface immunoglobulin (SIg)+ (80.84%), and 117 M-rosette+ SIg+ (70.06%). Of 32 SIg- cases, 28 were M-rosette+; and of 22 M-rosette-cases, 18 were SIg+. By combining results of the two assays and accepting positivity of either one or both as sufficient for diagnosis, B-CLL was diagnosed in 163 cases (97.60%). CD5 was performed in 49 cases of the 167 with paired data for SIg and M-rosettes. By combining the results of the three assays and accepting positivity of any two or all three as sufficient for diagnosis, all 49 cases (100%) were diagnosed. Correlation analysis showed no significant association between M-rosette, SIg, and CD5 expression. The results demonstrate the independent expression of the three markers, and their complementary role in immunophenotyping B-CLL. In RLC, all 119 cases were T-lineage and SIg-, and 115 were M-rosette-, indicating the role of the two markers in differentiating B-CLL from RLC. Three of the four M-rosette+ T-RLC were subsequently diagnosed as B-CLL, suggesting the necessity of follow-up of such cases.

  10. Modulation of Sox10, HIF-1α, Survivin, and YAP by Minocycline in the Treatment of Neurodevelopmental Handicaps following Hypoxic Insult.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Tsuneki, Masayuki; Krauthammer, Michael; Couture, Rachael; Schwartz, Michael; Madri, Joseph A

    2015-09-01

    Premature infants are at an increased risk of developing cognitive and motor handicaps due to chronic hypoxia. Although the current therapies have reduced the incidence of these handicaps, untoward side effects abound. Using a murine model of sublethal hypoxia, we demonstrated reduction in several transcription factors that modulate expression of genes known to be involved in several neural functions. We demonstrate the induction of these genes by minocycline, a tetracycline antibiotic with noncanonical functions, in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Specifically, there was induction of genes, including Sox10, Hif1a, Hif2a, Birc5, Yap1, Epo, Bdnf, Notch1 (cleaved), Pcna, Mag, Mobp, Plp1, synapsin, Adgra2, Pecam1, and reduction in activation of caspase 3, all known to affect proliferation, apoptosis, synaptic transmission, and nerve transmission. Minocycline treatment of mouse pups reared under sublethal hypoxic conditions resulted in improvement in open field testing parameters. These studies demonstrate beneficial effects of minocycline treatment following hypoxic insult, document up-regulation of several genes associated with improved cognitive function, and support the possibility of minocycline as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of neurodevelopmental handicaps observed in the very premature newborn population. Additionally, these studies may aid in further interpretation of the effects of minocycline in the treatment trials and animal model studies of fragile X syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

  11. Effects of Chronic Mental Stress and atherogenic diet on the immune inflammatory environment in mouse aorta

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Zhukov, Viktor; Bradlow, Henry; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Gonzalez, Alejandro Sanchez; Curtiss, Linda K.; Conti, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation and stress are regarded as two important atherogenic factors. Because stress can affect leukocyte distribution, we hypothesized that stress-mediated leukocyte extravasation can modify the inflammatory environment of the arterial wall possibly contributing to atherogenesis. To test this hypothesis we evaluated the inflammatory environment of the aorta in C57Bl/6 mice subjected to 3 and to 12 months of chronic stress and compared it to age matched non-stressed animals. Experiments were carried out in mice fed regular chow or atherogenic diets. Both treatments increased the expression of vascular and leukocyte adhesion molecules and leukocyte accumulation. At 3 months, stress but not an atherogenic diet elevated the number of CD4 cells, CD8 cells, macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils. These changes were associated with elevation of transcripts for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, E-Selectin and Neuropeptide Y. At 12 months, stress or high cholesterol acted similarly to elevate the number of CD8 and macrophages, and synergistically on the number of all cell types investigated. At this time-point, strong synergism was also observed on the level of E-selectin and NPY in the aorta, but not in the circulation. Despite these effects, histological and morphological alterations of the arterial wall were severe in the atherogenic diet, but not in the stress groups. Thus, although stress and an atherogenic diet may both affect leukocyte accumulation in the aorta, they may contribute differently to atherogenesis. PMID:21722726

  12. Chronic ethanol intake modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities in mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Mayas, M D; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; García, M J; Carrera, M P; Cobo, M; Camacho, B; Martínez Martos, J M

    2005-04-01

    In developing cerebellum, where critical periods of vulnerability have been established for several basic substances, it has been extensively studied the wide array of abnormalities induced by exposure to ethanol (EtOH). However, little is known about the effects of EtOH consumption on cerebellar functions in adult individuals. Several studies show participation in cognitive activities to be concentrated in the lateral cerebellum (hemispheres), whereas basic motor functions such as balance and coordination are represented in the medial parts of the cerebellum (vermis and paravermis). In addition to the circulating renin angiotensin system (RAS), a local system has been postulated in brain. The effector peptides of the RAS are formed via the activity of several aminopeptidases (AP). The present work analyses the effect of chronic EtOH intake on the RAS-regulating AP activities in the soluble and membrane-bound fractions of two cerebellar locations: the hemispheres and the vermis. We hypothesize that cerebellar RAS is involved in basic motor functions rather than in cognitive activities.

  13. Effects of chronic caffeine intake in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Ferrante, Antonella; Pèzzola, Antonella; Matteucci, Alessandra; Puopolo, Maria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2013-04-01

    Caffeine is a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist; chronic consumption has proved protective toward neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The present study was designed to determine whether caffeine intake affected survival and/or motor performance in a transgenic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). SOD1(G93A) mice received caffeine through drinking water from 70 days of age until death. Body weight, motor performance and survival were evaluated. Furthermore, the expression of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs), glial glutamate transporter (GLT1), and glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP) were evaluated by Western blotting. The results showed that caffeine intake significantly shortened the survival of SOD1(G93A) mice (log rank test, P = 0.01) and induced a nonsignificant advancing of disease onset. The expression of A(2A) R, GLT1, and GFAP was altered in the spinal cords of ALS mice, but caffeine did not influence their expression in either wild-type or SOD1(G93) mice. These data indicate that adenosine receptors may play an important role in ALS.

  14. Anti-fatigue effect of Myelophil in a chronic forced exercise mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Han, Jong-Min; Kim, Young-Ae; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-10-05

    This study was performed to evaluate the anti-fatigue effects of Myelophil. ICR male mice (10 weeks old) were forced to run for 1 hour, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Each running session was followed by administration of distilled water, Myelophil (50 or 100 mg/kg), or ascorbic acid (100 mg/kg) 1h later. Equal proportions of Astragali Radix and Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix were extracted using 30% ethanol, and formulated into Myelophil. To evaluate the anti-fatigue effects of Myelophil, exercise tolerance and forced swimming tests were conducted. Underlying mechanisms, including oxidant-antioxidant balance, inflammatory response, and energy metabolism, were investigated by analyzing skeletal muscle tissues and/or sera. Myelophil significantly increased exercise ability and latency times, and decreased the number of electric shocks and immobility time on exercise tolerance and forced swimming tests compared with control group. Myelophil also significantly ameliorated fatigue-induced alterations in oxidative stress biomarkers, antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant capacity, as measured by multiple assays, including enzyme activity assays and western blotting, as well as alterations in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, Myelophil normalized alterations in energy metabolic markers in sera. These findings suggest that Myelophil reduces the effects of chronic fatigue, likely by attenuating oxidative and inflammatory responses and normalizing energy metabolism. Consequently, this study provides evidence for the clinical relevance of Myelophil.

  15. The effect of chronic morphine treatment of excitatory junction potentials in the mouse vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    North, R. A.; Vitek, L. V.

    1980-01-01

    1 Intracellular recordings were made from smooth muscle cells of vasa deferentia in vitro. Vasa from two groups of mice were studied; the first were naive and the second had been chronically pretreated with morphine for 3 days. The vasa from morphine-pretreated mice were maintained in Krebs solution containing normorphine (300 nM). 2 The resting membrane potentials of the smooth muscle cells were the same in both groups of mice. 3 The excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) evoked by stimulation of the intramural nerves were depressed by normorphine in both groups of mice. The EC50 for this action of normorphine was 560 nM for the naive group and 6.6 microM for the morphine-pretreated group. 4 The EC50 for adenosine in depressing e.j.p. amplitude was the same in the two groups. 5 Naloxone did not change the resting membrane potential in cells from either group of mice. In morphine-pretreated mice, naloxone caused a marked increase in the amplitude of the evoked e.j.p. 6 The EC50 for noradrenaline in causing a contractile response of the isolated vas deferens was the same in both groups of mice. 7 The results indicate that changes in postsynaptic sensitivity to transmitter do not occur following morphine pretreatment. PMID:7052335

  16. Chronic inflammation, lymphangiogenesis, and effect of an anti-VEGFR therapy in a mouse model and in human patients with aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nihei, Mayumi; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Ebihara, Satoru; Kobayashi, Makoto; Niu, Kaijun; Gui, Peijun; Tamai, Tokiwa; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Yamaya, Mutsuo; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Ebihara, Takae; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2015-03-01

    Chronic inflammation induces lymphangiogenesis and blood vessel remodelling. Since aged pneumonia patients often have repeated episodes of aspiration pneumonia, the pathogenesis may involve chronic inflammation. For lymphangiogenesis, VEGFR-3 and its ligand VEGF-C are key factors. No previous studies have examined chronic inflammation or vascular changes in aspiration pneumonia or its mouse models. In lung inflammation, little is known about the effect of blocking VEGFR-3 on lung lymphangiogenesis and, moreover, its effect on the disease condition. This study aimed to establish a mouse model of aspiration pneumonia, examine the presence of chronic inflammation and vascular changes in the model and in patients, and evaluate the effect of inhibiting VEGFR-3 on the lymphangiogenesis and disease condition in this model. To induce aspiration pneumonia, we repeated inoculation of pepsin at low pH and LPS into mice for 21-28 days, durations in which bronchioalveolar lavage and plasma leakage in the lung suggested the presence of exaggerated inflammation. Conventional and immunohistochemical analysis of tracheal whole mounts suggested the presence of chronic inflammation, lymphangiogenesis, and blood vessel remodelling in the model. Quantitative RT-PCR of the trachea and lung suggested the involvement of lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C, VEGFR-3, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In the lung, the aspiration model showed the presence of chronic inflammation and exaggerated lymphangiogenesis. Treatment with the VEGFR inhibitor axitinib or the VEGFR-3 specific inhibitor SAR131675 impaired lymphangiogenesis in the lung and improved oxygen saturation in the aspiration model. Since the lung is the main site of aspiration pneumonia, the changes were intensive in the lung and mild in the trachea. Human lung samples also showed the presence of chronic inflammation and exaggerated lymphangiogenesis, suggesting the relevance of the model to the disease. These results suggest lymphatics in

  17. Chronic intermittent hypoxia causes hepatitis in a mouse model of diet-induced fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Savransky, Vladimir; Bevans, Shannon; Nanayakkara, Ashika; Li, Jianguo; Smith, Philip L; Torbenson, Michael S; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2007-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during sleep. OSA is associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in obese individuals and may contribute to progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease from steatosis to NASH. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CIH induces inflammatory changes in the liver in mice with diet-induced hepatic steatosis. C57BL/6J mice (n = 8) on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet were exposed to CIH for 6 mo and were compared with mice on the same diet exposed to intermittent air (control; n = 8). CIH caused liver injury with an increase in serum ALT (461 +/- 58 U/l vs. 103 +/- 16 U/l in the control group; P < 0.01) and AST (637 +/- 37 U/l vs. 175 +/- 13 U/l in the control group; P < 0.001), whereas alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin levels were unchanged. Histology revealed hepatic steatosis in both groups, with mild accentuation of fat staining in the zone 3 hepatocytes in mice exposed to CIH. Animals exposed to CIH exhibited lobular inflammation and fibrosis in the liver, which were not evident in control mice. CIH caused significant increases in lipid peroxidation in serum and liver tissue; significant increases in hepatic levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, and CXC chemokine MIP-2; a trend toward an increase in TNF-alpha; and an increase in alpha1(I)-collagen mRNA. We conclude that CIH induces lipid peroxidation and inflammation in the livers of mice on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet.

  18. Effects of chronic restraint-induced stress on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Varès, Guillaume; Kawagoshi, Taiki; Shiomi, Naoko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Liu, Qiang; Morita, Akinori; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Both ionizing radiation (IR) and psychological stress (PS) cause detrimental effects on humans. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced PS (CRIPS) diminished the functions of Trp53 and enhanced radiocarcinogenesis in Trp53-heterozygous (Trp53(+/-)) mice. These findings had a marked impact on the academic field as well as the general public, particularly among residents living in areas radioactively contaminated by nuclear accidents. In an attempt to elucidate the modifying effects of CRIPS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53(+/+)) animals, investigations involving multidisciplinary analyses were performed. We herein demonstrated that CRIPS induced changes in the frequency of IR-induced chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in splenocytes. Five-week-old male Trp53(+/+) C57BL/6J mice were restrained for 6h per day for 28 consecutive days, and total body irradiation (TBI) at a dose of 4Gy was performed on the 8th day. Metaphase chromosome spreads prepared from splenocytes at the end of the 28-day restraint regimen were painted with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for chromosomes 1, 2, and 3. The results obtained showed that CRIPS alone did not induce CAs, while TBI caused significant increases in CAs, mostly translocations. Translocations appeared at a lower frequency in mice exposed to TBI plus CRIPS than in those exposed to TBI alone. No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of the other types of CAs (insertions, dicentrics, and fragments) visualized with FISH between these experimental groups (TBI+CRIPS vs. TBI). These results suggest that CRIPS does not appear to synergize with the clastogenicity of IR.

  19. Variable effects of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure on ethanol drinking in a genetically diverse mouse cohort.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Becker, Howard C

    2017-02-01

    The BXD family of mice were generated by crossing and inbreeding ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J and ethanol-avoiding DBA/2J strains that differ greatly in genome sequence and other behaviors. This study evaluated variations in the level of voluntary ethanol intake in a cohort of 42 BXD strains and both progenitor strains using a model of alcohol dependence and relapse drinking. A total of 119 BXDs (85 males, 34 females) (n ∼ 4 per genotype; 1/genotype/sex/group) were evaluated along with males from both progenitor strains (n = 14-15/genotype). Mice were evaluated for intake using limited access (2 h/day) 2-bottle (15% v/v ethanol vs. water) model for 6 weeks (baseline intake). Each animal received 4 weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure (CIE group) or air control exposure (CTL group) (16 h/day × 4 days) interleaved by 5-day drinking test cycles. Blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) ranged from 150 to 300 mg/dl across genotypes. Baseline intake varied greatly among cases-from ∼0.8 to ∼2.9 g/kg. As expected, CIE exposure induced a significant increase in ethanol drinking in C57BL/6J relative to baseline as well as air controls that remained relatively stable over the four test cycles. In contrast, DBA/2J cases did not show a significant increase in consumption. Heritability of variation in baseline consumption, calculated from C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains is about 54% but this increases following treatment to 60-80%. As expected from the marked difference between progenitors, ethanol intake and level of escalation varied greatly among BXDs after exposure (∼-1.3 to 2.6 g/kg). Interestingly, the magnitude and direction of changes in ethanol intake did not relate to BEC values of the preceding CIE exposure cycle. Overall, these data indicate significant variation in consumption and even escalation, much of it under genetic control, following repeated CIE treatment.

  20. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M.; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C.; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L.; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca2+ mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca2+ mobilization. Ca2+ mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  1. Development of doxorubicin-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Varsha G.; Herman, Eugene H.; Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S.; Lewis, Sherry M.; Davis, Kelly J.; George, Nysia I.; Lee, Taewon; Kerr, Susan; Fuscoe, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Serum levels of cardiac troponins serve as biomarkers of myocardial injury. However, troponins are released into the serum only after damage to cardiac tissue has occurred. Here, we report development of a mouse model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced chronic cardiotoxicity to aid in the identification of predictive biomarkers of early events of cardiac tissue injury. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were administered intravenous DOX at 3 mg/kg body weight, or an equivalent volume of saline, once a week for 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were sacrificed a week following the last dose. A significant reduction in body weight gain was observed in mice following exposure to a weekly DOX dose for 1 week and longer compared to saline-treated controls. DOX treatment also resulted in declines in red blood cell count, hemoglobin level, and hematocrit compared to saline-treated controls after the 2nd weekly dose until the 8th and 9th doses, followed by a modest recovery. All DOX-treated mice had significant elevations in cardiac troponin T concentrations in plasma compared to saline-treated controls, indicating cardiac tissue injury. Also, a dose-related increase in the severity of cardiac lesions was seen in mice exposed to 24 mg/kg DOX and higher cumulative doses. Mice treated with cumulative DOX doses of 30 mg/kg and higher showed a significant decline in heart rate, suggesting drug-induced cardiac dysfunction. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the development of DOX-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} mice. -- Highlights: ► 24 mg/kg was a cumulative cardiotoxic dose of doxorubicin in male B6C3F{sub 1} mice. ► Doxorubicin-induced hematological toxicity was in association with splenomegaly. ► Doxorubicin induced severe testicular toxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} male mice.

  2. Longitudinal evaluation of FGF23 changes and mineral metabolism abnormalities in a mouse model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Jason R; He, Nan; Idiculla, Arun; Gillihan, Ryan; Liu, Shiguang; David, Valentin; Hong, Yan; Quarles, L Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic and vitamin D-regulatory hormone of putative bone origin that is elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The mechanisms responsible for elevations of FGF23 and its role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) remain uncertain. We investigated the association between FGF23 serum levels and kidney disease progression, as well as the phenotypic features of CKD-MBD in a Col4a3 null mouse model of human autosomal-recessive Alport syndrome. These mice exhibited progressive renal failure, declining 1,25(OH)(2)D levels, increments in parathyroid hormone (PTH) and FGF23, late-onset hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, high-turnover bone disease, and increased mortality. Serum levels of FGF23 increased in the earliest stages of renal damage, before elevations in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine. FGF23 gene transcription in bone, however, did not increase until late-stage kidney disease, when serum FGF23 levels were exponentially elevated. Further evaluation of bone revealed trabecular osteocytes to be the primary cell source for FGF23 production in late-stage disease. Changes in FGF23 mirrored the rise in serum PTH and the decline in circulating 1,25(OH)(2)D. The rise in PTH and FGF23 in Col4a3 null mice coincided with an increase in the urinary fractional excretion of phosphorus and a progressive decline in sodium-phosphate cotransporter gene expression in the kidney. Our findings suggest elevations of FGF23 in CKD to be an early marker of renal injury that increases before BUN and serum creatinine. An increased production of FGF23 by bone may not be responsible for early increments in FGF23 in CKD but does appear to contribute to FGF23 levels in late-stage disease. Elevations in FGF23 and PTH coincide with an increase in urinary phosphate excretion that likely prevents the early onset of hyperphosphatemia in the face of increased bone turnover and a

  3. Dendritic Spine Loss and Chronic White Matter Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Highly Repetitive Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Charisse N.; Noël, Anastasia; Neustadtl, Aidan; Parsadanian, Maia; Barton, David J.; Chellappa, Deepa; Wilkins, Tiffany E.; Alikhani, Andrew D.; Zapple, David N.; Villapol, Sonia; Planel, Emmanuel; Burns, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is an emerging risk for chronic behavioral, cognitive, and neurodegenerative conditions. Athletes absorb several hundred mTBIs each year; however, rodent models of repeat mTBI (rmTBI) are often limited to impacts in the single digits. Herein, we describe the effects of 30 rmTBIs, examining structural and pathological changes in mice up to 365 days after injury. We found that single mTBI causes a brief loss of consciousness and a transient reduction in dendritic spines, reflecting a loss of excitatory synapses. Single mTBI does not cause axonal injury, neuroinflammation, or cell death in the gray or white matter. Thirty rmTBIs with a 1-day interval between each mTBI do not cause dendritic spine loss; however, when the interinjury interval is increased to 7 days, dendritic spine loss is reinstated. Thirty rmTBIs cause white matter pathology characterized by positive silver and Fluoro-Jade B staining, and microglial proliferation and activation. This pathology continues to develop through 60 days, and is still apparent at 365 days, after injury. However, rmTBIs did not increase β-amyloid levels or tau phosphorylation in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer disease. Our data reveal that single mTBI causes a transient loss of synapses, but that rmTBIs habituate to repetitive injury within a short time period. rmTBI causes the development of progressive white matter pathology that continues for months after the final impact. PMID:26857506

  4. Chronic coexistence of two troponin T isoforms in adult transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes decreased contractile kinetics and caused dilatative remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Bin; Wei, Hongguang; Jin, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Our previous in vivo and ex vivo studies suggested that coexistence of two or more troponin T (TnT) isoforms in adult cardiac muscle decreased cardiac function and efficiency (Huang QQ, Feng HZ, Liu J, Du J, Stull LB, Moravec CS, Huang X, Jin JP, Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 294: C213-C22, 2008; Feng HZ, Jin JP, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 299: H97-H105, 2010). Here we characterized Ca(2+)-regulated contractility of isolated adult cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice coexpressing a fast skeletal muscle TnT together with the endogenous cardiac TnT. Without the influence of extracellular matrix, coexistence of the two TnT isoforms resulted in lower shortening amplitude, slower shortening and relengthening velocities, and longer relengthening time. The level of resting cytosolic Ca(2+) was unchanged, but the peak Ca(2+) transient was lowered and the durations of Ca(2+) rising and decaying were longer in the transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes vs. the wild-type controls. Isoproterenol treatment diminished the differences in shortening amplitude and shortening and relengthening velocities, whereas the prolonged durations of relengthening and Ca(2+) transient in the transgenic cardiomyocytes remained. At rigor state, a result from depletion of Ca(2+), resting sarcomere length of the transgenic cardiomyocytes became shorter than that in wild-type cells. Inhibition of myosin motor diminished this effect of TnT function on cross bridges. The length but not width of transgenic cardiomyocytes was significantly increased compared with the wild-type controls, corresponding to longitudinal addition of sarcomeres and dilatative remodeling at the cellular level. These dominantly negative effects of normal fast TnT demonstrated that chronic coexistence of functionally distinct variants of TnT in adult cardiomyocytes reduces contractile performance with pathological consequences.

  5. The Spectrum of Neurobehavioral Sequelae after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Novel Mouse Model of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Dayawansa, Samantha; Chen, Michael; Dashnaw, Matthew L.; Czerniecka, Katarzyna; Walker, Corey T.; Viterise, Tyler; Hyrien, Ollivier; Iliff, Jeffrey J.; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken; Huang, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There has been an increased focus on the neurological sequelae of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly neurodegenerative syndromes, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE); however, no animal model exists that captures the behavioral spectrum of this phenomenon. We sought to develop an animal model of CTE. Our novel model is a modification and fusion of two of the most popular models of TBI and allows for controlled closed-head impacts to unanesthetized mice. Two-hundred and eighty 12-week-old mice were divided into control, single mild TBI (mTBI), and repetitive mTBI groups. Repetitive mTBI mice received six concussive impacts daily for 7 days. Behavior was assessed at various time points. Neurological Severity Score (NSS) was computed and vestibulomotor function tested with the wire grip test (WGT). Cognitive function was assessed with the Morris water maze (MWM), anxiety/risk-taking behavior with the elevated plus maze, and depression-like behavior with the forced swim/tail suspension tests. Sleep electroencephalogram/electromyography studies were performed at 1 month. NSS was elevated, compared to controls, in both TBI groups and improved over time. Repetitive mTBI mice demonstrated transient vestibulomotor deficits on WGT. Repetitive mTBI mice also demonstrated deficits in MWM testing. Both mTBI groups demonstrated increased anxiety at 2 weeks, but repetitive mTBI mice developed increased risk-taking behaviors at 1 month that persist at 6 months. Repetitive mTBI mice exhibit depression-like behavior at 1 month. Both groups demonstrate sleep disturbances. We describe the neurological sequelae of repetitive mTBI in a novel mouse model, which resemble several of the neuropsychiatric behaviors observed clinically in patients sustaining repetitive mild head injury. PMID:24766454

  6. Alterations in Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [U-13C]Glucose Metabolism in a Chronic Epilepsy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form of adult epilepsy and shows high resistance to treatment. Increasing evidence has suggested that metabolic dysfunction contributes to the development of seizures, with previous studies indicating impairments in brain glucose metabolism. Here we aim to elucidate which pathways involved in glucose metabolism are impaired, by tracing the hippocampal metabolism of injected [U-13C]glucose (i.p.) during the chronic stage of the pilocarpine-status epilepticus mouse model of epilepsy. The enrichment of 13C in the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle were quantified in hippocampal extracts using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy, along with the measurement of the activities of enzymes in each pathway. We show that there is reduced incorporation of 13C in the intermediates of glycolysis, with the percentage enrichment of all downstream intermediates being highly correlated with those of glucose 6-phosphate. Furthermore, the activities of all enzymes in this pathway including hexokinase and phosphofructokinase were unaltered, suggesting that glucose uptake is reduced in this model without further impairments in glycolysis itself. The key findings were 33% and 55% losses in the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, respectively, along with reduced 13C enrichment in TCA cycle intermediates. This lower 13C enrichment is best explained in part by the reduced enrichment in glycolytic intermediates, whereas the reduction of key TCA cycle enzyme activity indicates that TCA cycling is also impaired in the hippocampal formation. Together, these data suggest that multitarget approaches may be necessary to restore metabolism in the epileptic brain. PMID:28303258

  7. Differential effect of chronic stress on mouse hippocampal memory and affective behavior: Role of major ovarian hormones.

    PubMed

    Karisetty, Bhanu Chandra; Maitra, Swati; Wahul, Abhipradnya Bipin; Musalamadugu, Anusha; Khandelwal, Nitin; Guntupalli, Sumasri; Garikapati, Ramya; Jhansyrani, Thatiparthi; Kumar, Arvind; Chakravarty, Sumana

    2017-02-01

    Molecular mechanisms of depression-like pathophysiology in female rodent models are less reported compared to males, despite its higher prevalence in human females. Moreover, the stress-response in brain circuitries including reward and cognition circuitries varies with age or hormonal status of the females. So, to understand the stress-induced mood and cognitive disorders in intact females (with ovaries) and ovariectomized (OVX) females, we studied changes in mouse hippocampus, a functionally heterogeneous neural structure involved in both affective and cognitive behaviors. Here, we used a 6-day Chronic Unpredictable Stress (CUS) paradigm in mice to induce depression and related mood disorders. Interestingly, intact females and OVX females showed difference in mood disorder sub-phenotypes to CUS. Similar to an earlier report of CUS affecting the critical reward circuitry structure the nucleus accumbens differently in females with and without ovaries, cognitive behavior in intact females and OVX females also responded differentially to CUS, as evident from Morris Water Maze (MWM) test results. We report that the presence or absence of ovarian hormones, particularly the estrogen, has a significant impact in altering the hippocampus related spatial memory and affective behavior, in females. Our results also illustrate that estrogen administration improves both reward and cognitive behavior, and plays a significant role in alleviating stress-induced despair behavior and enhancing spatial reference memory following a brief 6-day stressful paradigm. Further, it also indicates that the NMDA receptor subunits, GRIN2A and GRIN2B, might mediate the effects of estrogen in the hippocampal functions, thus suggestive of a translational significance of the finding.

  8. Effect of chronic coffee consumption on weight gain and glycaemia in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rustenbeck, I; Lier-Glaubitz, V; Willenborg, M; Eggert, F; Engelhardt, U; Jörns, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiological evidence shows that chronic coffee consumption in humans is correlated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For the experimental exploration of the underlying mechanisms, this effect needs to be replicated in an animal model of type 2 diabetes with a short lifespan. Design: Male C57BL/6 mice consumed regular coffee or water ad libitum and the development of obesity and diabetes caused by high-fat diet (55% lipids, HFD) was observed from week 10 on for 35 weeks in comparison with mice feeding on a defined normal diet (9% lipids, ND). Results: The massive weight gain in HFD mice was dose-dependently retarded (P=0.034), the moderate weight gain in ND mice was abolished (P<0.001) by coffee consumption, probably because of a lower feeding efficiency. The consumption of fluid (water or coffee) was significantly diminished by HFD (P<0.001), resulting in a higher coffee exposure of ND mice. On week 21 intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT) showed a dose-dependent faster decline of elevated glucose levels in coffee-consuming HFD mice (P=0.016), but not in ND mice. Remarkably, a spontaneous decrease in non-fasting glycaemia occurred after week 21 in all treatment groups (P<0.001). On week 39 the IPGTT showed diminished peak of glucose levels in coffee-consuming HFD mice (P<0.05). HFD mice were hyperinsulinaemic and had significantly (P<0.001) enlarged islets. Coffee consumption did not affect islet size or parameters of beta-cell apoptosis, proliferation and insulin granule content. Conclusion: Coffee consumption retarded weight gain and improved glucose tolerance in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes and corresponding controls. This gives rise to the expectation that further insight into the mechanism of the diabetes-preventive effect of coffee consumption in humans may be gained by this approach. PMID:24979152

  9. Alterations in Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [U-(13)C]Glucose Metabolism in a Chronic Epilepsy Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Tanya S; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Hodson, Mark P; Borges, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form of adult epilepsy and shows high resistance to treatment. Increasing evidence has suggested that metabolic dysfunction contributes to the development of seizures, with previous studies indicating impairments in brain glucose metabolism. Here we aim to elucidate which pathways involved in glucose metabolism are impaired, by tracing the hippocampal metabolism of injected [U-(13)C]glucose (i.p.) during the chronic stage of the pilocarpine-status epilepticus mouse model of epilepsy. The enrichment of (13)C in the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle were quantified in hippocampal extracts using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy, along with the measurement of the activities of enzymes in each pathway. We show that there is reduced incorporation of (13)C in the intermediates of glycolysis, with the percentage enrichment of all downstream intermediates being highly correlated with those of glucose 6-phosphate. Furthermore, the activities of all enzymes in this pathway including hexokinase and phosphofructokinase were unaltered, suggesting that glucose uptake is reduced in this model without further impairments in glycolysis itself. The key findings were 33% and 55% losses in the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, respectively, along with reduced (13)C enrichment in TCA cycle intermediates. This lower (13)C enrichment is best explained in part by the reduced enrichment in glycolytic intermediates, whereas the reduction of key TCA cycle enzyme activity indicates that TCA cycling is also impaired in the hippocampal formation. Together, these data suggest that multitarget approaches may be necessary to restore metabolism in the epileptic brain.

  10. Neurodegeneration severity can be predicted from early microglia alterations monitored in vivo in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Alejandra; Romero, Cesar O.; Breen, Kevin T.; Chagovetz, Alexis A.; Steele, Michael R.; Ambati, Balamurali K.; Vetter, Monica L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microglia serve key homeostatic roles, and respond to neuronal perturbation and decline with a high spatiotemporal resolution. The course of all chronic CNS pathologies is thus paralleled by local microgliosis and microglia activation, which begin at early stages of the disease. However, the possibility of using live monitoring of microglia during early disease progression to predict the severity of neurodegeneration has not been explored. Because the retina allows live tracking of fluorescent microglia in their intact niche, here we investigated their early changes in relation to later optic nerve neurodegeneration. To achieve this, we used the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma, which develops progressive retinal ganglion cell degeneration of variable severity during aging, and represents a useful model to study pathogenic mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell decline that are similar to those in human glaucoma. We imaged CX3CR1+/GFP microglial cells in vivo at ages ranging from 1 to 5 months by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) and quantified cell density and morphological activation. We detected early microgliosis at the optic nerve head (ONH), where axonopathy first manifests, and could track attenuation of this microgliosis induced by minocycline. We also observed heterogeneous and dynamic patterns of early microglia activation in the retina. When the same animals were aged and analyzed for the severity of optic nerve pathology at 10 months of age, we found a strong correlation with the levels of ONH microgliosis at 3 to 4 months. Our findings indicate that live imaging and monitoring the time course and levels of early retinal microgliosis and microglia activation in glaucoma could serve as indicators of future neurodegeneration severity. PMID:25755083

  11. The spectrum of neurobehavioral sequelae after repetitive mild traumatic brain injury: a novel mouse model of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Anthony L; Plog, Benjamin A; Dayawansa, Samantha; Chen, Michael; Dashnaw, Matthew L; Czerniecka, Katarzyna; Walker, Corey T; Viterise, Tyler; Hyrien, Ollivier; Iliff, Jeffrey J; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken; Huang, Jason H

    2014-07-01

    There has been an increased focus on the neurological sequelae of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly neurodegenerative syndromes, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE); however, no animal model exists that captures the behavioral spectrum of this phenomenon. We sought to develop an animal model of CTE. Our novel model is a modification and fusion of two of the most popular models of TBI and allows for controlled closed-head impacts to unanesthetized mice. Two-hundred and eighty 12-week-old mice were divided into control, single mild TBI (mTBI), and repetitive mTBI groups. Repetitive mTBI mice received six concussive impacts daily for 7 days. Behavior was assessed at various time points. Neurological Severity Score (NSS) was computed and vestibulomotor function tested with the wire grip test (WGT). Cognitive function was assessed with the Morris water maze (MWM), anxiety/risk-taking behavior with the elevated plus maze, and depression-like behavior with the forced swim/tail suspension tests. Sleep electroencephalogram/electromyography studies were performed at 1 month. NSS was elevated, compared to controls, in both TBI groups and improved over time. Repetitive mTBI mice demonstrated transient vestibulomotor deficits on WGT. Repetitive mTBI mice also demonstrated deficits in MWM testing. Both mTBI groups demonstrated increased anxiety at 2 weeks, but repetitive mTBI mice developed increased risk-taking behaviors at 1 month that persist at 6 months. Repetitive mTBI mice exhibit depression-like behavior at 1 month. Both groups demonstrate sleep disturbances. We describe the neurological sequelae of repetitive mTBI in a novel mouse model, which resemble several of the neuropsychiatric behaviors observed clinically in patients sustaining repetitive mild head injury.

  12. VHL: Cullin-g the hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Nadia J; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-03

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-mediated response to hypoxic conditions is turned off by VHL-mediated ubiquitination of HIFα. To achieve this, VHL binds HIFα and recruits it to a specific E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, a Cullin-RING-ligase. In this issue of Structure, Nguyen et al. provide a structural view of how VHL engages the ligase in order to inhibit the hypoxic response.

  13. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  14. Initiation of premature senescence by Bcl-2 in hypoxic condition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Desheng; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Senescence, a state of cell cycle arrest, has been regarded as an intrinsic barrier to malignance. Although being repressed in most immortal tumors, the genetic program of senescence can be reactivated by critical regulators, including the apoptosis regulator Bcl-2. We showed here that hypoxic condition resulted in an irreversible senescence-like phenotype with increased expression of Bcl-2 in mouse melanoma B16 cells. In CoCl2-simulating hypoxic condition, characteristic morphological alterations and increased activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) can be detected with high level of Bcl-2, which was confirmed by western blot and co-staining of SA-β-gal and Bcl-2 by immunocytochemistry. Accordingly, Bcl-2 silence by specific siRNA ahead of hypoxia treatment interrupted the senescent development. Moreover Bcl-2 overexpression led to early onset of senescence. We propose that Bcl-2 is required to initiate and maintain the senescent phenotype. In addition, p53 and p16 were not involved in hypoxia-induced senescence according to the expression levels during senescent process. These results suggest that when encountering harmful stress (hypoxia), melanoma cells overexpress Bcl-2 and turn to senescence, a permanent cell-cycle arrest, for prolonged survival.

  15. D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL is neuroprotective in a chronic Parkinson's disease mouse model and increases BNDF expression while reducing neuroinflammation and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanwei; Liu, WeiZhen; Li, Lin; Hölscher, Christian

    2017-02-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, treatment to improve insulin resistance in T2DM may be useful for PD patients. Glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a member of the incretin hormone family that can promote insulin release and improve insulin resistance. Several GIP analogues have been developed as potential treatments for T2DM. We had shown previously that D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL, a novel long-acting GIP analogue, can play a neuroprotective role in the PD mouse model induced by acute MPTP injection. The drug reduced damage to the dopaminergic neurons and increased CREB-mediated Bcl-2 expression to prevent apoptosis and reduced chronic inflammation in the brain. In the present study, we further tested the effects of chronic treatment by D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL in a chronic PD mouse model induced by MPTP (25mg/kg ip.) combination with probenecid (250mg/kg ip.) injection for 5 weeks. The results demonstrated that chronic treatment with D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL inhibits MPTP -induced Parkinsonism-like motor disorders in mice, and that the drug prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Moreover, D-Ala2-GIP-glu-PAL also inhibited the increased levels of expression of α-synuclein in the SNpc and striatum induced by MPTP. Furthermore, drug treatment reduced chronic neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, and increased the expression of BDNF. These findings show that GIP signaling is neuroprotective and holds promise as a novel treatment of PD.

  16. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of mouse cerebellum reveals alterations in RasGRF1 expression following in vivo chronic treatment with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Rusconi, Francesco; Rubino, Tiziana; Cattaneo, Angela; Martegani, Enzo; Parolaro, Daniela; Bachi, Angela; Zippel, Renata

    2009-02-01

    We have applied transcriptomic and proteomic techniques to identify changes in the RNA and the protein levels in the mouse cerebellum after chronic treatment with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Among approximately 14,000 transcripts in a mouse cDNA microarray library, we found 11 genes with altered expression. RasGRF1, a neuron-specific Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor, showed a reduction both at the RNA and protein levels with a specific decrease of the protein pool associated to cell membranes. In addition, proteomic analysis on cerebellum obtained from chronically THC-treated mice detected quantitative changes of additional 27 spots, mostly in the membranous fraction. We found enrichment of alpha (Galphao, Galphaq) and beta subunits (beta4/beta2 and beta5) of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and of two calcium-binding proteins, calretinin and hippocalcin-like protein-1. In addition, we also detected a significant increase in the membrane fraction of proteins involved in exo-endocytosis such as septins, dynamin-1, and vesicle protein sorting 29. By western blotting, we confirmed increased membrane localization of calretinin and of dynamin-1 isoforms with higher isoelectric point, indicative for an underphosphorylated state of the molecule. In conclusion, our results indicate that chronic THC modulates the expression and subcellular localization of proteins implicated in Ras signaling, calcium-buffering potential, and trafficking.

  17. Environmentally Relevant Chronic Low-Dose Tritium and Gamma Exposures do not Increase Somatic Intrachromosomal Recombination in pKZ1 Mouse Spleen.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Laura; Serran, Mandy; Bertrand, Lindsey; Klokov, Dmitry; Wyatt, Heather; Blimkie, Melinda; Gueguen, Yann; Priest, Nicholas; Jourdain, Jean-René; Sykes, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    The toxicity of tritium is a public health concern given its presence and mobility in the environment. For risk predictions using radiological protection models, it is essential to allocate an appropriate radiation weighting factor (WR). This in turn should be consistent with the observed relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta radiation. Although the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently recommends a WR of 1 for the calculation of committed effective dose for X rays, gamma rays and electrons of all energies, including tritium energies, there are concerns that tritium health risks are underestimated and that current regulatory tritium drinking water standards need revision. In this study, we investigated potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mouse spleen after one month and eight months of chronic exposure to low-dose tritiated water (HTO). The dose regimes studied were designed to mimic human chronic consumption of HTO at levels of 10 kBq/l, 1 MBq/l and 20 MBq/l. The total doses from these radiation exposures ranged from 0.01 to 180 mGy. We also compared the biological effects of exposure to HTO with equivalent exposure to external whole-body (60)Co gamma rays. Changes in spleen weight and somatic intrachromosomal recombination (DNA inversions) in spleen tissue of pKZ1(Tg/+) mice were monitored. Our results showed no overall changes in either spleen organ weights and no increase mouse splenic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies, indicating that current drinking water standards for tritium exposure in the form of HTO are likely to be adequately protective against cytotoxic and genotoxic damage in spleen. These results demonstrate no evidence for cytotoxicity or genotoxicity in mouse spleen following chronic exposures to HTO activities (or equivalent gamma doses) up to 20 MBq/L.

  18. Deletion of STAT5a/b in Vascular Smooth Muscle Abrogates the Male Bias in Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension in Mice: Implications in the Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang-Ming; Yuan, Huijuan; Edwards, John G; Skayian, Yester; Ochani, Kanta; Miller, Edmund J; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia typically elicits pulmonary hypertension (PH) in mice with a male-dominant phenotype. There is an opposite-sex bias in human PH, with a higher prevalence in women, but greater survival (the “estrogen paradox”). We investigated the involvement of the STAT5a/b species, previously established to mediate sexual dimorphism in other contexts, in the sex bias in PH. Mice with heterozygous or homozygous deletions of the STAT5a/b locus in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were generated in crosses between STAT5a/bfl/fl and transgelin (SM22α)-Cre+/+ parents. Wild-type (wt ) males subjected to chronic hypoxia showed significant PH and pulmonary arterial remodeling, with wt females showing minimal changes (a male-dominant phenotype). However, in conditional STAT5+/− or STAT5−/− mice, hypoxic females showed the severest manifestations of PH (a female-dominant phenotype). Immunofluorescence studies on human lung sections showed that obliterative pulmonary arterial lesions in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) or hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH), both male and female, overall had reduced STAT5a/b, reduced PY-STAT5 and reduced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) GTPase atlastin-3 (ATL3). Studies of SMCs and endothelial cell (EC) lines derived from vessels isolated from lungs of male and female IPAH patients and controls revealed instances of coordinate reductions in STAT5a, STAT5b and ATL3 in IPAH-derived cells, including SMCs and ECs from the same patient. Taken together, these data provide the first definitive evidence for a contribution of STAT5a/b to the sex bias in PH in the hypoxic mouse and implicate reduced STAT5 in the pathogenesis of the human disease. PMID:25470773

  19. Hypoxic viscosity and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, T; Fleming, J; Kohner, E M

    1990-01-01

    Diabetic and sickle retinopathy have features in common--for example, venous dilatation, microaneurysms, and capillary closure preceding neovascularisation. Bearing in mind that haemoglobin in poorly controlled diabetes is abnormal and that extremely low oxygen tensions (known to cause sickling) exist in the healthy cat retina, we wished to explore the possibility that diabetic blood, like that of sickle cell disease, may become more viscous when deoxygenated. To do this we measured whole blood viscosity, under oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions, of 23 normal persons, 23 diabetic patients without retinopathy, and 34 diabetic patients with retinopathy. The shear rate used was 230 s-1, which is similar to that thought to prevail in the major retinal veins. The viscosity of blood from normal persons, corrected for packed cell volume, did not change significantly on deoxygenation: mean 4.54 (SD 0.38) cps, versus, 4.57 (0.39) paired t test, p = 0.66. Similarly the blood from diabetics without retinopathy showed no change: 4.42 (0.45) versus 4.42 (0.30), p = 0.98; whereas the blood from patients with retinopathy changed from 4.82 (0.48) to 4.95 (0.63), p = 0.027. The hypoxic viscosity ratio (deoxygenated divided by oxygenated viscosity) correlated with total serum cholesterol (r = 0.44, p = 0.018) but not with HbA1, serum glucose, triglycerides, or age. A disproportionate increase in venous viscosity relative to arterial viscosity would lead to increased intraluminal and transmural pressure and therefore exacerbate leakage across capillary walls. PMID:2378855

  20. Chemoreceptor stimulation and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Levitzky, M G

    1979-07-01

    Dogs with electromagnetic flow probes implanted on their left (QL) and main (QT) pulmonary arteries, catheters in their left atria and external jugular veins, and chronic tracheostomies were trained to accept Carlens dual-lumen endotracheal tubes into their tracheostomies, thus allowing separate ventilation of the two lungs. Swan-Ganz catheters were inserted through the jugular vein catheters. Pneumotachographs measured air flow to each lung. During bilateral ventilation with room air or O2, QL was about 36% of QT. When the left lung was ventilated with N2 while the right remained on O2, PAO2 was above 90 mmHg and QL fell to about 25% of QT. When the left lung was ventilated with N2 and the right with room air, PAO2 fell below 40 mm Hg and QL increased to control levels. This increase in perfusion of the hypoxic lung during systemic hypoxemia was not seen in dogs after surgical deafferentation of the systemic arterial chemoreceptors, indicating that stimulation of the arterial chemoreceptors may interfere with the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  1. Chronic ethanol intake modifies pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes under resting and K+ -stimulated conditions: role of calcium.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García-López, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2008-07-04

    Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase (Pcp) is an omega peptidase that removes pyroglutamyl N-terminal residues of peptides such as thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH), which is one of the neuropeptides that has been localized into many areas of the brain and acts as an endogenous neuromodulator of several parameters related to ethanol (EtOH) consumption. In this study, we analysed the effects of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity on mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and their corresponding supernatant under basal and K+ -stimulated conditions, in presence and absence of calcium (Ca2+) to know the regulation of Pcp on TRH. In basal conditions, chronic EtOH intake significantly decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+. However, supernatant Pcp activity is also decreased in presence and absence of calcium. Under K+-stimulated conditions, chronic EtOH intake decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+, whereas supernatant Pcp activity was significantly decreased only in presence of Ca2+. The general inhibitory effect of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity suggests an inhibition of TRH metabolism and an enhancement of TRH neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions, which could be related to putative processes of tolerance to EtOH in which TRH has been involved. Our data may also indicate that active peptides and their degrading peptidases are released together to the synaptic cleft to regulate the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions of these peptides, through a Ca2+ -dependent mechanism.

  2. Chronic alcohol exposure affects pancreatic acinar mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate uptake: studies with mouse 266-6 cell line and primary cells

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Nabokina, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin is essential for normal metabolic activity of all mammalian cells, including those of the pancreas. Cells obtain thiamin from their surroundings and enzymatically convert it into thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) in the cytoplasm; TPP is then taken up by mitochondria via a specific carrier the mitochondrial TPP transporter (MTPPT; product of the SLC25A19 gene). Chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts the health of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on physiological/molecular parameters of MTPPT is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse pancreatic acinar tumor cell line 266-6 and primary PAC of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC25A19 promoter that were fed alcohol chronically. Chronic alcohol exposure of 266-6 cells (but not to its nonoxidative metabolites ethyl palmitate and ethyl oleate) led to a significant inhibition in mitochondrial TPP uptake, which was associated with a decreased expression of MTPPT protein, mRNA, and activity of the SLC25A19 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of mice led to a significant inhibition in expression of MTPPT protein, mRNA, heterogeneous nuclear RNA, as well as in activity of SLC25A19 promoter in PAC. While chronic alcohol exposure did not affect DNA methylation of the Slc25a19 promoter, a significant decrease in histone H3 euchromatin markers and an increase in H3 heterochromatin marker were observed. These findings show, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts pancreatic MTPPT, and that this effect is exerted, at least in part, at the level of Slc25a19 transcription and appears to involve epigenetic mechanism(s). PMID:26316591

  3. Early Onset of Hypersynchronous Network Activity and Expression of a Marker of Chronic Seizures in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Juan, Cécile; Remaud, Jessica; Halley, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments. PMID:25768013

  4. Chronic GluN2B antagonism disrupts behavior in wild-type mice without protecting against synapse loss or memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; Meilandt, William J; Gogineni, Alvin; Reynen, Paul; Herrington, James; Weimer, Robby M; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-06-11

    Extensive evidence implicates GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B-NMDARs) in excitotoxic-insult-induced neurodegeneration and amyloid β (Aβ)-induced synaptic dysfunction. Therefore, inhibiting GluN2B-NMDARs would appear to be a potential therapeutic strategy to provide neuroprotection and improve cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are no reports of long-term in vivo treatment of AD mouse models with GluN2B antagonists. We used piperidine18 (Pip18), a potent and selective GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties, for long-term dosing in AD mouse models. Reduced freezing behavior in Tg2576 mice during fear conditioning was partially reversed after subchronic (17 d) Pip18 treatment. However, analysis of freezing behavior in different contexts indicated that this increased freezing likely involves elevated anxiety or excessive memory generalization in both nontransgenic (NTG) and Tg2576 mice. In PS2APP mice chronically fed with medicated food containing Pip18 for 4 months, spatial learning and memory deficits were not rescued, plaque-associated spine loss was not affected, and synaptic function was not altered. At the same time, altered open field activity consistent with increased anxiety and degraded performance in an active avoidance task were observed in NTG after chronic treatment. These results indicate that long-term treatment with a GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist does not provide a disease-modifying benefit and could cause cognitive liabilities rather than symptomatic benefit in AD mouse models. Therefore, these results challenge the expectation of the therapeutic potential for GluN2B-NMDAR antagonists in AD.

  5. The Functional Study of a Chinese Herbal Compounded Antidepressant Medicine – Jie Yu Chu Fan Capsule on Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Guo, Hongliang; Yuan, Junliang; Li, Shujuan; Hu, Wenli; Golden, Teresa; Wu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Jie Yu Chu Fan capsule (JYCF) is a new compounded Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of depression. The present study was designed to explore the antidepressant effects and the possible mechanisms of JYCF by using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) mouse model and comparing results to that of fluoxetine. Behavioral tests including an open field test, sucrose preference test and forced swim test were performed to evaluate the antidepressant effects of JYCF. The concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolic products including norepinephrine (NE), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice were determined by means of high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). The results show that a successful mouse CUMS model was established through 5 weeks of continuous unpredictable stimulation, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose preference and locomotor activity and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. Chronic treatment of JYCF (1.25, 2.5 and 5 g/kg) and fluoxetine (20mg/kg) significantly reversed the CUMS-induced behavioral abnormalities. JYCF (1.25, 2.5 and 5 g/kg) significantly increased NE in CUMS mouse prefrontal cortex (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.05 respectively) and 5-HT in hippocampus (P < 0.05). In summary, our findings suggest that JYCF exerts comparable antidepressant-like effects to that of fluoxetine in CUMS mice. Besides, the antidepressant-like effect of JYCF is mediated by the increase of monoaminergic transmitters including 5-HT and NE. PMID:26186537

  6. T-Cell Activation under Hypoxic Conditions Enhances IFN-γ Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Jessica; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Guo, Jia; Sugunan, Siva; Meednu, Nida; Packirisamy, Gopinath; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Golding, Amit; Semenza, Gregg; Georas, Steve N.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues are characterized by hypoxic microenvironments, both in the steady state and during inflammation. Although hypoxia regulates T-cell metabolism and survival, very little is known about whether or how hypoxia influences T-cell activation. We stimulated mouse CD4+ T cells in vitro with antibodies directed against the T-cell receptor (CD3) and CD28 under normoxic (20% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. Here we report that stimulation under hypoxic conditions augments the secretion of effector CD4+ T-cell cytokines, especially IFN-γ. The enhancing effects of hypoxia on IFN-γ secretion were independent of mouse strain, and were also unaffected using CD4+ T cells from mice lacking one copy of the gene encoding hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Using T cells from IFN-γ receptor–deficient mice and promoter reporter studies in transiently transfected Jurkat T cells, we found that the enhancing effects of hypoxia on IFN-γ expression were not due to effects on IFN-γ consumption or proximal promoter activity. In contrast, deletion of the transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45–related factor 2 attenuated the enhancing effect of hypoxia on IFN-γ secretion and other cytokines. We conclude that hypoxia is a previously underappreciated modulator of effector cytokine secretion in CD4+ T cells. PMID:19372249

  7. Regulation of the distribution and function of [(125)I]epibatidine binding sites by chronic nicotine in mouse embryonic neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Cristian A; Salamander, Rakel M; Collins, Allan C; Grady, Sharon R; Marks, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Chronic nicotine produces up-regulation of α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) (* denotes that an additional subunit may be part of the receptor). However, the extent of up-regulation to persistent ligand exposure varies across brain regions. The aim of this work was to study the cellular distribution and function of nAChRs after chronic nicotine treatment in primary cultures of mouse brain neurons. Initially, high-affinity [(125)I]epibatidine binding to cell membrane homogenates from primary neuronal cultures obtained from diencephalon and hippocampus of C57BL/6J mouse embryos (embryonic days 16-18) was measured. An increase in α4β2*-nAChR binding sites was observed in hippocampus, but not in diencephalon, after 24 h of treatment with 1 μM nicotine. However, a nicotine dose-dependent up-regulation of approximately 3.5- and 0.4-fold in hippocampus and diencephalon, respectively, was found after 96 h of nicotine treatment. A significant fraction of total [(125)I]epibatidine binding sites in both hippocampus (45%) and diencephalon (65%) was located on the cell surface. Chronic nicotine (96 h) up-regulated both intracellular and surface binding in both brain regions without changing the proportion of those binding sites compared with control neurons. The increase in surface binding was not accompanied by an increase in nicotine-stimulated Ca(2+) influx, suggesting persistent desensitization or inactivation of receptors at the plasma membrane occurred. Given the differences observed between hippocampus and diencephalon neurons exposed to nicotine, multiple mechanisms may play a role in the regulation of nAChR expression and function.

  8. Rat, Mouse, and Primate Models of Chronic Glaucoma Show Sustained Elevation of Extracellular ATP and Altered Purinergic Signaling in the Posterior Eye

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wennan; Hu, HuiLing; Sévigny, Jean; Gabelt, B'Ann T.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Johnson, Elaine C.; Morrison, John C.; Zode, Gulab S.; Sheffield, Val C.; Zhang, Xiulan; Laties, Alan M.; Mitchell, Claire H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The cellular mechanisms linking elevated IOP with glaucomatous damage remain unresolved. Mechanical strains and short-term increases in IOP can trigger ATP release from retinal neurons and astrocytes, but the response to chronic IOP elevation is unknown. As excess extracellular ATP can increase inflammation and damage neurons, we asked if sustained IOP elevation was associated with a sustained increase in extracellular ATP in the posterior eye. Methods. No ideal animal model of chronic glaucoma exists, so three different models were used. Tg-MyocY437H mice were examined at 40 weeks, while IOP was elevated in rats following injection of hypertonic saline into episcleral veins and in cynomolgus monkeys by laser photocoagulation of the trabecular meshwork. The ATP levels were measured using the luciferin-luciferase assay while levels of NTPDase1 were assessed using qPCR, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Results. The ATP levels were elevated in the vitreal humor of rats, mice, and primates after a sustained period of IOP elevation. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 was elevated in optic nerve head astrocytes exposed to extracellular ATP for an extended period. NTPDase1 was also elevated in the retinal tissue of rats, mice, and primates, and in the optic nerve of rats, with chronic elevation in IOP. Conclusions. A sustained elevation in extracellular ATP, and upregulation of NTPDase1, occurs in the posterior eye of rat, mouse, and primate models of chronic glaucoma. This suggests the elevation in extracellular ATP may be sustained in chronic glaucoma, and implies a role for altered purinergic signaling in the disease. PMID:26024091

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and its receptors contribute to apoptosis of oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord of spinal hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy) sustaining chronic mechanical compression.

    PubMed

    Inukai, Tomoo; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Yayama, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Mwaka, Erisa S; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2009-12-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: To examine the distribution of apoptotic cells and expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and its receptors in the spinal hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy) with chronic cord compression using immunohistochemical methods. OBJECTIVE.: To study the mechanisms of apoptosis, particularly in oligodendrocytes, which could contribute to degenerative change and demyelination in chronic mechanical cord compression. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: TNF-alpha acts as an external signal initiating apoptosis in neurons and oligodendrocytes after spinal cord injury. Chronic spinal cord compression caused neuronal loss, myelin destruction, and axonal degeneration. However, the biologic mechanisms of apoptosis in chronically compressed spinal cord remain unclear. METHODS.: The cervical spinal cord of 34 twy mice aged 20 to 24 weeks and 11 control animals were examined. The apoptotic cells were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. The expression and the localization of TNF-alpha, TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), and TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) were examined using immunoblot and immnohistochemical analysis. RESULTS.: The number of TUNEL-positive cells in the white matter increased with the severity of compression, which was further increased bilaterally in the white matter of twy/twy mice. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that the number of cells positive for TUNEL and RIP, a marker of oligodendrocytes, increased in the white matter with increased severity of cord compression. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated overexpression of TNF-alpha, TNFR1, and TNFR2 in severe compression. The expression of TNF-alpha appeared in local cells including microglia while that of TNFR1 and TNFR2 was noted in apoptotic oligodendrocytes. CONCLUSION.: Our results suggested that the proportion of apoptotic oligodendrocytes, causing spongy axonal degeneration and demyelination, correlated with the magnitude of cord

  10. An investigation of renal function in chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed Central

    Daggett, P.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation has been made into various parameters of renal function in patients with chronic bronchitis and in a group of hypoxic controls. Abnormalities of glomerular filtration rate and of water handling have been demostrated in chronic bronchitic patients but not in hypoxic controls. The abnormalities are related to the arterial Pco2. A hypothesis is presented as to the role of CO2 in causing abnormalities of renal function in chronic bronchitis. PMID:17853

  11. Important role of PLC-γ1 in hypoxic increase in intracellular calcium in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vishal R; Song, Tengyao; Joseph, Leroy; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    An increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) induces hypoxic cellular responses in the lungs; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We report, for the first time, that acute hypoxia significantly enhances phospholipase C (PLC) activity in mouse resistance pulmonary arteries (PAs), but not in mesenteric arteries. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining reveal the expression of PLC-γ1 protein in PAs and PASMCs, respectively. The activity of PLC-γ1 is also augmented in PASMCs following hypoxia. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated gene knockdown of mitochondrial complex III Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP) to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production prevents hypoxia from increasing PLC-γ1 activity in PASMCs. Myxothiazol, a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, reduces the hypoxic response as well. The PLC inhibitor U73122, but not its inactive analog U73433, attenuates the hypoxic vasoconstriction in PAs and hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs. PLC-γ1 knockdown suppresses its protein expression and the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Hypoxia remarkably increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) production, which is blocked by U73122. The IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or xestospongin-C inhibits the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). PLC-γ1 knockdown or U73122 reduces H(2)O(2)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs and contraction in PAs. 2-APB and xestospongin-C produce similar inhibitory effects. In conclusion, our findings provide novel evidence that hypoxia activates PLC-γ1 by increasing RISP-dependent mitochondrial ROS production in the complex III, which causes IP(3) production, IP(3)R opening, and Ca(2+) release, playing an important role in hypoxic Ca(2+) and contractile responses in PASMCs.

  12. Chronic 5-HT4 receptor agonist treatment restores learning and memory deficits in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression.

    PubMed

    Darcet, Flavie; Gardier, Alain M; David, Denis J; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe

    2016-03-11

    Cognitive disturbances are often reported as serious invalidating symptoms in patients suffering from major depression disorders (MDD) and are not fully corrected by classical monoaminergic antidepressant drugs. If the role of 5-HT4 receptor agonists as cognitive enhancers is well established in naïve animals or in animal models of cognitive impairment, their cognitive effects in the context of stress need to be examined. Using a mouse model of anxiety/depression (CORT model), we reported that a chronic 5-HT4 agonist treatment (RS67333, 1.5mg/kg/day) restored chronic corticosterone-induced cognitive deficits, including episodic-like, associative and spatial learning and memory impairments. On the contrary, a chronic monoaminergic antidepressant drug treatment with fluoxetine (18mg/kg/day) only partially restored spatial learning and memory deficits and had no effect in the associative/contextual task. These results suggest differential mechanisms underlying cognitive effects of these drugs. Finally, the present study highlights 5-HT4 receptor stimulation as a promising therapeutic mechanism to alleviate cognitive symptoms related to MDD.

  13. Melatonin rescues cardiovascular dysfunction during hypoxic development in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Itani, Nozomi; Skeffington, Katie L; Beck, Christian; Niu, Youguo; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-01-01

    There is a search for rescue therapy against fetal origins of cardiovascular disease in pregnancy complicated by chronic fetal hypoxia, particularly following clinical diagnosis of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Melatonin protects the placenta in adverse pregnancy; however, whether melatonin protects the fetal heart and vasculature in hypoxic pregnancy independent of effects on the placenta is unknown. Whether melatonin can rescue fetal cardiovascular dysfunction when treatment commences following FGR diagnosis is also unknown. We isolated the effects of melatonin on the developing cardiovascular system of the chick embryo during hypoxic incubation. We tested the hypothesis that melatonin directly protects the fetal cardiovascular system in adverse development and that it can rescue dysfunction following FGR diagnosis. Chick embryos were incubated under normoxia or hypoxia (14% O2) from day 1 ± melatonin treatment (1 mg/kg/day) from day 13 of incubation (term ~21 days). Melatonin in hypoxic chick embryos rescued cardiac systolic dysfunction, impaired cardiac contractility and relaxability, increased cardiac sympathetic dominance, and endothelial dysfunction in peripheral circulations. The mechanisms involved included reduced oxidative stress, enhanced antioxidant capacity and restored vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and NO bioavailability. Melatonin treatment of the chick embryo starting at day 13 of incubation, equivalent to ca. 25 wk of gestation in human pregnancy, rescues early origins of cardiovascular dysfunction during hypoxic development. Melatonin may be a suitable antioxidant candidate for translation to human therapy to protect the fetal cardiovascular system in adverse pregnancy.

  14. Gold nanoparticles enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jae-Won; Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won-Gun; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Materials and Methods Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Results Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. Conclusion In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors. PMID:27730800

  15. Combining hypoxic methods for peak performance.

    PubMed

    Millet, Gregoire P; Roels, B; Schmitt, L; Woorons, X; Richalet, J P

    2010-01-01

    New methods and devices for pursuing performance enhancement through altitude training were developed in Scandinavia and the USA in the early 1990s. At present, several forms of hypoxic training and/or altitude exposure exist: traditional 'live high-train high' (LHTH), contemporary 'live high-train low' (LHTL), intermittent hypoxic exposure during rest (IHE) and intermittent hypoxic exposure during continuous session (IHT). Although substantial differences exist between these methods of hypoxic training and/or exposure, all have the same goal: to induce an improvement in athletic performance at sea level. They are also used for preparation for competition at altitude and/or for the acclimatization of mountaineers. The underlying mechanisms behind the effects of hypoxic training are widely debated. Although the popular view is that altitude training may lead to an increase in haematological capacity, this may not be the main, or the only, factor involved in the improvement of performance. Other central (such as ventilatory, haemodynamic or neural adaptation) or peripheral (such as muscle buffering capacity or economy) factors play an important role. LHTL was shown to be an efficient method. The optimal altitude for living high has been defined as being 2200-2500 m to provide an optimal erythropoietic effect and up to 3100 m for non-haematological parameters. The optimal duration at altitude appears to be 4 weeks for inducing accelerated erythropoiesis whereas <3 weeks (i.e. 18 days) are long enough for beneficial changes in economy, muscle buffering capacity, the hypoxic ventilatory response or Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. One critical point is the daily dose of altitude. A natural altitude of 2500 m for 20-22 h/day (in fact, travelling down to the valley only for training) appears sufficient to increase erythropoiesis and improve sea-level performance. 'Longer is better' as regards haematological changes since additional benefits have been shown as hypoxic exposure

  16. Lung tumorigenic response of strain A mice exposed to hypoxic cell sensitizers alone and in combination with gamma-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mian, T.A.; Theiss, J.C.; Grdina, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of metronidazole, misonidazole, and desmethylmisonidazole on the induction of lung adenomas in the strain A mouse was examined. Two dose levels of the hypoxic cell sensitizers, 0.2 and 0.6 mg/g, were used either alone or in combination with 900 rads of gamma-radiation in a fractionated dose schedule of twice a week for 3 weeks. In the groups of mice which received hypoxic cell sensitizers only, the prevalence and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse were somewhat increased (p less than 0.10) in the group receiving the higher dose (0.6 mg/g) of misonidazole but was not significantly different from results for the control animals in the other two sensitizer groups. The combination of hypoxic cell sensitizer and radiation did not show any significant enhancement of lung tumor response when compared with the group which received radiation only. The dose of radiation used in this study significantly enhanced lung tumor formation in mice when compared with that in the control group. Thus, under the experimental exposure conditions used in this investigation, which were somewhat similar to the exposure conditions occurring in clinical treatment, each of the hypoxic cell sensitizers tested failed to sensitize significantly the mice to the carcinogenic effects of gamma-radiation.

  17. Peripheral nerve injury is associated with chronic, reversible changes in global DNA methylation in the mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Tajerian, Maral; Alvarado, Sebastian; Millecamps, Magali; Vachon, Pascal; Crosby, Cecilia; Bushnell, M Catherine; Szyf, Moshe; Stone, Laura S

    2013-01-01

    Changes in brain structure and cortical function are associated with many chronic pain conditions including low back pain and fibromyalgia. The magnitude of these changes correlates with the duration and/or the intensity of chronic pain. Most studies report changes in common areas involved in pain modulation, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and pain-related pathological changes in the PFC can be reversed with effective treatment. While the mechanisms underlying these changes are unknown, they must be dynamically regulated. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression in response to experience and environment is reversible and dynamic. Epigenetic modulation by DNA methylation is associated with abnormal behavior and pathological gene expression in the central nervous system. DNA methylation might also be involved in mediating the pathologies associated with chronic pain in the brain. We therefore tested a) whether alterations in DNA methylation are found in the brain long after chronic neuropathic pain is induced in the periphery using the spared nerve injury modal and b) whether these injury-associated changes are reversible by interventions that reverse the pathologies associated with chronic pain. Six months following peripheral nerve injury, abnormal sensory thresholds and increased anxiety were accompanied by decreased global methylation in the PFC and the amygdala but not in the visual cortex or the thalamus. Environmental enrichment attenuated nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity and reversed the changes in global PFC methylation. Furthermore, global PFC methylation correlated with mechanical and thermal sensitivity in neuropathic mice. In summary, induction of chronic pain by peripheral nerve injury is associated with epigenetic changes in the brain. These changes are detected long after the original injury, at a long distance from the site of injury and are reversible with environmental manipulation. Changes in brain structure and cortical function that

  18. Analgesia induced by the epigenetic drug, L-acetylcarnitine, outlasts the end of treatment in mouse models of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Notartomaso, Serena; Mascio, Giada; Bernabucci, Matteo; Zappulla, Cristina; Scarselli, Pamela; Cannella, Milena; Imbriglio, Tiziana; Gradini, Roberto; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2017-01-01

    Background L-acetylcarnitine, a drug marketed for the treatment of chronic pain, causes analgesia by epigenetically up-regulating type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors in the spinal cord. Because the epigenetic mechanisms are typically long-lasting, we hypothesized that analgesia could outlast the duration of L-acetylcarnitine treatment in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Results A seven-day treatment with L-acetylcarnitine (100 mg/kg, once a day, i.p.) produced an antiallodynic effect in the complete Freund adjuvant mouse model of chronic inflammatory pain. L-Acetylcarnitine-induced analgesia persisted for at least 14 days after drug withdrawal. In contrast, the analgesic effect of pregabalin, amitryptiline, ceftriaxone, and N-acetylcysteine disappeared seven days after drug withdrawal. L-acetylcarnitine treatment enhanced mGlu2/3 receptor protein levels in the dorsal region of the spinal cord. This effect also persisted for two weeks after drug withdrawal and was associated with increased levels of acetylated histone H3 bound to the Grm2 gene promoter in the dorsal root ganglia. A long-lasting analgesic effect of L-acetylcarnitine was also observed in mice subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. In these animals, a 14-day treatment with pregabalin, amitryptiline, tramadol, or L-acetylcarnitine produced a significant antiallodynic effect, with pregabalin displaying the greatest efficacy. In mice treated with pregabalin, tramadol or L-acetylcarnitine the analgesic effect was still visible 15 days after the end of drug treatment. However, only in mice treated with L-acetylcarnitine analgesia persisted 37 days after drug withdrawal. This effect was associated with an increase in mGlu2/3 receptor protein levels in the dorsal horns of the spinal cord. Conclusions Our findings suggest that L-acetylcarnitine has the unique property to cause a long-lasting analgesic effect that might reduce relapses in patients suffering from

  19. miR-181b as a therapeutic agent for chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the Eµ-TCL1 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bresin, Antonella; Callegari, Elisa; D'Abundo, Lucilla; Cattani, Caterina; Bassi, Cristian; Zagatti, Barbara; Narducci, M Grazia; Caprini, Elisabetta; Pekarsky, Yuri; Croce, Carlo M; Sabbioni, Silvia; Russo, Giandomenico; Negrini, Massimo

    2015-08-14

    The involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis suggests the possibility of anti-CLL therapeutic approaches based on miRNAs. Here, we used the Eµ-TCL1 transgenic mouse model, which reproduces leukemia with a similar course and distinct immunophenotype as human B-CLL, to test miR-181b as a therapeutic agent.In vitro enforced expression of miR-181b mimics induced significant apoptotic effects in human B-cell lines (RAJI, EHEB), as well as in mouse Eµ-TCL1 leukemic splenocytes. Molecular analyses revealed that miR-181b not only affected the expression of TCL1, Bcl2 and Mcl1 anti-apoptotic proteins, but also reduced the levels of Akt and phospho-Erk1/2. Notably, a siRNA anti-TCL1 could similarly down-modulate TCL1, but exhibited a reduced or absent activity in other relevant proteins, as well as a reduced effect on cell apoptosis and viability. In vivo studies demonstrated the capability of miR-181b to reduce leukemic cell expansion and to increase survival of treated mice.These data indicate that miR-181b exerts a broad range of actions, affecting proliferative, survival and apoptotic pathways, both in mice and human cells, and can potentially be used to reduce expansion of B-CLL leukemic cells.

  20. TCL1 transgenic mouse model as a tool for the study of therapeutic targets and microenvironment in human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bresin, A; D'Abundo, L; Narducci, M G; Fiorenza, M T; Croce, C M; Negrini, M; Russo, G

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a B-cell malignancy with a mature phenotype. In spite of its relatively indolent nature, no radical cure is as yet available. CLL is not associated with either a unique cytogenetic or a molecular defect, which might have been a potential therapeutic target. Instead, several factors are involved in disease development, such as environmental signals which interact with genetic abnormalities to promote survival, proliferation and an immune surveillance escape. Among these, PI3-Kinase signal pathway alterations are nowadays considered to be clearly important. The TCL1 gene, an AKT co-activator, is the cause of a mature T-cell leukemia, as well as being highly expressed in all B-CLL. A TCL1 transgenic mouse which reproduces leukemia with a distinct immunophenotype and similar to the course of the human B-CLL was developed several years ago and is widely used by many groups. This is a review of the CLL biology arising from work of many independent investigators who have used TCL1 transgenic mouse model focusing on pathogenetic, microenviroment and therapeutic targets. PMID:26821067

  1. TCL1 transgenic mouse model as a tool for the study of therapeutic targets and microenvironment in human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bresin, A; D'Abundo, L; Narducci, M G; Fiorenza, M T; Croce, C M; Negrini, M; Russo, G

    2016-01-28

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a B-cell malignancy with a mature phenotype. In spite of its relatively indolent nature, no radical cure is as yet available. CLL is not associated with either a unique cytogenetic or a molecular defect, which might have been a potential therapeutic target. Instead, several factors are involved in disease development, such as environmental signals which interact with genetic abnormalities to promote survival, proliferation and an immune surveillance escape. Among these, PI3-Kinase signal pathway alterations are nowadays considered to be clearly important. The TCL1 gene, an AKT co-activator, is the cause of a mature T-cell leukemia, as well as being highly expressed in all B-CLL. A TCL1 transgenic mouse which reproduces leukemia with a distinct immunophenotype and similar to the course of the human B-CLL was developed several years ago and is widely used by many groups. This is a review of the CLL biology arising from work of many independent investigators who have used TCL1 transgenic mouse model focusing on pathogenetic, microenviroment and therapeutic targets.

  2. Altered Hypoxic-Adenosine Axis and Metabolism in Group III Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Luis J; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Melicoff, Ernestina; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Bunge, Raquel R; Bruckner, Brian A; Loebe, Matthias; Eltzschig, Holger K; Pandit, Lavannya M; Blackburn, Michael R; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Group III pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a highly prevalent and deadly lung disorder with limited treatment options other than transplantation. Group III PH affects patients with ongoing chronic lung injury, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Between 30 and 40% of patients with IPF are diagnosed with PH. The diagnosis of PH has devastating consequences to these patients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality, yet the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of PH in patients with chronic lung disease remain elusive. Our hypothesis was that the hypoxic-adenosinergic system is enhanced in patients with group III PH compared with patients with IPF with no PH. Explanted lung tissue was analyzed for markers of the hypoxic-adenosine axis, including expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1A, adenosine A2B receptor, CD73, and equilibrative nucleotide transporter-1. In addition, we assessed whether altered mitochondrial metabolism was present in these samples. Increased expression of HIF-1A was observed in tissues from patients with group III PH. These changes were consistent with increased evidence of adenosine accumulation in group III PH. A novel observation of our study was of evidence suggesting altered mitochondrial metabolism in lung tissue from group III PH leading to increased succinate levels that are able to further stabilize HIF-1A. Our data demonstrate that the hypoxic-adenosine axis is up-regulated in group III PH and that subsequent succinate accumulation may play a part in the development of group III PH.

  3. Interleukin-33 drives activation of alveolar macrophages and airway inflammation in a mouse model of acute exacerbation of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Melissa M; Shadie, Alexander M; Flesher, Rylie P; Nikiforova, Valentina; Garthwaite, Linda; Tedla, Nicodemus; Herbert, Cristan; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33) in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM) were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  4. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha; Massey, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  5. Complement Component 5 Mediates Development of Fibrosis, via Activation of Stellate Cells, in 2 Mouse Models of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sendler, Matthias; Beyer, Georg; Mahajan, Ujjwal M.; Kauschke, Vivien; Maertin, Sandrina; Schurmann, Claudia; Homuth, Georg; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Halangk, Walter; Wartmann, Thomas; Weiss, Frank-Ulrich; Hegyi, Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Mayerle, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of complement component 5 (C5) in pancreatic fibrogenesis in mice and patients. Methods Chronic pancreatitis was induced by ligation of the midpancreatic duct, followed by a single supramaximal intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, in C57Bl6 (control) and C5-deficient mice. Some mice were given injections of 2 different antagonists of the receptor for C5a over 21 days. In a separate model, mice were given injections of cerulein for 10 weeks to induce chronic pancreatitis. Direct effects of C5 were studied in cultured primary cells. We performed genotype analysis for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs 17611 and rs 2300929 in C5 in patients with pancreatitis and healthy individuals (controls). Blood cells from 976 subjects were analyzed by transcriptional profiling. Results During the initial phase of pancreatitis, levels of pancreatic damage were similar between C5-deficient and control mice. During later stages of pancreatitis, C5-deficient mice and mice given injections of C5a-receptor antagonists developed significantly less pancreatic fibrosis than control mice. Primary pancreatic stellate cells were activated in vitro by C5a. There were no differences in the rs 2300929 SNP between subjects with or without pancreatitis, but the minor allele rs17611 was associated with a significant increase in levels of C5 in whole blood. Conclusions In mice, loss of C5 or injection of a C5a-receptor antagonist significantly reduced the level of fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis, but this was not a consequence of milder disease in early stages of pancreatitis. C5 might be a therapeutic target for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26001927

  6. Loss of a chromosomal region with synteny to human 13q14 occurs in mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia that originates from early-generated B1 B cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Kyoko; Formica, Anthony M.; Colombo, Matthew J.; Shinton, Susan A.; Brill-Dashoff, Joni; Morse, Herbert C.; Li, Yue-Sheng; Hardy, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    A common feature of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is chromosomal loss of 13q14, containing the miR15a/16-1 locus controlling B cell proliferation. However, CLL etiology remains unclear. CLL is an adult leukemia with an incidence that increases with advancing age. A unique feature of CLL is biased B cell antigen receptor (BCR) usage, autoreactivity with polyreactivity, and CD5 expression, all suggest a role for the BCR in driving CLL pathogenesis. Among human CLLs, BCRs autoreactive with non-muscle myosin IIA (AMyIIA) are recurrent. Here we identify an unmutated AMyIIA BCR in mouse, with distinctive CDR3 segments capable of promoting leukemogenesis. B cells with this AMyIIA BCR are generated by BCR-dependent signaling during B-1 fetal/neonatal development with CD5 induction, but not in adults. These early-generated AMyIIA B1 B cells self-renew, increase during aging, and can progress to become monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis, followed by aggressive CLL in aged mice, often with loss of a chromosomal region containing the miR15a/16-1 locus of varying length, as in human CLL. Thus, the ability to generate this defined autoreactive BCR by B1 B cells is a key predisposing step in mice, promoting progression to chronic leukemia. PMID:27055869

  7. Effects of chronic and acute methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) administration on locomotor activity, ultrasonic vocalizations, and neuromotor development in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups.

    PubMed

    Penner, M R; McFadyen, M P; Carrey, N; Brown, R E

    2001-11-01

    The present study examined the effects of chronic and acute treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) on isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations, spontaneous locomotor activity, and neuromotor coordination in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups. In Experiment 1, 3- to 11-day-old pups received daily injections of saline, 5 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of methylphenidate hydrochloride, or no injection and were tested on postnatal Days 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. Both doses of methylphenidate resulted in significant increases in locomotor activity at all ages, but had no significant effect on body weight, neuromotor development, or emission of ultrasonic vocalizations. In Experiment 2, pups were given a single dose of methylphenidate (5 or 20 mg/kg), saline, or no injection on one of postnatal Days 5, 7, 9, or 11. This acute methylphenidate treatment increased locomotor activity, but had no significant effects on ultrasonic vocalizations or neuromotor coordination. These results indicate that short-term, chronic methylphenidate treatment elevates locomotor responses, but has no immediate effects on anxietylike responses or on the development of neuromotor behavior of CD-1 mice in the first 11 days of life.

  8. Lysyl oxidase mediates hypoxic control of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Erler, Janine T; Giaccia, Amato J

    2006-11-01

    Hypoxic cancer cells pose a great challenge to the oncologist because they are especially aggressive, metastatic, and resistant to therapy. Recently, we showed that elevation of the extracellular matrix protein lysyl oxidase (LOX) correlates with metastatic disease and is essential for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In an orthotopic rodent model of breast cancer, a small-molecule or antibody inhibitor of LOX abolished metastasis, offering preclinical validation of this enzyme as a therapeutic target.

  9. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Cong; Ju, Wei-na; Jin, Hang; Sun, Xin; Zhao, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In this review, we

  10. Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in the Term Infant

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Ali; Wilson, Mary Ann; Johnston, Michael V.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Hypoxia-ischemia in the perinatal period is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated disabilities in children. There has been significant research progress in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy over the last two decades and many new molecular mechanisms have been identified. Despite all these advances, therapeutic interventions are still limited. In this review paper, we discuss a number of molecular pathways involved in hypoxia-ischemia, and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:19944838

  11. Modeling month-season of birth as a risk factor in mouse models of chronic disease: from multiple sclerosis to autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jacob D; Case, Laure K; Krementsov, Dimitry N; Raza, Abbas; Bartiss, Rose; Teuscher, Cory

    2017-03-14

    Month-season of birth (M-SOB) is a risk factor in multiple chronic diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS), where the lowest and greatest risk of developing MS coincide with the lowest and highest birth rates, respectively. To determine whether M-SOB effects in such chronic diseases as MS can be experimentally modeled, we examined the effect of M-SOB on susceptibility of C57BL/6J mice to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). As in MS, mice that were born during the M-SOB with the lowest birth rate were less susceptible to EAE than mice born during the M-SOB with the highest birth rate. We also show that the M-SOB effect on EAE susceptibility is associated with differential production of multiple cytokines/chemokines by neuroantigen-specific T cells that are known to play a role in EAE pathogenesis. Taken together, these results support the existence of an M-SOB effect that may reflect seasonally dependent developmental differences in adaptive immune responses to self-antigens independent of external stimuli, including exposure to sunlight and vitamin D. Moreover, our documentation of an M-SOB effect on EAE susceptibility in mice allows for modeling and detailed analysis of mechanisms that underlie the M-SOB effect in not only MS but in numerous other diseases in which M-SOB impacts susceptibility.-Reynolds, J. D., Case, L. K., Krementsov, D. N., Raza, A., Bartiss, R., Teuscher, C. Modeling month-season of birth as a risk factor in mouse models of chronic disease: from multiple sclerosis to autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  12. Chronic levodopa treatment alters expression and function of dopamine D3 receptor in the MPTP/p mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cote, Samantha R; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2015-01-12

    Chronic treatment with levodopa or antipsychotics results in manifestation of side-effects such as dyskinesia which correlates with changes in expression and function of receptors and signaling proteins. Previous studies have suggested a role for the dopamine D3 receptor in Parkinson's disease (PD) and tardive dyskinesia. Yet the expression and signaling function of D3 receptor in these disorders is not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that chronic levodopa treatment alters both expression and function of D3 receptors in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine plus probenecid (MPTP/p) mouse model of PD. drd3-EGFP reporter mice were injected biweekly with saline or MPTP and probenecid for a 5-week period. During the last two weeks of the 5-week period, the mice were administered saline or levodopa twice daily. Locomotor activity was measured during the treatment period. D3 receptor expression was determined by western blot analysis. D3 receptor signaling function was determined at tissue and single cell level by measuring the activation of D3 receptor-mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The drd3-EGFP mice administered MPTP/p exhibited akinesia/bradykinesia. Expression of D3 receptor protein in the dorsal striatum specifically increased in the MPTP/p-treated mice administered levodopa. In the dorsal striatum of levodopa and MPTP/p-treated drd3-EGFP mice, administration of a D3 receptor-selective dose of agonist, PD128907, failed to activate D3 receptor-MAPK signaling. These results suggest that MPTP-induced lesion and chronic levodopa treatment alters D3 receptor expression and function in the dorsal striatum which could contribute to the development of dyskinesias and other motor side-effects.

  13. NREM sleep hypersomnia and reduced sleep/wake continuity in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression based on chronic corticosterone administration.

    PubMed

    Le Dantec, Y; Hache, G; Guilloux, J P; Guiard, B P; David, D J; Adrien, J; Escourrou, P

    2014-08-22

    Sleep/wake disorders are frequently associated with anxiety and depression and to elevated levels of cortisol. Even though these alterations are increasingly sought in animal models, no study has investigated the specific effects of chronic corticosterone (CORT) administration on sleep. We characterized sleep/wake disorders in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression, based on chronic CORT administration in the drinking water (35 μg/ml for 4 weeks, "CORT model"). The CORT model was markedly affected during the dark phase by non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) increase without consistent alteration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Total sleep duration (SD) and sleep efficiency (SE) increased concomitantly during both the 24h and the dark phase, due to the increase in the number of NREM sleep episodes without a change in their mean duration. Conversely, the total duration of wake decreased due to a decrease in the mean duration of wake episodes despite an increase in their number. These results reflect hypersomnia by intrusion of NREM sleep during the active period as well as a decrease in sleep/wake continuity. In addition, NREM sleep was lighter, with an increased electroencephalogram (EEG) theta activity. With regard to REM sleep, the number and the duration of episodes decreased, specifically during the first part of the light period. REM and NREM sleep changes correlated respectively with the anxiety and the anxiety/depressive-like phenotypes, supporting the notion that studying sleep could be of predictive value for altered emotional behavior. The chronic CORT model in mice that displays hallmark characteristics of anxiety and depression provides an insight into understanding the changes in overall sleep architecture that occur under pathological conditions.

  14. Peptidylarginine Deiminases as Drug Targets in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sigrun

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen deprivation and infection are major causes of perinatal brain injury leading to cerebral palsy and other neurological disabilities. The identification of novel key factors mediating white and gray matter damage are crucial to allow better understanding of the specific contribution of different cell types to the injury processes and pathways for clinical intervention. Recent studies in the Rice-Vannucci mouse model of neonatal hypoxic ischemia (HI) have highlighted novel roles for calcium-regulated peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) and demonstrated neuroprotective effects of pharmacological PAD inhibition following HI and synergistic infection mimicked by lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

  15. Cyctotoxicities of mitomycin C and x rays to aerobic and hypoxic cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwell, S.

    1982-01-01

    Aerobic and hypoxic EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells in exponential growth in vitro were used to study cell survival after treatment with radiation (250k V X rays) and mitomycin C in various combinations. The cytotoxicities of the two agents were found to be additive as judged by comparing dose-response curves for each agent alone with survival curves after combination therapy and by isobologram analysis. The cytotoxicities resulting from combination treatments were found to be independent of the sequence of the treatments or the interval between treatments.

  16. NDRG1 deficiency attenuates fetal growth and the intrauterine response to hypoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Jacob; Chen, Baosheng; Shi, Xiao-Hua; Mishima, Takuya; Kokame, Koichi; Barak, Yaacov; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2014-03-01

    Intrauterine mammalian development depends on the preservation of placental function. The expression of the protein N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is increased in placentas of human pregnancies affected by fetal growth restriction and in hypoxic primary human trophoblasts, where NDRG1 attenuates cell injury. We sought to assess the function of placental NDRG1 in vivo and tested the hypothesis that NDRG1 deficiency in the mouse embryo impairs placental function and consequently intrauterine growth. We found that Ndrg1 knock-out embryos were growth restricted in comparison to wild-type or heterozygous counterparts. Furthermore, hypoxia reduced the survival of female, but not male, knock-out embryos. Ndrg1 deletion caused significant alterations in placental gene expression, with a marked reduction in transcription of several lipoproteins in the placental labyrinth. These transcriptional changes were associated with reduced fetal:maternal serum cholesterol ratio exclusively in hypoxic female embryos. Collectively, our findings indicate that NDRG1 promotes fetal growth and regulates the metabolic response to intrauterine hypoxic injury in a sexually dichotomous manner.

  17. Action of SNAIL1 in Cardiac Myofibroblasts Is Important for Cardiac Fibrosis following Hypoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Hirak; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic injury to the heart results in cardiac fibrosis that leads to cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. SNAIL1 is a zinc finger transcription factor implicated in fibrosis following organ injury and cancer. To determine if the action of SNAIL1 contributed to cardiac fibrosis following hypoxic injury, we used an endogenous SNAIL1 bioluminescence reporter mice, and SNAIL1 knockout mouse models. Here we report that SNAIL1 expression is upregulated in the infarcted heart, especially in the myofibroblasts. Utilizing primary cardiac fibroblasts in ex vivo cultures we find that pro-fibrotic factors and collagen I increase SNAIL1 protein level. SNAIL1 is required in cardiac fibroblasts for the adoption of myofibroblast fate, collagen I expression and expression of fibrosis-related genes. Taken together this data suggests that SNAIL1 expression is induced in the cardiac fibroblasts after hypoxic injury and contributes to myofibroblast phenotype and a fibrotic scar formation. Resultant collagen deposition in the scar can maintain elevated SNAIL1 expression in the myofibroblasts and help propagate fibrosis. PMID:27706205

  18. A comparative immunological analysis of CoCl2 treated cells with in vitro hypoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Shweta; Mishra, K P; Chanda, S; Singh, S B; Ganju, L

    2015-02-01

    The hypoxic preconditioning of mammalian cells has been shown to have beneficial effects against hypoxic injuries. However, very little information is available on the comparative analysis of immunological responses to hypoxic and hypoxia mimetic exposure. Therefore, in the present study, mouse peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes were subjected to hypoxia exposure (0.5 % O2) and hypoxia mimetic Cobalt chloride (CoCl2) treatment to evaluate their effect on immune response and delineate the underlying signaling mechanisms. The results obtained indicated that super oxide generation increased while TLR4 expression and cell surface markers like CD25, CD40 and CD69 were suppressed in both the treatments as compared to normoxia. Cobalt chloride treatment increased NF-κB expression, nitric oxide (NO) and iNOS expression, cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 as compared to hypoxia exposure. Our study showed that CoCl2 stabilizes HIF-1α to create hypoxia like conditions but it mainly influences the inflammatory response via NF-κB signaling pathway by skewing the production of proinflammatory molecules like TNF-α, IL-6 and NO.

  19. Chronic mild stress and imipramine treatment elicit opposite changes in behavior and in gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Erburu, M; Cajaleon, L; Guruceaga, E; Venzala, E; Muñoz-Cobo, I; Beltrán, E; Puerta, E; Tordera, R M

    2015-08-01

    Many studies suggest that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a target limbic region for stress response because a dysfunction here is linked to anhedonia, a decrease in reactivity to rewards, and to anxiety. It is suggested that stress-induced persistent molecular changes in this brain region could bring some light on the mechanisms perpetuating depressive episodes. In order to address this issue, here we have studied the long-term PFC gene expression pattern and behavioral effects induced by a chronic mild stress (CMS) model and antidepressant treatment in mice. CMS was applied to mice for six weeks and imipramine (10mg/kg, i.p.) or saline treatment was administered for five weeks starting from the third week of CMS. Mice were sacrificed one month after CMS and following two weeks after the discontinuation of drug treatment and the PFC was dissected and prepared for gene (mRNA) and protein expression studies. Using the same experimental design, a separate group of mice was tested for anhedonia, recognition memory, social interaction and anxiety. CMS induced a long-term altered gene expression profile in the PFC that was partially reverted by imipramine. Specifically, the circadian rhythm signaling pathway and functions such as gene expression, cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis as well as neurological and psychiatric disorders were affected. Of these, some changes of the circadian rhythm pathway (Hdac5, Per1, and Per2) were validated by RT-PCR and western-blot. Moreover, CMS induced long-lasting anhedonia that was reverted by imipramine treatment. Impaired memory, decreased social interaction and anxiety behavior were also induced by chronic stress. We have identified in the PFC molecular targets oppositely regulated by CMS and imipramine that could be relevant for chronic depression and antidepressant action. Among these, a possible candidate for further investigation could be the circadian rhythm pathway.

  20. Opiorphin is a master regulator of the hypoxic response in corporal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shibo; Tar, Moses Tarndie; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin Paul

    2014-01-01

    Men with sickle cell disease (SCD) risk developing priapism. Recognizing that SCD is a disease of hypoxia, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on gene expression in corporal smooth muscle (CSM) cells. Rat CSM cells in vitro were treated with CoCl2 or low oxygen tension to mimic hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions increased expression of genes previously associated with priapism in animal models. Variable coding sequence a1 (Vcsa1; the rat opiorphin homologue, sialorphin), hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (Hif-1a), and A2B adenosine receptor (a2br) were increased by 10-, 4-, and 6-fold, respectively, by treatment with CoCl2, whereas low oxygen tension caused increases in expression of 3-, 4-, and 1.5-fold, respectively. Sialorphin-treated CSM cells increased expression of Hif-1a and a2br by 4-fold, and vcsa1-siRNA treatment reduced expression by ∼50%. Using a Hif-1a inhibitor, we demonstrated up-regulation of a2br by sialorphin is dependent on Hif-1a, and knockdown of vcsa1 expression with vcsa1-siRNA demonstrated that hypoxic-up-regulation of Hif-1a is dependent on vcsa1. In CSM from a SCD mouse, there was 15-fold up-regulation of opiorphin at a life stage prior to priapism. We conclude that in CSM, opiorphins are master regulators of the hypoxic response. Opiorphin up-regulation in response to SCD-associated hypoxia activates CSM “relaxant” pathways; excessive activation of these pathways results in priapism.—Fu, S., Tar, M. T., Melman, A., Davies, K. P. Opiorphin is a master regulator of the hypoxic response in corporal smooth muscle cells. PMID:24803544

  1. Increased Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Protein Underlies Chronic Nicotine-Induced Up-Regulation of Nicotinic Agonist Binding Sites in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Whiteaker, Paul; Salminen, Outi; Brown, Robert W. B.; Cooper, John; Collins, Allan C.; Lindstrom, Jon M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic nicotine treatment elicits a brain region-selective increase in the number of high-affinity agonist binding sites, a phenomenon termed up-regulation. Nicotine-induced up-regulation of α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in cell cultures results from increased assembly and/or decreased degradation of nAChRs, leading to increased nAChR protein levels. To evaluate whether the increased binding in mouse brain results from an increase in nAChR subunit proteins, C57BL/6 mice were treated with nicotine by chronic intravenous infusion. Tissue sections were prepared, and binding of [125I]3-((2S)-azetidinylmethoxy)-5-iodo-pyridine (A85380) to β2*-nAChR sites, [125I]monoclonal antibody (mAb) 299 to α4 nAChR subunits, and [125I]mAb 270 to β2 nAChR subunits was determined by quantitative autoradiography. Chronic nicotine treatment dose-dependently increased binding of all three ligands. In regions that express α4β2-nAChR almost exclusively, binding of all three ligands increased coordinately. However, in brain regions containing significant β2*-nAChR without α4 subunits, relatively less increase in mAb 270 binding to β2 subunits was observed. Signal intensity measured with the mAbs was lower than that with [125I]A85380, perhaps because the small ligand penetrated deeply into the sections, whereas the much larger mAbs encountered permeability barriers. Immunoprecipitation of [125I]epibatidine binding sites with mAb 270 in select regions of nicotine-treated mice was nearly quantitative, although somewhat less so with mAb 299, confirming that the mAbs effectively recognize their targets. The patterns of change measured using immunoprecipitation were comparable with those determined autoradiographically. Thus, increases in α4β2*-nAChR binding sites after chronic nicotine treatment reflect increased nAChR protein. PMID:21228066

  2. [Autonomic regulation at emotional stress under hypoxic conditions in the elderly with physiological and accelerated aging: effect of hypoxic training].

    PubMed

    Os'mak, E D; Asanov, É O

    2014-01-01

    The effect of hypoxic training on autonomic regulation in psycho-emotional stress conditions in hypoxic conditions in older people with physiological (25 people) and accelerated (28 people) aging respiratory system. It is shown that hypoxic training leads to an increase in vagal activity indicators (HF) and reduced simpatovagal index (LF/HF), have a normalizing effect on the autonomic balance during stress loads in older people with different types of aging respiratory system.

  3. Acute and Chronic Plasma Metabolomic and Liver Transcriptomic Stress Effects in a Mouse Model with Features of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; D’Arpa, Peter; Donohue, Duncan E.; Muhie, Seid; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Luke, Brian T.; Grapov, Dmitry; Carroll, Erica E.; Meyerhoff, James L.; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2015-01-01

    Acute responses to intense stressors can give rise to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD diagnostic criteria include trauma exposure history and self-reported symptoms. Individuals who meet PTSD diagnostic criteria often meet criteria for additional psychiatric diagnoses. Biomarkers promise to contribute to reliable phenotypes of PTSD and comorbidities by linking biological system alterations to behavioral symptoms. Here we have analyzed unbiased plasma metabolomics and other stress effects in a mouse model with behavioral features of PTSD. In this model, C57BL/6 mice are repeatedly exposed to a trained aggressor mouse (albino SJL) using a modified, resident-intruder, social defeat paradigm. Our recent studies using this model found that aggressor-exposed mice exhibited acute stress effects including changed behaviors, body weight gain, increased body temperature, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic histopathologies and transcriptomic changes of heart tissue. Some of these acute stress effects persisted, reminiscent of PTSD. Here we report elevated proteins in plasma that function in inflammation and responses to oxidative stress and damaged tissue at 24 hrs post-stressor. Additionally at this acute time point, transcriptomic analysis indicated liver inflammation. The unbiased metabolomics analysis showed altered metabolites in plasma at 24 hrs that only partially normalized toward control levels after stress-withdrawal for 1.5 or 4 wks. In particular, gut-derived metabolites were altered at 24 hrs post-stressor and remained altered up to 4 wks after stress-withdrawal. Also at the 4 wk time point, hyperlipidemia and suppressed metabolites of amino acids and carbohydrates in plasma coincided with transcriptomic indicators of altered liver metabolism (activated xenobiotic and lipid metabolism). Collectively, these system-wide sequelae to repeated intense stress suggest that the simultaneous perturbed functioning of multiple organ systems (e.g., brain, heart

  4. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-04

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice.

  5. Chronic Caffeine Alters the Density of Adenosine, Adrenergic, Cholinergic, GABA, and Serotonin Receptors and Calcium Channels in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dan; Nikodijević, Olga; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. Chronic ingestion of caffeine by male NIH strain mice alters the density of a variety of central receptors. 2. The density of cortical A1 adenosine receptors is increased by 20%, while the density of striatal A2A adenosine receptors is unaltered. 3. The densities of cortical β1 and cerebellar β2 adrenergic receptors are reduced by ca. 25%, while the densities of cortical α1 and α2 adrenergic receptors are not significantly altered. Densities of striatal D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors are unaltered. The densities of cortical 5 HT1 and 5 HT2 serotonergic receptors are increased by 26–30%. Densities of cortical muscarinic and nicotinic receptors are increased by 40–50%. The density of cortical benzodiazepine-binding sites associated with GABAA receptors is increased by 65%, and the affinity appears slightly decreased. The density of cortical MK-801 sites associated with NMDA-glutaminergic receptors appear unaltered. 4. The density of cortical nitrendipine-binding sites associated with calcium channels is increased by 18%. 5. The results indicate that chronic ingestion of caffeine equivalent to about 100 mg/kg/day in mice causes a wide range of biochemical alterations in the central nervous system. PMID:8242688

  6. Germination under Extreme Hypobaric and Hypoxic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hirofumi

    Is the agriculture on Mars without a pressured greenhouse dome possible? In order to inves-tigate a possibility of plant cultivation for the space agriculture on Mars, germination rate for six species of plant, Jute, Chrysanthemum, Komatsuna, Cucumber, Okra, and Eggplant under extreme hypobaric and hypoxic condition was measured. Oxygen partial pressure was 1kPa which was equal to 1/100 of normal earth atmosphere. Seeds of Jute and Cucumber were able to germinate in six species. In the case of Jute, germination rate under the oxygen partial pressure of 1kPa was very high, 70

  7. Restoration of Haemoglobin Level Using Hydrodynamic Gene Therapy with Erythropoietin Does Not Alleviate the Disease Progression in an Anaemic Mouse Model for TGFβ1-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lea; Wogensen, Lise; Marcussen, Niels; Cecchi, Claudia R; Dalsgaard, Trine; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin, Epo, is a 30.4 kDa glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the fetal liver and the adult kidney. Epo exerts its haematopoietic effects by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of erythrocytes with subsequent improved tissue oxygenation. Epo receptors are furthermore expressed in non-haematopoietic tissue and today, Epo is recognised as a cytokine with many pleiotropic effects. We hypothesize that hydrodynamic gene therapy with Epo can restore haemoglobin levels in anaemic transgenic mice and that this will attenuate the extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidneys. The experiment is conducted by hydrodynamic gene transfer of a plasmid encoding murine Epo in a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses TGF-β1 locally in the kidneys. This model develops anaemia due to chronic kidney disease characterised by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, deposition of mesangial matrix and mild interstitial fibrosis. A group of age matched wildtype littermates are treated accordingly. After a single hydrodynamic administration of plasmid DNA containing murine EPO gene, sustained high haemoglobin levels are observed in both transgenic and wildtype mice from 7.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L to 9.4 ± 1.2 mmol/L and 10.7 ± 0.3 mmol/L to 15.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L, respectively. We did not observe any effects in the thickness of glomerular or tubular basement membrane, on the expression of different collagen types in the kidneys or in kidney function after prolonged treatment with Epo. Thus, Epo treatment in this model of chronic kidney disease normalises haemoglobin levels but has no effect on kidney fibrosis or function.

  8. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Novel Semicarbazide-Sensitive Amine-Oxidase Inhibitor SzV-1287 in Chronic Arthritis Models of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Ádám; Menghis, Awt; Botz, Bálint; Borbély, Éva; Kemény, Ágnes; Tékus, Valéria; Csepregi, Janka Zsófia; Mócsai, Attila; Juhász, Tamás; Zákány, Róza; Bogdán, Dóra; Mátyus, Péter; Keeble, Julie; Pintér, Erika; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2017-01-01

    Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) catalyses oxidative deamination of primary amines. Since there is no data about its function in pain and arthritis mechanisms, we investigated the effects of our novel SSAO inhibitor SzV-1287 in chronic mouse models of joint inflammation. Effects of SzV-1287 (20 mg/kg i.p./day) were investigated in the K/BxN serum-transfer and complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-evoked active immunization models compared to the reference SSAO inhibitor LJP-1207. Mechanonociception was assessed by aesthesiometry, oedema by plethysmometry, clinical severity by scoring, joint function by grid test, myeloperoxidase activity by luminescence, vascular leakage by fluorescence in vivo imaging, histopathological changes by semiquantitative evaluation, and cytokines by Luminex assay. SzV-1287 significantly inhibited hyperalgesia and oedema in both models. Plasma leakage and keratinocyte chemoattractant production in the tibiotarsal joint, but not myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by SzV-1287 in K/BxN-arthritis. SzV-1287 did not influence vascular and cellular mechanisms in CFA-arthritis, but significantly decreased histopathological alterations. There was no difference in the anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory actions of SzV-1287 and LJP-1207, but only SzV-1287 decreased CFA-induced tissue damage. Unlike SzV-1287, LJP-1207 induced cartilage destruction, which was confirmed in vitro. SzV-1287 exerts potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions in chronic arthritis models of distinct mechanisms, without inducing cartilage damage. PMID:28067251

  9. Chronic treatment with a novel γ-secretase modulator, JNJ-40418677, inhibits amyloid plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Broeck, B; Chen, J-M; Tréton, G; Desmidt, M; Hopf, C; Ramsden, N; Karran, E; Mercken, M; Rowley, A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE γ-Secretase modulators represent a promising therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease (AD) because they selectively decrease amyloid β 42 (Aβ42), a particularly neurotoxic Aβ species that accumulates in plaques in the brains of patients with AD. In the present study, we describe the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of a potent novel γ-secretase modulator, 2-(S)-(3,5-bis(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)phenyl)-4-methylpentanoic acid (JNJ-40418677). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The potency and selectivity of JNJ-40418677 for Aβ reduction was investigated in human neuroblastoma cells, rat primary neurones and after treatment with single oral doses in non-transgenic mouse brains. To evaluate the effect of JNJ-40418677 on plaque formation, Tg2576 mice were treated from 6 until 13 months of age via the diet. KEY RESULTS JNJ-40418677 selectively reduced Aβ42 secretion in human neuroblastoma cells and rat primary neurones, but it did not inhibit Notch processing or formation of other amyloid precursor protein cleavage products. Oral treatment of non-transgenic mice with JNJ-40418677 resulted in an excellent brain penetration of the compound and a dose- and time-dependent decrease of brain Aβ42 levels. Chronic treatment of Tg2576 mice with JNJ-40418677 reduced brain Aβ levels, the area occupied by plaques and plaque number in a dose-dependent manner compared with transgenic vehicle-treated mice. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS JNJ-40418677 selectively decreased Aβ42 production, showed an excellent brain penetration after oral administration in mice and lowered brain Aβ burden in Tg2576 mice after chronic treatment. JNJ-40418677 therefore warrants further investigation as a potentially effective disease-modifying therapy for AD. PMID:21232036

  10. Effects of Chronic Scopolamine Treatment on Cognitive Impairments and Myelin Basic Protein Expression in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Ha; Choi, Hyun Young; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Won, Moo-Ho; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Choi, Jung Hoon; Chung, Jin-Young; Lee, Choong-Hyun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kang, Il Jun; Kim, Jong-Dai

    2016-08-01

    Myelin plays an important role in learning and memory, and degradation of myelin is a key feature in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders involving cognitive dysfunction. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is one of the most abundant structural proteins in myelin and is essential for myelin formation and compaction. In this study, we first examined changes in the distribution of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers and MBP levels according to hippocampal subregion in mice following chronic systemic treatment with 1 mg/kg scopolamine (SCO) for 4 weeks. We found that SCO-induced cognitive impairments, as assayed by the water maze and passive avoidance tests, were significantly reduced 1 week after SCO treatment and the impairments were maintained without any hippocampal neuronal loss. MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers were easily detected in the stratum radiatum and lacunosum-moleculare of the hippocampus proper (CA1-3 region) and in the molecular and polymorphic layers of the dentate gyrus. The distribution of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers was not altered 1 week after SCO treatment. However, the density of MBP-immunoreactive myelinated fibers was significantly decreased 2 weeks after SCO treatment; thereafter, the density gradually, though not significantly, decreased with time. In addition, the changing pattern of MBP levels in the hippocampus following SCO treatment corresponded to immunohistochemical changes. In brief, this study shows that chronic systemic treatment with SCO induced significant degradation of MBP in the hippocampus without neuronal loss at least 2 weeks after SCO treatment, although cognitive impairments occurred 1 week after SCO treatment.

  11. Hepcidin-dependent and hepcidin-independent regulation of erythropoiesis in a mouse model of anemia of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Jacqueline M; Yates, Saiah C; Femnou, Laurette K; McCranor, Bryan J; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Vaulont, Sophie; Civin, Curt I; Walston, Jeremy D; Roy, Cindy N

    2014-05-01

    Increased hepcidin antimicrobial peptide correlates with hypoferremia and anemia in various disease states, but its requirement for anemia of inflammation has not been adequately demonstrated. Anemia of inflammation is usually described as normocytic and normochromic, while diseases associated with over expression of hepcidin, alone, are often microcytic and hypochromic. These differences in erythrocyte parameters suggest anemia in many inflammatory states may not be fully explained by hepcidin-mediated iron sequestration. We used turpentine-induced sterile abscesses to model chronic inflammation in mice with targeted disruption of Hepcidin 1 [Hepc1 (-/-)] or its positive regulator, Interleukin-6 [IL-6 (-/-)], to determine whether these genes are required for features characteristic of anemia of inflammation. Although hemoglobin levels did not decline in Hepc1 (-/-) mice with sterile abscesses, erythrocyte numbers were significantly reduced compared to untreated Hepc1 (-/-) mice. In contrast, both hemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte number declined significantly in wild type and IL-6 (-/-) mice with sterile abscesses. Both Hepc1 (-/-) and IL-6 (-/-) mice had increased erythrocyte mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin following sterile abscesses, while wild types had no change. Thus, IL-6 (-/-) mice with sterile abscesses exhibit an intermediate phenotype between wild type and Hepc1 (-/-). Our results demonstrate the requirement of Hepc1 for the development of anemia in this rodent model. Simultaneously, our results demonstrate hepcidin-independent effects of inflammation on the suppression of erythropoiesis. Our results suggest chronic anemia associated with inflammation may benefit from interventions protecting erythrocyte number in addition to anti-hepcidin interventions aimed at enhancing iron availability.

  12. Chronic Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Exposure Alters Corticotropin Releasing Factor Expression and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BNST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST. PMID:20537804

  13. Chronic anabolic androgenic steroid exposure alters corticotropin releasing factor expression and anxiety-like behaviors in the female mouse.

    PubMed

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-11-01

    In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BnST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST.

  14. Chronic Exposure to Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids Exacerbates Axonal Injury and Microgliosis in the CHIMERA Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R.; Cheng, Wai Hang; Carr, Michael; Martens, Kris M.; Zareyan, Shahab; Wilkinson, Anna; McInnes, Kurt A.; Cripton, Peter A.; Wellington, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    Concussion is a serious health concern. Concussion in athletes is of particular interest with respect to the relationship of concussion exposure to risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative condition associated with altered cognitive and psychiatric functions and profound tauopathy. However, much remains to be learned about factors other than cumulative exposure that could influence concussion pathogenesis. Approximately 20% of CTE cases report a history of substance use including androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). How acute, chronic, or historical AAS use may affect the vulnerability of the brain to concussion is unknown. We therefore tested whether antecedent AAS exposure in young, male C57Bl/6 mice affects acute behavioral and neuropathological responses to mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced with the CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration) platform. Male C57Bl/6 mice received either vehicle or a cocktail of three AAS (testosterone, nandrolone and 17α-methyltestosterone) from 8–16 weeks of age. At the end of the 7th week of treatment, mice underwent two closed-head TBI or sham procedures spaced 24 h apart using CHIMERA. Post-repetitive TBI (rTBI) behavior was assessed for 7 d followed by tissue collection. AAS treatment induced the expected physiological changes including increased body weight, testicular atrophy, aggression and downregulation of brain 5-HT1B receptor expression. rTBI induced behavioral deficits, widespread axonal injury and white matter microgliosis. While AAS treatment did not worsen post-rTBI behavioral changes, AAS-treated mice exhibited significantly exacerbated axonal injury and microgliosis, indicating that AAS exposure can alter neuronal and innate immune responses to concussive TBI. PMID:26784694

  15. Chronic Exposure to Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids Exacerbates Axonal Injury and Microgliosis in the CHIMERA Mouse Model of Repetitive Concussion.

    PubMed

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R; Cheng, Wai Hang; Carr, Michael; Martens, Kris M; Zareyan, Shahab; Wilkinson, Anna; McInnes, Kurt A; Cripton, Peter A; Wellington, Cheryl L

    2016-01-01

    Concussion is a serious health concern. Concussion in athletes is of particular interest with respect to the relationship of concussion exposure to risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative condition associated with altered cognitive and psychiatric functions and profound tauopathy. However, much remains to be learned about factors other than cumulative exposure that could influence concussion pathogenesis. Approximately 20% of CTE cases report a history of substance use including androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). How acute, chronic, or historical AAS use may affect the vulnerability of the brain to concussion is unknown. We therefore tested whether antecedent AAS exposure in young, male C57Bl/6 mice affects acute behavioral and neuropathological responses to mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced with the CHIMERA (Closed Head Impact Model of Engineered Rotational Acceleration) platform. Male C57Bl/6 mice received either vehicle or a cocktail of three AAS (testosterone, nandrolone and 17α-methyltestosterone) from 8-16 weeks of age. At the end of the 7th week of treatment, mice underwent two closed-head TBI or sham procedures spaced 24 h apart using CHIMERA. Post-repetitive TBI (rTBI) behavior was assessed for 7 d followed by tissue collection. AAS treatment induced the expected physiological changes including increased body weight, testicular atrophy, aggression and downregulation of brain 5-HT1B receptor expression. rTBI induced behavioral deficits, widespread axonal injury and white matter microgliosis. While AAS treatment did not worsen post-rTBI behavioral changes, AAS-treated mice exhibited significantly exacerbated axonal injury and microgliosis, indicating that AAS exposure can alter neuronal and innate immune responses to concussive TBI.

  16. Antidepressant-like effects of Sanyuansan in the mouse forced swim test, tail suspension test, and chronic mild stress model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuo; You, Zi-Li; Zhao, Qiu-Ying; Peng, Cheng; He, Gang; Gou, Xiao-Jun; Lin, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Natural products have been widely reported as effective therapeutic alternatives for treatment of depression. Sanyuansan is a compound recipe composed of ginseng total saponins, fish oil, and valeriana. The aims of this study were to validate whether Sanyuansan has antidepressant-like effects through acute behavioral tests including the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), locomotor activity test, and chronic mild stress (CMS) mice model of depression. C57BL/6 mice were given oral administration of 30 mg/kg imipramine, Sanyuansan, and saline, respectively. The acute behavioral tests including the TST, FST, and locomotor activity test were done after the administration of drugs for consecutively three times (24 hours, 1 hour, and 0.5 hour prior to the tests). Furthermore, the sucrose preference and the serum corticosterone level of mice in the CMS model were examined. Sanyuansan only at 900 mg/kg markedly reduced immobility time in the TST compared with the saline-treated group of mice. Sanyuansan at doses of 225 mg/kg, 450 mg/kg, and 900 mg/kg significantly reduced immobility time of mice in the FST. Sanyuansan reversed the CMS-induced anhedonia and hyperactivation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. In addition, our results showed that neither imipramine nor Sanyuansan at any dosage increased spontaneous motor activity. These results suggested that Sanyuansan induced significant antidepressant-like effects in mice in both acute and chronic animal models, which seemed unlikely to be attributed to an increase in locomotor activities of mice, and had no sedative-like effects.

  17. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase promotes hypoxic survival by activating the mitochondrial unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Mao, X R; Kaufman, D M; Crowder, C M

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the mouse nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase type 1 (Nmnat1) produce two remarkable phenotypes: protection against traumatic axonal degeneration and reduced hypoxic brain injury. Despite intensive efforts, the mechanism of Nmnat1 cytoprotection remains elusive. To develop a new model to define this mechanism, we heterologously expressed a mouse Nmnat1 non-nuclear-localized gain-of-function mutant gene (m-nonN-Nmnat1) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and show that it provides protection from both hypoxia-induced animal death and taxol-induced axonal pathology. Additionally, we find that m-nonN-Nmnat1 significantly lengthens C. elegans lifespan. Using the hypoxia-protective phenotype in C. elegans, we performed a candidate screen for genetic suppressors of m-nonN-Nmnat1 cytoprotection. Loss of function in two genes, haf-1 and dve-1, encoding mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mitoUPR) factors were identified as suppressors. M-nonN-Nmnat1 induced a transcriptional reporter of the mitoUPR gene hsp-6 and provided protection from the mitochondrial proteostasis toxin ethidium bromide. M-nonN-Nmnat1 was also protective against axonal degeneration in C. elegans induced by the chemotherapy drug taxol. Taxol markedly reduced basal expression of a mitoUPR reporter; the expression was restored by m-nonN-Nmnat1. Taken together, these data implicate the mitoUPR as a mechanism whereby Nmnat1 protects from hypoxic and axonal injury. PMID:26913604

  18. Effect of rapamycin on mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia and the development of nonhematopoietic malignancies in Emu-TCL1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zanesi, Nicola; Aqeilan, Rami; Drusco, Alessandra; Kaou, Mohamed; Sevignani, Cinzia; Costinean, Stefan; Bortesi, Laura; La Rocca, Gaspare; Koldovsky, Pavel; Volinia, Stefano; Mancini, Rita; Calin, George; Scott, Charles P; Pekarsky, Yuri; Croce, Carlo M

    2006-01-15

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the world. The TCL1 gene, responsible for prolymphocytic T cell leukemia, is also overexpressed in human B cell malignancies and overexpression of the Tcl1 protein occurs frequently in CLL. Aging transgenic mice that overexpress TCL1 under control of the mu immunoglobulin gene enhancer, develop a CD5+ B cell lymphoproliferative disorder mimicking human CLL and implicating TCL1 in the pathogenesis of CLL. In the current study, we exploited this transgenic mouse to investigate two different CLL-related issues: potential treatment of CLL and characterization of neoplasms that accompany CLL. We successfully transplanted CLL cells into syngeneic mice that led to CLL development in the recipient mice. This approach allowed us to verify the involvement of the Tcl1/Akt/mTOR biochemical pathway in the disease by testing the ability of a specific pharmacologic agent, rapamycin, to slow CLL. We also showed that 36% of these transgenic mice were affected by solid malignancies, in which the expression of the Tcl1 protein was absent. These findings indicate that other oncogenic mechanism(s) may be involved in the development of solid tumors in Emu-TCL1 transgenic mice.

  19. CD4+ T cell vaccination overcomes defective cross-presentation of fungal antigens in a mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Antonella De; Iannitti, Rossana G.; Bozza, Silvia; Beau, Remi; Casagrande, Andrea; D’Angelo, Carmen; Moretti, Silvia; Cunha, Cristina; Giovannini, Gloria; Massi-Benedetti, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Boon, Louis; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Romani, Luigina

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a model fungal pathogen and a common cause of infection in individuals with the primary immunodeficiency chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Although primarily considered a deficiency of innate immunity, CGD is also linked to dysfunctional T cell reactivity. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells mediate vaccine-induced protection from experimental aspergillosis, but the molecular mechanisms leading to the generation of protective immunity and whether these mechanisms are dysregulated in individuals with CGD have not been determined. Here, we show that activation of either T cell subset in a mouse model of CGD is contingent upon the nature of the fungal vaccine, the involvement of distinct innate receptor signaling pathways, and the mode of antigen routing and presentation in DCs. Aspergillus conidia activated CD8+ T cells upon sorting to the Rab14+ endosomal compartment required for alternative MHC class I presentation. Cross-priming of CD8+ T cells failed to occur in mice with CGD due to defective DC endosomal alkalinization and autophagy. However, long-lasting antifungal protection and disease control were successfully achieved upon vaccination with purified fungal antigens that activated CD4+ T cells through the endosome/lysosome pathway. Our study thus indicates that distinct intracellular pathways are exploited for the priming of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to A. fumigatus and suggests that CD4+ T cell vaccination may be able to overcome defective antifungal CD8+ T cell memory in individuals with CGD. PMID:22523066

  20. Transplantation of Donor-Origin Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Thymic Epithelial Progenitors Prevents the Development of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Liu, Yalan; Su, Min; Song, Yinhong; Rood, Debra; Lai, Laijun

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative therapy for many malignant and nonmalignant diseases. However, chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) remains a significant cause of late morbidity and mortality after allogeneic HSCT. cGVHD often manifests as autoimmune syndrome. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) play a critical role in supporting negative selection and regulatory T-cell (Treg) generation. Studies have shown that damage in TECs is sufficient to induce cGVHD. We have previously reported that mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) can be selectively induced to generate thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPs) in vitro. When transplanted in vivo, mESC-TEPs further develop into TECs that support T-cell development. We show here that transplantation of donor-origin mESC-TEPs into cGVHD recipients induces immune tolerance to both donor and host antigens and prevents the development of cGVHD. This is associated with more TECs and Tregs. Our results suggest that embryonic stem cell-derived TEPs may offer a new tool to control cGVHD. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:121-130.

  1. Transplantation of Donor-Origin Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Thymic Epithelial Progenitors Prevents the Development of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Liu, Yalan; Su, Min; Song, Yinhong; Rood, Debra; Lai, Laijun

    2016-08-02

    : Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative therapy for many malignant and nonmalignant diseases. However, chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) remains a significant cause of late morbidity and mortality after allogeneic HSCT. cGVHD often manifests as autoimmune syndrome. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) play a critical role in supporting negative selection and regulatory T-cell (Treg) generation. Studies have shown that damage in TECs is sufficient to induce cGVHD. We have previously reported that mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) can be selectively induced to generate thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPs) in vitro. When transplanted in vivo, mESC-TEPs further develop into TECs that support T-cell development. We show here that transplantation of donor-origin mESC-TEPs into cGVHD recipients induces immune tolerance to both donor and host antigens and prevents the development of cGVHD. This is associated with more TECs and Tregs. Our results suggest that embryonic stem cell-derived TEPs may offer a new tool to control cGVHD.

  2. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tzekov, Radouil; Dawson, Clint; Orlando, Megan; Mouzon, Benoit; Reed, Jon; Evans, James; Crynen, Gogce; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham) we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL), tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A), microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B), collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3) and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1), APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the involvement of

  3. The grey mouse lemur uses season-dependent fat or protein sparing strategies to face chronic food restriction.

    PubMed

    Giroud, Sylvain; Perret, Martine; Stein, Peter; Goudable, Joëlle; Aujard, Fabienne; Gilbert, Caroline; Robin, Jean Patrice; Le Maho, Yvon; Zahariev, Alexandre; Blanc, Stéphane; Momken, Iman

    2010-01-21

    During moderate calorie restriction (CR) the heterotherm Microcebus murinus is able to maintain a stable energy balance whatever the season, even if only wintering animals enter into torpor. To understand its energy saving strategies to respond to food shortages, we assessed protein and energy metabolisms associated with wintering torpor expression or summering torpor avoidance. We investigated body composition, whole body protein turnover, and daily energy expenditure (DEE), during a graded (40 and 80%) 35-day CR in short-days (winter; SD40 and SD80, respectively) and long-days (summer; LD40 and LD80, respectively) acclimated animals. LD40 animals showed no change in fat mass (FM) but a 12% fat free mass (FFM) reduction. Protein balance being positive after CR, the FFM loss was early and rapid. The 25% DEE reduction, in LD40 group was mainly explained by FFM changes. LD80 animals showed a steady body mass loss and were excluded from the CR trial at day 22, reaching a survival-threatened body mass. No data were available for this group. SD40 animals significantly decreased their FM level by 21%, but maintained FFM. Protein sparing was achieved through a 35 and 39% decrease in protein synthesis and catabolism (protein turnover), respectively, overall maintaining nitrogen balance. The 21% reduction in energy requirement was explained by the 30% nitrogen flux drop but also by torpor as DEE FFM-adjusted remained 13% lower compared to ad-libitum. SD80 animals were unable to maintain energy and nitrogen balances, losing both FM and FFM. Thus summering mouse lemurs equilibrate energy balance by a rapid loss of active metabolic mass without using torpor, whereas wintering animals spare protein and energy through increased torpor expression. Both strategies have direct fitness implication: 1) to maintain activities at a lower body size during the mating season and 2) to preserve an optimal wintering muscle mass and function.

  4. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Tzekov, Radouil; Dawson, Clint; Orlando, Megan; Mouzon, Benoit; Reed, Jon; Evans, James; Crynen, Gogce; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham) we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL), tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A), microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B), collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3) and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1), APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the involvement of

  5. Synaptic NMDA Receptors Mediate Hypoxic Excitotoxic Death

    PubMed Central

    Wroge, Christine M.; Hogins, Joshua; Eisenman, Larry; Mennerick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Excessive NMDA receptor activation and excitotoxicity underlies pathology in many neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including hypoxia/ischemia. Thus, the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders demands a complete understanding of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation during excitotoxic insults. The extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis posits that synaptic NMDARs are neurotrophic/neuroprotective and extrasynaptic NMDARs are neurotoxic. In part, the extrasynaptic hypothesis is built on observed selectivity for extrasynaptic receptors of a neuroprotective use-dependent NMDAR channel blocker, memantine. In rat hippocampal neurons we found that a neuroprotective concentration of memantine shows little selectivity for extrasynaptic NMDARs when all receptors are tonically activated by exogenous glutamate. This led us to test the extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis using metabolic challenge, where the source of excitotoxic glutamate buildup may be largely synaptic. Three independent approaches suggest strongly that synaptic receptors participate prominently in hypoxic excitotoxicity. First, block of glutamate transporters with a non-substrate antagonist exacerbated rather than prevented damage, consistent with a primarily synaptic source of glutamate. Second, selective, preblock of synaptic NMDARs with a slowly reversible, use-dependent antagonist protected nearly fully against prolonged hypoxic insult. Third, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), which degrades ambient but not synaptic glutamate, did not protect against hypoxia but protected against exogenous glutamate damage. Together, these results suggest that synaptic NMDARs can mediate excitotoxicity, particularly when the glutamate source is synaptic and when synaptic receptor contributions are rigorously defined. Moreover, the results suggest that in some situations therapeutically targeting extrasynaptic receptors may be inappropriate. PMID:22573696

  6. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-07-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +/- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +/- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +/- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD50 was estimated to be 125-150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +/- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit.

  7. Possible role of lysophosphatidic acid in rat model of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by cellular and structural changes in the vascular wall of pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid, is implicated in this vascular remodeling in a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Exposure of Wistar rats to 10% O2 for 3 weeks induced an increase in the mean serum levels of LPA, to 40.9 (log-detransformed standard deviations: 23.4–71.7) μM versus 21.6 (11.0–42.3) μM in a matched control animal group (P = 0.037). We also observed perivascular LPA immunohistochemical staining in lungs of hypoxic rats colocalized with the secreted lysophospholipase D autotaxin (ATX). Moreover, ATX colocalized with mast cell tryptase, suggesting implication of these cells in perivascular LPA production. Hypoxic rat lungs expressed more ATX transcripts (2.4-fold) and more transcripts of proteins implicated in cell migration: β2 integrin (1.74-fold), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; 1.84-fold), and αM integrin (2.70-fold). Serum from the hypoxic group of animals had significantly higher chemoattractant properties toward rat primary lung fibroblasts, and this increase in cell migration could be prevented by the LPA receptor 1 and 3 antagonists. LPA also increased adhesive properties of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells as well as those of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, via the activation of LPA receptor 1 or 3 followed by the stimulation of gene expression of ICAM-1, β-1, E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule integrins. In conclusion, chronic hypoxia increases circulating and tissue levels of LPA, which might induce fibroblast migration and recruitment of mononuclear cells in pulmonary vasculature, both of which contribute to pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:25621161

  8. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development.

  9. The antifibrotic drug pirfenidone promotes pulmonary cavitation and drug resistance in a mouse model of chronic tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahidjo, Bintou A.; Maiga, Mariama C.; Ihms, Elizabeth A.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Cheung, Laurene S.; Beck, Sarah; Andrade, Bruno B.; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Pirfenidone is a recently approved antifibrotic drug for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Because tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by granulomatous inflammation in conjunction with parenchymal destruction and replacement fibrosis, we sought to determine whether the addition of pirfenidone as an adjunctive, host-directed therapy provides a beneficial effect during antimicrobial treatment of TB. We hypothesized that pirfenidone’s antiinflammatory and antifibrotic properties would reduce inflammatory lung damage and increase antimicrobial drug penetration in granulomas to accelerate treatment response. The effectiveness of adjunctive pirfenidone during TB drug therapy was evaluated using a murine model of chronic TB. Mice treated with standard therapy 2HRZ/4HR (H, isoniazid; R, rifampin; and Z, pyrazinamide) were compared with 2 alternative regimens containing pirfenidone (Pf) (2HRZPf/4HRPf and 2HRZPf/4HR). Contrary to our hypothesis, adjunctive pirfenidone use leads to reduced bacterial clearance and increased relapse rates. This treatment failure is closely associated with the emergence of isoniazid monoresistant bacilli, increased cavitation, and significant lung pathology. While antifibrotic agents may eventually be used as part of adjunctive host-directed therapy of TB, this study clearly demonstrates that caution must be exercised. Moreover, as pirfenidone becomes more widely used in clinical practice, increased patient monitoring would be required in endemic TB settings. PMID:27699232

  10. Therapeutic and space radiation exposure of mouse brain causes impaired DNA repair response and premature senescence by chronic oxidant production.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Rodriguez, Olga C; Winters, Thomas A; Fornace, Albert J; Albanese, Chris; Datta, Kamal

    2013-08-01

    Despite recent epidemiological evidences linking radiation exposure and a number of human ailments including cancer, mechanistic understanding of how radiation inflicts long-term changes in cerebral cortex, which regulates important neuronal functions, remains obscure. The current study dissects molecular events relevant to pathology in cerebral cortex of 6 to 8 weeks old female C57BL/6J mice two and twelve months after exposure to a γ radiation dose (2 Gy) commonly employed in fractionated radiotherapy. For a comparative study, effects of 1.6 Gy heavy ion 56Fe radiation on cerebral cortex were also investigated, which has implications for space exploration. Radiation exposure was associated with increased chronic oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis. These results when considered with decreased cortical thickness, activation of cell-cycle arrest pathway, and inhibition of DNA double strand break repair factors led us to conclude to our knowledge for the first time that radiation caused aging-like pathology in cerebral cortical cells and changes after heavy ion radiation were more pronounced than γ radiation.

  11. YAP is up-regulated in the bronchial airway smooth muscle of the chronic asthma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Jing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by leukocytic infiltration and tissue remodeling with structural changes including subepithelial fibrosis and ASM cells proliferation. The Hippo pathway is a key regulatory point involved in cell proliferation, fibroblasts, and smooth muscle cell differentiation. In order to disclose the relation between asthma and the Hippo pathway, expression of the Yes-associated protein (YAP), a key gene in the Hippo pathway, in the bronchial smooth muscle of chronic asthma model (CAM) was studied. 40 mice were randomly divided into control (wide type) and experimental group to construct CAM using chicken ovalbumin (OVA). Pathological changes of the lung tissues were observed in the CAM mice compared with the control using HE staining method. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect if YAP protein is expressed in the lung tissues. The pathological changes of the CAM group showed that a large number of inflammatory cells infiltration including mainly lymphocytes and a small amount of eosinophilic, with the presence of certain airway smooth muscle hyperplasia, was observed in comparison with the control. IHC results showed that the YAP protein was significantly increased compared with the control groups (P < 0.01). This result was further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay which detected the up-regulation of the YAP gene (P < 0.01) and Western blot. In conclusion, the YAP protein was significantly expressed in the bronchial airway tissues of the CAM mice, and could be used as an indicator for asthma. PMID:26617833

  12. Apoptotic Mediators are Upregulated in the Skeletal Muscle of Chronic/Progressive Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Erekat, Nour S

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). Parkinson disease is characterized by skeletal muscle abnormalities. The aim of this study is to illustrate the impact of PD induction on the expression of apoptotic mediators. Twenty normal albino mice were randomly selected and equally divided in control and PD groups. Chronic Parkinsonism was induced in the PD group using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTP/p). After that, samples from gastrocnemius muscles were evaluated by immunohistochemistry to examine the expression of p53 and active caspase-3 in the two groups of animals. P53 and active caspase-3 expression was significantly higher in gastrocnemius skeletal muscle in PD mice compared with that in the control mice (P value <0.01). Furthermore, we show PD gastrocnemius muscle atrophy measured by significant reduction (P < 0.01) in the muscle fiber cross-sectional area. Thus, our present data suggest that PD induction increased the expression of the apoptotic mediators p53 and active caspase-3 in gastrocnemius muscle, indicating the induction of apoptosis, which was correlative with gastrocnemius muscle atrophy subsequent to the induction of PD.

  13. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1+/− mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1+/−/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression. PMID:27406855

  14. Dietary phosphate restriction suppresses phosphaturia but does not prevent FGF23 elevation in a mouse model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiqin; Gillihan, Ryan; He, Nan; Fields, Timothy; Liu, Shiguang; Green, Troy; Stubbs, Jason R

    2013-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone that in end-stage renal disease is markedly increased in serum; however, the mechanisms responsible for this increase are unclear. Here, we tested whether phosphate retention in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is responsible for the elevation of FGF23 in serum using Col4α3 knockout mice, a murine model of Alport disease exhibiting CKD. We found a significant elevation in serum FGF23 in progressively azotemic 8- and 12-week-old CKD mice along with an increased fractional excretion of phosphorus. Both moderate and severe phosphate restriction reduced fractional excretion of phosphorus by 8 weeks, yet serum FGF23 levels remained strikingly elevated. By 12 weeks, FGF23 levels were further increased with moderate phosphate restriction, while severe phosphate restriction led to severe bone mineralization defects and decreased FGF23 production in bone. CKD mice on a control diet had low serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D) levels and 3-fold higher renal Cyp24α1 gene expression compared to wild-type mice. Severe phosphate restriction increased 1,25(OH)(2)D levels in CKD mice by 8 weeks and lowered renal Cyp24α1 gene expression despite persistently elevated serum FGF23. Renal klotho gene expression declined in CKD mice on a control diet, but improved with severe phosphate restriction. Thus, dietary phosphate restriction reduces the fractional excretion of phosphorus independent of serum FGF23 levels in mice with CKD.

  15. Hypoxic regulation of lactate dehydrogenase A. Interaction between hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and cAMP response elements.

    PubMed

    Firth, J D; Ebert, B L; Ratcliffe, P J

    1995-09-08

    The oxygen-regulated control system responsible for the induction of erythropoietin (Epo) by hypoxia is present in most (if not all) cells and operates on other genes, including those involved in energy metabolism. To understand the organization of cis-acting sequences that are responsible for oxygen-regulated gene expression, we have studied the 5' flanking region of the mouse gene encoding the hypoxically inducible enzyme lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH). Deletional and mutational analysis of the function of mouse LDH-reporter fusion gene constructs in transient transfection assays defined three domains, between -41 and -84 base pairs upstream of the transcription initiation site, which were crucial for oxygen-regulated expression. The most important of these, although not capable of driving hypoxic induction in isolation, had the consensus of a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) site, and cross-competed for the binding of HIF-1 with functionally active Epo and phosphoglycerate kinase-1 sequences. The second domain was positioned close to the HIF-1 site, in an analogous position to one of the critical regions in the Epo 3' hypoxic enhancer. The third domain had the motif of a cAMP response element (CRE). Activation of cAMP by forskolin had no effect on the level of LDH mRNA in normoxia, but produced a magnified response to hypoxia that was dependent upon the integrity of the CRE, indicating an interaction between inducible factors binding the HIF-1 and CRE sites.

  16. Utrophin A is essential in mediating the functional adaptations of mdx mouse muscle following chronic AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Al-Rewashdy, Hasanen; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Lin, Wei; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the absence of dystrophin along muscle fibers. An attractive therapeutic avenue for DMD consists in the upregulation of utrophin A, a protein with high sequence identity and functional redundancy with dystrophin. Recent work has shown that pharmacological interventions that induce a muscle fiber shift toward a slower, more oxidative phenotype with increased expression of utrophin A confer morphological and functional improvements in mdx mice. Whether such improvements result from the increased expression of utrophin A per se or are linked to other beneficial adaptations associated with the slow, oxidative phenotype remain to be established. To address this central issue, we capitalized on the use of double knockout (dKO) mice, which are mdx mice also deficient in utrophin. We first compared expression of signaling molecules and markers of the slow, oxidative phenotype in muscles of mdx versus dKO mice and found that both strains exhibit similar phenotypes. Chronic activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase with 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside (AICAR) resulted in expression of a slower, more oxidative phenotype in both mdx and dKO mice. In mdx mice, this fiber type shift was accompanied by clear functional improvements that included reductions in central nucleation, IgM sarcoplasmic penetration and sarcolemmal damage resulting from eccentric contractions, as well as in increased grip strength. These important morphological and functional adaptations were not seen in AICAR-treated dKO mice. Our findings show the central role of utrophin A in mediating the functional benefits associated with expression of a slower, more oxidative phenotype in dystrophic animals.

  17. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Billeh, Yazan N.; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25–P30, ≥50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  18. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

  19. Chronic exposure to nanoparticulate TiO2 causes renal fibrosis involving activation of the Wnt pathway in mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Hong, Fashui; Hong, Jie; Wang, Ling; Zhou, Yingjun; Liu, Dong; Xu, Bingqing; Yu, Xiaohong; Sheng, Lei

    2015-02-11

    Chronic exposure to nano-TiO2 may induce renal fibrosis, and the mechanism of this process is not well understood. Therefore, in this study, mice were administered nano-TiO2 by intragastric feeding for 9 months, and the urinary levels of nephrotoxicity biomarkers, activation of the Wnt pathway, and markers of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the kidneys were investigated. The findings suggested that exposure to nano-TiO2 increased the level of renal titanium accumulation, urinary levels of kidney injury molecule-1 (1.18 ± 0.13- to 3.60 ± 0.41-fold), clusterin (1.40 ± 0.16- to 5.14 ± 0.58-fold), and osteopontin (0.71 ± 0.08- to 2.41 ± 0.29-fold), and increased levels of renal inflammation and fibrosis. Furthermore, nano-TiO2 increased the level of expression of Wnt ligands (Wnt1, Wnt2, Wnt3, Wnt4, Wnt5a, Wnt6, Wnt7a, Wnt9a, Wnt10a, and Wnt11, 0.09 ± 0.02- to 4.84 ± 0.52-fold), Wnt receptors Frizzled (Fz1, Fz5, and Fz7, 0.37 ± 0.04- to 8.57 ± 0.91-fold), and coreceptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins 5 and 6 (0.73 ± 0.09- to 5.27 ± 0.56-fold) in the kidney. Wnt signaling components induced by nano-TiO2 were corroborated by decreased levels of expression of Wnt antagonist-related markers (Dkk1, Dkk2, Dkk3, Dkk4, and sFRP/FrzB, -0.06 ± 0.01- to -0.87 ± 0.09-fold) and increased levels of expression of Wnt target genes (Abcb1b, cyclin D1, and Myc, 0.03 ± 0.01- to 2.73 ± 0.28-fold) and EMT markers Colla1, Fn, Twist, and α-SMA (0.06 ± 0.02- to 5.80 ± 0.61-fold). These findings indicate that nano-TiO2 induced renal fibrosis that may be mediated via Wnt signaling.

  20. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  1. Chronic inflammation: is it the driver or is it paving the road for malignant transformation?

    PubMed Central

    Afrasiabi, Kambiz; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Fleischman, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in well-defined mouse models such as Giα2 knock out mouse has been shown to trigger formation and expansion of hypoxic niches and also leads to up regulation of NFĸB, offering cells which have adapted their genetic machinery to hypoxia a unique survival advantage. These adapted cells have been shown to acquire stem cell-like capabilities as shown by up regulation of stem cell markers. Such long lived cells become permanent residents in sub mucosa and acquire a malignant phenotype from long-term exposure to noxious environmental agents due to a barrier defect secondary to down regulation of barrier proteins such as Zo1 and Occludin. Indeed mitotic spindle disorientation in such mice has been proposed as another contributory factor to malignant transformation. Sterilization of bowel lumen of these mice through different techniques has prevented malignant transformation in the presence of chronic inflammation. These facts stand strongly against chronic inflammation as a true driver of carcinogenesis but clearly support its role in facilitating the emergence of the neoplastic clone. PMID:26124920

  2. Investigation of the modifying effects of vitamin A and hypoxic cell sensitizers in radiation carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mian, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of vitamin A (retinyl acetate) and three hypoxic cell sensitizers (metronidazole, misonidazole and desmethylmisonidazole) on lung tumor development in strain A mice exposed to radiation was assessed. In experiments involving vitamin A, two groups of mice were fed a low vitamin A diet (< 100 IU/100g diet) while the two other groups were fed a high vitamin A diet (800 IU/100 g diet). After two weeks one group maintained on the high vitamin A diet and one group maintained on the low vitamin A diet were given an acute dose of 500 rad of gamma radiation to the thoracic region. Mice were killed, their lungs were removed and the number of surface adenomas were counted. There was a significant increase in the number of mice bearing lung tumors and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse in the irradiated group maintained on the high vitamin A diet at 40 weeks post irradiation as compared to the irradiated group maintained on a low vitamin A diet. In the other experiment two dose levels of the hypoxic cell sensitizers, 0.2 mg/g and 0.6 mg/g, were used either alone or in combination with 900 rad of gamma radiation in a fractionated dose schedule of twice a week for three weeks. In the groups of mice which received hypoxic cell sensitizers only, the prevalence and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse were somewhat increased in the higher dose group (0.6 mg/g) of misonidazole but was not significantly different from the control animals in the other two sensitizer groups. The combination of hypoxic cell sensitizer and radiation did not show any significant enhancement of lung tumor response when compared with the group which received radiation only. The dose of radiation used in this study significantly enhanced lung tumor formation in mice when compared with the control group.

  3. Chronic Exposure to Low Doses of Dioxin Promotes Liver Fibrosis Development in the C57BL/6J Diet-Induced Obesity Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Caroline; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima; Leblanc, Alix F.; Touch, Sothea; Emond, Claude; Guerre-Millo, Michèle; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Barouki, Robert; Aggerbeck, Martine; Coumoul, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been associated with the progression of chronic liver diseases, yet the contribution of POPs to the development of fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition closely linked to obesity, remains poorly documented. Objectives: We investigated the effects of subchronic exposure to low doses of the POP 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand, on NAFLD progression in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a 10% low-fat (LFD) or a 45% high-fat (HFD) purified diet for 14 weeks and TCDD-exposed groups were injected once a week with 5 μg/kg TCDD or the vehicle for the last 6 weeks of the diet. Results: Liver histology and triglyceride levels showed that exposure of HFD fed mice to TCDD worsened hepatic steatosis, as compared to either HFD alone or LFD plus TCDD and the mRNA levels of key genes of hepatic lipid metabolism were strongly altered in co-treated mice. Further, increased liver collagen staining and serum transaminase levels showed that TCDD induced liver fibrosis in the HFD fed mice. TCDD in LFD fed mice increased the expression of several inflammation and fibrosis marker genes with no additional effect from a HFD. Conclusions: Exposure to TCDD amplifies the impairment of liver functions observed in mice fed an enriched fat diet as compared to a low fat diet. The results provide new evidence that environmental pollutants promote the development of liver fibrosis in obesity-related NAFLD in C57BL/6J mice. Citation: Duval C, Teixeira-Clerc F, Leblanc AF, Touch S, Emond C, Guerre-Millo M, Lotersztajn S, Barouki R, Aggerbeck M, Coumoul X. 2017. Chronic exposure to low doses of dioxin promotes liver fibrosis development in the C57BL/6J diet-induced obesity mouse model. Environ Health Perspect 125:428–436; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP316 PMID:27713108

  4. Role of Tachykinin 1 and 4 Gene-Derived Neuropeptides and the Neurokinin 1 Receptor in Adjuvant-Induced Chronic Arthritis of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, Éva; Hajna, Zsófia; Sándor, Katalin; Kereskai, László; Tóth, István; Pintér, Erika; Nagy, Péter; Szolcsányi, János; Quinn, John; Zimmer, Andreas; Stewart, James; Paige, Christopher; Berger, Alexandra; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Objective Substance P, encoded by the Tac1 gene, is involved in neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia via neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor activation. Its non-neuronal counterpart, hemokinin-1, which is derived from the Tac4 gene, is also a potent NK1 agonist. Although hemokinin-1 has been described as a tachykinin of distinct origin and function compared to SP, its role in inflammatory and pain processes has not yet been elucidated in such detail. In this study, we analysed the involvement of tachykinins derived from the Tac1 and Tac4 genes, as well as the NK1 receptor in chronic arthritis of the mouse. Methods Complete Freund’s Adjuvant was injected intraplantarly and into the tail of Tac1−/−, Tac4−/−, Tacr1−/− (NK1 receptor deficient) and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Paw volume was measured by plethysmometry and mechanosensitivity using dynamic plantar aesthesiometry over a time period of 21 days. Semiquantitative histopathological scoring and ELISA measurement of IL-1β concentrations of the tibiotarsal joints were performed. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reduced from day 11 in Tac4−/− and Tacr1−/− animals, while paw swelling was not altered in any strain. Inflammatory histopathological alterations (synovial swelling, leukocyte infiltration, cartilage destruction, bone damage) and IL-1β concentration in the joint homogenates were significantly smaller in Tac4−/− and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Conclusions Hemokinin-1, but not substance P increases inflammation and hyperalgesia in the late phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis. While NK1 receptors mediate its antihyperalgesic actions, the involvement of another receptor in histopathological changes and IL-1β production is suggested. PMID:23626716

  5. Measuring DNA Damage and Repair in Mouse Splenocytes After Chronic In Vivo Exposure to Very Low Doses of Beta- and Gamma-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Flegal, Matthew; Blimkie, Melinda S; Wyatt, Heather; Bugden, Michelle; Surette, Joel; Klokov, Dmitry

    2015-07-03

    Low dose radiation exposure may produce a variety of biological effects that are different in quantity and quality from the effects produced by high radiation doses. Addressing questions related to environmental, occupational and public health safety in a proper and scientifically justified manner heavily relies on the ability to accurately measure the biological effects of low dose pollutants, such as ionizing radiation and chemical substances. DNA damage and repair are the most important early indicators of health risks due to their potential long term consequences, such as cancer. Here we describe a protocol to study the effect of chronic in vivo exposure to low doses of γ- and β-radiation on DNA damage and repair in mouse spleen cells. Using a commonly accepted marker of DNA double-strand breaks, phosphorylated histone H2AX called γH2AX, we demonstrate how it can be used to evaluate not only the levels of DNA damage, but also changes in the DNA repair capacity potentially produced by low dose in vivo exposures. Flow cytometry allows fast, accurate and reliable measurement of immunofluorescently labeled γH2AX in a large number of samples. DNA double-strand break repair can be evaluated by exposing extracted splenocytes to a challenging dose of 2 Gy to produce a sufficient number of DNA breaks to trigger repair and by measuring the induced (1 hr post-irradiation) and residual DNA damage (24 hrs post-irradiation). Residual DNA damage would be indicative of incomplete repair and the risk of long-term genomic instability and cancer. Combined with other assays and end-points that can easily be measured in such in vivo studies (e.g., chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei frequencies in bone marrow reticulocytes, gene expression, etc.), this approach allows an accurate and contextual evaluation of the biological effects of low level stressors.

  6. Chronic active hepatitis induced by Helicobacter hepaticus in the A/JCr mouse is associated with a Th1 cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Whary, M T; Morgan, T J; Dangler, C A; Gaudes, K J; Taylor, N S; Fox, J G

    1998-07-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection in A/JCr mice results in chronic active hepatitis characterized by perivascular, periportal, and parenchymal infiltrates of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. This study examined the development of hepatitis and the immune response of A/JCr mice to H. hepaticus infection. The humoral and cell-mediated T helper immune response was profiled by measuring the postinfection (p.i.) antibody response in serum, feces, and bile and by the production of cytokines and proliferative responses by splenic mononuclear cells to H. hepaticus antigens. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG2a antibody developed by 4 weeks p.i. and persisted through 12 months. Splenocytes from infected mice proliferated and produced more gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) than interleukin-4 (IL-4) or IL-5 when cultured with H. hepaticus outer membrane proteins. The predominantly IgG2a antibody response in serum and the in vitro production of IFN-gamma in excess of IL-4 or IL-5 are consistent with a Th1 immune response reported in humans and mice infected with Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis, respectively. Mice infected with H. hepaticus developed progressively severe perivascular, periportal, and hepatic parenchymal lesions consisting of lymphohistiocytic and plasmacytic cellular infiltrates. In addition, transmural typhlitis was observed at 12 months p.i. The characterization of a cell-mediated Th1 immune response to H. hepaticus infection in the A/JCr mouse should prove valuable as a model for experimental regimens which manipulate the host response to Helicobacter.

  7. Mouse chronic social stress increases blood and brain kynurenine pathway activity and fear behaviour: Both effects are reversed by inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Fuertig, René; Azzinnari, Damiano; Bergamini, Giorgio; Cathomas, Flurin; Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Vavassori, Stefano; Luippold, Andreas; Hengerer, Bastian; Ceci, Angelo; Pryce, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Psychosocial stress is a major risk factor for mood and anxiety disorders, in which excessive reactivity to aversive events/stimuli is a major psychopathology. In terms of pathophysiology, immune-inflammation is an important candidate, including high blood and brain levels of metabolites belonging to the kynurenine pathway. Animal models are needed to study causality between psychosocial stress, immune-inflammation and hyper-reactivity to aversive stimuli. The present mouse study investigated effects of psychosocial stress as chronic social defeat (CSD) versus control-handling (CON) on: Pavlovian tone-shock fear conditioning, activation of the kynurenine pathway, and efficacy of a specific inhibitor (IDOInh) of the tryptophan-kynurenine catabolising enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1), in reversing CSD effects on the kynurenine pathway and fear. CSD led to excessive fear learning and memory, whilst repeated oral escitalopram (antidepressant and anxiolytic) reversed excessive fear memory, indicating predictive validity of the model. CSD led to higher blood levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, kynurenine (KYN), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and kynurenic acid, and higher KYN and 3-HK in amygdala and hippocampus. CSD was without effect on IDO1 gene or protein expression in spleen, ileum and liver, whilst increasing liver TDO2 gene expression. Nonetheless, oral IDOInh reduced blood and brain levels of KYN and 3-HK in CSD mice to CON levels, and we therefore infer that CSD increases IDO1 activity by increasing its post-translational activation. Furthermore, repeated oral IDOInh reversed excessive fear memory in CSD mice to CON levels. IDOInh reversal of CSD-induced hyper-activity in the kynurenine pathway and fear system contributes significantly to the evidence for a causal pathway between psychosocial stress, immune-inflammation and the excessive fearfulness that is a major psychopathology in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  8. BL-7010 Demonstrates Specific Binding to Gliadin and Reduces Gluten-Associated Pathology in a Chronic Mouse Model of Gliadin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    McCarville, Justin L.; Nisemblat, Yotam; Galipeau, Heather J.; Jury, Jennifer; Tabakman, Rinat; Cohen, Ad; Naftali, Esmira; Neiman, Bela; Halbfinger, Efrat; Murray, Joseph A.; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Varvak, Alexander; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Verdu, Elena F.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder in individuals that carry DQ2 or DQ8 MHC class II haplotypes, triggered by the ingestion of gluten. There is no current treatment other than a gluten-free diet (GFD). We have previously shown that the BL-7010 copolymer poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-styrene sulfonate) (P(HEMA-co-SS)) binds with higher efficiency to gliadin than to other proteins present in the small intestine, ameliorating gliadin-induced pathology in the HLA-HCD4/DQ8 model of gluten sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of two batches of BL-7010 to interact with gliadin, essential vitamins and digestive enzymes not previously tested, and to assess the ability of the copolymer to reduce gluten-associated pathology using the NOD-DQ8 mouse model, which exhibits more significant small intestinal damage when challenged with gluten than HCD4/DQ8 mice. In addition, the safety and systemic exposure of BL-7010 was evaluated in vivo (in rats) and in vitro (genetic toxicity studies). In vitro binding data showed that BL-7010 interacted with high affinity with gliadin and that BL-7010 had no interaction with the tested vitamins and digestive enzymes. BL-7010 was effective at preventing gluten-induced decreases in villus-to-crypt ratios, intraepithelial lymphocytosis and alterations in paracellular permeability and putative anion transporter-1 mRNA expression in the small intestine. In rats, BL-7010 was well-tolerated and safe following 14 days of daily repeated administration of 3000 mg/kg. BL-7010 did not exhibit any mutagenic effect in the genetic toxicity studies. Using complementary animal models and chronic gluten exposure the results demonstrate that administration of BL-7010 is effective and safe and that it is able to decrease pathology associated with gliadin sensitization warranting the progression to Phase I trials in humans. PMID:25365555

  9. PI3K/Akt contributes to increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages exposed to hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Young; Jeong, Eunshil; Joung, Sun Myung; Lee, Joo Young

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression is mediated by PI3K/Akt in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/Akt regulated HIF-1 activation leading to TLR4 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not involved in TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia-mediated TLR4 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in triggering immune and inflammatory responses by detecting invading microbial pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Increased expression of TLR4 is implicated in aggravated inflammatory symptoms in ischemic tissue injury and chronic diseases. Results from our previous study showed that TLR4 expression was upregulated by hypoxic stress mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) at a transcriptional level in macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the upstream signaling pathway that contributed to the increase of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Either treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of Akt expression by siRNA blocked the increase of TLR4 mRNA and protein levels in macrophages exposed to hypoxia and CoCl{sub 2}. Phosphorylation of Akt by hypoxic stress preceded nuclear accumulation of HIF-1{alpha}. A PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated CoCl{sub 2}-induced nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. In addition, HIF-1{alpha}-mediated upregulation of TLR4 expression was blocked by LY294002. Furthermore, sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia- and CoCl{sub 2}-induced upregulation of TLR4 mRNA and protein by inhibiting PI3K/Akt activation and the subsequent nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. However, p38 was not involved in HIF-1{alpha} activation and TLR4 expression induced by hypoxic stress in macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PI3K

  10. Ontogeny of hypoxic modulation of cardiac performance and its allometry in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Pan, T-C Francis; Burggren, Warren W

    2013-01-01

    The ontogeny of cardiac hypoxic responses, and how such responses may be modified by rearing environment, are poorly understood in amphibians. In this study, cardiac performance was investigated in Xenopus laevis from 2 to 25 days post-fertilization (dpf). Larvae were reared under either normoxia or moderate hypoxia (PO₂ = 110 mmHg), and each population was assessed in both normoxia and acute hypoxia. Heart rate (f(H)) of normoxic-reared larvae exhibited an early increase from 77 ± 1 beats min⁻¹ at 2 dpf to 153 ± 1 beats min⁻¹ at 4 dpf, followed by gradual decreases to 123 ± 3 beats min⁻¹ at 25 dpf. Stroke volume (SV), 6 ± 1 nl, and cardiac output (CO), 0.8 ± 0.1 μl min⁻¹, at 5 dpf both increased by more than 40-fold to 25 dpf with rapid larval growth (~30-fold increase in body mass). When exposed to acute hypoxia, normoxic-reared larvae increased f(H) and CO between 5 and 25 dpf. Increased SV in acute hypoxia, produced by increased end-diastolic volume (EDV), only occurred before 10 dpf. Hypoxic-reared larvae showed decreased acute hypoxic responses of EDV, SV and CO at 7 and 10 dpf. Over the period of 2-25 dpf, cardiac scaling with mass showed scaling coefficients of -0.04 (f(H)), 1.23 (SV) and 1.19 (CO), contrary to the cardiac scaling relationships described in birds and mammals. In addition, f(H) scaling in hypoxic-reared larvae was altered to a shallower slope of -0.01. Collectively, these results indicate that acute cardiac hypoxic responses develop before 5 dpf. Chronic hypoxia at a moderate level can not only modulate this cardiac reflex, but also changes cardiac scaling relationship with mass.

  11. Dietary nitrate increases arginine availability and protects mitochondrial complex I and energetics in the hypoxic rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Branco-Price, Cristina; West, James A; Cowburn, Andrew S; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Johnson, Randall S; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic exposure is associated with impaired cardiac energetics in humans and altered mitochondrial function, with suppressed complex I-supported respiration, in rat heart. This response might limit reactive oxygen species generation, but at the cost of impaired electron transport chain (ETC) activity. Dietary nitrate supplementation improves mitochondrial efficiency and can promote tissue oxygenation by enhancing blood flow. We therefore hypothesised that ETC dysfunction, impaired energetics and oxidative damage in the hearts of rats exposed to chronic hypoxia could be alleviated by sustained administration of a moderate dose of dietary nitrate. Male Wistar rats (n = 40) were given water supplemented with 0.7 mmol l−1 NaCl (as control) or 0.7 mmol l−1 NaNO3, elevating plasma nitrate levels by 80%, and were exposed to 13% O2 (hypoxia) or normoxia (n = 10 per group) for 14 days. Respiration rates, ETC protein levels, mitochondrial density, ATP content and protein carbonylation were measured in cardiac muscle. Complex I respiration rates and protein levels were 33% lower in hypoxic/NaCl rats compared with normoxic/NaCl controls. Protein carbonylation was 65% higher in hearts of hypoxic rats compared with controls, indicating increased oxidative stress, whilst ATP levels were 62% lower. Respiration rates, complex I protein and activity, protein carbonylation and ATP levels were all fully protected in the hearts of nitrate-supplemented hypoxic rats. Both in normoxia and hypoxia, dietary nitrate suppressed cardiac arginase expression and activity and markedly elevated cardiac l-arginine concentrations, unmasking a novel mechanism of action by which nitrate enhances tissue NO bioavailability. Dietary nitrate therefore alleviates metabolic abnormalities in the hypoxic heart, improving myocardial energetics. PMID:25172947

  12. Opiorphin is a master regulator of the hypoxic response in corporal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shibo; Tar, Moses Tarndie; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin Paul

    2014-08-01

    Men with sickle cell disease (SCD) risk developing priapism. Recognizing that SCD is a disease of hypoxia, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on gene expression in corporal smooth muscle (CSM) cells. Rat CSM cells in vitro were treated with CoCl2 or low oxygen tension to mimic hypoxia. Hypoxic conditions increased expression of genes previously associated with priapism in animal models. Variable coding sequence a1 (Vcsa1; the rat opiorphin homologue, sialorphin), hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (Hif-1a), and A2B adenosine receptor (a2br) were increased by 10-, 4-, and 6-fold, respectively, by treatment with CoCl2, whereas low oxygen tension caused increases in expression of 3-, 4-, and 1.5-fold, respectively. Sialorphin-treated CSM cells increased expression of Hif-1a and a2br by 4-fold, and vcsa1-siRNA treatment reduced expression by ∼50%. Using a Hif-1a inhibitor, we demonstrated up-regulation of a2br by sialorphin is dependent on Hif-1a, and knockdown of vcsa1 expression with vcsa1-siRNA demonstrated that hypoxic-up-regulation of Hif-1a is dependent on vcsa1. In CSM from a SCD mouse, there was 15-fold up-regulation of opiorphin at a life stage prior to priapism. We conclude that in CSM, opiorphins are master regulators of the hypoxic response. Opiorphin up-regulation in response to SCD-associated hypoxia activates CSM "relaxant" pathways; excessive activation of these pathways results in priapism.

  13. Adenosine A2B receptor modulates intestinal barrier function under hypoxic and ischemia/reperfusion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Zhang, Chaojun; Yang, Hanwenbo; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Sun, Li-Hua; Yang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intestinal barrier function failure from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and acute hypoxia has been implicated as a critical determinant in the predisposition to intestinal inflammation and a number of inflammatory disorders. Here, we identified the role of Adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR) in the regulation of intestinal barrier function under I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. Methods: C57BL/6J mice were used, and were randomized into three groups: Sham, I/R, IR+PSB1115 (a specific A2BAR antagonist) groups. After surgery, the small bowel was harvested for immunohistochemical staining, RNA and protein content, and intestinal permeability analyses. Using an epithelial cell culture model, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on the epithelial function, and the role of A2BAR in the expressions of tight junction and epithelial permeability. The expressions of Claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western-Blot. Epithelial barrier function was assessed with transepithelial resistance (TER). Results and conclusions: The A2BAR antagonist, PSB1115, significantly increased tight junction protein expression after intestinal I/R or acute hypoxia conditions. PSB1115 also attenuated the disrupted distribution of TJ proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of A2BAR attenuated the decrease in TER induced by I/R or acute hypoxic conditions, and maintained intestinal barrier function. Antagonism of A2BAR activity improves intestinal epithelial structure and barrier function in a mouse model of intestinal I/R and a cell model of acute hypoxia. These findings support a potentially destructive role for A2BAR under intestinal I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. PMID:24966910

  14. Small Molecule Inhibition of microRNA-210 Reprograms an Oncogenic Hypoxic Circuit.

    PubMed

    Costales, Matthew G; Haga, Christopher L; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-03-08

    A hypoxic state is critical to the metastatic and invasive characteristics of cancer. Numerous pathways play critical roles in cancer maintenance, many of which include noncoding RNAs such as microRNA (miR)-210 that regulates hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). Herein, we describe the identification of a small molecule named Targapremir-210 that binds to the Dicer site of the miR-210 hairpin precursor. This interaction inhibits production of the mature miRNA, derepresses glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like enzyme (GPD1L), a hypoxia-associated protein negatively regulated by miR-210, decreases HIF-1α, and triggers apoptosis of triple negative breast cancer cells only under hypoxic conditions. Further, Targapremir-210 inhibits tumorigenesis in a mouse xenograft model of hypoxic triple negative breast cancer. Many factors govern molecular recognition of biological targets by small molecules. For protein, chemoproteomics and activity-based protein profiling are invaluable tools to study small molecule target engagement and selectivity in cells. Such approaches are lacking for RNA, leaving a void in the understanding of its druggability. We applied Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP) to study the cellular selectivity and the on- and off-targets of Targapremir-210. Targapremir-210 selectively recognizes the miR-210 precursor and can differentially recognize RNAs in cells that have the same target motif but have different expression levels, revealing this important feature for selectively drugging RNAs for the first time. These studies show that small molecules can be rapidly designed to selectively target RNAs and affect cellular responses to environmental conditions, resulting in favorable benefits against cancer. Further, they help define rules for identifying druggable targets in the transcriptome.

  15. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed.

  16. Thalamic mediation of hypoxic respiratory depression in lambs.

    PubMed

    Koos, Brian J; Rajaee, Arezoo; Ibe, Basil; Guerra, Catalina; Kruger, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Immaturity of respiratory controllers in preterm infants dispose to recurrent apnea and oxygen deprivation. Accompanying reductions in brain oxygen tensions evoke respiratory depression, potentially exacerbating hypoxemia. Central respiratory depression during moderate hypoxia is revealed in the ventilatory decline following initial augmentation. This study determined whether the thalamic parafascicular nuclear (Pf) complex involved in adult nociception and sensorimotor regulation (Bentivoglio M, Balerecia G, Kruger L. Prog Brain Res 87: 53-80, 1991) also becomes a postnatal controller of hypoxic ventilatory decline. Respiratory responses to moderate isocapnic hypoxia were studied in conscious lambs. Hypoxic ventilatory decline was compared with peak augmentation. Pf and/or adjacent thalamic structures were destroyed by the neuron-specific toxin ibotenic acid (IB). IB lesions involving the thalamic Pf abolished hypoxic ventilatory decline. Lesions of adjacent thalamic nuclei that spared Pf and control injections of vehicle failed to blunt hypoxic respiratory depression. Our findings reveal that the thalamic Pf region is a critical controller of hypoxic ventilatory depression and thus a key target for exploring molecular concomitants of forebrain pathways regulating hypoxic ventilatory depression in early development.

  17. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, carotid body function and erythropoietin production in adult rats perinatally exposed to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Ramirez, Maria; Olea, Elena; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Cogolludo, Angel; Castañeda, Javier; Yubero, Sara; Agapito, Teresa; Gomez-Niño, Angela; Rocher, Asuncion; Rigual, Ricardo; Obeso, Ana; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; González, Constancio

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalians possess three cell systems that are activated by acute bodily hypoxia: pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), carotid body chemoreceptor cells (CBCC) and erythropoietin (EPO)-producing cells. In rats, chronic perinatal hyperoxia causes permanent carotid body (CB) atrophy and functional alterations of surviving CBCC. There are no studies on PASMC or EPO-producing cells. Our aim is to define possible long-lasting functional changes in PASMC or EPO-producing cells (measured as EPO plasma levels) and, further, to analyse CBCC functional alterations. We used 3- to 4-month-old rats born and reared in a normal atmosphere or exposed to perinatal hyperoxia (55–60% O2 for the last 5–6 days of pregnancy and 4 weeks after birth). Perinatal hyperoxia causes an almost complete loss of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which was correlated with lung oxidative status in early postnatal life and prevented by antioxidant supplementation in the diet. O2-sensitivity of K+ currents in the PASMC of hyperoxic animals is normal, indicating that their inhibition is not sufficient to trigger HPV. Perinatal hyperoxia also abrogated responses elicited by hypoxia on catecholamine and cAMP metabolism in the CB. An increase in EPO plasma levels elicited by hypoxia was identical in hyperoxic and control animals, implying a normal functioning of EPO-producing cells. The loss of HPV observed in adult rats and caused by perinatal hyperoxia, comparable to oxygen therapy in premature infants, might represent a previously unrecognized complication of such a medical intervention capable of aggravating medical conditions such as regional pneumonias, atelectases or general anaesthesia in adult life. Key points Adult animals that have been perinatally exposed to oxygen-rich atmospheres (hyperoxia), recalling those used for oxygen therapy in infants, exhibit a loss of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas vasoconstriction elicited by depolarizing agents is

  18. Hypoxic induction of caspase-11/caspase-1/interleukin-1beta in brain microglia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Gon; Lee, Heasuk; Son, Eunyung; Kwon, Oh-Young; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Suk, Kyoungho

    2003-06-10

    Caspase-11 is an inducible protease that plays an important role in both inflammation and apoptosis. Inflammatory stimuli induce and activate caspase-11, which is required for the activation of caspase-1 or interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) converting enzyme (ICE). Caspase-1 in turn mediates the maturation of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, which is one of the crucial mediators of neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Here, we report that hypoxic exposure of cultured brain microglia (BV-2 mouse microglia cells and rat primary microglial cultures) induces expression and activation of caspase-11, which is accompanied by activation of caspase-1 and secretion of mature IL-1beta and IL-18. Hypoxic induction of caspase-11 was observed in both mRNA and protein levels, and was mediated through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Transient global ischemia in rats also induced caspase-11 expression and IL-1beta production in hippocampus supporting our in vitro findings. Caspase-11-expressing cells in hippocampus were morphologically identified as microglia. Taken together, our results indicate that hypoxia induces a sequential event-caspase-11 induction, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1beta release-in brain microglia, and point out the importance of initial caspase-11 induction in hypoxia-induced inflammatory activation of microglia.

  19. The metal-responsive transcription factor-1 contributes to HIF-1 activation during hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Brian J. . E-mail: brian.murphy@sri.com; Sato, Barbara G.; Dalton, Timothy P.; Laderoute, Keith R.

    2005-11-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the major transcriptional regulator of the mammalian cellular response to low oxygen (hypoxia), is embedded within a complex network of signaling pathways. We have been investigating the importance of another stress-responsive transcription factor, MTF-1, for the adaptation of cells to hypoxia. This article reports that MTF-1 plays a central role in hypoxic cells by contributing to HIF-1 activity. Loss of MTF-1 in transformed Mtf1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results in an attenuation of nuclear HIF-1{alpha} protein accumulation, HIF-1 transcriptional activity, and expression of an established HIF-1 target gene, glucose transporter-1 (Glut1). Mtf1 null (Mtf1 KO) MEFs also have constitutively higher levels of both glutathione (GSH) and the rate-limiting enzyme involved in GSH synthesis-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit-than wild type cells. The altered cellular redox state arising from increased GSH may perturb oxygen-sensing mechanisms in hypoxic Mtf1 KO cells and decrease the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. Together, these novel findings define a role for MTF-1 in the regulation of HIF-1 activity.

  20. Pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction: how strong? How fast?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, D. W.; Klocke, R. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a minimally invasive technique for studying regional blood flow in conscious sheep, bypassing the complications of open-chest surgery, flow probes and tracer infusion. We quantitate regional perfusion continuously on the basis of regional clearance of methane (methane is produced in the sheep rumen, enters the circulation and is eliminated nearly completely (greater than 95%) in the lung). Tracheal intubation with a dual-lumen catheter isolates the gas exchange of the right apical lobe (RAL; less than 15% of the lung) from that of the remainder of the lung, which serves as a control (CL). We measure RAL and CL methane elimination by entraining expirates in constant flows, sampled continuously for methane. Results obtained with this technique and from regional oxygen uptake are in excellent agreement. We have found that hypoxic vasoconstriction is far more potent and stable during eucapnic hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia. The time course of the vasoconstriction suggests that many of the data in the literature may have been obtained prior to steady state.

  1. Hypoxic Hepatitis: A Review and Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Najeff; Chen, Po-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischemic hepatitis or shock liver, is characterized by a massive, rapid rise in serum aminotransferases resulting from reduced oxygen delivery to the liver. The most common predisposing condition is cardiac failure, followed by circulatory failure as occurs in septic shock and respiratory failure. HH does, however, occur in the absence of a documented hypotensive event or shock state in 50% of patients. In intensive care units, the incidence of HH is near 2.5%, but has been reported as high as 10% in some studies. The pathophysiology is multifactorial, but often involves hepatic congestion from right heart failure along with reduced hepatic blood flow, total body hypoxemia, reduced oxygen uptake by hepatocytes or reperfusion injury following ischemia. The diagnosis is primarily clinical, and typically does not require liver biopsy. The definitive treatment of HH involves correction of the underlying disease state, but successful management includes monitoring for the potential complications such as hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, hyperammonemia and hepatopulmonary syndrome. Prognosis of HH remains poor, especially for cases in which there was a delay in diagnosis. The in-hospital mortality rate is >50%, and the most frequent cause of death is the predisposing condition and not the liver injury itself. PMID:27777895

  2. Mass Law Predicts Hyperbolic Hypoxic Ventilatory Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severinghaus, John W.

    The hyperbolic hypoxic ventilatory response vs PaO2, HVRp, is interpreted as relecting a mass hyperbolic relationship of cytochrome PcO2 to cytochrome potential Ec, offset 32 torr by the constant diffusion gradient between arterial blood and cytochrome in CB at its constant metabolic rate dot VO_2 . Ec is taken to be a linear function of redox reduction and CB ventilatory drive. As Ec rises in hypoxia, the absolute potentials of each step in the citric acid cycle rises equally while the potential drop across each step remains constant because flux rate remains constant. A hypothetic HVRs ( dot VE vs SaO2) response curve computed from these assumptions is strikingly non linear. A hypothetic HVRp calculated from an assumed linear HVRs cannot be fit to the observed hyperbolic increase of ventilation in response to isocapnic hypoxia at PO2 less than 40 torr. The incompatibility of these results suggest that in future studies HVRs will not be found to be linear, especially below 80% SaO2 and HVRp will fail to be accurately hyperbolic.

  3. Advancing hypoxic training in team sports: from intermittent hypoxic training to repeated sprint training in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Faiss, Raphaël; Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), that is, a method where athletes live at or near sea level but train under hypoxic conditions, has gained unprecedented popularity. By adding the stress of hypoxia during 'aerobic' or 'anaerobic' interval training, it is believed that IHT would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea level. A thorough analysis of studies including IHT, however, leads to strikingly poor benefits for sea-level performance improvement, compared to the same training method performed in normoxia. Despite the positive molecular adaptations observed after various IHT modalities, the characteristics of optimal training stimulus in hypoxia are still unclear and their functional translation in terms of whole-body performance enhancement is minimal. To overcome some of the inherent limitations of IHT (lower training stimulus due to hypoxia), recent studies have successfully investigated a new training method based on the repetition of short (<30 s) 'all-out' sprints with incomplete recoveries in hypoxia, the so-called repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH). The aims of the present review are therefore threefold: first, to summarise the main mechanisms for interval training and repeated sprint training in normoxia. Second, to critically analyse the results of the studies involving high-intensity exercises performed in hypoxia for sea-level performance enhancement by differentiating IHT and RSH. Third, to discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning the effectiveness of those methods, and their inherent limitations, along with the new research avenues surrounding this topic.

  4. Thiopental Inhibits Global Protein Synthesis by Repression of Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 2 and Protects from Hypoxic Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, Christian I.; Lehane, Cornelius; Guelzow, Timo; Zenker, Simone; Strosing, Karl M.; Spassov, Sashko; Erxleben, Anika; Heimrich, Bernd; Buerkle, Hartmut; Humar, Matjaz

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic and traumatic brain injury is associated with increased risk for death and disability. The inhibition of penumbral tissue damage has been recognized as a target for therapeutic intervention, because cellular injury evolves progressively upon ATP-depletion and loss of ion homeostasis. In patients, thiopental is used to treat refractory intracranial hypertension by reducing intracranial pressure and cerebral metabolic demands; however, therapeutic benefits of thiopental-treatment are controversially discussed. In the present study we identified fundamental neuroprotective molecular mechanisms mediated by thiopental. Here we show that thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis, which preserves the intracellular energy metabolite content in oxygen-deprived human neuronal SK-N-SH cells or primary mouse cortical neurons and thus ameliorates hypoxic cell damage. Sensitivity to hypoxic damage was restored by pharmacologic repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase. Translational inhibition was mediated by calcium influx, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase, and inhibitory phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Our results explain the reduction of cerebral metabolic demands during thiopental treatment. Cycloheximide also protected neurons from hypoxic cell death, indicating that translational inhibitors may generally reduce secondary brain injury. In conclusion our study demonstrates that therapeutic inhibition of global protein synthesis protects neurons from hypoxic damage by preserving energy balance in oxygen-deprived cells. Molecular evidence for thiopental-mediated neuroprotection favours a positive clinical evaluation of barbiturate treatment. The chemical structure of thiopental could represent a pharmacologically relevant scaffold for the development of new organ-protective compounds to ameliorate tissue damage when oxygen availability is limited. PMID:24167567

  5. The role of inflammation in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: from cellular mechanisms to clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Poth, Jens M.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Olschewski, Andrea; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases sharing the common feature of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. The disease is usually characterized by mild to moderate pulmonary vascular remodeling that is largely thought to be reversible compared with the progressive irreversible disease seen in World Health Organization (WHO) group I disease. However, in these patients, the presence of PH significantly worsens morbidity and mortality. In addition, a small subset of patients with hypoxic PH develop “out-of-proportion” severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling that is irreversible and similar to that in WHO group I disease. In all cases of hypoxia-related vascular remodeling and PH, inflammation, particularly persistent inflammation, is thought to play a role. This review focuses on the effects of hypoxia on pulmonary vascular cells and the signaling pathways involved in the initiation and perpetuation of vascular inflammation, especially as they relate to vascular remodeling and transition to chronic irreversible PH. We hypothesize that the combination of hypoxia and local tissue factors/cytokines (“second hit”) antagonizes tissue homeostatic cellular interactions between mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts and/or smooth muscle cells) and macrophages and arrests these cells in an epigenetically locked and permanently activated proremodeling and proinflammatory phenotype. This aberrant cellular cross-talk between mesenchymal cells and macrophages promotes transition to chronic nonresolving inflammation and vascular remodeling, perpetuating PH. A better understanding of these signaling pathways may lead to the development of specific therapeutic targets, as none are currently available for WHO group III disease. PMID:25416383

  6. Psychological strain: examining the effect of hypoxic bedrest and confinement.

    PubMed

    Stavrou, Nektarios A M; McDonnell, Adam C; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to assess the effect of a 10-day exposure to the environmental stressors anticipated in future lunar habitats on indices of psychological strain. In addition to the reduced gravity of the Moon, future habitats on the Moon will likely maintain a hypobaric hypoxic environment. The hypobaric environment will eliminate the need for long decompression profiles prior to each extra-vehicular activity. We investigated the indices of psychological strain during three 10-day conditions, designed to assess the separate and combined effects of inactivity/unloading and normobaric hypoxia on several physiological systems. Eleven male participants underwent three 10-day campaigns in a randomised manner: 1) normobaric normoxic bed rest (NBR), 2) normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR) and 3) normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB). The most negative psychological profile appeared on day 10 of the HBR and HAMB (hypoxic) conditions. Concomitantly, a decrease in positive emotions was observed from baseline to day 10 of the HBR and NBR conditions. Thus, confinement in a hypoxic environment seems to exert a negative effect on an individual's psychological mood.

  7. Effect of DMPPO, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Eddahibi, Saadia; Raffestin, Bernadette; Le Monnier de Gouville, Anne-Charlotte; Adnot, Serge

    1998-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine 3′–5′-monophosphate (cyclic GMP) is the second messenger of important physiologically active mediators controlling the pulmonary vascular tone. To potentiate the effects of cyclic GMP on the pulmonary vasculature, we used DMPPO, a new selective PDE-5 inhibitor, and examined its action in a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.Levels of cyclic GMP measured during baseline conditions at 5 and 60 min of perfusion were similar in the perfusate of isolated lungs from normoxic and chronically hypoxic rats and did not differ with time. Pretreatment with DMPPO (1 μM) induced a larger increase in cyclic GMP concentration in the perfusate from chronically hypoxic rat lungs (319±36 at 5 min to 1821±83 pmol ml−1 at 60 min) than in normoxic rat lungs (329±20 to 1281±127 pmol ml−1, P<0.05).In isolated lungs preconstricted with U-46619, pretreatment with DMPPO (1 μM) potentiated the vasodilator effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (100 pM–10 nM) and sodium nitroprusside (1 pM–10 nM), but did not alter vasodilation to isoproterenol.In conscious rats previously exposed to 15 days hypoxia and studied under 10% O2, DMPPO (0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 mg kg−1, i.v. bolus) caused a dose-dependent decrease in pulmonary arterial pressure (Pap) with no change in systemic artery pressure (Sap) and cardiac output.Continuous infusion of DMPPO (0.1 mg kg−1 h−1 i.v. by osmotic pumps) in rats exposed to 10% O2 during 2-weeks reduced the Pap (P<0.05) and the degree of muscularization of pulmonary vessels at the alveolar wall (P<0.01) and alveolar duct levels (P<0.05) despite no significant change in right ventricular hypertrophy.These results suggest that cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase inhibition may selectively dilate pulmonary circulation during chronic hypoxia. PMID:9831902

  8. Effect of high-frequency positive-pressure ventilation on halothane ablation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Hall, S M; Chapleau, M; Cairo, J; Levitzky, M G

    1985-08-01

    High-frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV) was compared to intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (IPPV) during unilateral atelectasis with and without halothane anesthesia. Dogs with electromagnetic flow probes chronically implanted on their main (Qt) and left (Ql) pulmonary arteries were ventilated via Carlen's dual-lumen endotracheal tubes. In eight closed-chest dogs, about 43% of the cardiac output perfused the left lung during bilateral ventilation by either a Harvard animal respirator (IPPV) or a Health-dyne model 300 high-frequency ventilator (HFPPV). Unilateral atelectasis decreased blood flow (Ql/Qt) to that lung. Ql/Qt was 19 +/- 1% with HFPPV during left-lung atelectasis and right-lung ventilation, compared to 32 +/- 1% with unilateral IPPV. This suggests that HFPPV permits stronger hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Addition of 1% halothane increased blood flow to the atelectatic left lung during unilateral ventilation with IPPV but not with HFPPV. This suggests that halothane decreases the effects of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction during conventional ventilation but not during HFPPV.

  9. The blood antioxidant defence capacity during intermittent hypoxic training in elite swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Poprzęcki, S; Zając, A; Karpiński, J; Wilk, R; Bril, G; Maszczyk, A; Toborek, M

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the chronic effect of simulated intermittent normobaric hypoxia on blood antioxidant defence capacity in swimmers. The study included 14 male and 14 female competitive swimmers performing part of land training under simulated intermittent normobaric hypoxia (O2 = 15.5%) or in normoxia. Land interval training took place twice per week, with a total of 8 training units during the study, performed with individualized intensity. The activities of blood antioxidant enzymes did not change significantly during the first and last training unit in the hypoxic and normoxic group. However, when comparing individual variables a significant effect of exercise was observed on GPx an CAT activities, whereas training units significantly differentiated GPx and GR activities. The oxygen conditions and gender had a significant influence on CAT activity. The total antioxidant capacity was not significantly affected. Only in male swimmers from the hypoxic group did the training significantly increase resting levels of MDA. In conclusion, training in normobaric hypoxia was not an adequate stimulus for the excessive response of the antioxidant defence system, despite increased oxidative stress in these conditions. PMID:28090139

  10. The long noncoding RNA landscape in hypoxic and inflammatory renal epithelial injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Xue, Chenyi; Zhang, Hanrui; Shashaty, Michael G. S.; Gosai, Sager J.; Meyer, Nuala; Grazioli, Alison; Hinkle, Christine; Caughey, Jennifer; Li, Wenjun; Susztak, Katalin; Gregory, Brian D.; Li, Mingyao; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key species-specific regulators of cellular and disease processes. To identify potential lncRNAs relevant to acute and chronic renal epithelial injury, we performed unbiased whole transcriptome profiling of human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) in hypoxic and inflammatory conditions. RNA sequencing revealed that the protein-coding and noncoding transcriptomic landscape differed between hypoxia-stimulated and cytokine-stimulated human PTECs. Hypoxia- and inflammation-modulated lncRNAs were prioritized for focused followup according to their degree of induction by these stress stimuli, their expression in human kidney tissue, and whether exposure of human PTECs to plasma of critically ill sepsis patients with acute kidney injury modulated their expression. For three lncRNAs (MIR210HG, linc-ATP13A4-8, and linc-KIAA1737-2) that fulfilled our criteria, we validated their expression patterns, examined their loci for conservation and synteny, and defined their associated epigenetic marks. The lncRNA landscape characterized here provides insights into novel transcriptomic variations in the renal epithelial cell response to hypoxic and inflammatory stress. PMID:26400545

  11. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Bianca C.; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L.; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A.; McMullen, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions. PMID:26660322

  12. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Bianca C; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A; McMullen, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions.

  13. Enhanced non-eupneic breathing following hypoxic, hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic gas challenges in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Getsy, Paulina M; Davis, Jesse; Coffee, Gregory A; May, Walter J; Palmer, Lisa A; Strohl, Kingman P; Lewis, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    C57BL6 mice display non-eupneic breathing and spontaneous apneas during wakefulness and sleep as well as markedly disordered breathing following cessation of a hypoxic challenge. We examined whether (1) C57BL6 mice display marked non-eupneic breathing following hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic challenges, and (2) compared the post-hypoxia changes in non-eupneic breathing of C57BL6 mice to those of B6AF1 (57BL6 dam × A/J sire) and Swiss-Webster mice, which display different ventilatory responses than C57BL6 mice. C57BL6 mice displayed marked increases in respiratory frequency and non-eupneic breathing upon return to room-air after hypoxic (10% O2, 90% N2), hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2 and 74% N2) and hypoxic-hypercapnic (10% O2, 5% CO2 and 85% N2) challenges. B6AF1 mice displayed less tachypnea and reduced non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia, whereas Swiss-Webster mice displayed robust tachypnea with minimal increases in non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that non-eupneic breathing increases after physiologically-relevant hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge in C57BL6 mice and suggest that further studies with these and B6AF1 and Swiss-Webster mice will help define the genetics of non-eupneic breathing.

  14. Enhanced non-eupneic breathing following hypoxic, hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic gas challenges in conscious mice

    PubMed Central

    Getsy, Paulina M.; Davis, Jesse; Coffee, Gregory A.; May, Walter J.; Palmer, Lisa A.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    C57BL6 mice display non-eupneic breathing and spontaneous apneas during wakefulness and sleep as well as markedly disordered breathing following cessation of a hypoxic challenge. We examined whether (1) C57BL6 mice display marked non-eupneic breathing following hypercapnic or hypoxic-hypercapnic challenges, and (2) compared the post-hypoxia changes in non-eupneic breathing of C57BL6 mice to those of B6AF1 (57BL6 dam × A/J sire) and Swiss-Webster mice, which display different ventilatory responses than C57BL6 mice. C57BL6 mice displayed marked increases in respiratory frequency and non-eupneic breathing upon return to room-air after hypoxic (10% O2, 90% N2), hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2, 74% N2) and hypoxic-hypercapnic (10% O2, 5% CO2, 85% N2) challenges. B6AF1 mice displayed less tachypnea and reduced non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia, whereas Swiss-Webster mice displayed robust tachypnea with minimal increases in non-eupneic breathing post-hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that non-eupneic breathing increases after physiologically-relevant hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge in C57BL6 mice and suggest that further studies with these and B6AF1 and Swiss-Webster mice will help define the genetics of non-eupneic breathing. PMID:25242462

  15. Increase of cellular hypoxic tolerance by erythromycin and other antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Kasischke, K; Ludolph, A C; Riepe, M W

    1999-05-14

    Antibiotics are used extensively, but in addition to their anti-infectious effects some inhibit cellular energy metabolism. We investigated hypoxic tolerance following in vivo pretreatment with erythromycin and kanamycin, or in vitro pretreatment with ampicillin. Recovery of the CA1 population spike amplitude in hippocampal slices upon 15 min hypoxia improved time-dependently following single i.p. in vivo pretreatment with erythromycin (maximum at 6 h: recovery 90+/-7% (mean s.d.) vs 30% in untreated controls; p<0.01). The hypoxia-induced increase in NADH was smaller in slices that recovered from hypoxia. We conclude that antibiotics increase cellular hypoxic tolerance to a varying extent. Use of antibiotics in experimental studies may, therefore, distort conclusions about hypoxic sensitivity and confounding mechanisms. In contrast, antibiotics may provide an effective strategy to induce chemical preconditioning in humans.

  16. Aging and chronic alcohol consumption are determinants of p16 gene expression, genomic DNA methylation and p16 promoter methylation in the mouse colon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  17. Ageing, chronic alcohol consumption and folate are determinants of genomic DNA methylation, p16 promoter methylation and the expression of p16 in the mouse colon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elder age and chronic alcohol consumption are important risk factors for the development of colon cancer. Each factor can alter genomic and gene-specific DNA methylation. This study examined the effects of aging and chronic alcohol consumption on genomic and p16-specific methylation, and p16 express...

  18. Role of glutamate and serotonin on the hypoxic ventilatory response in high-altitude-adapted plateau Pika.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhenzhong; Voituron, Nicolas; Wuren, Tana; Jeton, Florine; Jin, Guoen; Marchant, Dominique; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Ge, Ri-Li; Pichon, Aurélien P

    2015-07-01

    The highland "plateau Pika" is considered to be adapted to chronic hypoxia. We hypothesized that glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, and serotonin are involved in hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in Pikas. We tested the effects of NMDA (memantine) and non-NMDA receptors (DNQX) antagonists, NO synthase inhibitor (L-NAME), and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine) on ventilation and HVR in Pikas. Ventilatory parameters were measured before and after drug (or vehicle) injections in conscious Pikas at their natural living altitude (PIO2 86 mmHg) and after a hypoxic challenge (PIO2 57 mmHg, 3 min) to assess the influence of peripheral chemoreceptor on HVR. Minute ventilation (VI) and tidal volume (Vt) increased during hypoxic challenge after vehicle injection, whereas the Ti/Ttot ratio remained unchanged. The increase in VI and Vt observed with vehicle at PIO2-57, when compared with PIO2-86, was inhibited after memantine and fluoxetine injection, whereas the DNQX injection increased HVR. At PIO2-57, L-NAME induced an increase in the Ti/Ttot ratio when compared with vehicle. Therefore, the glutamate through NMDA-R/AMPA receptor bindings and serotonin pathway are implicated at the peripheral chemoreceptor level in HVR in Pikas. However, NO influences the ventilatory pattern of Pikas at their habitual living altitude.

  19. Advancing hypoxic training in team sports: from intermittent hypoxic training to repeated sprint training in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Faiss, Raphaël; Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), that is, a method where athletes live at or near sea level but train under hypoxic conditions, has gained unprecedented popularity. By adding the stress of hypoxia during ‘aerobic’ or ‘anaerobic’ interval training, it is believed that IHT would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea level. A thorough analysis of studies including IHT, however, leads to strikingly poor benefits for sea-level performance improvement, compared to the same training method performed in normoxia. Despite the positive molecular adaptations observed after various IHT modalities, the characteristics of optimal training stimulus in hypoxia are still unclear and their functional translation in terms of whole-body performance enhancement is minimal. To overcome some of the inherent limitations of IHT (lower training stimulus due to hypoxia), recent studies have successfully investigated a new training method based on the repetition of short (<30 s) ‘all-out’ sprints with incomplete recoveries in hypoxia, the so-called repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH). The aims of the present review are therefore threefold: first, to summarise the main mechanisms for interval training and repeated sprint training in normoxia. Second, to critically analyse the results of the studies involving high-intensity exercises performed in hypoxia for sea-level performance enhancement by differentiating IHT and RSH. Third, to discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning the effectiveness of those methods, and their inherent limitations, along with the new research avenues surrounding this topic. PMID:24282207

  20. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Madery, Brandon D; Pike, Tasha L; Eisenach, John H; Dietz, Niki M; Joyner, Michael J; Wilkins, Brad W

    2009-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml x min(-1).100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (DeltaFVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 +/- 29 and 314 +/- 34 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect DeltaFVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 +/- 29 ml x min(-1)x100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.4) or 20% (287 +/- 48 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.3). In protocol 2, DeltaFVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 +/- 30 and 453 +/- 41 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20% respectively). DeltaFVC was similar at 10% (352 +/- 39 ml min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.8) and 20% (528 +/- 45 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, DeltaFVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans.

  1. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism.

  2. Application of altitude/hypoxic training by elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Randall L

    2007-09-01

    At the Olympic level, differences in performance are typically less than 0.5%. This helps explain why many contemporary elite endurance athletes in summer and winter sport incorporate some form of altitude/hypoxic training within their year-round training plan, believing that it will provide the "competitive edge" to succeed at the Olympic level. The purpose of this paper is to describe the practical application of altitude/hypoxic training as used by elite athletes. Within the general framework of the paper, both anecdotal and scientific evidence will be presented relative to the efficacy of several contemporary altitude/hypoxic training models and devices currently used by Olympic-level athletes for the purpose of legally enhancing performance. These include the three primary altitude/hypoxic training models: 1) live high+train high (LH+TH), 2) live high+train low (LH+TL), and 3) live low+train high (LL+TH). The LH+TL model will be examined in detail and will include its various modifications: natural/terrestrial altitude, simulated altitude via nitrogen dilution or oxygen filtration, and hypobaric normoxia via supplemental oxygen. A somewhat opposite approach to LH+TL is the altitude/hypoxic training strategy of LL+TH, and data regarding its efficacy will be presented. Recently, several of these altitude/hypoxic training strategies and devices underwent critical review by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) for the purpose of potentially banning them as illegal performance-enhancing substances/methods. This paper will conclude with an update on the most recent statement from WADA regarding the use of simulated altitude devices.

  3. Microbial mineralization of dichloroethene and vinyl chloride under hypoxic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralization of 14C-radiolabled vinyl chloride ([1,2-14C] VC) and cis-dichloroethene ([1,2-14C] cis-DCE) under hypoxic (initial dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations about 0.1 mg/L) and nominally anoxic (DO minimum detection limit = 0.01 mg/L) was examined in chloroethene-exposed sediments from two groundwater and two surface water sites. The results show significant VC and dichloroethene (DCE) mineralization under hypoxic conditions. All the sample treatments exhibited pseudo-first-order kinetics for DCE and VC mineralization over an extended range of substrate concentrations. First-order rates for VC mineralization were approximately 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher in hypoxic groundwater sediment treatments and at least three times higher in hypoxic surface water sediment treatments than in the respective anoxic treatments. For VC, oxygen-linked processes accounted for 65 to 85% of mineralization at DO concentrations below 0.1 mg/L, and 14CO2 was the only degradation product observed in VC treatments under hypoxic conditions. Because the lower detection limit for DO concentrations measured in the field is typically 0.1 to 0.5 mg/L, these results indicate that oxygen-linked VC and DCE biodegradation can be significant under field conditions that appear anoxic. Furthermore, because rates of VC mineralization exceeded rates of DCE mineralization under hypoxic conditions, DCE accumulation without concomitant accumulation of VC may not be evidence of a DCE degradative “stall” in chloroethene plumes. Significantly, mineralization of VC above the level that could reasonably be attributed to residual DO contamination was also observed in several nominally anoxic (DO minimum detection limit = 0.01 mg/L) microcosm treatments.

  4. An Isolation Method for Assessment of Brain Mitochondria Function in Neonatal Mice with Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Caspersen, Casper S.; Sosunov, Alexander; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina; Ratner, Veniamin I.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Ten, Vadim S.

    2010-01-01

    This work was undertaken to develop a method for the isolation of mitochondria from a single cerebral hemisphere in neonatal mice. Mitochondria from the normal mouse brain hemisphere isolated by the proposed method exhibited a good respiratory control ratio of 6.39 ± 0.53 during glutamate-malate-induced phosphorylating respiration. Electron microscopy showed intact mitochondria. The applicability of this method was tested on mitochondria isolated from naïve mice and their littermates subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Hypoxic-ischemic insult prior to reperfusion resulted in a significant (p < 0.01) inhibition of phosphorylating respiration compared to naïve littermates. This was associated with a profound depletion of the ATP content in the ischemic hemisphere. The expression for Mn superoxide dismutase and cytochrome C (markers for the integrity of the mitochondrial matrix and outer membrane) was determined by Western blot to control for mitochondrial integrity and quantity in the compared samples. Thus, we have developed a method for the isolation of the cerebral mitochondria from a single hemisphere adapted to neonatal mice. This method may serve as a valuable tool to study mitochondrial function in a mouse model of immature brain injury. In addition, the suggested method enables us to examine the mitochondrial functional phenotype in immature mice with a targeted genetic alteration. PMID:18349523

  5. Stem cells, telomerase regulation and the hypoxic state.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Juanita; Davy, Philip M C; Gardner, Lauren H; Allsopp, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    The cellular response to a hypoxic environment is regulated by hypoxia inducible factors. Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1alpha) in particular, is tightly regulated by the hypoxic environment in most cells, and plays an important role in regulating the stress response of cells to hypoxia. Interestingly, substantial observations are now emerging that point to an important role for Hif1alpha in stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, neuronal stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells. Notably, Hif1alpha has been shown to enhance self renewal of stem cells, mediate a shift to glycolytic metabolism, and promote telomerase expression.

  6. Chemical composition of rainbow trout urine following acute hypoxic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, Joseph B.

    1969-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) were anesthetized with MS-222, catheterized, and introduced into urine collecting chambers. Twenty-four hours after introduction, a 4-hour accumulation of urine was collected to serve as the control. Water flow to the chambers was then discontinued for 30 minutes during which the oxygen content of the water exiting in the chamber dropped from 4.9 to 2.8 mg/l. Following this hypoxic stress fresh water was restored and accumulated urine samples were taken for analysis at 1, 4, and 20 hours post-hypoxic stress. Rainbow trout excrete abnormally high concentrations of Na, K, Mg, Cl, and inorganic PO4 following hypoxia.

  7. Dilated iris vasculature in the setting of the neonatal hypoxic encephelopathy.

    PubMed

    Gorovoy, Ian R; Vaccari, Jordan C

    2015-07-01

    The differential diagnosis of dilated iris vasculature in a neonate includes retinopathy of prematurity with anterior segment plus disease, persistent fetal vasculature, intrauterine cocaine exposure, maternal diabetes, and other pathologies associated with iris neovascularization and ischemia seen in adult populations, such as central retinal vein occlusions, ocular ischemic syndrome, and chronic retinal detachment. We present neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy as a new etiology of dilated iris vasculature in a male baby who suffered a large in-utero brain vasculature insult three weeks prior to delivery but with normal fundi, no risk factors for retinopathy of prematurity (normal birth weight, and gestational age), and no other explanatory etiologies. The mechanism of the dilated iris vasculature is likely also ischemic and therefore its presence likely portends a poor prognosis. We recommend that the neonatologist evaluate for this sign for this reason and consult ophthalmology to ensure its correct etiology.

  8. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: haemodynamic changes after oxygen and various vasodilators in the same patient at different time periods.

    PubMed

    Král, H; Hamet, A; Cernohorský, D; Stásek, J; Tilser, P

    1993-01-01

    The haemodynamic response to oxygen breathing and various vasodilatory drugs (Nifedipine, Ketanserin, Dihydralazine, Nitroglycerin, Iso-Mack, Nit-Ret) was repeatedly measured at different time intervals (4-24 months) in 10 males with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension due to chronic obstructive lung disease. It was found that the pulmonary artery mean pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance changes are stable in most of the patients, discordant reactions being exceptional and of small degree. The authors consider these findings important in the therapeutical decision making for longterm oxygen therapy and or vasodilatory drug administration.

  9. Effect of the sphingosine kinase 1 selective inhibitor, PF-543 on arterial and cardiac remodelling in a hypoxic model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    MacRitchie, Neil; Volpert, Giora; Al Washih, Mohammed; Watson, David G; Futerman, Anthony H; Kennedy, Simon; Pyne, Susan; Pyne, Nigel J

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the expression of sphingosine kinase 1, the enzyme that catalyses formation of the bioactive lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate, is increased in lungs from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. In addition, Sk1(-/-) mice are protected from hypoxic-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. Therefore, we assessed the effect of the sphingosine kinase 1 selective inhibitor, PF-543 and a sphingosine kinase 1/ceramide synthase inhibitor, RB-005 on pulmonary and cardiac remodelling in a mouse hypoxic model of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Administration of the potent sphingosine kinase 1 inhibitor, PF-543 in a mouse hypoxic model of pulmonary hypertension had no effect on vascular remodelling but reduced right ventricular hypertrophy. The latter was associated with a significant reduction in cardiomyocyte death. The protection involves a reduction in the expression of p53 (that promotes cardiomyocyte death) and an increase in the expression of anti-oxidant nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf-2). In contrast, RB-005 lacked effects on right ventricular hypertrophy, suggesting that sphingosine kinase 1 inhibition might be nullified by concurrent inhibition of ceramide synthase. Therefore, our findings with PF-543 suggest an important role for sphingosine kinase 1 in the development of hypertrophy in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  10. [Mechanism of protective effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein 1 on hypoxic cardiomyocytes of rats].

    PubMed

    Xiang, F; Zhang, D X; Ma, S Y; Huang, Y S

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of protective effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein 1 (TRAP1) on hypoxic cardiomyocytes of rats. Methods: Primary cultured cardiomyocytes were obtained from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 1 to 3 days) and then used in the following experiments. (1) Cells were divided into group TRAP1 and control group according to the random number table (the same grouping method below), and then the total protein of cells was extracted. Total protein of cells in group TRAP1 was added with mouse anti-rat TRAP1 monoclonal antibody, while that in control group was added with the same type of IgG from mouse. Co-immunoprecipitation and protein mass spectrography analysis were used to determine the possible proteins interacted with TRAP1. (2) Cells were divided into normoxia blank control group (NBC), normoxia+ TRAP1 interference control group (NTIC), normoxia+ TRAP1 interference group (NTI), normoxia+ TRAP1 over-expression control group (NTOC), and normoxia+ TRAP1 over-expression group (NTO), with 1 well in each group. Cells in group NBC were routinely cultured, while cells in the latter four groups were respectively added with TRAP1 RNA interference empty virus vector, TRAP1 RNA interference adenovirus vector, TRAP1 over-expression empty virus vector, and TRAP1 over-expression adenovirus vector. Another batch of cells were divided into group NBC, hypoxic blank control group (HBC), hypoxic+ TRAP1 interference control group (HTIC), hypoxic+ TRAP1 interference group (HTI), hypoxic+ TRAP1 over-expression control group (HTOC), and hypoxic+ TRAP1 over-expression group (HTO), with 1 well in each group. Cells in hypoxic groups were under hypoxic condition for 6 hours after being treated as those in the corresponding normoxia groups, respectively. The mRNA expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅱ (COXⅡ) of cells in each group was detected by real time fluorescent quantitive reverse transcription polymerase chain

  11. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area andvolume

    EPA Science Inventory

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L−1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and ...

  12. Anti-hyperalgesic effect of a benzilidine-cyclohexanone analogue on a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain: Participation of the κ-opioid receptor and KATP.

    PubMed

    Ming-Tatt, Lee; Khalivulla, Shaik Ibrahim; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Lajis, Nordin; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Akira, Ahmad; Ali, Daud Israf; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the analgesic effect of a novel synthetic cyclohexanone derivative, 2,6-bis-4-(hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzilidine)-cyclohexanone or BHMC in a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. It was demonstrated that intraperitoneal administration of BHMC (0.03, 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0mg/kg) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in mice, when evaluated using Randall-Selitto mechanical analgesiometer. It was also demonstrated that pretreatment of naloxone (non-selective opioid receptor blocker), nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI, selective κ-opioid receptor blocker), but not β-funaltrexamine (β-FN, selective μ-opioid receptor blocker) and naltrindole hydrochloride (NTI, selective δ-opioid receptor blocker), reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of BHMC. In addition, the analgesic effect of BHMC was also reverted by pretreatment of 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, soluble guanosyl cyclase blocker) and glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker) but not Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase blocker). Taken together, the present study demonstrated that the systemic administration of BHMC attenuated chronic constriction, injury-induced neuropathic pain. We also suggested that the possible mechanisms include κ-opioid receptor activation and nitric oxide-independent cyclic guanosine monophosphate activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel opening.

  13. [5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor interplay: Chronic activation of 5-HT7 receptors decreases the functional activity of 5-HT1A receptor and its сontent in the mouse brain].

    PubMed

    Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Naumenko, V S

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin receptors 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 are involved in the development of various psychopathologies. Some data indicate that there is an interplay between 5-HT1A 5-HT7 receptors that could be implicated in the regulation of their function. This work analyzed the effects of chronic 5-HT7 activation on the functional activity of 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors, on the corresponding protein levels, and on the expression of genes encoding 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors in the mouse brain. Chronic administration of the 5-HT7 selective agonist LP44 (20.5 nmol, i.c.v., 14 days) produced considerable desensitization of both 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors. In LP44-treated mice, the hypothermic responses mediated by both 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors were attenuated. Moreover, the levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein in the midbrain and the frontal cortex of LP44-treated mice were significantly decreased. However, the brain levels of 5-HT7 receptor protein did not differ between LP44-treated and control mice. Chronic LP44 treatment did not alter the expression of the 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptor genes in all investigated brain structure. These data suggest that 5-HT7 receptors participate in the posttranscriptional regulation of the 5-HT1A receptors functioning.

  14. Field study of cyclic hypoxic effects on gene expression in grass shrimp hepatopancreas.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiandao; Brouwer, Marius

    2013-12-01

    Grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, are widely used for ecological and toxicological research. They commonly experience cyclic hypoxia in their natural habitats. The response of grass shrimp to laboratory-controlled cyclic hypoxia has been studied in detail, but little is known about how field acclimatized grass shrimp regulate the gene expression and response to cyclic hypoxia. In this study we examined morphometric parameters, relative fecundity and gene expression of grass shrimp collected from two areas in Weeks Bay (Mobile, Alabama). One is a traditionally normoxic location (WBM), and the other is a traditionally cyclic hypoxic location (WC). In the week preceding grass shrimp collection dissolved oxygen (DO) at the field sites was measured continuously. DO was <2 (mg/L DO) and between 2 and 3 (mg/L DO) for 0 and 255min at WBM, and for 285 and 1035min at WC, respectively. Weight and length of WBM grass shrimp were significantly greater than weight and length of WC shrimp. WBM shrimp had more eggs than WC shrimp, but the difference was not significant. Shrimp from WC had a significant higher number of parasites than those from WBM. A cDNA microarray was utilized to investigate the changes in gene expression in grass shrimp hepatopancreas. Five genes, previously identified as hypoxia/cyclic hypoxia-responsive genes in laboratory exposure studies, were significantly up-regulated in WC shrimp relative to WBM. A total of 5 genes were significantly down-regulated in the field study. Only one of those genes, vitellogenin, has been previously found in chronic and cyclic hypoxic studies. Up and down-regulation of 7 selected genes was confirmed by qPCR. The overall pattern of gene expression in wild shrimp from cyclic DO sites in Weeks Bay showed only weak correlations with gene expression in shrimp from chronic and cyclic hypoxic laboratory studies. It appears therefore that transcriptome profiles of laboratory acclimated animals are of limited utility for understanding

  15. Nitrous oxide emissions from the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, in hypoxic coastal zones remains poorly characterized due to a lack of data, though large nitrogen inputs and deoxygenation typical of these systems create the potential for large N2O emissions. We report the first N...

  16. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions.

  17. Notification: Evaluate the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone Reduction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY13-0012, January 30, 2013. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) is starting preliminary research on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) and states’ efforts to reduce the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone.

  18. Population differences in response to hypoxic stress in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Côte, J; Roussel, J-M; Le Cam, S; Bal, G; Evanno, G

    2012-12-01

    Understanding whether populations can adapt to new environmental conditions is a major issue in conservation and evolutionary biology. Aquatic organisms are increasingly exposed to environmental changes linked with human activities in river catchments. For instance, the clogging of bottom substratum by fine sediments is observed in many rivers and usually leads to a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentrations in gravel beds. Such hypoxic stress can alter the development and even be lethal for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) embryos that spend their early life into gravel beds. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to compare the responses to hypoxic stress of four genetically differentiated and environmentally contrasted populations. We used factorial crossing designs to measure additive genetic variation of early life-history traits in each population. Embryos were reared under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and we measured their survival, incubation time and length at the end of embryonic development. Under hypoxic conditions, embryos had a lower survival and hatched later than in normoxic conditions. We found different hypoxia reaction norms among populations, but almost no population effect in both treatments. We also detected significant sire × treatment interactions in most populations and a tendency for heritability values to be lower under stressful conditions. Overall, these results reveal a high degree of phenotypic plasticity in salmon populations that nevertheless differ in their adaptive potential to hypoxia given the distinct reaction norms observed between and within populations.

  19. Chemoreceptor stimulation interferes with regional hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, M W; Wilson, L B; Gregory, T J; Levitzky, M G

    1988-02-01

    Hypoxemia interferes with the diversion of blood flow away from hypoxic regions of the lung, possibly through activation of the arterial chemoreceptor reflex. The purpose of this study was to determine if selective stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors reduces the diversion of flow (hypoxic vasoconstriction) when normal systemic oxygen levels are present. Chloralose anesthetized dogs were paralyzed and each lung was separately ventilated via a dual-lumen endobronchial tube. Left pulmonary artery (QL) and main pulmonary artery (QT) blood flows were measured with electromagnetic flow probes. Chemoreceptors were stimulated by perfusion of the carotid sinuses with hypoxic, hypercapnic blood. QL/QT averaged 46 +/- 4, 29 +/- 2, and 36 +/- 4% during bilateral O2 ventilation (control), left lung N2 ventilation, and left lung N2 plus chemoreceptor stimulation in dogs treated with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor meclofenamate. After vagotomy, QL/QT averaged 45 +/- 4, 27 +/- 3, and 28 +/- 2% during the same conditions. QL/QT decreased significantly from control (P less than 0.05) during left lung N2 alone but did not decrease during left lung N2 plus chemoreceptor stimulation in dogs with intact vagi. In contrast, QL/QT decreased significantly both before and during chemoreceptor stimulation in vagotomized dogs. The same responses were observed in dogs not treated with meclofenamate. These results indicate that selective stimulation of arterial chemoreceptors can interfere with regional hypoxic vasoconstriction and suggest that the vagus nerves may mediate this effect.

  20. MODULATION OF HYPOXIC PULMONARY VASOCONSTRICTION BY ERYTHROCYTIC NITRIC OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    American Heart Association 2001

    Modulation of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction by Erythrocytic NO
    McMahon TJ1, Gow AJ1, Huang YCT4, Stamler JS1,2,3
    Departments of Medicine1 and Biochemistry2, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute3,
    Duke University Med...

  1. Effects of regional phentolamine on hypoxic vasodilatation in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, C J; Minson, C T; Joyner, M J; Halliwill, J R

    2001-12-01

    1. Limb vascular beds exhibit a graded dilatation in response to hypoxia despite increased sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity. We investigated the extent to which sympathetic vasoconstriction can mask hypoxic vasodilatation and assessed the relative contributions of beta-adrenergic and nitric oxide (NO) pathways to hypoxic vasodilatation. 2. We measured forearm blood flow responses (plethysmography) to isocapnic hypoxia (arterial saturation approximately 85%) in eight healthy men and women (18-26 years) after selective alpha-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine) of one forearm. Subsequently, we measured hypoxic responses after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine and propranolol) and after combined alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade coupled with NO synthase inhibition (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, L-NMMA). 3. Hypoxia increased forearm vascular conductance by 49.0 +/- 13.5% after phentolamine (compared to +16.8 +/- 7.0% in the control arm without phentolamine, P < 0.05). After addition of propranolol, the forearm vascular conductance response to hypoxia was reduced by approximately 50%, but dilatation was still present (+24.7 +/- 7.0%, P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). When L-NMMA was added, there was no further reduction in the forearm vascular conductance response to hypoxia (+28.2 +/- 4.0%, P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). 4. Thus, selective regional alpha-adrenergic blockade unmasked a greater hypoxic vasodilatation than occurs in the presence of functional sympathetic nervous system responses to hypoxia. Furthermore, approximately half of the hypoxic vasodilatation in the forearm appears to be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated pathways. Finally, since considerable dilatation persists in the presence of both beta-adrenergic blockade and NO synthase inhibition, it is likely that an additional vasodilator mechanism is activated by hypoxia in humans.

  2. The anatomy of a hypoxic operator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Deckert, J; Torres, A M; Hwang, S M; Kastaniotis, A J; Zitomer, R S

    1998-01-01

    Aerobic repression of the hypoxic genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by the DNA-binding protein Rox1 and the Tup1/Ssn6 general repression complex. To determine the DNA sequence requirements for repression, we carried out a mutational analysis of the consensus Rox1-binding site and an analysis of the arrangement of the Rox1 sites into operators in the hypoxic ANB1 gene. We found that single base pair substitutions in the consensus sequence resulted in lower affinities for Rox1, and the decreased affinity of Rox1 for mutant sites correlated with the ability of these sites to repress expression of the hypoxic ANB1 gene. In addition, there was a general but not complete correlation between the strength of repression of a given hypoxic gene and the compliance of the Rox1 sites in that gene to the consensus sequence. An analysis of the ANB1 operators revealed that the two Rox1 sites within an operator acted synergistically in vivo, but that Rox1 did not bind cooperatively in vitro, suggesting the presence of a higher order repression complex in the cell. In addition, the spacing or helical phasing of the Rox1 sites was not important in repression. The differential repression by the two operators of the ANB1 gene was found to be due partly to the location of the operators and partly to the sequences between the two Rox1-binding sites in each. Finally, while Rox1 repression requires the Tup1/Ssn6 general repression complex and this complex has been proposed to require the aminoterminal regions of histones H3 and H4 for full repression of a number of genes, we found that these regions were dispensable for ANB1 repression and the repression of two other hypoxic genes. PMID:9832521

  3. Marine Natural Products as Inhibitors of Hypoxic Signaling in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Marine natural products have become a major source of new chemical entities in the discovery of potential anticancer agents that potently suppress various antitumor molecular targets. As a consequence of insufficient vascularization, hypoxic regions form within rapidly growing solid tumor masses. Specific alterations of gene expression in these hypoxic tumor cells help facilitate the survival and metastatic spread of solid tumors. The transcriptional response to cellular hypoxia is primarily mediated by the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) that regulates the expression of more than 100 genes involved in cellular adaptation and survival under hypoxic stress. Clinical studies in cancer patients indicate that HIF-1 activation is directly correlated with advanced disease stages and treatment resistance. HIF-1 has emerged as an important tumor-selective molecular target for anticancer drug discovery. As a result, natural product-based inhibitors of HIF-1 activation have been identified from plants and microorganisms. Recently, structurally unique natural products from marine sponges, crinoids, and algae have been identified as HIF-1 activation inhibitors. The US National Cancer Institute’s Open Repository of marine invertebrate and algae extracts has proven to be a valuable source of natural product HIF-1 inhibitors. Among the active compounds identified, certain marine natural products have also been shown to suppress the hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Some of these marine HIF-1 inhibitors act by interfering with the generation of mitochondrial signaling molecules in hypoxic cells. However, the precise mechanisms of action for many newly identified marine natural product HIF-1 inhibitors remain unresolved. PMID:20622986

  4. Chronic oral or intraarticular administration of docosahexaenoic acid reduces nociception and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant–induced knee arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that supplementation with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) reduce joint destruction and inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of individual ω-3 PUFAs on chronic arthritic pain have not been evaluated to date. Thus, our aim in this study was to examine whether purified docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an ω-3 PUFA) reduces spontaneous pain-related behavior and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of knee arthritis. Methods Unilateral arthritis was induced by multiple injections of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) into the right knee joints of male ICR adult mice. Mice that received CFA injections were then chronically treated from day 15 until day 25 post–initial CFA injection with oral DHA (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg daily) or intraarticular DHA (25 and 50 μg/joint twice weekly). Spontaneous flinching of the injected extremity (considered as spontaneous pain-related behavior), vertical rearing and horizontal exploratory activity (considered as functional outcomes) and knee edema were assessed. To determine whether an endogenous opioid mechanism was involved in the therapeutic effect of DHA, naloxone (NLX, an opioid receptor antagonist, 3 mg/kg subcutaneously) was administered in arthritic mice chronically treated with DHA (30 mg/kg by mouth) at day 25 post–CFA injection. Results The intraarticular CFA injections resulted in increasing spontaneous flinching and knee edema of the ipsilateral extremity as well as worsening functional outcomes as time progressed. Chronic administration of DHA, given either orally or intraarticularly, significantly improved horizontal exploratory activity and reduced flinching behavior and knee edema in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of NLX did not reverse the antinociceptive effect of DHA. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to demonstrate DHA’s antinociceptive and

  5. Chronic Exercise Training Down-Regulates TNF-α and Atrogin-1/MAFbx in Mouse Gastrocnemius Muscle Atrophy Induced by Hindlimb Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nassan, Saad; Fujita, Naoto; Kondo, Hiroyo; Murakami, Shinichiro; Fujino, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic moderate-intensity training in order to prevent muscle atrophy with a focus on TNF-α and atrogin-1/MAFbx as main proteolytic indicators. Hindlimb unloading model of mice received treadmill running exercise for 1 hr per day during hindlimb unloading period of 6 weeks. The gastrocnemius muscle mass, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in the muscle fiber were higher in the exercised group, while TNF-α and atrogin-1/MAFbx mRNA expressions were significantly lower. Results in the present study showed that chronic exercise could prevent over expression of TNF-α and atrogin-1/MAFbx in the atrophied skeletal muscle, providing further support to the effects of chronic exercise training on muscle atrophy. PMID:23378678

  6. A non-invasive approach to monitor chronic lymphocytic leukemia engraftment in a xenograft mouse model using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide-magnetic resonance imaging (USPIO-MRI).

    PubMed

    Valdora, Francesca; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Morabito, Fortunato; Massucco, Carlotta; Emionite, Laura; Boccardo, Simona; Basso, Luca; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Salvi, Sandra; Rosa, Francesca; Gentile, Massimo; Ravina, Marco; Pace, Daniele; Castronovo, Angela; Cilli, Michele; Truini, Mauro; Calabrese, Massimo; Neri, Antonino; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele; Fais, Franco; Baio, Gabriella; Ferrarini, Manlio

    2016-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent leukemia among adults. Despite its indolent nature, CLL remains an incurable disease. Herein we aimed to monitor CLL disease engraftment and, progression/regression in a xenograft CLL mouse model using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide-magnetic resonance imaging (USPIO-MRI). Spleen contrast enhancement, quantified as percentage change in signal intensity upon USPIO administration, demonstrated a difference due to a reduced USPIO uptake, in the spleens of mice injected with CLL cells (NSG-CLL, n=71) compared to controls (NSG-CTR, n=17). These differences were statistically significant both after 2 and 4weeks from CLL cells injection. In addition comparison of mice treated with rituximab with untreated controls for changes in spleen iron uptake confirmed that it is possible to monitor treatment efficacy in this mouse model of CLL using USPIO-enhanced MRI. Further applications could include the preclinical in vivo monitoring of new therapies and the clinical evaluation of CLL patients.

  7. Homogentisate 1-2-Dioxygenase Downregulation in the Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian Epidemic Strain-1 in the CF Lung.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Wynn, Matthew; Pinto, Rachel; Cordwell, Stuart; Rose, Barbara R; Harbour, Colin; Triccas, James A; Manos, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Some Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains including Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1 or AUS-01) cause persistent chronic infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with greater morbidity and mortality. Factors conferring persistence are largely unknown. Previously we analysed the transcriptomes of AES-1 grown in Luria broth, nematode growth medium for Caenorhabditis elegans assay (both aerobic) and artificial sputum medium (mainly hypoxic). Transcriptional comparisons included chronic AES-1 strains against PAO1 and acute AES-1 (AES-1R) against its chronic isogen (AES-1M), isolated 10.5 years apart from a CF patient and not eradicated in the meantime. Prominent amongst genes downregulated in AES-1M in all comparisons was homogentisate-1-2-dioxygenase (hmgA); an oxygen-dependent gene known to be mutationally deactivated in many chronic infection strains of P. aeruginosa. To investigate if hmgA downregulation and deactivation gave similar virulence persistence profiles, a hmgA mutant made in UCBPP-PA14 utilising RedS-recombinase and AES-1M were assessed in the C. elegans virulence assay, and the C57BL/6 mouse for pulmonary colonisation and TNF-α response. In C. elegans, hmgA deactivation resulted in significantly increased PA14 virulence while hmgA downregulation reduced AES-1M virulence. AES-1M was significantly more persistent in mouse lung and showed a significant increase in TNF-α (p<0.0001), sustained even with no detectable bacteria. PA14ΔhmgA did not show increased TNF-α. This study suggests that hmgA may have a role in P. aeruginosa persistence in chronic infection and the results provide a starting point for clarifying the role of hmgA in chronic AES-1.

  8. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF MOUSE SKIN AND PAPILLOMAS FOLLOWING CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO MONOMETHYLARSONOUS ACID IN K6/ODC TRANSGENIC MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylarsonous acid [MMA(III)], a common metabolite of inorganic arsenic metabolism, increases tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice following a chronic exposure. To characterize gene expression profiles predictive of MMA(III) exposure and mode of action of carcin...

  9. Chronic treatment with valproic acid or sodium butyrate attenuates novel object recognition deficits and hippocampal dendritic spine loss in a mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Takuma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Yuta; Kataoka, Shunsuke; Kawanai, Takuya; Maeda, Yuko; Watanabe, Ryo; Takano, Erika; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Ago, Yukio; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    We recently showed that prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA) in mice causes autism-like behavioral abnormalities, including social interaction deficits, anxiety-like behavior and spatial learning disability, in male offspring. In the present study, we examined the effect of prenatal VPA on cognitive function and whether the effect is improved by chronic treatment with VPA and sodium butyrate, histone deacetylase inhibitors. In addition, we examined whether the cognitive dysfunction is associated with hippocampal dendritic morphological changes. Mice given prenatal exposure to VPA exhibited novel object recognition deficits at 9 weeks of age, and that the impairment was blocked by chronic (5-week) treatment with VPA (30 mg/kg/d, i.p.) or sodium butyrate (1.2g/kg/d, i.p.) starting at 4 weeks of age. In agreement with the behavioral findings, the mice prenatally exposed to VPA showed a decrease in dendritic spine density in the hippocampal CA1 region, and the spine loss was attenuated by chronic treatment with sodium butyrate or VPA. Furthermore, acute treatment with sodium butyrate, but not VPA, significantly increased acetylation of histone H3 in the hippocampus at 30 min, suggesting the difference in the mechanism for the effects of chronic VPA and sodium butyrate. These findings suggest that prenatal VPA-induced cognitive dysfunction is associated with changes in hippocampal dendritic spine morphology.

  10. Topical application of a platelet activating factor receptor agonist suppresses phorbol ester-induced acute and chronic inflammation and has cancer chemopreventive activity in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Rezania, Samin; Ocana, Jesus A; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C; Bradish, Joshua R; Richey, Justin D; Warren, Simon J; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B; Konger, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development.

  11. Kidney EPO expression during chronic hypoxia in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Benderro, Girriso F; LaManna, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain normal cellular function, mammalian tissue oxygen concentrations must be tightly regulated within a narrow physiological range. The hormone erythropoietin (EPO) is essential for maintenance of tissue oxygen supply by stimulating red blood cell production and promoting their survival. In this study we compared the effects of 290 Torr atmospheric pressure on the kidney EPO protein levels in young (4-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sacrificed after being anesthetized, and kidney samples were collected and processed by Western blot analysis. Relatively low basal expression of EPO during normoxia in young mice showed significant upregulation in hypoxia and stayed upregulated throughout the hypoxic period (threefold compared to normoxic control), showing a slight decline toward the third week. Whereas, a relatively higher normoxic basal EPO protein level in aged mice did not show significant increase until seventh day of hypoxia, but showed significant upregulation in prolonged hypoxia. Hence, we confirmed that there is a progressively increased accumulation of EPO during chronic hypoxia in young and aged mouse kidney, and the EPO upregulation during hypoxia showed a similarity with the pattern of increase in hematocrit, which we have reported previously.

  12. Popularity of hypoxic training methods for endurance-based professional and amateur athletes.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Herms, J; Julià-Sánchez, S; Hamlin, M J; Corbi, F; Pagès, T; Viscor, G

    2015-05-01

    Scientific debate continues into whether hypoxic training has any performance benefit for athletes, and although this type of training seems popular, to our knowledge little empirical evidence on its popularity with endurance-based athletes exists. To quantify the usage of hypoxic training in endurance-based athletes we asked 203 athletes (amateur = 108, professional = 95) to complete a 17-question survey during 2013-2014 season. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes were 4.5 times (3.0-6.8, odds ratio, 95% confidence limits) more likely to undertake hypoxic training. Live-high train-low was the most popular hypoxic training protocol for athletes (52% professional and 80% amateur) with live-high train-high also used (38% professional, 20% amateur). Compared to amateurs, professional athletes tended to use evidence-based hypoxic training methods, seek advice on hypoxic training from reliable sources and were generally more realistic about the potential performance gains as a result of hypoxic training. Almost one third (25-30%) of all athletes suffered illness during their hypoxic training. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes are more likely to undertake hypoxic training and tend to follow current scientific guidelines. Attenuation of the ill effects that occur during hypoxic training may be accomplished if athletes give more attention to monitoring stress and training levels.

  13. Hypoxic pulmonary vasodilation: a paradigm shift with a hydrogen sulfide mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Nathan L.; Bearden, Shawn E.; St. Leger, Judy; Nilson, Erika; Gao, Yan; Madden, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HVC), an intrinsic and assumed ubiquitous response of mammalian pulmonary blood vessels, matches regional ventilation to perfusion via an unknown O2-sensing mechanism. Global pulmonary hypoxia experienced by individuals suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or numerous hypoventilation syndromes, including sleep apnea, often produces maladaptive pulmonary hypertension, but pulmonary hypertension is not observed in diving mammals, where profound hypoxia is routine. Here we examined the response of cow and sea lion pulmonary arteries (PA) to hypoxia and observed the expected HVC in the former and a unique hypoxic vasodilation in resistance vessels in the latter. We then used this disparate response to examine the O2-sensing mechanism. In both animals, exogenous H2S mimicked the vasoactive effects of hypoxia in isolated PA. H2S-synthesizing enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfur transferase, were identified in lung tissue from both animals by one-dimensional Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The relationship between H2S production/consumption and O2 was examined in real time by use of amperometric H2S and O2 sensors. H2S was produced by sea lion and cow lung homogenate in the absence of O2, but it was rapidly consumed when O2 was present. Furthermore, consumption of exogenous H2S by cow lung homogenate, PA smooth muscle cells, and heart mitochondria was O2 dependent and exhibited maximal sensitivity at physiologically relevant Po2 levels. These studies show that HVC is not an intrinsic property of PA and provide further evidence for O2-dependent H2S metabolism in O2 sensing. PMID:19889863

  14. Chronic Glucose Exposure Systematically Shifts the Oscillatory Threshold of Mouse Islets: Experimental Evidence for an Early Intrinsic Mechanism of Compensation for Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Eric; Thompson, Benjamin; Vadrevu, Suryakiran; Lu, Shusheng; Kennedy, Robert T.; Ha, Joon; Sherman, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Mouse islets exhibit glucose-dependent oscillations in electrical activity, intracellular Ca2+ and insulin secretion. We developed a mathematical model in which a left shift in glucose threshold helps compensate for insulin resistance. To test this experimentally, we exposed isolated mouse islets to varying glucose concentrations overnight and monitored their glucose sensitivity the next day by measuring intracellular Ca2+, electrical activity, and insulin secretion. Glucose sensitivity of all oscillation modes was increased when overnight glucose was greater than 2.8mM. To determine whether threshold shifts were a direct effect of glucose or involved secreted insulin, the KATP opener diazoxide (Dz) was coapplied with glucose to inhibit insulin secretion. The addition of Dz or the insulin receptor antagonist s961 increased islet glucose sensitivity, whereas the KATP blocker tolbutamide tended to reduce it. This suggests insulin and glucose have opposing actions on the islet glucose threshold. To test the hypothesis that the threshold shifts were due to changes in plasma membrane KATP channels, we measured cell KATP conductance, which was confirmed to be reduced by high glucose pretreatment and further reduced by Dz. Finally, treatment of INS-1 cells with glucose and Dz overnight reduced high affinity sulfonylurea receptor (SUR1) trafficking to the plasma membrane vs glucose alone, consistent with insulin increasing KATP conductance by altering channel number. The results support a role for metabolically regulated KATP channels in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. PMID:26697721

  15. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application.

  16. The Galvanotactic Migration of Keratinocytes is Enhanced by Hypoxic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaowei; Jiang, Xupin; Ren, Xi; Sun, Huanbo; Zhang, Dongxia; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous electric field (EF)-directed migration of keratinocytes (galvanotaxis) into wounds is an essential step in wound re-epithelialization. Hypoxia, which occurs immediately after injury, acts as an early stimulus to initiate the healing process; however, the mechanisms for this effect, remain elusive. We show here that the galvanotactic migration of keratinocytes was enhanced by hypoxia preconditioning as a result of the increased directionality rather than the increased motility of keratinocytes. This enhancement was both oxygen tension- and preconditioning time-dependent, with the maximum effects achieved using 2% O2 preconditioning for 6 hours. Hypoxic preconditioning (2% O2, 6 hours) decreased the threshold voltage of galvanotaxis to < 25 mV/mm, whereas this value was between 25 and 50 mV/mm in the normal culture control. In a scratch-wound monolayer assay in which the applied EF was in the default healing direction, hypoxic preconditioning accelerated healing by 1.38-fold compared with the control conditions. Scavenging of the induced ROS by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) abolished the enhanced galvanotaxis and the accelerated healing by hypoxic preconditioning. Our data demonstrate a novel and unsuspected role of hypoxia in supporting keratinocyte galvanotaxis. Enhancing the galvanotactic response of cells might therefore be a clinically attractive approach to induce improved wound healing. PMID:25988491

  17. Accumulation and activation of epidermal γδ T cells in a mouse model of chronic dermatitis is not required for the inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sulcova, Jitka; Maddaluno, Luigi; Meyer, Michael; Werner, Sabine

    2015-09-01

    Chronic skin inflammation resulting from a defective epidermal barrier is a hallmark of atopic dermatitis (AD). We previously demonstrated that mice lacking FGF receptors 1 and 2 in keratinocytes (K5-R1/R2 mice) develop an AD-like chronic dermatitis as a result of an impaired epidermal barrier. Here, we show that γδ T cells, which rapidly respond to various insults, accumulate in the epidermis of K5-R1/R2 mice before the development of histological abnormalities. Their number and activation further increase as the phenotype progresses, most likely as a consequence of increased expression of Il-2 and Il-7 and the stress-induced proteins Rae-1, H60c, Mult1, PlexinB2, and Skint1. To determine the role of γδ T cells in the skin phenotype, we generated quadruple mutant K5-R1/-R2 mice lacking γδ T cells. Surprisingly, loss of γδ T cells did not or only marginally affect keratinocyte proliferation, epidermal thickness, epidermal barrier function, and accumulation and activation of different immune cells in the skin of K5-R1/R2 mice, possibly due to partial compensation by αβ T cells. These results demonstrate that γδ T cells do not contribute to the development or maintenance of chronic inflammation in response to a defect in the epidermal barrier.

  18. Myostatin up-regulation is associated with the skeletal muscle response to hypoxic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Maurice; Rodriguez, Julie; Vernus, Barbara; Carnac, Gilles; Jean, Elise; Allen, David; Goret, Lucie; Obert, Philippe; Candau, Robin; Bonnieu, Anne

    2011-01-30

    Myostatin and hypoxia signalling pathways are able to induce skeletal muscle atrophy, but whether a relationship between these two pathways exists is currently unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a potential mechanism for hypoxia effect on skeletal muscle may be through regulation of myostatin. We reported an induction of myostatin expression in muscles of rats exposed to chronic hypoxia. Interestingly, we also demonstrated increased skeletal muscle myostatin protein expression in skeletal muscle of hypoxemic patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Parallel studies in human skeletal muscle cell cultures showed that induction of myostatin expression in myotubes treated with hypoxia-mimicking agent such as cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) is associated with myotube atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of myostatin by means of genetic deletion of myostatin or treatment with blocking antimyostatin antibodies inhibits the CoCl(2)-induced atrophy in muscle cells. Finally, addition of recombinant myostatin restored the CoCl(2)-induced atrophy in myostatin deficient myotubes. These results strongly suggest that myostatin can play an essential role in the adaptation of skeletal muscle to hypoxic environment.

  19. Combination of the Pro-Apoptotic TRAIL-Receptor Antibody Mapatumumab With Ionizing Radiation Strongly Increases Long-Term Tumor Control Under Ambient and Hypoxic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marini, Patrizia; Budach, Wilfried; Niyazi, Maximilian; Junginger, Dorothea; Stickl, Stefan; Jendrossek, Verena; Belka, Claus

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Mapatumumab, an agonistic tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand-receptor antibody, exerts highly synergistic apoptotic effects in vitro and in short-term growth delay assays when combined with irradiation. Because it remained unclear in how far these effects influence local tumor control, long-term experiments using a colorectal xenograft model were undertaken. Material and Methods: Experiments were performed with irradiation (5 x 3 Gy, d1-5) and mapatumumab (10 mg/kg) in Colo205-xenograft-bearing NMRI (nu/nu) nude mice. Graded top up doses were delivered on the tumor-bearing hind leg under ambient and hypoxic conditions; follow-up was 270 days. Growth delay and local tumor control were end points of the study. Statistical analysis of the experiments included calculation of tumor regrowth and local tumor control. Results: After combined treatment, a pronounced tumor regrowth-delay was observed when compared with irradiation alone. Long-term experiments revealed a highly significant increase in local tumor control for ambient (p = 0.00076) and hypoxic treatment (p = 0.000069). Conclusions: The present data demonstrate for the first time that combination of a pro-apoptotic antibody with irradiation results in evidently reduced tumor regrowth times and subsequently highly increased local tumor control under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in a xenograft mouse model.

  20. Hypoxic priming of mESCs accelerates vascular-lineage differentiation through HIF1-mediated inverse regulation of Oct4 and VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sae-Won; Jeong, Han-Kyul; Lee, Ji-Young; Yang, Jimin; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Su-Yeon; Youn, Seock-Won; Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Woo Jean; Kim, Kyu-Won; Lim, Jeong Mook; Park, Jong-Wan; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic microenvironment plays an important role in determining stem cell fates. However, it is controversial to which direction between self-renewal and differentiation the hypoxia drives the stem cells. Here, we investigated whether a short exposure to hypoxia (termed ‘hypoxic-priming’) efficiently directed and promoted mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to differentiate into vascular-lineage. During spontaneous differentiation of embryoid bodies (EBs), hypoxic region was observed inside EB spheroids even under normoxic conditions. Indeed, hypoxia-primed EBs more efficiently differentiated into cells of vascular-lineage, than normoxic EBs did. We found that hypoxia suppressed Oct4 expression via direct binding of HIF-1 to reverse hypoxia-responsive elements (rHREs) in the Oct4 promoter. Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was highly upregulated in hypoxia-primed EBs, which differentiated towards endothelial cells in the absence of exogenous VEGF. Interestingly, this differentiation was abolished by the HIF-1 or VEGF blocking. In vivo transplantation of hypoxia-primed EBs into mice ischemic limb elicited enhanced vessel differentiation. Collectively, our findings identify that hypoxia enhanced ESC differentiation by HIF-1-mediated inverse regulation of Oct4 and VEGF, which is a novel pathway to promote vascular-lineage differentiation. PMID:22821840

  1. Flows and hypoxic blackwater events in managed ephemeral river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyz, Sally; Watkins, Susanne C.; Whitworth, Kerry L.; Baldwin, Darren S.

    2011-04-01

    SummaryAs pressure increases on the availability of water resources worldwide, especially in the face of climatic change, it is probable that the likelihood of streams undergoing at least some periods of drying will increase in arid and semi-arid regions. This has implications for the ongoing management of waterways in these areas. One area of concern is the potential occurrence of hypoxic blackwater events upon re-instatement of flows in creek and river channels following periods of drying. Hypoxic blackwater events are characterised by high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the metabolism of which results in low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the water column, which can cause fish and crustacean mortality. Therefore, understanding hypoxic blackwater events is important in order to reduce the potential for fish mortalities and other water quality impacts from both managed and natural flows. In this study, we set out to determine the factors that influenced the occurrence of a hypoxic blackwater event in the Edward-Wakool river system, in southern NSW, Australia during the previous austral summer (2008-2009). Standing stocks of plant litter, emergent macrophytes and river red gum saplings ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn.), as well as rates of litterfall, were determined in dry and inundated channels. A series of mesocosm experiments were undertaken to determine which carbon source was the greatest contributor to DOC and to DO depletion, and what loadings could result in hypoxia. These experiments were then used to create a simple algorithm relating carbon loading in a dry channel to DOC in the overlying water column following inundation. Results revealed that plant litter was the main contributor to water column DOC and to DO depletion. Litter loadings equal to or greater than 370 g m -2 were found to cause DO in a shallow (20 cm) water column at 20 °C to fall to zero within two days. This loading was approximately half of that found in dry channels in the

  2. Alteration of hedgehog signaling by chronic exposure to different pesticide formulations and unveiling the regenerative potential of recombinant sonic hedgehog in mouse model of bone marrow aplasia.

    PubMed

    Chaklader, Malay; Law, Sujata

    2015-03-01

    Chronic pesticide exposure-induced downregulation of hedgehog signaling and its subsequent degenerative effects on the mammalian hematopoietic system have not been investigated yet. However a number of concurrent studies have pointed out the positive correlation between chronic pesticide exposure induced bone marrow failure and immune suppression. Here, we have given an emphasis on the recapitulation of human marrow aplasia like condition in mice by chronic mixed pesticide exposures and simultaneously unravel the role of individual pesticides in the said event. Unlike the effect of mixed pesticide, individual pesticides differentially alter the hedgehog signaling in the bone marrow primitive hematopoietic compartment (Sca1 + compartment) and stromal compartment. Individually, hexaconazole disrupted hematopoietic as well as stromal hedgehog signaling activation through inhibiting SMO and facilitating PKC δ expression. On contrary, both chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin increased the sequestration and degradation of GLI1 by upregulating SU(FU) and βTrCP, respectively. However, cypermethrin-mediated inhibition of hedgehog signaling has partly shown to be circumvented by non-canonical activation of GLI1. Finally, we have tested the regenerative response of sonic hedgehog and shown that in vitro supplemented recombinant SHH protein augmented clonogenic stromal progenitors (CFU-F) as well as primitive multipotent hematopoietic clones including CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM of mixed pesticide-induced aplastic marrow. It is an indication of the marrow regeneration. Finally, our findings provide a gripping evidence that downregulated hedgehog signaling contribute to pesticide-mediated bone marrow aplasia but it could be recovered by proper supplementation of recombinant SHH along with hematopoietic base cocktail. Furthermore, SU(FU) and GLI1 can be exploited as future theradiagnostic markers for early marrow aplasia diagnosis.

  3. [Biochemical and pharmacological mechanisms of different types of hypoxic preconditioning in cerebral ischemia in mice].

    PubMed

    Kulinskiĭ, V I; Gavrilina, T V; Minakina, L N; Kovtun, V Iu

    2006-01-01

    Different types of hypoxic preconditioning (hypoxic, circulatory, hemic and tissue hypoxia) increase the tolerance to complete global cerebral ischemia at early terms (hours). Biochemico-pharmacological analysis with the use of selective agonists and antagonists showed the importance of adenosine A1-receptors and K+(ATP)-channels in the mechanisms of the neuroprotective effect and natural tolerance. The general scheme of the investigated mechanisms of different types of hypoxic preconditioning has been proposed.

  4. Chronic subordinate colony housing paradigm: A mouse model for mechanisms of PTSD vulnerability, targeted prevention, and treatment-2016 Curt Richter Award Paper.

    PubMed

    Reber, Stefan O; Langgartner, Dominik; Foertsch, Sandra; Postolache, Teodor T; Brenner, Lisa A; Guendel, Harald; Lowry, Christopher A

    2016-12-01

    There is considerable individual variability in vulnerability for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); evidence suggests that this variability is related in part to genetic and environmental factors, including adverse early life experience. Interestingly, recent studies indicate that induction of chronic low-grade inflammation may be a common mechanism underlying gene and environment interactions that increase the risk for development of PTSD symptoms, and, therefore, may be a target for novel interventions for prevention or treatment of PTSD. Development of murine models with face, construct, and predictive validity would provide opportunities to investigate in detail complex genetic, environmental, endocrine, and immunologic factors that determine vulnerability to PTSD-like syndromes, and furthermore may provide mechanistic insight leading to development of novel interventions for both prevention and treatment of PTSD symptoms. Here we describe the potential use of the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) paradigm in mice as an adequate animal model for development of a PTSD-like syndrome and describe recent studies that suggest novel interventions for the prevention and treatment of PTSD.

  5. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (107 CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear. PMID:26553466

  6. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Graham, Leah C; Harder, Jeffrey M; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R

    2016-02-18

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water can lead to resistance to antimonial drugs in a mouse model of visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Perry, Meghan R; Wyllie, Susan; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Joerg; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2013-12-03

    The Indian subcontinent is the only region where arsenic contamination of drinking water coexists with widespread resistance to antimonial drugs that are used to treat the parasitic disease visceral leishmaniasis. We have previously proposed that selection for parasite resistance within visceral leishmaniasis patients who have been exposed to trivalent arsenic results in cross-resistance to the related metalloid antimony, present in the pentavalent state as a complex in drugs such as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) and meglumine antimonate (Glucantime). To test this hypothesis, Leishmania donovani was serially passaged in mice exposed to arsenic in drinking water at environmentally relevant levels (10 or 100 ppm). Arsenic accumulation in organs and other tissues was proportional to the level of exposure and similar to that previously reported in human liver biopsies. After five monthly passages in mice exposed to arsenic, isolated parasites were found to be completely refractory to 500 μg · mL(-1) Pentostam compared with the control passage group (38.5 μg · mL(-1)) cultured in vitro in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Reassessment of resistant parasites following further passage for 4 mo in mice without arsenic exposure showed that resistance was stable. Treatment of infected mice with Pentostam confirmed that resistance observed in vitro also occurred in vivo. We conclude that arsenic contamination may have played a significant role in the development of Leishmania antimonial resistance in Bihar because inadequate treatment with antimonial drugs is not exclusive to India, whereas widespread antimonial resistance is.

  8. The complementary roles of surface-immunoglobulin clonality and fluorescence intensity, mouse rosettes, and cd5 in the diagnosis of B-chronic lymphocytic-leukemia.

    PubMed

    Batata, A; Shen, B; Yanes, B; Nicholson, G; Hines, D; Chang, J; Gross, H; Llenadolee, M; Merle, S

    1993-03-01

    Peripheral blood from 77 cases of B-CLL was analyzed to evaluate the diagnostic value of SIg clonality and fluorescence intensity, mouse rosettes (MR), and CD5. Monoclonal SIg (L-chain restriction or H-chain restriction or both) was detected in 69 cases (89.61%), with weak fluorescence (mean channel number on flow cytometry <200) in 65 (94.2%); MR was positive in 66 (85.71%); CD5 positive in 64 (83.12%). The association of SIg intensity, MR, and CD5 was as follows: weak SIg/MR+/CD5+, 41 cases (53.25%); weak SIg/MR+/CD5-, 13 (16.88%); weak SIg/MR-/CD5+, 11 (14.29%); strong SIg/MR+/CD5+, 4 (5.19%); and undetected SIg/MR+/CD5+, 8 (10.39%). Thus, by performing the three markers and accepting either two or three positive results (weak SIg, MR+, CD5+) as sufficient for diagnosis, all 77 cases (100%) were diagnosed. The study demonstrated the complementary roles between L- and H- chains, and between SIg intensity, MR, and CD5 in immunophenotyping CLL.

  9. Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Leah C.; Harder, Jeffrey M.; Soto, Ileana; de Vries, Wilhelmine N.; John, Simon W. M.; Howell, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26888450

  10. Macrophage derived Wnt signalling opposes Notch signalling in a Numb mediated manner to specify HPC fate in chronic liver disease in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Boulter, Luke; Govaere, Olivier; Bird, Tom G; Radulescu, Sorina; Ramachandran, Prakash; Pellicoro, Antonella; Ridgway, Rachel A; Seo, Sang Soo; Spee, Bart; Van Rooijen, Nico; Sansom, Owen J.; Iredale, John P; Lowell, Sally; Roskams, Tania; Forbes, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    During chronic injury, regeneration of the adult liver becomes impaired. In this context bipotent Hepatic Progenitor Cells (HPCs) become activated and can regenerate both cholangiocytes and hepatocytes. Notch and Wnt signalling during hepatic ontogeny are described, but their roles in HPC mediated liver regeneration are unclear. Here we show in human diseased liver and murine models of the ductular reaction with biliary and hepatocyte regeneration that Notch and Wnt signalling direct HPC specification within the activated myofibroblasts and macrophages HPC niche. During biliary regeneration, Numb is downregulated in HPCs, Jagged1 promotes biliary specification within HPCs. During hepatocyte regeneration, macrophage derived canonical Wnt signalling maintains Numb within HPCs, and Notch signalling is reduced promoting hepatocyte specification. This dominant Wnt state is stimulated through engulfment of hepatocyte debris by niche macrophages and can directly influence the HPCs. Macrophage Wnt3a expression in turn facilitates hepatocyte regeneration – thus exemplifying a novel positive feedback mechanism in adult parenchymal regeneration. PMID:22388089

  11. Lack of the P2X7 receptor protects against AMD-like defects and microparticle accumulation in a chronic oxidative stress-induced mouse model of AMD.

    PubMed

    Carver, Kyle A; Lin, C M; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Yang, Dongli

    2017-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is an ATP-gated ion channel that is a key player in oxidative stress under pathological conditions. The P2X7R is expressed in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and neural retina. Chronic oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice lacking Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) developed chronic oxidative stress as well as AMD-like features, but whether the P2X7R plays a causative role in oxidative stress-induced AMD is unknown. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to test if concurrent knockout (KO) of P2X7R could block AMD-like defects seen in Sod1 KO mice. Using multiple approaches, we demonstrate that Sod1 KO causes AMD-like defects, including positive staining for oxidative stress markers, 3-nitrotyrosine and carboxymethyl lysine, thinning of the RPE and retina, thickening of Bruch's membrane, presence of basal laminar and linear deposits, RPE barrier disruption and accumulation of microglia/macrophages. Moreover, we find that Sod1 KO mice accumulate more microparticles (MPs) within RPE/choroid tissues. Concurrent KO of the P2X7R protects against AMD-like defects and MP accumulation in Sod1 KO mice. Together, we show for the first time, that deficiency of P2X7R prevents in vivo oxidative stress-induced accumulation of MPs and AMD-like defects. This work could potentially lead to novel therapies for AMD and other oxidative stress-driven diseases.

  12. Neurobehavioral impairments, generation of oxidative stress and release of pro-apoptotic factors after chronic exposure to sulphur mustard in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Bal, Amanjit; Bhutia, Yangchen D.; Vijayaraghavan, R.; Flora, S.J.S.; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2009-10-15

    Recent global events have focused attention on the potential threat of international and domestic chemical terrorism, as well as the possibility of chemical warfare proliferation. Sulphur mustard (SM) is one of the potent chemical warfare agents (CWA), which initiates a cascade of events that converge on the redox mechanisms common to brain injury. The present study was designed to examine the effects of chronic SM exposure on neurobehavioral impairments, mitochondrial oxidative stress in male Swiss Albino mice and its role in inducing apoptotic neuronal cell death. The animals were divided into four groups (control, low, medium and high dose) of 5 animals each. Exposure to SM was given percutaneously daily for 12 weeks. The results demonstrated impairment in neurobehavioral indices viz. rota rod, passive avoidance and water maze tests in a dose dependent manner. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content whereas, decrease in the activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase suggesting impaired antioxidant defense system. Immunoblotting of cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax and activation of caspase-3 suggest induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Finally, increased p53 expression suggests that it may target the mitochondrial pathway for inducing apoptosis in response to DNA damage signals. In conclusion, chronic SM exposure may have the potential to generate oxidative stress which may trigger the release of cytochrome c as well as caspase-3 activation in neurons leading to cell death by apoptosis in a dose dependent manner which may in the end be responsible for the disruption of cognitive functions in mice.

  13. Significant reduction of brain cysts caused by Toxoplasma gondii after treatment with spiramycin coadministered with metronidazole in a mouse model of chronic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wai Kit; Segarra, Ignacio; Ambu, Stephen; Mak, Joon Wah

    2012-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasite that generates latent cysts in the brain; reactivation of these cysts may lead to fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis, for which treatment remains unsuccessful. We assessed spiramycin pharmacokinetics coadministered with metronidazole, the eradication of brain cysts and the in vitro reactivation. Male BALB/c mice were fed 1,000 tachyzoites orally to develop chronic toxoplasmosis. Four weeks later, infected mice underwent different treatments: (i) infected untreated mice (n = 9), which received vehicle only; (ii) a spiramycin-only group (n = 9), 400 mg/kg daily for 7 days; (iii) a metronidazole-only group (n = 9), 500 mg/kg daily for 7 days; and (iv) a combination group (n = 9), which received both spiramycin (400 mg/kg) and metronidazole (500 mg/kg) daily for 7 days. An uninfected control group (n = 10) was administered vehicle only. After treatment, the brain cysts were counted, brain homogenates were cultured in confluent Vero cells, and cysts and tachyzoites were counted after 1 week. Separately, pharmacokinetic profiles (plasma and brain) were assessed after a single dose of spiramycin (400 mg/kg), metronidazole (500 mg/kg), or both. Metronidazole treatment increased the brain spiramycin area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to ∞ (AUC(0-∞)) by 67% without affecting its plasma disposition. Metronidazole plasma and brain AUC(0-∞) values were reduced 9 and 62%, respectively, after spiramycin coadministration. Enhanced spiramycin brain exposure after coadministration reduced brain cysts 15-fold (79 ± 23 for the combination treatment versus 1,198 ± 153 for the untreated control group [P < 0.05]) and 10-fold versus the spiramycin-only group (768 ± 125). Metronidazole alone showed no effect (1,028 ± 149). Tachyzoites were absent in the brain. Spiramycin reduced in vitro reactivation. Metronidazole increased spiramycin brain penetration, causing a significant reduction of T. gondii brain cysts, with potential clinical

  14. Acute and chronic stress differentially regulate cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in mouse brain: implications to glucocorticoid actions and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, A; Siamatras, T; Delgado-Morales, R; Amin, N D; Shukla, V; Zheng, Y-L; Pant, H C; Almeida, O F X; Kino, T

    2015-01-01

    Stress activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which in turn increases circulating glucocorticoid concentrations and stimulates the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Chronically elevated glucocorticoids by repetitive exposure to stress are implicated in major depression and anxiety disorders. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a molecule essential for nervous system development, function and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, can modulate GR activity through phosphorylation. We examined potential contribution of CDK5 to stress response and pathophysiology of major depression. In mice, acute immobilized stress (AS) caused a biphasic effect on CDK5 activity, initially reducing but increasing afterwards in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HIPPO), whereas chronic unpredictable stress (CS) strongly increased it in these brain areas, indicating that AS and CS differentially regulate this kinase activity in a brain region-specific fashion. GR phosphorylation contemporaneously followed the observed changes of CDK5 activity after AS, thus CDK5 may in part alter GR phosphorylation upon this stress. In the postmortem brains of subjects with major depression, CDK5 activity was elevated in Brodmann's area 25, but not in entire PFC and HIPPO. Messenger RNA expression of glucocorticoid-regulated/stress-related genes showed distinct expression profiles in several brain areas of these stressed mice or depressive subjects in which CDK5-mediated changes in GR phosphorylation may have some regulatory roles. Taken together, these results indicate that CDK5 is an integral component of stress response and major depression with regulatory means specific to different stressors, brain areas and diseases in part through changing phosphorylation of GR. PMID:26057048

  15. Acute and chronic interference with BDNF/TrkB-signaling impair LTP selectively at mossy fiber synapses in the CA3 region of mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schildt, Sandra; Endres, Thomas; Lessmann, Volkmar; Edelmann, Elke

    2013-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling via TrkB crucially regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain. Although BDNF is abundant at hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) synapses, which critically contribute to hippocampus dependent memory, its role in MF synaptic plasticity (long-term potentiation, LTP) remained largely unclear. Using field potential recordings in CA3 of adult heterozygous BDNF knockout (ko, BDNF+/-) mice we observed impaired (∼50%) NMDAR-independent MF-LTP. In contrast to MF synapses, LTP at neighboring associative/commissural (A/C) fiber synapses remained unaffected. To exclude that impaired MF-LTP in BDNF+/- mice was due to developmental changes in response to chronically reduced BDNF levels, and to prove the importance of acute availability of BDNF in MF-LTP, we also tested effects of acute interference with BDNF/TrkB signaling. Inhibition of TrkB tyrosine kinase signaling with k252a, or with the selective BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc, both inhibited MF-LTP to the same extent as observed in BDNF+/- mice. Basal synaptic transmission, short-term plasticity, and synaptic fatigue during LTP induction were not significantly altered by treatment with k252a or TrkB-Fc, or by chronic BDNF reduction in BDNF+/- mice. Since the acute interference with BDNF-signaling did not completely block MF-LTP, our results provide evidence that an additional mechanism besides BDNF induced TrkB signaling contributes to this type of LTP. Our results prove for the first time a mechanistic action of acute BDNF/TrkB signaling in presynaptic expression of MF-LTP in adult hippocampus.

  16. Time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Porteus, Cosima; Hedrick, Michael S; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias; Milsom, William K

    2011-04-01

    Over a decade has passed since Powell et al. (Respir Physiol 112:123-134, 1998) described and defined the time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in adult mammals. These time domains, however, have yet to receive much attention in other vertebrate groups. The initial, acute HVR of fish, amphibians and reptiles serves to minimize the imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. If the hypoxia is sustained, a suite of secondary adjustments occur giving rise to a more long-term balance (acclimatization) that allows the behaviors of normal life. These secondary responses can change over time as a function of the nature of the stimulus (the pattern and intensity of the hypoxic exposure). To add to the complexity of this process, hypoxia can also lead to metabolic suppression (the hypoxic metabolic response) and the magnitude of this is also time dependent. Unlike the original review of Powell et al. (Respir Physiol 112:123-134, 1998) that only considered the HVR in adult animals, we also consider relevant developmental time points where information is available. Finally, in amphibians and reptiles with incompletely divided hearts the magnitude of the ventilatory response will be modulated by hypoxia-induced changes in intra-cardiac shunting that also improve the match between O(2) supply and demand, and these too change in a time-dependent fashion. While the current literature on this topic is reviewed here, it is noted that this area has received little attention. We attempt to redefine time domains in a more 'holistic' fashion that better accommodates research on ectotherms. If we are to distinguish between the genetic, developmental and environmental influences underlying the various ventilatory responses to hypoxia, however, we must design future experiments with time domains in mind.

  17. Clinical perspectives for the use of new hypoxic cell sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    Experience with high pressure oxygen in combination with radiotherapy has shown that, for some tumors at least, the presence of hypoxic cells is a limiting factor in the ability to cure these tumors even with conventional daily fractionation. This suggests that hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, of which misonidazole (MISO) is the prototype drug, may play a role in improving the cure-rate of some tumors when combined with daily fractionation. Even for those tumors for which no improvement is seen when combined with daily fractionation, it is likely that there will be an important role for these sensitizers by using them in combination with regimens of only a few dose fractions. Because of the limiting side effects of neuropathy, a less toxic radiosensitizer than MISO is required to gain the full clinical benefit of these drugs. A possible way of achieving this is to reduce the lipid solubility (lipophilicity) of the compounds while still retaining their electron-affinity. This reduces the concentration of drug in the neural tissues (brain, peripheral nerves) without affecting the tumor concentration. However, if the lipophilicity is too low, the drugs are unable to enter the hypoxic cells and hence lose their radiosensitivity efficiency. It would appear that a lipophilicity given by an octanol:water partition coefficient of approximately 0.04 is optimum (cf. MISO = 0.43) with the 2-nitroimidazole amide SR-2508 the best in this series. Tumor levels of this drug of at least 7-8 times those obtained with MISO should be attainable clinically for no increase in neurotoxicity. Another property of electron-affinic sensitizers shows clinical promise. This is their ability to preferentially sensitize tumors compared to normal tissues to the cytotoxic action of several chemotherapeutic agents.

  18. Sirtuin 6 protects the heart from hypoxic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Maksin-Matveev, Anna; Kanfi, Yariv; Hochhauser, Edith; Isak, Ahuva; Cohen, Haim Y.; Shainberg, Asher

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. We investigated whether life extension is associated with cardioprotection against hypoxia. The proposed study is to develop approaches to reduce hypoxic damage through the use of the sirtuin pathway and to elucidate the mechanism involved. For that purpose we subjected cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice (TG) with over-expression of SIRT6, to hypoxic stress in cell cultures. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice subjected to prolonged hypoxia may release survival factors or fewer damage markers to protect them from hypoxic stress compared with wild type (WT) mice. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released to the medium and propidium iodide (PI) binding, were markedly decreased following hypoxia in TG cardiomyocytes. The protective mechanism of SIRT6 over-expression includes the activation of pAMPKα pathway, the increased protein level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), the decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction in the protein level of phospho-protein kinase B (pAkt) during hypoxia. Together, all these processes impede the necrosis/apoptosis pathways leading to the improved survival of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia, which might explain life extension. - Highlights: • Sirtuin 6 is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 protects cardiocytes from hypoxia and oxidative stress. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 activates the pAMPKα pathway and the Bcl2 expression. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 decreases ROS formation and pAkt level during hypoxia. • These pathways protect cardiocytes from hypoxia and might explain lifespan extension.

  19. Reflex gelastic-dacrystic seizures following hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2013-07-12

    Reflex or stimulus-sensitive epilepsies are uncommon epileptic syndromes triggered by exogenous-specific sensory stimulus or endogenous various mental activities. Gelastic-dacrystic seizures are rare epileptic manifestations characterised by ictal laughter and crying. Gelastic-dacrystic seizures are commonly caused by hypothalamic hamartoma but rarely described due to cortical dysplasia, lesions of frontal and temporal lobes, tumours and vascular malformations. We report a young woman who presented with somatosensory-evoked gelastic-dacrystic seizures. This patient had a positive history of perinatal insult substantiated by MRI findings. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy as the cause of gelastic-dacrystic seizures has not been reported so far in the literature.

  20. Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I)-induced Chronic Gliosis and Retinal Stress Lead to Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model of Retinopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Villacampa, Pilar; Ribera, Albert; Motas, Sandra; Ramírez, Laura; García, Miquel; de la Villa, Pedro; Haurigot, Virginia; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) exerts multiple effects on different retinal cell types in both physiological and pathological conditions. Despite the growth factor's extensively described neuroprotective actions, transgenic mice with increased intraocular levels of IGF-I showed progressive impairment of electroretinographic amplitudes up to complete loss of response, with loss of photoreceptors and bipolar, ganglion, and amacrine neurons. Neurodegeneration was preceded by the overexpression of genes related to retinal stress, acute-phase response, and gliosis, suggesting that IGF-I altered normal retinal homeostasis. Indeed, gliosis and microgliosis were present from an early age in transgenic mice, before other alterations occurred, and were accompanied by signs of oxidative stress and impaired glutamate recycling. Older mice also showed overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that, when chronically increased, intraocular IGF-I is responsible for the induction of deleterious cellular processes that can lead to neurodegeneration, and they highlight the importance that this growth factor may have in the pathogenesis of conditions such as ischemic or diabetic retinopathy. PMID:23620587

  1. NLRP3 Deficiency Attenuates Renal Fibrosis and Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Mouse Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Model of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Bi, Xiao; Zhou, Ping; Zhu, Shijian

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. The nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing PYD-3 (NLRP3) inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, its exact role in glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis is still undefined. The present study was performed to identify the function of NLRP3 in modulating renal injury and fibrosis and the potential involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the murine unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model of CKD. Methods. Employing wild-type (WT) and NLRP3−/− mice with or without UUO, we evaluated renal structure, tissue injury, and mitochondrial ultrastructure, as well as expression of some vital molecules involved in the progression of fibrosis, apoptosis, inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Results. The severe glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced in WT mice by UUO was markedly attenuated in NLRP3−/− mice as evidenced by blockade of extracellular matrix deposition, decreased cell apoptosis, and phenotypic alterations. Moreover, NLRP3 deletion reversed UUO-induced impairment of mitochondrial morphology and function. Conclusions. NLRP3 deletion ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction and alleviates renal fibrosis in a murine UUO model of CKD. PMID:28348462

  2. Role of mir-15a/16-1 in early B cell development in a mouse model of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Underbayev, Chingiz; Kasar, Siddha; Ruezinsky, William; Degheidy, Heba; Schneider, Joel Solomon; Marti, Gerald; Bauer, Steven R.; Fraidenraich, Diego; Lightfoote, Marilyn M.; Parashar, Vijay; Raveche, Elizabeth; Batish, Mona

    2016-01-01

    In both human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and the New Zealand Black (NZB) murine model of CLL, decreased levels of microRNAs miR-15a/16 play an important role in the disease. Here we investigate the effects of this microRNA on early steps of B cell development and the capacity of miR-15a-deficient hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and B1 progenitor cells (B1P) to reproduce CLL-like phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that both miR-15a deficient HSC and B1P cells are capable of repopulating irradiated recipients and produce higher numbers of B1 cells than sources with normal miR-15a/16 levels. Furthermore, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived for the first time from NZB mice, provided insights into the B cell differentiation roadblock inherent in this strain. In addition, exogenously delivered miR-15a into the NZB derived B cell line provided valuable clues into novel targets such as Mmp10 and Mt2. Our data supports the hypothesis that miR-15a/16 deficient stem cells and B1Ps experience a maturation blockage, which contributes to B1 cells bias in development. This work will help understand the role of miR-15a in early events of CLL and points to B1P cells as potential cells of origin for this incurable disease. PMID:27533467

  3. Hypoxic-Preconditioned Bone Marrow Stem Cell Medium Significantly Improves Outcome After Retinal Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Steven; Dreixler, John C.; Mathew, Biji; Balyasnikova, Irina; Mann, Jacob R.; Boddapati, Venkat; Xue, Lai; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We have previously demonstrated the protective effect of bone marrow stem cell (BMSC)-conditioned medium in retinal ischemic injury. We hypothesized here that hypoxic preconditioning of stem cells significantly enhances the neuroprotective effect of the conditioned medium and thereby augments the protective effect in ischemic retina. Methods Rats were subjected to retinal ischemia by increasing intraocular pressure to 130 to 135 mm Hg for 55 minutes. Hypoxic-preconditioned, hypoxic unconditioned, or normoxic medium was injected into the vitreous 24 hours after ischemia ended. Recovery was assessed 7 days after injections by comparing electroretinography measurements, histologic examination, and apoptosis (TUNEL, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay). To compare proteins secreted into the medium in the groups and the effect of hypoxic exposure, we used rat cytokine arrays. Results Eyes injected with hypoxic BMSC–conditioned medium 24 hours after ischemia demonstrated significantly enhanced return of retinal function, decreased retinal ganglion cell layer loss, and attenuated apoptosis compared to those administered normoxic or hypoxic unconditioned medium. Hypoxic-preconditioned medium had 21 significantly increased protein levels compared to normoxic medium. Conclusions The medium from hypoxic-preconditioned BMSCs robustly restored retinal function and prevented cell loss after ischemia when injected 24 hours after ischemia. The protective effect was even more pronounced than in our previous studies of normoxic conditioned medium. Prosurvival signals triggered by the secretome may play a role in this neuroprotective effect. PMID:27367588

  4. Ionic storm in hypoxic/ischemic stress: Can opioid receptors subside it?

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Dongman; Xia, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are extremely vulnerable to oxygen deprivation and blood supply insufficiency. Indeed, hypoxic/ischemic stress triggers multiple pathophysiological changes in the brain, forming the basis of hypoxic/ischemic encephalopathy. One of the initial and crucial events induced by hypoxia/ischemia is the disruption of ionic homeostasis characterized by enhanced K+ efflux and Na+-, Ca2+- and Cl− influx, which causes neuronal injury or even death. Recent data from our laboratory and those of others have shown that activation of opioid receptors, particularly δ-opioid receptors (DOR), is neuroprotective against hypoxic/ischemic insult. This protective mechanism may be one of the key factors that determine neuronal survival under hypoxic/ischemic condition. An important aspect of the DOR-mediated neuroprotection is its action against hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis. Specially, DOR signal inhibits Na+ influx through the membrane and reduces the increase in intracellular Ca2+, thus decreasing the excessive leakage of intracellular K+. Such protection is dependent on a PKC-dependent and PKA-independent signaling pathway. Furthermore, our novel exploration shows that DOR attenuates hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis through the inhibitory regulation of Na+ channels. In this review, we will first update current information regarding the process and features of hypoxic/ischemic disruption of ionic homeostasis and then discuss the opioid-mediated regulation of ionic homeostasis, especially in hypoxic/ischemic condition, and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:20036308

  5. Hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell transplantation therapy after intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Takuma; Narasimhan, Purnima; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Wang, Eric; Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Chan, Pak H

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that intraparenchymal transplantation of neural stem cells ameliorates neurological deficits in animals with intracerebral hemorrhage. However, hemoglobin in the host brain environment causes massive grafted cell death and reduces the effectiveness of this approach. Several studies have shown that preconditioning induced by sublethal hypoxia can markedly improve the tolerance of treated subjects to more severe insults. Therefore, we investigated whether hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell resilience to the hemorrhagic stroke environment and improves therapeutic effects in mice. To assess whether hypoxic preconditioning enhances neural stem cell survival when exposed to hemoglobin, neural stem cells were exposed to 5% hypoxia for 24 hours before exposure to hemoglobin. To study the effectiveness of hypoxic preconditioning on grafted-neural stem cell recovery, neural stem cells subjected to hypoxic preconditioning were grafted into the parenchyma 3 days after intracerebral hemorrhage. Hypoxic preconditioning significantly enhanced viability of the neural stem cells exposed to hemoglobin and increased grafted-cell survival in the intracerebral hemorrhage brain. Hypoxic preconditioning also increased neural stem cell secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, transplanted neural stem cells with hypoxic preconditioning exhibited enhanced tissue-protective capability that accelerated behavioral recovery. Our results suggest that hypoxic preconditioning in neural stem cells improves efficacy of stem cell therapy for intracerebral hemorrhage.

  6. Least-cost control of agricultural nutrient contributions to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2007, the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico, measuring 20,720 km**2, was one of the two largest reported since measurement of the zone began in 1985. The extent of the hypoxic zone is related to nitrogen and phosphorous loadings originating on agricultural fields in the upper Midwest. This stud...

  7. Tetrahydrobiopterin in the Prevention of Hypertonia in Hypoxic Fetal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Whitsett, Jennifer; Derrick, Matthew; Ji, Xinhai; Yu, Lei; Tan, Sidhartha

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency is one of the causes of dystonia at birth. We hypothesized that BH4 is a developmental factor determining vulnerability of the immature fetal brain to hypoxic-ischemic injury and subsequent motor deficits in newborns. Methods: Pregnant rabbits were subjected to 40-min uterine ischemia and fetal brains were investigated for global and focal changes in BH4. Newborn kits were assessed by neurobehavioral tests following vehicle and sepiapterin (BH4-analog) treatment of dams. Results: Naive fetal brains at 70% gestation (E22) were severely deficient for BH4 compared to maternal and other fetal tissues. BH4 concentration rapidly increased normally in the perinatal period with the highest concentrations found in the thalamus compared to basal ganglia, frontal, occipital, hippocampus and parietal cortex. Global sustained 40-min hypoxia-ischemia depleted BH4 in E22 thalamus and to a lesser extent in basal ganglia, but not in the frontal, occipital and parietal regions. Maternal supplementation prior to hypoxia-ischemia with sepiapterin increased BH4 in all brain regions and especially in the thalamus, but did not increase the intermediary metabolite, 7,8-BH2. Sepiapterin treatment also reduced incidence of severe motor deficits and perinatal death following E22 hypoxia-ischemia. Interpretation: We conclude that early developmental BH4 deficiency plays a critical role in hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Increasing brain BH4 via maternal supplementation may be an effective strategy in preventing motor deficits from antenatal hypoxia-ischemia. PMID:19798726

  8. Regional hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs with asymptomatic dirofilariasis.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, M W; Fish, R E; Levitzky, M G

    1985-06-01

    The pulmonary hemodynamic response to unilateral alveolar hypoxia was investigated in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs with mild heartworm (HW) disease and in dogs free of HW (HWF). Left lung nitrogen ventilation in HWF dogs resulted in a decrease in the fraction of the cardiac output (QT) perfusing the left lung (QL) from 0.37 +/- 0.03 (SEM) to 0.20 +/- 0.02 (P less than 0.01). In contrast, dogs with mild HW disease did not develop a significant decrease in QL/QT which decreased from 0.38 +/- 0.02 to 0.33 +/- 0.02. This attenuated pulmonary vascular response to regional alveolar hypoxia in dogs with HW disease was associated with a normal pulmonary arterial pressure (14.8 +/- 1.5 mm of Hg) that was not different from that seen in HWF dogs (15.8 +/- 1.7 mm of Hg). These results indicate that mild HW disease interferes with the ability of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction to redistribute pulmonary blood flow away from hypoxic regions of the lung.

  9. The Effects of Acidic and Hypoxic Conditions on the Estuarine ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The interactive and combined effects of coastal acidification and hypoxia on estuarine species is an increasing concern as these stressors change concomitantly. There is a need to understand how these environmental factors interact, as well as their effect on estuarine organisms. A method was developed for this research whereby four exposure treatments were created simultaneously: ambient, elevated pCO2, (~1300µatm, IPCC RCP 8.5 scenario), hypoxic (low dissolved oxygen, ~2 mg/L), and combined elevated pCO2 with low dissolved oxygen. An exposure with variant water quality parameters allows for the comparative study of organismal survival response to acidified and hypoxic conditions. The goal of this research is to determine acute species sensitivity, which is determined by survivability, to the combined effects of elevated pCO2 and hypoxia over a 5 day period, as well as possible differences in sensitivity between life-stages. Preliminary research on sheepshead minnow and mysid shrimp, indicates that mysid shrimp were tolerant of both elevated pCO2 and low DO exposure regardless of life-stage, whereas sheepshead minnows were more sensitive to the combined effects of acidification and hypoxia. This work is part of the first phase of the NECAH project, which is identifying species that are sensitive to the combined effects of acidification and hypoxia. The project describes the initial work on the first 2 species selected for testing and the final product will be

  10. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity. PMID:27047695

  11. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... hospital for: Pain medicines Fluids given through a vein (IV) Stopping food or fluid by mouth to ...

  12. Reconstitution activity of hypoxic cultured human cord blood CD34-positive cells in NOG mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Haruko; Takubo, Keiyo; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Gomei, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Arai, Fumio; Takahashi, Takao; Suda, Toshio

    2009-01-16

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in hypoxic areas of the bone marrow. However, the role of hypoxia in the maintenance of HSCs has not been fully characterized. We performed xenotransplantation of human cord blood cells cultured in hypoxic or normoxic conditions into adult NOD/SCID/IL-2R{gamma}{sup null} (NOG) mice. Hypoxic culture (1% O{sub 2}) for 6 days efficiently supported the maintenance of HSCs, although cell proliferation was suppressed compared to the normoxic culture. In contrast, hypoxia did not affect in vitro colony-forming ability. Upregulation of a cell cycle inhibitor, p21, was observed in hypoxic culture. Immunohistochemical analysis of recipient bone marrow revealed that engrafted CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} cord blood HSCs were hypoxic. Taken together, these results demonstrate the significance of hypoxia in the maintenance of quiescent human cord blood HSCs.

  13. Hypoxic environments as refuge against predatory fish in the Amazonian floodplains.

    PubMed

    Anjos, M B; De Oliveira, R R; Zuanon, J

    2008-02-01

    Several groups of Amazonian fishes exhibit behavioral, morphological and physiological characteristics that allow occupying hypoxic environments, despite the energetic costs of living in such harsh conditions. One of the supposed advantages of occupying hypoxic habitats would be a lower predation pressure resulting from a lower number of piscivorous fishes in those environments. We tested this hypothesis in an area of the Amazon River floodplain through gill net fishing in normoxic and hypoxic habitats. From the 103 species caught, 38 were classified as piscivores. We found no difference in the number of piscivorous species captured in hypoxic and normoxic habitats (chi2 = 0.23; p = 0.63; df = 1) but piscivorous individuals were more numerous in normoxic than in hypoxic sampling stations (chi2 = 104.4; p < 0.001; df = 1). This indicates that environments submitted to low oxygen conditions may in fact function as refuges against piscivorous fishes in the Amazonian floodplains.

  14. Genetic divergence in the transcriptional engram of chronic alcohol abuse: A laser-capture RNA-seq study of the mouse mesocorticolimbic system.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Megan K; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Pandey, Ashutosh K; Smith, Maren L; Gong, Suzhen; Ingels, Jesse; Miles, Michael F; Lopez, Marcelo F; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W

    2017-02-01

    Genetic factors that influence the transition from initial drinking to dependence remain enigmatic. Recent studies have leveraged chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) paradigms to measure changes in brain gene expression in a single strain at 0, 8, 72 h, and even 7 days following CIE. We extend these findings using LCM RNA-seq to profile expression in 11 brain regions in two inbred strains - C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) - 72 h following multiple cycles of ethanol self-administration and CIE. Linear models identified differential expression based on treatment, region, strain, or interactions with treatment. Nearly 40% of genes showed a robust effect (FDR < 0.01) of region, and hippocampus CA1, cortex, bed nucleus stria terminalis, and nucleus accumbens core had the highest number of differentially expressed genes after treatment. Another 8% of differentially expressed genes demonstrated a robust effect of strain. As expected, based on similar studies in B6, treatment had a much smaller impact on expression; only 72 genes (p < 0.01) are modulated by treatment (independent of region or strain). Strikingly, many more genes (415) show a strain-specific and largely opposite response to treatment and are enriched in processes related to RNA metabolism, transcription factor activity, and mitochondrial function. Over 3 times as many changes in gene expression were detected in D2 compared to B6, and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) module comparison identified more modules enriched for treatment effects in D2. Substantial strain differences exist in the temporal pattern of transcriptional neuroadaptation to CIE, and these may drive individual differences in risk of addiction following excessive alcohol consumption.

  15. Disrupted MEK/ERK signaling in the medial orbital cortex and dorsal endopiriform nuclei of the prefrontal cortex in a chronic restraint stress mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Leem, Yea-Hyun; Yoon, Sang-Sun; Kim, Yu-Han; Jo, Sangmee Ahn

    2014-09-19

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental illnesses, and causes a constant feeling of sadness and lose of interest, which often leads to suicide. Evidence suggests that depression is associated with aberrant MEK/ERK signaling. However, studies on MEK/ERK signaling in depression have only been done in a few brain regions, such as the hippocampus and mesolimbic reward pathways. Recent studies also implicate the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in depression. Thus, we examined the changes in MEK/ERK signaling in subregions of the prefrontal cortex of C57BL/6 mice by immunohistochemistry using phospho-MEK1/2 (Ser 217/221) and ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) antibodies. Mice were subjected to 21 consecutive days of restraint stress (for 2h daily), and depression-like behavior was evaluated using a sociability test and tail suspension test. The antidepressant, imipramine (20mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 30min before restraint stress exposure. Chronic/repeated restraint stress produced depressive-like behavior, such as increased social avoidance in the social interaction test, and enhanced immobility time in the tail suspension test. This depressive behavior was ameliorated by imipramine. The behavioral changes well corresponded to a decrease in MEK/ERK immunoreactivity in the medial orbital (MO) cortex and dorsal endopiriform nuclei (DEn), which was averted by imipramine, but not in cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic, and motor cortex. These results suggest that MEK/ERK signaling is disrupted in the DEn and MO subregions of the prefrontal cortex in the depressive phenotype, and that blocking a decrease in activated MEK/ERK is inherent to the antidepressant imipramine response.

  16. A new model of an arteriovenous fistula in chronic kidney disease in the mouse: beneficial effects of upregulated heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lu; Grande, Joseph P; Hillestad, Matthew L; Croatt, Anthony J; Barry, Michael A; Katusic, Zvonimir S; Nath, Karl A

    2016-03-15

    The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the preferred hemodialysis vascular access, but it is complicated by high failure rates and attendant morbidity. This study provides the first description of a murine AVF model that recapitulates two salient features of hemodialysis AVFs, namely, anastomosis of end-vein to side-artery to create the AVF and the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD reduced AVF blood flow, observed as early as 3 days after AVF creation, and increased neointimal hyperplasia, venous wall thickness, thrombus formation, and vasculopathic gene expression in the AVF. These adverse effects of CKD could not be ascribed to preexisting alterations in blood pressure or vascular reactivity in this CKD model. In addition to vasculopathic genes, CKD induced potentially vasoprotective genes in the AVF such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and HO-2. To determine whether prior HO-1 upregulation may protect in this model, we upregulated HO-1 by adeno-associated viral gene delivery, achieving marked venous induction of the HO-1 protein and HO activity. Such HO-1 upregulation improved AVF blood flow and decreased venous wall thickness in the AVF. Finally, we demonstrate that the administration of carbon monoxide, a product of HO, acutely increased AVF blood flow. This study thus demonstrates: 1) the feasibility of a clinically relevant murine AVF model created in the presence of CKD and involving an end-vein to side-artery anastomosis; 2) the exacerbatory effect of CKD on clinically relevant features of this model; and 3) the beneficial effects in this model conferred by HO-1 upregulation by adeno-associated viral gene delivery.

  17. New Mouse Model for Chronic Infections by Gram-Negative Bacteria Enabling the Study of Anti-Infective Efficacy and Host-Microbe Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pletzer, Daniel; Mansour, Sarah C.; Wuerth, Kelli; Rahanjam, Negin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Only a few, relatively cumbersome animal models enable long-term Gram-negative bacterial infections that mimic human situations, where untreated infections can last for weeks. Here, we describe a simple murine cutaneous abscess model that enables chronic or progressive infections, depending on the subcutaneously injected bacterial strain. In this model, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis epidemic isolate LESB58 caused localized high-density skin and soft tissue infections and necrotic skin lesions for up to 10 days but did not disseminate in either CD-1 or C57BL/6 mice. The model was adapted for use with four major Gram-negative nosocomial pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Escherichia coli. This model enabled noninvasive imaging and tracking of lux-tagged bacteria, the influx of activated neutrophils, and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen species at the infection site. Screening antimicrobials against high-density infections showed that local but not intravenous administration of gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem significantly but incompletely reduced bacterial counts and superficial tissue dermonecrosis. Bacterial RNA isolated from the abscess tissue revealed that Pseudomonas genes involved in iron uptake, toxin production, surface lipopolysaccharide regulation, adherence, and lipase production were highly upregulated whereas phenazine production and expression of global activator gacA were downregulated. The model was validated for studying virulence using mutants of more-virulent P. aeruginosa strain PA14. Thus, mutants defective in flagella or motility, type III secretion, or siderophore biosynthesis were noninvasive and suppressed dermal necrosis in mice, while a strain with a mutation in the bfiS gene encoding a sensor kinase showed enhanced invasiveness and mortality in mice compared to controls infected with wild-type P. aeruginosa PA14. PMID:28246361

  18. Disturbed hypoxic responses as a pathogenic mechanism of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Zheng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is a chronic complication of diabetes that is characterized by impaired wound healing in the lower extremities. DFU remains a major clinical challenge because of poor understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms. Impaired wound healing in diabetes is characterized by decreased angiogenesis, reduced bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) recruitment, and decreased fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that increased hypoxic conditions and impaired cellular responses to hypoxia are essential pathogenic factors of delayed wound healing in DFU. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1, a heterodimer of HIF-1α and HIF-1β) is a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis that mediates the adaptive cellular responses to hypoxia by regulating the expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, metabolic changes, proliferation, migration, and cell survival. However, HIF-1 signalling is inhibited in diabetes as a result of hyperglycaemia-induced HIF-1α destabilization and functional repression. Increasing HIF-1α expression and activity using various approaches promotes angiogenesis, EPC recruitment, and granulation, thereby improving wound healing in experimental diabetes. The mechanisms underlying HIF-1α regulation in diabetes and the therapeutic strategies targeting HIF-1 signalling for the treatment of diabetic wounds are discussed in this review. Further investigations of the pathways involved in HIF-1α regulation in diabetes are required to advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired wound healing in diabetes and to provide a foundation for developing novel therapeutic approaches to treat DFU.

  19. Pulmonary administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to the lungs induces alveolar regeneration in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Michiko; Hirokawa, Mai; Abe, Kaori; Kumagai, Harumi; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2016-07-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive respiratory disease with several causes, including smoking, and no curative therapeutic agent is available, particularly for destructive alveolar lesions. In this study, we investigated the differentiation-inducing effect on undifferentiated lung cells (Calu-6) and the alveolar regenerative effect of the active vitamin 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (VD3) with the ultimate goal of developing a novel curative drug for COPD. First, the differentiation-inducing effect of VD3 on Calu-6 cells was evaluated. Treatment with VD3 increased the proportions of type I alveolar epithelial (AT-I) and type II alveolar epithelial (AT-II) cells constituting alveoli in a concentration- and treatment time-dependent manner, demonstrating the potent differentiation-inducing activity of VD3 on Calu-6 cells. We thus administered VD3 topically to the mice lung using a previously developed intrapulmonary administration via self-inhalation method. To evaluate the alveolus-repairing effect of VD3, we administered VD3 intrapulmonarily to elastase-induced COPD model mice and computed the mean distance between the alveolar walls as an index of the extent of alveolar injury. Results showed significant decreases in the alveolar wall distance in groups of mice that received 0.01, 0.1, and 1μg/kg of intrapulmonary VD3, revealing excellent alveolus-regenerating effect of VD3. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of VD3 on improving respiratory function using a respiratory function analyzer. Lung elasticity and respiratory competence [forced expiratory volume (FEV) 1 s %] are reduced in COPD, reflecting advanced emphysematous changes. In elastase-induced COPD model mice, although lung elasticity and respiratory competence were reduced, VD3 administered intrapulmonarily twice weekly for 2weeks recovered tissue elastance and forced expiratory volume in 0.05s to the forced vital capacity, which are indicators of lung elasticity and respiratory

  20. Treating Viral Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Insights from a Mouse Model of Cigarette Smoke and H1N1 Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Carla M. T.; Zavitz, Caleb C. J.; Botelho, Fernando M.; Lambert, Kristen N.; Brown, Earl G.; Mossman, Karen L.; Taylor, John D.; Stämpfli, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a progressive lung disease that is punctuated by periods of exacerbations (worsening of symptoms) that are attributable to viral infections. While rhinoviruses are most commonly isolated viruses during episodes of exacerbation, influenza viruses have the potential to become even more problematic with the increased likelihood of an epidemic. Methodology and Principal Findings This study examined the impact of current and potential pharmacological targets namely the systemic corticosteroid dexamethasone and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- gamma agonist pioglitazone on the outcome of infection in smoke-exposed mice. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to room air or cigarette smoke for 4 days and subsequently inoculated with an H1N1 influenza A virus. Interventions were delivered daily during the course of infection. We show that smoke-exposed mice have an exacerbated inflammatory response following infection. While smoke exposure did not compromise viral clearance, precision cut lung slices from smoke-exposed mice showed greater expression of CC (MCP-1, -3), and CXC (KC, MIP-2, GCP-2) chemokines compared to controls when stimulated with a viral mimic or influenza A virus. While dexamethasone treatment partially attenuated the inflammatory response in the broncho-alveolar lavage of smoke-exposed, virally-infected animals, viral-induced neutrophilia was steroid insensitive. In contrast to controls, dexamethasone-treated smoke-exposed influenza-infected mice had a worsened health status. Pioglitazone treatment of virally-infected smoke-exposed mice proved more efficacious than the steroid intervention. Further mechanistic evaluation revealed that a deficiency in CCR2 did not improve the inflammatory outcome in smoke-exposed, virally-infected animals. Conclusions and Significance This animal model of cigarette smoke and H1N1 influenza infection demonstrates that smoke-exposed animals are differentially primed to

  1. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos triggered body weight increase and memory impairment depending on human apoE polymorphisms in a targeted replacement mouse model.

    PubMed

    Peris-Sampedro, Fiona; Basaure, Pia; Reverte, Ingrid; Cabré, Maria; Domingo, José L; Colomina, Maria Teresa

    2015-05-15

    Despite restrictions on their use, humans are still constantly exposed to organophosphates (OPs). A huge number of studies have ratified the neurotoxic effects of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and suggested its association with neurodegenerative diseases, but data are still scarce. Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in lipid transport and distribution. In humans, the apoE4 isoform has been linked to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE3 is the most prevalent isoform worldwide, and has been often established as the healthful one. The current study, performed in targeted replacement (TR) adult male mice, aimed to inquire whether genetic variations of the human apoE respond differently to a chronic dietary challenge with CPF. At four/five months of age, mice carrying apoE2, apoE3 or apoE4 were pair-fed a diet supplemented with CPF at 0 or 2mg/kg body weight/day for 13weeks. Cholinergic signs were monitored daily and body weight changes weekly. In the last week of treatment, learning and memory were assessed in a Barnes maze task. Dietary CPF challenge increased body weight only in apoE3 mice. Differences in the acquisition and retention of the Barnes maze were attributed to apoE genetic differences. Our results showed that apoE4 mice performed worse than apoE2 and apoE3 carriers in the acquisition period of the spatial task, and that apoE2 mice had poorer retention than the other two genotypes. On the other hand, CPF increased the search velocity of apoE2 subjects during the acquisition period. Retention was impaired only in CPF-exposed apoE3 mice. These results underline that gene×environment interactions need to be taken into account in epidemiological studies. Given that apoE3, the most common polymorphism in humans, has proved to be the most sensitive to CPF, the potential implications for human health merit serious thought.

  2. Phenotypic heterogeneity of disseminated tumour cells is preset by primary tumour hypoxic microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Fluegen, Georg; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Wang, Yarong; Padgen, Michael R; Williams, James K; Nobre, Ana Rita; Calvo, Veronica; Cheung, Julie F; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Entenberg, David; Castracane, James; Verkhusha, Vladislav; Keely, Patricia J; Condeelis, John; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A

    2017-02-01

    Hypoxia is a poor-prognosis microenvironmental hallmark of solid tumours, but it is unclear how it influences the fate of disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) in target organs. Here we report that hypoxic HNSCC and breast primary tumour microenvironments displayed upregulation of key dormancy (NR2F1, DEC2, p27) and hypoxia (GLUT1, HIF1α) genes. Analysis of solitary DTCs in PDX and transgenic mice revealed that post-hypoxic DTCs were frequently NR2F1(hi)/DEC2(hi)/p27(hi)/TGFβ2(hi) and dormant. NR2F1 and HIF1α were required for p27 induction in post-hypoxic dormant DTCs, but these DTCs did not display GLUT1(hi) expression. Post-hypoxic DTCs evaded chemotherapy and, unlike ER(-) breast cancer cells, post-hypoxic ER(+) breast cancer cells were more prone to enter NR2F1-dependent dormancy. We propose that primary tumour hypoxic microenvironments give rise to a subpopulation of dormant DTCs that evade therapy. These post-hypoxic dormant DTCs may be the source of disease relapse and poor prognosis associated with hypoxia.

  3. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Feng, Lianshi; Xie, Minhao; Zhang, Li; Xu, Jianfang; He, Zihong; You, Tongjian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n = 10 each): control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1-4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4), living, and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1-4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4), and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1-4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4). Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3-4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P < 0.05-0.01), and higher expression of leptin and leptin receptor (P < 0.05-0.01) in adipose tissue. Conclusion: In a rodent model of altitude training, living, and exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions.

  4. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingli; Feng, Lianshi; Xie, Minhao; Zhang, Li; Xu, Jianfang; He, Zihong; You, Tongjian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n = 10 each): control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1–4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4), living, and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1–4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4), and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1–4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4). Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3–4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P < 0.05–0.01), and higher expression of leptin and leptin receptor (P < 0.05–0.01) in adipose tissue. Conclusion: In a rodent model of altitude training, living, and exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions. PMID:27932989

  5. Tirapazamine: hypoxic cytotoxicity and interaction with radiation as assessed by the micronucleus assay.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, T.; Shibamoto, Y.; Sasai, K.; Oya, N.; Murata, R.; Takagi, T.; Hiraoka, M.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the cytotoxicity and the interaction with low-dose radiation (1-4Gy) of tirapazamine by the in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay. Murine SCCVII and human melanoma (G-361) cells were treated with tirapazamine under aerobic or hypoxic conditions for 1 h and the MN frequency was determined using cytochalasin-B. The cells were also treated with or without tirapazamine or KU-2285 (hypoxic cell sensitiser) under hypoxic conditions and irradiated with or without reaeration of the cell suspensions. A dose-dependent increase of MN frequency was observed by tirapazamine treatment and the hypoxic toxicity ratio was about 130 for SCCVII and 37 for G-361. The radiation dose-response curves of MN frequency suggested that the interaction of tirapazamine with irradiation appeared to be essentially additive in both cell lines. In contrast, the dose-response curve became steeper by KU-2285 treatment. Combined effects of tirapazamine and irradiation on the hypoxic cells were much higher than the radiation effect on aerobic cells at low doses, while the effects of KU-2285 did not exceed that of aerobic irradiation. In conclusion, tirapazamine appeared to be superior to hypoxic radiosensitisers at clinically relevant doses, not because of aerobic radiosensitisation but because of its potent hypoxic cytotoxicity additive to radiation effect. PMID:8763848

  6. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area and volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Chengfeng; Lehrter, John C.; Hu, Chuanmin; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L-1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and volume were related to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived monthly estimates of river plume area (km2) and average, inner shelf chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a, mg m-3). River plume area in June was negatively related with midsummer hypoxic area (km2) and volume (km3), while July inner shelf Chl a was positively related to hypoxic area and volume. Multiple regression models using river plume area and Chl a as independent variables accounted for most of the variability in hypoxic area (R2 = 0.92) or volume (R2 = 0.89). These models explain more variation in hypoxic area than models using Mississippi River nutrient loads as independent variables. The results here also support a hypothesis that confinement of the river plume to the inner shelf is an important mechanism controlling hypoxia area and volume in this region.

  7. A scenario and forecast model for Gulf of Mexico hypoxic area and volume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    For almost three decades, the relative size of the hypoxic region on the Louisiana-Texas continental shelf has drawn scientific and policy attention. During that time, both simple and complex models have been used to explore hypoxia dynamics and to provide management guidance relating the size of the hypoxic zone to key drivers. Throughout much of that development, analyses had to accommodate an apparent change in hypoxic sensitivity to loads and often cull observations due to anomalous meteorological conditions. Here, we describe an adaptation of our earlier, simple biophysical model, calibrated to revised hypoxic area estimates and new hypoxic volume estimates through Bayesian estimation. This application eliminates the need to cull observations and provides revised hypoxic extent estimates with uncertainties, corresponding to different nutrient loading reduction scenarios. We compare guidance from this model application, suggesting an approximately 62% nutrient loading reduction is required to reduce Gulf hypoxia to the Action Plan goal of 5,000 km2, to that of previous applications. In addition, we describe for the first time, the corresponding response of hypoxic volume. We also analyze model results to test for increasing system sensitivity to hypoxia formation, but find no strong evidence of such change.

  8. Effects of various acute hypoxic conditions on the hemorheological response during exercise and recovery1.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hwang-Woon; Shin, Se-Hyun; Lee, Chul-Hyun; Park, Hun-Young; Sunoo, Sub; Nam, Sang-Seok

    2016-10-05

    Even though exercise hemorheology at hypoxic condition has been considered as a good tool to understand clinical hemorheology, there have been limited studies reported. Previous researches showed that hemorheological variables are closely correlated with oxygen delivery capacity during exercise. The present study investigated hypoxic responses including RBC deformability and aggregation, metabolic parameters and complete blood cell counts at various hypoxic conditions during cycling exercise and recovery. Eleven Korean healthy male subjects performed submaximal bike exercise at sea level (20.9% O2) and under various hypoxic conditions (16.5% O2, 14.5% O2, 12.8% O2, and 11.2% O2) in a random order. The submaximal bike exercise intensity of the subjects was 70% maximum heart rate at sea level. All variables were measured at rest, during exercise and recovery 30-minute, respectively. As oxygen partial pressure decreased, arterial blood oxygen saturation decreased but oxygen uptake did not change much. Heart rate and lactate concentration during exercise increased when oxygen partial pressure is less than or equal to 14.5% O2 condition. Red blood cell (RBC) counts, hemoglobin counts, and hematocrit level were not apparently altered with hypoxic conditions. RBC deformability showed significant alterations at 11.2% O2 conditions compared with other hypoxic conditions during exercise or recovery, except at 10 minutes recovery. However, decreases in oxygen partial pressure did not affect red blood cell aggregation. Therefore, we conclude that alterations in RBC deformability may reduce aerobic capabilities at hypoxic condition.

  9. Switching off malignant mesothelioma: exploiting the hypoxic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Noushin; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Churg, Andrew; Wang, Yuzhuo; Collins, Colin C.; Mutti, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesotheliomas are aggressive, asbestos-related cancers with poor patient prognosis, typically arising in the mesothelial surfaces of tissues in pleural and peritoneal cavity. The relative unspecific symptoms of mesotheliomas, misdiagnoses, and lack of precise targeted therapies call for a more critical assessment of this disease. In the present review, we categorize commonly identified genomic aberrations of mesotheliomas into their canonical pathways and discuss targeting these pathways in the context of tumor hypoxia, a hallmark of cancer known to render solid tumors more resistant to radiation and most chemo-therapy. We then explore the concept that the intrinsic hypoxic microenvironment of mesotheliomas can be Achilles' heel for targeted, multimodal therapeutic intervention. PMID:28191281

  10. Erythropoietin modulates the neural control of hypoxic ventilation.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Soliz, Jorge

    2009-11-01

    Numerous factors involved in general homeostasis are able to modulate ventilation. Classically, this comprises several kind of molecules, including neurotransmitters and steroids that are necessary for fine tuning ventilation under different conditions such as sleep, exercise, and acclimatization to high altitude. Recently, however, we have found that erythropoietin (Epo), the main regulator of red blood cell production, influences both central (brainstem) and peripheral (carotid bodies) respiratory centers when the organism is exposed to hypoxic conditions. Here, we summarize the effect of Epo on the respiratory control in mammals and highlight the potential implication of Epo in the ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude, as well as in the several respiratory sickness and syndromes occurring at low and high altitude.

  11. Microfluidic Platform Generates Oxygen Landscapes for Localized Hypoxic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rexius, Megan L.; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T.

    2014-01-01

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes. PMID:25315003

  12. Microfluidic platform generates oxygen landscapes for localized hypoxic activation.

    PubMed

    Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Mauleon, Gerardo; Malik, Asrar B; Rehman, Jalees; Eddington, David T

    2014-12-21

    An open-well microfluidic platform generates an oxygen landscape using gas-perfused networks which diffuse across a membrane. The device enables real-time analysis of cellular and tissue responses to oxygen tension to define how cells adapt to heterogeneous oxygen conditions found in the physiological setting. We demonstrate that localized hypoxic activation of cells elicited specific metabolic and gene responses in human microvascular endothelial cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A robust demonstration of the compatibility of the device with standard laboratory techniques demonstrates the wide utility of the method. This platform is ideally suited to study real-time cell responses and cell-cell interactions within physiologically relevant oxygen landscapes.

  13. [Radiation protection using a gaseous hypoxic mixture in oncological practice].

    PubMed

    Strelkov, R B; Chizhov, A Ia; Il'ina, A I; Kuznetsova, L E; Pines, E V

    1979-01-01

    Studies on volunteers have shown that the gas hypoxic mixture containing 10% of oxygen and 90% of nitrogen (GHM-10) renders a protective action on the genetic apparatus of human skin cells but provides no protection of the peripheral blood leucocytes, which show the identical character of metabolic processes as neoplastic cells. Under clinically performed distant x-ray therapy for breast cancer the inhaling of GHM-10 was found to render the antiradiation protective action on different normal tissues (skin, subcellular connective tissue, muscle tissue, mammary gland tissue), but it fails to protect the tumor tissue and regional lymph nodes involved. The clinical observations were supported by pathomorphological examination of the operation material.

  14. Atrial natriuretic factor in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, X; Figueras, J; Salvia, M D; Esque, M T; Delgado, M P; Jimenez, R

    1993-01-01

    The influence of perinatal asphyxia in the secretion of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) during the first 6 days of life, and its renal consequences are discussed. Comparison between 20 healthy term neonates and 19 with first--or second--degree hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is made. Daily controls were performed on clinical and neurological examinations and administration of sodium and fluids. On the first and sixth days of life, 24 hours urine collection, natremia, natriuresis, fractionated excretion of sodium and creatinine clearance were determined. The ANF was performed at 1, 2, 3 and 6 days old, by R.I.A. The full term newborns with HIE showed a peak in ANF values on day two, as does the control group, thereafter maintaining higher levels, with a significant difference on day three and six. No correlation could be found between the ANF levels and the renal variables analyzed.

  15. Hypoxia inducible factors and the response to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Majmundar, Amar J.; Wong, Waihay J.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) is an essential nutrient that serves as a key substrate in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. In a variety of physiological and pathological states, organisms encounter insufficient O2 availability, or hypoxia. In order to cope with this stress, evolutionarily conserved responses are engaged. In mammals, the primary transcriptional response to hypoxic stress is mediated by the Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). While canonically regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzymes (PHDs), the HIFα subunits are intricately responsive to numerous other factors including Factor Inhibiting HIF-1α (FIH1), sirtuins, and metabolites. These transcription factors function in normal tissue homeostasis and impinge on critical aspects of disease progression and recovery. Insights from basic HIF biology are being translated into pharmaceuticals targeting the HIF pathway. PMID:20965423

  16. The hypoxia signaling pathway and hypoxic adaptation in fishes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-02-01

    The hypoxia signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved cellular signaling pathway present in animals ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. The pathway is crucial for oxygen homeostasis maintenance. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) are master regulators in the hypoxia signaling pathway. Oxygen concentrations vary a lot in the aquatic environment. To deal with this, fishes have adapted and developed varying strategies for living in hypoxic conditions. Investigations into the strategies and mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes will allow us to understand fish speciation and breed hypoxia-tolerant fish species/strains. This review summarizes the process of the hypoxia signaling pathway and its regulation, as well as the mechanism of hypoxia adaptation in fishes.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for imaging hypoxic tissues.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, L I; Stypinski, D

    1996-09-01

    Although hypoxia has been known for decades to play an important role in the outcome of radiotherapy in oncology, and inspite of the contribution of hypoxia to a myriad of pathologies that involve vascular disease, the selective imaging of hypoxic tissue has attained prominence only within the past decade. Contemporary research in the hypoxia imaging field is based largely on radiosensitizer research of the 1960's and 1970's. Early sensitizer research identified a family of nitro-organic compounds, the N-1 substituted 2-nitroimidazoles as candidate drugs. The early champion, and still the reference standard for therapeutic radiosensitization of hypoxic tumor cells is misonidazole (MISO). Its peripheral neurotoxicity led to failure in clinical studies, but its biological, biophysical and biochemical properties have been investigated in detail and serve as a basis for further design, not only of sensitizers, but of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic characterization of radiopharmaceuticals, specifically radiopharmaceuticals for imaging tissue hypoxia, has not been a central theme in their development. The advent of PET, through which quantitative determinations first became possible, opened the field for both descriptive and analytical radiopharmacokinetic studies. In SPECT, however, this approach is still undergoing refinement. This paper addresses some of the underlying issues in radiopharmaceutical pharmacokinetics. There is a paucity of published radiopharmacokinetic data for SPECT hypoxia imaging agents. Consequently, the pharmacokinetic issues for MISO are presented as a basis for development of pharmacokinetics for the chemically-related imaging agents. Properties of an hypoxia marker are described from a pharmacokinetic viewpoint, a theoretical model for descriptive pharmacokinetics is introduced and finally, recent pharmacokinetic studies from our laboratory are described.

  18. First aid kit for hypoxic survival: sensors and strategies.

    PubMed

    López-Barneo, J; Nurse, C A; Nilsson, G E; Buck, L T; Gassmann, M; Bogdanova, A Yu

    2010-01-01

    Survival success under conditions of acute oxygen deprivation depends on efficiency of the central and peripheral chemoreception, optimization of oxygen extraction from the hypoxic environment and its delivery to the periphery, and adjustments of energy production and consumption. This article uses a comparative approach to assess the efficiency of adaptive strategies used by anoxia-tolerant and hypoxia-sensitive species to support survival during the first minutes to 1 h of oxygen deprivation. An aquatic environment is much more demanding in terms of diurnal and seasonal variations of the ambient oxygen availability from anoxia to hyperoxia than is an air environment. Therefore, fishes and aquatic turtles have developed a number of adaptive responses, which are lacking in most of the terrestrial mammals, to cope with these extreme conditions. These include efficient central and peripheral chemoreception, acute changes in respiratory rate and amplitude, and acute increase of the gas-exchange interface. A special set of adaptive mechanisms are engaged in reduction of the energy expenditure of the major oxygen-consuming organs: the brain and the heart. Both reduction of ATP consumption and a switch to alterative energy sources contribute to the maintenance of ATP and ion balance in hypoxia-tolerant animals. Hypoxia and hyperoxia are conditions favoring development of oxidative stress. Efficient protection from oxidation in anoxia-tolerant species includes reduction in the glutamate levels in the brain, stabilization of the mitochondrial function, and maintenance of nitric oxide production under conditions of oxygen deprivation. We give an overview of the current state of knowledge on some selected molecular and cellular acute adaptive mechanisms. These include the mechanisms of chemoreception in adult and neonatal mammals and in fishes, acute metabolic adaptive responses in the brain, and the role of nitrite in the preservation of heart function under hypoxic

  19. Carbohydrate Supplementation Influences Serum Cytokines after Exercise under Hypoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Caris, Aline Venticinque; Da Silva, Edgar Tavares; Dos Santos, Samile Amorim; Lira, Fabio Santos; Oyama, Lila Missae; Tufik, Sergio; Dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Exercise performed at the hypoxia equivalent of an altitude of 4200 m is associated with elevated inflammatory mediators and changes in the Th1/Th2 response. By contrast, supplementation with carbohydrates has an anti-inflammatory effect when exercise is performed under normoxic conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of carbohydrate supplementation on cytokines and cellular damage markers after exercise under hypoxic conditions at a simulated altitude of 4200 m. Methods: Seven adult male volunteers who exercised for 60 min at an intensity of 50% VO2Peak were randomly evaluated under three distinct conditions; normoxia, hypoxia and hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation. Blood samples were collected at rest, at the end of exercise and after 60 min of recovery. To evaluate hypoxia + carbohydrate supplementation, volunteers received a solution of 6% carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or a placebo (strawberry-flavored Crystal Light®; Kraft Foods, Northfield, IL, USA) every 20 min during exercise and recovery. Statistical analyses comprised analysis of variance, with a one-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test with a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 after exercise and after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05), while in the hypoxia + carbohydrate group, there was a significant increase in the concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α after exercise compared to at rest (p < 0.05). Furthermore, under this condition, TNF-α, IL-2 and the balance of IL-2/IL-4 were increased after recovery compared to at rest (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation modified the IL-6 and TNF-α serum concentrations and shifted the IL-2/IL-4 balance towards Th1 in response without glycemic, glutaminemia and cell damage effects. PMID:27827949

  20. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It’s one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca2+ influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies. PMID:27441209

  1. Oxygen transport in conscious newborn dogs during hypoxic hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Rohlicek, C V; Saiki, C; Matsuoka, T; Mortola, J P

    1998-03-01

    We questioned whether the decrease in O2 consumption (VO2) during hypoxia in newborns is a regulated response or reflects a limitation in O2 availability. Experiments were conducted on previously instrumented conscious newborn dogs. VO2 was measured at a warm ambient temperature (30 degrees C, n = 7) or in the cold (20 degrees C, n = 6), while the animals breathed air or were sequentially exposed to 15 min of fractional inspired O2 (FIO2): 21, 18, 15, 12, 10, 8, and 6%. In normoxia, VO2 averaged 15 +/- 1 (SE) and 25 +/- 1 ml . kg-1 . min-1 in warm and cold conditions, respectively. In the warm condition, hypometabolism (i.e., hypoxic VO2 < normoxic VO2) occurred at FIO2 hypoxic drop in VO2 in the newborn reflects a limitation in O2 availability. The results are compatible with the idea that the phenomenon is one of "regulated conformism" to hypoxia.

  2. Adenosine A1 and A3 receptors protect astrocytes from hypoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Olga; Shang, Mingmei; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Daré, Elisabetta; Fredholm, Bertil B

    2008-10-31

    Brain levels of adenosine are elevated during hypoxia. Through effects on adenosine receptors (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) on astrocytes, adenosine can influence functions such as glutamate uptake, reactive gliosis, swelling, as well as release of neurotrophic and neurotoxic factors having an impact on the outcome of metabolic stress. We have studied the roles of these receptors in astrocytes by evaluating their susceptibility to damage induced by oxygen deprivation or exposure to the hypoxia mimic cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)). Hypoxia caused ATP breakdown and purine release, whereas CoCl(2) (0.8 mM) mainly reduced ATP by causing cell death in human D384 astrocytoma cells. Further experiments were conducted in primary astrocytes prepared from specific adenosine receptor knock-out (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. In WT cells purine release following CoCl(2) exposure was mainly due to nucleotide release, whereas hypoxia-induced intracellular ATP breakdown followed by nucleoside efflux. N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), an unselective adenosine receptor agonist, protected from cell death following hypoxia. Cytotoxicity was more pronounced in A(1)R KO astrocytes and tended to be higher in WT cells in the presence of the A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). Genetic deletion of A(2A) receptor resulted in less prominent effects. A(3)R KO glial cells were more affected by hypoxia than WT cells. Accordingly, the A(3) receptor agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-N-methyl-5'-carbamoyladenosine (CL-IB-MECA) reduced ATP depletion caused by hypoxic conditions. It also reduced apoptosis in human astroglioma D384 cells after oxygen deprivation. In conclusion, the data point to a cytoprotective role of adenosine mediated by both A(1) and A(3) receptors in primary mouse astrocytes.

  3. Brain neurochemical and hemodynamic findings in the NY1DD mouse model of mild sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min-Hui; Suzuka, Sandra M; Branch, Nicholas A; Ambadipudi, Kamalakar; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Acharya, Seetharama A; Billett, Henny H; Branch, Craig A

    2017-02-10

    To characterize the cerebral profile associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), we used in vivo proton MRI and MRS to quantify hemodynamics and neurochemicals in the thalamus of NY1DD mice, a mild model of SCD, and compared them with wild-type (WT) control mice. Compared with WT mice, NY1DD mice at steady state had elevated cerebral blood flow (CBF) and concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), alanine, total creatine and N-acetylaspartylglutamate. Concentrations of glutathione (GSH) at steady state showed a negative correlation with BOLD signal change in response to 100% oxygen, a marker for oxidative stress, and mean diffusivity assessed using diffusion-tensor imaging, a marker for edematous inflammation. In NY1DD mice, elevated basal CBF was correlated negatively with [NAA], but positively with concentration of glutamine ([Gln]). Immediately after experimental hypoxia (at reoxygenation after 18 hours of 8% O2 ), concentrations of NAA, Glu, GSH, Gln and taurine (Tau) increased only in NY1DD mice. [NAA], [Glu], [GSH] and [Tau] all returned to baseline levels two weeks after the hypoxic episode. The altered neurochemical profile in the NY1DD mouse model of SCD at steady state and following experimental hypoxia/reoxygenation suggests a state of chronic oxidative stress leading to compensatory cerebral metabolic adjustments.

  4. [Hemo- and neurodynamics of the human brain during exposure to moderate hypoxic hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, D A; Zubarev, A F; Krupina, T N; Iarullin, Kh Kh; Kuznets, E I

    1984-01-01

    Synchronous electro- and rheoencephalography were used to study tolerance to moderate hypoxic hypoxia for 30 min at an altitude of 5000 m without additional oxygen supply. As test subject, men with autonomic-vascular dystonia (29-39 years old), 15 men over 40 (41-56 years old), and 16 essentially healthy controls (23-36 years old) were used. The aged volunteers (41-56 years old) did not differ from the controls with respect to their tolerance to hypoxic hypoxia. The men with early symptoms of hypertonic-type dystonia also showed high tolerance to hypoxic hypoxia. The subjects with hypotonic-type dystonia displayed lower tolerance.

  5. Involvement of SIRT1 in hypoxic down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of polyphenols

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kyung-Soo; Park, Jun-Ik; Kim, Mi-Ju; Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Jae-Won; Dao, Trong Tuan; Oh, Won Keun; Kang, Chi-Dug; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2012-03-01

    SIRT1 has been found to function as a Class III deacetylase that affects the acetylation status of histones and other important cellular nonhistone proteins involved in various cellular pathways including stress responses and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the role of SIRT1 signaling in the hypoxic down-regulations of c-Myc and β-catenin and hypoxic preconditioning effect of the red wine polyphenols such as piceatannol, myricetin, quercetin and resveratrol. We found that the expression of SIRT1 was significantly increased in hypoxia-exposed or hypoxic preconditioned HepG2 cells, which was closely associated with the up-regulation of HIF-1α and down-regulation of c-Myc and β-catenin expression via deacetylation of these proteins. In addition, blockade of SIRT1 activation using siRNA or amurensin G, a new potent SIRT1 inhibitor, abolished hypoxia-induced HIF-1α expression but increased c-Myc and β-catenin expression. SIRT1 was also found to stabilize HIF-1α protein and destabilize c-Myc, β-catenin and PHD2 under hypoxia. We also found that myricetin, quercetin, piceatannol and resveratrol up-regulated HIF-1α and down-regulated c-Myc, PHD2 and β-catenin expressions via SIRT1 activation, in a manner that mimics hypoxic preconditioning. This study provides new insights of the molecular mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and suggests that polyphenolic SIRT1 activators could be used to mimic hypoxic/ischemic preconditioning. -- Graphical abstract: Polyphenols mimicked hypoxic preconditioning by up-regulating HIF-1α and SIRT1 and down-regulating c-Myc, PHD2, and β-catenin. HepG2 cells were pretreated with the indicated doses of myricetin (MYR; A), quercetin (QUR; B), or piceatannol (PIC; C) for 4 h and then exposed to hypoxia for 4 h. Levels of HIF-1α, SIRT1, c-Myc, β-catenin, and PHD2 were determined by western blot analysis. The data are representative of three individual experiments. Highlights: ► SIRT1 expression is increased in hypoxia

  6. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 promotes human adipose tissue-derived stem cell survival and chronic wound healing

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIANG; GUO, YANPING; CHEN, FEIFEI; LIU, JING; JIN, PEISHENG

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) hold great potential for the stem cell-based therapy of cutaneous wound healing. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) activates CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4+ and CXCR7+ cells and plays an important role in wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests a critical role for SDF-1 in cell apoptosis and the survival of mesenchymal stem cells. However, the function of SDF-1 in the apoptosis and wound healing ability of ADSCs is not well understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of SDF-1 on the apoptosis and therapeutic effect of ADSCs in cutaneous chronic wounds in vitro and in vivos. By flow cytometric analysis, it was found that hypoxia and serum free promoted the apoptosis of ADSCs. When pretreated with SDF-1, the apoptosis of ADSCs induced by hypoxia and serum depletion was partly recovered. Furthermore, in vivo experiments established that the post-implantation cell survival and chronic wound healing ability of ADSCs were increased following pretreatment with SDF-1 in a diabetic mouse model of chronic wound healing. To explore the potential mechanism underlying the effect of SDF-1 on ADSC apoptosis, western blot analysis was employed and the results indicate that SDF-1 may protect against cell apoptosis in hypoxic and serum-free conditions through activation of the caspase signaling pathway in ADSCs. This study provides evidence that SDF-1 pretreatment can increase the therapeutic effect of ADSCs in cutaneous chronic wounds in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27347016

  7. Chronic Cough

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic cough Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A chronic cough is a cough that lasts eight weeks or longer in adults, or four weeks in children. A chronic cough is more than just an annoyance. A chronic ...

  8. Effect of Intermittent Hypoxic Training Followed by Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure on Aerobic Capacity of Long Distance Runners.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Fernanda P; Ivamoto, Rafael K; Andrade, Marilia Dos S; de Lira, Claudio A B; Silva, Bruno M; da Silva, Antonio C

    2016-06-01

    Effects of intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) are still controversial and detraining effects remain uninvestigated. Therefore, we investigated (a) whether IHT improves aerobic capacity; (b) whether aerobic detraining occurs post-IHT; and (c) whether intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) at rest reduces a possible aerobic detraining post-IHT. Twenty eight runners (21 men/7 women; 36 ± 2 years; maximal oxygen uptake [V[Combining Dot Above]O2max] 55.4 ± 1.3 ml·kg·min) participated in a single-blinded placebo-controlled trial. Twice a week, 1 group performed 6 weeks of IHT (n = 11), followed by 4 weeks of IHE (n = 11) at rest (IHT+IHE group). Another group performed 6 weeks of IHT (n = 10), followed by 4 weeks of normoxic exposure (NE, n = 9) at rest (IHT+NE group). A control group performed 6 weeks of normoxic training (NT, n = 7), followed by 4 weeks of NE (n = 6) at rest (NT+NE group). Hematological and submaximal/maximal aerobic measurements were conducted in normoxia at pretraining, posttraining, and postexposure. Hemoglobin concentration did not change, but lactate threshold and running economy improved in all groups at posttraining (p ≤ 0.05 vs. pretraining). Ventilatory threshold, respiratory compensation point, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max increased after IHT (IHT+IHE group: 7.3, 5.4, and 9.2%, respectively; IHT+NE group: 10.7, 7.5, and 4.8%; p ≤ 0.05 vs. pretraining), but not after NT (-1.1, -1.0, and -3.8%; p > 0.05 vs. pretraining). Such IHT-induced adaptations were maintained at postexposure (p > 0.05 vs. postexposure). In conclusion, IHT induced further aerobic improvements than NT. These additional IHT adaptations were maintained for 4 weeks post-IHT, regardless of IHE.

  9. Critical role of neuronal pentraxin 1 in mitochondria-mediated hypoxic-ischemic neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Al Rahim, Md; Thatipamula, Shabarish; Hossain, Mir Ahamed

    2013-02-01

    Developing brain is highly susceptible to hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury leading to severe neurological disabilities in surviving infants and children. Previously, we have reported induction of neuronal pentraxin 1 (NP1), a novel neuronal protein of long-pentraxin family, following HI neuronal injury. Here, we investigated how this specific signal is propagated to cause the HI neuronal death. We used wild-type (WT) and NP1 knockout (NP1-KO) mouse hippocampal cultures, modeled in vitro following exposure to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD), and in vivo neonatal (P9-10) mouse model of HI brain injury. Our results show induction of NP1 in primary hippocampal neurons following OGD exposure (4-8 h) and in the ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions at 24-48 h post-HI compared to the contralateral side. We also found increased PTEN activity concurrent with OGD time-dependent (4-8 h) dephosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and GSK-3β (Ser9). OGD also caused a time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of Bad (Ser136), and Bax protein levels. Immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fractionation analyses revealed increased mitochondrial translocation of Bad and Bax proteins from cytoplasm following OGD (4 h) and simultaneously increased release of Cyt C from mitochondria followed by activation of caspase-3. NP1 protein was immunoprecipitated with Bad and Bax proteins; OGD caused increased interactions of NP1 with Bad and Bax, thereby, facilitating their mitochondrial translocation and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)). This NP1 induction preceded the increased mitochondrial release of cytochrome C (Cyt C) into the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and OGD time-dependent cell death in WT primary hippocampal neurons. In contrast, in NP1-KO neurons there was no translocation of Bad and Bax from cytosol to the mitochondria, and no evidence of ΔΨ(m) loss, increased Cyt C release and caspase-3 activation following OGD; which resulted in

  10. A Molecular and Whole Body Insight of the Mechanisms Surrounding Glucose Disposal and Insulin Resistance with Hypoxic Treatment in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, R. W. A.; Watt, P.

    2016-01-01

    Although the mechanisms are largely unidentified, the chronic or intermittent hypoxic patterns occurring with respiratory diseases, such as chronic pulmonary disease or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obesity, are commonly associated with glucose intolerance. Indeed, hypoxia has been widely implicated in the development of insulin resistance either via the direct action on insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) or indirectly through adipose tissue expansion and systemic inflammation. Yet hypoxia is also known to encourage glucose transport using insulin-dependent mechanisms, largely reliant on the metabolic master switch, 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In addition, hypoxic exposure has been shown to improve glucose control in type 2 diabetics. The literature surrounding hypoxia-induced changes to glycemic control appears to be confusing and conflicting. How is it that the same stress can seemingly cause insulin resistance while increasing glucose uptake? There is little doubt that acute hypoxia increases glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle and does so using the same pathway as muscle contraction. The purpose of this review paper is to provide an insight into the mechanisms underpinning the observed effects and to open up discussions around the conflicting data surrounding hypoxia and glucose control. PMID:27274997

  11. Novel Genes Critical for Hypoxic Preconditioning in Zebrafish Are Regulators of Insulin and Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Manchenkov, Tania; Pasillas, Martina P.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Imam, Farhad B.

    2015-01-01

    Severe hypoxia is a common cause of major brain, heart, and kidney injury in adults, children, and newborns. However, mild hypoxia can be protective against later, more severe hypoxia exposure via “hypoxic preconditioning,” a phenomenon that is not yet fully understood. Accordingly, we have established and optimized an embryonic zebrafish model to study hypoxic preconditioning. Using a functional genomic approach, we used this zebrafish model to identify and validate five novel hypoxia-protective genes, including irs2, crtc3, and camk2g2, which have been previously implicated in metabolic regulation. These results extend our understanding of the mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and affirm the discovery potential of this novel vertebrate hypoxic stress model. PMID:25840431

  12. Ixr1p and the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Vizoso-Vázquez, Angel; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Becerra, Manuel; González-Siso, M Isabel; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2012-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adaptation to hypoxia/anaerobiosis requires the transcriptional induction or derepression of multiple genes organized in regulons controlled by specific transcriptional regulators. Ixr1p is a transcriptional regulatory factor that causes aerobic repression of several hypoxic genes (COX5B, TIR1, and HEM13) and also the activation of HEM13 during hypoxic growth. Analysis of the transcriptome of the wild-type strain BY4741 and its isogenic derivative Δixr1, grown in aerobic and hypoxic conditions, reveals differential regulation of genes related not only to the hypoxic and oxidative stress responses but also to the re-adaptation of catabolic and anabolic fluxes in response to oxygen limitation. The function of Ixr1p in the transcriptional regulation of genes from the sulfate assimilation pathway and other pathways producing α-keto acids is of biotechnological importance for industries based on yeast-derived fermentation products.

  13. The involvement of reactive oxygen species in hypoxic injury to rat liver.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Strubelt, O

    1988-03-01

    Isolated perfused livers from fasted, but not from fed rats showed hepatotoxic responses when subjected to 30 min of hypoxia followed by 60 min of reoxygenation. Toxicity was evident by a release of glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione into the perfusate, by a depletion of hepatic glutathione and by an accumulation of calcium in the liver. This indicates, that the liver is resistant to hypoxic injury as long as glycogen is present to maintain anaerobic ATP-synthesis. This is substantiated by the fact that addition of fructose--but not glucose--to the medium resulted in a protection of the liver against hypoxic injury concomitant with its degradation to lactate + pyruvate. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, desferrioxamine and allopurinol prevented hypoxic liver injury suggesting a substantial role of reactive oxygen species formed via the xanthine oxidase reaction in mediating hypoxic liver injury.

  14. [Age, gender and individually-typological characteristics of reaction to acute hypoxic exposure].

    PubMed

    Krivoshchekov, S G; Balioz, N V; Nekipelova, N V; Kapilevich, L V

    2014-01-01

    Individual pequliarities of hypoxic resistance, assessed by the response of cardiorespiratory system to acute normobaric hypoxia (10% O2), were studied in healthy subjects. Age changes in dynamics of blood oxygen saturation after the acute hypoxia are shown at level of separate sites curve SpO2 (phases of a delay, decrease and lifting). It is established, that at children sensitivity to acute hypoxia above, than at teenagers, and at teenagers above, than at adults. Higher lability of mental processes, sympathetic activity, and personal anxiety are associated with choleric temperament. Cholerics are characterized by slower restoration of blood oxygen saturation after the acute hypoxia compared with sanguine persons that we consider an indication of less hypoxic tolerance of the first group. We have developed the complex algorithm, dynamics describing dependence oxygen saturation in various phases of the hypoxic test, which can be used as a universal method of an estimation hypoxic stability at different groups of the population.

  15. Scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini, utilizes deep-water, hypoxic zone in the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, S J; Klimley, A P; Muhlia-Melo, A F

    2009-05-01

    A hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini tracked for 74 days revealed an expansion of the range of vertical distribution for the species to include the extreme hypoxic environment of the oxygen minimum layer in the Gulf of California.

  16. Chronic hypoxia induces the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Rojas-Abalos, Macarena; Abbott, Ana C; Moya, Esteban A; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice in vivo. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) was analyzed as a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6-72 h) stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin (DCX). Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in a double transgenic APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that exposure to hypoxia in vivo can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired.

  17. [Modification of the radiation injury of hematopoiesis in rats using the gaseous hypoxic mixture GHM-10].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkov, L P; Sklobovskaia, I E; Strelkov, R B; Chizhov, A Ia

    1986-01-01

    In experiments on Wistar rats it was shown that gas hypoxic mixture containing O2 (10%) and N2 (90%) had a radioprotective action with regard to the survival rate for 30 days and to the haemopoietic system status. The application of gas hypoxic mixture reduced the postirradiation cytopenia in the blood and lowered the degree of the bone marrow depletion by the 3d day following irradiation; DMF was 1.25 as determined by total bone marrow cellularity.

  18. Hepatic transcriptomic and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass to acute and chronic hypoxic insult

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis), white bass (Morone chrysops), and their hybrid are an important group of recreational and farmed species in the United States. Regardless of habitat, it is not uncommon for fish of the genus Morone to encounter and cope with conditions of scarce oxygen availability....

  19. Analysis of Hypoxic and Hypercapnic Ventilatory Response in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ling; Sharifi, Husham; Rico, Tom; Andlauer, Olivier; Aran, Adi; Bloomrosen, Efrat; Faraco, Juliette; Fang, Han; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A previous study has suggested that the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) allele DQB1*06:02 affects hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) but not hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) in an Asian population. The current study evaluated the relationship in Caucasians and Asians. In addition we assessed whether gender or polymorphisms in genes participating in the control of breathing affect HVR and HCVR. Methods A re-breathing system was used to measure HVR and HCVR in 551 young adults (56.8% Caucasians, 30% Asians). HLA-DQB1*06:02 and tagged polymorphisms and coding variants in genes participating in breathing (PHOX2B, GPR4 and TASK2/KCNK5) were analyzed. The associations between HVR/HCVR and HLA-DQB1*06:02, genetic polymorphisms, and gender were evaluated using ANOVA or frequentist association testing with SNPTEST. Results HVR and gender are strongly correlated. HCVR and gender are not. Mean HVR in women was 0.276±0.168 (liter/minute/%SpO2) compared to 0.429±0.266 (liter/minute/%SpO2) in men, p<0.001 (55.4% higher HVR in men). Women had lower baseline minute ventilation (8.08±2.36 l/m vs. 10.00±3.43l/m, p<0.001), higher SpO2 (98.0±1.3% vs. 96.6±1.7%, p<0.001), and lower EtCO2 (4.65±0.68% vs. 4.82±1.02%, p = 0.025). One hundred and two (18.5%) of the participants had HLA-DQB1*06:02. No association was seen between HLA-DQB1*06:02 and HVR or HCVR. Genetic analysis revealed point wise, uncorrected significant associations between two TASK2/KCNK5 variants (rs2815118 and rs150380866) and HCVR. Conclusions This is the largest study to date reporting the relationship between gender and HVR/ HCVR and the first study assessing the association between genetic polymorphisms in humans and HVR/HCVR. The data suggest that gender has a large effect on hypoxic breathing response. PMID:28045995

  20. Effects of intermittent hypoxic training on aerobic and anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Morton, James Peter; Cable, Nigel Tim

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether short-term intermittent hypoxic training would enhance sea level aerobic and anaerobic performance over and above that occurring with equivalent sea level training. Over a 4-week period, two groups of eight moderately trained team sports players performed 30 min of cycling exercise three times per week. One group trained in normobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 2750 m (F(I)O2= 0.15), the other group trained in a laboratory under sea level conditions. Each training session consisted of ten 1-min bouts at 80% maximum workload maintained for 2 min (Wmax) during the incremental exercise test at sea level separated by 2-min active recovery at 50% Wmax. Training intensities were increased by 5% after six training sessions and by a further 5% (of original Wmax) after nine sessions. Pre-training assessments of VO(2max), power output at onset of 4 mM blood lactate accumulation (OBLA), Wmax and Wingate anaerobic performance were performed on a cycle ergometer at sea level and repeated 4-7 d following the training intervention. Following training there were significant increases (p < 0.01) in VO(2max) (7.2 vs. 8.0%), Wmax (15.5 vs. 17.8%), OBLA (11.1 vs. 11.9%), mean power (8.0 vs. 6.5%) and peak power (2.9 vs. 9.3%) in both the hypoxic and normoxic groups respectively. There were no significant differences between the increases in any of the above-mentioned performance parameters in either training environment (p > 0.05). In addition, neither haemoglobin concentration nor haematocrit were significantly changed in either group (p > 0.05). It is concluded that acute exposure of moderately trained subjects to normobaric hypoxia during a short-term training programme consisting of moderate- to high-intensity intermittent exercise has no enhanced effect on the degree of improvement in either aerobic or anaerobic performance. These data suggest that if there are any advantages to training in hypoxia for sea level

  1. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  2. Archaeal enrichment in the hypoxic zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Lauren E; Thrash, J Cameron; deRada, Sergio; Rabalais, Nancy N; Mason, Olivia U

    2015-10-01

    Areas of low oxygen have spread exponentially over the past 40 years, and are cited as a key stressor on coastal ecosystems. The world's second largest coastal hypoxic (≤ 2 mg of O2 l(-1)) zone occurs annually in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The net effect of hypoxia is the diversion of energy flow away from higher trophic levels to microorganisms. This energy shunt is consequential to the overall productivity of hypoxic water masses and the ecosystem as a whole. In this study, water column samples were collected at 39 sites in the nGOM, 21 of which were hypoxic. Analysis of the microbial community along a hypoxic to oxic dissolved oxygen gradient revealed that the relative abundance (iTag) of Thaumarchaeota species 16S rRNA genes (> 40% of the microbial community in some hypoxic samples), the absolute abundance (quantitative polymerase chain reaction; qPCR) of Thaumarchaeota 16S rRNA genes and archaeal ammonia-monooxygenase gene copy number (qPCR) were significantly higher in hypoxic samples. Spatial interpolation of the microbial and chemical data revealed a continuous, shelfwide band of low dissolved oxygen waters that were dominated by Thaumarchaeota (and Euryarchaeota), amoA genes and high concentrations of phosphate in the nGOM, thus implicating physicochemical forcing on microbial abundance.

  3. Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light damage independently of hypoxia inducible transcription factors in rods.

    PubMed

    Kast, Brigitte; Schori, Christian; Grimm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light-induced degeneration preserving retinal morphology and function. Although hypoxia inducible transcription factors 1 and 2 (HIF1, HIF2) are the main regulators of the hypoxic response, photoreceptor protection does not depend on HIF1 in rods. Here we used rod-specific Hif2a single and Hif1a;Hif2a double knockout mice to investigate the potential involvement of HIF2 in rods for protection after hypoxic preconditioning. To identify potential HIF2 target genes in rods we determined the retinal transcriptome of hypoxic control and rod-specific Hif2a knockouts by RNA sequencing. We show that rods do not need HIF2 for hypoxia-induced increased survival after light exposure. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a number of genes that are potentially regulated by HIF2 in rods; among those were Htra1, Timp3 and Hmox1, candidates that are interesting due to their connection to human degenerative diseases of the retina. We conclude that neither HIF1 nor HIF2 are required in photoreceptors for protection by hypoxic preconditioning. We hypothesize that HIF transcription factors may be needed in other cells to produce protective factors acting in a paracrine fashion on photoreceptor cells. Alternatively, hypoxic preconditioning induces a rod-intrinsic response that is independent of HIF transcription factors.

  4. Effect of acute hypoxic shock on the rat brain morphology and tripeptidyl peptidase I activity.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Emilia B; Dimitrova, Mashenka B; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Pavlova, Velichka G; Dimitrova, Stella G; Kadiysky, Dimitar S

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxic events are known to cause substantial damage to the hippocampus, cerebellum and striatum. The impact of hypoxic shock on other brain parts is not sufficiently studied. Recent studies show that tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPPI) activity in fish is altered after a hypoxic stress pointing out at a possible enzyme involvement in response to hypoxia. Similar studies are not performed in mammals. In this work, the effect of sodium nitrite-induced acute hypoxic shock on the rat brain was studied at different post-treatment periods. Morphological changes in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, thalamus, mesencephalon and pons were assessed using silver-copper impregnation for neurodegeneration. TPPI activity was biochemically assayed and localized by enzyme histochemistry. Although less vulnerable to oxidative stress, the studied brain areas showed different histopathological changes, such as neuronal loss and tissue vacuolization, dilatation of the smallest capillaries and impairment of neuronal processes. TPPI activity was strictly regulated following the hypoxic stress. It was found to increase 12-24h post-treatment, then decreased followed by a slow process of recovery. The enzyme histochemistry revealed a temporary enzyme deficiency in all types of neurons. These findings indicate a possible involvement of the enzyme in rat brain response to hypoxic stress.

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen suppresses hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Lu, Mengru; Li, Qing-Jie; Zhang, Zhuo; Wu, Zheng-Zheng; Li, Jie; Qian, Lai; Xu, Yun; Wang, Zhong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The optimal therapeutic time-window and protective mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the neuroprotective effects of hyperbaric oxygen. Following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage modeling in neonatal rats, hyperbaric oxygen was administered at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 1 week after hypoxia, respectively, once daily for 1 week. Fourteen days after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, cell density and apoptosis rate, number of Fas-L+, caspase-8+, and caspase-3+ neuronal cells, levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase in hippocampus were examined. Morris water maze test was conducted 28 days after insult. Significant improvements were found in cell density, rate of apoptosis, oxidative stress markers, FasL, and caspases in rats treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 72 hours compared to hypoxic-ischemic injury. Similarly, time-dependent behavioral amelioration was observed in pups treated with hyperbaric oxygen. Our findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen protects against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by inhibiting oxidative stress and FasL-induced apoptosis, and optimal therapeutic time window is within 72 hours after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  6. Chronic Lyme borreliosis in the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Barthold, S. W.; de Souza, M. S.; Janotka, J. L.; Smith, A. L.; Persing, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    C3H/HeJ mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(7) uncloned Borrelia burgdorferi at 4 weeks of age and examined on days 30, 90, 180, and 360. Spirochetes were isolated from multiple tissues at all intervals. Joint and heart disease were present in all mice at 30 days and resolved after 90 days. At 180 and 360 days, some mice had mild recurrent joint and heart disease, and most had peripheral segmental periarteritis. The protein electrophoretic migration of 360-day isolates differed from the original inoculum. The experiment was repeated with C3H/HeN and BALB/cByJ mice inoculated intradermally with 10(4) cloned B. burgdorferi. Characterization of infection and disease at 180 and 360 days were similar to those of the first experiment, but spirochetal proteins of isolates from both intervals displayed no protein variation in electrophoretic mobilities. Spirochetes isolated at 360 days were fully pathogenic in naive mice. Sera from infected mice showed an initial immunoglobulin M response, followed by a sustained immunoglobulin G response, involving IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3, with expanding reactivity against multiple antigens over time. These results indicate that immunocompetent mice sustain persistent infections and develop early acute joint and heart lesions that resolve and then recur intermittently. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8362988

  7. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular contractility in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by vascular remodeling of pulmonary arteries (PAs) and increased vascular resistance in the lung. Monocrotaline (MCT), a toxic alkaloid, is widely used for developing rat models of PAH caused by injury to pulmonary endothelial cells; however, characteristics of vascular functions in MCT-induced PAH vary and are not fully understood. Here, we investigated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) responses and effects of various vasoconstrictors with isolated/perfused lungs of MCT-induced PAH (PAH-MCT) rats. Using hematoxylin and eosin staining, we confirmed vascular remodeling (i.e., medial thickening of PA) and right ventricle hypertrophy in PAH-MCT rats. The basal pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and PAP increase by a raised flow rate (40 mL/min) were higher in the PAH-MCT than in the control rats. In addition, both high K+ (40 mM KCl)- and angiotensin II-induced PAP increases were higher in the PAH-MCT than in the control rats. Surprisingly, application of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), induced a marked PAP increase in the PAH-MCT rats, suggesting that endothelial functions were recovered in the three-week PAH-MCT rats. In addition, the medial thickening of the PA was similar to that in chronic hypoxia-induced PAH (PAH-CH) rats. However, the HPV response (i.e., PAP increased by acute hypoxia) was not affected in the MCT rats, whereas HPV disappeared in the PAH-CH rats. These results showed that vascular contractility and HPV remain robust in the MCT-induced PAH rat model with vascular remodeling. PMID:27847441

  8. Host immune responses after hypoxic reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Jerchel, Stefan; Kaufhold, Inga; Schuchardt, Larissa; Shima, Kensuke; Rupp, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Genital tract infections with Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) are the most frequent sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Severe clinical sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), tubal occlusion, and tubal infertility are linked to inflammatory processes of chronically infected tissues. The oxygen concentrations in the female urogenital tract are physiologically low and further diminished (0.5–5% O2, hypoxia) during an ongoing inflammation. However, little is known about the effect of a low oxygen environment on genital C. trachomatis infections. In this study, we investigated the host immune responses during reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infection under hypoxia. For this purpose, the activation of the MAP-kinases p44/42 and p38 as well as the induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 were analyzed. Upon hypoxic reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infection, the phosphorylation of the p44/42 but not of the p38 MAP-kinase was significantly diminished compared to IFN-γ induced chlamydial persistence under normoxic condition. In addition, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression levels were observed for reactivated Chlamydiae under hypoxia compared to a persistent chlamydial infection under normoxia. Our findings indicate that hypoxia not only reactivates IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infections resulting in increased bacterial growth and progeny but also dampens inflammatory host immune signaling responses that are normally observed in a normoxic environment. PMID:24783060

  9. Hypoxic preconditioning attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress in rat kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Ching; Ma, Ming-Chieh; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Sun, Wan-Kuan; Chen, Chau-Fong

    2007-01-01

    Chronic hypoxic (CH) preconditioning reduces superoxide-induced renal dysfunction via the upregulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and contents. Endotoxaemia reduces renal antioxidant status. We hypothesize that CH preconditioning might protect the kidney from subsequent endotoxaemia-induced oxidative injury. Endotoxaemia was induced by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 4 mg kg−1) in rats kept at sea level (SL) and rats with CH in an altitude chamber (5500 m for 15 h day−1) for 4 weeks. LPS enhanced xanthine oxidase (XO) and gp91phox (catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase) expression associated with burst amount of superoxide production from the SL kidney surface and renal venous blood detected by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. LPS induced a morphologic-independent renal dysfunction in baseline and acute saline loading stages and increased renal IL-1β protein and urinary protein concentration in the SL rats. After 4 weeks of induction, CH significantly increased Cu/ZnSOD, MnSOD and catalase expression (16 ± 17, 128 ± 35 and 48 ± 21, respectively) in renal cortex, and depressed renal cortex XO (44 ± 16%) and renal cortex (20 ± 9%) and medulla (28 ± 11%) gp91phox when compared with SL rats. The combined effect of enhanced antioxidant proteins and depressed oxidative proteins significantly reduced LPS-enhanced superoxide production, renal XO and gp91phox expression, renal IL-1β production, and urinary protein level. CH also ameliorated LPS-induced renal dysfunction in the baseline and acute saline loading periods. We conclude that CH treatment enhances the intrarenal antioxidant/oxidative protein ratio to overcome endotoxaemia-induced reactive oxygen species formation and inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:17317755

  10. Hypoxic cell sensitizers and heavy charged-particle radiations.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J. D.; Urtasun, R. C.; Blakely, E. A.; Smith, K. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Stationary-phase populations of Chinese hamster V-79 cells were irradiated with 250 kV X-rays and the Bragg peaks (spread to a width of 4 cm) of energetic He-, C-, Ne-, and A-ion beams produced at the 184-inch cyclotron and BEVALAC at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Survival curves were generated with each radiation for cells suspended in air-saturated and nitrogen-saturated medium with and without sensitizer present. The oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) measured for X-rays with 1mM metronidazole and 0.5 mM misonidazole were 2.0 and 1.6 respectively. The OERs without sensitizer for He-, C-, Ne-, and A-ion Bragg peaks were 2.4, 1.7, 1.6 and 1.4 respectively. For each type of radiation tested the presence of hypoxic-cell sensitizers resulted in an additional reduction in the measured OERs, indicating that these drugs should be of benefit in the radiotherapy planned with these and other high LET radiations. PMID:277223

  11. Experimental models of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, R C

    1993-01-01

    Animal research has provided important information on the pathogenesis of and neuropathologic responses to perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. In experimental animals, structural brain damage from hypoxia-ischemia has been produced in immature rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep and monkeys (18, 20, 24, 25, 38). Of the several available animal models, the fetal and newborn rhesus monkey and immature rat have been studied most extensively because of their similarities to humans in respect to the physiology of reproduction and their neuroanatomy at or shortly following birth. Given the frequency of occurrence of human perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and the multiple, often severe neurologic handicaps which ensue in infants and children, it is not surprising that the above described animal models have been developed. These models have provided the basis fo