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Sample records for chronic intracorporeal radiation

  1. Acute radiation syndrome and chronic radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip; Giannoula, Evanthia; Fountos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) or sickness or poisoning or toxicity is induced after a whole body exposure of men to high doses of radiation between 1-12Gy. First symptoms are from the gastrointestinal system, which together with bone marrow are the most sensitive parts of our body. Chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) may be induced by smaller than 1Gy radiation doses or after a mild form of ARS. Prophylaxis and treatment suggestions are described. In cases of ARS, a large part of the exposed population after proper medical care may survive, while without medical care this part of the population will be lost. Prophylaxis may also save another part of the population.

  2. INTRACORPOREAL HEAT DISSIPATION FROM A RADIOISOTOPE-POWERED ARTIFICIAL HEART

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Fred N.; Hagen, Kenneth G.; Whalen, Robert L.; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of radioisotope-fueled circulatory support systems depends on the ability of the body to dissipate the reject heat from the power source driving the blood pump as well as to tolerate chronic intracorporeal radiation. Our studies have focused on the use of the circulating blood as a heat sink. Initial in vivo heat transfer studies utilized straight tube heat exchangers (electrically and radioisotope energized) to replace a segment of the descending aorta. More recent studies have used a left ventricular assist pump as a blood-cooled heat exchanger. This approach minimizes trauma, does not increase the area of prosthetic interface with the blood, and minimizes system volume. Heat rejected from the thermal engine (vapor or gas cycle) is transported from the nuclear power source in the abdomen to the pump in the thoracic cavity via hydraulic lines. Adjacent tissue is protected from the fuel capsule temperature (900 to 1200°F) by vacuum foil insulation and polyurethane foam. The in vivo thermal management problems have been studied using a simulated thermal system (STS) which approximates the heat rejection and thermal transport mechanisms of the nuclear circulatory support systems under development by NHLI. Electric heaters simulate the reject heat from the thermal engines. These studies have been essential in establishing the location, suspension, surgical procedures, and postoperative care for implanting prototype nuclear heart assist systems in calves. The pump has a thermal impedance of 0.12°C/watt. Analysis of the STS data in terms of an electrical analog model implies a heat transfer coefficient of 4.7 × 10−3 watt/cm2°C in the abdomen compared to a value of 14.9 × 10−3 watt/cm2°C from the heat exchanger plenum into the diaphragm. Images PMID:15215968

  3. Chronic radiation myelitis.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R H; Marks, R D; Wallace, K M

    1982-08-01

    From March 1971 to September 1973, 200 patients with primary bronchogenic carcinoma received 4,000 rad (40 Gy) by means of split-course accelerated fractionation. Forty-five patients (22.5%) survived more than 11 months; and of these, 6 (13.3%) were found to have progressive myelitis. Recent reports indicate that rapid fractionation is preferred in some centers and may be undergoing a resurgence. The authors review their experience with this technique and the current understanding of the factors which affect the development of radiation myelitis.

  4. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  5. Improvements in Intracorporeal Lithotripters for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ramsay L.

    2007-04-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is an effective minimally invasive surgical approach for the treatment of large renal stone burden. Intracorporeal lithotripters (ICL) are utilized during PNL to fragment calculi, with some devices capable of concurrently removing fragments as well. Much progress has been made in the design of ICL devices, resulting in potentially more efficient treatment of nephrolithiasis.

  6. The Vale knot: an intracorporeal slipknot.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D F; Nassar, A H; Tamijmarane, A

    2000-01-01

    Mastering intracorporeal ligation and suturing is an essential skill for the performance of most advanced endoscopic surgical procedures. Although many disposable instruments have become available for various tasks necessitating the construction of sutures and knots; issues of performance, safety, and cost-efficiency remain to be settled. The authors believe that training should aim at the development of manual skills that could realize the clinical and cost-efficiency benefits of using conventional surgical tasks in the endoscopic setting.

  7. Slow continuous intracorporeal plasmapheresis for acute fluid overload.

    PubMed

    Handley, Harold H; Gorsuch, Rey; Levin, Nathan W; Ronco, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Intermittent dialysis is still the predominant treatment for acute or chronic renal insufficiency in the USA despite increasing evidence that slower and longer fluid management therapies are more beneficial to the patient. We have investigated the use of slow continuous intracorporeal plasmapheresis (SCIP) as a more efficient and hemodynamically stable alternative means of treating acute fluid overload. In this paper we discuss preliminary observations on the safety of SCIP catheter insertion, fluid removal, extraction and pathology in Yorkshire pigs. SCIP catheters removed plasma for extracorporeal plasma water removal without significant gross or histopathological changes. Blood chemistry and cell counts remained stable during therapy. Toxicological studies indicated no pyrogenicity, hemolysis, cytotoxicity, acute systemic toxicity, delayed-type hypersensitivity, or blood recalcification coagulation inhibition. Intracutaneous extracts caused only mild irritation. SCIP therapy appears to be safe for use in the removal of plasma and plasma water from experimental animals.

  8. Robotic ileal ureter: a completely intracorporeal technique.

    PubMed

    Brandao, Luis Felipe; Autorino, Riccardo; Zargar, Homayoun; Laydner, Humberto; Krishnan, Jayram; Samarasekera, Dinesh; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Kaouk, Jihad H; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Stein, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    The first laparoscopic case of ileal interposition was reported in 2000, proving the feasibility of the procedure in a minimally invasive fashion by duplicating the principles of open surgery. Robotic applications in urology are expanding worldwide, given the unique features of the robotic platform, which facilitates more advanced laparoscopic procedures. In this study, we report a case of completely intracorporeal robotic ileal ureter and thoroughly describe our technique for this complex minimally invasive procedure. A 50-year-old gentleman with a history of right renal stones underwent multiple right ureteroscopies and thereafter developed 2 proximal ureteral strictures of 5 mm. Preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate was 71 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Renal scan showed preserved function. The treatment options were discussed, and the patient elected to undergo a robotic ileal ureter interposition. Total operative time was 7 hours, the estimated blood loss was approximately 50 mL, and the patient progressed to regular diet on postoperative day 4 without any problem, being discharged without complications. On the postoperative day 12, a cystogram demonstrated no extravasation, and the Foley catheter was removed. After 1 month, renal scan showed the left kidney with 60.1% and the right kidney with 39.9% of total renal function. At 2 years follow-up, his serum creatinine was 1.14 and estimated glomerular filtration rate was 70 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Robot-assisted laparaoscopic ileal ureter with a completely intracorporeal technique is feasible and appears to be safe. A larger number of procedures using this technique and longer follow-up are needed to further define its role in the treatment of ureteral strictures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Tips and tricks for intracorporeal robot-assisted urinary diversion.

    PubMed

    Collins, J W; Hosseini, A; Sooriakumaran, P; Nyberg, T; Sanchez-Salas, R; Adding, C; Schumacher, Martin C; Wiklund, N P

    2014-11-01

    Since 2003, Karolinska University Hospitals have performed totally intracorporeal robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) in carefully selected patients. As our technique has evolved, the proportion of patients undergoing RARC has progressively increased. Whilst open radical cystectomy remains the gold standard, several high-volume centres have now demonstrated that RARC is both feasible and safe. RARC comprises three stages: radical cystectomy, extended lymph node dissection and urinary diversion. The majority of centres in the United States currently perform RARC utilizing an extracorporeal approach for the urinary diversion stage, perceiving this to be a more accessible option with a reduced risk of complications. We assess the evidence for this perception, reviewing the literature and reporting the functional outcomes and complication rates for a totally intracorporeal RARC approach. We also describe our technique for both intracorporeal orthotopic neobladder and intracorporeal ileal conduit, identifying the potential hazard steps and the 'tips and tricks' to optimize outcomes.

  10. Intravenous catheter for intracorporeal plasma filtration.

    PubMed

    Handley, Harold H; Gorsuch, Rey; Levin, Nathan W; Ronco, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Future advances in dialysis of end-stage renal disease patients may include improvements in therapeutic continuity and patient mobility. Continuous renal replacement therapies could lead to self-contained, mobile and potentially wearable dialysis units. We investigated an experimental, intravenous slow-continuous plasma separation system (IPSS) as a precursor to direct intravenous hemofiltration. An intracorporeal catheter employs asymmetric hollow fibers to separate blood cells from plasma in vivo. The fibers possess a sieving coefficient of 0.7 microm and remove 99.99% of all platelets. In vivo, catheters sustain an average plasma separation flow rate of 3 ml/min over 22 h, sufficient to remove 2 net liters of water from pigs through an extracorporeal hemofilter. Used catheter fibers are relatively free of protein deposition or clots in situ. In vitro studies suggest that human catheters may perform at 3-4 times the rate of porcine catheters. IPSS is proposed for acute fluid removal in CHF patients refractory to diuretics. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Endoscopic management of chronic radiation proctitis

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy occurs in 5%-20% of patients following pelvic radiotherapy. Although many cases resolve spontaneously, some lead to chronic symptoms including diarrhea, tenesmus, urgency and persistent rectal bleeding with iron deficiency anemia requiring blood transfusions. Treatments for chronic radiation proctitis remain unsatisfactory and the basis of evidence for various therapies is generally insufficient. There are very few controlled or prospective trials, and comparisons between therapies are limited because of different evaluation methods. Medical treatments, including formalin, topical sucralfate, 5-amino salicylic acid enemas, and short chain fatty acids have been used with limited success. Surgical management is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy using modalities such as the heater probe, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser, potassium titanyl phosphate laser and bipolar electrocoagulation has been reported to be of some benefit, but with frequent complications. Argon plasma coagulation is touted to be the preferred endoscopic therapy due to its efficacy and safety profile. Newer methods of endoscopic ablation such as radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy have been recently described which may afford broader areas of treatment per application, with lower rate of complications. This review will focus on endoscopic ablation therapies, including such newer modalities, for chronic radiation proctitis. PMID:22147960

  12. Ionizing Radiation and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David B.; Wing, Steve; Schroeder, Jane; Schmitz-Feuerhake, Inge; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. government recently implemented rules for awarding compensation to individuals with cancer who were exposed to ionizing radiation while working in the nuclear weapons complex. Under these rules, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is considered to be a nonradiogenic form of cancer. In other words, workers who develop CLL automatically have their compensation claim rejected because the compensation rules hold that the risk of radiation-induced CLL is zero. In this article we review molecular, clinical, and epidemiologic evidence regarding the radiogenicity of CLL. We note that current understanding of radiation-induced tumorigenesis and the etiology of lymphatic neoplasia provides a strong mechanistic basis for expecting that ionizing radiation exposure increases CLL risk. The clinical characteristics of CLL, including prolonged latency and morbidity periods and a low case fatality rate, make it relatively difficult to evaluate associations between ionizing radiation and CLL risk via epidemiologic methods. The epidemiologic evidence of association between external exposure to ionizing radiation and CLL is weak. However, epidemiologic findings are consistent with a hypothesis of elevated CLL mortality risk after a latency and morbidity period that spans several decades. Our findings in this review suggest that there is not a persuasive basis for the conclusion that CLL is a nonradiogenic form of cancer. PMID:15626639

  13. [Making easier what is difficult: continuous suture in intracorporeal anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Márquez, Manuel; Belda-Lozano, Ricardo; Solvas-Salmerón, María José; Ferrer-Ayza, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery requires a high level of training and detailed knowledge of advanced laparoscopy, especially when carrying out intracorporeal anastomosis. The following presentation shows two examples used by our group, which consists of slipknots done at the beginning and the end of the thread that allows us to do the suture quickly and securely.

  14. Initial Series of Four-Arm Robotic Completely Intracorporeal Ileal Ureter.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Sameer; Metcalfe, Charles; Satkunasivam, Raj; Nagaraj, Shalini; Becker, Carlee; de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Azhar, Raed A; Gill, Inderbir; Desai, Mihir; Aron, Monish; Berger, Andre

    2016-04-01

    Ileal ureter formation has been found to be a suitable treatment option for long, chronic ureteral strictures not amendable to less invasive forms of repair. Minimally invasive surgical techniques for this condition have been investigated. We report the first series of robotic completely intracorporeal ileal ureter using a four-arm robotic technique. Three patients underwent this procedure, including one patient with a solitary kidney. All procedures were performed effectively with a median operative time of 450 minutes (range: 420-540) and median estimated blood loss of 100 mL (range: 50-200). Postoperatively, one patient suffered volvulus and subsequent necrosis of small bowel and ileal ureter, which required re-operation and small bowel resection, including the ileal ureter. The other two patients report no surgical complications to date. This early series represents preliminary technical procedure feasibility. Further experience is necessary.

  15. Robotic Total Gastrectomy With Intracorporeal Robot-Sewn Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Amilcare; Ricci, Francesco; Trastulli, Stefano; Cirocchi, Roberto; Gemini, Alessandro; Grassi, Veronica; Corsi, Alessia; Renzi, Claudio; De Santis, Francesco; Petrina, Adolfo; Pironi, Daniele; D’Andrea, Vito; Santoro, Alberto; Desiderio, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer constitutes a major health problem. Robotic surgery has been progressively developed in this field. Although the feasibility of robotic procedures has been demonstrated, there are unresolved aspects being debated, including the reproducibility of intracorporeal in place of extracorporeal anastomosis. Difficulties of traditional laparoscopy have been described and there are well-known advantages of robotic systems, but few articles in literature describe a full robotic execution of the reconstructive phase while others do not give a thorough explanation how this phase was run. A new reconstructive approach, not yet described in literature, was recently adopted at our Center. Robotic total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy and a so-called “double-loop” reconstruction method with intracorporeal robot-sewn anastomosis (Parisi's technique) was performed in all reported cases. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were collected and a technical note was documented. All tumors were located at the upper third of the stomach, and no conversions or intraoperative complications occurred. Histopathological analysis showed R0 resection obtained in all specimens. Hospital stay was regular in all patients and discharge was recommended starting from the 4th postoperative day. No major postoperative complications or reoperations occurred. Reconstruction of the digestive tract after total gastrectomy is one of the main areas of surgical research in the treatment of gastric cancer and in the field of minimally invasive surgery. The double-loop method is a valid simplification of the traditional technique of construction of the Roux-limb that could increase the feasibility and safety in performing a full hand-sewn intracorporeal reconstruction and it appears to fit the characteristics of the robotic system thus obtaining excellent postoperative clinical outcomes. PMID:26656323

  16. Intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of devices are currently available for intracorporeal stone fragmentation. Recently a new wavelength of laser, the Holmium:YAG, has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications including ablation of soft tissue lesions as well as stone fragmentation. This laser has a wavelength of 2100 nm and operates in a pulsed mode. Energy is delivered through a 400 um quartz end-firing fiber. In this presentation we review our clinical experience with the Holmium:YAG laser for the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi. Over a 23 month period, 63 patients underwent 67 procedures. Seven procedures consisted of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy for large or staghorn renal calculi. Sixty procedures were performed for ureteral stones. Procedures for proximal ureteral stones (6) employed a retrograde approach using flexible ureteroscopes (8.5 or 9.8). Stones in the mid ureter (12) and distal ureter (42) were approached transurethrally using a 6.9 rigid ureteroscope. Complete stone fragmentation without the need for additional procedures was achieved in 82% of cases. Treatment failures included 1 stone migration into the renal pelvis during laser activation, 6 patients who had incomplete fragmentation and 3 patients in which laser malfunction precluded complete fragmentation. Stone analysis available in 23 patients revealed calcium oxalate monohydrate (15), calcium oxalate dihydrate (2), cystine (2), uric acid (3) and calcium phosphate (1). A single complication of ureteral perforation occurred when the laser was fired without direct visual guidance. Radiographic follow-up at an average of 16 weeks is available in 22 patients and has identified 2 patients with ureteral strictures that are not believed to be related to laser lithotripsy. In summary, we have found the Holmium:YAG laser to be a reliable and versatile device for intracorporeal lithotripsy. Its safety and efficacy make it a suitable alternative for performing intracorporeal lithotripsy of urinary

  17. Radiation Safety During Interventions of Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phillip; Phan, Hung; R Shah, Sara; Latif, Faisal; Nguyen, Thach

    2015-01-01

    During percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO), prolonged procedures increase the risk of excessive radiation exposure. These situations harbor a major concern to protect patients and personnel in the cardiac interventional laboratory (CCL). Important questions regarding radiation safety for interventional cardiologists performing PCI for CTO lesions are discussed and concrete applications are suggested.

  18. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Spałek, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients’ quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and radiomics that allow scientists and clinicians to select patients who are at risk of the development of chronic radiation dermatitis. Novel treatment methods and clinical

  19. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Spałek, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients' quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and radiomics that allow scientists and clinicians to select patients who are at risk of the development of chronic radiation dermatitis. Novel treatment methods and clinical

  20. Formalin irrigation for hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng-Hui; Yuan, Zi-Xu; Zhong, Qing-Hua; Wang, Huai-Ming; Qin, Qi-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of a modified topical formalin irrigation method in refractory hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). METHODS: Patients with CRP who did not respond to previous medical treatments and presented with grade II-III rectal bleeding according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were enrolled. Patients with anorectal strictures, deep ulcerations, and fistulas were excluded. All patients underwent flexible endoscopic evaluation before treatment. Patient demographics and clinical data, including primary tumor, radiotherapy and previous treatment options, were collected. Patients received topical 4% formalin irrigation in a clasp-knife position under spinal epidural anesthesia in the operating room. Remission of rectal bleeding and related complications were recorded. Defecation, remission of bleeding, and other symptoms were investigated at follow-up. Endoscopic findings in patients with rectovaginal fistulas were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-four patients (19 female, 5 male) with a mean age of 61.5 ± 9.5 years were enrolled. The mean time from the end of radiotherapy to the onset of bleeding was 11.1 ± 9.0 mo (range: 2-24 mo). Six patients (25.0%) were blood transfusion dependent. The median preoperative Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS) was 3 points. Nineteen patients (79.2%) received only one course of topical formalin irrigation, and five (20.8%) required a second course. No side effects were observed. One month after treatment, bleeding cessation was complete in five patients and obvious in 14; the effectiveness rate was 79.1% (19/24). For long-term efficacy, 5/16, 1/9 and 0/6 patients complained of persistent bleeding at 1, 2 and 5 years after treatment, respectively. Three rectovaginal fistulas were found at 1 mo, 3 mo and 2 years after treatment. Univariate analysis showed associations of higher endoscopic VRS and ulceration score with risk of developing rectovaginal fistula. CONCLUSION: Modified formalin

  1. Formalin irrigation for hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng-Hui; Yuan, Zi-Xu; Zhong, Qing-Hua; Wang, Huai-Ming; Qin, Qi-Yuan; Chen, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Lei

    2015-03-28

    To assess the efficacy and safety of a modified topical formalin irrigation method in refractory hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). Patients with CRP who did not respond to previous medical treatments and presented with grade II-III rectal bleeding according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were enrolled. Patients with anorectal strictures, deep ulcerations, and fistulas were excluded. All patients underwent flexible endoscopic evaluation before treatment. Patient demographics and clinical data, including primary tumor, radiotherapy and previous treatment options, were collected. Patients received topical 4% formalin irrigation in a clasp-knife position under spinal epidural anesthesia in the operating room. Remission of rectal bleeding and related complications were recorded. Defecation, remission of bleeding, and other symptoms were investigated at follow-up. Endoscopic findings in patients with rectovaginal fistulas were analyzed. Twenty-four patients (19 female, 5 male) with a mean age of 61.5 ± 9.5 years were enrolled. The mean time from the end of radiotherapy to the onset of bleeding was 11.1 ± 9.0 mo (range: 2-24 mo). Six patients (25.0%) were blood transfusion dependent. The median preoperative Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS) was 3 points. Nineteen patients (79.2%) received only one course of topical formalin irrigation, and five (20.8%) required a second course. No side effects were observed. One month after treatment, bleeding cessation was complete in five patients and obvious in 14; the effectiveness rate was 79.1% (19/24). For long-term efficacy, 5/16, 1/9 and 0/6 patients complained of persistent bleeding at 1, 2 and 5 years after treatment, respectively. Three rectovaginal fistulas were found at 1 mo, 3 mo and 2 years after treatment. Univariate analysis showed associations of higher endoscopic VRS and ulceration score with risk of developing rectovaginal fistula. Modified formalin irrigation is an effective and safe

  2. Acute and Chronic Cutaneous Reactions to Ionizing Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bray, Fleta N; Simmons, Brian J; Wolfson, Aaron H; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is an important treatment modality for a variety of malignant conditions. However, development of radiation-induced skin changes is a significant adverse effect of radiation therapy (RT). Cutaneous repercussions of RT vary considerably in severity, course, and prognosis. When they do occur, cutaneous changes to RT are commonly graded as acute, consequential-late, or chronic. Acute reactions can have severe sequelae that impact quality of life as well as cancer treatment. Thus, dermatologists should be informed about these adverse reactions, know how to assess their severity and be able to determine course of management. The majority of measures currently available to prevent these acute reactions are proper skin hygiene and topical steroids, which limit the severity and decrease symptoms. Once acute cutaneous reactions develop, they are treated according to their severity. Treatments are similar to those used in prevention, but incorporate wound care management that maintains a moist environment to hasten recovery. Chronic changes are a unique subset of adverse reactions to RT that may develop months to years following treatment. Chronic radiation dermatitis is often permanent, progressive, and potentially irreversible with substantial impact on quality of life. Here, we also review the etiology, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, prevention, and management of late-stage cutaneous reactions to radiotherapy, including chronic radiation dermatitis and radiation-induced fibrosis.

  3. [Nonsurgical treatment of chronic radiation-induced hemorrhagic proctitis].

    PubMed

    de Parades, Vincent; Bauer, Pierre; Marteau, Philippe; Chauveinc, Laurent; Bouillet, Thierry; Atienza, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of radiation-induced chronic hemorrhagic proctitis is less than 10 to 20%. The onset of this proctitis is delayed relative to the radiation therapy and generally develops from 6 to 24 months later. There are numerous predisposing factors, the most important of which is the radiation therapy dose: risk increases exponentially above 40-45 Gy. Its pathophysiology involves progressive obliterating endarteritis and transmural interstitial fibrosis, which induce chronic ischemia that is irreversible and progressive during the years after radiation therapy. Its diagnosis depends most often on the combination of clinical history and typical endoscopic appearance (congestive mucosa and/or telangiectases). Topical administrative of sucralfate or corticosteroids as well as argon plasma coagulation, with formalin treatment if necessary, provides relief for most patients.

  4. Robotic partial nephrectomy with intracorporeal renal hypothermia using ice slush.

    PubMed

    Kaouk, Jihad H; Samarasekera, Dinesh; Krishnan, Jayram; Autorino, Riccardo; Acka, Oktay; Brando, Luis Felipe; Laydner, Humberto; Zargar, Homayoun

    2014-09-01

    To outline our technique for intracorporeal cooling with ice slush during robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN), with real-time parenchymal temperature monitoring. Eleven consecutive patients with enhancing solid renal masses suitable for treatment with RPN between September 2013 and January 2014 were included in the analysis. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Preoperative patient characteristics, intraoperative surgical parameters including patient body temperature and ipsilateral kidney temperature with real-time monitoring, and short-term functional outcomes were analyzed. Median age was 55 years (range, 39-75 years) and American Society of Anesthesiologists score was 3 (range, 2-4). Median tumor size was 4 cm (range, 2.3-7.1) and RENAL nephrometry score was 9 (range, 5-11). One patient had a solitary kidney. During cooling, the lowest median renal parenchymal temperature was 17.05°C (range, 11°C-26°C) and cold ischemia time was 27.17 minutes (range, 18-49 minutes). Median time to latest postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate was 12 days (range, 2-30 days). Median glomerular filtration rate preservation was 81% (range, 47.9%-126%). There was one positive margin. There were no postoperative complications, and no patients experienced a prolonged ileus. The limitations of this study include a small number of patients and short-term follow-up. RPN with renal hypothermia using intracorporeal ice slush is technically feasible. Our simplified method of introducing the ice slush was free of complications and highly reproducible. The use of a needle temperature probe allowed us to monitor in real time cooling of the renal parenchyma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Streptococcus bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jadeja, L.; Kantarjian, H.; Bolivar, R.

    1983-12-01

    We describe the first patient with simultaneous S bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis. This case underlines the value of a thorough gastrointestinal evaluation of all patients with S bovis infection, and the need for a neurologic investigation even with minor neurologic manifestations.

  6. Absence of ischemia in telangiectasias of chronic radiation proctopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedland, S; Benaron, D; Maxim, P; Parachikov, I; Soetikno, R

    2006-05-01

    It has been postulated that chronic radiation proctopathy, clinically manifested by hematochezia and by the appearance of multiple telangiectasias, is caused by ischemia. This theory is based on reports that appeared in the 1980s which described obliterative endarteritis in patients with chronic radiation-induced ulcers. However, bleeding from radiation proctopathy is typically successfully treated endoscopically by widespread tissue coagulation, and the complications that would be expected to occur if the tissue was ischemic, such as poor wound healing, generally do not arise. We therefore hypothesized that the ischemia theory is incorrect and that rectal capillary oxygen saturation is normal in patients with telangiectasias of chronic radiation proctopathy. We developed a visible-light spectroscopy device that measures mucosal capillary hemoglobin oxygen saturation during endoscopy (having reported its operating characteristics previously). We prospectively studied 20 patients who had typical findings of multiple rectal telangiectasias, 1 - 20 years after undergoing external-beam irradiation for prostate or rectal carcinoma. We measured and compared the mucosal capillary oxygen saturations in the affected areas of the distal rectum and in endoscopically normal areas in the rectosigmoid colon. Mucosal oxygenation was normal in all 20 patients in affected areas (64 % - 80 %) and in unaffected areas (63 % - 75 %). The mean mucosal hemoglobin oxygen saturation was actually slightly higher in the affected areas of the rectum than in the uninvolved rectosigmoid colon (73 % vs. 69 %, P < 0.01). The common form of chronic radiation proctopathy, characterized by multiple telangiectasias without ulcers or strictures, is not associated with ongoing mucosal ischemia. This finding may explain why endoscopic treatment of this disorder, in which large areas of the mucosa are coagulated with argon plasma or other treatment modalities that cause widespread ulceration, does not

  7. Skin cancer in patients with chronic radiation dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.M.; Hanke, C.W.; Zollinger, T.W.; Montebello, J.F.; Hornback, N.B.; Norins, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    The cases of 76 patients with chronic radiation dermatitis resulting from low-dose ionizing radiation for benign disease were reviewed retrospectively for risk factors leading to the development of neoplasia. The patients were studied with respect to original hair color, eye color, sun reactive skin type, benign disease treated, area treated, age at treatment, and age at development of first skin cancer. Analysis of data showed 37% of patients had sun-reactive skin type I, 27% had type II, and 36% had type III. Types IV through VI were not represented. There appeared to be an overrepresentation of types I and II. Increased melanin pigmentation may therefore be either directly or indirectly protective against the development of skin cancers in patients who have received low-dose superficial ionizing radiation for benign disease. The sun-reactive skin type of patients with chronic radiation dermatitis may be used as a predictor of skin cancer risk when the total dose of ionizing radiation is not known.

  8. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal neobladder diversion: The Karolinska experience

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Justin W.; Sooriakumaran, P.; Sanchez-Salas, R.; Ahonen, R.; Nyberg, T.; Wiklund, N. P.; Hosseini, A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this report is to describe our surgical technique of totally intracorporeal robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) with neobladder formation. Materials and Methods: Between December 2003 and March 2013, a total of 147 patients (118 male, 29 female) underwent totally intracorporeal RARC for urinary bladder cancer. We also performed a systematic search of Medline, Embase and PubMed databases using the terms RARC, robotic cystectomy, robot-assisted, totally intracorporeal RARC, intracorporeal neobladder, intracorporeal urinary diversion, oncological outcomes, functional outcomes, and complication rates. Results: The mean age of our patients was 64 years (range 37-87). On surgical pathology 47% had pT1 or less disease, 27% had pT2, 16% had pT3 and 10% had pT4. The mean number of lymph nodes removed was 21 (range 0-60). 24% of patients had lymph node positive dAQ1isease. Positive surgical margins occurred in 6 cases (4%). Mean follow-up was 31 months (range 4-115 months). Two patients (1.4%) died within 90 days of their operation. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, overall survival and cancer specific survival at 60 months was 68% and 69.6%, respectively. 80 patients (54%) received a continent diversion with totally intracorporeal neobladder formation. In the neobladder subgroup median total operating time was 420 minutes (range 265-760). Daytime continence and satisfactory sexual function or potency at 12 months ranged between 70-90% in both men and women. Conclusions: Our experience with totally intracorporeal RARC demonstrates acceptable oncological and functional outcomes that suggest this is a viable alternative to open radical cystectomy. PMID:25097318

  9. Advantages of Robotic Right Colectomy With Intracorporeal Anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Henry J; Plasencia, Gustavo; Rivera, Brian X; Molano, Andres; Fagenson, Alex; Jane, Louis A; Holguin, Diego

    2017-03-17

    Through retrospective review of consecutive charts, we compare the short-term and long-term clinical outcomes after robotic-assisted right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis (RIA) (n=89) and laparoscopic right colectomy with extracorporeal anastomosis (LEA) (n=135). Cohorts were similar in demographic characteristics, comorbidities, pathology, and perioperative outcomes (conversion, days to flatus and bowel movement, and length of hospitalization). The RIA cohort experienced statistically significant: less blood loss, shorter incision lengths, and longer specimen lengths than the LEA cohort. Operative times were significantly longer for the RIA group. No incisional hernias occurred in the RIA group, whereas the LEA group had 5 incisional hernias; mean follow-up was 33 and 30 months, respectively. RIA is effective and safe and provides some clinical advantages. Future studies may show that, in obese and other technically challenging patients, RIA facilitates resection of a longer, consistent specimen with less mesentery trauma that can be extracted through smaller incisions.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  10. Effective Treatment of Chronic Radiation Proctitis Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Becker, Laren; Chen, Yu; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Figueiredo, Marisa; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Endoscopic argon plasma coagulation and bipolar electrocautery are currently preferred treatments for chronic radiation proctitis, but ulcerations and strictures frequently occur. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been successful for mucosal ablation in the esophagus. Here we report the efficacy of RFA with the BarRx Halo90 system in three patients with bleeding from chronic radiation proctitis. In all cases, the procedure was well tolerated and hemostasis was achieved after 1 or 2 RFA sessions. Re-epithelialization of squamous mucosa was observed over areas of prior hemorrhage. No stricturing or ulceration was seen on follow-up up to 19 months after RFA treatment. Real-time endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) visualized epithelialization and subsurface tissue microvasculature pre- and post-treatment, demonstrating its potential for follow-up assessment of endoscopic therapies. PMID:20593010

  11. Intracorporal knot tying techniques - which is the right one?

    PubMed

    Romero, Philipp; Nickel, Felix; Mantel, Maisha; Frongia, Giovanni; Rossler, Alina; Kowalewski, Karl-Friedrich; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Günther, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Intracorporal knot tying (ICKT) and suturing in minimal invasive surgery (MIS) represent a key skill for advanced procedures such as Nissen fundoplication. Suture placement under tension is particularly challenging during MIS. The aim of this study was to compare ICKT of the common surgical square knot and the slipping knot on a simulated suture placement under tension. Furthermore, we objectively assessed the surgical skill of ICKT following 3hours of hands-on training. A box trainer was used for laparoscopic knot tying with predefined openings. A 12cm suture was placed in central view. We used a standardized silicon suture pad with a defined wound dehiscence of 0.5cm and marked needle entrance and exit targets next to the incision. Twenty participants were divided among three groups in this study. The first group (n=5) consisted of senior physicians. The second group (n=5) was made up of surgical residents in the first to fourth year of residency training. The third group (n=10) contained medical students between their third and sixth year of study without any prior experience in laparoscopic surgery. Residents and students received a 3-hour hands-on training in surgical square and slipping knot tying. Each participant tied two of each knot types before and after the hands-on training. Knot quality, performance, total time and suture placement accuracy were the parameters for assessment in this study. The knot quality was greater for the slipping knot compared with the square knot in all groups. There were no significant intragroup differences in knot tying performance, task time and accuracy of both suture methods. Students and residents improved in all categories for both ICKT techniques after training. We compared ICKT of the surgical square knot with the slipping knot on a simulated suture placement under tension during a standardized training program for medical students and surgical residents. In our study, the average quality of the slipping knot was

  12. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia after radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cottin, V; Frognier, R; Monnot, H; Levy, A; DeVuyst, P; Cordier, J F

    2004-01-01

    The priming of bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia by radiation therapy (RT) to the breast is now a well recognised syndrome. This study describes the occurrence of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia following RT after surgery for breast cancer in five female patients, with a mean age of 68 yrs (range 49-77). All patients had a history of asthma and/or allergy. At the onset of eosinophilic pneumonia, all patients were symptomatic. Chest radiograph showed pulmonary infiltrates, unilateral and limited to the irradiated lung in three patients, and bilateral in two. Pulmonary opacities were migratory in one patient. All patients had blood eosinophilia >1.0 10(9) x L(-1) and/or eosinophilia >40% at bronchoalveolar lavage differential cell count. The median time interval between the end of radiation therapy and the onset of eosinophilic pneumonia was 3.5 months (range 1-10). All patients rapidly improved with oral corticosteroids without sequelae. Relapse occurred in two patients after treatment withdrawal. Priming of alveolitis by radiation therapy to the breast might promote either bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia or chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, with the latter depending on genetic or acquired characteristics of patients and/or further stimulation that may trigger a T-helper cell type 2 form of lymphocyte response, especially in patients with asthma or other atopic manifestations.

  13. Chronic radiation proctopathy: A practical review of endoscopic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Luciano; Rohr, Rachel; Nakao, Frank; Libera, Ermelindo; Ferrari, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is a troublesome complication of pelvic radiotherapy. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding. CRP symptoms interfere with daily activities and decrease quality of life. Rectal bleeding management in patients with CRP represents a conundrum for practitioners. Medical therapy is ineffective in general and surgical approach has a high morbid-mortality. Endoscopy has a role in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of this disease. Currently available endoscopic modalities are formalin, potassium titanyl phosphate laser, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, argon laser, bipolar electrocoagulation (BiCAP), heater probe, band ligation, cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). Among these options, APC is the most promising. PMID:26981189

  14. Magnetic resonance enterography findings of chronic radiation enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Algin, Oktay; Turkbey, Baris; Ozmen, Evrim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The diagnosis of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE) is considerably challenging both for clinicians and radiologists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) in the diagnosis of CRE. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on the role of MRE in the diagnosis of CRE specifically. In this report, we present MRE findings of 4 patients with CRE. The most important factors in CRE diagnosis are the clinical findings and medical history, but focal abnormal bowel loop in the region of a known radiation field is the most important information. This abnormal loop is generally located in the distal ileum as present in our patients. Other associated findings helpful for the diagnosis are small bowel thickening, contrast material enhancement in a long segment, mesenteric stranding and luminal narrowing. MRE can be sufficient and useful in the diagnosis of CRE and for treatment planning, especially in patients with significant comorbidities who have had radiotherapy in the past. Adding MRE into the diagnostic algorithm can be helpful in post-radiotherapy patients with acute/subacute gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:22138564

  15. Detectability and medico-legal value of the gunshot residues in the intracorporeal channel.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Arnaldo Stanislao; Andreola, Salvatore; Battistini, Alessio; Gentile, Guendalina; Muccino, Enrico; Vancheri, Giulia; Zoja, Riccardo

    2015-11-01

    The application of the histochemical stain of sodium rhodizonate to the entrance wound for the detection of the lead (Pb) residues coming from the gunshot may be affected by false positive cases due to the contamination of the environmental Pb. The aim of the Authors is to histochemically search the Pb of GSR in a region which should be more protected by the contamination: the intracorporeal channel. Two hundreds and eighteen serial histological specimens of the intracorporeal channels coming from 25 subjects (dead due to gunshots and being autopsied at the Section of Legal Medicine of the Milan University, in the years 2013-2014) were stained with the sodium rhodizonate and sodium rhodizonate in acid environment (HCl 5%), and then observed by the microscope. The sodium rhodizonate showed a positivity for the Pb residues in the intracorporeal channel, with the detection of the particles within the first 2 cm beyond the entrance wound in 6 cases over the total number of 25 (24%). Victims were characterized by common features: short-barreled weapon; contact shots or short-distance shots; involvement of regions that were not covered by clothing; preservation of the microscopic structure of organs interested by the intracorporeal channel. The searching of GSR in the intracorporeal channel, even in conditions securing a high sensitivity, could represent an important test for the discrimination between an environmental contamination of Pb and the presence of Pb residues by GSR: once confirmed the presence of GSR in the intracorporeal channel by the histochemical analysis, the diagnostic process should require the application of the SEM-EDX for the confirmation of the results. Although not yet studied, this combination could be applied to cadavers exposed to the environment, with advanced post-mortal phenomena permitting at least the suspects of the existence of gunshot wounds at the macroscopic autopsy evaluation. Indeed, in some cases, the putrefaction is so advanced

  16. Robotic Intracorporeal Padua Ileal Bladder: Surgical Technique, Perioperative, Oncologic and Functional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Simone, Giuseppe; Papalia, Rocco; Misuraca, Leonardo; Tuderti, Gabriele; Minisola, Francesco; Ferriero, Mariaconsiglia; Vallati, Giulio; Guaglianone, Salvatore; Gallucci, Michele

    2016-10-22

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) with intracorporeal neobladder reconstruction is a challenging procedure. The need for surgical skills and the long operative times have led to concern about its reproducibility. To illustrate our technique for RARC and totally intracorporeal orthotopic Padua ileal bladder. From August 2012 to February 2014, 45 patients underwent this technique at a single tertiary referral centre. RARC, extended pelvic lymph node dissection, and intracorporeal partly stapled neobladder. Surgical steps are demonstrated in the accompanying video. Demographics, clinical, and pathological data were collected. Perioperative, 2-yr oncologic and 2-yr functional outcomes were reported. Intraoperative transfusion or conversion to open surgery was not necessary in any case and intracorporeal neobladder was successfully performed in all 45 patients. Median operative time was 305min (interquartile range [IQR]: 282-345). Median estimated blood loss was 210ml (IQR: 50-250). Median hospital stay was 9 d (IQR: 7-12). The overall incidence of perioperative, 30-d and 180-d complications were 44.4%, 57.8%, and 77.8%, respectively, while severe complications occurred in17.8%, 17.8%, and 35.5%, respectively. Two-yr daytime and night-time continence rates were 73.3% and 55.5%, respectively. Two-yr disease free survival, cancer specific survival, and overall survival rates were 72.5%, 82.3%, and 82.4%, respectively. The small sample size and high caseload of the centre might affect the reproducibility of these results. Our experience supports the feasibility of totally intracorporeal neobladder following RARC. Operative times and perioperative complication rates are likely to be reduced with increasing experience. We report the outcomes of our first 45 consecutive patients who underwent robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal neobladders. Perioperative, oncologic, and functional outcomes support this technique as a feasible and safe surgical option

  17. Three cases of laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy for gastric cancer in remnant stomach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Mou, Yi-Ping; Chen, Ke; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Cai, Jia-Qin; Wu, Di; Zhou, Yu-Cheng

    2014-11-13

    Gastric cancer in remnant stomach is a rare tumor but with poor prognosis. Compared with conventional open surgery, laparoscopic gastrectomy has potential benefits for these patients due to advantages resulting from its minimally invasive approach. Herein, we report on three patients with gastric cancer in remnant stomach who underwent laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy successfully. The operative time was 280, 250 and 225 minutes, the estimated blood loss was 100, 80 and 50 ml and the length of postoperative hospital stay was seven, eight and nine days respectively. Our experience has suggested that laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy can be a safe, feasible and promising option for patients with gastric cancer in remnant stomach.

  18. Intracorporeal Suturing and Knot Tying Broadens the Clinical Applicability of Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Homero; Cacchione, Robert N.; Ferzli, George S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: As surgeons become more experienced with basic laparoscopic procedures like cholecystectomy, they are able to expand this approach to less common operations. However, without laparoscopic suturing skills, like those obtained with Nissen fundoplication, many operations cannot be completed laparoscopically. We present a series of 10 patients with less common surgical illnesses who were successfully treated with minimal access techniques and intracorporeal suturing. Methods: Over a 6-month period at 2 medical centers, 10 patients underwent operations with laparoscopic intracorporeal suturing and knot tying. Diagnoses included bowel obstruction due to gallstone ileus (n=1), perforated uterus from an intrauterine device (n=1), urinary bladder diverticulum (n=1), bleeding Meckel's diverticulum (n=3), and perforated duodenal ulcer (n=4). Results: Each patient was treated with standard surgical interventions performed entirely laparoscopically with intracorporeal suturing. No morbidity or mortality occurred in any patient due to the operation. Conclusions: Although each of these operations has been previously reported, as a series, they point out the importance of mastering laparoscopic suturing. Although devices are commercially available to facilitate certain suturing scenarios, we encourage residents and fellows to sew manually. We believe that none of these operations could have been completed as effectively by using a suture device. The ability to suture laparoscopically markedly broadens the number of clinical scenarios in which minimal access techniques can be used. PMID:12856844

  19. Tips and tricks to robot-assisted radical cystectomy and intracorporeal diversion.

    PubMed

    Poch, Michael A; Raza, Johar; Nyquist, John; Guru, Khurshid A

    2013-01-01

    To summarize the fundamental principles for technique of robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) based on current peer reviewed literature. Also provide most recent evidence for the efficacy of RARC and Intracorporeal Ileal Conduit (ICIC). Technical tricks have increased the efficiency of RARC and ICIC diversion. Perioperative and short-term outcomes have demonstrated that RARC is an acceptable alternative to open radical cystectomy. Acceptable positive surgical margin rates, thorough extended lymph node dissection based on tenets of oncological principles and acceptable short-term oncologic outcomes have been reported. Learning curve towards safe incorporation of intracorporeal urinary diversion and its evolution are presented. The technical tips and tricks have led to evolution of technique translating into improved surgical outcomes. RARC is a well tolerated and effective alternative to open cystectomy and urinary diversion. Intracorporeal urinary diversion is the next challenge on the horizon with an acceptable learning curve and outcomes; this evolution will lead to improvement in quality of life after this morbid surgical procedure.

  20. Learning curve analysis of intracorporeal cuff suturing during robotic single-site total hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Ali; Zeybek, Burak; Ozgurel, Banu; Oztekin, Mehmet Kemal; Sendag, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the learning curve of intracorporeal cuff suturing during robotic single-site total hysterectomy. Retrospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-1). University hospital. Twenty-four patients with benign indications for hysterectomy. Twenty-four patients who underwent robotic single-site total hysterectomy to treat benign indications were included in the study. Surgical procedures were performed by a single surgeon with extensive experience in laparoscopy, using the single-site platform of the da Vinci Surgical System. All vaginal cuffs were closed intracorporeally using semi-rigid single-site instruments. An exponential learning curve technique was used to analyze the learning curve. The overall mean (SD) vaginal cuff closure time was 23.2 (7) minutes. Learning curve analysis revealed a decrease in vaginal closure time after 14 procedures. An experienced robotic surgeon requires approximately 14 procedures to achieve proficiency in intracorporeal cuff suturing during robotic single-site total hysterectomy. Novel instruments that create perfect triangulation are needed to overcome the current challenges of suturing and to shorten operative time. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Endoscopic diode laser therapy for chronic radiation proctitis.

    PubMed

    Polese, Lino; Marini, Lucia; Rizzato, Roberto; Picardi, Edgardo; Merigliano, Stefano

    2017-09-11

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic diode laser therapy in patients presenting rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). A retrospective analysis of CRP patients who underwent diode laser therapy in a single institution between 2010 and 2016 was carried out. The patients were treated by non-contact fibers without sedation in an outpatient setting. Fourteen patients (median age 77, range 73-87 years) diagnosed with CRP who had undergone high-dose radiotherapy for prostatic cancer and who presented with rectal bleeding were included. Six required blood transfusions. Antiplatelet (three patients) and anticoagulant (two patients) therapy was not suspended during the treatments. The patients underwent a median of two sessions; overall, a mean of 1684 J of laser energy per session was used. Bleeding was resolved in 10/14 (71%) patients, and other two patients showed improvement (93%). Only one patient, who did not complete the treatment, required blood transfusions after laser therapy; no complications were noted during or after the procedures. Study findings demonstrated that endoscopic non-contact diode laser treatment is safe and effective in CRP patients, even in those receiving antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy.

  2. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  3. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  4. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation. PMID:26795421

  5. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-22

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  6. Total laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with 3-step stapled intracorporeal isoperistaltic ileocolic anastomosis for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jian-Cheng, Tu; Shu-Sheng, Wang; Bo, Zhang; Jian, Fang; Liang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with extracorporeal anastomosis is a widely used procedure; several authors have published their approach to intracorporeal anastomosis. In this paper, we present an approach developed by us and compare short-term outcomes with those of extracorporeal anastomosis in colon cancer patients. Retrospective review of colon cancer patients treated with laparoscopic right hemicolectomy either with intracorporeal anastomosis (TLG group) or extracorporeal anastomosis (LG group) at the Zhangjiagang Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University between January 2011 and October 2015. Operative and postoperative data are compared. Around 85 patients underwent laparoscopic hemicolectomy (56 TLG and 29 LG) during the reference period for this study. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), stage of cancer, operation time, number of lymph nodes harvested, and length of hospital stay were comparable between the 2 groups. In the TLG group, the ileocolic anastomosis time was significantly shorter (9.9–15.5 minutes vs 13.5–18.2 minutes in LG; P < 0.001), the mean intraoperative blood loss was lower (83.2 mL [range, 56.5–100.5 mL] vs 93.3 mL [range, 75.8 – 110.3 mL]; P < 0.001), the recovery of bowel function was faster (P < 0.001), and the postoperative pain score was lower (P < 0.001) as compared to that in the LG group. Complications in the LG group included wound infection (4 patients), obstruction (1), and postoperative bleeding complications (1); however, only 1 patient developed complication (wound infection) in the TLG group. Total laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with 3-step stapled intracorporeal anastomosis for colon cancer is a safe and reliable procedure. Its advantages include short anastomosis time, less intraoperative blood loss, less postoperative pain, and early bowel function recovery. PMID:27902621

  7. Impact of body mass index on robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Nariman; Clifford, Thomas G; Miranda, Gus; Cai, Jie; Aron, Monish; Desai, Mihir M; Gill, Inderbir S

    2017-05-22

    To determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on peri-operative and oncological outcomes after robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) with intracorporeal urinary diversion. A total of 216 patients undergoing RARC, extended lymphadenectomy and intracorporeal urinary diversion, between July 2010 and December 2015, were categorized into four BMI groups according to the 2004 World Health Organization obesity classification groups: <25 kg/m(2) (normal); 25-29.9 kg/m(2) (pre-obese); 30-34.9 kg/m(2) (obese class I); and ≥35 kg/m(2) (obese class II). Pre-, intra- and postoperative characteristics, oncological outcomes, and 90-day complications were compared using sas statistical software. All 216 patients underwent intracorporeal urinary diversion, with 68 (32%) undergoing orthotopic neobladder construction. Demographics were similar among the BMI groups with regard to median (range) age (71.8 [35- 95] years), gender (80.6% men), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score (66.2% with CCI score 0-1), pathological stage (carcinoma in situ to T2: 55.1%, T3-T4/N0: 18.5%, Tx/N+: 26.4%), median (interquartile range) node count [41 (28, 53)] and positive soft tissue margin rate (4.2%). Obese patients had greater blood loss and longer operating time (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). There were no significant differences in length of hospital stay, transfusion rates, readmission or 90-day overall and high-grade complication rates (P = 0.16, P = 0.96, P = 0.89, P = 0.22 and P = 0.51, respectively). At a median (range) follow-up of 13 months (15 days to 4.8 years), recurrence-free survival (P = 0.92) and overall survival (P = 0.68) were similar among the groups. The results of the present study show that RARC with intracorporeal urinary diversion is safe and feasible in obese patients with bladder cancer. BMI was not associated with significant differences in peri-operative, pathological or early oncological outcomes. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU

  8. Solo Intracorporeal Esophagojejunostomy Reconstruction Using a Laparoscopic Scope Holder in Single-Port Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Son, Sang-Yong; Jung, Do Hyun; Park, Young Suk; Shin, Dong Joon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer has recently been reported by Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. However, this is not a popular procedure primarily because of the technical difficulties involved in achieving consistent intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy. At Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, we recently introduced a simple, easy-to-use, low-profile laparoscopic manual scope holder that enables the maintenance of a stable field of view, the most demanding condition in single-port gastrectomy. In this technical report, we describe in detail the world's first solo single-incision laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D1+ lymph node dissection and intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy for proximal early gastric cancer.

  9. Solo Intracorporeal Esophagojejunostomy Reconstruction Using a Laparoscopic Scope Holder in Single-Port Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Son, Sang-Yong; Jung, Do Hyun; Park, Young Suk; Shin, Dong Joon; Park, Do Joong

    2015-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer has recently been reported by Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. However, this is not a popular procedure primarily because of the technical difficulties involved in achieving consistent intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy. At Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, we recently introduced a simple, easy-to-use, low-profile laparoscopic manual scope holder that enables the maintenance of a stable field of view, the most demanding condition in single-port gastrectomy. In this technical report, we describe in detail the world's first solo single-incision laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D1+ lymph node dissection and intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy for proximal early gastric cancer. PMID:26161287

  10. A Comparative Study in Learning Curves of Two Different Intracorporeal Knot Tying Techniques.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Manuneethimaran; Ravindrakumar, Chandru

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. In our study we are aiming to analyse the learning curves in our surgical trainees by using two standard methods of intracorporeal knot tying. Material and Method. Two randomized groups of trainees are trained with two different intracorporeal knot tying techniques (loop and winding) by single surgeon for eight sessions. In each session participants were allowed to make as many numbers of knots in thirty minutes. The duration for each set of knots and the number of knots for each session were calculated. At the end each session, participants were asked about their frustration level, difficulty in making knot, and dexterity. Results. In winding method the number of knots tied was increasing significantly in each session with less frustration and less difficulty level. Discussion. The suturing and knotting skill improved in every session in both groups. But group B (winding method) trainees made significantly higher number of knots and they took less time for each set of knots than group A (loop method). Although both knotting methods are standard methods, the learning curve is better in loop method. Conclusion. The winding method of knotting is simpler and easier to perform, especially for the surgeons who have limited laparoscopic experience.

  11. [Body packing: the value of modern imaging procedures in the detection of intracorporeal transport media].

    PubMed

    Freislederer, A; Bautz, W; Schmidt, V

    1988-01-01

    The necessity of rapid objective appraisal of the suspicion of intracorporeal drug smuggling (body-packing) by effective methods of investigation in the course of the first criminal investigation department measures raises the questions of suitable and admissible methods. The proportion of undetected crimes in intracorporeal narcotic smuggling must be rated as very high according to the data of the Federal Criminal Investigation Department. In the present paper, the suitability of various imaging techniques for drug detection are reported in terms of their risk, practicability and costs. For this purpose, the value of digital radiography, two-spectra radiography and X-ray computer tomography as compared to conventional X-ray investigations is examined in human experiments. A reality-oriented narcotics dummy (glucose pressed hard in preservative) was developed and administered to nine volunteers per os with a variable initial alimentary situation. Four radiograms were taken at fixed times up to 12 hours after administration with each imaging technique. The highest rate of detection was attained with computer tomography. In contrast to the other methods, more than 90% of the body packs could be identified here. Nevertheless, an application in criminal investigation practice cannot be recommended owing to various disadvantages. The recovery rate of the remaining methods is between 20% and 25%.

  12. Inflammation and chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced late normal tissue injury: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiling; Robbins, Mike E C

    2009-01-01

    The threat of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury limits the dose of radiation that can be delivered safely to cancer patients presenting with solid tumors. Tissue dysfunction and failure, associated with atrophy, fibrosis and/or necrosis, as well as vascular injury, have been reported in late responding normal tissues, including the central nervous system, gut, kidney, liver, lung, and skin. The precise mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury have not been fully elucidated. It has been proposed recently that the radiation-induced late effects are caused, in part, by chronic oxidative stress and inflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to lipid peroxidation, oxidation of DNA and proteins, as well as activation of pro-inflammatory factors has been observed in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will present direct and indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. To improve the long-term survival and quality of life for radiotherapy patients, new approaches have been examined in preclinical models for their efficacy in preventing or mitigating the radiation-induced chronic normal tissue injury. We and others have tested drugs that can either attenuate inflammation or reduce chronic oxidative stress in animal models of late radiation-induced normal tissue injury. The effectiveness of renin-angiotensin system blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, and antioxidants/antioxidant enzymes in preventing or mitigating the severity of radiation-induced late effects indicates that radiation-induced chronic injury can be prevented and/or treated. This provides a rationale for the design and development of anti-inflammatory-based interventional approaches for the treatment of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury.

  13. Behavior, physiology, and energy deposition in rats chronically exposed to 2450-MHz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, J.A.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-11-01

    The research program was initiated to determine both the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the behavioral and physiological consequences of chronic c-w microwave radiation exposure at 2450 MHz in the laboratory rat. Whole-body average and local SARs at discrete sites within the body of rats and mice were determined experimentally using different exposure systems and analytical techniques. The whole-body average SAR and the distribution of SAR within the body depends on a variety of factors: type of exposure system, polarization of the field, size of the animal, and angle of radiation incident on the body. Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of chronic exposure to 2450-MHz microwave radiation on several measures of rat behavior and physiology. Groups of rats were exposed intermittently to 2450-MHz radiation at power densities of 0.5 mW/sq. cm. or 2.5 mW/sq. cm. for 90 days.

  14. [Transpedicular intracorporeal hydroxyapatite grafting and pedicle screw fixation via paraspinal approach for thoracolumbar fractures].

    PubMed

    Lin, Da-sheng; Guo, Lin-xin; Ding, Zhen-qi; Chen, Chang-qing; Lian, Ke-jian; Hong, Jia-yuan

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility and safety of the treatment for thoracolumbar fractures with transpedicular intracorporeal hydroxyapatite grafting and pedicle screw fixation via paraspinal approach. From June 2007 to December 2008, 19 cases of thoracolumbar fractures were treated with transpedicular intracorporeal hydroxyapatite grafting and pedicle screw fixation via paraspinal approach. There were 7 female and 12 male, ranging from 21 to 57 years of age (mean 40.8 years) at surgery. The time from injury to surgery varied from 1 d to 5 d (mean 2.9 d). Nineteen patients all suffered from single thoracolumbar fracture with the distribution of injury level being T(11) in 1, T(12) in 5, L(1) in 9, and L(2) in 4. According to Denis fracture classification, there were 5 compression fractures and 14 burst fractures. The mean preoperative ratio of the anterior height of the body was 57.2%, kyphosis angle was 17.6° and occupation of spinal canal was 27.7%. The mean preoperative load-sharing classification of spine fractures was 5.2. Based on the ASIA neurologic grading system, preoperative neurological function was grade B in 2 cases, C in 9 and D in 8. Median operating time was 83.8 min (range 60-95 min) and median blood loss was 133 ml (range 90 - 200 ml). Infection did not occur in any of the patients and the operative incisions were healing well. Average follow-up time was 19.2 months (range 12 - 36 months). At the latest follow-up, the height of the anterior border was corrected to 88.4%, the kyphosis angle was 6.1°, and the occupation of spinal canal was 8.2% on average. The postoperative neurologic function of all 19 patients was improved with grade D in 2 cases and E in 17. There were no instances of instrumentation failure and no patient had persistent postoperative back pain. Transpedicular intracorporeal hydroxyapatite grafting and pedicle screw fixation via paraspinal approach could provide reliable neurologic improvement in patients with incomplete neurologic

  15. Radiation-Induced Tumor Lysis Syndrome in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Ali; Kütük, Tuğçe; Karcı, Ebru; Yaşar, Arzu; Hiçsönmez, Ayşe; Utkan, Güngör

    2016-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is an important oncological emergency that is usually observed with hematological malignancies and rarely with solid tumors. It can be induced either by therapy or spontaneously. Radiotherapy-induced TLS has been rarely reported in the literature. Here we present a patient with a diagnosis of metastatic prostate cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia complicated with TLS during palliative radiotherapy. PMID:27093891

  16. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage from Chronic Laser Radiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Laser Radiation Final Report T. Lawwill, M.D. and R.S. Crockett, Ph.D. July 1981 - Supported by U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command Fort...Army Medical Research and Development Command July 1981 Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21701 ATTN: SGRD-RMS 13. NUMBEROFPAGES "- _158 14. MONITORING AGENCY...professor. ANIMAL USE STATEMENT In conducting the research described in this report, the investigator adhered to the "Guide for Laboratory Animal

  17. Plutonium-238: an ideal power source for intracorporeal ventricular assist devices?

    PubMed

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Bush, Bryan S; Swartz, Michael F; Day, Steven W; Massey, H Todd

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices emerged as a widely used modality for treatment of end-stage heart failure; however, despite significant advances, external energy supply remains a problem contributing to significant patient morbidity and potential mortality. One potential solution is using the nuclear radioisotope Plutonium-238 as a power source. Given its very high energy density and long half-life, Plutonium-238 could eventually allow a totally intracorporeal ventricular assist system that lasts for the patient's lifetime. Risks, such as leakage and theft identified decades ago, still remain. However, it is possible that newer technologies could be used to overcome the system complexity and unreliability of the previous generations of nuclear-powered mechanical assist systems. Were it not for the remaining safety risks, Plutonium-238 would be an ideal energy source for this purpose.

  18. The calcified intracorporeal vacuole: an aid to the pathological diagnosis of solitary cerebral cysticercus granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, G.; Rajshekhar, V.; Chandy, M.; Chandi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Fifty four cases of single small (<20 mm) enhancing CT lesions (SSECTLs) of the brain that were excised between 1987 and 1995were reviewed histologically. In 28 cases the entire cysticercus or its parts were found. In the remaining 26 cases, most had a histological picture suggestive of a parasitic granuloma. In six of these 26 cases, small ovoid masses corresponding in morphology to the intracorporeal vacuoles of a cysticercus were seen lying free in the cavitary space of the granuloma. This lends further strength to the contention that SSECTLs of the brain are caused by cysticercus, and that in the event of a surgical excision, absence of obvious parasitic parts should necessitate a closer search, as calcareous residues of the parasite might be the only evidence of the cysticercal aetiology in the granuloma.

 PMID:10990517

  19. [Endolacunar laser radiation of the tonsils in conservative treatment of chronic tonsillitis].

    PubMed

    Staroverova, T K; Shul'diakov, V A; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Tatarenko, D A

    2007-01-01

    Vegetative and immune system indices, clinical symptoms of chronic tonsillitis exacerbation were compared in laser radiation of the tonsils with two methods - surface pharyngeal and endolacunar. The results show that under endolacunar method the symptoms regress 1.46 times faster, the number of late exacerbations decrease 1.5-2-fold.

  20. Chronic radiation enteritis after ovarian cancer: from home parenteral nutrition to oral diet.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Alfonso; de la Cuerda, Cristina; Luis Escat, José; Bretón, Irene; Camblor, Miguel; García-Peris, Pilar

    2006-08-01

    External beam radiation of abdominal and pelvic cavities is a current therapy for gynaecological cancer that often produces radiation-induced bowel injury and malnutrition. A 72-year old patient underwent surgery and external beam radiation therapy for an ovarian carcinoma. Two years later she was found to have intestinal pseudoobstruction related to chronic radiation enteritis and protein-energy malnutrition. Home parenteral nutrition was prescribed due to poor oral intake, but it was discontinued after 6 catheter-related sepsis and upper cava vein thrombosis. Parenteral nutrition could be reintroduced after an angioplasty of that vein, and the patient was operated on with the finding of an incarcerated ileum eventration. Nowadays she maintains a normal nutritional status with oral diet. Radiation enteritis can lead to perforation, fistulae or strictures of the bowel. Malnutrition is common and parenteral nutrition may be necessary. Surgery can solve these complications, achieves good survival rates and can allow stopping parenteral nutrition.

  1. [The remote effects of chronic exposure to ionizing radiation and electromagnetic fields with respect to hygienic standardization].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Shafirkin, A V; Nikitina, V N; Vasin, A L

    2003-01-01

    A variety and rate of non-cancer diseases occurred in humans as a result of chronic exposure to ionizing radiation or to electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of high and superhigh frequency have been compared. The intensity of EMR was slightly higher than a sanitary standard for population. A risk of health impairments in workers having occupational exposure to EMR was assessed on the basis of Selie's concept of development of non-specific reaction of the body to chronic stress factors (general adaptation syndrome), models of changes in the body compensatory reserves and calculations of radiation risk after severe and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation.

  2. Effects of N2-laser radiation on the immune system cells of patients with chronic bronchitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provorov, Alexander S.; Kozhevnikova, T. A.; Salmin, Vladimir V.

    2001-05-01

    In spite of various investigations devoted to a problem of chronic bronchitis, many problems concerning both the reasons of the origin of this disease, and the essence of the processes, explicating in the bronchial tubes, especially on early stages of the disease, remain insufficiently studied. It makes it difficult to use an integrated approach to chronic bronchitis, that would reflect the peculiarities of its etiology, pathogenesis, its clinical course and efficiency of the therapy. During the last years the data of the clinical laboratory analysis of chronic bronchitis in connection with its immune therapy have been accumulated. In the literature there is a lot of information about the violation of immune reactions in the organism of patients, methods of the immune therapy, the data of the successful application of the intravenous laser therapy in the treatment of obstructive chronic bronchitis and bronchial asthma. However, there is no research explaining the mechanisms of the laser radiation impact on the immune status of patients suffering from chronic bronchitis. According to this it has become extremely urgent to research the mechanisms of the laser radiation impact on immune competent cells of patients suffering from chronic bronchitis.

  3. Lower thresholds for lifetime health effects in mammals from high-LET radiation - Comparison with chronic low-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Sazykina, Tatiana G; Kryshev, Alexander I

    2016-12-01

    Lower threshold dose rates and confidence limits are quantified for lifetime radiation effects in mammalian animals from internally deposited alpha-emitting radionuclides. Extensive datasets on effects from internal alpha-emitters are compiled from the International Radiobiological Archives. In total, the compiled database includes 257 records, which are analyzed by means of non-parametric order statistics. The generic lower threshold for alpha-emitters in mammalian animals (combined datasets) is 6.6·10(-5) Gy day(-1). Thresholds for individual alpha-emitting elements differ considerably: plutonium and americium - 2.0·10(-5) Gy day(-1); radium - 2.1·10(-4) Gy day(-1). Threshold for chronic low-LET radiation is previously estimated at 1·10(-3) Gy day(-1). For low exposures, the following values of alpha radiation weighting factor wR for internally deposited alpha-emitters in mammals are quantified: wR(α) = 15 as a generic value for the whole group of alpha-emitters; wR(Pu) = 50 for plutonium; wR(Am) = 50 for americium; wR(Ra) = 5 for radium. These values are proposed to serve as radiation weighting factors in calculations of equivalent doses to non-human biota. The lower threshold dose rate for long-lived mammals (dogs) is significantly lower than comparing with the threshold for short-lived mammals (mice): 2.7·10(-5) Gy day(-1), and 2.0·10(-4) Gy day(-1), respectively. The difference in thresholds is exactly reflecting the relationship between the natural longevity of these two species. Graded scale of severity in lifetime radiation effects in mammals is developed, based on compiled datasets. Being placed on the severity scale, the effects of internal alpha-emitters are situated in the zones of considerably lower dose rates than effects of the same severity caused by low-LET radiation. RBE values, calculated for effects of equal severity, are found to depend on the intensity of chronic exposure: different RBE values are characteristic for low

  4. Improving the Advantages of Single Port in Right Hemicolectomy: Analysis of the Results of Pure Transumbilical Approach with Intracorporeal Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Conde, Salvador; Barranco, Antonio; Socas, María; Méndez, Cristina; Alarcón, Isaias; Cañete, Jesús; Padillo, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Single-port laparoscopic surgery has recently emerged as a method to improve patient recovery and cosmetic benefits of laparoscopic surgery. The evolution of our technique has led us to move from a periumbilical incision to a transumbilical one, avoiding the use of drain and maintaining a pure single-port approach with intracorporeal anastomosis in order to maintain the incision as smaller as possible. Method. We report a prospective clinical analysis of our first 38 patients. Oncological surgical steps were followed as during the standard laparoscopic approach, performing the anastomosis intracorporeally in all cases. Results. Mean age of 68,39 years old and an average BMI of 27,88%. (range 19,81–41,5). Most lesions were adenocarcinoma (65,8%), while the remaining were polyps (31,5%) and one a mucocele of the appendix. We moved from a periumbilical incision, initial 14 cases, into a transumbilical one, (medium size of the incision 3,25 cm). Average surgical time was 117,42 minutes. Drains was only used in our first 3 cases. Mean hospital stay was 5,2 days, (86,5% stayed less than 5 days). Total morbidity was 13%. Histological exams of the specimens showed that the oncological criteria were preserved. Conclusions. Single-port right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis is feasible and safe. The advantages of a total intracorporeal anastomosis include that there is no need to enlarge the umbilical incision and avoid traction of the pedicle of the mesenterium of the transverse colon during the extracorporeal anastomosis. A transumbilical incision offers better cosmetic results, and the use of drains can be avoided, which increase, patient's satisfaction. PMID:22567227

  5. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion in patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Martin N; Adding, L Christofer; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Schumacher, Martin C; Volz, Daniela; Nilsson, Andreas; Carlsson, Stefan; Wiklund, N Peter

    2011-11-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) may reduce morbidity after cystectomy. Descriptions of the surgical techniques of RARC with intracorporeal orthotopic neobladder or ileal conduit are sparse and oncologic and functional outcome data have not been reported. We present our technique with RARC and intracorporeal urinary diversion (neobladder or ileal conduit) and present oncologic and functional outcomes, as well as complication rates. Single-hospital institution case-series from 2004 to 2009 including 45 selected patients (38 male, 7 female) with high-grade and/or muscle-invasive urothelial cancer of the bladder. We performed RARC; pelvic lymph node dissection using three different templates; and a totally intracorporeal urinary diversion, either orthotopic neobladder (n=36) or ileal conduit (n=9). Perioperative variables, pathology data, early and late complication rates, urinary continence, potency, and cancer-specific survival were evaluated as outcome measures. Median patient age, operative time, estimated blood loss, and lymph node yield were 62 yr (range: 37-79), 477 min (range: 325-760), 550 ml (range: 200-2200), and 19 (range: 10-52), respectively. Nine patients were diagnosed with positive lymph nodes. Surgical margins were clear in all but one patient. Early complications occurred in 18 patients (40%). Median postoperative stay was 9 d (range: 4-78), and median postoperative follow-up time was 25 mo. Four patients died due to metastatic disease. The study is limited by a relative small sample size and no comparative group. RARC with totally intracorporeal urinary diversion is technically feasible with good intermediate-term oncologic results. This is a nonrandomised study including a limited number of patients with a restricted follow-up time, however, and so precautions must be considered when interpreting the outcomes. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Risk of death from circulatory diseases in a cohort of patients exposed to chronic radiation].

    PubMed

    Azizova, T V; Grigoryeva, E S; Hunter, N; Pikulina, M V; Moseeva, M B

    To assess mortality from circulatory diseases (CD) in a cohort of workers exposed occupationally to chronic radiation in relation to external and internal exposure, by taking into account known non-radiation risk factors (RFs), such as smoking (including smoking index), alcohol consumption, hypertension, and body mass index. Mortality from CD (ICD-10: I00 - I99) was studied in a cohort of 22,377 nuclear power plant («Mayak» Production Association) workers exposed occupationally to chronic radiation. The study was based on the individual dose estimates of external and internal exposure taken from the new Mayak workers dosimetry system 2008 (MWDS-2008). The quantitative characteristics of smoking (smoking index) were used for the first time to assess the risk for CD in the cohort of workers exposed to chronic radiation. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between CD mortality and external gamma-dose after adjusting for the non-radiation RFs; the excess relative risk per unit dose (ERR/Gy) was 0.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0 to 0.11). Introducing an additional adjustment for internal alpha-dose resulted in a twofold increase in ERR/Gy=0.10 (95% CI: 0.02 to 0.21). There was a statistically significant increasing trend in CD mortality with the elevated absorbed dose from internal alpha-radiation in the liver (ERR/Gy=0.27; 95% CI: 0.12 to 0.48). However, ERR/Gy decreased and lost its statistical significance after adjusting for external gamma-dose. The results of this study are in good agreement with risk estimates obtained in the Japanese cohort of atomic bomb survivors and in the cohorts of occupationally exposed workers.

  7. Micro RNA responses to chronic or acute exposures to low dose ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad; Omaruddin, Romaica A.; Kreger, Bridget; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    Human health risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. A wide variety of biological effects are induced after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain to be completely understood. We hypothesized that low dose c-radiation-induced effects are controlled by the modulation of micro RNA (miRNA) that participate in the control of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in many cellular processes. We monitored the expression of several miRNA in human cells exposed to acute or chronic low doses of 10 cGy or a moderate dose of 400 cGy of 137Cs γ-rays. Dose, dose rate and time dependent differences in the relative expression of several miRNA were investigated. The expression patterns of many miRNA differed after exposure to either chronic or acute 10 cGy. The expression of miRNA let-7e, a negative regulator of RAS oncogene, and the c-MYC miRNA cluster were upregulated after 10 cGy chronic dose but were downregulated after 3 h of acute 10 cGy. The miR-21 was upregulated in chronic or acute low dose and moderate dose treated cells and its target genes hPDCD4, hPTEN, hSPRY2, and hTPM1 were found to be downregulated. These findings provide evidence that low dose and dose rate c-irradiation dictate the modulation of miRNA, which can result in a differential cellular response than occurs at high doses. This information will contribute to understanding the risks to human health after exposure to low dose radiation. PMID:22367372

  8. Genetic variation in natural Melandrium album populations exposed to chronic ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Karimullina, Elina; Antonova, Elena V; Pozolotina, Vera N

    2016-11-01

    The effect of radiation pollution on genetic variation in natural populations of Melandrium album was investigated at the head part of the East-Ural Radioactive Trace (EURT) and background areas. The highest genetic differentiation estimated using F ST was revealed between compared pairs of the background and impact samples in populations of M. album. The highest rate of polymorphism was observed at the closest to nuclear accident, Impact-1 site. The unique alleles (Mdh-3(104), Pgi-2(106), Lap (105), Mdh-2(96), and Dia (94)) were discovered at the EURT. Individuals from chronically low-level irradiated sites were genetically closer than to plants from background sites using Nadhdh locus. The increase of the frequency of unique homozygous and heterozygous genotypes was identified in populations of M. album growing under chronic radiation exposure conditions. The largest contribution to the group of unique heterozygous genotypes at the EURT was made by three loci - Lap, Pgi-2, and Nadhdh; the main role in interpopulation differentiation of samples was made by the alleles Sod-2(115), Skdh (100), and Nadhdh (100). Our results provide evidence for the correlation between the increase of genetic variation other than the «genetic erosion» and chronic radiation exposure factor in natural plant populations.

  9. Chronic radiation exposure of neuroblastoma cells reduces nMYC copy number.

    PubMed

    Gnanamony, Manu; Antony, Reuben; Fernández, Karen S; Jaime, Libes; Lin, Julian; Joseph, Pushpa A; Gondi, Christopher S

    2017-09-01

    Neuroblastoma accounts for >15% of cancer-associated mortalities of children in the USA. Despite aggressive treatment regimens, the long-term survival for these children remains <40%. The identification of v-Myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene neuroblastoma-derived homolog (nMYC) gene amplification during diagnosis is associated with poor prognosis in neuroblastoma. There are limited studies examining changes in nMYC copy numbers in response to therapy and its biological effect on cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of radiation on nMYC expression and amplification status in high-risk neuroblastoma. The effect of acute (5 Gy) and chronic (25 Gy) radiation on two nMYC-amplified cell lines, SK-N-BE (2) and NB-1691, was investigated. The results demonstrate that, following chronic but not acute radiation, the two cell lines regained their proliferation potential similar to the controls. This increased proliferation was characterized by loss of nMYC mRNA and protein expression. It was also revealed that nMYC loss was accompanied by nuclear localization of c-Myc. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, the results of the present study demonstrated that chronic radiation causes a severe loss of nMYC gene copy number. The present study is the first to provide experimental evidence that prolonged radiation therapy affects nMYC gene copy number in high-risk neuroblastoma but does not significantly improve the prognostic outlook.

  10. A comprehensive guide to perioperative management and operative technique for robotic cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Shen; Lamb, Benjamin W; Sridhar, Ashwin; Briggs, Timothy P; Kelly, John D

    2017-02-27

    Robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) represents an evolution of open radical cystectomy (ORC) with the aim of reducing patient morbidity and improving return to normal function, whilst maintaining oncological equivalence. RARC is gaining popularity, especially in high-volume centres, although there remains a lack of level 1 evidence to demonstrate any superiority of RARC over ORC. All previously reported studies that randomised ORC and RARC have utilised a technique for RARC requiring a conversion to open surgery for urinary diversion. Conversion to open surgery invariably masks the benefits of a truly minimally invasive approach. Moreover, such studies tend to report a small sample size, likely reflecting early surgical experience that may contribute to the lack of observed benefit. Nonetheless, it is established that short-term oncological outcomes following RARC are comparable to those after ORC. It is likely that the benefits of RARC are only observed in cases wherein intracorporeal urinary diversion (iRARC) is performed by a surgical team with high volume experience, which will minimise morbidity and maximise early return to normal function. In this review, we will discuss a holistic approach to iRARC, including patient selection, perioperative optimisation, the surgical technique for iRARC with urinary diversion reconstruction, the use of enhanced recovery protocol, oncological outcomes and perioperative complications.

  11. Comparison of ultrasonic and pneumatic intracorporeal lithotripsy techniques during percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Karakan, Tolga; Diri, Akif; Hascicek, Ahmet Metin; Ozgur, Berat Cem; Ozcan, Serkan; Eroglu, Muzaffer

    2013-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness and safety of ultrasonic and pneumatic lithotripters in the treatment of renal stone disease. A total of 227 consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures for renal calculi were performed. In 107 patients ultrasonic lithotriptors were used (group I) and in 83 patients pneumatic lithotriptors were used (group II). In the remaining 37 patients, stones were managed with both pneumatic and ultrasonic lithotripters. Follow-up studies included intravenous urography (IVU) and/or computed tomography (CT). The mean operative time and duration of hospitalization were similar between the groups. In the ultrasonic treatment group, 100 (96.9%) patients were stone-free on postoperative day 1 and 5 (4.6%) went on to undergo an additional treatment modality, resulting in a total stone-free rate of 97.2%. In the pneumatic lithotripsy group, 68 (81.9%) patients were stone-free after the primary procedure on the first day and 15 (18.1%) went on to undergo an additional treatment modality, resulting in a stone-free rate of 91.5%. The final stone-free rates at 3 months postoperatively in groups I, II, and III were 97.2%, 91.5%, and 87.9%, respectively (P = 0.826). We conclude that both ultrasonic and pneumatic lithotripters are effective and safe for intracorporeal lithotripsy. However, the ultrasonic lithotripter provides higher stone-free rates with similar morbidity compared with pneumatic devices.

  12. Performance analysis of a miniature turbine generator for intracorporeal energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Pfenniger, Alois; Vogel, Rolf; Koch, Volker M; Jonsson, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    Replacement intervals of implantable medical devices are commonly dictated by battery life. Therefore, intracorporeal energy harvesting has the potential to reduce the number of surgical interventions by extending the life cycle of active devices. Given the accumulated experience with intravascular devices such as stents, heart valves, and cardiac assist devices, the idea to harvest a small fraction of the hydraulic energy available in the cardiovascular circulation is revisited. The aim of this article is to explore the technical feasibility of harvesting 1 mW electric power using a miniature hydrodynamic turbine powered by about 1% of the cardiac output flow in a peripheral artery. To this end, numerical modelling of the fluid mechanics and experimental verification of the overall performance of a 1:1 scale friction turbine are performed in vitro. The numerical flow model is validated for a range of turbine configurations and flow conditions (up to 250 mL/min) in terms of hydromechanic efficiency; up to 15% could be achieved with the nonoptimized configurations of the study. Although this article does not entail the clinical feasibility of intravascular turbines in terms of hemocompatibility and impact on the circulatory system, the numerical model does provide first estimates of the mechanical shear forces relevant to blood trauma and platelet activation. It is concluded that the time-integrated shear stress exposure is significantly lower than in cardiac assist devices due to lower flow velocities and predominantly laminar flow.

  13. Robotic Intracorporeal Ileal Conduit Formation: Initial Experience from a Single UK Centre

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Conrad V.; Adshead, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To describe our technique of robotic intracorporeal ileal conduit formation (RICIC) during robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC). To report our initial results of this new procedure. Patients and Methods. Seven male and one female patients underwent RARC with RICIC over a six-month period. Demographic, operative, and outcome data was collected prospectively. Median patient age was 75 years (range 62–78 years). Median followup was 9 months (range 7–14 months). Results. RARC with RICIC was performed successfully in all eight patients. The median total operating time was 360 minutes (range 310–440 minutes) with a median blood loss of 225 mL (range 50–1000 mL). The median length of stay was nine days (range 6–34 days). Four patients (50%) were discharged within seven days. Four patients (50%) experienced one or more complications. This included two Clavien I complications, two Clavien II complications, and two Clavien III complications. Two patients (25%) required transfusion of two units each. To date, there have been no complications associated with the ileal conduit. Conclusion. Whilst being technically challenging, this procedure is safe, feasible, and reproducible. Patients who avoid complication show potential for rapid recovery and early discharge. PMID:24072995

  14. Chromosome Damage Caused by Accidental Chronic Whole-Body Gamma Radiation Exposure in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Dolling, J.; Lavoie, J.; Mitchel, R. E. J.; Boreham, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    In February 2000, a radiation incident involving a medical 60Co source occurred in a metal scrapyard in Thailand. Several individuals were suspected to have received chronic or fractionated exposures ranging from a few mGy to a several Gy. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to paint chromosomes, we determined the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 13 people who entered the scrapyard, 3 people who involved in recovering the source, and 9 nearby residents. Aberration frequencies greater than controls were observed in 13 of the donors at 3 months postexposure. The predominant form of aberration observed was simple, complete, symmetrical translocations. An approximate 50% decrease in these aberrations and in total color junctions was observed in 7 donors resampled at 16 months postexposure. Although high, acute exposures are known to have detrimental effects, the biological consequences of chronic, low dose-rate radiation exposures are unclear. Thirteen of the donors had elevated aberration frequencies, and 6 also had symptoms of acute radiation syndrome. If there are any long-term health consequences of this incident, it will most likely occur among this group of individuals. The consequences for the remaining donors, who presumably received lower total doses delivered at lower dose rates, are less clear. PMID:26740811

  15. Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy: short- and long-term outcomes of intracorporeal versus extracorporeal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Mark H; Hwang, Grace S; Phelan, Michael J; Bui, Thanh-Lan; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Stamos, Michael J; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    The use of laparoscopy for right hemicolectomy has gained popularity allowing the option of a totally laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis (IA) for intestinal reconstruction. This technique may alleviate some of the technical limitations that a surgeon faces with a laparoscopic-assisted extracorporeal anastomosis (EA). A retrospective chart review of 195 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy by four colorectal surgeons at three institutions from March 2005 to June 2014 was performed. Multivariate regression analysis was used to compare postoperative and oncologic outcomes. A total of 195 patients underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy over the study period, with 86 (44 %) patients receiving IA and 109 (56 %) patients receiving an EA. The most common indication for surgery in both groups was cancer: 56 (65 %) of IA cases and 57 (52 %) of EA cases. IA had a significantly higher rate of minor complications but no difference in serious complications compared to EA. Conversion to open resection was higher in EA. Using multivariate analysis to compare IA versus EA, there was no significant difference in length of stay, return of bowel function, risk of anastomotic leak, risk of intraabdominal abscess or risk of wound complications. Amongst cancer resections, there was no significant difference in the median number of lymph nodes harvested (18 LNs in IA group vs. 19 LNs in EA group, P > 0.05). There was also no significant difference in overall survival and disease-free survival at 5.7 years between the two groups. IA in laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is associated with similar postoperative and oncologic outcomes compared to EA. IA may possess advantages in terms of conversion and flexibility of specimen extraction, but this is counterbalanced by a higher incidence of minor complications. These findings suggest that IA represents a valid technique in the arsenal of the experienced colorectal surgeon without compromising

  16. Introducing an enhanced recovery programme to an established totally intracorporeal robot-assisted radical cystectomy service.

    PubMed

    Collins, Justin W; Adding, Christofer; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Nyberg, Tommy; Pini, Giovannalberto; Dey, Linda; Wiklund, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of introducing an enhanced recovery programme (ERP) to an established robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) service. Data were prospectively collected on 221 consecutive patients undergoing totally intracorporeal RARC between December 2003 and May 2014. The ERP was specifically designed to support an evolving RARC service, where increasing proportions of patients requiring radical cystectomy underwent RARC. Patient demographics and outcomes before and after implementation of the ERP were compared. The primary endpoint was length of stay (LOS). Secondary outcomes included age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, preoperative staging, operative time, complications and readmissions. Differences in outcomes between patients before and after implementation of ERP were tested with the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test and quantile regression with backward selection. Following implementation of the ERP, the demographics of the patients (n = 135) changed, with median age increasing from 66 to 70 years (p < 0.01), higher ASA grade (p < 0.001), higher preoperative stage cancer (pT ≥ 2, p < 0.05) and increased likelihood of undergoing an ileal conduit diversion (p < 0.001). Median LOS before ERP was 9 days [interquartile range (IQR) 8-13 days] and after ERP was 8 days (IQR 6-10 days) (p < 0.001). ASA grade and neoadjuvant chemotherapy also affected LOS (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). There was no significant difference in 30 day complication rates, readmission rates or 90 day mortality, with 59% experiencing complications before ERP implementation and 57% after implementation. The majority of complications were low grade. Patient demographics changed as the RARC service evolved from selected patients to a general service. Despite worsening demographics, LOS decreased following ERP implementation. This evidence-based ERP safely standardized perioperative care, resulting in decreased LOS and decreased

  17. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL COMPARING THREE DIFFERENT MODALITIES OF LITHOTRITES FOR INTRACORPOREAL LITHOTRIPSY IN PCNL.

    PubMed

    York, Nadya; Borofsky, Michael; Chew, Ben H; Dauw, Casey A; Paterson, Ryan F; Denstedt, John D; Razvi, Hassan; Nadler, Robert B; Humphreys, Mitchell R; Preminger, Glenn M; Nakada, Stephen Y; Krambeck, Amy E; Miller, Nicole L; Terry, Colin; Rawlings, Lori; Lingeman, James E

    2017-08-31

    To compare the efficiency (stone fragmentation and removal time) and complications of three models of intracorporeal lithotripters in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Prospective, randomized controlled trial at nine centers in the North America from 2009 to 2016. Patients were randomized to one of three lithotripter devices: the Cyberwand, a dual probe ultrasonic device; the Swiss Lithoclast Select, a combination pneumatic and ultrasonic device; and the StoneBreaker, a portable pneumatic device powered by CO2 cartridges. The Since the StoneBreaker lacks an ultrasonic component, it was used with the LUS-II ultrasonic lithotripter to allow fair comparison with combination devices. 270 patients were enrolled, 69 were excluded after randomization. 201 patients completed the study: 71 in the Cyberwand group, 66 in the Lithoclast Select, and 64 in the StoneBreaker group. The baseline patient characteristics of the three groups were similar. Mean stone surface area was smaller in the StoneBreaker group at 407.8mm2 vs 577.5mm2 (Lithoclast Select) and 627.9mm2 (Cyberwand). The stone clearance rate was slowest in the StoneBreaker group at 24.0 mm2/min vs 28.9 mm2/min and 32.3 mm2/min in the Lithoclast Select and Cyberwand groups respectively. After statistically adjusting for the smaller mean stone size in the StoneBreaker group, there was no difference in the stone clearance rate among the three groups (p=0.249). Secondary outcomes, including complications and stone free rates, were similar between the groups. The Cyberwand, Lithoclast Select, and the StoneBreaker lithotripters have similar adjusted stone clearance rates in PCNL for stones > 2cm. The safety and efficacy of these devices are comparable.

  18. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation. PMID:27599890

  19. Long-term outcomes of laparoscopic intracorporeal inguinal hernia ligation in infants under 1 year of age.

    PubMed

    Cho, Alexander; Devany, Adam; Tsang, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The majority of current literature regarding laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair group all their pediatric patients together. This study aimed to evaluate the long-term outcomes of patients who underwent laparoscopic intracorporeal inguinal hernia ligation under the age of 1 year to ascertain if there were hidden advantages or limitations in this particular group. Patients under the age of 1 year at time of laparoscopic intracorporeal inguinal hernia ligation by a single pediatric surgeon were identified. Data were obtained from case notes, hospital electronic records, and parental telephone consultation. One hundred fourteen patients under the age of 1 year underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair from November 2003 to October 2010. The male:female ratio was 4:1. The mean corrected age at surgery was 15.5 (range, 3-42) weeks, and the mean weight at surgery was 5.3 (range, 1.9-9.8) kg. All patients' case notes and electronic records were accessed. Forty-two percent of parents were contactable (mean of 4 years following surgery). There was one recurrence on the asymptomatic side in a boy that presented 3 years later. Five patients required orchidopexy following laparoscopic hernia repair, although 3 cases were known to be undescended at the time of surgery. One patient had intermittent ipsilateral groin swelling that resolved spontaneously after 6 months. Laparoscopic intracorporeal inguinal hernia ligation in patients under the age of 1 year is safe and effective. Recurrence rates may be lower than those in patients under 1 year of age undergoing a traditional open repair. However, there may be a higher rate iatrogenic of cryptorchidism in this laparoscopic group.

  20. Double blind glucocorticoid controlled trial of samarium-153 particulate hydroxyapatite radiation synovectomy for chronic knee synovitis

    PubMed Central

    O'Duffy, E; Clunie, G; Lui, D; Edwards, J; Ell, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Samarium-153 particulate hydroxyapatite (Sm-153 PHYP) is a relatively new radiation synovectomy agent developed for the treatment of chronic synovitis. Although it has been shown that the levels of unwanted extra-articular radiation are lower after intra-articular injection of Sm-153 PHYP than yttrium-90 colloid, its clinical efficacy has not been rigorously studied.
OBJECTIVES—To establish whether Sm-153 PHYP radiation synovectomy results in a clinically useful benefit sustained at one year.
METHODS—In a randomised double blind study, patients received either intra-articular 40 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide alone or 40 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide combined with Sm-153 PHYP in an outpatient clinic.
RESULTS—Sixty patients (28 male, 32 female), median age 51 (18-75) with chronic knee synovitis were studied. Diagnoses included: rheumatoid arthritis (n=29); psoriatic arthritis (n=9); ankylosing spondylitis (n=3); reactive arthritis (n=2); undifferentiated seronegative oligoarthritis (n=13) and miscellaneous inflammatory conditions (n=4). More patients who received Sm-153 PHYP/triamcinolone hexacetonide sustained clinical benefit a year after treatment compared with patients who received corticosteroid alone (12 of 31 (39%) v 6 of 29 (21%), a difference of 18% more patients (95% CI −5% to 41%)) though the difference was not significant (χ2=2.31, 0.2>p>0.1, n=60). Despite the variation in injected activity (median 563 MBq, range 218-840 MBq), there was no obvious relation between low levels of injected activity (<555 MBq) and relapse within 12 months of treatment (χ2 =2.61, 0.2>p>0.1, n=31).
CONCLUSIONS—There was no clear beneficial clinical effect of combined Sm-153 PHYP/triamcinolone hexacetonide injection over triamcinolone hexacetonide alone a year after treatment for chronic knee synovitis.

 PMID:10460188

  1. Gastrointestinal function in chronic radiation enteritis--effects of loperamide-N-oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, E K; Horowitz, M; Russo, A; Muecke, T; Robb, T; Chatterton, B E

    1993-01-01

    The effects of loperamide-N-oxide, a new peripheral opiate agonist precursor, on gastrointestinal function were evaluated in 18 patients with diarrhoea caused by chronic radiation enteritis. Each patient was given, in double-blind randomised order, loperamide-N-oxide (3 mg orally twice daily) and placebo for 14 days, separated by a washout period of 14 days. Gastrointestinal symptoms; absorption of bile acid, vitamin B12, lactose, and fat; gastric emptying; small intestinal and whole gut transit; and intestinal permeability were measured during placebo and loperamide-N-oxide phases. Data were compared with those obtained in 18 normal subjects. In the patients, in addition to an increased frequency of bowel actions (p < 0.001), there was reduced bile acid absorption, (p < 0.001) a higher prevalence of lactose malabsorption (p < 0.05) associated with a reduced dietary intake of dairy products (p < 0.02), and faster small intestinal (p < 0.001) and whole gut transit (p < 0.05) when compared with the normal subjects. There was no significant difference in gastric emptying between the two groups. Treatment with loperamide-N-oxide was associated with a reduced frequency of bowel actions (p < 0.001), slower small intestinal (p < 0.001), and total gut transit (p < 0.01), more rapid gastric emptying (p < 0.01), improved absorption of bile acid (p < 0.01), and increased permeability to 51Cr EDTA (p < 0.01). These observations indicate that: (1) diarrhoea caused by chronic radiation enteritis is associated with more rapid intestinal transit and a high prevalence of bile acid and lactose malabsorption, and (2) loperamide-N-oxide slows small intestinal transit, increases bile acid absorption, and is effective in the treatment of diarrhoea associated with chronic radiation enteritis. PMID:8491393

  2. Clinical study of the radioprotective effects of Amifostine (YM-08310, WR-2721) on chronic radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, I.; Nagai, T.; Miyaishi, K.; Maehara, Y.; Niibe, H.

    1986-06-01

    We have previously reported that Amifostine, a radioprotective agent, was effective in treating acute radiation mucositis in the head and neck region. We found that when a considerable amount of Amifostine accumulates in the salivary glands, it may be useful in preventing chronic disturbances of salivary secretion. We have observed an increase in the uptake of Ga-67-citrate to the salivary glands when they were irradiated. In this paper, the radioprotective effects of Amifostine, in treating chronic radiation injury of the salivary glands, were studied, using the cessation of an increase in uptake of Ga-67-citrate after radiotherapy as the criterion. The subjects were 105 patients, (280 salivary glands in Ga-scintigrams) with malignancy of the head and neck region treated by irradiation from 1978 to 1984. Ga-negative glands were recognized in 97%, that is, 36 out of 37 glands, before irradiation, and the figure decreased to 19%, seven out of 37, within 1 to 2 weeks (10Gy less than or equal to) after the start of radiotherapy. In patients who were irradiated with more than 30 Gy and in whom scintigraphy was performed at 6 months or more after radiotherapy, Ga-negative glands were recognized in 18 out of 41 glands, 44%, with Amifostine, compared with 13%, four out of 32 glands, without Amifostine. A difference was recognized between these two groups in the negative change in Ga-67 uptake after radiotherapy (p less than 0.05). These facts suggest that Amifostine may have a radioprotective effect on chronic radiation injury.

  3. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to radiation and chronically inhaled cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Nikula, K.J.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear workers may be exposed to radiation in various forms, such as low-LET {gamma}-irradiation or {alpha}-irradiation from inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles. These workers may then have increased risk for lung cancer compared to the general population. Of additional concern is the possibility that interactions between radiation and other carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer induction, compared to the risks from either type of agent alone. An important and common lung carcinogen is cigarette smoke. The purpose of this project is to better determine the combined effects of chronically inhaled cigarette smoke and either inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} or external, thoracic X-irradiation on the induction of lung cancer in rats. Histologic and dosimetric evaluations of rats in the CS + {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} study continue, and the study of CS + X rays is beginning.

  4. Synchrotron radiation (SR) diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) of chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) mode.

    PubMed

    Chen-Chen, Xia; Yadav, Arun Kumar; Kai, Zhang; Yi-Feng, Peng; Qing-Xi, Yuan; Pei-Ping, Zhu; Li-Jin, Feng; Xu-Dong, Xu; A-Shan, Wu; Guang-Yu, Tang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate microstructural changes in chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) rabbit model under diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) technology of synchrotron radiation (SR). The chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) models were obtained within two months after 5 New Zealand white rabbits were treated with doxorubicin hydrochloride. Blood exams, urine tests and kidney histological studies were carried out after the 5 rabbits were humanely sacrificed by hyperanesthesia. The kidney tissues were fixed in 4% formalin for one week before DEI experiment, with another 5 normal rabbits used as the control group. The experiment was performed at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) with a 4W1A beam line (beam energy was 14keV). On routine scanning process, the rocking curve was detected, and slope position on the curve was selected to make a 360° spatial CT scan; DEI reconstruction software was used to generate a 3-dimensional image, from which the difference in grey value between the chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) group and the control group was measured and analyzed using MATLAB and SPSS. Without radio-contrast, DEI provided clear visibility of the microstructures including artery, vein, straight collecting ducts, papillary tubules, glomeruli in both the chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) group and the control group, with a spatial resolution as low as 10μm. MATLAB grey value extraction and SPSS analysis showed that cortex of CGN group (91 to 112) lost more gray value compared to the control group (121 to 141), T tests P <  0.05. Equivalant cortical ROI (data points 450×80) quantitative analysis showed that gross grey value of CGN group (ranking from 55 to 160) was smaller than the control group (ranking from 75 to 175). DEI images correlated well with pathologic images. Morphological changes in the microstructure of contstartabstractCGN kidney was revealed, due to the advantage of phase-contrast imaging (PCI) mechanism, and the diagnostic

  5. Mortality associated with chronic external radiation exposure in the French combined cohort of nuclear workers.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Laurent, O; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Hubert, D; Richardson, D B; Laurier, D

    2013-09-01

    The long-term effects of protracted low level ionising radiation exposure are investigated in a combined analysis of French nuclear workers employed by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA), AREVA Nuclear Cycle (AREVA NC) and Electricité de France (EDF). Associations between cumulative external radiation dose and mortality due to solid cancers, leukaemia and circulatory disease were examined. All workers hired by CEA, AREVA NC and EDF between 1950 and 1994 who were employed for at least 1 year, badge-monitored for radiation exposure and alive on 1 January 1968 were included. Individual data of annual exposure to penetrating photons (X-rays and gamma rays) were reconstructed for each worker. Estimates of radiation dose-mortality associations were obtained using a linear excess relative risk (ERR) Poisson regression model. Among the 59 021 nuclear workers, 2312 died of solid cancer, 78 of leukaemia and 1468 of circulatory diseases during the 1968-2004 period. Approximately 72% of the cohort had a non-zero cumulative radiation dose estimate, with a mean cumulative dose of 22.5 mSv. Positive but non-significant ERR/Sv were observed for all solid cancers, leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), ischaemic heart diseases and cerebrovascular diseases. A significant ERR/Sv was found for myeloid leukaemia. This is the first combined analysis of major French cohorts of nuclear workers. Results were consistent with risks estimated in other nuclear worker cohorts and illustrate the potential of a further joint international study to yield direct risk estimates in support to radiation protection standards.

  6. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Suk Chul; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kang, Yu Mi; Kim, Kwanghee; Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo; Kim, Chong Soon; Kim, Hee Sun

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  7. Treatment and long-term outcome of chronic radiation esophagitis after radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: A report of 13 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Silvain, C.; Barrioz, T.; Besson, I.; Babin, P.; Fontanel, J.P.; Daban, A.; Matuchansky, C.; Beauchant, M. )

    1993-05-01

    The natural history of chronic radiation esophagitis occurring in previously normal esophagus is still unknown. The authors describe here the long-term outcome of chronic esophagitis arising after neck irradiation for oropharynx and larynx carcinomas in 13 consecutive adult patients. The first clinical signs of radiation esophagitis were dysphagia or impossibility of oral intake, which appeared within 26 months (range 2--120 months) after the end of radiation for pyriform fossae carcinoma (N = 5), tonsil carcinoma (N = 2), larynx carcinoma (N = 2), pharynx carcinoma (N = 2), base of the tongue (N = 1), and thyroid carcinomas (N = 1). During upper endoscopy, an esophageal stenosis was found in 11 cases and was associated with ulceration in three cases. An isolated esophageal ulceration was present in only two cases. Chronic radiation esophagitis diagnosis was confirmed by histology and surgery in seven cases. In the last six cases, diagnosis was supported by the absence of first cancer relapses within a median follow-up of two years (16 months to nine years) and by endoscopic findings. Seven patients received parenteral or enteral nutrition. Ten patients were treated by peroral dilatations. These treatments allowed nearly normal oral diet in 11/13 patients. Only one patient was lost of follow-up after 20 months. Four patients died from chronic radiation esophagitis. One of these patients died from massive hemorrhage after peroral dilatation. Four patients died of a second carcinoma with no first cancer recurrence. Four patients were alive after six months to nine years of follow-up. Moderate dysphagia was still present, allowing nearly normal oral feeding. In conclusion, chronic radiation esophagitis is a severe disease with an underestimated frequency. In this study, peroral dilatations appeared to be necessary and were not associated with an increased morbidity. 21 refs., 1 tab.

  8. [A case-control study of extracorporeal versus intracorporeal anastomosis in patients subjected to right laparoscopic hemicolectomy].

    PubMed

    Chaves, Jorge Arredondo; Idoate, Carlos Pastor; Fons, Jorge Baixauli; Oliver, Manuel Bellver; Rodríguez, Nicolás Pedano; Delgado, Alvaro Bueno; Lizoain, José Luis Hernández

    2011-01-01

    There is still insufficient scientific evidence on which is the best technique to perform the anastomosis -intracorporeal (IC) or extracorporeal (EC)- in right laparoscopic hemicolectomy. The objective of the present study is to determine whether there are differences to compare in both techniques. A study was performed on a prospective patient series subjected to right laparoscopic hemicolectomy in our Hospital. The preoperative and the postoperative variables associated with complications recorded depending on the type of anastomosis. A total of 60 patients were intervened form June 2004 to June 2010 (35 IC; 25 EC). There were no significant differences between both groups as regards baseline preoperative characteristics or associated comorbidities. The median operation time was 212 minutes (142-305 min), with no significant difference between both techniques. The number of lymph nodes removed was higher in the IC group (21 versus 14; p=0.03). The beginning of oral tolerance and the first bowel movement were significantly earlier in the IC group. The complications rate was similar for both groups (14% IC; 16% EC; p=0.89). Three patients in the IC group had anastomosis dehiscence. The mortality rate was 2.8% (one patient in each group). Intracorporeal versus extracorporeal anastomosis in right laparoscopic hemicolectomy can obtain a higher number of resected lymph nodes and an earlier oral tolerance and intestinal transit. Copyright © 2010 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracorporeal suturing: Transfer from Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery to cadavers results in substantial increase in mental workload.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rebecca C; Scerbo, Mark W; Montano, Michael; Kennedy, Rebecca A; Prytz, Erik; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    A spatial secondary task developed by the authors was used to measure the mental workload of the participant when transferring suturing skills from a box simulator to more realistic surgical conditions using a fresh cadaver. We hypothesized that laparoscopic suturing on genuine bowel would be more challenging than on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS)-simulated bowel as reflected in differences on both suturing and secondary task scores. We trained 14 surgical assistant students to FLS proficiency in intracorporeal suturing. Participants practiced suturing on the FLS box for 30 minutes and then were tested on both the FLS box and the bowel of a fresh cadaver using the spatial, secondary dual-task conditions developed by the authors. Suturing times increased by >333% when moving from the FLS platform to the cadaver F(1,13) = 44.04, P < .001. The increased completion times were accompanied by a 70% decrease in secondary task scores, F(1,13) = 21.21, P < .001. The mental workload associated with intracorporeal suturing increases dramatically when trainees transfer from the FLS platform to human tissue under more realistic conditions of suturing. The increase in mental workload is indexed by both an increase in suturing times and a decrease in the ability to attend to the secondary task. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploratory Investigation of Early Biomarkers for Chronic Fatigue in Prostate Cancer Patients Following Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li Rebekah; Wolff, Brian S; Lukkahatai, Nada; Espina, Alexandra; Saligan, Leorey N

    Fatigue is one of the most debilitating adverse effects of cancer therapy. Identifying biomarkers early during cancer therapy may help us understand the biologic underpinnings of the persistence of fatigue following therapy. We aimed to identify early biomarkers of fatigue by examining correlations of levels of cytokines during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with persistence of fatigue 1 year following treatment completion in men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer (NM-PC). A sample of 34 men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer scheduled to receive EBRT were followed up at baseline (T1), midpoint of EBRT (T2), and 1 year following EBRT (T3). Demographic and clinical data were obtained by chart review. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue was administered to measure fatigue levels. Plasma cytokine levels were determined at T1 and T2 using the Bio-Rad Bio-Plex Cytokine Assay Kits. Significant correlations were observed between levels of interleukin 2 (IL-3), IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-16, interferon γ-induced protein 10, interferon α2, interferon γ, and stromal cell-derived factor 1α at T2 with worsening of fatigue from T1 to T3. Immunological changes prior to chronic fatigue development may reflect the long-term response to radiation therapy-induced damage. Early biomarkers for chronic fatigue related to cancer therapy will help advance our understanding of the etiology of this distressing symptom and will help nurses identify patients at risk of developing chronic fatigue after cancer treatment. This information will also aid in patient education, as well as symptom management.

  11. Repair of potentially lethal radiation damage in human squamous carcinoma cells after chronic hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Tim Tak; Sutherland, R.M. )

    1994-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the repair of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage in A431 and CaSki cells after chronic hypoxia. Cells in exponential phase are subjected to hypoxia (<10 ppm oxygen) for up to 12 h and then are allowed to reoxygenate in air for up to 4 h. Cells are then irradiated with [gamma] rays. Cell survivals are measured by clonogenic assay immediately and at different times after irradiation. Compared to aerobic controls, an increase in the level of potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) is demonstrated in A431 cells reoxygenated for 10 min after >4 h of hypoxia. The repair returned to aerobic control level by 3 h of reoxygenation. PLDR of A431 cells reached maximum at about 9 h after irradiation in cells reoxygenated for 10 min after hypoxia. However, the repair is maximum at 6 h in cells reoxygenated for 3 h after hypoxia and in aerobic cells not previously exposed to hypoxia. Reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia did not affect the PLDR capacity and repair kinetics of CaSki cells. The results suggest that radiosensitization by reoxygenation after chronic hypoxia is not related to inhibition of PLDR. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Radiation and the risk of chronic lymphocytic and other leukemias among chornobyl cleanup workers.

    PubMed

    Zablotska, Lydia B; Bazyka, Dimitry; Lubin, Jay H; Gudzenko, Nataliya; Little, Mark P; Hatch, Maureen; Finch, Stuart; Dyagil, Irina; Reiss, Robert F; Chumak, Vadim V; Bouville, Andre; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Kryuchkov, Victor P; Golovanov, Ivan; Bakhanova, Elena; Babkina, Nataliya; Lubarets, Tatiana; Bebeshko, Volodymyr; Romanenko, Anatoly; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-01-01

    Risks of most types of leukemia from exposure to acute high doses of ionizing radiation are well known, but risks associated with protracted exposures, as well as associations between radiation and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are not clear. We estimated relative risks of CLL and non-CLL from protracted exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation. A nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 110,645 Ukrainian cleanup workers of the 1986 Chornobyl nuclear power plant accident. Cases of incident leukemia diagnosed in 1986-2006 were confirmed by a panel of expert hematologists/hematopathologists. Controls were matched to cases on place of residence and year of birth. We estimated individual bone marrow radiation doses by the Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation (RADRUE) method. We then used a conditional logistic regression model to estimate excess relative risk of leukemia per gray (ERR/Gy) of radiation dose. We found a significant linear dose response for all leukemia [137 cases, ERR/Gy = 1.26 (95% CI: 0.03, 3.58]. There were nonsignificant positive dose responses for both CLL and non-CLL (ERR/Gy = 0.76 and 1.87, respectively). In our primary analysis excluding 20 cases with direct in-person interviews < 2 years from start of chemotherapy with an anomalous finding of ERR/Gy = -0.47 (95% CI: < -0.47, 1.02), the ERR/Gy for the remaining 117 cases was 2.38 (95% CI: 0.49, 5.87). For CLL, the ERR/Gy was 2.58 (95% CI: 0.02, 8.43), and for non-CLL, ERR/Gy was 2.21 (95% CI: 0.05, 7.61). Altogether, 16% of leukemia cases (18% of CLL, 15% of non-CLL) were attributed to radiation exposure. Exposure to low doses and to low dose-rates of radiation from post-Chornobyl cleanup work was associated with a significant increase in risk of leukemia, which was statistically consistent with estimates for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Based on the primary analysis, we conclude that CLL and non-CLL are both radiosensitive.

  13. [Effect of low dose of gamma-radiation on the cellular content in the center of chronic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Klymenko, M O; Onyshchenko, M I

    2004-01-01

    On the model of chronic aseptic carrageenan-induced inflammation in rats it is shown that low dose-rate y-radiation of small dose (0.1 Gy) leads to the increase of fibroblast and macrophage proliferation in the inflammatory focus, and produces considerable decrease of lymphocyte emigration at all investigated radiation doses. Obtained data on stimulation of proliferation in the inflammatory focus with possible accumulation of DNA errors at depressed immunological supervision by lymphocytes can indirectly point to probability of oncogenous potential increase in the chronic inflammatory focus at low dose-rate gamma-irradiation.

  14. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Quintens, Roel; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2016-01-01

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays) or during chronic (Californium-252) exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy) doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight. PMID:27203085

  15. Chronic restraint-induced stress has little modifying effect on radiation hematopoietic toxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Katsube, Takanori; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Vares, Guillaume; Liu, Qiang; Morita, Akinori; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    Both radiation and stresses cause detrimental effects on humans. Besides possible health effects resulting directly from radiation exposure, the nuclear plant accident is a cause of social psychological stresses. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced stresses (CRIS) attenuated Trp53 functions and increased carcinogenesis susceptibility of Trp53-heterozygous mice to total-body X-irradiation (TBXI), having a big impact on the academic world and a sensational effect on the public, especially the residents living in radioactively contaminated areas. It is important to investigate the possible modification effects from CRIS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53wt) animals. Prior to a carcinogenesis study, effects of TBXI on the hematopoietic system under CRIS were investigated in terms of hematological abnormality in the peripheral blood and residual damage in the bone marrow erythrocytes using a mouse restraint model. Five-week-old male Trp53wt C57BL/6J mice were restrained 6 h per day for 28 consecutive days, and TBXI (4 Gy) was given on the 8th day. Results showed that CRIS alone induced a marked decrease in the red blood cell (RBC) and the white blood cell (WBC) count, while TBXI caused significantly lower counts of RBCs, WBCs and blood platelets, and a lower concentration of hemoglobin regardless of CRIS. CRIS alone did not show any significant effect on erythrocyte proliferation and on induction of micronucleated erythrocytes, whereas TBXI markedly inhibited erythrocyte proliferation and induced a significant increase in the incidences of micronucleated erythrocytes, regardless of CRIS. These findings suggest that CRIS does not have a significant impact on radiation-induced detrimental effects on the hematopoietic system in Trp53wt mice. PMID:26045492

  16. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival.

    PubMed

    Pani, Giuseppe; Verslegers, Mieke; Quintens, Roel; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2016-01-01

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays) or during chronic (Californium-252) exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy) doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight.

  17. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswari, K. Sri; Sarma, K. R.; Rajvanshi, V. S.; Sharan, R.; Sharma, Manju; Barathwal, Vinita; Singh, Vinod

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoicchambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months ( P<0.01, Δ% 21.5%) and during follow-up ( P<0.01, Δ% 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (Δ mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (Δ%+12.4 vs.+7.54). The animals were sacrified and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed. No significant variation was observed in the tissue T lymphocyte counts of microwave-irradiated rabbits. From these results it is speculated that the T lymphocytes are sequestered to various lymphoid organs under the influence of microwaves. A sub-population of T cells known as T helper cells (mediating DTH response) are

  18. Endothelial dysfunction in rectal cancer patients chronically exposed to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Inoue, Ken; Pak, Laura; Kawano, Noriyuki; Takeichi, Nobuo; Hoshi, Masaharu; Noso, Yoshihiro; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Manambayeva, Zukhra; Khozhayev, Arman; Molgazhdarov, Maulen; Olzhaev, Sayakhat; Tokanova, Sholpan; Madiyeva, Madina

    2017-08-01

    We sought to identify the features of endothelial function in rectal cancer patients who were exposed to chronic ionizing radiation from a nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. We examined 146 individuals, 76 of whom were rectal cancer patients. The existence of a complex of disturbances of the endothelium and hemostasis systems in patients vs non-patients was revealed. Endothelial dysfunction was expressed as an increase of nitric oxide (NO) production along with decreases in vasodilatation function, and increased levels of von Willebrand factor in blood, along with an increase in the number of circulating endotheliocytes. Significant correlations between indicators of endothelial function and vascular-platelet hemostasis were observed. These changes and their interrelations were expressed more strongly in the patients who lived in the contaminated area around the nuclear test site. Such patients could have an increased risk of thrombosis and other complications after the treatment of a malignant neoplasm.

  19. Transgenerational accumulation of radiation damage in small mammals chronically exposed to Chernobyl fallout.

    PubMed

    Ryabokon, Nadezhda I; Goncharova, R I

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation has been the analysis of the long-term development of biological damage in natural populations of a model mammalian species, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus, Schreber), which were chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation over 22 animal generations within 10 years following the Chernobyl accident. The time course of the biological end-points (chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells and embryonic lethality) was compared with the time course of the whole-body absorbed dose rate from external and internal exposure in the studied populations inhabiting monitoring sites in Belarus with different ground deposition of radionuclides. The yield of chromosome aberrations and, in lesser degree, embryonic lethality was associated with the radionuclide contamination of the monitoring areas in a dose-dependent manner. As a main feature of the long-term development of biological damage under low dose rate irradiation, permanently elevated levels of chromosome aberrations and an increasing frequency of embryonic lethality have developed over 22 animal generations. This contrasts with the assumption that the biological damage would gradually disappear since in the same period of time the whole-body absorbed dose rate decreased exponentially with a half-value time of about 2.5-3 years. Furthermore, gravid females were captured, and their offspring, born and grown up under contamination-free laboratory conditions, showed the same enhanced level of chromosome aberrations. Therefore the authors suggest that, along with the biological damage attributable to the individual exposure of each animal, the observed cellular and systemic effects reflect the transgenerational transmission and accumulation, via genetic and/or epigenetic pathways, of damage attributable to the chronic low-dose rate exposure of the preceding generations of animals. They also suggest that the level of the accumulated transmissible damage in the investigated

  20. An approach for the assessment of risk from chronic radiation to populations of phytoplankton and zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R C; Vives i Batlle, J; Watts, S J; McDonald, P; Jones, S R; Craze, A

    2010-03-01

    A conceptual model of the effects of chronic radiation on a population of phytoplankton and zooplankton in an oceanic nutrient layer is presented. The model shows that there are distinct threshold dose rates at which the different plankton populations become unsustainable. These are 10,400 microGy h(-1) for phytoplankton and 125 microGy h(-1) for zooplankton. Both these values are considerably greater than the current screening values for protection of 10 microGy h(-1). The model highlights the effects of predator-prey dynamics in predicting that when the zooplankton is affected by the radiation dose, the phytoplankton population can increase. In addition, the model was altered to replicate the dose rates to the plankton of a previous ERICA Irish Sea assessment (24 microGy h(-1) for zooplankton and 430 microGy h(-1) to phytoplankton). The results showed only a 10% decrease in the zooplankton population and a 15% increase in the phytoplankton population. Therefore, at this level of dose, the model predicts that although the dose rate exceeds the guideline value, populations are not significantly affected. This result highlights the limitations of a single screening value for different groups of organisms.

  1. Robotic Intracorporeal Orthotopic Neobladder: Urodynamic Outcomes, Urinary Function, and Health-related Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Satkunasivam, Raj; Santomauro, Michael; Chopra, Sameer; Plotner, Elisabeth; Cai, Jie; Miranda, Gus; Salibian, Salpi; Aron, Monish; Ginsberg, David; Daneshmand, Siamak; Desai, Mihir; Gill, Inderbir S

    2016-02-01

    Intracorporeal orthotopic neobladder (iONB) creation following robotic radical cystectomy is an emerging procedure and robust functional data are required. To evaluate urodynamic features of iONB and bladder cancer-specific and general health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes. We retrospectively assessed 28 men who underwent iONB creation (January 2012 to October 2013) and compared results to a previously characterized cohort of 79 of open ONB procedures. iONB pressure-volume properties were characterized using multichannel urodynamics (UDS). The Bladder Cancer Index (BCI) questionnaire, modified with mucus- and pad-related questions, and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used to evaluate urinary function and HRQOL. ONB cohorts were compared for functional outcomes and BCI score. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess predictors of BCI score. The median follow-up was 9.4 mo for the iONB and 62.1 mo for the open ONB group (p<0.0001); ≥2-yr follow-up had been completed for one (4%) patient in the iONB group compared to 75 (95%) patients in the open ONB group (p<0.0001). In UDS tests, the iONB group had minimal postvoid residual volume, normal compliance, and a mean capacity of 514 cm(3) (range 339-1001). BCI mean scores for urinary function (p=0.58) and urinary bother (p=0.31) were comparable between the groups. The surgical approach was not associated with the BCI score on multivariable analysis. Rates of 24-h pad use were comparable between iONB and open ONB groups (pad-free 17% vs. 19%; ≤2 pads 84% vs. 79%), as reflected by total pad usage (p=0.1); pad size and daytime wetness were worse in the iONB group. The clean intermittent catheterization rate was 10.7% in the iONB and 6.3% in the open ONB group. Limitations include the retrospective comparison, small number of patients and short follow-up for the iONB group. iONB had adequate UDS characteristics and comparable bladder cancer-specific HRQOL scores to open ONB. However, pad size

  2. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation. [Paramecium tetraurelia; Synechococcus lividus

    SciTech Connect

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y.

  3. [Radiation situation prognosis for deep space: reactions of water and living systems to chronic low-dose ionizing irradiation].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Tsetlin, V V; Moisa, S S

    2013-01-01

    The authors review the findings of researches into the effects of low-dose ionizing irradiation on diverse biological objects (embryonic Japanese quails, Aspergillus niger, Spirostomum ambiguum Ehrbg., mesenchymal stem cells from mouse marrow, dry higher plants seeds, blood lymphocytes from pilots and cosmonauts). Model experiments with chronic exposure to ionizing radiation doses comparable with the measurements inside orbital vehicles and estimations for trips through the interplanetary space resulted in morphological disorders (embryonic Japanese quails, Aspergillus niger), radiation hormesis (Aspergillus niger, MSCs from mouse marrow), increase in the seed germination rate, inhibition of Spirostomum spontaneous activity, DNA damages, chromosomal aberrations, and increase of the blood lymphocytes reactivity to additional radiation loading. These facts give grounds to assume that the crucial factor in the radiation outcomes is changes in liquid medium. In other words, during extended orbiting within the magnetosphere region and interplanetary missions ionizing radiation affects primarily liquids of organism and, secondarily, its morphofunctional structures.

  4. The effects of chronic radiation on reproductive success of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of lifetime exposure to chronic irradiation on reproductive success were assessed for laboratory populations of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata. Lifetime exposure was initiated upon the spawning of the P1 female and was terminated upon spawning of the F1 female. Groups of experimental worms received either no radiation (controls) or 0.19, 2.1, or 17 mGy/h. The total dose received by the worms was either background or approximately 0.55, 6.5, or 54 Gy, respectively. The broods from the F1 mated pairs were sacrificed before hatching occurred, and information was obtained on brood size, on the number of normal and abnormal embryos, and on the number of embryos that were living, dying, and dead. The mean number of embryos in the broods from the F1 females exposed to lifetime radiation of 0.19 and 2.1 mGy/h was not significantly different from the mean number of embryos from control females; however, the mean number of embryos was different from those F1 females exposed to 17 mGy/h. There was a significant reduction in the number of live embryos in the broods from the F1 mated pairs that were exposed to the lowest dose rate given, 0.19 mGy/h, as well as those exposed to 2.1 and 17 mGy/h. Also, increased percentages of abnormal embryos were determined in the broods of all the radiation-exposed groups. 39 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Safety and feasibility during the initial learning process of intracorporeal Billroth I (delta-shaped) anastomosis for laparoscopic distal gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Oh; Jung, Mi Ran; Park, Young Kyu; Ryu, Seong Yeop

    2015-06-01

    Intracorporeal Billroth I (ICBI) (delta-shaped) anastomosis is being increasingly used for laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. However, few studies have focused on the safety and feasibility of adopting this new technique. The present study aimed to review the surgical outcomes after the initial experience of performing ICBI anastomosis and to evaluate whether this technique can be safely adopted without increasing operative risk during the early learning process. Forty-two consecutive patients who underwent ICBI anastomosis with laparoscopic distal gastrectomy by a single surgeon were enrolled, and their operative outcomes and hospital course were compared with those of 179 patients who underwent conventional extracorporeal Billroth I (ECBI) anastomosis by the same operator. The learning curve was assessed by evaluating the moving average of anastomosis time. The operating time in the ICBI group was significantly longer than that in the ECBI group (142 vs. 116 min, p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in the postoperative hospital course such as gas passage, diet initiation, postoperative fever, and hospital stay between the two groups. Postoperative morbidity did not significantly differ between the ICBI and ECBI groups (7.1 vs. 12.3 %, p = 0.428). No anastomosis-related complications occurred in the ICBI group. The mean anastomosis time for ICBI anastomosis was 24 ± 5 min, and the anastomosis average time curve showed that it reached a plateau approximately after the 14th case. ICBI anastomosis has a steep learning curve without increasing operative risk in the early learning process, when performed by experienced laparoscopic surgeons. The technical feasibility and clinical advantages of intracorporeal anastomosis need to be proven in future clinical trials.

  6. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-08-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  7. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M.; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  8. Therapeutic and space radiation exposure of mouse brain causes impaired DNA repair response and premature senescence by chronic oxidant production.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Rodriguez, Olga C; Winters, Thomas A; Fornace, Albert J; Albanese, Chris; Datta, Kamal

    2013-08-01

    Despite recent epidemiological evidences linking radiation exposure and a number of human ailments including cancer, mechanistic understanding of how radiation inflicts long-term changes in cerebral cortex, which regulates important neuronal functions, remains obscure. The current study dissects molecular events relevant to pathology in cerebral cortex of 6 to 8 weeks old female C57BL/6J mice two and twelve months after exposure to a γ radiation dose (2 Gy) commonly employed in fractionated radiotherapy. For a comparative study, effects of 1.6 Gy heavy ion 56Fe radiation on cerebral cortex were also investigated, which has implications for space exploration. Radiation exposure was associated with increased chronic oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis. These results when considered with decreased cortical thickness, activation of cell-cycle arrest pathway, and inhibition of DNA double strand break repair factors led us to conclude to our knowledge for the first time that radiation caused aging-like pathology in cerebral cortical cells and changes after heavy ion radiation were more pronounced than γ radiation.

  9. Colostomy is a simple and effective procedure for severe chronic radiation proctitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zi-Xu; Ma, Teng-Hui; Wang, Huai-Ming; Zhong, Qing-Hua; Yu, Xi-Hu; Qin, Qi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of diverting colostomy in treating severe hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). METHODS: Patients with severe hemorrhagic CRP who were admitted from 2008 to 2014 were enrolled into this study. All CRP patients were diagnosed by a combination of pelvic radiation history, clinical rectal bleeding, and endoscopic findings. Inclusion criteria were CRP patients with refractory bleeding with moderate to severe anemia with a hemoglobin level < 90 g/L. The study group included patients who were treated by diverting colostomy, while the control group included patients who received conservative treatment. The remission of bleeding was defined as complete cessation or only occasional bleeding that needed no further treatment. The primary outcome was bleeding remission at 6 mo after treatment. Quality of life before treatment and at follow-up was evaluated according to EORTC QLQ C30. Severe CRP complications were recorded during follow-up. RESULTS: Forty-seven consecutive patients were enrolled, including 22 in the colostomy group and 27 in the conservative treatment group. When compared to conservative treatment, colostomy obtained a higher rate of bleeding remission (94% vs 12%), especially in control of transfusion-dependent bleeding (100% vs 0%), and offered a better control of refractory perianal pain (100% vs 0%), and a lower score of bleeding (P < 0.001) at 6 mo after treatment. At 1 year after treatment, colostomy achieved better remission of both moderate bleeding (100% vs 21.5%, P = 0.002) and severe bleeding (100% vs 0%, P < 0.001), obtained a lower score of bleeding (0.8 vs 2.0, P < 0.001), and achieved obvious elevated hemoglobin levels (P = 0.003), when compared to the conservative treatment group. The quality of life dramatically improved after colostomy, which included global health, function, and symptoms, but it was not improved in the control group. Pathological evaluation after colostomy found diffused chronic

  10. Effects of chronic restraint-induced stress on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Varès, Guillaume; Kawagoshi, Taiki; Shiomi, Naoko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Liu, Qiang; Morita, Akinori; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Both ionizing radiation (IR) and psychological stress (PS) cause detrimental effects on humans. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced PS (CRIPS) diminished the functions of Trp53 and enhanced radiocarcinogenesis in Trp53-heterozygous (Trp53(+/-)) mice. These findings had a marked impact on the academic field as well as the general public, particularly among residents living in areas radioactively contaminated by nuclear accidents. In an attempt to elucidate the modifying effects of CRIPS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53(+/+)) animals, investigations involving multidisciplinary analyses were performed. We herein demonstrated that CRIPS induced changes in the frequency of IR-induced chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in splenocytes. Five-week-old male Trp53(+/+) C57BL/6J mice were restrained for 6h per day for 28 consecutive days, and total body irradiation (TBI) at a dose of 4Gy was performed on the 8th day. Metaphase chromosome spreads prepared from splenocytes at the end of the 28-day restraint regimen were painted with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for chromosomes 1, 2, and 3. The results obtained showed that CRIPS alone did not induce CAs, while TBI caused significant increases in CAs, mostly translocations. Translocations appeared at a lower frequency in mice exposed to TBI plus CRIPS than in those exposed to TBI alone. No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of the other types of CAs (insertions, dicentrics, and fragments) visualized with FISH between these experimental groups (TBI+CRIPS vs. TBI). These results suggest that CRIPS does not appear to synergize with the clastogenicity of IR.

  11. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nageswari, K S; Sarma, K R; Rajvanshi, V S; Sharan, R; Sharma, M; Barathwal, V; Singh, V

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoic chambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months (P less than 0.01, delta % 21.5%) and during follow-up (P less than 0.01, delta % 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (delta mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (delta % +12.4 vs. +7.54). The animals were sacrificed and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Different Phenotyping Approaches Lead to Dissimilar Biologic Profiles in Men With Chronic Fatigue After Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li Rebekah; Dickinson, Kristin; Kline, Neila; Saligan, Leorey N

    2016-12-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) persists months after treatment completion. Although a CRF biomarker has not yet been identified, validated self-report questionnaires are used to define and phenotype CRF in the discovery of potential biomarkers. The purposes of this study are to identify CRF subjects using three well-known CRF phenotyping approaches using validated self-report questionnaires and to compare the biologic profiles that are associated with each CRF phenotype. Fatigue in men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer receiving external beam radiation therapy was measured at baseline (T1), midpoint (T2), end point (T3), and one-year post-external beam radiation therapy (T4) using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue (FACT-F) and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Fatigue. Chronic fatigue (CF) and nonfatigue subjects were grouped based on three commonly used phenotyping approaches: 1) T4 FACT-F <43; 2) T1-T4 decline in FACT-F score ≥3 points; 3) T4 Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Fatigue T-score >50. Differential gene expressions using whole-genome microarray analysis were compared in each of the phenotyping criterion. The study enrolled 43 men, where 34%-38% had CF based on the three phenotyping approaches. Distinct gene expression patterns were observed between CF and nonfatigue subjects in each of the three CRF phenotyping approaches: 1) Approach 1 had the largest number of differentially expressed genes and 2) Approaches 2 and 3 had 40 and 21 differentially expressed genes between the fatigue groups, respectively. The variation in genetic profiles for CRF suggests that phenotypic profiling for CRF should be carefully considered because it directly influences biomarker discovery investigations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE−/− Alzheimer's mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Stefan J.; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Braga-Tanaka, Ignacia; Tanaka, Satoshi; Neff, Frauke; Saran, Anna; Larsen, Martin R.; Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer's model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates. The radiation-induced changes in the phosphoproteome were associated with the control of synaptic plasticity, calcium-dependent signalling and brain metabolism. An inhibition of CREB signalling was found at both dose rates whereas Rac1-Cofilin signalling was found activated only at the lower dose rate. Similarly, the reduction in the number of activated microglia in the molecular layer of hippocampus that paralleled with reduced levels of TNFα expression and lipid peroxidation was significant only at the lower dose rate. Adult neurogenesis, investigated by Ki67, GFAP and NeuN staining, and cell death (activated caspase-3) were not influenced at any dose or dose rate. This study shows that several molecular targets induced by chronic low-dose-rate radiation overlap with those of Alzheimer's pathology. It may suggest that ionising radiation functions as a contributing risk factor to this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27708245

  14. Ionizing radiation exposures in treatments of solid neoplasms are not associated with subsequent increased risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Sachs, Rainer K; Gale, Robert Peter; Smith, Mitchell R; Hill, Brian T

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is not thought to cause chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Challenging this notion are recent data suggesting CLL incidence may be increased by radiation exposure from the atomic bombs (after many decades), uranium mining and nuclear power facility accidents. To assess the effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for the treatment of solid neoplasms we studied CLL risks in data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Specifically, we compared the risks of developing CLL in persons with a 1(st) non-hematologic cancer treated with or without ionizing radiation. We controlled for early detection effects on CLL risk induced by surveillance after 1(st) cancer diagnoses by forming all-time cumulative CLL relative risks (RR). We estimate such CLL RR to be 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.17, 1.23) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with ionizing radiation and 1.00 (0.96, 1.05) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was treated with ionizing radiations. These results imply that diagnosis of a solid neoplasm is associated with an increased risk of developing CLL only in persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with radiation therapy.

  15. Radiation safety protocol for high dose 131I therapy of thyroid carcinoma in patients on hemodialysis for chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Modarresifar, Homayoun; Almodovar, Samuel; Bass, William B; Ojha, Buddhiwardhan

    2007-02-01

    Iodine ablation therapy for thyroid cancer on patients receiving dialysis poses unique radiation safety challenges. Exposure to gamma and beta negative particles by the hemodialysis (HD) staff is a concern that has not been well studied. A 53-y-old male patient on HD for chronic renal failure was scheduled for 131I high dose therapy as treatment for thyroid papillary carcinoma. The patient was on HD every other day, prior to ablation. A high dose of 131I (3,607.5 MBq) was required. The patient was admitted for 131I therapy, and continued HD. Thyroid cancer ablation therapy was administered according to our institutional protocol. New radiation safety measures were developed and implemented in order to give the patient an optimal treatment dose, reduce radiation to the patient (critical organs and whole body), and to protect the HD personnel. This included placing two lead shields between the patient and the HD nurse, and HD monitoring by two alternating nurses to reduce their radiation exposure. Film badges were used to measure radiation exposure to the nursing staff. Dosimetry calculations were obtained to determine radiation absorbed doses by the optic lens, skin, and whole body. Quality control verification for this shielding arrangement proved to be effective in protecting the HD staff against gamma and beta negative radiation from recent 131I high dose therapy. Implementation of this model proved to be an effective and adequate radiation safety protocol for limiting radiation exposure to the HD staff. The patient was given 3607.5 MBq for optimal treatment after HD. Hemodialysis was repeated after approximately 48 and 96 h to remove excess 131I and reduce radiation to the patient.

  16. An unexpected resident in the ileum detected during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy and intracorporeal Studer pouch formation: Taenia saginata parasite.

    PubMed

    Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Asil, Erem; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2011-02-01

    A case of moving ileal Taenia saginata parasites is presented with demonstrative images. We came across the parasites surprisingly while performing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy with intracorporeal Studer pouch urinary diversion. We recommend stool sample evaluation in the preoperative period for possible presence of intestinal parasitic diseases, particularly in patients with bladder cancer who are admitted from areas with an increased incidence of intestinal parasitic diseases, before opening the bowel segments during surgery to perform radical cystectomy and urinary diversion.

  17. A modified efficient purse-string stapling technique (mEST) that uses a new metal rod for intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy in laparoscopic total gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Omori, Takeshi; Moon, Jeong-Ho; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Yanagimoto, Yoshitomo; Sugimura, Keijirou; Miyata, Hiroshi; Yano, Masahiko; Sakon, Masato

    2017-01-01

    Intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy after laparoscopic total gastrectomy is technically difficult because this procedure should be performed in a narrow surgical field in the upper abdomen even when completely laparoscopic approaches are used. The placement of the anvil of a circular stapling device into the esophagus and connection the instrument to the anvil are extremely difficult steps in this surgery. Therefore, we developed a simple technique for intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy using hemi-double stapling technique; we named this technique the efficient purse-string stapling technique (EST). More recently, we have developed a modified EST (mEST) that utilizes a new stainless steel anvil rod instead of a plastic rod. Relative to the plastic rod, the steel rod is reusable and shorter; thus, it was easier to perform anvil placement into the esophagus with the steel rod. Anvil preparation for mEST: a stainless steel rod is attached to the shaft of the anvil, and the needle and thread are sutured to the tip of the rod. After complete insertion of the anvil into the esophageal cavity, the needle and thread are used to penetrate the anterior esophageal wall, and the esophagus is then clamped using a linear stapler just distal to the site penetrated by the thread. The linear stapler is fired, and anvil placement in the esophagus is simultaneously accomplished. After the rod is removed from the anvil, the instrument is intracorporeally connected to the anvil and then fired to complete the gastrojejunostomy. This technique is simple and facilitates intracorporeal reconstruction procedures in laparoscopic total gastrectomy.

  18. Effect of chronic HTO. beta. or /sup 60/Co. gamma. radiation on preimplantation mouse development in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Yukawa, O.; Asami, K.; Nakazawa, T.

    1982-11-01

    Response of pronuclear, early 2-cell, and late 2-cell mouse embryos to chronic HTO ..beta.. and /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. irradiation was investigated. The pronuclear embryos fertilized in vitro and 2-cell stage embryos of BC3F/sub 1/ (C3H/C57BL) mice were grown in vitro in chemically defined medically defied media containing tritium oxide. Activity levels ranged from 100 to 2000 ..mu..Ci/ml. With development to blastocyst as the end point, the LD/sub 50/ was determined to be 118, 230, and 426 ..mu..Ci/ml for pronuclear, early 2-cell, and late 2-cell embryos, respectively. Similar embryos were exposed in vitro to chronic ..gamma.. radiation from /sup 60/Co during the same period of development, and RBE values of HTO ..beta.. radiation relative to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays were calculated to be within the range of 1.0 to 1.7.

  19. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  20. Laparoscopic colon and rectal resections with intracorporeal anastomosis and trans-vaginal specimen extraction for colorectal cancer. A case series and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Stipa, Francesco; Burza, Antonio; Curinga, Rosanna; Santini, Ettore; Delle Site, Pietro; Avantifiori, Riccardo; Picchio, Marcello

    2015-07-01

    Intracorporeal anastomosis associated to trans-vaginal specimen extraction decreases the extent of colon mobilisation and the number and size of abdominal incisions, improving the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in female patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this procedure for colorectal cancer. Between 2009 and 2013, 13 female patients underwent laparoscopic colon and rectal resection for colorectal cancer with intracorporeal anastomosis and trans-vaginal specimen extraction: 2 right colectomies, 1 transverse colon resection, 4 left colectomies and 6 anterior resections were performed. A MEDLINE search of publications on the presented procedure for colon neoplasms was carried out. There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions. Postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) score in the pelvis, abdomen and shoulder was moderate. In the postoperative period, we observed two colorectal anastomotic strictures, successfully treated with pneumatic endoscopic dilation. Median length of the specimen was 18.5 cm, with a median tumour size of 5.5 cm in diameter. Median number of retrieved lymph nodes was 12. All circumferential resection margins were negative. During a mean follow-up of 31 months (range, 6-62), there was neither evidence of recurrent disease nor disorders related to the genitourinary system. The aesthetic outcome was considered satisfactory in all patients. Nine studies were identified in the systematic review. Our case series, according to the results of the literature, showed that intracorporeal anastomosis associated to trans-vaginal specimen extraction is feasible and safe in selected female patients.

  1. Optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence findings in chronic phototoxic maculopathy secondary to snow-reflected solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Dhananjay

    2015-05-01

    A professional mountain trekker presented with gradual, moderate visual decline in one eye. The subnormal vision could not be explained by the examination of anterior and posterior segment of either eye, which was unremarkable. Optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging revealed subtle defects in the outer retina, which correlated with the extent of visual disturbance. A novel presentation of retinal phototoxicity due to indirect solar radiation reflected from snow in inadequately protected eyes of a chronically exposed subject is reported.

  2. Effects of chronic low-dose ultraviolet B radiation on DNA damage and repair in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D L; Greinert, R; de Gruijl, F R; Guikers, K L; Breitbart, E W; Byrom, M; Gallmeier, M M; Lowery, M G; Volkmer, B

    1999-06-15

    Chronic exposure to sunlight causes skin cancer in humans, yet little is known about how habitual exposure to low doses of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) affects DNA damage in the skin. We treated Skh-1 hairless mice with daily doses of suberythemal UVB for 40 days and analyzed the amount and distribution of DNA photodamage using RIAs and immunofluorescence micrography. We found that DNA damage accumulated in mouse skin as a result of chronic irradiation and that this damage persisted in the dermis and epidermis for several weeks after the chronic treatment was terminated. Although the persistent damage was evenly distributed throughout the dermis, it remained in the epidermis as a small number of heavily damaged cells at the dermal-epidermal boundary. Rates of DNA damage induction and repair were determined at different times over the course of chronic treatment in response to a higher challenge dose of UVB light. The amount of damage induced by the challenge dose increased in response to chronic exposure, and excision repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone dimers was significantly reduced. The sensitization of mouse epidermal DNA to photoproduct induction, the reduction in excision repair, and the accumulation of nonrepairable DNA damage in the dermis and epidermis suggest that chronic low-dose exposure to sunlight may significantly enhance the predisposition of mammalian skin to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of gabapentin for chronic low back pain with and without a radiating component.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J Hampton; Slater, Mark A; Capparelli, Edmund V; Patel, Shetal M; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony; Abramson, Ian S; Wallace, Mark S; Funk, Stephen D; Rutledge, Thomas R; Wetherell, Julie L; Matthews, Scott C; Zisook, Sidney; Garfin, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    Gabapentin is prescribed for analgesia in chronic low back pain, yet there are no controlled trials supporting this practice. This randomized, 2-arm, 12-week, parallel group study compared gabapentin (forced titration up to 3600 mg daily) with inert placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline to the last week on treatment measured by the Descriptor Differential Scale; the secondary outcome was disability (Oswestry Disability Index). The intention-to-treat analysis comprised 108 randomized patients with chronic back pain (daily pain for ≥6 months) whose pain did (43%) or did not radiate into the lower extremity. Random effects regression models which did not impute missing scores were used to analyze outcome data. Pain intensity decreased significantly over time (P < 0.0001) with subjects on gabapentin or placebo, reporting reductions of about 30% from baseline, but did not differ significantly between groups (P = 0.423). The same results pertained for disability scores. In responder analyses of those who completed 12 weeks (N = 72), the proportion reporting at least 30% or 50% reduction in pain intensity, or at least "Minimal Improvement" on the Physician Clinical Global Impression of Change did not differ significantly between groups. There were no significant differences in analgesia between participants with radiating (n = 46) and nonradiating (n = 62) pain either within or between treatment arms. There was no significant correlation between gabapentin plasma concentration and pain intensity. Gabapentin appears to be ineffective for analgesia in chronic low back pain with or without a radiating component.

  4. Studies of adaptive response and mutation induction in MCF-10A cells following exposure to chronic or acute ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Manesh, Sara Shakeri; Sangsuwan, Traimate; Wojcik, Andrzej; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2015-10-01

    A phenomenon in which exposure to a low adapting dose of radiation makes cells more resistant to the effects of a subsequent high dose exposure is termed radio-adaptive response. Adaptive response could hypothetically reduce the risk of late adverse effects of chronic or acute radiation exposures in humans. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of such responses is of relevance for radiation protection as well as for the clinical applications of radiation in medicine. However, due to the variability of responses depending on the model system and radiation condition, there is a need to further study under what conditions adaptive response can be induced. In this study, we analyzed if there is a dose rate dependence for the adapting dose, assuming that the adapting dose induces DNA response/repair pathways that are dose rate dependent. MCF-10A cells were exposed to a 50mGy adapting dose administered acutely (0.40Gy/min) or chronically (1.4mGy/h or 4.1mGy/h) and then irradiated by high acute challenging doses. The endpoints of study include clonogenic cell survival and mutation frequency at X-linked hprt locus. In another series of experiment, cells were exposed to 100mGy and 1Gy at different dose rates (acutely and chronically) and then the mutation frequencies were studied. Adaptive response was absent at the level of clonogenic survival. The mutation frequencies were significantly decreased in the cells pre-exposed to 50mGy at 1.4mGy/h followed by 1Gy acute exposure as challenging dose. Importantly, at single dose exposures (1 Gy or 100mGy), no differences at the level of mutation were found comparing different dose rates.

  5. Relationship Between Radiation-Induced Apoptosis of T Lymphocytes and Chronic Toxicity in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated by Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Foro, Palmira; Algara, Manuel; Lozano, Joan; Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier; Torres, Erica; Carles, Joan; Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael; Quera, Jaume; Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Oscar; Lacruz, Marti; Bellosillo, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes with late toxicity of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: 214 patients were prospectively included in the study. Peripheral blood was drawn from patients before treatment and irradiated with 8 Gy. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes that underwent radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Toxicity and mortality were correlated in 198 cases with pretreatment apoptosis and clinical and biological variables by use of a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The mean percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte radiation-induced apoptosis was 28.58% (±14.23) and 50.76% (±18.9), respectively. Genitourinary (GU) toxicity was experienced by 39.9% of patients, while gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was experienced by 19.7%. The probability of development of GU toxicity was nearly doubled (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, P=.014) in those patients in whom the percentage of in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T-lymphocytes was ≤28.58%. It was also almost double in patients who received doses ≥50 Gy in 65% of the bladder volume (V65 ≥50) (HR 1.92, P=.048). No correlation was found between GI toxicity and any of the variables studied. The probability of death during follow-up, after adjustment for different variables, was 2.7 times higher in patients with a percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte apoptosis ≤50.76% (P=.022). Conclusions: In conclusion, our study shows, in the largest prospective cohort of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, that in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T lymphocytes assessed before radiation therapy was associated with the probability of developing chronic GU toxicity. In addition, the radiation dose received in the urinary bladder (V65 ≥50) affected the occurrence of GU toxicity. Finally, we also demonstrate that radiation-induced apoptosis of

  6. Relationship between radiation-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes and chronic toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated by radiation therapy: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Foro, Palmira; Algara, Manuel; Lozano, Joan; Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier; Torres, Erica; Carles, Joan; Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael; Quera, Jaume; Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Oscar; Lacruz, Marti; Bellosillo, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    To assess the correlation of radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes with late toxicity of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. 214 patients were prospectively included in the study. Peripheral blood was drawn from patients before treatment and irradiated with 8 Gy. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes that underwent radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Toxicity and mortality were correlated in 198 cases with pretreatment apoptosis and clinical and biological variables by use of a Cox proportional hazards model. The mean percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte radiation-induced apoptosis was 28.58% (±14.23) and 50.76% (±18.9), respectively. Genitourinary (GU) toxicity was experienced by 39.9% of patients, while gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was experienced by 19.7%. The probability of development of GU toxicity was nearly doubled (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, P=.014) in those patients in whom the percentage of in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T-lymphocytes was ≤28.58%. It was also almost double in patients who received doses ≥50 Gy in 65% of the bladder volume (V65 ≥50) (HR 1.92, P=.048). No correlation was found between GI toxicity and any of the variables studied. The probability of death during follow-up, after adjustment for different variables, was 2.7 times higher in patients with a percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte apoptosis ≤50.76% (P=.022). In conclusion, our study shows, in the largest prospective cohort of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, that in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T lymphocytes assessed before radiation therapy was associated with the probability of developing chronic GU toxicity. In addition, the radiation dose received in the urinary bladder (V65 ≥50) affected the occurrence of GU toxicity. Finally, we also demonstrate that radiation-induced apoptosis of CD8+ T lymphocytes was associated with overall survival

  7. Efficacy of argon plasma coagulation compared with topical formalin application for chronic radiation proctopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhli, AA; Alazmi, WM; Ponich, T; Howard, JM; Prokopiw, I; Alaqeel, A; Gregor, JC

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is a troublesome complication of radiotherapy to the pelvis for which current treatment modalities are suboptimal. Currently, the application of formalin to the rectal mucosa (AFR) and thermal ablation with argon plasma coagulation (APC) are the most promising options. OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of AFR with APC for CRP. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Records of 22 patients (male to female ratio, 19:3; mean age, 74 years) who received either APC or AFR for chronic hematochezia caused by CRP, and who were evaluated and treated between May 1998 and April 2002, were reviewed. Complete evaluations were made three months after completion of each therapeutic modality. Patients were considered to be responders if there was a 10% increase in hemoglobin from baseline or complete normalization of hemoglobin (male patients, higher than 130 g/L; female patients, higher than 115 g/L) without the requirement for blood transfusion. RESULTS: The mean hemoglobin level before therapy was 107 g/L. Patients received an average of 1.78 sessions for APC and 1.81 sessions for AFR. Eleven patients (50%) were treated with APC alone, eight patients (36%) with AFR alone and three (14%) with both modalities (two with AFR followed by APC, and one with APC followed by AFR). Eleven of 14 patients (79%) in the APC group were responders, compared with three of 11 patients (27%) in the AFR group (P=0.017). In the APC group, seven of 11 responders required only a single session, while in the AFR group, only one patient responded after a single session. Adverse events (nausea, vomiting, flushing, abdominal cramps, rectal pain and fever) occurred in two patients after APC and in nine patients after AFR (P=0.001). In the APC group, the mean hemoglobin level increase was 20 g/L at three months follow-up, compared with 14 g/L in the AFR group. CONCLUSION: This retrospective study suggests that APC is more effective and safe than topical AFR to

  8. Possible cause for altered spatial cognition of prepubescent rats exposed to chronic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sareesh Naduvil; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Karun, Kalesh M; Nayak, Satheesha B; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2015-10-01

    The effects of chronic and repeated radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFEMR) exposure on spatial cognition and hippocampal architecture were investigated in prepubescent rats. Four weeks old male Wistar rats were exposed to RF-EMR (900 MHz; SAR-1.15 W/kg with peak power density of 146.60 μW/cm(2)) for 1 h/day, for 28 days. Followed by this, spatial cognition was evaluated by Morris water maze test. To evaluate the hippocampal morphology; H&E staining, cresyl violet staining, and Golgi-Cox staining were performed on hippocampal sections. CA3 pyramidal neuron morphology and surviving neuron count (in CA3 region) were studied using H&E and cresyl violet stained sections. Dendritic arborization pattern of CA3 pyramidal neuron was investigated by concentric circle method. Progressive learning abilities were found to be decreased in RF-EMR exposed rats. Memory retention test performed 24 h after the last training revealed minor spatial memory deficit in RF-EMR exposed group. However, RF-EMR exposed rats exhibited poor spatial memory retention when tested 48 h after the final trial. Hirano bodies and Granulovacuolar bodies were absent in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of different groups studied. Nevertheless, RF-EMR exposure affected the viable cell count in dorsal hippocampal CA3 region. RF-EMR exposure influenced dendritic arborization pattern of both apical and basal dendritic trees in RF-EMR exposed rats. Structural changes found in the hippocampus of RF-EMR exposed rats could be one of the possible reasons for altered cognition.

  9. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Okunieff, Paul . E-mail: paul_okunieff@urmc.rochester.edu; Xu Jianhua; Hu Dongping; Liu Weimin; Zhang Lurong; Morrow, Gary; Pentland, Alice; Ryan, Julie L.; Ding, Ivan M.D.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-{alpha}, and lymphotoxin-{beta}) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-{beta}) during the same acute and chronic phases. Methods and Materials: Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Results: Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-{alpha}, and lymphotoxin-{beta}) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-{beta}, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Conclusion: Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy.

  10. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Okunieff, Paul; Xu, Jianhua; Hu, Dongping; Liu, Weimin; Zhang, Lurong; Morrow, Gary; Pentland, Alice; Ryan, Julie L; Ding, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, and lymphotoxin-beta) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-beta) during the same acute and chronic phases. Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-alpha, and lymphotoxin-beta) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-beta, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy.

  11. Oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria of small-intestinal enterocytes at chronic and single exposure to low power ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Кhуzhnyak, S V; Bezdrobna, L K; Stepanova, L I; Morozova, V S; Voitsitskіy, V M

    2014-09-01

    Objective - to investigate the intensity of oxidation and phosphorylation processes in the small intestine enterocytes mitochondria of the rats under chronic and single exposure to ionizing radiation of low power. Materials and methods. The single irradiation of the rats with X-rays was performed using the RUM-17 equipment (at the dose of 0.055 Gy/min) for absorbed doses of 0.1; 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. The functional state of mitochondria was evaluated in 1 h and 24 h after irradiation. The chronic external γ-irradiation (at the dose rate of 0.72 cGy/min to achieve a total dose of 0.3; 0.6 and 1.0 Gy was performed using the "Etalon" equipment which contained 60Co. The intensity of the oxidation and phosphorylation activity of the small intestine enterocytes mitochondria was assessed by the polarographic method. Results. The use of malate as exogenous substrate allowed to assess the functioning of all areas of the electron transport chain of mitochondria in experimental conditions. The increase in the intensity of mitochondrial respiration was found in all conditions and terms of research in response to irradiation. In chronic ionizing radiation appears partial separation of interface processes of oxidation and phosphorylation, as evidenced by the decrease in value of the index control and ADP / O and reducing efficiency phosphorylation (decrease of value Vf). For single exposure disconnection of coupling processes oxidation and phosphorylation were not accompanied by changes in the index of oxidative phosphorylation, however, was characterized by reduced ratio V4S/V4АТP. Conclusions. Single and chronic exposure to low power of ionizing radiation leads to an increase in intensity of respiration and disruption of oxidative phosphorylation as a result of separation of interface processes of oxidation and phosphorylation. In chronic exposure received changes were accompanied by inhibition of ATP from ADP and FN because no change of ATP hydrolase activity of mitochondria was

  12. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of sodium pentosanpolysulfate in the treatment of chronic radiation-induced proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Pilepich, M.V.; Parsons, C.L. )

    1990-02-01

    This is a report of a phase I/II study of 13 patients treated with sodium pentosanpolysulfate (PPS) for chronic radiation-induced proctitis. A complete response was obtained in 82%, a partial response occurred in 9%, and 9% failed to respond to therapy. No significant toxicity was observed. It is concluded that PPS is an effective treatment for chronic radiation-induced proctitis and a phase III randomized, double-blind study of PPS versus placebo is planned.

  13. Transfer of training in the development of intracorporeal suturing skill in medical student novices: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Muresan, Claude; Lee, Tommy H; Seagull, Jacob; Park, Adrian E

    2010-10-01

    To help optimize the use of limited resources in trainee education, we developed a prospective randomized trial to determine the most effective means of teaching laparoscopic suturing to novices. Forty-one medical students received rudimentary instruction in intracorporeal suturing, then were pretested on a pig enterotomy model. They then were posttested after completion of 1 of 4 training arms: laparoscopic suturing, laparoscopic drills, open suturing, and virtual reality (VR) drills. Tests were scored for speed, accuracy, knot quality, and mental workload (National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] Task Load Index). Paired t tests were used. Task time was improved in all groups except the VR group. Knot quality improved only in the open or laparoscopic suturing groups. Mental workload improved only for those practicing on a physical laparoscopic trainer. For novice trainees, the efficacy of VR training is questionable. In contrast, the other training methods had benefits in terms of time, quality, and perceived workload. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A randomized controlled trial of gabapentin for chronic low back pain with and without a radiating component

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, J. Hampton; Slater, Mark A.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Patel, Shetal M.; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony; Abramson, Ian S.; Wallace, Mark S.; Funk, Stephen D.; Rutledge, Thomas R.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Matthews, Scott C.; Zisook, Sidney; Garfin, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Gabapentin is prescribed for analgesia in chronic low back pain, yet there are no controlled trials supporting this practice. This randomized, two-arm, 12-week, parallel group study compared gabapentin (forced titration up to 3600 mg daily) to inert placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline to the last week on treatment measured by the Descriptor Differential Scale; the secondary outcome was disability (Oswestry Disability Index). The intention-to-treat analysis comprised 108 randomized chronic back pain patients (daily pain for ≥ 6 months) whose pain did (43%) or did not radiate into the lower extremity. Random effects regression models which did not impute missing scores were used to analyze outcome data. Pain intensity decreased significantly over time (p < .0001) with subjects on gabapentin or placebo reporting reductions of about 30% from baseline, but did not differ significantly between groups (p = .423). The same results pertained for disability scores. In responder analyses of those who completed 12 weeks (N=72), the proportion reporting at least 30% or 50% reduction in pain intensity, or at least “Minimal Improvement” on the Physician Clinical Global Impression of Change did not differ significantly between groups. There were no significant differences in analgesia between participants with radiating (n = 46) and non-radiating (n = 62) pain either within or between treatment arms. There was no significant correlation between gabapentin plasma concentration and pain intensity. Gabapentin appears to be ineffective for analgesia in chronic low back pain with or without a radiating component. PMID:26963844

  15. Effects of long-term chronic exposure to sun radiation in immunological system of commercial fishermen in Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Sarita Maria de Fátima Martins de Carvalho; Sotto, Mirian Nakagami; Orii, Noemia Mie; Alves, Cleiton; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Among the various occupations which necessarily require long-term and chronic sun exposure is that of a fisherman. However, clinical experience in dermatology earned over several years of medical practice does not seem to confirm this hypothesis. To evaluate clinical, histological and immunological effects of long-term and chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation in fishermen. A prospective, cross-sectional and observational study characterized skin lesions, immunological markers and histological alterations in fishermen, as well as lymphocyte subpopulations compared to a control group. Mann-Whitney, Fisher's and Wilcoxon statistical tests were used at a significance level of 0.05. There were significant differences between the exposed group and the group protected due to elastosis (p = 0.03), ectasia of dermal vessels (p = 0.012) and number of cells in the epidermal layers between cones (p = 0.029). Most common among fishermen were CD45RO, CD68 + and mastocytes in the skin (p = 0.040, p <0.001, p = 0.001) and CD3CD8CD45RO in the blood (p = 0.016). The alterations suggest that long-term and chronic sun exposure promotes tolerance to ultraviolet radiation, which protects against immunosuppression.

  16. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera. III. Immunology and immunopathology in rapidly induced models

    SciTech Connect

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1983-03-01

    Although chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) frequently develops in the long-term rat radiation chimera, we present three additional models in which a histologically similar disease is rapidly induced. These include adoptive transfer of spleen and bone marrow from rats with spontaneous chronic GVHD into lethally irradiated rats of the primary host strain; sublethal irradiation of stable chimeras followed by a booster transplant; and transfer of spleen cells of chimeras recovering from acute GVHD into second-party (primary recipient strain) or third-party hosts. Some immunopathologic and immune abnormalities associated with spontaneous chronic GVHD were not observed in one or more of the induced models. Thus, IgM deposition in the skin, antinuclear antibodies, and vasculitis appear to be paraphenomena. On the other hand, lymphoid hypocellularity of the thymic medulla, immaturity of splenic follicles, and nonspecific suppressor cells were consistently present in the long term chimeras, and in all models. These abnormalities therefore may be pathogenetically important, or closely related to the development of chronic GVHD.

  17. Effects of chronic continuous wave microwave radiation (2. 45 GHz) on the foraging behavior of the white-throated sparrow

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, F.E.; Patterson, D.A.; Kunz, T.H.; Battista, S.P.; Byman, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of chronic continuous wave microwave radiation on the foraging behavior of the White-throated Sparrow was examined using an optimal foraging laboratory technique. Birds were exposed to microwaves for seven days at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and power densities of 0.0, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 25.0 mW/cm/sup 2/. Even though there were differences in foraging behaviors among power densities no trend was found for a dose response effect. Birds showed no significant differences in foraging behaviors among pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure periods.

  18. Estimating incidence of organ cancer related to PCI radiation exposure in patients treated for acute and chronic total occlusions.

    PubMed

    Godino, Cosmo; Maccagni, Davide; Pavon, Anna Giulia; Viani, Giacomo; Cappelletti, Alberto; Margonato, Alberto; Colombo, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Minimal data exist on the number of additional cancer cases related to radiation exposure following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of this study is to estimate the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence for individual organs following radiation exposure during PCI in the context of two opposite sides of the angiographic spectrum of coronary occlusive disease: ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and chronic coronary total occlusion (CTO). We identified all consecutive patients treated with PCI for STEMI (n = 555) and for CTO (n = 543) in a tertiary care center in 6 years. The LARs of cancer incidence for 6 organs were estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII model. The estimated LAR of cancer incidence for individual organs was found to markedly increase as the age of the patient decreased and was significantly higher for the lung (additional risk up to 18/100,000 persons exposed in CTO and 9/100,000 persons exposed in STEMI patients, respectively; P<.0001) and for the red bone marrow (up to 3.5/100,000 persons exposed and 1.5/100,000 persons exposed, respectively; P<.0001). In PCI procedures, the lung was the organ with the highest radiation absorbed. The number of additional estimated cancer cases for individual organs was on average two times higher in patients treated with PCI for CTO and the highest estimated LARs were for lung and red bone marrow cancers.

  19. Analysis of cellular response by exposure to acute or chronic radiation in human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Yasumoto, J.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.

    To clarify the biological effects of low-dose rate radiation on human health for long-term stay in space, we analyzed the induction of apoptosis and apoptosis-related gene expression after irradiation with different dose-rate in human lymphoblastoid TK-6 cells harboring wild-type p53 gene. We irradiated TK-6 cells by X-ray at 1.5 Gy (1 Gy/min) and then sampled at 25 hr after culturing. We also irradiated by gamma-ray at 1.5 Gy (1 mGy/min) and then sampled immediately or 25 hr after irradiation. For DNA ladder analysis, we extracted DNA from these samples and electrophoresed with 2% agarose gel. In addition, we extracted mRNA from these samples for DNA-array analysis. mRNA from non-irradiated cells was used as a control. After labeling the cDNA against mRNA with [α -33P]-dCTP and hybridizing onto DNA array (Human Apoptosis Expression Array, R&D Systems), we scanned the profiles of the spots by a phosphorimager (BAS5000, FUJI FILM) and calculated using a NIH Image program. The data of each DNA-array were normalized with eight kinds of house keeping genes. We analyzed the expression level of apoptosis-related genes such as p53-related, Bcl-2 family, Caspase family and Fas-related genes. DNA ladders were obviously detected in the cells exposed to a high dose-rate radiation. We detected the induction of the gene expression of apoptosis-promotive genes. In contrast, almost no apoptosis was observed in the cells exposed to the chronic radiation at a low dose-rate. In addition, we detected the induction of the gene expression of apoptosis-suppressive genes as compared with apoptosis promotive-genes immediately after chronic irradiation. These results lead the importance of biological meaning of exposure to radiation at low dose-rate from an aspect of carcinogenesis. Finally, the effects of chronic irradiation become a highly important issue in space radiation biology for human health.

  20. Screening of illegal intracorporeal containers ("body packing"): is abdominal radiography sufficiently accurate? A comparative study with low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Canel, Laurent; Becker, Christoph D; Wolff, Hans; Elger, Bernice; Lock, Eric; Sarasin, François; Bonfanti, Monica S; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal radiography in the detection of illegal intracorporeal containers (hereafter, packets), with low-dose computed tomography (CT) as the reference standard. This study was approved by the institutional ethical review board, with written informed consent. From July 2007 to July 2010, 330 people (296 men, 34 women; mean age, 32 years [range, 18-55 years]) suspected of having ingested drug packets underwent supine abdominal radiography and low-dose CT. The presence or absence of packets at abdominal radiography was reported, with low-dose CT as the reference standard. The density and number of packets (≤ 12 or >12) at low-dose CT were recorded and analyzed to determine whether those variables influence interpretation of results at abdominal radiography. Packets were detected at low-dose CT in 53 (16%) suspects. Sensitivity of abdominal radiography for depiction of packets was 0.77 (41 of 53), and specificity was 0.96 (267 of 277). The packets appeared isoattenuated to the bowel contents at low-dose CT in 16 (30%) of the 53 suspects with positive results. Nineteen (36%) of the 53 suspects with positive low-dose CT results had fewer than 12 packets. Packets that were isoattenuated at low-dose CT and a low number of packets (≤12) were both significantly associated with false-negative results at abdominal radiography (P = .004 and P = .016, respectively). Abdominal radiography is mainly limited by low sensitivity when compared with low-dose CT in the screening of people suspected of carrying drug packets. Low-dose CT is an effective imaging alternative to abdominal radiography. © RSNA, 2012.

  1. Outpatient management of intra-corporeal left ventricular assist device system in children: a multi-center experience.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, M; Vanderpluym, C; Jeewa, A; Canter, C E; Jansz, P; Parrino, P E; Miera, O; Schmitto, J; Mehegan, M; Adachi, I; Hübler, M; Zimpfer, D

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about the outcomes of children supported on intracorporeal left ventricular assist device (HVAD), and the feasibility of outpatient management. All centers with pediatric patients discharged from the hospital on the device were identified using company database. A total of 14 centers were contacted, with 9 centers, contributing data retrospectively. From 2011 to 2013, 12 pediatric patients (7 females), mean aged 11.9 ± 2.3 years (range 8-15), mean weight 43 ± 19 kg (range 18-81), mean body surface area 1.3 ± 0.3 m(2) (range 0.76-1.96) were identified. Diagnosis included: dilated cardiomyopathy (CMP) (n = 5), noncompaction CMP (n = 4), toxic CMP (n = 2) and viral CMP (n = 1). Indications for support were permanent support (n = 1), bridge to recovery (n = 1) and bridge to transplantation (n = 10). Prior to HVAD implantation, all patients received intravenous inotropes and two patients were on temporary mechanical support. Overall mortality was 0%. Mean duration of inpatient and outpatient support were 56 (range: 19-95 days) and 290 days (range: 42-790), respectively. Mean readmission rate was 0.02 per patient month (2.1 per patient). No adverse events involving emergency department occurred. Eight children resumed local schooling. Home discharge of children supported on HVAD is feasible and safe. School integration can be achieved. There is wide center variability to discharge practice for children.

  2. Total laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with 3-step stapled intracorporeal isoperistaltic ileocolic anastomosis for colon cancer: An evaluation of short-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jian-Cheng, Tu; Shu-Sheng, Wang; Bo, Zhang; Jian, Fang; Liang, Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with extracorporeal anastomosis is a widely used procedure; several authors have published their approach to intracorporeal anastomosis. In this paper, we present an approach developed by us and compare short-term outcomes with those of extracorporeal anastomosis in colon cancer patients.Retrospective review of colon cancer patients treated with laparoscopic right hemicolectomy either with intracorporeal anastomosis (TLG group) or extracorporeal anastomosis (LG group) at the Zhangjiagang Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University between January 2011 and October 2015. Operative and postoperative data are compared.Around 85 patients underwent laparoscopic hemicolectomy (56 TLG and 29 LG) during the reference period for this study. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), stage of cancer, operation time, number of lymph nodes harvested, and length of hospital stay were comparable between the 2 groups. In the TLG group, the ileocolic anastomosis time was significantly shorter (9.9-15.5 minutes vs 13.5-18.2 minutes in LG; P < 0.001), the mean intraoperative blood loss was lower (83.2 mL [range, 56.5-100.5 mL] vs 93.3 mL [range, 75.8 - 110.3 mL]; P < 0.001), the recovery of bowel function was faster (P < 0.001), and the postoperative pain score was lower (P < 0.001) as compared to that in the LG group. Complications in the LG group included wound infection (4 patients), obstruction (1), and postoperative bleeding complications (1); however, only 1 patient developed complication (wound infection) in the TLG group.Total laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with 3-step stapled intracorporeal anastomosis for colon cancer is a safe and reliable procedure. Its advantages include short anastomosis time, less intraoperative blood loss, less postoperative pain, and early bowel function recovery.

  3. Chronic effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on growth and cell volume of Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Bacillariophyceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Behrenfeld, M.J. ); Hardy, J.T. ); Lee, H. II )

    1992-12-01

    Cultures of the temperate estuarine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin (NEPCC Clone 31), were grown under ambient intensities of ultraviolet-A radiation (UVAR), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and various intensities of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR; 290-320 nm). Growth rates and cell volumes were monitored for 36 d. UVBR decreased growth rates and increased cell volumes. Sensitivity of growth to UVBR increased with time. Growth rates of P. tricornutum decreased with increasing ratios of UVBR:UVAR + PAR. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Failure of 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas to improve chronic radiation proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, C.A.; Biddle, W.L.; Miner, P.B. Jr.

    1989-05-01

    Radiation proctitis is a well-known complication of abdominal and pelvic radiation. Conventional medical and surgical treatment often is disappointing. 5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is the active component in sulfasalazine and is effective in the treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. Four patients with radiation proctitis were treated with 4 g 5-ASA by enema nightly for two to six months. Patients were seen monthly, interviewed, and a sigmoidoscopic exam performed. No change was seen in the degree of mucosal inflammation on follow-up sigmoidoscopic exams. Three patients noted no change in their symptoms of bleeding, pain, or tenesmus. One patient noted initial improvement, but this was not sustained. 5-ASA enemas do not appear to be effective in the treatment of radiation proctitis.

  5. AN INTRACORPOREAL (ABDOMINAL) LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE [ALVAD], XXX: CLINICAL READINESS AND INITIAL TRIALS IN MAN

    PubMed Central

    Norman, John C.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present documenting evidence of the clinical readiness of an abdominal left ventricular assist device (ALVAD) according to NHLI criteria,‡ and the initiation of clinical trials of this device in otherwise irretrievable adult post-cardiotomy patients at the Texas Heart Institute of St. Luke's Episcopal and Texas Children's Hospitals. The ALVAD system has been developed, modified, and improved under NHLI auspices over the last eight years,‡‡ with annual reviews. Over 20,000 hours of in-vivo testing in the calf have been accomplished in our laboratories. The current clinical trials underwent two federal reviews (May 22, 1973 and October 17, 1974) and were the topic of an Ad Hoc Workshop at NHLI on October 28, 1973.‡‡‡ More recently, a consecutive series of 26 bovine ALVAD implantations were undertaken; acute and chronic hemodynamic effectiveness with maintenance or augmentation of the systemic circulation during profound ventricular unloading without undue blood trauma, intra-or extra-prosthetic thrombosis, or sepsis was demonstrated; no biomaterials problems were encountered. In-vivo realibility and durability, histologic and pathologic results were detailed, summarized, and submitted to NHLI. Patient acceptability surveys and geometric and volumetric human configuration studies were analyzed. Categorizations of the patients at risk in our institutions and the needs for such a device were documented. The periods of intended use (two weeks-one month), weaning procedures, and the possibility of pump dependence have been discussed. The legal, moral, ethical and informed consent issues were addressed. Clinical protocols (anesthesia, surgical, cardiologic, hematologic, engineering, computerized data-acquisition, follow-up) and cost analyses were developed. The device has now been used in four terminal patients since December, 1975; all subsequently succumbed, but their circulations were temporarily supported during total left

  6. Urinary bladder carcinogenesis induced by chronic exposure to persistent low-dose ionizing radiation after Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Alina; Kakehashi, Anna; Morimura, Keiichirou; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Wei, Min; Vozianov, Alexander; Fukushima, Shoji

    2009-11-01

    Urinary bladder urothelium as well as cells in the microenvironment of lamina propria (endothelial elements, fibroblasts and lymphocytes) demonstrate a number of responses to chronic persistent long-term, low-dose ionizing radiation (IR). Thus, oxidative stress occurs, accompanied by up-regulation of at least two signaling pathways (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB cascades) and activation of growth factor receptors, in the bladder urothelium of people living in Cesium 137-contaminated areas of Ukraine, resulting in chronic inflammation and the development of proliferative atypical cystitis, so-called Chernobyl cystitis, which is considered a possible pre-neoplastic condition in humans. Furthermore, significant alterations in regulation of cell cycle transitions are associated with increased cell proliferation, along with up-regulated ubiquitination and sumoylation processes as well as inefficient DNA repair (base and nucleotide excision repair pathways) in the affected urothelium. The microenvironmental changes induced by chronic long-term, low-dose IR also appear to promote angiogenesis and remodeling of the extracellular matrix that could facilitate invasion as well as progression of pre-existing initiated cells to malignancy. Based on the available findings, new strategies have been developed for predicting and treatment of Chernobyl cystitis-a first step in urinary bladder carcinogenesis in humans.

  7. Combined exposure to simulated microgravity and acute or chronic radiation reduces neuronal network integrity and cell survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benotmane, Rafi

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. This study aimed at assessing the effect of these combined conditions on neuronal network density, cell morphology and survival, using well-connected mouse cortical neuron cultures. To this end, neurons were exposed to acute low and high doses of low LET (X-rays) radiation or to chronic low dose-rate of high LET neutron irradiation (Californium-252), under the simulated microgravity generated by the Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch space). High content image analysis of cortical neurons positive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin unveiled a reduced neuronal network integrity and connectivity, and an altered cell morphology after exposure to acute/chronic radiation or to simulated microgravity. Additionally, in both conditions, a defect in DNA-repair efficiency was revealed by an increased number of γH2AX-positive foci, as well as an increased number of Annexin V-positive apoptotic neurons. Of interest, when combining both simulated space conditions, we noted a synergistic effect on neuronal network density, neuronal morphology, cell survival and DNA repair. Furthermore, these observations are in agreement with preliminary gene expression data, revealing modulations in cytoskeletal and apoptosis-related genes after exposure to simulated microgravity. In conclusion, the observed in vitro changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by space simulated conditions provide us with mechanistic understanding to evaluate health risks and the development of countermeasures to prevent neurological disorders in astronauts over long-term space travels. Acknowledgements: This work is supported partly by the EU-FP7 projects CEREBRAD (n° 295552)

  8. Ionizing Radiation and Risk of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in the 15-Country Study of Nuclear Industry Workers

    PubMed Central

    Vrijheid, Martine; Cardis, Elisabeth; Ashmore, Patrick; Auvinen, Anssi; Gilbert, Ethel; Habib, Rima R.; Malker, Hans; Muirhead, Colin R.; Richardson, David B.; Rogel, Agnes; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary; Tardy, Hélène; Telle-Lamberton, Maylis

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to other types of leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been regarded as non-radiogenic, i.e. not caused by ionizing radiation. However, the justification for this view has been challenged. We therefore report on the relationship between CLL mortality and external ionizing radiation dose within the 15-country nuclear workers cohort study. The analyses included, in seven countries with CLL deaths, a total of 295,963 workers with more than 4.5 million person-years of follow-up and an average cumulative bone marrow dose of 15 mSv; there were 65 CLL deaths in this cohort. The relative risk (RR) at an occupational dose of 100 mSv compared to 0 mSv was 0.84 (95% CI 0.39, 1.48) under the assumption of a 10-year exposure lag. Analyses of longer lag periods showed little variation in the RR, but they included very small numbers of cases with relatively high doses. In conclusion, the largest nuclear workers cohort study to date finds little evidence for an association between low doses of external ionizing radiation and CLL mortality. This study had little power due to low doses, short follow-up periods, and uncertainties in CLL ascertainment from death certificates; an extended follow-up of the cohorts is merited and would ideally include incident cancer cases. PMID:18959468

  9. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h(-1) up to 1.5 Gy h(-1). Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h(-1). A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR10) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h(-1), followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h(-1) and 169 ± 12 mGy h(-1) on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h(-1), antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h(-1) which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic stress conditions

  10. Single-port plus an additional port robotic complete mesocolic excision and intracorporeal anastomosis using a robotic stapler for right-sided colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Jeong, Woon Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The concept of complete mesocolic excision and central vascular ligation for colonic cancer has been recently introduced. The paper describes a technique of right-sided complete mesocolic excision and intracorporeal anastomosis by using a single-port robotic approach with an additional conventional robotic port. We performed a single-port plus an additional port robotic surgery using the Da Vinci Single-Site platform via the Pfannenstiel incision and the wristed robotic instruments via an additional robotic port in the left lower quadrant. The total operative and docking times were 280 and 25 minutes, respectively. The total number of lymph nodes harvested was 36 and the proximal and distal resection margins were 31 and 50 cm, respectively. Single-port plus an additional port robotic surgery for right-sided complete mesocolic excision and intracorporeal anastomosis appears to be feasible and safe. This system can overcome certain limitations of the previous robotic systems and conventional single-port laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27757400

  11. Radiation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  12. Analysis of open and intracorporeal robotic assisted radical cystectomy shows no significant difference in recurrence patterns and oncological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Shen; Sridhar, Ashwin; Ellis, Gidon; Lamb, Benjamin; Goldstraw, Miles; Nathan, Senthil; Hines, John; Cathcart, Paul; Briggs, Tim; Kelly, John

    2016-06-01

    To report and compare early oncological outcomes and cancer recurrence sites among patients undergoing open radical cystectomy (ORC) and robotic-assisted radical cystectomy with intracorporeal urinary diversion (iRARC). A total of 184 patients underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. ORC cases (n = 94) were performed between June 2005 and July 2014 while iRARC cases (n = 90) were performed between June 2011 and July 2014. Primary outcome was recurrence free survival (RFS). Secondary outcomes were sites of local and metastatic recurrence, cancer specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS). Median follow-up for patients without recurrence was 33.8 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 20.5-45.4) for ORC; and 16.1 months (IQR: 11.2-27.0) for iRARC. No significant difference in age, sex, precystectomy T stage, precystectomy grade, or lymph node yield between ORC and iRARC was observed. The ORC cohort included more patients with≥pT2 (64.8% ORC vs. 38.9% iRARC) but fewer pT0 status (8.5% ORC vs.vs. 22.2% iRARC) due to lower preoperative chemotherapy use (22.3% ORC vs. 34.4% iRARC). Positive surgical margin rate was significantly higher in the ORC cohort (19.3% vs. 8.2%; P = 0.042). Kaplan-Meir analysis showed no significant difference in RFS (69.5% ORC vs. 78.8% iRARC), cancer specific survival (80.9% ORC vs. 84.4% iRARC), or OS (73.5% ORC vs.vs. iRARC 83.8%) at 24 months. Cox regression analysis showed RFS, cancer specific survival and OS were not influenced by cystectomy technique. No significant difference between local and metastatic RFS between ORC and iRARC was observed. This study has found no difference in recurrence patterns or oncological outcomes between ORC and iRARC. Recurrent metastatic sites vary, but are not related to surgical technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Comparative evaluation of influence of low-intensity laser radiation of different spectrum components and regimen of laser work upon microcirculation in comprehensive treatment of chronic parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Krechina, E K; Shidova, A V; Maslova, V V

    2008-01-01

    Comparative study of the influence details of low-intensity pulse and continuous oscillation of laser radiation of red and infrared parts of spectrum upon microcirculation indices in comprehensive treatment of chronic parodontitis of light and middle severity was performed. For the first time the predominantly activating influence upon microcirculation in gingival tissues of the pulsed laser radiation in the red part of spectrum was established.

  14. Bone marrow derived macrophages fuse with intestine stromal cells and contribute to chronic fibrosis after radiation.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Han; Chang, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Yi-Chih; Chen, Su-Liang; Huang, Tze-Sing; Chiu, Jeng-Fong; Ch'ang, Hui-Ju

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) have been demonstrated to play a critical role in intestine regeneration. However, organ fibrosis was one of the major side effects of bone marrow (BM) transplantation. It warrants further investigation on the mechanisms of BM cell therapy in radiation induced intestine damage. We established three murine models to evaluate BMDC within intestines after radiation, including cre-loxP system of transgenic mice. In vitro co-culture between murine BM with human intestine stromal cells was also performed to measure the level of fusion and fibrosis after treatment with anti-fibrotic agents or after macrophage depletion. Despite complete recovery of epithelial mucosa from radiation damage, we found persistent proliferation and repopulation of BMDC within the lamina propria. Fusion between BM derived monocytic and intestine stromal cells correlated with the level of fibrosis and proliferation index. Depleting macrophages genetically using CD11b-DTR mouse model or pharmacologically using clodronate liposome reduced the level of cell fusion and intestine fibrosis. Fibrotic cues from intestine enhance fusion between BM-derived monocytes/macrophages with intestine stromal cells. The fusion hybrids promote cell cycle re-entry, proliferation and reinforce fibrosis signal. Depleting macrophages interferes with cell fusion and ameliorates radiation-induced intestine fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A study of immunological reactions in dogs exposed to prolonged chronic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantinova, I. V.; Grigoryev, Y. G.; Markelov, B. A.; Skryabin, A. S.; Zemskov, V. M.; Vasilyev, I. S.; Veysfeyler, Y. K.; Iokai, I.

    1974-01-01

    Immunomorphological studies on dog tissues exposed to long term gamma irradiation show that the number of cells containing antibodies increased and that the blast transformation reaction was activated. Prolonged radiation did not cause a reliable change in the synthesis of nucleic acids in spleen cells.

  16. Chronic radiation exposure as an ecological factor: Hypermethylation and genetic differentiation in irradiated Scots pine populations.

    PubMed

    Volkova, P Yu; Geras'kin, S A; Horemans, N; Makarenko, E S; Saenen, E; Duarte, G T; Nauts, R; Bondarenko, V S; Jacobs, G; Voorspoels, S; Kudin, M

    2017-09-18

    Genetic and epigenetic changes were investigated in chronically irradiated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) populations from territories that were heavily contaminated by radionuclides as result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. In comparison to the reference site, the genetic diversity revealed by electrophoretic mobility of AFLPs was found to be significantly higher at the radioactively contaminated areas. In addition, the genome of pine trees was significantly hypermethylated at 4 of the 7 affected sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biodosimetry of Persons Chronically Exposed to Low and Therapeutic Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zedginidze, Alla; Namchevadze, Ema; Ormocadze, George; Kapanadze, Archil; Nikuradze, Tamara; Lomidze, Darejan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic changes of the chromosomal aberrations and the DNA damage were analyzed in individuals exposed to low and therapeutic doses of radiation. The investigation included 37 persons living in areas where the radioactive sources were discovered 10–12 years ago. It was established by biodosimetry methods that the examined persons had absorbed dose of 0.2–0.7 Gy or had increased number of chromosomal aberrations, though insufficient to determine a dose. Clinical examination, chromosomal analysis, and assay of DNA damage by the comet (single-cell gel electrophoresis) assay were carried out. There was no correlation between the doses received 10 years ago and the cytogenetic changes with clinical outcome. The effect of the local fractionated gamma-irradiation with doses of 40–70 Gy was studied in cancer patients with localized head and neck tumors. The study of chromosomal abnormalities, the DNA damages by the comet assay, and the micronuclei detection of the buccal cells revealed a statistically significant correlation between the initial cytogenetic indices in cancer patients and their dynamic changes during and after the radiation exposure. In addition, the correlation was detected between the initial cytogenetic parameters and the functional stage of red blood system. Our results allow us to conclude that there is a need for further research to estimate the individual radiation risk to optimize and individualize the subsequent medical management of radiotherapy. PMID:28217288

  18. Comparative study of bipolar eletrocoagulation versus argon plasma coagulation for rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation coloproctopathy.

    PubMed

    Lenz, L; Tafarel, J; Correia, L; Bonilha, D; Santos, M; Rodrigues, R; Gomes, G; Andrade, G; Martins, F; Monaghan, M; Nakao, F; Libera, E; Ferrari, A P; Rohr, R

    2011-08-01

    Chronic radiation coloproctopathy (CRCP) is a well-recognized complication of radiotherapy, with rectal bleeding the most common presentation. It is frequently refractory to conservative management, but the optimal endoscopic treatment of bleeding secondary to CRCP is still controversial. The efficacy and safety of bipolar eletrocoagulation (BEC) and argon plasma coagulation (APC) in the management of bleeding from CRCP were evaluated and compared. 30 patients (mean age 67.4 years) with active and chronic bleeding from telangiectasias, were randomly allocated to BEC or APC and stratified by severity of CRCP according to clinical severity and endoscopic findings (Saunders score). Success was defined as eradication of all telangiectasias, and therapeutic failure as need for more than seven sessions or for other treatment. Complications were categorized as minor (e.g. fever, anal or abdominal pain) or major (hemorrhagic). Both treatments were equally effective for the treatment of CRCP rectal bleeding. Only one failure was observed in each group (P = 1.000). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding number of sessions, minor or major complications, or relapse. However, overall complication rate was significantly higher in the BEC group (P = 0.003). BEC and APC are both effective for the therapy of bleeding telangiectasias from CRCP. There are probably no major differences between them. Although APC seemed safer than BEC in this investigation, further studies, involving a much larger population, are needed to assess the complication rates and determine the best management option. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Whey peptides prevent chronic ultraviolet B radiation-induced skin aging in melanin-possessing male hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins or peptides exhibit various actions, including an antioxidant action, an anticancer action, and a protective action against childhood asthma and atopic syndrome. The effects of orally administered whey peptides (WPs) on chronic ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cutaneous changes, including changes in cutaneous thickness, elasticity, wrinkle formation, etc., have not been examined. In this study, we studied the preventive effects of WPs on cutaneous aging induced by chronic UVB irradiation in melanin-possessing male hairless mice (HRM). UVB (36-180 mJ/cm(2)) was irradiated to the dorsal area for 17 wk in HRM, and the measurements of cutaneous thickness and elasticity in UVB irradiated mice were performed every week. WPs (200 and 400 mg/kg, twice daily) were administered orally for 17 wk. WPs inhibited the increase in cutaneous thickness, wrinkle formation, and melanin granules and the reduction in cutaneous elasticity associated with photoaging. Furthermore, it has been reported that UVB irradiation-induced skin aging is closely associated with the increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Ki-67-, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-positive cells. WPs also prevented increases in the expression of MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9, VEGF, and Ki-67- and 8-OHdG-positive cells induced by chronic UVB irradiation. It was found that WPs prevent type IV collagen degradation, angiogenesis, proliferation, and DNA damage caused by UVB irradiation. Overall, these results demonstrate the considerable benefit of WPs for protection against solar UV-irradiated skin aging as a supplemental nutrient.

  20. Chronic eosinophilic leukemia with FIP1L1-PDGFRA transcripts after occupational and therapeutic exposure to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Balatzenko, Gueorgui; Stoyanov, Nikolay; Bekrieva, Elena; Guenova, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    We present for the first time a 40-year-old male patient with a 20 year history of occupational exposure to radiation as a nuclear power plant worker, who developed FIP1L1-PDGFRA-positive chronic eosinophilic leukemia 27 months after radiotherapy for testicular seminoma. After an one-year history of dry cough, itching and night sweats, the patient presented with an elevated leukocyte count with absolute eosinophilia of 14.2×109/L, bone marrow and lymph node involvement. Treatment with Imatinib was initiated, resulting in complete hematological remission at the sixth month and complete molecular response by nested primers reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction - at the end of the first year. This case contributes to the clinical heterogeneity of a rare entity such as FIP1L1-PDGFA-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms, and for the possible role of occupational and therapeutic radiation, raising the question if one or both of them might be the causative factor. PMID:22184538

  1. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Loseva, Olga; Shubbar, Emman; Haghdoost, Siamak; Evers, Bastiaan; Helleday, Thomas; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats

    2014-01-01

    The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h) of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS). We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) is mechanistically involved. PMID:28250385

  2. Cancer and non-cancer brain and eye effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background According to a fundamental law of radiobiology (“Law of Bergonié and Tribondeau”, 1906), the brain is a paradigm of a highly differentiated organ with low mitotic activity, and is thus radio-resistant. This assumption has been challenged by recent evidence discussed in the present review. Results Ionizing radiation is an established environmental cause of brain cancer. Although direct evidence is lacking in contemporary fluoroscopy due to obvious sample size limitation, limited follow-up time and lack of focused research, anecdotal reports of clusters have appeared in the literature, raising the suspicion that brain cancer may be a professional disease of interventional cardiologists. In addition, although terminally differentiated neurons have reduced or mild proliferative capacity, and are therefore not regarded as critical radiation targets, adult neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb, and is important for mood, learning/memory and normal olfactory function, whose impairment is a recognized early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases. The head doses involved in radiotherapy are high, usually above 2 Sv, whereas the low-dose range of professional exposure typically involves lifetime cumulative whole-body exposure in the low-dose range of < 200 mSv, but with head exposure which may (in absence of protection) arrive at a head equivalent dose of 1 to 3 Sv after a professional lifetime (corresponding to a brain equivalent dose around 500 mSv). Conclusions At this point, a systematic assessment of brain (cancer and non-cancer) effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiologists and staff is needed. PMID:22540409

  3. A transcriptome signature of endothelial lymphatic cells coexists with the chronic oxidative stress signature in radiation-induced post-radiotherapy breast angiosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Hamou, Nabila-Sandra; Laé, Marick; Almeida, Anna; de la Grange, Pierre; Kirova, Youlia; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Malfoy, Bernard

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced breast angiosarcomas are rare but recognized complication of breast cancer radiotherapy and are of poor prognosis. Little is known about the genetic abnormalities present in these secondary tumors. Herein, we investigated the differences in the genome and in the transcriptome that discriminate these tumors as a function of their etiology. Seven primary breast angiosarcomas and 18 secondary breast angiosarcomas arising in the irradiation field of a radiotherapy were analyzed. Copy number alterations and gene expression were analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Array and Affymetrix Exon Arrays, respectively. We showed that two transcriptome signatures of the radiation tumorigenesis coexisted in these tumors. One was histology specific and correctly discriminated 100% of the primary tumors from the radiation-induced tumors. The deregulation of marker genes, including podoplanin (PDPN), prospero homeobox 1 (PROX-1), vascular endothelial growth factor 3 (VEGFR3) and endothelin receptor A (EDNRA), suggests that the radiation-induced breast angiosarcomas developed from radiation-stimulated lymphatic endothelial cells. None of the genes of the histology-specific signature were present in our previously published signature of the radiation tumorigenesis which shows the presence of a chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced sarcomas of various histologies. Nevertheless, this oxidative stress signature classified correctly 88% of the breast angiosarcomas as a function of the etiology. In contrast, MYC amplification, which is observed in all radiation-induced tumors but also at a low rate in primary tumors, was not a marker of the radiation tumorigenesis.

  4. Effect of chronic near-ultraviolet radiation on the gray squirrel lens in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zigman, S; Paxhia, T; McDaniel, T; Lou, M F; Yu, N T

    1991-05-01

    The effects of ambient exposure to near-ultraviolet (near-UV) radiation (300-400 nm) on the ocular lens of the diurnal squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) are reported. Gray squirrels lived in cages illuminated for 12 hr a day with near-UV light (6 mW/cm2, 365 nm) for 1 yr. The non-UV-exposed controls were housed separately. In the lenses of UV-exposed animals, anterior pole changes occurred. Central epithelial cells swelled, disappeared, or underwent proliferation. A band of disoriented degenerating fiber cells was seen in the midcortex, with a degree of liquefaction. When lens protein compartments were separated by centrifugation, water-insoluble but urea-soluble fractions were enhanced in the outer and inner cortex and the nucleus. Both high-performance liquid chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that proteins mainly in the midcortex and nucleus were altered considerably. Evidence of a loss of sulfhydryl compounds (by chemical and Raman spectroscopic analyses) and an increase of protein-thiol mixed disulfides (chemically) was also observed. These data prove that repetitive ambient exposure of diurnal animals to near-UV radiation at subsolar levels damages the lens by interfering with the maintenance of epithelial cells and altering the structural proteins; some of this may be due to the conversion of sulfhydryls to mixed disulfides.

  5. Cutaneous changes in rats induced by chronic skin exposure to ultraviolet radiation and organophosphate pesticide.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; Santos, Itamar; Korinsfky, Juliana Pedrosa; Lima e Silva, Benedyto Sávio; Carvalho, Luis Otávio; Plapler, Hélio

    2014-01-01

    To study the possible potentiation of the carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet radiation associated with an organophosphate pesticide. Forty Wistar rats were assigned into four groups (n=10 each) randomized according to the procedures: group A received only UVR-B radiation; group B, UVR-B for eight weeks followed by a seven week period of pesticide exposure; group C, UVR-B + pesticide concomitantly: group D, only pesticide application. At the end of the fifth, tenth and fifteenth weeks the animals were photographed. Skin biopsy and histopathological study with Hematoxylin-Eosin were done on the fifteenth week. Statistical analysis with Fisher's and Sign (unilateral) tests, 5% value for significance. Macroscopic lesions in the group A evolved from the erythema to erythema + desquamation. The groups B and C, with the association of two carcinogens, and group D presented evolution to keratosis, with higher incidence in group D. The histology showed a significant increase in the severity of injuries when the UVR-B and the pesticide were applied simultaneously, leading to cellular atypia. Concurrent association of UVR-B to organophosphate pesticide produced more severe lesions microscopically, although this has not been so apparent macroscopically. In daily practice the clinical evaluation should be complemented with laboratory evaluation.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells inhibit cutaneous radiation-induced fibrosis by suppressing chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jason A; Hudak, Kathryn E; Chung, Eun Joo; White, Ayla O; Scroggins, Bradley T; Burkeen, Jeffrey F; Citrin, Deborah E

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) can result in the development of cutaneous fibrosis, for which few therapeutic options exist. We tested the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) would favorably alter the progression of IR-induced fibrosis. We found that a systemic infusion of BMSC from syngeneic or allogeneic donors reduced skin contracture, thickening, and collagen deposition in a murine model. Transcriptional profiling with a fibrosis-targeted assay demonstrated increased expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and decreased expression of IL-1β in the irradiated skin of mice 14 days after receiving BMSC. Similarly, immunoassay studies demonstrated durable alteration of these and several additional inflammatory mediators. Immunohistochemical studies revealed a reduction in infiltration of proinflammatory classically activated CD80(+) macrophages and increased numbers of anti-inflammatory regulatory CD163(+) macrophages in irradiated skin of BMSC-treated mice. In vitro coculture experiments confirmed that BMSC induce expression of IL-10 by activated macrophages, suggesting polarization toward a regulatory phenotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-receptor 2 (TNF-R2) mediates IL-10 production and transition toward a regulatory phenotype during coculture with BMSC. Taken together, these data demonstrate that systemic infusion of BMSC can durably alter the progression of radiation-induced fibrosis by altering macrophage phenotype and suppressing local inflammation in a TNF-R2-dependent fashion. © AlphaMed Press.

  7. Risk of Cataract Incidence in a Cohort of Mayak PA Workers following Chronic Occupational Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Azizova, Tamara V.; Bragin, Evgeny V.; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Bannikova, Maria V.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study of cataract incidence in a cohort of Mayak Production Association workers first employed at one of the main facilities in 1948–1982 and followed up till the end of 2008 (22,377 workers). Principal advantages of the study are the large size of the cohort, long-term follow-up and sufficient statistical power, available results of annual eye examinations over the entire follow-up period and detailed information on non-radiation confounders. Individual measured doses from external γ-rays and neutrons used in the analyses were provided by the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008). Relative risk (RR) and excess relative risk (ERR) per unit dose (Gy) were calculated based on maximum likelihood using the AMFIT module of the EPICURE software. The RR of cataract incidence was found to be the highest in workers exposed at doses above 2.0 Gy. A significant linear association of cataract incidence with cumulative dose from external γ-rays was found with ERR/Gy equal to 0.28 (95% confidence intervals: 0.20, 0.37). The results obtained varied slightly with inclusion of additional adjustments for non-radiation factors (smoking index, hypertension, glaucoma and body mass index). Adjusting for the dose from neutrons gave a considerable increase in ERR/Gy for cataract incidence. PMID:27723789

  8. Solid cancer mortality associated with chronic external radiation exposure at the French atomic energy commission and nuclear fuel company.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2011-07-01

    nuclear workers, which should improve knowledge about the risks associated with chronic low doses and provide useful risk estimates for radiation protection.

  9. Non-parametric estimation of thresholds for radiation effects in vertebrate species under chronic low-LET exposures.

    PubMed

    Sazykina, Tatiana G; Kryshev, A I; Sanina, K D

    2009-11-01

    Databases on effects of chronic low-LET radiation exposure were analyzed by non-parametric statistical methods, to estimate the threshold dose rates above which radiation effects can be expected in vertebrate organisms. Data were grouped under three umbrella endpoints: effects on morbidity, reproduction, and life shortening. The data sets were compiled on a simple 'yes' or 'no' basis. Each data set included dose rates at which effects were reported without further details about the size or peculiarity of the effects. In total, the data sets include 84 values for endpoint "morbidity", 77 values for reproduction, and 41 values for life shortening. The dose rates in each set were ranked from low to higher values. The threshold TDR5 for radiation effects of a given umbrella type was estimated as a dose rate below which only a small percentage (5%) of data reported statistically significant radiation effects. The statistical treatment of the data sets was performed using non-parametric order statistics, and the bootstrap method. The resulting thresholds estimated by the order statistics are for morbidity effects 8.1 x 10(-4) Gy day(-1) (2.0 x 10(-4)-1.0 x 10(-3)), reproduction effects 6.0 x 10(-4) Gy day(-1) (4.0 x 10(-4)-1.5 x 10(-3)), and life shortening 3.0 x 10(-3) Gy day(-1) (1.0 x 10(-3)-6.0 x 10(-3)), respectively. The bootstrap method gave slightly lower values: 2.1 x 10(-4) Gy day(-1) (1.4 x 10(-4)-3.2 x 10(-4)) (morbidity), 4.1 x 10(-4) Gy day(-1) (3.0 x 10(-4)-5.7 x 10(-4)) (reproduction), and 1.1 x 10(-3) Gy day(-1) (7.9 x 10(-4)-1.3 x 10(-3)) (life shortening), respectively. The generic threshold dose rate (based on all umbrella types of effects) was estimated at 1.0 x 10(-3) Gy day(-1).

  10. Tc-99m MDP, thallium-201 chloride and Tc-99m MAG3 renal uptake in subacute and chronic radiation nephritis compared.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, B; Uysal, K; Bekis, R; Cetingoz, R; Kaya, G C; Durak, H

    2001-10-01

    The authors present a comparison of the findings for thallium-201 (Tl-201), Tc-99m MAG3 and Tc-99m MDP in subacute and chronic radiation nephritis in a 9-yr-old boy who was treated by radiation therapy for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of the left chest wall by a radiation port that partially included the left kidney. Tl-201 imaging three and six months later showed a cortical defect in the left kidney due to radiation nephritis. Tc-99m MDP scan showed increased uptake on both occasions, but more marked in the subacute period than in the chronic period. Tc-99m MAG3 showed decreased concentration and increased cortical retention three months later. Six months after the radiation therapy, a cortical defect corresponding to the cortical area that showed increased parenchymal retention was more prominent in the Tc-99m MAG3 scan. In the present case, Tc-99m MDP, Tl-201 and Tc-99m MAG3 findings may provide useful information for understanding pathophysiological damage in the kidney after radiation.

  11. Modeling deterministic effects in hematopoietic system caused by chronic exposure to ionizing radiation in large human cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Akushevich, Igor V.; Veremeyeva, Galina A.; Dimov, Georgy P.; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V.; Arbeev, Konstantin G.; Akleyev, Alexander V.; Yashin, Anatoly I.

    2013-01-01

    A new model of the hematopoietic system for humans chronically exposed to ionizing radiation allows for quantitative description of the initial hematopoiesis inhibition and subsequent increase in the risks of late stochastic effects such as leukemia. This model describes the dynamics of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as well as the dynamics of each of the three blood cell types (leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets). The model parameters are estimated from the results of other experiments. They include the steady-state numbers of hematopoietic stem cells and peripheral blood cell lines for an unexposed organism, amplification parameters for each blood cell line, parameters describing the proliferation and apoptosis, parameters of feedback functions regulating the steady-state numbers, and characteristics of radiosensitivity in respect to cell death and non-lethal cell damages. The dynamic model of hematopoiesis is applied to the data on subcohort of the Techa River residents with hematological measurements (e.g., blood counts) performed in 1950–1956 (which totals to about 3,500 exposed individuals). Among well-described effects observed in these data are the slope value of the dose-effect curves describing the hematopoietic inhibition and the dose rate patterns of the fractions of cytopenic states (e.g., leukopenia, thrombocytopenia). The model has been further generalized by inclusion of the component describing the risk of late stochastic effects. The risks of the development of late effects (such as leukemia) in population groups with specific patterns of early reactions in hematopoiesis (such as leukopenia induced by ionizing radiation) are investigated using simulation studies and compared to data. PMID:20699693

  12. Leukemia risk associated with chronic external exposure to ionizing radiation in a French cohort of nuclear workers.

    PubMed

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2012-11-01

    Leukemia is one of the earliest cancer effects observed after acute exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation. Leukemia mortality after external exposure at low doses and low-dose rates has been investigated at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Nuclear Fuel Company (AREVA NC) after an additional follow-up of 10 years. The cohort included radiation-monitored workers employed for at least one year during 1950-1994 at CEA or AREVA NC and followed during 1968-2004. Association between external exposure and leukemia mortality was estimated with excess relative risk (ERR) models and time-dependent modifying factors were investigated with time windows. The cohort included 36,769 workers, followed for an average of 28 years, among whom 73 leukemia deaths occurred. Among the workers with a positive recorded dose, the mean cumulative external dose was 21.7 mSv. Results under a 2-year lag assumption suggested that the risk of leukemia (except chronic lymphatic leukemia) increased significantly by 8% per 10 mSv. The magnitude of the association for myeloid leukemia was larger. The higher ERR/Sv for doses received 2-14 years earlier suggest that time since exposure modifies the effect. The ERR/Sv also appeared higher for doses received at exposure rates ≥20 mSv per year. These results are consistent with those found in other studies of nuclear workers. However, confidence intervals are still wide. Further analyses should be conducted in pooled cohorts of nuclear workers.

  13. Long-Term Endoscopic Follow-Up of Patients with Chronic Radiation Proctopathy after Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Nosaka, Takuto; Saito, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Hayama, Ryoko; Naito, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Kazuto; Ofuji, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Shioura, Hiroki; Kimura, Hirohiko; Aoki, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Osamu; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is late toxicity and associated with morbidity. Aim. To investigate the predictors of prognosis in patients with CRP after brachytherapy (BT). Methods. One hundred four patients with prostate cancer were treated with BT or BT followed by external-beam radiotherapy (BT + EBRT). We retrospectively investigated the 5-year incidence of rectal bleeding and endoscopic findings of CRP using the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Twenty patients with VRS ≥ 1 were divided into the improved VRS group without treatment, unchanged VRS group, and treated group. The parameters associated with alteration of VRS were analyzed. Results. The incidence of rectal bleeding was 24%. The risk of rectal bleeding was higher in patients treated with BT + EBRT compared to those treated with BT (p < 0.0001). The incidence of superficial microulceration was higher in the improved VRS group than in the unchanged VRS group (p < 0.05). The incidence of multiple confluent telangiectasia or superficial ulcers > 1 cm2 was higher in the treated group than in both the improved and unchanged VRS groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Patients treated with BT + EBRT have a high risk of CRP. Endoscopic findings were useful for prognostic prediction of CRP. PMID:27378828

  14. Long-Term Endoscopic Follow-Up of Patients with Chronic Radiation Proctopathy after Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Nosaka, Takuto; Saito, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Hayama, Ryoko; Naito, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Kazuto; Ofuji, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Shioura, Hiroki; Kimura, Hirohiko; Aoki, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Osamu; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is late toxicity and associated with morbidity. Aim. To investigate the predictors of prognosis in patients with CRP after brachytherapy (BT). Methods. One hundred four patients with prostate cancer were treated with BT or BT followed by external-beam radiotherapy (BT + EBRT). We retrospectively investigated the 5-year incidence of rectal bleeding and endoscopic findings of CRP using the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Twenty patients with VRS ≥ 1 were divided into the improved VRS group without treatment, unchanged VRS group, and treated group. The parameters associated with alteration of VRS were analyzed. Results. The incidence of rectal bleeding was 24%. The risk of rectal bleeding was higher in patients treated with BT + EBRT compared to those treated with BT (p < 0.0001). The incidence of superficial microulceration was higher in the improved VRS group than in the unchanged VRS group (p < 0.05). The incidence of multiple confluent telangiectasia or superficial ulcers > 1 cm(2) was higher in the treated group than in both the improved and unchanged VRS groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Patients treated with BT + EBRT have a high risk of CRP. Endoscopic findings were useful for prognostic prediction of CRP.

  15. [Apoptosis of Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes in the Members of the Techa River Cohort Chronically Exposed to Radiation].

    PubMed

    Blinova, E A; Akleyev, A V

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to estimate the intensity of the apoptotic death of lymphocytes during the period of carcinogenic effect realization in the residents of the Techa riverside villages. The investigation included analyses of the frequency of lymphocytes at the early and late stages of apoptosis and necrosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes using the method of FITC Annexin V, lymphocyte counts at the stage of DNA fragmentation using the TUNEL method, and the number of CD95(+)-lymphocytes. In the capacity of additional tests, loading tests involving in vitro irradiation at the dose of 1 Gy of a suspension of lymphocytes and incubations for 5 and 24 hours were used. Activation of the initial apoptotic and necrotic death of peripheral blood lymphocytes was revealed in the persons chronically exposed to low-intensity radiation within the range from 0.01 to 4.23 Gy. Exposed patients demonstrated a decrease in the number of CD95(+)-cells as compared to unexposed patients. The results of the cell death studies in the persons residing in the Techa riverside villages testify indirectly to the genomic instability of the peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  16. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera: I. clinical features, hematology, histology, and immunopathology in long-term chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1982-04-01

    The clinical features, pathology, and immunopathology of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developing in the long-term rat radiation chimera are described. At 6 to 12 months post-transplant, the previously stable ACI/LEW chimeras developed patchy to diffuse severe hair loss and thickened skin folds, and had microscopic features resembling scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis. Skin histology showed dermal inflammation and acanthosis with atrophy of the appendages, with progression to dermal sclerosis. The liver revealed chronic hepatitis with bile duct injury and proliferation and periportal piecemeal necrosis. The tongue had considerable submucosal inflammation, muscular necrosis, and atrophy and arteritis. The serous salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and bronchi had lymphocytic inflammation and injury to duct, acinar, and mucosal columnar epithelium. The thymus had lymphocyte depletion of the medulla with prominent epithelium. The spleen and lymph nodes had poorly developed germinal centers but increased numbers of plasma cells. IgM was observed along the basement membrane and around the basal cells of the skin and tongue and along the basement membrane of the bile ducts. IgM was present also in the arteries of the tongue. Immunoglobulins eluted from the skin, cross-reacted with the bile duct epithelium and usually with both ACI and Lewis skin. Increased titers of speckled antinuclear antibodies were present in the serum of rats with chronic (GVHD). Chronic GVHD in the long-term rat radiation chimera is very similar to human chronic GVHD and is a potentially excellent model for autoimmune disorders including scleroderma, Sjorgren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis.

  17. No adaptive response is induced by chronic low-dose radiation from Ra-226 in the CHSE/F fish embryonic cell line and the HaCaT human epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaopei; Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether chronic low-dose α-particle radiation from Ra-226 over multiple cell generations can lead to an adaptive response in CHSE/F fish embryonic cells or HaCaT human epithelial cells receiving subsequent acute high-dose γ-ray radiation. CHSE/F and HaCaT cells were exposed to very low doses of Ra-226 in medium for multiple generations prior to being challenged by a higher dose γ-ray radiation. The clonogenic assay was used to test the clonogenic survival of cells with or without being pretreated by radiation from Ra-226. In general, pretreatment with chronic radiation has no significant influence on the reaction of cells to the subsequent challenge radiation. Compared to unprimed cells, the change in clonogenic survival of primed cells after receiving challenge radiation is mainly due to the influence of the chronic exposure, and there's little adaptive response induced. However at several dose points, pretreatment of CHSE/F fish cells with chronic radiation resulted in a radiosensitive response to a challenge dose of γ-ray radiation, and pretreatment of HaCaT cells resulted in no effect except for a slightly radioresistant response to the challenge radiation which was not significant. The results suggest that chronic low-dose radiation is not effective enough to induce adaptive response. There was a difference between human and fish cells and it may be important to consider results from multiple species before making conclusions about effects of chronic or low doses of radiation in the environment. The term "radiosensitive" or "adaptive" make no judgment about whether such responses are ultimately beneficial or harmful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P R Vivek; Seshadri, M; Jaikrishan, G; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year(-1)), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N=43, range 1.07 mSv year(-1) to 5.55 mSv year(-1)) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year(-1) to 17.41 mSv year(-1)), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P=0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from our study suggest in vivo chronic low-level natural radiation provides an initial exposure that allows an adaptation to a subsequent higher radiation exposure, perhaps through improving DNA repair via an unknown mechanism. Therefore, further investigations would be necessary in this population to understand the biological and health effects of chronic low-level natural radiation exposures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Influence of chronic exposure to low doses of space ionizing radiation on the character of formation of microbial assemblage in the habitat of orbital station].

    PubMed

    Tsetlin, V V; Deshevaia, E A

    2003-01-01

    Statistically valid relations between radiation conditions in compartments of MIR station and the micromicete population (CFU number) on the surface of the equipment and the interior have been established. It was found that in conditions of a chronic exposure to space radiation the number of CFU increased in one thousand and more times with increasing of absorbed dose rate from 200 up to 1000 microGy/day. The results of land-based model experiments confirmed morphological changes in the "flight" strains of funguses under exposure to low doses of gamma (100-800 microGy/day) and neutron (0.2-2 neutron/cm2.s) radiation. It was found that the morphological changes in the control (museum) cultures of funguses of the same species, which were expressed in the weak increase of vegetative mycelium, were detected only after repeated gamma- and gamma + neutron irradiation.

  20. The efficiency of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia exposed to ionizing radiation due to the Chornobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Dmytrenko, I V; Fedorenko, V G; Shlyakhtychenko, T Y; Sholoyko, V V; Lyubarets, T F; Malinkina, T V; Dmytrenko, O O; Balan, V V; Kravchenko, S M; Martina, Z V; Tovstogan, A O; Minchenko, J M; Dyagil, I S

    2014-09-01

    Objective. To study the efficiency of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) therapy in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) exposed to ionizing radiation due to the Chornobyl NPP accident, based on the data of cytogenetic and molecular monitoring. Material and methods. 29 CML patients with confirmed radiation exposure due to Chornobyl NPP accident were examined. Of these, 20 patients were treated with imatinib; 103 patients with CML without radiation history treated with TKI were a comparison group. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic disturbances before and on the different stage of TKI therapy were analysed. Results. Additional chromosomal abnormalities as well as special pattern of BCR/ABL transcripts were not revealed in CML patients exposed to ionizing radiation. Complete cytogenetic response (CCR) was shown in 50 and 48.5 % of patients from study and comparison group, respectively. Major molecular response (MMR) was achieved in 20 % of patients with radiation exposure in anamnesis and in 27.6 % of patients from comparison group. The vast majority of CCR and MMR was reached in patients with the pretreatment term up to 6 months, when imatinib was used as a first line therapy. There were less cases of primary imatinib resistance in the same group of patients. In CML patients who had a history of radiation exposure, secondary resistance developed more frequently than in the comparison group and was 25 %. Conclusion. Laboratory monitoring based on the registration of CCR and MMR demonstrated high efficiency of TKI in the CML treatment of patients, exposed due to Chornobyl accident. Extension of pretreatment term leads to the loss of TKI therapy efficiency and increases the likelihood of primary resistance. CML patients exposed to ionizing radiation develop secondary resistence more often than CML patients without radiation exposure in anamnesis. I. V. Dmytrenko, V. G. Fedorenko, T. Y. Shlyakhtychenko, V. V. Sholoyko, T. F. Lyubarets, T. V. Malinkina, O. O

  1. Curriculum-based solo virtual reality training for laparoscopic intracorporeal knot tying: objective assessment of the transfer of skill from virtual reality to reality.

    PubMed

    Munz, Yaron; Almoudaris, Alex M; Moorthy, Krishna; Dosis, Aristotelis; Liddle, Alexander D; Darzi, Ara W

    2007-06-01

    Very few studies have addressed the transferability of skills from virtual reality (VR) to real life. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of teaching intracorporeal knot tying (ICKT) by VR simulation only. Twenty novices underwent structured training of basic skills training on the Minimally Invasive Surgical Trainer simulator (Mentice AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) followed by knot tying training on the LapSim simulator (Surgical Science, Gothenburg, Sweden). They were assessed pre- and post-training on a video trainer. Assessment of performance included motion tracking and video-based checklist. Nonparametric statistical analysis was used, and P < .05 was deemed significant. All participants completed a correct knot as compared with only 25% before VR training. Time to completion was 66% faster and knot quality 45% better after VR training. Significant reduction in number of movements (P = .006) and distance traveled (P < .000) by both hands after VR training. Teaching ICKT by VR simulators only is feasible and effective. Furthermore, this study highlights the complementary use of different VR simulators within a structured curriculum.

  2. Early Recurrence Patterns Following Totally Intracorporeal Robot-assisted Radical Cystectomy: Results from the EAU Robotic Urology Section (ERUS) Scientific Working Group.

    PubMed

    Collins, Justin W; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Adding, Christofer; Nyberg, Tommy; Koupparis, Anthony; Rowe, Edward; Perry, Matthew; Issa, Rami; Schumacher, Martin C; Wijburg, Carl; Canda, Abdullah E; Balbay, Melvin D; Decaestecker, Karel; Schwentner, Christian; Stenzl, Arnulf; Edeling, Sebastian; Pokupić, Saša; D'Hondt, Fredrik; Mottrie, Alexander; Wiklund, Peter N

    2017-05-01

    Recurrence following radical cystectomy often occurs early, with >80% of recurrences occurring within the first 2 yr. Debate remains as to whether robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) negatively impacts early recurrence patterns because of inadequate resection or pneumoperitoneum. We report early recurrence patterns among 717 patients who underwent RARC with intracorporeal urinary diversion at nine different institutions with a minimum follow-up of 12 mo. Clinical, pathologic, radiologic, and survival data at the latest follow-up were collected. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) estimates were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression models were built to assess variables associated with recurrence. RFS at 3, 12, and 24 mo was 95.9%, 80.2%, and 74.6% respectively. Distant recurrences most frequently occurred in the bones, lungs, and liver, and pelvic lymph nodes were the commonest site of local recurrence. We identified five patients (0.7%) with peritoneal carcinomatosis and two patients (0.3%) with metastasis at the port site (wound site). We conclude that unusual recurrence patterns were not identified in this multi-institutional series and that recurrence patterns appear similar to those in open radical cystectomy series. In this multi-institutional study, bladder cancer recurrences following robotic surgery are described. Early recurrence rates and locations appear to be similar to those for open radical cystectomy series. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Endoscopically controlled electrohydraulic intracorporal shock wave lithotripsy as a new therapy for sialolithiasis: first clinical experiences in comparison to the results of laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigsberger, Rainer; Feyh, Jens; Goetz, Alwin E.; Kastenbauer, E.

    1992-06-01

    The endoscopically controlled electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripsy (EISL) of salivary stones was performed on 29 patients with submandibular duct stones as a new non-surgical treatment of sialolithiasis. Under local anesthesia, a flexible fiberscope with an additional probe to generate shock waves is placed into the submandibular duct. Under endoscopic monitoring the fiberscope is advanced until the stone is identified. For stone disintegration, the probe must be situated 1 mm in front of the concrement. The fragmentation itself is performed by pressure waves generated by a sparkover at the tip of the probe. By means of the endoscopically controlled shock wave lithotripsy (EISL), it was possible to achieve complete stone fragmentation in 20 of 29 patients without serious side effects. In 3 patients only partial stone fragmentation could be achieved due to the stone quality. The endoscopically controlled electrohydraulic intracorporal shock wave lithotripsy (EISL) represents a novel non-invasive therapy for endoscopically accessible salivary gland stones. This therapy is performed on an outpatient basis with little inconvenience to the patient. The advantage in comparison to the endoscopically controlled laser lithotripsy will be discussed.

  4. Chronic Nonmodulated Microwave Radiations in Mice Produce Anxiety-like and Depression-like Behaviours and Calcium- and NO-related Biochemical Changes in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Surya P.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate behavioural and biochemical effects of chronic exposure of amplitude modulated and non-modulated microwave radiation on laboratory mice. Chronic microwave exposures were executed with 2.45 GHz of either modulated (power density, 0.029 mW/cm2; specific absorption rate, 0.019 W/Kg with sinusoidal modulation of 400 Hz) or nonmodulated continuous sinusoidal wave (power density, 0.033 mW/cm2; specific absorption rate, 0.023 W/Kg) for 2 hrs daily for 1 month. Mice subjected to non-modulated microwave exposure had significantly increased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased intracellular calcium and nitric oxide levels in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and also had increased glucose and corticosterone levels in blood compared to control mice. These non-modulated microwave-exposed mice exhibited anxiety-like and depression-like behaviours. In contrast, mice exposed to modulated microwave for the same period did not show such changes in concomitant biochemical and behavioural analyses. These results suggest that chronic non-modulated microwave, but not modulated microwave, radiation may cause anxiety-like and depression-like behaviours and calcium- and NO-related biochemical changes in the brain. PMID:28035182

  5. Radiation Proctopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grodsky, Marc B.; Sidani, Shafik M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a widely utilized treatment modality for pelvic malignancies, including prostate cancer, rectal cancer, and cervical cancer. Given its fixed position in the pelvis, the rectum is at a high risk for injury secondary to ionizing radiation. Despite advances made in radiation science, up to 75% of the patients will suffer from acute radiation proctitis and up to 20% may experience chronic symptoms. Symptoms can be variable and include diarrhea, bleeding, incontinence, and fistulization. A multitude of treatment options exist. This article summarizes the latest knowledge relating to radiation proctopathy focusing on the vast array of treatment options. PMID:26034407

  6. Dose–volume analysis of predictors for chronic gastrointestinal complications in patients with cervical cancer treated with postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Mabuchi, Seiji; Akino, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tamari, Keisuke; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ueda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Eiji; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Okubo, Hirofumi; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose–volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in patients with cervical cancer who have undergone postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). The subjects were 135 patients who had undergone postoperative WPRT with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy between 2000 and 2014. Associations between selected DVH parameters and the incidence of chronic GI complications of G3 or higher were evaluated. Chronic GI complications of severity G3 occurred in 18 (13%) patients. Patients with GI complications had significantly greater V5–V45, mean dose and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of the small bowel loops, compared with those without GI complications. V30–V45, mean dose and gEUD of the bowel bag also showed significant differences between patients with and without GI complications. In contrast, no parameter for the large bowel loop was correlated with GI complications. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis indicated that V30–V45 of the small bowel loops were better predictors than these respective parameters for the bowel bag. Next, patients were divided into four groups based on the median V15 and V40 of the small bowel loops. The group with both a high V15 and a high V40 showed a significantly higher probability of chronic GI complications. In conclusion, the small bowel loops are better predictors of chronic GI complications compared with the bowel bag, and a relatively high-dose volume (e.g. V40) of the small bowel loops is a useful predictor of chronic GI complications. PMID:27342839

  7. Effects of acute and chronic exposure to both 900 MHz and 2100 MHz electromagnetic radiation on glutamate receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gökçek-Saraç, Çiğdem; Er, Hakan; Kencebay Manas, Ceren; Kantar Gok, Deniz; Özen, Şükrü; Derin, Narin

    2017-09-01

    To demonstrate the molecular effects of acute and chronic exposure to both 900 and 2100 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) on the hippocampal level/activity of some of the enzymes - including PKA, CaMKIIα, CREB, and p44/42 MAPK - from N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-related signaling pathways. Rats were divided into the following groups: sham rats, and rats exposed to 900 and 2100 MHz RF-EMR for 2 h/day for acute (1 week) or chronic (10 weeks), respectively. Western blotting and activity measurement assays were used to assess the level/activity of the selected enzymes. The obtained results revealed that the hippocampal level/activity of selected enzymes was significantly higher in the chronic groups as compared to the acute groups at both 900 and 2100 MHz RF-EMR exposure. In addition, hippocampal level/activity of selected enzymes was significantly higher at 2100 MHz RF-EMR than 900 MHz RF-EMR in both acute and chronic groups. The present study provides experimental evidence that both exposure duration (1 week versus 10 weeks) and different carrier frequencies (900 vs. 2100 MHz) had different effects on the protein expression of hippocampus in Wistar rats, which might encourage further research on protection against RF-EMR exposure.

  8. High-Resolution Computed Tomography Examinations for Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease in Early Childhood: Radiation Exposure and Image Quality Evaluations With Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm Use.

    PubMed

    Smarda, Magdalini; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios; Mazioti, Argyro; Kordolaimi, Sofia; Ploussi, Agapi; Priftis, Konstantinos; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Alexopoulou, Efthymia

    2016-08-01

    High radiosensitivity of children undergoing repetitive computed tomography examinations necessitates the use of iterative reconstruction algorithms in order to achieve a significant radiation dose reduction. The goal of this study is to compare the iDose iterative reconstruction algorithm with filtered backprojection in terms of radiation exposure and image quality in 33 chest high-resolution computed tomography examinations performed in young children with chronic bronchitis. Fourteen patients were scanned using the filtered backprojection protocol while 19 patients using the iDose protocol and reduced milliampere-seconds, both on a 64-detector row computed tomography scanner. The iDose group images were reconstructed with different iDose levels (2, 4, and 6). Radiation exposure quantities were estimated, while subjective and objective image qualities were evaluated. Unpaired t tests were used for data statistical analysis. The iDose application allowed significant effective dose reduction (about 80%). Subjective image quality evaluation showed satisfactory results even with iDose level 2, whereas it approached excellent image with iDose level 6. Subjective image noise was comparable between the 2 groups with the use of iDose level 4, while objective noise was comparable between filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction level 6 images. The iDose algorithm use in pediatric chest high-resolution computed tomography reduces radiation exposure without compromising image quality. Further evaluation with iterative reconstruction algorithms is needed in order to establish high-resolution computed tomography as the gold standard low-dose method for children suffering from chronic lung diseases. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of chronic exposure to 835.62 MHz FDMA or 847.74 MHz CDMA radiofrequency radiation on the incidence of spontaneous tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    La Regina, Marie; Moros, Eduardo G; Pickard, William F; Straube, William L; Baty, Jack; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2003-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation from cellular phones increased the incidence of spontaneous tumors in F344 rats. Eighty male and 80 female rats were randomly placed in each of three irradiation groups. The sham group received no irradiation; the Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) group was exposed to 835.62 MHz FDMA RF radiation; and the Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) group was exposed to 847.74 MHz CDMA RF radiation. Rats were irradiated 4 h per day, 5 days per week over 2 years. The nominal time-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) in the brain for the irradiated animals was 0.85 +/- 0.34 W/kg (mean +/- SD) per time-averaged watt of antenna power. Antennas were driven with a time-averaged power of 1.50 +/- 0.25 W (range). That is, the nominal time-averaged brain SAR was 1.3 +/- 0.5 W/kg (mean +/- SD). This number was an average from several measurement locations inside the brain, and it takes into account changes in animal weight and head position during irradiation. All major organs were evaluated grossly and histologically. The number of tumors, tumor types and incidence of hyperplasia for each organ were recorded. There were no significant differences among final body weights or survival days for either males or females in any group. No significant differences were found between treated and sham-exposed animals for any tumor in any organ. We conclude that chronic exposure to 835.62 MHz FDMA or 847.74 MHz CDMA RF radiation had no significant effect on the incidence of spontaneous tumors in F344 rats.

  10. Use of Human Cadaveric Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of a Chronic Radiation-Induced Skin Lesion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Portas, M; Mansilla, E; Drago, H; Dubner, D; Radl, A; Coppola, A; Di Giorgio, M

    2016-09-01

    Acute and late radiation-induced injury on skin and subcutaneous tissues are associated with substantial morbidity in radiation therapy, interventional procedures and also are of concern in the context of nuclear or radiological accidents. Pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of acutely responding epithelial tissues and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Efforts for medical management of severe radiation-induced lesions have been made. Nevertheless, the development of strategies to promote wound healing, including stem cell therapy, is required. From 1997 to 2014, over 248 patients were referred to the Radiopathology Committee of Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burns Hospital) for the diagnosis and therapy of radiation-induced localized lesions. As part of the strategies for the management of severe cases, there is an ongoing research and development protocol on 'Translational Clinical Trial phases I/II to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adult mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow for the treatment of large burns and radiological lesions'. The object of this work was to describe the actions carried out by the Radiopathology Committee of the Burns Hospital in a chronic case with more than 30 years of evolution without positive response to conventional treatments. The approach involved the evaluation of the tissular compromise of the lesion, the prognosis and the personalized treatment, including regenerative therapy.

  11. Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation: RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift from acclimation to survival strategies.

    PubMed

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Nauts, Robin; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2017-04-01

    Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plant species. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treatments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stress in plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morphological and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7days in a dose-rate dependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosynthetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined the gene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expression data reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by triggering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes related to antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting that only high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the photosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study, supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towards survival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Gayle Woloschak

    2009-12-16

    As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

  13. A preliminary report on the usage of an intracorporal antibiotic cast with synthetic high purity CaSO4 for the treatment of infected penile implant.

    PubMed

    Swords, Kelly; Martinez, Daniel R; Lockhart, Jorge L; Carrion, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    Currently, the surgical treatment of infected penile prostheses is complete removal and either immediate salvage procedure, which carries a significant infection risk, or delayed implantation. With delayed implantation the risk of infection is lower, but the patient loses penile length and width due to corporal fibrosis. We present our experience with the use of a novel temporary synthetic high purity calcium sulfate (SHPCaSO4) component that acts as a "spacer" at the time of removal of an infected prosthesis while providing constant delivery of local antibiotic elution to the infected area. Demonstrate that the use of a novel material, SHPCaSO4, can be an innovative way to bridge the gap between removal of an infected penile implant and delayed reimplantation. Two patients (Patient A and B) presented with pain and erythema and were found to have infected malleable penile prosthesis. Both underwent removal of all infected components, and sent for tissue culture. The SHPCaSO4 was mixed with vancomycin and tobramycin, allowed to set up for 5 minutes, and then injected into the corporal space followed by closure with 2-0 Vicryl sutures. The injected SHPCaSO4 was palpable in the penile shaft both proximally and distally, as an "intracorporal casts." Patients denied pain postoperatively. Delayed implantation occurred at 6 weeks for patient A. This went uneventful and a new three-piece inflatable implant was inserted. Patient B underwent salvage placement of right malleable implant at 15 weeks, and here significant corporal fibrosis was encountered. Patients have had no infection since their delayed implantation (mean follow-up 4 months). Data in reference to SHPCaSO4 shows that this product dissolves in approximately 4-6 weeks. This may account for the difference in the ease of delayed implantation between the two patients. Further investigation is warranted. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  14. A minimally invasive surgery combining temporary percutaneous pedicle screw fixation without fusion and vertebroplasty with transpedicular intracorporeal hydroxyapatite blocks grafting for fresh thoracolumbar burst fractures: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Takami, Masanari; Yamada, Hiroshi; Nohda, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Munehito

    2014-07-01

    The conventional surgical treatment for thoracolumbar burst fractures is physically invasive for the patient and also causes problems such as the sacrifice of healthy mobile segments to stabilize the fracture site. We performed a procedure for the treatment of fresh thoracolumbar burst fractures by combining percutaneous short pedicle screw fixation and vertebroplasty with transpedicular intracorporeal hydroxyapatite blocks grafting. Patients with type A3 fresh thoracolumbar burst fractures with no or mild neurological symptoms were treated using temporary posterior fixation without fusion. Consecutive 21 patients were studied, with a mean age of 45.4 years (range 23-73) and a mean follow-up period of 21.9 months (range 15-25). We evaluated operative time, estimated blood loss, low back pain on a visual analogue scale, change in the kyphotic angle, correction loss, bone union, and complications. The average operative time was 95.7 min (range 69-143), and the average blood loss was 38.6 mL (range 10-130). The average correction angle was 9.6°. There were slight correction losses of height of the vertebral bodies. Bone union was obtained in all patients, with no instrumentation failures. Our procedure resulted in no surgery-related complications. For the treatment of type A3 fresh thoracolumbar burst fractures, this method is less invasive and can preserve the adjacent healthy mobile segment. Our treatment is an optional therapeutic strategy for patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures and is a good option particularly for young adult patients.

  15. [Adaptation processes in mice during chronic combined exposure to radiation and chemical compounds (acetone, ethanol, acetaldehyde) innate to exploration missions].

    PubMed

    Tatarkin, S V; Shafirkin, A V; Mukhamedieva, L N; Barantseva, M Iu; Ivanova, S M

    2012-01-01

    The paper reports the results of experimental investigation with mice subjected to 63-day of daily 10-fold fractionated gamma-irradiation at the total dose of 350 cGy followed by 70-day exposure to chemical mixture (acetone, ethanol, acetate aldehyde) at close to maximum permissible concentrations innate to piloted space vehicles (MPCpsv). Measured levels of radiation and known radiation sensitivity of mice were used to model absorbed dose to cosmonauts on an exploration mission. Functional shifts in the hematopoietic system and changes in biochemical parameters of erythrocytes indicative of energy exchange and redox potential were tracked up during the combined radiation-chemical exposure and 90 days of recovery. It was shown that adaptation caused pronounced and strongly pronounced tension of regulatory mechanisms, particularly under the effects of radiation. High tension still persisted in the recovery period.

  16. Long-term effects of simulated microgravity and/or chronic exposure to low-dose gamma radiation on behavior and blood–brain barrier integrity

    PubMed Central

    Bellone, John A; Gifford, Peter S; Nishiyama, Nina C; Hartman, Richard E; Mao, Xiao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts on lengthy voyages will be exposed to an environment of microgravity and ionizing radiation that may have adverse effects on physical abilities, mood, and cognitive functioning. However, little is known about the long-term effects of combined microgravity and low-dose radiation. We exposed mice to gamma radiation using a cobalt-57 plate (0.01 cGy/h for a total dose of 0.04 Gy), hindlimb unloading to simulate microgravity, or a combination of both for 3 weeks. Mice then underwent a behavioral test battery after 1 week, 1 month, 4 months, and 8 months to assess sensorimotor coordination/balance (rotarod), activity levels (open field), learned helplessness/depression-like behavior (tail suspension test), risk-taking (elevated zero maze), and spatial learning/memory (water maze). Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression was assessed in the brain after behavioral testing to determine blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Mice that received unloading spent significantly more time in the exposed portions of the elevated zero maze, were hypoactive in the open field, and spent less time struggling on the tail suspension test than mice that did not receive unloading. Mice in the combination group expressed more AQP4 immunoactivity than controls. Elevated zero maze and AQP4 data were correlated. No differences were seen on the water maze or rotarod, and no radiation-only effects were observed. These results suggest that microgravity may lead to changes in exploratory/risk-taking behaviors in the absence of other sensorimotor or cognitive deficits and that combined microgravity and a chronic, low dose of gamma radiation may lead to BBB dysfunction. PMID:28725731

  17. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation.

    PubMed

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Liza S; Osipov, Andrian N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    2015-09-01

    The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism's cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1×Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab DNA and TM values may provide the information about the human organism's cell resistivity to chronic exposure to the low-dose IR and about the development of the adaptive response in the organism that is aimed, firstly, at the effective cfDNA elimination from the blood circulation, and, secondly - at survival of the cells, including the cells with the damaged DNA.

  18. Evaluation of the impact of the urinary symptoms on quality of life of patients with painful bladder syndrome/chronic pelvic pain and radiation cystitis: EURCIS study.

    PubMed

    Rapariz-González, M; Castro-Díaz, D; Mejía-Rendón, D

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of urinary symptoms of Painful Bladder/Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis (PBCPPS) on the Quality of Life, and self-esteem of the patient. An observational, multicenter, epidemiological and cross-sectional study was performed on patients with Painful Bladder/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis. Data was recorded on severity of urinary symptoms and QoL impairment using the PUF Score. The patients evaluated the QoL deterioration grade through the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and the level of their anxiety and self-esteem with the Goldberg's Anxiety Scale (GAS) and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. Post-hoc comparisons were performed between the results of the KHQ of this study and a sample of patients with urinary incontinence (UI). Results on RSES were analyzed with data from the general population and from patients with erectile dysfunction. A total of 530 cases, mostly female patients, who had been diagnosed with PBCPPS, were analyzed. High levels of deterioration in QoL were described: KHQ scores were significantly higher when compared with patients with UI (P<.01). Involvement of self-esteem was higher in patients with RC and men, who obtained scores similar to those of patients with erectile dysfunction. Patients with Painful Bladder Syndrome/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis present high levels of anxiety, and significant reductions in both quality of life and self-esteem. Especially for men, this affectation is similar to that caused by erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Is argon plasma coagulation an effective and safe treatment option for patients with chronic radiation proctitis after high doses of radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Hortelano, Eduardo; Gómez-Iturriaga, Alfonso; Ortiz-de-Zárate, Roberto; Zaballa, Manuel; Barturen, Ángel; Casquero, Francisco; San-Miguel, Íñigo; Carvajal, Carvajal; Cacicedo, Jon; Del-Hoyo, Olga; Lupiani, Javier; Pérez, Fernando; Bilbao, Pedro

    2014-03-01

    In severe cases refractory to medical treatment, APC appears to be the preferred alternative to control persistent rectal bleeding of patients with chronic radiation proctitis. Although successful outcomes have been demonstrated in patients previously treated with moderate doses of radiotherapy, there is reluctance towards its indication due to the concern of severe adverse events in patients treated with high doses of radiation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of APC in the management of bleeding radiationinduced proctitis in patients treated with high doses of radiation for prostate cancer. Data from 30 patients were treated with APC due to chronic radiation proctitis, were reviewed retrospectively. All cases had prostate cancer and 9 of them (30 %) underwent previous radical prostatectomy. The median dose of conformal 3D External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) delivered was 74 Gy (range 46-76). Median rectal D1cc and D2cc was 72.5 and 72.4 Gy respectively. Median rectal V70, V60 and V40 was 12, 39.5 and 80 %. Cardiovascular and digestive disease, diabetes, smoking behaviour, lowest haemoglobin and transfusion requirements were recorded. Indications for treatment with APC were anemia and persistent bleeding despite medical treatment. Argon gas flow was set at 1.8 l/min with an electrical power setting of 50 W. Median age of all patients was 69.6 years. The median lowest haemoglobin level was 9.6 g/dL. Median time between completion of radiotherapy and first session of APC was 13 months. Ninety-four therapeutic sessions were performed (median 3 sessions). Median time follow-up was 14.5 months (range 2-61). Complete response with resolved rectal bleeding was achieved in 23 patients (77 %), partial response in 5 (16 %) and no control in 2 (6 %). No patients required transfusion following therapy. Two patients developed long-term (> 6 weeks) grade 2 rectal ulceration and grade 2 rectal incontinence, respectively. The argon plasma coagulation

  20. Risk of chronic myeloid and acute leukemia mortality after exposure to ionizing radiation among workers at four U.S. nuclear weapons facilities and a nuclear naval shipyard.

    PubMed

    Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Daniels, Robert D; Fleming, Donald A; Markey, Andrea M; Couch, James R; Ahrenholz, Steven H; Burphy, Jenneh S; Anderson, Jeri L; Tseng, Chih-Yu

    2007-02-01

    A nested case-control study was conducted among workers at five U.S. nuclear facilities to evaluate leukemia mortality risk (excluding chronic lymphocytic) from ionizing radiation using worksite doses and adjusting for potential confounding. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of exposed workers and the excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of radiation among 206 cases and 823 age-matched controls. Adjusting for sex and benzene, the RR of leukemia for workers receiving more than 10 mSv was higher compared to those receiving lower or no dose; however, the risk increase was attenuated in the highest dose group. The ERR per 10 mSv was 1.44% (95% CI: < -1.03%, 7.59%) but was higher for workers born after 1921 compared to workers born earlier or when excluding leukemias of uncertain type. Excluding the 7% who were high-dose workers (> 100 mSv), the sex- and benzene-adjusted ERR per 10 mSv was 6.82% (95% CI: -2.87%, 24.1%). The results suggest that risks among these nuclear workers are comparable to those observed in high-dose populations, although no evidence was observed of a positive quadratic dose-response term in this study. This large study is among the first to jointly evaluate benzene and ionizing radiation risk.

  1. General Approach to Treatment of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Growth Factors for Treating Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Radiation Therapy for Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Surgery for Chronic Myelomonocytic ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  2. Measuring DNA Damage and Repair in Mouse Splenocytes After Chronic In Vivo Exposure to Very Low Doses of Beta- and Gamma-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Flegal, Matthew; Blimkie, Melinda S; Wyatt, Heather; Bugden, Michelle; Surette, Joel; Klokov, Dmitry

    2015-07-03

    Low dose radiation exposure may produce a variety of biological effects that are different in quantity and quality from the effects produced by high radiation doses. Addressing questions related to environmental, occupational and public health safety in a proper and scientifically justified manner heavily relies on the ability to accurately measure the biological effects of low dose pollutants, such as ionizing radiation and chemical substances. DNA damage and repair are the most important early indicators of health risks due to their potential long term consequences, such as cancer. Here we describe a protocol to study the effect of chronic in vivo exposure to low doses of γ- and β-radiation on DNA damage and repair in mouse spleen cells. Using a commonly accepted marker of DNA double-strand breaks, phosphorylated histone H2AX called γH2AX, we demonstrate how it can be used to evaluate not only the levels of DNA damage, but also changes in the DNA repair capacity potentially produced by low dose in vivo exposures. Flow cytometry allows fast, accurate and reliable measurement of immunofluorescently labeled γH2AX in a large number of samples. DNA double-strand break repair can be evaluated by exposing extracted splenocytes to a challenging dose of 2 Gy to produce a sufficient number of DNA breaks to trigger repair and by measuring the induced (1 hr post-irradiation) and residual DNA damage (24 hrs post-irradiation). Residual DNA damage would be indicative of incomplete repair and the risk of long-term genomic instability and cancer. Combined with other assays and end-points that can easily be measured in such in vivo studies (e.g., chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei frequencies in bone marrow reticulocytes, gene expression, etc.), this approach allows an accurate and contextual evaluation of the biological effects of low level stressors.

  3. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Influence of HFF-range radiation therapy upon dynamics of biochemical indices in patients with chronic generalized parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kazarina, L N; Okulova, Iu V

    2007-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on patients with a parodontitis in whome a low-intensive broad band electromagnetic radiation of the HFF-range was used in complex treatment. The authors confirmed that the EMR of the physiological intensity HFF leads to improvement of a parodontologic status and can be recommended in complex treatment of a parodontitis.

  5. Illegal intra-corporeal packets: can dual energy CT be used for the evaluation of cocaine concentration? A cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D; Lock, Eric; Wolff, Hans; Perneger, Thomas; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2016-01-13

    The recent implementation of the dual energy technology on CT-scanners has opened new perspectives in tissue and material characterization. This study aims to evaluate whether dual energy CT can be used to assess the concentration of cocaine of intra-intestinal illegal packets. The study was approved by the institutional review board of our institution (CER 13_027_R). From November 2010 to May 2013, all consecutive conveyors in whom a low-dose abdominal CT (LDCT) revealed the presence of illegal intra-corporeal drug packets underwent a dual energy CT series (gemstone spectral imaging) targeted on one container. The mean radiological density (HU) of these packets was measured on the LDCT series, and on the monochromatic dual energy series, at 40 and 140 keV. The difference between the HU at 40 and 140 keV was reported as ∆HU. The effective atomic number Z(eff) was also measured on the monochromatic series. A chemical analysis was performed after expulsion to select cocaine containing packets, and to determine their cocaine concentrations. A correlation analysis was performed between HU, ∆HU and Z(eff), with regard to the percentage of cocaine. Fifty-four cocaine conveyors were included. The mean cocaine content of the packets was 36.8% (range 11.2-80, SD 15.4), the mean radiologic density 105 HU, the mean Z(eff) 8.7 and the mean ∆HU 163. The cocaine content was correlated with the ∆HU (0.57, p < 0.001), with the Z(eff) (r = 0.56, p < 0.001) but not with radiologic density (r = 0.25, p = 0.064). ∆HU >200 was 0.9 (9 of 10) sensitive and 0.82 (36 of 44) specific to predict a cocaine concentration higher than 50%. Measuring ∆HU or Z(eff) on dual energy monochromatic CT series can be used to detect ingested packets with cocaine concentration >50%.

  6. Topically applied NO-releasing nanoparticles can increase intracorporal pressure and elicit spontaneous erections in a rat model of radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tar, Moses; Cabrales, Pedro; Mahantesh, Navarti; Adler, Brandon; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel; Davies, Kelvin P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED) refractory to PDE5 inhibitors, which act downstream of CN-mediated release of nitric oxide (NO). Direct delivery of NO to the penis could potentially circumvent this limitation. Aim To determine if topically applied NO-releasing nanoparticles (NO-np) can elicit erections in a rat model of RP and demonstrate that the mechanism is through increased blood flow. Methods 26 Sprague–Dawley rats underwent bilateral transection of the CN. One week later NO-np were applied topically to the penile shaft in DMSO-gel (10 animals) or coconut oil (6 animals). Control animals were treated with empty-np. Erectile function was determined through the intracorporal pressure/blood pressure ratio (ICP/BP). The effect of the NO-np on blood flow was determined using a hamster dorsal window chamber. Main Outcome Measures Animals were investigated for spontaneous erections, onset and duration of erectile response and basal ICP/BP ratio. Microcirculatory blood-flow was determined through arteriolar and venular diameter and blood flow. Results Eight of ten animals treated with NO-np suspended in DMSO-gel had significant increases in basal ICP/BP, and six out of these ten animals demonstrated spontaneous erections of approximately one minute duration. Onset of spontaneous erections ranged from 5–37 minutes and occurred for at least 45 minutes. Similar results were observed with NO-np applied in coconut oil. No erectile response was observed in control animal models treated with empty-np. The hamster dorsal window chamber demonstrated NO-np applied as a suspension in coconut oil caused a significant increase in the microcirculatory blood flow, sustained over 90 minutes. Conclusions Topically applied NO-np induced spontaneous erections and increased basal ICP in an animal model of RP. These effects are most likely due to increased microcirculatory blood flow. These characteristics suggest that

  7. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing 137CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The 137Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the 137CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the 137Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the 137Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively. PMID:26825299

  8. Assessment of growth, genotoxic responses and expression of stress related genes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas following chronic exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Devos, Alexandre; Dallas, Lorna J; Voiseux, Claire; Lecomte-Pradines, Catherine; Jha, Awadhesh N; Fiévet, Bruno

    2015-06-30

    Marine organisms are exposed to low doses of anthropogenic contaminants during their entire life. Authorized amounts of radionuclides are discharged in the Channel by nuclear facilities. The Pacific oyster was used to investigate the potential impact of chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Though we exposed larvae and spat for two weeks to much higher concentrations than those encountered near nuclear facilities, oyster growth and expression of 9 selected stress genes were not significantly changed. To determine potential DNA damage, 2year old oysters were exposed for two weeks to tritiated water. The comet assay was used to evaluate the level of DNA strand breaks in haemocytes, whilst the 'clearance rate' was used as a measure of physiological effects. Whilst other parameters did not alter, DNA damage significantly increased. Our results highlight the significance of the observed DNA damage and their potential consequences at higher levels of biological organization.

  9. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing (137)CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The (137)Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the (137)CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the (137)Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the (137)Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively.

  10. [Metabolic effect of amaranth oil and impulse hypoxic training under chronic fluoride intoxication and small doses of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Konyk, U V; Hzhehots'kyĭ, M P; Koval'chuk, S M

    2002-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation and antioxidative defence system in blood, liver and heart tissues, nitric oxide metabolites content in brain tissue of rats under binary action of small-doses of ionizing radiation and fluoride intoxication treated by amaranth oil and interval hypoxic training have been studied. Complex using of amaranth oil and interval hypoxic training result in increase both enzymatic, as nonezymatic links of antioxidant defence in all investigated tissues. It was revealed also enhance of NO system metabolites content in brain gomogenate. In this conditions lipid peroxidation processes in liver and heart tissues normalize comparison with essential increase level LPO under binary action influence. On the basis of obtained results LPO metabolites content we can suppossed that complex using of amaranth oil and interval hypoxic training result in increase of organism adaptative possibility. This complex can be using for binary action of ionizing radiation and fluoride intoxication correction.

  11. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography for chronic liver disease: comparison with ultrasound-based scores of experienced radiologists, Child-Pugh scores and liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate whether acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography provides better diagnostic performance for diagnosis of chronic liver disease and correlates better with Child-Pugh scores and liver function tests, compared with an ultrasound (US) scoring system based on visual assessment of conventional B-mode US images by experienced radiologists. Five hundred and twenty-one patients with clinically proven chronic liver disease (n = 293), fatty liver (n = 95) or normal liver (n = 133) were included in this study. B-mode liver US and ARFI elastography were performed in all patients. ARFI elastography was performed at least five times, with each measurement obtained at a different area of the right hepatic lobe; mean shear wave velocity (SWV) was calculated for each patient. The mean SWV was compared with US-based scores from two radiologists (based on liver surface nodularity, parenchyma echotexture and hepatic vein contour), Child-Pugh scores and liver function tests. The mean SWV of the normal liver group was 1.08 m/s ± 0.15; of the fatty liver group, 1.02 m/s ± 0.16; and of the chronic liver disease group, 1.66 m/s ± 0.60 (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the mean SWV in ARFI elastography was significantly higher than that of the conventional B-mode US-based scores by two radiologists (0.89 vs. 0.74 and 0.77, p < 0.05), with a sensitivity of 75.4% and a specificity of 89.5% at the cut-off value of 1.22 m/s. The sensitivity of the mean SWV was significantly higher than the US-based scores (p < 0.001), although the specificity was not (p > 0.05). The mean SWV was better correlated with Child-Pugh scores and all liver function tests (except total protein) than the US-based scores from two radiologists. In conclusion, ARFI elastography showed better diagnostic performance than visual assessment of experienced radiologists for diagnosis of chronic liver disease, as well as for

  12. Radiation enteritis.

    PubMed

    Harb, Ali H; Abou Fadel, Carla; Sharara, Ala I

    2014-01-01

    Radiation enteritis continues to be a major health concern in recipients of radiation therapy. The incidence of radiation enteritis is expected to continue to rise during the coming years paralleling the unprecedented use of radiotherapy in pelvic cancers. Radiation enteritis can present as either an acute or chronic syndrome. The acute form presents within hours to days of radiation exposure and typically resolves within few weeks. The chronic form may present as early as 2 months or as long as 30 years after exposure. Risk factors can be divided into patient and treatment-related factors. Chronic radiation enteritis is characterized by progressive obliterative endarteritis with exaggerated submucosal fibrosis and can manifest by stricturing, formation of fistulae, local abscesses, perforation, and bleeding. In the right clinical context, diagnosis can be confirmed by cross-sectional imaging, flexible or video capsule endoscopy. Present treatment strategies are directed primarily towards symptom relief and management of emerging complications. Recently, however, there has been a shift towards rational drug design based on improved understanding of the molecular basis of disease in an effort to limit the fibrotic process and prevent organ damage.

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: special reference to survival and radiation-induced pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate radiation-induced pneumonitis (RIP) and a related condition that we define in this report—prolonged minimal RIP (pmRIP)—after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I primary lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed 136 Stage I lung cancer patients with COPD who underwent SBRT. Airflow limitation on spirometry was classified into four Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, with minor modifications: GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), GOLD 3 (severe) and GOLD 4 (very severe). On this basis, we defined two subgroups: COPD-free (COPD −) and COPD-positive (COPD +). There was no significant difference in overall survival or cause-specific–survival between these groups. Of the 136 patients, 44 (32%) had pmRIP. Multivariate analysis showed that COPD and the Brinkman index were statistically significant risk factors for the development of pmRIP. COPD and the Brinkman index were predictive factors for pmRIP, although our findings also indicate that SBRT can be tolerated in early lung cancer patients with COPD. PMID:25887042

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: special reference to survival and radiation-induced pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-07-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate radiation-induced pneumonitis (RIP) and a related condition that we define in this report--prolonged minimal RIP (pmRIP)--after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I primary lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed 136 Stage I lung cancer patients with COPD who underwent SBRT. Airflow limitation on spirometry was classified into four Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, with minor modifications: GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), GOLD 3 (severe) and GOLD 4 (very severe). On this basis, we defined two subgroups: COPD-free (COPD -) and COPD-positive (COPD +). There was no significant difference in overall survival or cause-specific-survival between these groups. Of the 136 patients, 44 (32%) had pmRIP. Multivariate analysis showed that COPD and the Brinkman index were statistically significant risk factors for the development of pmRIP. COPD and the Brinkman index were predictive factors for pmRIP, although our findings also indicate that SBRT can be tolerated in early lung cancer patients with COPD.

  15. French maritime pine bark (Pinus maritima Lam.) extract (Flavangenol) prevents chronic UVB radiation-induced skin damage and carcinogenesis in melanin-possessing hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho

    2010-01-01

    A French maritime pine bark extract, Flavangenol, is widely used as a nutritional supplement for protection against atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, etc. Chronic exposure to solar UV radiation damages skin, increasing cutaneous thickness, wrinkling and pigmentation, as well as reducing elasticity, and causes skin cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of flavangenol on skin damage and the incidence of skin tumors caused by long-term UVB irradiation in melanin-possessing hairless mice. The oral administration of flavangenol (60, 200 or 600 mg kg(-1), twice daily) significantly inhibited increases in skin thickness, and the formation of wrinkles and melanin granules, as well as increases in the diameter and length of skin blood vessels. Furthermore, it prevented increases in numbers of apoptotic, Ki-67-positive and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-positive cells, and the expression of skin vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced by chronic UVB irradiation. The effect on these biomarkers was associated with a reduction in the incidence of tumors in mice. The antiphotoaging and anticarcinogenetic activities of flavangenol may be due to inhibition of the expression of Ki-67, 8-OHdG and VEGF through a scavenging effect on reactive oxygen species.

  16. Cosmetic Outcome and Chronic Breast Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT) as a Single Modality or as a Boost Using the Intrabeam(®) Device: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Key, Stéphane; Miglierini, Petra; Dupré, Pierre-François; Guilbert, Sandrine; Lucia, Anne-Sophie; Abgral, Ronan; Conan-Charlet, Virginie; Uguen, Arnaud; Pradier, Olivier; Schick, Ulrike

    2017-09-01

    We aim to report our results in terms of chronic toxicities and cosmetic outcomes after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using kV X-rays in women treated for early breast cancer at our institution. Patients with early breast carcinoma were recruited between April 2011 and November 2014. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated with IORT using the Intrabeam(®) device. IORT was completed by whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) at a dose of 46-50.4 Gy in 23-28 fractions in case of adverse pathologic criteria on the final specimen examination. Skin toxicity was graded using the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale every 6 months, and cosmetic outcomes were evaluated at 36 months by patient self-evaluation and by two radiation oncologists, on a 1-10 scale. Forty-one women received IORT only and 30 patients received IORT followed by WBRT (IORT + WBRT group). After a median follow-up of 38.9 months, no locoregional or distant recurrence occurred. After IORT only, 2.4% of grade 2 or higher breast fibrosis, and no other grade 2 or higher disease, was observed. In the IORT + WBRT group, grade 2 or higher fibrosis and grade 2 or higher breast retraction were observed in 43.3 and 23.3% of patients, respectively. Objective cosmetic outcomes were very good and significantly better in the IORT-only group compared with the IORT + WBRT group (8.87 vs. 6.96) (p < 0.001). IORT using the Intrabeam(®) is well-tolerated, with very little chronic toxicity and good cosmetic outcome. However, a high rate of grade 2 or higher chronic breast toxicity was observed when IORT had to be completed by WBRT.

  17. Comparison of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and transient elastography for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dakun; Chen, Min; Wang, Ruifang; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Dedong; Liu, Liping; Zhou, Guangde

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography and transient elastography (TE) in the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and to evaluate the impact of elevated alanine transaminase levels on liver stiffness assessment using ARFI elastography. One hundred eighty consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis B were enrolled in this study and evaluated with respect to histologic and biochemical features. All patients underwent ARFI elastography and TE. ARFI elastography and TE correlated significantly with histologically assessed fibrosis (r = 0.599, p < 0.001, for ARFI elastography; r = 0.628, p < 0.001, for TE) and necro-inflammatory activity (r = 0.591, p < 0.001, for ARFI elastography; r = 0.616, p < 0.001, for TE). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for ARFI elastography and TE were 0.764 and 0.813 (p = 0.302, ≥stage 2), 0.852 and 0.852 (p = 1.000, ≥stage 3) and 0.825 and 0.799 (p = 0.655, S = 4), respectively. The optimum cutoff values for ARFI elastography were 1.63 m/s for stage ≥2, 1.74 m/s for stage ≥3 and 2.00 m/s for stage 4 in patients for whom alanine transaminase levels were evaluated. The cutoff values decreased to 1.24 m/s for ≥ stage 2, 1.32 m/s for ≥ stage 3 and 1.41 m/s for stage 4 in patients with normal alanine transaminase levels. ARFI elastography may be a reliable method for diagnosing the stage of liver fibrosis with diagnostic performance similar to that of TE in patients with chronic hepatitis B. In addition, liver stiffness values obtained with ARFI elastography, like those obtained with TE, may be influenced by alanine transaminase levels.

  18. Radiation enteritis and radiation scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.; Eng, K.; Engler, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    Any patient with radiation scoliosis should be suspected of having a visceral lesion as well. Chronic radiation enteritis may be manifested by intestinal obstruction, fistulas, perforation, and hemorrhage. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication, and must be differentiated from postoperative cast or from spinal-traction syndrome. Obstruction that does not respond promptly to conservative measures must be treated surgically. Irradiated bowel is ischemic, and necrosis with spontaneous perforation can only be avoided with early diagnosis and surgical intervention.

  19. Photodynamic therapy for in situ squamous cell carcinoma on chronic radiation dermatitis after photosensitization with 5-aminolaevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Guillen, C; Sanmartin, O; Escudero, A; Botella-Estrada, R; Sevila, A; Castejon, P

    2000-07-01

    The accessibility of the skin to light treatment, as well as the developments made by dermatologists in photodynamic therapy (PDT), creates an exciting apportunity to include it as a part of our standard therapeutic armamentarium. We report a 63-year-old man with an in situ squamous cell carcinoma located on a chronic radiodermitis area in a finger, treated successfully with PDT. PDT appears to be a viable alternative to conventional therapy for in situ squamous cell carcinoma as well as for other superficial tumours of the skin.

  20. Analysis of the Mortality Experience amongst U.S. Nuclear Power Industry Workers after Chronic Low-Dose Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, Jack J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2004-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). While associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15 countries will have greater power for testing the main hypotheses

  1. Acute and chronic intakes of fallout radionuclides by Marshallese from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak and related internal radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L; Weinstock, Robert M

    2010-08-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  2. ACUTE AND CHRONIC INTAKES OF FALLOUT RADIONUCLIDES BY MARSHALLESE FROM NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTING AT BIKINI AND ENEWETAK AND RELATED INTERNAL RADIATION DOSES

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L.; Weinstock, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  3. Frequency of micronuclei in the peripheral blood and bone marrow of cancer-prone mice chronically exposed to 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Frei, M R; Dusch, S J; Guel, V; Meltz, M L; Jauchem, J R

    1997-04-01

    C3H/HeJ mice, which are prone to mammary tumors, were exposed for 20 h/day, 7 days/week, over 18 months to continuous-wave 2450 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation in circularly polarized wave guides at a whole-body average specific absorption rate of 1.0 W/kg. Sham-exposed mice were used as controls. The positive controls were the sentinel mice treated with mitomycin C during the last 24 h before necropsy. At the end of the 18 months, all mice were necropsied. Peripheral blood and bone marrow smears were examined for the extent of genotoxicity as indicated by the presence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs). The results indicate that the incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs was not significantly different between groups exposed to RF radiation (62 mice) and sham-exposed groups (58 mice), and the mean frequencies were 4.5 +/- 1.23 and 4.0 +/- 1.12 in peripheral blood and 6.1 +/- 1.78 and 5.7 +/- 1.60 in bone marrow, respectively. In contrast, the positive controls (7 mice) showed a significantly elevated incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and the mean frequencies were 50.9 +/- 6.18 and 55.2 +/- 4.65, respectively. When the animals with mammary tumors were considered separately, there were no significant differences in the incidence of micronuclei/1,000 PCEs between the group exposed to RF radiation (12 mice) and the sham-exposed group (8 mice), and the mean frequencies were 4.6 +/- 1.03 and 4.1 +/- 0.89 in peripheral blood and 6.1 +/- 1.76 and 5.5 +/- 1.51 in bone marrow, respectively. Thus there was no evidence for genotoxicity in mice prone to mammary tumors that were exposed chronically to 2450 MHz RF radiation compared with sham-exposed controls.

  4. THEORETICAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS AND PHYSIOLOGIC PERFORMANCE CRITERIA FOR AN IMPROVED INTRACORPOREAL (ABDOMINAL) ELECTRICALLY ACTUATED LONG-TERM LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE (“E-TYPE” ALVAD) OR PARTIAL ARTIFICIAL HEART

    PubMed Central

    Igo, Stephen R.; Hibbs, C. Wayne; Fuqua, John M.; Trono, Ruben; Edmonds, Charles H.; Norman, John C.

    1978-01-01

    Our laboratories are engaged in the design of a clinically-oriented electrically actuated long-term intracorporeal (abdominal) left ventricular assist device (“E-type” ALVAD) or partial artificial heart. This infradiaphragmatic blood pump is designed to be powered by implantable electrical to mechanical energy converter systems. The following analyses were undertaken to: [List: see text] The proposed “E-type” ALVAD should be capable of pumping 4-7 liters per minute at heart rates of 75-100 beats per minute during rest, and 10 liters per minute at rates of 120 beats per minute during moderate exercise. These performance levels should be exceeded with a maximum device stroke volume of 85-90 ml and a mean pump inflow (filling) impedance of ≤ 0.072 gm/sec/cm−5. Images PMID:15216070

  5. The effects of chronic radiation of gamma ray on protein expression and oxidative stress in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Yeon; Hong, Min Jeong; Park, Cheong-Sool; Seo, Yong Weon

    2015-05-01

    To compare the effects of gamma-irradiation on biochemical responses and growth, six-week-old Brachypodium plants were chronically exposed to gamma-irradiation for 30 days at various dosages. Growth surveys of Brachypodium plants in response to different dosages of gamma-irradiation were conducted to compare physiological changes between irradiated and non-irradiated plants. Photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugar content, activities of antioxidant enzymes, and malonaldehyde (MDA) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were also measured. Gamma-irradiation had a negative influence on the average plant height, leaf length, leaf width, and fresh weight. Photosynthetic pigment levels decreased with increasing dosages of gamma-irradiation, while soluble sugar content slightly increased. Gamma-irradiation responsive proteins were detected and identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF). The proteins had a role in photosynthetic carbon fixation, anabolic pathway glycolysis, mitochondrial ATP production, and oxidative stress response regulation. MDA levels and activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) increased with the increase in gamma-irradiation dosage level. This study provides some basic information regarding responses to gamma-irradiation, and provides valuable physiological and biological data on the effects of different gamma-irradiation dosages on Triticeae species.

  6. DNA alterations and effects on growth and reproduction in Daphnia magna during chronic exposure to gamma radiation over three successive generations.

    PubMed

    Parisot, Florian; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Plaire, Delphine; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Alonzo, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    This study examined chronic effects of external Cs-137 gamma radiation on Daphnia magna exposed over three successive generations (F0, F1 and F2) to environmentally relevant dose rates (ranging from 0.007 to 35.4 mGy h(-1)). Investigated endpoints included survival, growth, reproduction and DNA alterations quantified using random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Results demonstrated that radiation effects on survival, growth and reproduction increased in severity from generation F0 to generation F2. Mortality after 21 days at 35.4 mGy h(-1) increased from 20% in F0 to 30% in F2. Growth was affected by a slight reduction in maximum length at 35.4 mGy h(-1) in F0 and by reductions of 5 and 13% in growth rate, respectively, at 4.70 and 35.4 mGy h(-1) in F2. Reproduction was affected by a reduction of 19% in 21 day-fecundity at 35.4 mGy h(-1) in F0 and by a delay of 1.9 days in brood release as low as 0.070 mGy h(-1) in F2. In parallel, DNA alterations became significant at decreasing dose rates over the course of F0 (from 4.70 mGy h(-1) at hatching to 0.007 mGy h(-1) after ∼21 days) and from F0 to F2 (0.070 mGy h(-1) at hatching to 0.007 mGy h(-1) after ∼21 days), demonstrating their rapid accumulation in F0 daphnids and their transmission to offspring generations. Transiently more efficient DNA repair leading to some recovery at the organism level was suggested in F1, with no effect on survival, a slight reduction of 12% in 21 day-fecundity at 35.4 mGy h(-1) and DNA alterations significant at highest dose rates only. The study improved our understanding of long term responses to low doses of radiation at the molecular and organismic levels in a non-human species for a better radioprotection of aquatic ecosystems.

  7. Chronic cigarette smoke exposure increases the pulmonary retention and radiation dose of {sup 239}Pu inhaled as {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} by F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Lundgren, D.L.; Barr, E.B.; Chen, B.T.; Griffith, W.C.; Hobbs, C.H.; Hoover, M.D.; Nikula, K.J.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    As a portion of a study to examine how chronic cigarette smoke exposure might alter the risk of lung tumors from inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} in rats, the effects of smoke exposure on alpha-particle lung dosimetry over the life-span of exposed rats were determined. Male and female rats were exposed to inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} alone or in combination with cigarette smoke. Animals exposed to filtered air along served as controls for the smoke exposure. Whole-body exposure to mainstream smoke diluted to concentrations of either 100 or 250 mg total particulate matter m{sup {minus}3} began at 6 wk of age and continued for 6 h d{sup {minus}1}, 5 d wk{sup {minus}1}, for 30 mo. A single, pernasal, acute exposure to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} was given to all rats at 12 wk of age. Exposure to cigarette smoke caused decreased body weight gains in a concentration dependent manner. Lung-to-body weight ratios were increased in smoke-exposed rats. Rats exposed to cigarette smoke before the {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} exposure deposited less {sup 239}Pu in the lung than did controls. Except for male rats exposed to LCS, exposure to smoke retarded the clearance of {sup 239}Pu from the lung compared to control rats through study termination at 870 d after {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} exposure. Radiation doses to lungs were calculated by sex and by exposure group for rats on study for at least 360 d using modeled body weight changes, lung-to-body weight ratios, and standard dosimetric calculations. For both sexes, estimated lifetime radiation doses from the time of {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} exposure to death were 3.8 Gy, 4.4 Gy, or 6.7 Gy for the control, LCS, or HCS exposure groups, respectively. Assuming an approximately linear dose-response relationship between radiation dose and lung neoplasm incidence, approximate increases of 20% or 80% in tumor incidence over controls would be expected in rats exposed to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} and LCS or {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} and HCS, respectively.

  8. Risk Factors For Radiation-Induced Skin Ulceration in Percutaneous Coronary Interventions of Chronic Total Occluded Lesions: A 2-Year Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chi-Cheng; Wei, Kai-Che; Chen, Wen-Yee; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Wang, Wen-Hwa; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Yang, Kuo-Chung; Chen, Lee-Wei; Liu, Chun-Peng

    2017-08-16

    Relationship between radiation-induced skin ulceration (RSU) and variables in percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) was rarely reported. RSU is a severe complication in PCIs, especially for chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions. We investigated the RSUs and their risk factors in patients receiving CTO PCIs over a 2-year period. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests, t-tests and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of 238 patients, 11 patients (4.6%) had RSUs all at right upper back. RSUs were significantly associated with use of left anterior oblique (LAO) views (100% vs. 47.1%, p < 0.001), retrograde techniques (36.3% vs. 7.9%, p = 0.012), or a procedure time (PT) defined as a time duration between the first and last angiograms of > 120, 180, or 240 minutes (p < 0.05). ROC analysis showed a long PT was an accurate predictor of RSUs (AUC = 0.88; p < 0.001) at a cut-off of 130 minutes (sensitivity = 0.91, specificity = 0.81). The results showed risk factors for RSUs containing use of large LAO views, retrograde techniques, and prolonged PTs. This study suggests that, to minimize RSU, interventionalists should limit PT to roughly 2 hours in fixed LAO views.

  9. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R.; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M.; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m2 of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  10. [Efficacy of low-intensity laser radiation and antibacterial therapy in the treatment of chronic prostatitis in the presence of sexually transmitted infections].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, A I; Khrianin, A A; Safina, O N; Neĭmark, B A; Kondrat'eva, Iu S

    2007-01-01

    We studied 94 patients with chronic prostatitis (CP) in combination with urogenital chlamydiasis. The patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 32 patients with bacterial prostatitis and sexually transmitted infection (STI). They were treated with fromilid in a dose 500 mg twice a day. Group 2 (n = 27) received also low-intensity laser radiation (LILR) on the prostatic gland. Group 3 patients (n = 35) with abacterial prostatitis were given fromilid (500 mg twice a day). We studied prostatic hemodynamics with color doppler mapping. A specific feature of prostatic vascularisation in CP and STI versus healthy subjects is heterogeneous decline of vessels density in ischemic zones with parallel decrease in these vessels diameter. A peripheral prostatic zone in CP patients with STI was characterized by lower vascularisation than central one. This deteriorates the course of the disease. The results of the study show that adjuvant LILR in CP patients with STI raises efficacy of therapy by 11%. Investigation of prostate vascularisation and hemodynamics of its vessels in CP patients with STI using transrectal ultrasonography and dopplerography provide detailed information about prostatic structure allowing for lesion zones. This facilitates choice of an optimal complex treatment with application of LELR in peripheral inflammation of the prostate.

  11. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m(2) of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  12. Associations between body composition and nutritional assessments and biochemical markers in patients with chronic radiation enteritis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongliang; Cai, Da; Yao, Danhua; Chen, Yong; Wang, Jian; Li, Yousheng

    2016-05-28

    Chronic radiation enteritis (CRE) is defined as loss of absorptive capacity after irradiation due to chronic inflammation and damage of intestinal mucosa, which may lead to varying degrees of malnutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential correlation between the nutritional status and systemic inflammation in patients with CRE. Medical records of 92 patients with CRE and 184 age- and sex-matched controls in a single center from January 2010 to October 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. All enrolled subjects underwent nutritional status analysis, including three different nutritional indices: Nutritional Risk Screening-2002 (NRS-2002), Patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) and Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT), bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS), and biochemical markers, within 24 h of admission. The results showed that NRS-2002, PG-SGA and CONUT were all positively correlated with neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (r = 0.304, 0.384 and 0.425, all p < 0.001) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.357, 0.479 and 0.230, all p < 0.001), while negatively correlated with albumin (r = -0.612, -0.727 and -0.792, all p < 0.001) and total cholesterol (TC) (r = -0.485, -0.545 and -0.473, all p < 0.001) in patients with CRE, respectively. Body cell mass (BCM) has been deemed a key body composition parameter. It was positively correlated with albumin (r = 0.489, p < 0.001) and TC (r = 0.237, p < 0.001), while negatively correlated with NLR (r = -0.140, p = 0.02) and CRP (r = -0.215, p < 0.001). A multivariate linear regression analysis showed that values of intracellular water (β coefficient = 0.760, p < 0.001), extracellular water (β coefficient = 0.006, p = 0.011), protein (β coefficient = 0.235, p < 0.001) and CRP (β coefficient = 0.001, p = 0.009) were independent determinants of BCM. This study revealed that BIS combined with

  13. Chronic exposure to the ultraviolet radiation levels from arc welding does not result in obvious damage to the human corneal endothelium.

    PubMed

    Oblak, Emil; Doughty, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    study does not indicate that chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure, through occupational welding (mainly electrical arc), results in or is associated with endothelial cell polymegethism and pleomorphism. This may indicate that, despite the periodic flash welding exposures, the exposure levels are still below those needed to cause damage to the corneal endothelium. This study outcome can be taken to indicate that despite the occurrence of welders flash episodes, the eye protection habitually used by these workers was adequate to protect their corneal endothelium.

  14. [Evaluation of the risk of delayed adverse effects of chronic combined exposure to radiation and chemical factors with the purpose to ensure safety in orbital and exploration space missions].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Mukhamedieva, L N; Tatarkin, S V; Barantseva, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    The work had the aim to anatomize the existing issues with providing safety in extended orbital and exploration missions for ensuing estimation of actual values of the total radiation risk for the crew, and risks of other delayed effects of simultaneous exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical pollutants in cabin air, and a number of other stressful factors inevitable in space flight. The flow of chronic experiments for separate and combined studies with reproduction of air makeup and radiation doses in actual orbital and predicted exploration missions is outlined. To set safety limits, new approaches should be applied to the description of gradual norm degradation to pathologies in addition to several generalized quantitative indices of adaptation and straining of the regulatory systems, as well as of effectiveness of the compensatory body reserve against separate and combined exposure.

  15. [Case of chronic radiation sickness with subsequent leukemia in track driver subjected to long-external gamma-irradiation (cesium-137)].

    PubMed

    Baranov, A E; Davtian, A A; Gordeeva, A A; Nugis, V Iu; Gusev, I A; Gus'kova, A K

    2004-01-01

    The article deals with consequences seen in track driver after prolonged exposure to radiation caused by "lost" gamma-source (cesium-137) that long remained in receptacle of the vehicle's left door. Radiation dose averaged 8 Gy. The authors presented clinical manifestations, changes in peripheral blood and bone marrow, cytogenetic data by progression of radiation hemopoiesis hypoplasy to myelodysplastic syndrome and to acute leukaemia.

  16. Chronic TiO2 nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: Impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study examined the chronic toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca, using an industry standard, P25, and a coated nano-TiO2 used in commercial products. There is limited information on the chronic effects of nano...

  17. Chronic TiO2 nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: Impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study examined the chronic toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca, using an industry standard, P25, and a coated nano-TiO2 used in commercial products. There is limited information on the chronic effects of nano...

  18. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. Materials/Methods T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ≥ 12 months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), ), masseter (MM), Buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Results Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving ≥69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). Conclusion In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. PMID:26897515

  19. A novel structure optical fiber radiation dosimeter for radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weimin; Qin, Zhuang; Ma, Yu; Zhao, Wenhui; Hu, Yaosheng; Zhang, Daxin; Chen, Ziyin; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-04-01

    An investigation into a novel in-vivo PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) fiber-optic dosimeter to monitor the dose of ionizing radiation, both for instantaneous and integrating measurements, for radiotherapy applications is proposed. This fiber sensor is designed as an intracorporal X-ray ionizing sensor to enhance the curative effect of radiotherapy. The fiber-optic dosimeter is made in a PMMA fiber, whose core is micromachined to create a small diameter (0.25 to 0.5 mm) hole at one fiber end. An inorganic scintillating material, terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) is chosen as the sensing material, because it can fluoresce on immediately under exposure of ionizing radiation (X-Rays or electron beam). This sensing material is filled and packaged in the small hole by epoxy resin adhesive. This kind of novel structure dosimeter shows high light coupling efficiency compared with other kind of inorganic scintillation dosimeter. This fiber-optic dosimeter shows good repeatability with a maximum deviation of 0.16%. The testing results of the fiber-optic dosimeter are perfectly proportional to the data of IC with R2 as 0.9999. In addition, the fiber sensor shows excellent isotropic in its radial angular dependence. All the experiments indicate that the fiber-optic dosimeter is properly used for patient in-vivo dosimeter such as brachytherapy applications or intraoperative radiation therapy.

  20. Analysis of the Effect of Chronic and Low-Dose Radiation Exposure on Spermatogenic Cells of Male Large Japanese Field Mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Takino, Sachio; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Sugano, Yukou; Fujishima, Yohei; Nakata, Akifumi; Kasai, Kosuke; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Shinoda, Hisashi; Miura, Tomisato; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2017-02-01

    In this study we analyzed the effect of chronic and low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation on spermatogenic cells of large Japanese field mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident. In March 2014, large Japanese field mice were collected from two sites located in, and one site adjacent to, the FNPP ex-evacuation zone: Tanashio, Murohara and Akogi, respectively. Testes from these animals were analyzed histologically. External dose rate from radiocesium (combined (134)Cs and (137)Cs) in these animals at the sampling sites exhibited 21 μGy/day in Tanashio, 304-365 μGy/day in Murohara and 407-447 μGy/day in Akogi. In the Akogi group, the numbers of spermatogenic cells and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells per seminiferous tubule were significantly higher compared to the Tanashio and Murohara groups, respectively. TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells tended to be detected at a lower level in the Murohara and Akogi groups compared to the Tanashio group. These results suggest that enhanced spermatogenesis occurred in large Japanese field mice living in and around the FNPP ex-evacuation zone. It remains to be elucidated whether this phenomenon, attributed to chronic exposure to LDR radiation, will benefit or adversely affect large Japanese field mice.

  1. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  2. Chronic Cough

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic cough Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A chronic cough is a cough that lasts eight weeks or longer in adults, or four weeks in children. A chronic cough is more than just an annoyance. A chronic ...

  3. Analyses of critical target cell responses during preclinical phases of evolving chronic radiation-induced myeloproliferative disease-exploitation of a unique canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.; Tolle, D.V.; Fritz, T.E.; Frazier, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This document briefly summarizes and highlights ongoing studies on the cellular and molecular processes involved in the induction and progression of myeloid leukemia in dogs chronically exposed to low daily doses of wholebody gamma irradiation. Under such conditions, select groups of dogs exhibit extremely high frequencies of myeloproliferative disease (MPD) (i.e., /congruent/50%) of which myeloid leukemia is most prominent. 2 figs.

  4. Human circulating ribosomal DNA content significantly increases while circulating satellite III (1q12) content decreases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma- neutron and tritium beta-radiation.

    PubMed

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Elizaveta S; Skorodumova, Elena N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Volkova, Irina V; Stepanova, Elena V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    A single exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in an elevated cell-free DNA (cfDNA) content in the blood plasma. In this case, the cfDNA concentration can be a marker of the cell death in the organism. However, a chronic exposure to a low-dose IR enhances both the endonuclease activity and titer of antibodies to DNA in blood plasma, resulting in a decrease of the total concentration of circulating cfDNA in exposed people. In this case, the total cfDNA concentration should not be considered as a marker of the cell death in an exposed body. We assumed that a pool of the cfDNA circulating in the exposed people contains DNA fragments, which are resistant to a double-strand break formation in the environment of the elevated plasma endonuclease activity, and can be accumulated in the blood plasma. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the content of GC-rich sequences (69%GC) of the transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat (rDNA), as well as the content of AT-rich repeat (63%AT) of satellite III (1q12) in the cfDNA samples obtained from 285 individuals. We have found that a chronic exposure to gamma-neutron radiation (N=88) and tritium β-radiation (N=88) evokes an increase of the rDNA content (RrDNA index) and a decrease of the satellite III content (RsatIII index) in the circulating cfDNA as compared with the cfDNA of non-exposed people (N=109). Such index that simultaneously displays both the increase of rDNA content and decrease of satellite III content in the cfDNA (RrDNA/RsatIII) can be recommended as a marker of chronic processes in the body that involve the elevated cell death rate and/or increased blood plasma endonuclease activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Definition of Procedures for Chronic Exposure of Cancer-Prone Mice to Low-Level 2,450-MHz Radiofrequency Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    et al. ’s work yielded two positive correlations between microwave exposure and cancer: (1) The incidence of benign pheochromocytomas of the adrenal...Radiat Environ Biophys 28:67-77 (1989a). Frei, M.R., Jauchem, J.R., Padilla, J.M., and Merritt, J.H. Thermal and physiological responses of rats exposed

  6. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  7. Influence of Exposure to Chronic Persistent Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Tumor Biology of Clear-Cell Renal-Cell Carcinoma. An Immunohistochemical and Morphometric Study of Angiogenesis and Vascular Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saurí, Amparo; Valencia-Villa, Gerardo; Romanenko, Alina; Pérez, Jesús; García, Raúl; García, Heydi; Benavent, José; Sancho-Tello, María; Carda, Carmen; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Increased angiogenesis is related to boosted growth and malignancy in carcinomas. "Chronic Persistent Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation" (CPLDIR) exposure increases incidence and aggressive behavior of clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma (CCRCC). The aim was to study the biology of angiogenesis, including microvessel density (MVD), in human clear-cell renal-cell carcinomas (CCRCC) originating from a radio-contaminated geographical area (Ukraine) and to compare with similar tumors diagnosed in non-contaminated regions of Europe (Spain, Valencia) and Latin America (Colombia, Barranquilla). MVD was comparatively examined in 124 patients diagnosed with CCRCC from three geographical areas by means of digital micro-imaging and computerized analysis. Additionally, 50 adult normal kidneys were used for controls (autopsy kidneys from Valencia and Barranquilla). Furthermore, an immunohistochemical study of several vascular related growth factors was undertaken using a similar methodology. MVD as well as VEFG are the most discriminating factors associated with an aggressive behavior of CCRCC. Their expression increased in proportion to the level of exposure to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation in Ukrainian patients in the 25 years since the Chernobyl accident substantiated by comparison with the two control groups of renal carcinomas present in non-irradiated areas (Spain and Colombia). No major biological differences relating to angiogenesis appear to exist between the CCRCC diagnosed in two distant geographical areas of the world. HIF-1α expression was similar in all groups, with no statistical significance. Present findings demonstrate the existence of a significant relationship between MVD and VEGF in CCRCC: an increased expression of VEGF is associated with a high level of angiogenesis.

  8. Radiation Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View and download EPA radiation ...

  9. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine the amount of radiation exposure from nuclear accidents, the best signs of the severity of the ... doses of radiation, such as radiation from a nuclear power plant accident Exposure to excessive radiation for medical treatments

  10. Radiation enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  11. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients & Visitors Giving For Professionals Treatment & Programs Health Information Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Bronchitis Chronic Bronchitis ...

  12. A Novel Use of Early Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Hyperbilirubinemia in a Patient with Primary Hepatic Lymphoma and Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Tammana, Venkata S.; Begum, Rehana; Oneal, Patricia; Karpurapu, Hemamalini; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Hasan, Nabhani

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomas arising in the liver are extremely rare. Here, we describe a case of Hepatitis C virus infection with primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) presenting with hyperbilirubinemia. A 45-year-old African American male presented with abdominal pain, pruritus, and itching for two days. CT of abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed numerous masses in the liver. The liver biopsy was consistent with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Conventional chemotherapy was avoided initially because of hyperbilirubinemia. Hence, radiation therapy was given initially to reduce his bilirubin levels and tumor size. The patient was able to complete six cycles of rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy and achieved a complete response verified by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). PHL should be considered when there are numerous space occupying liver lesions seen on imaging. Hyperbilirubinemia may be a reason for delay in treatment for some of these patients. Hence, the role of radiation therapy prior to treatment with R-CHOP is an alternative to management for stage IV diffuse large B cell lymphoma. PMID:24872902

  13. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  14. A Comparison of Acute and Chronic Toxicity for Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy or {sup 125}I Permanent Implant

    SciTech Connect

    Eade, Thomas N.; Horwitz, Eric M. Ruth, Karen; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; D'Ambrosio, David J.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Chen, David Y.T.; Pollack, Alan

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity and biochemical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and {sup 125}I transperineal permanent prostate seed implant ({sup 125}I) for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, a total of 374 low-risk patients (prostate-specific antigen < 10 ng/ml, T1c-T2b, Gleason score of 6 or less, and no neoadjuvant hormones) were treated at Fox Chase Cancer Center (216 IMRT and 158 {sup 125}I patients). Median follow-up was 43 months for IMRT and 48 months for {sup 125}I. The IMRT prescription dose ranged from 74-78 Gy, and {sup 125}I prescription was 145 Gy. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was recorded by using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Freedom from biochemical failure was defined by using the Phoenix definition (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2.0 ng/ml). Results: Patients treated by using IMRT were more likely to be older and have a higher baseline American Urological Association symptom index score, history of previous transurethral resection of the prostate, and larger prostate volumes. On multivariate analysis, IMRT was an independent predictor of lower acute and late Grade 2 or higher GU toxicity and late Grade 2 or higher GI toxicity. Three-year actuarial estimates of late Grade 2 or higher toxicity were 2.4% for GI and 3.5% for GU by using IMRT compared with 7.7% for GI and 19.2% for GU for {sup 125}I, respectively. Four-year actuarial estimates of freedom from biochemical failure were 99.5% for IMRT and 93.5% for {sup 125}I (p = 0.09). Conclusions: The IMRT and {sup 125}I produce similar outcomes, although IMRT appears to have less acute and late toxicity.

  15. Preventing stone retropulsion during intracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Elashry, Osama M; Tawfik, Ahmad M

    2012-12-01

    Several studies of ureteroscopic treatment for ureteral stones have reported that most stone clearance failures can be attributed to stone fragment retropulsion. Stone retropulsion can result in increased operative time and cost-resulting from the need to change from the semi-rigid ureteroscope to a flexible instrument to chase migrated calculi-and additional procedures to treat residual migrated fragments are often required. The degree of migration depends mainly on the energy source used for lithotripsy; pneumatic and electrohydraulic lithotripters are associated with a greater degree of retropulsion than lasers. Different stone-trapping strategies and devices have been developed to minimize stone migration. Novel devices include the Lithovac(®) suction device, the Passport(™) balloon, the Stone Cone(™), the PercSys Accordion(®), the NTrap(®), and stone baskets such as the LithoCatch(™), the Parachute(™), and the Escape(®). Some authors have also reported on the use of lubricating jelly and BackStop(®) gel (a reverse thermosensitive polymeric plug); these devices are instilled proximal to the stone prior to the application of kinetic energy in order to prevent retrograde stone migration.

  16. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  17. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention. PMID:26504733

  18. Chronic TiO₂ nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Lindsay K; Diamond, Stephen A; Ma, Hongbo; Hoff, Dale J; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Li, Shibin

    2014-11-15

    There is limited information on the chronic effects of nanomaterials to benthic organisms, as well as environmental mitigating factors that might influence this toxicity. The present study aimed to fill these data gaps by examining various growth endpoints (weight gain, instantaneous growth rate, and total protein content) for up to a 21 d sediment exposure of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca. An uncoated standard, P25, and an Al(OH)3 coated nano-TiO2 used in commercial products were added to sediment at 20 mg/L or 100 mg/L Under test conditions, UV exposure alone was shown to be a greater cause of toxicity than even these high levels of nano-TiO2 exposure, indicating that different hazards need to be addressed in toxicity testing scenarios. In addition, this study showed the effectiveness of a surface coating on the decreased photoactivity of the material, as the addition of an Al(OH)3 coating showed a dramatic decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, this reduced photoactivity was found to be partially restored when the coating had been degraded, leading to the need for future toxicity tests which examine the implications of weathering events on particle surface coatings.

  19. New insights for pelvic radiation disease treatment: Multipotent stromal cell is a promise mainstay treatment for the restoration of abdominopelvic severe chronic damages induced by radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Francois, Sabine; Douay, Luc; Benderitter, Marc; Voswinkel, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy may induce irreversible damage on healthy tissues surrounding the tumor. It has been reported that the majority of patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy show early or late tissue reactions of graded severity as radiotherapy affects not only the targeted tumor cells but also the surrounding healthy tissues. The late adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy concern 5% to 10% of them, which could be life threatening. However, a clear medical consensus concerning the clinical management of such healthy tissue sequelae does not exist. Although no pharmacologic interventions have yet been proven to efficiently mitigate radiotherapy severe side effects, few preclinical researches show the potential of combined and sequential pharmacological treatments to prevent the onset of tissue damage. Our group has demonstrated in preclinical animal models that systemic mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) injection is a promising approach for the medical management of gastrointestinal disorder after irradiation. We have shown that MSCs migrate to damaged tissues and restore gut functions after irradiation. We carefully studied side effects of stem cell injection for further application in patients. We have shown that clinical status of four patients suffering from severe pelvic side effects resulting from an over-dosage was improved following MSC injection in a compationnal situation. PMID:24179599

  20. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  1. Radiation proteomics: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    Acute biological effects caused by the exposure to high doses of radiation, either ionizing or nonionizing, are relatively well-known but the delayed effects, occurring decades after exposure, are difficult to predict. The knowledge of the acute and delayed effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation (e.g. bystander effect) or nonionizing radiation (e.g. radiation emitted by wireless communication devices) is not yet reliably established. Often the acute effects of low doses are small and difficult to discover and replicate in scientific studies. Chronic effects of prolonged exposures to low-dose radiation for decades are virtually unknown and often not possible to predict on the basis of the knowledge gained from acute exposures to high doses of radiation. Physiological significance of the biological effects induced by low doses of radiation is not known. The same lack of predictability of outcomes applies to the delayed effects of high-dose radiation exposures. Proteomics, supplemented with other "omics" techniques, might be the best way forward to find out the target molecules of radiation, the biomarkers of radiation exposure and the physiological and health significance of the acute and delayed biological effects caused by the exposures to high- and low-dose radiation. However, the currently available database of radiation effects on proteomes is far too small to be useful in formulation of new hypotheses concerning health consequences of radiation exposures.

  2. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy Print A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  3. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy A A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  4. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  5. Ionizing radiation promotes protozoan reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    This experiment was performed to determine whether ionizing radiation is essential for maximum growth rate in a ciliated protozoan. When extraneous ionizing radiation was reduced to 0.15 mrad/day, the reproduction rate of Tetrahymena pyriformis was significantly less (P less than 0.01) than it was at near ambient levels, 0.5 or 1.8 mrad/day. Significantly higher growth rates (P less than 0.01) were obtained when chronic radiation was increased. The data suggest that ionizing radiation is essential for optimum reproduction rate in this organism.

  6. Radiation exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book deals with radiation laws, the phenomena of radiation exchange, the quantification of radiation, and the mechanisms whereby radiation is attenuated in passing through the earth's atmosphere. Applications of radiation exchange are discussed, such as the measurement of the effective radiating temperature of the ozonosphere. Also presented is the development of the concept of atmospheric windows and atmospheric transmittance. Radiation exchange experiments between Earth and space are presented and their interpretations given. The book fives detailed, step-by-step procedures for carrying out the radiometric calibration of an infrared prism spectrometer and a radiation thermopile.

  7. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  8. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  9. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a disease, often call Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) . A person with COPD may have either emphysema or chronic bronchitis, but many have both. Some people with COPD may also have asthma . Let’s take a look ...

  10. Space Radiation and Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Jeffrey S.; Lloyd, Shane A.J.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Bateman, Ted A.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation may negatively impact skeletal integrity during extended spaceflight missions to the moon, Mars, or near-Earth asteroids. However, our understanding of the effects of radiation on bone is limited when compared to the effects of weightlessness. In addition to microgravity, astronauts will be exposed to space radiation from solar and cosmic sources. Historically, radiation exposure has been shown to damage both osteoblast precursors and local vasculature within the irradiated volume. The resulting suppression of bone formation and a general state of low bone-turnover is thought to be the primary contributor to bone loss and eventual fracture. Recent investigations using mouse models have identified a rapid, but transient, increase in osteoclast activity immediately after irradiation with both spaceflight and clinically-relevant radiation qualities and doses. Together with a chronic suppression of bone formation after radiation exposure, this acute skeletal damage may contribute to long-term deterioration of bone quality, potentially increasing fracture risk. Direct evidence for the damaging effects of radiation on human bone are primarily demonstrated by the increased incidence of fractures at sites that absorb high doses of radiation during cancer therapy: exposures are considerably higher than what could be expected during spaceflight. However, both the rapidity of bone damage and the chronic nature of the changes appear similar between exposure scenarios. This review will outline our current knowledge of space and clinical exploration exposure to ionizing radiation on skeletal health. PMID:22826632

  11. Space Radiation and Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Willey, Jeffrey S; Lloyd, Shane A J; Nelson, Gregory A; Bateman, Ted A

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation may negatively impact skeletal integrity during extended spaceflight missions to the moon, Mars, or near-Earth asteroids. However, our understanding of the effects of radiation on bone is limited when compared to the effects of weightlessness. In addition to microgravity, astronauts will be exposed to space radiation from solar and cosmic sources. Historically, radiation exposure has been shown to damage both osteoblast precursors and local vasculature within the irradiated volume. The resulting suppression of bone formation and a general state of low bone-turnover is thought to be the primary contributor to bone loss and eventual fracture. Recent investigations using mouse models have identified a rapid, but transient, increase in osteoclast activity immediately after irradiation with both spaceflight and clinically-relevant radiation qualities and doses. Together with a chronic suppression of bone formation after radiation exposure, this acute skeletal damage may contribute to long-term deterioration of bone quality, potentially increasing fracture risk. Direct evidence for the damaging effects of radiation on human bone are primarily demonstrated by the increased incidence of fractures at sites that absorb high doses of radiation during cancer therapy: exposures are considerably higher than what could be expected during spaceflight. However, both the rapidity of bone damage and the chronic nature of the changes appear similar between exposure scenarios. This review will outline our current knowledge of space and clinical exploration exposure to ionizing radiation on skeletal health.

  12. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  13. Radiation Basics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Radiation can come from unstable atoms or it can be produced by machines. There are two kinds of radiation; ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Learn about alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray radiation, as well the different types of doses.

  14. Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.

  15. Chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J

    2014-03-24

    Chronic migraine is a disabling neurologic condition that affects 2% of the general population. Patients with chronic migraine have headaches on at least 15 days a month, with at least eight days a month on which their headaches and associated symptoms meet diagnostic criteria for migraine. Chronic migraine places an enormous burden on patients owing to frequent headaches; hypersensitivity to visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli; nausea; and vomiting. It also affects society through direct and indirect medical costs. Chronic migraine typically develops after a slow increase in headache frequency over months to years. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of transforming to chronic migraine. The diagnosis requires a carefully performed patient interview and neurologic examination, sometimes combined with additional diagnostic tests, to differentiate chronic migraine from secondary headache disorders and other primary chronic headaches of long duration. Treatment takes a multifaceted approach that may include risk factor modification, avoidance of migraine triggers, drug and non-drug based prophylaxis, and abortive migraine treatment, the frequency of which is limited to avoid drug overuse. This article provides an overview of current knowledge regarding chronic migraine, including epidemiology, risk factors for its development, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and guidelines. The future of chronic migraine treatment and research is also discussed.

  16. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Professions in Radiation Therapy Radiation Oncologist Therapeutic Medical Physicist Radiation Therapist Dosimetrist Radiation Oncology Nurse Social Worker Dietitian Radiation Oncologist Radiation oncologists are physicians who oversee the ...

  17. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  18. Chronic Radiation Sickness Among Techa Riverside Residents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    diseases (ICD-9 class 9), 30 - urogenital tract impairment (ICD-9 class 10), and 0 trauma (ICD-9 class 17) were almost similar in the CRS cohort and the...10.54 9. Diseases of the digestive system 5 2.26 258 2.21 10. Diseases of the urogenital system 2 0.90 105 0.90 11. Pregnancy complications 47 0.40 12...liver, and pancreas (summarized), (b) breast can- cer, (c) cancer of the urogenital organs, and (d) leu- In patients with CRS, only one case of cancer

  19. Radiation safety.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-06-01

    Diagnostic radiology procedures, such as computed tomography (CT) and X-ray, are an increasing source of ionising radiation exposure to our community. Exposure to ionising radiation is associated with increased risk of malignancy, proportional to the level of exposure. Every diagnostic test using ionising radiation needs to be justified by clinical need. General practitioners need a working knowledge of radiation safety so they can adequately inform their patients of the risks and benefits of diagnostic imaging procedures.

  20. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Matthew J; DiMagno, Eugene P

    2012-09-01

    We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2011. Smoking increases the risk of nongallstone acute pancreatitis and the progression of acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90 000 United States Pharmacopeia units of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared with endoscopic treatment in patients advanced chronic pancreatitis with a dilated main duct ± pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with chronic pancreatitis but approximately 30% of patients have significant side effects. Patients with nongallstone-related acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis of any cause should cease smoking. Results of this year's investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Radiation Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation is energy that travels in the form of waves or high-speed particles. It occurs naturally in sunlight. Man-made radiation is used in X-rays, nuclear weapons, nuclear power plants and cancer treatment. If you are exposed to small amounts of radiation over a ...

  2. Treatment of Radiation-Induced Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Matthias D; Liu, Joceline S; Morey, Allen F

    2017-02-01

    Radiation therapy may result in urethral strictures from vascular damage. Most radiation-induced urethral strictures occur in the bulbomembranous junction, and urinary incontinence may result as a consequence of treatment. Radiation therapy may compromise reconstruction due to poor tissue healing and radionecrosis. Excision and primary anastomosis is the preferred urethroplasty technique for radiation-induced urethral stricture. Principles of posterior urethroplasty for trauma may be applied to the treatment of radiation-induced urethral strictures. Chronic management with suprapubic tube is an option based on patient comorbidities and preference.

  3. Electroencephalographic responses to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    GARCIA, J; BUCHWALD, N A; BACH-Y-RITA, G; FEDER, B H; KOELLING, R A

    1963-04-19

    Electroencephalographic recordings made from chronically implanted cortical electrodes indicate that ionizing radiation has an immediate effect upon brain wave patterns. X-rays delivered at the rate of 0.2 roentgen per second produce an arousal effect resembling that which occurs as a result of stimulation through peripheral receptor systems.

  4. Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    Radiation protection is a very important aspect for the application of particle detectors in many different fields, like high energy physics, medicine, materials science, oil and mineral exploration, and arts, to name a few. The knowledge of radiation units, the experience with shielding, and information on biological effects of radiation are vital for scientists handling radioactive sources or operating accelerators or X-ray equipment. This article describes the modern radiation units and their conversions to older units which are still in use in many countries. Typical radiation sources and detectors used in the field of radiation protection are presented. The legal regulations in nearly all countries follow closely the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Tables and diagrams with relevant information on the handling of radiation sources provide useful data for the researcher working in this field.

  5. Radiation safety

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    Radiation safety is rapidly becoming a major concern of every patient. Poor understanding of ionizing radiation and its effects frequently heightens anxiety. The average United States resident receives about 125 mrem of radiation per year from natural background radiation and another 120 mrem from man-made sources. The 240 million x-ray procedures performed annually contribute 90 percent of the man-made portion. It is assumed that the risks of medical radiation are outweighed by the benefits gained from the information obtained. If present in sufficiently high dosage, radiation can have harmful effects, such as induction of leukemia and thyroid malignancy. No deleterious effects have been shown to have been caused by diagnostic radiation. It is reassuring that the risks of medical radiation appear to be quite small compared with other common hazards most people face daily. Careful attention to the use of radiographic safety and protective technique will ensure the lowest possible radiation dose. The physician's discretion in ordering only appropriate and indicated x-ray films will ensure the patients are exposed to the lowest possible amount of radiation.

  6. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get into your lungs.Bronchitis causes a cough that produces mucus (sometimes called sputum), trouble breathing, ... main symptom of chronic bronchitis is a persistent cough that doesn’t go away for months. The ...

  7. [Chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Holle, D; Müller, D; Nägel, S; Rabe, K

    2013-12-01

    The classification of the International Headache Society (IHS) generally differentiates episodic from chronic headache. Chronic migraine is defined as headache on 15 and more days a month over more than 3 months and headache on 8 days or more fulfils the criteria for migraine or were triptan/ergot-responsive when thought to be migrainous in early stages of the attack. The prevalence of chronic migraine is estimated at 2-4 %. The quality of life is highly compromised in this condition and comorbidities are much more frequent compared to episodic migraine. Data from prospective randomized studies are scarce as most patients with chronic migraine were excluded from previous trials and only few studies were conducted for this condition. The efficacy for prophylactic treatment compared with placebo is proven for topiramate and onabotulinum toxin A.

  8. Chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic bacterial prostatitis? What are the effects of treatments for chronic abacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, allopurinol, alpha-blockers, biofeedback, local injections of antimicrobial drugs, mepartricin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral antimicrobial drugs, pentosan polysulfate, prostatic massage, quercetin, radical prostatectomy, sitz baths, transurethral microwave thermotherapy, and transurethral resection. PMID:21736764

  9. Radiator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    1993-01-01

    Radiator technology is discussed in the context of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative's (CSTI's) high capacity power-thermal management project. The CSTI project is a subset of a project to develop a piloted Mars nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle. The following topics are presented in vugraph form: advanced radiator concepts; heat pipe codes and testing; composite materials; radiator design and integration; and surface morphology.

  10. Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  11. Radiation epidemiology: Past and present

    SciTech Connect

    Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    Major advancements in radiation epidemiology have occurred during the last several years in studies of atomic bomb survivors, patients given medical radiation, and radiation workers, including underground miners. Risks associated with the Chernobyl accident, indoor radon and childhood exposure to I-131 have yet to be elucidated. Situations in the former Soviet Union around Chelyabinsk, a nuclear installation in the southern Urals, and in the Altai, which received radioactive fallout from weapons testing at Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, have the potential to provide information on the effects of chronic radiation exposure. Since Roentgen`s discovery of x-rays just 100 years ago, a tremendous amount of knowledge has been accumulated about human health effects following irradiation. The 1994 UNSCEAR report contains the latest compilation and synthesis of radiation epidemiology. This overview will cover epidemiology from a radiation perspective. The different types of study methodologies will be described, followed by a kaleidoscope coverage of past and present studies; ending with some remaining questions in radiation epidemiology. This should set the stage for future chapters, and stimulate thinking about implications of the new data on radiation cancer risks.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  13. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Leznoff, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the pathophysiology of chronic urticaria in light of recent evidence for it being an autoimmune disease, and to recommend appropriate management. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: An extensive literature review was supplemented with a MEDLINE search. Articles from easily available journals were preferred. These consisted of the most recent basic articles on autoimmunity in relation to chronic urticaria and a selection of previous articles on pathophysiology, which illustrate consistencies with recent evidence. The investigation and management protocol is supported by original and relevant literature. MAIN FINDINGS: The histopathology and immunohistology of chronic urticaria and certain clinical studies were a prelude to definitive evidence that most instances of chronic urticaria are autoimmune. Although allergic and other causes are uncommon, these must be sought because identification can lead to cure or specific treatment. Management of the much more common autoimmune urticaria is based on principles derived from the demonstrated pathogenesis and on results of published clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS: In most instances, chronic urticaria is an autoimmune disease, but uncommon allergic or other causes must be considered. PMID:9805172

  14. Understanding Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Radiation is a natural energy force that has been a part of the environment since the Earth was formed. It takes various forms, none of which can be smelled, tasted, seen, heard, or felt. Nevertheless, scientists know what it is, where it comes from, how to measure and detect it, and how it affects people. Cosmic radiation from outer space and…

  15. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  16. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  17. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  18. Radiation retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Zamber, R W; Kinyoun, J L

    1992-01-01

    Radiation therapy is effective against many cancerous and noncancerous disease processes. As with other therapeutics, side effects must be anticipated, recognized, and managed appropriately. Radiation retinopathy is a vision-threatening complication of ocular, orbital, periorbital, facial, nasopharyngeal, and cranial irradiation. Factors that appear important in the pathogenesis of radiation retinopathy include total radiation dosage, fraction size, concomitant chemotherapy, and preexisting vascular disorders. Clinical manifestations of the disorder include macular edema and nonproliferative and proliferative retinopathy, similar to changes seen in diabetic retinopathy. Argon laser photocoagulation has proved efficacious for managing macular edema and fibrovascular proliferation in some of these patients. Ongoing basic laboratory and clinical research efforts have led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis, natural history, and treatment response of radiation retinopathy. The ultimate goal of this knowledge is to improve the prevention, recognition, and management of this vision-threatening complication. Images PMID:1441494

  19. [Radiation carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Yoshio

    2013-11-01

    Misrepair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation is a potential cause of carcinogenesis following exposure to radiation. Radiation exposure increases the incidence of the same types of mutations that occur spontaneously in a given population. A high incidence of DNA double-strand breaks is characteristic of damage by ionizing radiation compared with those induced by other environmental mutagens. In China, residents living in areas with high level background radiation(6mSv/y) had a significantly higher frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes compared to that for the residents living in the control areas(2mSv/y). Radiation-associated increases in risk were seen for most sites. Gender-averaged excess absolute risk rates estimated at age 70, after exposure at age 30, differ in the sites, and the risks of gastric cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer were highly increased, in that order. Latent periods for the development of leukemia and thyroid cancer after radiation exposure at ages younger than 18 were shorter compared to those for other solid cancers.

  20. Chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, S; Tandon, R K

    1996-06-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is currently the most exciting new imaging technique for chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopy-assisted duodenal intubation during the secretin-cholecystokinin test reduces intubation time in difficult cases. The NBT-para-amino benzoic acid test has been refined to enhance its discriminant power. The cholesteryl-[C13]octanoate breath test and the faecal elastase test are newer highly sensitive and specific tubeless tests. Pain in chronic pancreatitis continues to be a vexing therapeutic issue. Enzyme treatment continues despite criticism. Neurotensin is the new suspected mediator of the feedback mechanism, which is downregulated by enzyme therapy. Steroid ganglion block is an exciting therapeutic tool for pain relief. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy, Dormia basketing and pancreatic stenting in conjunction with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy should be performed early in chronic pancreatitis to prevent parenchymal atrophy with ensuing exocrine and endocrine pancreatic dysfunction. The modified Puestow's procedure preserves endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions besides relieving pain. Closed loop insulin infusion allows superior management of pancreatic diabetes following near total pancreatectomy. The standardised incidence rate of pancreatic cancer is 16.5 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and 100 for tropical chronic pancreatitis. Aggressive treatment protocols combining neo-adjuvant chemoradiation and intra-operative radiation with surgery are being used to improve the prognosis in this dismal complication of chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... breathing. You may also have other tests. Chronic bronchitis is a long-term condition that keeps coming back or never goes away completely. If you smoke, it is important to quit. Treatment can help with your symptoms. It often includes ...

  2. Chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines.

  3. Chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines. PMID:25901896

  4. Chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, David N

    2013-02-01

    This article provides an overview of current strategies for evaluating and treating patients who experience chronic insomnia. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several medications for the treatment of insomnia that incorporate a variety of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, thus allowing the development of a customized therapeutic approach. FDA-approved medications include γ-aminobutyric acid-modulating benzodiazepine receptor agonists, a melatonin receptor agonist, and a histamine receptor agonist. Psychological and behavioral techniques combined as cognitive-behavioral therapy also have been shown to be effective in the treatment of chronic insomnia. Insomnia is the most common sleep disturbance and represents a chronic condition for many people. Difficulty falling asleep and maintaining sleep are highly prevalent problems in patients with neurologic disorders. Multiple factors typically contribute to insomnia. Accordingly, a rather broad approach to evaluating patients is warranted. Evidence-based guidelines support the use of cognitive and behavioral strategies and selected medications in the treatment of patients with chronic insomnia.

  5. Radiation dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  6. Radiation dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  7. Radiation protection and radiation recovery with essential metalloelement chelates

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, J.R.J.; Soderberg, L.S.F.; Chang, L.W.

    1995-12-01

    This review presents the roles of some essential metalloelement-dependent enzymes in tissue maintenance and function, and their responses to radiation injury in accounting for radiation protection and recovery effects observed for nontoxic doses of essential metalloelement compounds. Effects of biochemicals including water undergoing bond radiolysis and the effects of free radicals derived from diatomic oxygen account for the acute and chronic aspects of radiation injury. Copper chelates have radiation protection and radiation recovery activities and cause rapid recovery of immunocompetency and recovery from radiation-induced histopathology. Mice treated with Cu(II){sub 2}(3,5-disopropylsalicy-late){sub 4}[Cu(II){sub 2}(3,5-DIPS){sub 4}] had increased survival and corresponding increases in numbers of myeloid and multipotential progenitor cells early after irradiation and earlier recovery of immune reactivity. Examination of radiation-induced histopathology in spleen, bone marrow, thymus, and small intestine also revealed Cu(II){sub 2}(3,5-DIPS){sub 4}-mediated rapid recovery of radiation-induced histopathology. Most recently, Fe, Mn, and Zn complexes have also been found to prevent death in lethally irradiated mice. These pharmacological effects of essential metalloelement chelates can be understood as due to facilitation of de novo synthesis of essential metalloelement-dependent enzymes which have roles in preventing the accumulation of pathological concentrations of oxygen radicals or repairing biochemical damage caused by radiation-induced bond homolysis. Essential metalloelement chelates offer a physiological approach to prevention and/or treatment of radiation injury. 97 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish

  9. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) Proton therapy is another kind of radiation used to ... than using x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  10. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  11. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  12. Integrative Radiation Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2015-02-27

    We plan to study tissue-level mechanisms important to human breast radiation carcinogenesis. We propose that the cell biology of irradiated tissues reveals a coordinated multicellular damage response program in which individual cell contributions are primarily directed towards suppression of carcinogenesis and reestablishment of homeostasis. We identified transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ) as a pivotal signal. Notably, we have discovered that TGFβ suppresses genomic instability by controlling the intrinsic DNA damage response and centrosome integrity. However, TGFβ also mediates disruption of microenvironment interactions, which drive epithelial to mesenchymal transition in irradiated human mammary epithelial cells. This apparent paradox of positive and negative controls by TGFβ is the topic of the present proposal. First, we postulate that these phenotypes manifest differentially following fractionated or chronic exposures; second, that the interactions of multiple cell types in tissues modify the responses evident in this single cell type culture models. The goals are to: 1) study the effect of low dose rate and fractionated radiation exposure in combination with TGFβ on the irradiated phenotype and genomic instability of non-malignant human epithelial cells; and 2) determine whether stromal-epithelial interactions suppress the irradiated phenotype in cell culture and the humanized mammary mouse model. These data will be used to 3) develop a systems biology model that integrates radiation effects across multiple levels of tissue organization and time. Modeling multicellular radiation responses coordinated via extracellular signaling could have a significant impact on the extrapolation of human health risks from high dose to low dose/rate radiation exposure.

  13. Peritoneal dialysis for chronic cardiorenal syndrome: Lessons learned from ultrafiltration trials

    PubMed Central

    Kazory, Amir

    2015-01-01

    The current models of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) are mainly based on a cardiocentric approach; they assume that worsening renal function is an adverse consequence of the decline in cardiac function rather than a separate and independent pathologic phenomenon. If this assumption were true, then mechanical extraction of fluid (i.e., ultrafiltration therapy) would be expected to portend positive impact on renal hemodynamics and function through improvement in cardio-circulatory physiology and reduction in neurohormonal activation. However, currently available ultrafiltration trials, whether in acute heart failure (AHF) or in CRS, have so far failed to show any improvement in renal function; they have reported no impact or even observed adverse renal outcomes in this setting. Moreover, the presence or absence of renal dysfunction seems to affect the overall safety and efficacy of ultrafiltration therapy in AHF. This manuscript briefly reviews cardiorenal physiology in AHF and concludes that therapeutic options for CRS should not only target cardio-circulatory status of the patients, but they need to also have the ability of addressing the adverse homeostatic consequences of the associated decline in renal function. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) can be such an option for the chronic cases of CRS as it has been shown to provide efficient intracorporeal ultrafiltration and sodium extraction in volume overloaded patients while concurrently correcting the metabolic consequences of diminished renal function. Currently available trials on PD in heart failure have shown the safety and efficacy of this therapeutic modality for patients with chronic CRS and suggest that it could represent a pathophysiologically and conceptually relevant option in this setting. PMID:26225199

  14. Development of a centrifugal pump with improved antithrombogenicity and hemolytic property for chronic circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Taenaka, Y; Wakisaka, Y; Masuzawa, T; Tatsumi, E; Toda, K; Miyazaki, K; Eya, K; Baba, Y; Nakatani, T; Ohno, T; Nishimura, T; Takano, H

    1996-06-01

    A centrifugal pump with a unique structure has been developed for chronic support. The pump is driven by a magnetic coupling and has no rotating shaft, no seal around the rotating part, and a balancing hole at the center of the impeller and the thrust bearing. The pump was improved in stepwise fashion to realize good antithrombogenicity and low hemolysis. The first pump, the National Cardiovascular Center (NCVC)-0, had an impeller with 4 rectangular and curved vanes; 6 triangularly shaped curved vanes were employed in the second model, the NCVC-1, to reduce trauma to the blood. In the third design, the NCVC-2, the central hole was enlarged, and the thrust bearing shoulder was rounded so that blood washing was enhanced around the impeller; stream lines also were smoothed for improved antithrombogenicity. The hemolytic property of the device was evaluated in vitro with heparinized fresh goat blood; hemolysis indexes of the NCVC-0, -1, and -2 were 0.05, 0.01, and 0.006 g per 100 L, respectively. Antithrombogenicity of the pumps was examined in animal experiments as a left heart bypass device in goals weighing 52-75 kg. Six NCVC-0 pumps were driven for 14 to 33 (22.0 +/- 7.6) days in goats receiving the antiplatelet drug cilostazol orally. Four NCVC-1 pumps ran for 1 to 80 (28.5 +/- 30.6) days with the same drug regimen in 2 cases and with no anticoagulation therapy in 2 cases. After 3 preliminary 1-week tests of NCVC-2 pumps in animals, the pump was installed in 3 goats; 2 pumps were still running on the 182nd and 58th pumping day. Intracorporeal implantation also was attempted successfully. The results indicate that this pump has promising features for chronic support although longer term and additional evaluations are necessary.

  15. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  16. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia Overview Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is an uncommon type of cancer of the blood cells. The term "chronic" in chronic myelogenous leukemia indicates that this cancer ...

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    COPD; Chronic obstructive airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... can do to relieve symptoms and keep the disease from getting worse. If you smoke, now is ...

  18. Chronic motor tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  19. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org National ...

  20. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic ...

  1. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Burrall, B. A.; Halpern, G. M.; Huntley, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Urticaria affects 15% to 20% of the population once or more during a lifetime. Chronic urticaria is a frequent recurrent eruption over a period greater than 6 weeks; the cause remains a mystery in more than 75% of cases. Urticaria and angioedema may be produced by immunologic or nonimmunologic means. Urticarial vasculitis, contact urticaria, mastocytosis, physical urticarias, dermatographism, cholinergic urticaria, localized heat urticaria, cold urticaria, aquagenic urticaria, and vibratory angioedema all require specific evaluation and treatment. Chronic idiopathic urticaria is usually controlled by antihistamines; depending on the circadian rhythm of the eruption, sedative or nonsedative antihistamines are prescribed. Some patients will require a combination of H1 and H2 antagonists, or even parenteral corticosteroids. PMID:1970697

  2. Chronic Cough.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Adalberto; de Diego, Alfredo; Domingo, Christian; Lamas, Adelaida; Gutierrez, Raimundo; Naberan, Karlos; Garrigues, Vicente; López Vime, Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Chronic cough (CC), or cough lasting more than 8 weeks, has attracted increased attention in recent years following advances that have changed opinions on the prevailing diagnostic and therapeutic triad in place since the 1970s. Suboptimal treatment results in two thirds of all cases, together with a new notion of CC as a peripheral and central hypersensitivity syndrome similar to chronic pain, have changed the approach to this common complaint in routine clinical practice. The peripheral receptors involved in CC are still a part of the diagnostic triad. However, both convergence of stimuli and central nervous system hypersensitivity are key factors in treatment success. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation takes its Toll

    PubMed Central

    Ratikan, Josephine A.; Micewicz, Ewa D.; Xie, Michael W.; Schaue, Dörthe

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recognize and respond to universal molecular patterns on invading microorganisms allows our immune system to stay on high alert, sensing danger to our self-integrity. Our own damaged cells and tissues in pathological situations activate similar warning systems as microbes. In this way, the body is able to mount a response that is appropriate to the danger. Toll-like receptors are at the heart of this pattern recognition system that initiates innate pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and ultimately bridges recognition of danger to adaptive immunity. The acute inflammatory lesions that are formed segue into resolution of inflammation, repair and healing or, more dysfunctionally, into chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, excessive tissue damage and carcinogenesis. Redox is at the nexus of this decision making process and is the point at which ionizing radiation initially intercepts to trigger similar responses to self-damage. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how radiation-damaged cells interact with Toll-like receptors and how the immune systems interprets these radiation-induced danger signals in the context of whole-body exposures and during local tumor irradiation. PMID:25819030

  4. Radiation takes its Toll.

    PubMed

    Ratikan, Josephine A; Micewicz, Ewa D; Xie, Michael W; Schaue, Dörthe

    2015-11-28

    The ability to recognize and respond to universal molecular patterns on invading microorganisms allows our immune system to stay on high alert, sensing danger to our self-integrity. Our own damaged cells and tissues in pathological situations activate similar warning systems as microbes. In this way, the body is able to mount a response that is appropriate to the danger. Toll-like receptors are at the heart of this pattern recognition system that initiates innate pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and ultimately bridges recognition of danger to adaptive immunity. The acute inflammatory lesions that are formed segue into resolution of inflammation, repair and healing or, more dysfunctionally, into chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, excessive tissue damage and carcinogenesis. Redox is at the nexus of this decision making process and is the point at which ionizing radiation initially intercepts to trigger similar responses to self-damage. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how radiation-damaged cells interact with Toll-like receptors and how the immune systems interprets these radiation-induced danger signals in the context of whole-body exposures and during local tumor irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Radiation Therapy Print A ... have many questions and concerns about it. About Radiation Therapy In radiation therapy, high-energy radiation from ...

  6. Abdominal radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - abdomen - discharge; Cancer - abdominal radiation; Lymphoma - abdominal radiation ... When you have radiation treatment for cancer, your body goes through changes. About 2 weeks after radiation treatment starts, you might notice changes ...

  7. Brain radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  8. Is radiation protection for the unborn child guaranteed by radiation protection for female workers?

    PubMed

    Nosske, D; Karcher, K

    2003-01-01

    ICRP Publication 88 recommends doses to the embryo and fetus from intakes of radionuclides by the mother for various intake scenarios. Mainly by answering the question 'Is radiation protection for the unborn child guaranteed by radiation protection for female workers?' it has been assessed if the intake scenarios given in ICRP Publication 88 are adequate for radiation protection purposes. This is generally the case, but the consideration of an additional chronic intake scenario for early pregnancy would be helpful. It is demonstrated that following chronic intake by inhalation, for most radionuclides radiation protection for (female) workers is also adequate for protection of the unborn child, considered as a member of the public. However, there are a number of radionuclides for which possible intakes in routine operations should be more restricted (up to 1% of the annual limits on intake for workers in the case of nickel isotopes) to ensure radiation protection for the unborn child.

  9. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly.

  10. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  11. RADIATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Glass, F.M.; Wilson, H.N.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation detecting and measuring systems, particularly a compact, integrating, background monitor, are discussed. One of the principal features of the system is the use of an electrometer tube where the input of the tube is directly connected to an electrode of the radiation detector and a capacitor is coupled to the tube input. When a predetermined quantity of radiation has been integrated, a trigger signal is fed to a recorder and a charge is delivered to the capacitor to render the tube inoperative. The capacitor is then recharged for the next period of operation. With this arrangement there is a substantial reduction in lead lengths and the principal components may be enclosed and hermetically sealed to insure low leakage.

  12. Radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Preston, R J

    2012-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 1 (C1) considers the risk of induction of cancer and heritable disease; the underlying mechanisms of radiation action; and the risks, severity, and mechanisms of induction of tissue reactions (formerly 'deterministic effects'). C1 relies upon the interpretation of current knowledge of radio-epidemiological studies; current information on the underlying mechanisms of diseases and radiation-induced disease; and current radiobiological studies at the whole animal, tissue, cell, and molecular levels. This overview will describe the activities of C1 in the context of the 2007 Recommendations of ICRP. In particular, the conclusions from the most recent C1 Task Group deliberations on radon and lung cancer, and tissue reactions will be discussed. Other activities are described in summary fashion to illustrate those areas that C1 judge to be likely to influence the development of the risk estimates and nominal risk coefficients used for radiation protection purposes.

  13. Radiation myelopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, B; Pant, G C; Subrahmaniyam, K; Agrawal, M S; Mohanty, S

    1979-01-01

    Five cases of radiation myelopathy were found in a total of 10,000 cases given radiotherapy from 1968 to 1977. The clinical presentation and treatment details including the total dose, treatment volume, number of fractionations, overall time, and the RET value at the spinal cord were calculated and compared with other reports on this subject. The total number of fractionations ranged from 20 to 26 with an overall time of 32 days to 37 days. The dose received by four patients ranged from 1030 to 1900 RET, a little higher than the tolerance level of the spinal cord as compared to reported values. Two patients in this series had high blood pressure. The incidence of radiation myelopathy, already acceptably low, could possibly be reduced further by meticulous planning of radiation. PMID:448380

  14. Synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamed of just a decade or so ago. Here we will discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others.

  15. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  16. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  17. Directional radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Jonathan L.

    2017-09-12

    Directional radiation detectors and systems, methods, and computer-readable media for using directional radiation detectors to locate a radiation source are provided herein. A directional radiation detector includes a radiation sensor. A radiation attenuator partially surrounds the radiation sensor and defines an aperture through which incident radiation is received by the radiation sensor. The aperture is positioned such that when incident radiation is received directly through the aperture and by the radiation sensor, a source of the incident radiation is located within a solid angle defined by the aperture. The radiation sensor senses at least one of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma particles, or neutrons.

  18. RADIATION SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Brucer, M.H.

    1958-04-15

    A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

  19. (Radiation susceptibility)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1988-04-07

    The traveler was a participant in a workshop at RERF that was established to determine if current data or future studies could be utilized to address the question of whether radiation-sensitive individuals could have been over-represented in the A-bomb non-survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and thereby affect the cancer incidences. The topic was addressed by presentations by RERF staff on their current studies pertinent to radiation susceptibility; round-table discussions among panel members and observers; a written series of recommendations prepared by the workshop members and presented to the RERF council.

  20. Radiation dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, R.B.; Lynch, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    Even in this era of modern radiotherapy, injuries associated with the medical and industrial use of radiation devices will continue to pose a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. It must be borne in mind that the single most serious hazard to surgery in irradiated tissue is the lodgement of bacteria in tissue rendered avascular by the radiation and the secondary necrosis from the infection itself. The basic principles of wound management must be augmented by thorough knowledge of the use of well-vascularized muscle and musculocutaneous flap to provide adequate, blood-rich, soft-tissue coverage.

  1. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  2. Chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Valade, D

    2013-05-01

    The second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders revised in 2006 (ICHD-2R) gives a definition which requires 15 or more headache days per month over the past 3months with at least eight headache days per month that meet criteria for migraine without aura or that responds to migraine specific treatment. Approximately 2% of the global population suffers of chronic migraine (CM). Frequency of headache and degree of disability distinguish CM from episodic migraine (EM). There is a high frequency of medication overuse. The treatment depends on evaluation with education, lifestyle modifications, and trigger management, behavioral and pharmacologic therapies.

  3. Mind-Body Approaches and Chronic Illness: Status of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Cynthia A.; Pliego, Jessica; Rae, William A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of children experience chronic health issues that affect their academic and behavioral functioning, as well as psychological well-being. At the same time, psychological stress can exacerbate the chronic illness. The first line of treatment most often is medical (e.g., pharmacology, surgery, radiation). Even when the medical…

  4. Mind-Body Approaches and Chronic Illness: Status of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Cynthia A.; Pliego, Jessica; Rae, William A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of children experience chronic health issues that affect their academic and behavioral functioning, as well as psychological well-being. At the same time, psychological stress can exacerbate the chronic illness. The first line of treatment most often is medical (e.g., pharmacology, surgery, radiation). Even when the medical…

  5. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiation insulation technology from Apollo and subsequent spacecraft was used to develop superinsulators, used by makers of cold weather apparel, to make parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. The radiant barrier technology offers warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  6. Radiation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, W. G. G.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of both the wave and the corpuscular photon model of light. Suggests that students should be informed that the two models are complementary and that each model successfully describes a wide range of radiation phenomena. Cites 19 references which might be of interest to physics teachers and students. (LC)

  7. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiation insulation technology from Apollo and subsequent spacecraft was used to develop superinsulators, used by makers of cold weather apparel, to make parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. The radiant barrier technology offers warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  8. Radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity.

  9. Ionizing radiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  10. Radiation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, W. G. G.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of both the wave and the corpuscular photon model of light. Suggests that students should be informed that the two models are complementary and that each model successfully describes a wide range of radiation phenomena. Cites 19 references which might be of interest to physics teachers and students. (LC)

  11. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and typically one to two years of clinical physics training. They are certified by the American Board of Radiology or the American Board of Medical Physics . Radiation Therapist Radiation therapists work with radiation oncologists. ...

  12. Laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy: feasibility study in a chronic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Kaouk, Jihad H; Gill, Inderbir S; Desai, Mihir M; Banks, Kevin L W; Raja, Shanker S; Skacel, Marek; Sung, Gyung Tak

    2003-02-01

    to complex stone surgery such as anatrophic nephrolithotomy with encouraging surgical and functional outcomes. To our knowledge this report represents the initial study of in situ creation of experimental staghorn calculi and laparoscopic anatrophic nephrolithotomy performed completely intracorporeally in a chronic porcine model.

  13. Radiation Engineering for Designers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of the natural space radiation environment, an introduction to radiation effect types, an overview of EEE parts selection, scrubbing, and radiation mitigation, and an introduction to radiation testing.

  14. Radiation Engineering for Designers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of the natural space radiation environment, an introduction to radiation effect types, an overview of EEE parts selection, scrubbing, and radiation mitigation, and an introduction to radiation testing.

  15. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Cancer.gov

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  16. Ultraviolet Radiation: Human Exposure and Health Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenkate, Thomas D.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of human exposure to ultraviolet radiation and associated health effects as well as risk estimates for acute and chronic conditions resulting from such exposure. Demonstrates substantial reductions in health risk that can be achieved through preventive actions. Also includes a risk assessment model for skin cancer. Contains 36…

  17. Ultraviolet Radiation: Human Exposure and Health Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenkate, Thomas D.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of human exposure to ultraviolet radiation and associated health effects as well as risk estimates for acute and chronic conditions resulting from such exposure. Demonstrates substantial reductions in health risk that can be achieved through preventive actions. Also includes a risk assessment model for skin cancer. Contains 36…

  18. Ultraviolet radiation revisited.

    PubMed

    Bergmanson, J P; Sheldon, T M

    1997-07-01

    It is likely that we currently receive a greater lifetime exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) than earlier generations due to increased UVR reaching the earth's surface, our longer life expectancy, and increased activities in UV intense environments. This elevated UVR exposure is likely to lead to a higher incidence of acute and chronic ocular and skin radiation trauma. We reviewed the evidence in the current literature supporting these assertions as well as reports of preventive strategies for blocking UVR. Hawaii is the most UV-intense location on earth as it has the lowest ozone thickness values ever recorded outside the Antarctic zone. It is anticipated that the overall ozone depletion will continue into the next millennium. Significant evidence suggests a correlation between UVR exposure and conjunctival pterygium, photokeratitis, climatic droplet keratopathy and cataracts. The incidence of skin cancer is also on the rise as a result of the increased amount of UVR reaching the earth secondary to the thinning ozone. There are compelling reasons to counsel our patients on the adverse effects of UVR and to offer them the various options available for UV protection. Sunglasses and UV blocking ophthalmic lenses traditionally have been the most commonly selected forms of UVR protection. The UV blocking hydrogel contact lens, a recent addition to our armamentarium, is a means of blocking UVR.

  19. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... A subdural hematoma develops when bridging veins tear and leak blood. These are the tiny veins that run between the ...

  20. Hemochromatosis heterozygotes may constitute a radiation-sensitive subpopulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R G.; Morris, James E. ); Anderson, Larry E. )

    1999-12-01

    A primary mechanism of radiation-induced DNA damage is by generation of free radicals. Chronically increased oxidative stress from elevated body iron may increase radiation sensitivity by decreasing cellular oxygen radical scavenging capability. Hemochromatosis heterozygotes have elevated body iron. Low-level radiation sensitization by iron may be particularly pertinent for risk of breast cancer. Since ten percent of the population appears to be heterozygous for the hemochromatosis gene, a radiosensitizing effect would have pervasive implications.

  1. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  2. CHRONIC URTICARIA

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Sandeep; Gupta, Vibhanshu; Amin, Syed Suhail; Tahseen, Mohd

    2011-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a disturbing allergic condition of the skin. Although frequently benign, it may sometimes be a red flag sign of a serious internal disease. A multitude of etiologies have been implicated in the causation of CU, including physical, infective, vasculitic, psychological and idiopathic. An autoimmune basis of most of the ‘idiopathic’ forms is now hypothesized. Histamine released from mast cells is the major effector in pathogenesis and it is clinically characterized by wheals that have a tendency to recur. Laboratory investigations aimed at a specific etiology are not always conclusive, though may be suggestive of an underlying condition. A clinical search for associated systemic disease is strongly advocated under appropriate circumstances. The mainstay of treatment remains H1 antihistaminics. These may be combined with complementary pharmacopeia in the form of H2 blockers, doxepin, nifedipine and leukotriene inhibitors. More radical therapy in the form of immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide may be required for recalcitrant cases. Autologous transfusion and alternative remedies like acupuncture have prospects for future. A stepwise management results in favorable outcomes. An update on CU based on our experience with patients at a tertiary care centre is presented. PMID:22345759

  3. [Physical treatment modalities for chronic leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J

    2010-05-01

    An increasing numbers of physical treatment options are available for chronic leg ulcer. In this review article, compression therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, negative pressure therapy, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, electrostimulation therapy, electromagnetic therapy, photodynamic therapy, water-filtered infrared-A-radiation and hydrotherapy are discussed in terms of their practical applications and the underlying evidence. With the exception of compression therapy for most of these treatments, good scientific data are not available. However this is a widespread problem in the treatment of chronic wounds. Nevertheless, several of the described methods such as negative pressure therapy represent one of the gold standards in practical treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers. Although the use of physical treatment modalities may improve healing in patients with chronic leg ulcers, the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying causes are essential for long-lasting success.

  4. Chronic actinic damage of facial skin.

    PubMed

    Bilaç, Cemal; Şahin, Mustafa Turhan; Öztürkcan, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Chronic actinic damage of the skin manifests itself as extrinsic skin aging (photoaging) and photocarcinogenesis. During the last decade, substantial progress has been made in understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of photoaging. DNA photodamage and ultraviolet-generated reactive oxygen species are the initial events that lead to most of the typical histologic and clinical manifestations of chronic photodamage of the skin. Chronic actinic damage affects all layers of the skin. Keratinocytes, melanocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells are altered by ultraviolet radiation and can result in numerous changes in human skin, particularly the skin of fair-skinned individuals. These changes include actinic keratosis, thickening and wrinkling, elastosis, telengiectasia, solar comedones, diffuse or mottled hyperpigmentation, and skin cancers. There are many options in the treatment of changes caused by chronic actinic damage. The most effective measure of prevention of the photoaging and photocarcinogenesis is sun protection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Shortwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Accurate shortwave radiation data is critical to evapotranspiration (ET) models used for developing irrigation schedules to optimize crop production while saving water, minimizing fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide applications, reducing soil erosion, and protecting surface and ground water quality. Low cost silicon cell pyranometers have proven to be sufficiently accurate and robust for widespread use in agricultural applications under unobstructed daylight conditions. More expensive thermopile pyranometers are required for use as calibration standards and measurements under light with unique spectral properties (electric lights, under vegetation, in greenhouses and growth chambers). Routine cleaning, leveling, and annual calibration checks will help to ensure the integrity of long-term data.

  6. Shortwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, Steve; Bugbee, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Accurate shortwave radiation data is critical to evapotranspiration (ET) models used for developing irrigation schedules to optimize crop production while saving water, minimizing fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide applications, reducing soil erosion, and protecting surface and ground water quality. Low cost silicon cell pyranometers have proven to be sufficiently accurate and robust for widespread use in agricultural applications under unobstructed daylight conditions. More expensive thermopile pyranometers are required for use as calibration standards and measurements under light with unique spectral properties (electric lights, under vegetation, in greenhouses and growth chambers). Routine cleaning, leveling, and annual calibration checks will help to ensure the integrity of long-term data.

  7. Effects of chronic exposure to 950 MHz ultra-high-frequency electromagnetic radiation on reactive oxygen species metabolism in the right and left cerebral cortex of young rats of different ages.

    PubMed

    Furtado-Filho, Orlando V; Borba, Juliana B; Maraschin, Tatiana; Souza, Larissa M; Henriques, João A P; Moreira, José C F; Saffi, Jenifer

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of 950 MHz ultra-high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (UHF-EMR) on biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids in the left cerebral cortex (LCC) and right cerebral cortex (RCC) of neonate and 6-day-old rats. Twelve rats were equally divided into two groups as controls (CR) and exposed (ER), for each age (0 and 6 days). The LCC and RCC were examined in ER and CR after exposure. Radiation exposure lasted 30 min per day for up to 27 days (throughout pregnancy and 6 days postnatal). The specific absorption rate ranged from 1.32-1.14 W/kg. The damage to lipids, proteins and DNA was verified by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, carbonylated proteins (CP) and comets, respectively. The concentration of glucose in the peripheral blood of the rats was measured by the Accu-Chek Active Kit due to increased CP in RCC. In neonates, no modification of the biomarkers tested was detected. On the other hand, there was an increase in the levels of CP in the RCC of the 6-day-old ER. Interestingly, the concentration of blood glucose was decreased in this group. Our results indicate that there is no genotoxicity and oxidative stress in neonates and 6 days rats. However, the RCC had the highest concentration of CP that do not seem to be a consequence of oxidative stress. This study is the first to demonstrate the use of UHF-EMR causes different damage responses to proteins in the LCC and RCC.

  8. [Cutaneous radiation syndrome after accidental skin exposure to ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Peter, R U

    2013-12-01

    Accidental exposure of the human skin to single doses of ionizing radiation greater than 3 Gy results in a distinct clinical picture, which is characterized by a transient and faint erythema after a few hours, then followed by severe erythema, blistering and necrosis. Depending on severity of damage, the latter generally occurs 10-30 days after exposure, but in severe cases may appear within 48 hrs. Between three and 24 months after exposure, epidermal atrophy combined with progressive dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis is the predominant clinical feature. Even years and decades after exposure, atrophy of epidermis, sweat and sebaceous glands; telangiectases; and dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis may be found and even continue to progress. For this distinct pattern of deterministic effects following cutaneous accidental radiation exposure the term "cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS)" was coined in 1993 and has been accepted by all international authorities including IAEA and WHO since 2000. In contrast to the classical concept that inhibition of epidermal stem cell proliferation accounts for the clinical symptomatology, research of the last three decades has demonstrated the additional crucial role of inflammatory processes in the etiology of both acute and chronic sequelae of the CRS. Therefore, therapeutic approaches should include topical and systemic anti-inflammatory measures at the earliest conceivable point, and should be maintained throughout the acute and subacute stages, as this reduces the need for surgical intervention, once necrosis has occurred. If surgical intervention is planned, it should be executed with a conservative approach; no safety margins are needed. Antifibrotic measures in the chronic stage should address the chronic inflammatory nature of this process, in which over-expression TGF beta-1 may be a target for therapeutic intervention. Life-long follow-up often is required for management of delayed effects and for early detection of secondary

  9. Radiation Risk to the Fluoroscopy Operator and Staff.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Cosette M; Meisinger, Quinn C; Andre, Michael P; Kinney, Thomas B; Newton, Isabel G

    2016-10-01

    Recent articles discussing cases of brain cancer in interventionalists have raised concerns regarding the hazards of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. We review the basics of radiation dose and the potential radiation effects, particularly as they pertain to the operator. Then we present the data regarding the risk of each type of radiation effect to the fluoroscopy operator and staff, with special attention on cancer induction, radiation-induced cataracts, and the pregnant operator. Although the evidence overwhelmingly shows that exposure to higher doses of radiation carries a risk of cancer and tissue reactions, the risks of chronic exposure to low-level radiation are less clear. Many studies examining occupational exposure to radiation fail to show an increased risk of stochastic effects of radiation, but the positive results raise concern that the studies are underpowered to consistently detect the small risk. The lack of information in these studies about radiation doses and adherence to radiation protection further confound their interpretation. Large prospective studies of populations with occupational exposure to low-level radiation might clarify this issue. More clearly established are the risks of radiation to the fetus and the risk of cataracts in interventional cardiologists and interventional radiologists. Interventionalists can mitigate these risks by following established radiation safety practices.

  10. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliedner, T. M.; Nothdurft, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.; Weiss, M.; Kindler, H.

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a ``turbulence region'' for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a ``blood stem cell bank'' might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container.

  11. Chronic oxidative stress after irradiation: an unproven hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Samuel R; Cohen, Eric P

    2012-01-01

    Injury and organ failure after irradiation of late-responding tissues is a substantial problem in radiation oncology and a major threat after accidental or belligerent exposures. The mechanisms of injury may include death of clonogens, vascular injury, activation of cytokine networks, and/or chronic oxidative stress. Knowledge of mechanisms may guide optimal use of mitigators. The hypothesis of chronic oxidative stress as a mechanism of late radiation injury has received much attention. We review herein the published evidence for chronic oxidative stress in vivo, and for use of antioxidants as mitigators of normal tissue radiation injury. We conclude that there is only indirect evidence for chronic oxidative stress after irradiation, and there are only limited published reports of mitigation by antioxidants. We did not find a differentiation of persistent markers of oxidative stress from an ongoing production of oxygen radicals. It is thus unproven that chronic oxidative stress plays a major role in causing radiation injury and organ failure in late-responding tissues. Further investigation is justified, to identify persistent oxidative stress and to identify optimal mitigators of radiation injury. PMID:23245910

  12. RADIATION DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

    1960-05-10

    An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

  13. RADIATION COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.

    1958-02-01

    This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

  14. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An aluminized polymer film is a highly effective radiation barrier for both manned and unmanned spacecraft. Variations of this space-devised material are also used as an energy conservation technique for homes and offices. One commercial company, Tech 2000 (formerly Buckeye Radiant Barrier), markets 'Super R' Radiant Barrier, which finds its origins in the Apollo Mission programs. The material is placed between wall studs and exterior facing before siding or in new roof installation, between roof support and roof sheathing. Successful retrofit installations have included schools and shrink wrap ovens. The radiant barrier blocks 95 percent of radiant energy, thus retaining summer heat and blocking winter cold. Suppliers claim utility bill reductions of 20 percent or more.

  15. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Apollo and subsequent spacecraft have had highly effective radiation barriers; made of aluminized polymer film, they bar or let in heat to maintain consistent temperatures inside. Tech 2000, formerly Quantum International Corporation used the NASA technology in its insulating materials, Super "Q" Radiant Barrier, for home, industry and mobile applications. The insulation combines industrial aluminum foil overlaid around a core of another material, usually propylene or mylar. The outer layer reflects up to 97 percent of heat; the central layer creates a thermal break in the structure and thus allows low radiant energy emission. The Quantum Cool Wall, used in cars and trucks, takes up little space while providing superior insulation, thus reducing spoilage and costs. The panels can also dampen sound and engine, exhaust and solar heat.

  16. Radiative opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of opacity calculations performed during the past decade is presented. Attention is given to envelopes and interiors, equations of state, atomic data, line profiles, and mesh points. Results for a Cepheid model are presented. The solar radiative interior, solar abundances, hydrogen and helium, and contributions from the different elements are discussed. Work over the past decade has led to major revisions in envelope opacities, by factors as large as 3 or 4. There are also some revisions in results for deeper layers, which are important but not so pronounced. A comparison of the work of two opacity research groups, OPAL from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the international OP project, is given.

  17. Radiation dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Hoelsher, James W.; Hegland, Joel E.; Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  18. Supporting Self-management of Chronic Pain

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-19

    Chronic Pain Syndrome; Chronic Pain; Chronic Pain Due to Injury; Chronic Pain Due to Trauma; Chronic Pain Due to Malignancy (Finding); Chronic Pain Post-Procedural; Chronic Pain Hip; Chronic Pain, Widespread

  19. Radiation exposure of aircrews.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Wallace; Copeland, Kyle; Duke, Frances E; Nicholas, Joyce S; Darden, Edgar B; O'Brien, Keran

    2002-01-01

    Information is provided about the radiation to which aircrews are exposed and possible health consequences. Recommended radiation exposure limits are given. Crewmembers on commercial aircraft are exposed to higher doses of ionizing radiation than normally received by members of the general population in most parts of the world. The principal ionizing radiation is galactic cosmic radiation. On infrequent occasions, radiation from the sun leads to an increase in the ionizing radiation at aircraft flight altitudes. Radioactive cargo is another possible source of exposure to ionizing radiation. Crewmembers are exposed to nonionizing radiation in the form of electric and magnetic fields generated by the aircraft s electronic and electrical systems. Other potential sources of nonionizing radiation exposure are microwave radiation from the aircraft's weather radar, laser radiation, and ultraviolet radiation.

  20. [History of the radiation damage in occupations].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji

    2014-03-01

    In the year following Röntgen`s discovery of X-rays in 1895, approximately 60 cases of hand dermatitis and hair loss induced by radiation were reported. People using X-rays in their occupation, including X-ray tube manufacturers, physicians, and engineers, experienced chronic radiation dermatitis and were the first to be diagnosed with occupational radiation exposure. Reports of later appearing disorders, including skin cancer, suffered by doctors and engineers, were regarded as serious occupational diseases. In the 1910's, blood disorders, including leukemia, in people with occupational exposure to radiation came into focus. Dial painters applying radium to watches with a luminous dial clock face suffered osteomyelitis from about 1914. Other radiation damage reports include radiation death and carcinogenesis in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, and radiation death in the Tokai-mura JCO accident in 1999. The details of radiation damage in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011 have not yet been reported, but must be followed in the future.

  1. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  2. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  3. Transumbilical single-port laparoscopic appendectomy (TUSPLA): scarless intracorporeal appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tae Ho; Kim, Hyung Lan; Lee, Yoon Suk; Kim, Jin Jo; Lee, Keun Ho; You, Young Kyoung; Oh, Se Jeong; Park, Seung Man

    2009-02-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy is generally performed with the three-port system. In this study, we performed a unique single-port laparoscopic appendectomy, which we refer to as the transumbilical single-port laparoscopic appendectomy (TUSPLA). From April 19, 2008, 33 cases of TUSPLA were performed. A surgical glove was used as the "single-port" with an extra-small wound retractor, which was set up through a small umbilical incision. The surgical glove attached with one trocar and two pipes were then fixed to the outer ring of the wound retractor, which served as a single port with three working channels. Using this single-port system, TUSPLA was performed. The overall procedure was similar to that used for the three-port laparoscopic appendectomy. TUSPLA was attempted in 33 patients (11 males and 22 females), with an average age of 31.2 years (range, 14-73). Average patient body mass index was 22.8 kg/m2 (range, 16.8-35.8). TUSPLA was successfully completed in 31 patients. In 2 cases, the operation was converted to the conventional three-port laparoscopic appendectomy due to a gangrenous change at the base of the appendix in 1 case and the need for drainage in another. Mean operation time was 40.8 minutes (range, 15-90), and mean postoperative hospital stay was 2.5 days (range, 1-11). Postoperative complications occurred in 3 cases; 2 cases were of localized pericecal abscess and 1 case was of omphalitis, and all were treated conservatively. TUSPLA is a safe, effective technique that allows nearly scarless abdominal surgery.

  4. Laparoscopic colon resection and intracorporeal hand-sewn anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Wolharn, R; Reuter, F; Kenne, R; Clotten, M; Szabò, Z; Coburg, A J

    1994-01-01

    The application of laparoscopic surgical techniques to colonic surgery is restricted to selected cases and to rather few surgical centers. On the one hand, the disadvantages of the open approach involves the sizable laparotomy incision for mobilization of the viscera, especially if the colonic flexures are to be mobilized. On the other hand, in the minimally invasive approach the extent of dissection requires additional skills and a well honed endoscopic surgical team is needed especially if laparoscopic reconstruction of the large colon is to be accomplished. The teamwork is more critical for colon procedures than for laparoscopic gallbladder surgery.

  5. [Chronic otitis mediaChronic Otitis Media].

    PubMed

    Kohles, N; Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2015-11-01

    There are 2 different kinds of chronic otitis media: Otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and otitis media chronica epitympanalis (cholesteatoma). The incidence of chronic otitis media as reported in literature differs in a wide range. The incidence rates vary between 0.45 and 46%. Both, otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and cholesteatoma, lead to eardrum perforation due to lengthy and recurring inflammations. Furthermore, chronic otitis media is characterized by frequently recurring otorrhea and conductive hearing loss.

  6. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  7. Managing acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, James R A; Shankar, Arjun; Pereira, Stephen P

    2010-10-01

    Pancreatitis may be acute or chronic. Although both can be caused by similar aetiologies, they tend to follow distinct natural histories. Around 80% of acute pancreatitis (AP) diagnoses occur secondary to gallstone disease and alcohol misuse. AP is commonly associated with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back that is usually severe enough to warrant the patient seeking urgent medical attention. Onset of pain may be related to a recent alcohol binge or rich, fatty meal. The patient may appear unwell, be tachycardic and have exquisite tenderness in the upper abdomen. Overall, 10-25% of AP episodes are classified as severe, leading to an associated mortality rate of 7.5%. Disease severity is best predicted from a number of clinical scoring systems which can be applied at diagnosis in association with repeated clinical assessment, measurement of acute inflammatory markers, and CT. All patients with suspected AP should be referred urgently. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) follows continued, repetitive or sustained injury to the pancreas and 70% of diagnoses occur secondary to alcohol abuse. The characteristic presenting feature of CP is insidious progression of chronic, severe, upper abdominal pain, radiating to the back, caused by a combination of progressive pancreatic destruction, inflammation and duct obstruction. Signs and symptoms include weight loss and steatorrhoea and later on diabetes. CP patients may also present with recurrent episodes mimicking AP, both symptomatically and metabolically. Diagnosis of CP should be based on symptom profile, imaging and assessment of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. CT should be the first-line imaging investigation.

  8. Factors modifying the response of large animals to low-intensity radiation exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, N. P.; Still, E. T.

    1972-01-01

    In assessing the biological response to space radiation, two of the most important modifying factors are dose protraction and dose distribution to the body. Studies are reported in which sheep and swine were used to compare the hematology and lethality response resulting from radiation exposure encountered in a variety of forms, including acute (high dose-rate), chronic (low dose-rate), combinations of acute and chronic, and whether received as a continuous or as fractionated exposure. While sheep and swine are basically similar in response to acute radiation, their sensitivity to chronic irradiation is markedly different. Sheep remain relatively sensitive as the radiation exposure is protracted while swine are more resistant and capable of surviving extremely large doses of chronic irradiation. This response to chronic irradiation correlated well with changes in radiosensitivity and recovery following an acute, sublethal exposure.

  9. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Learn about the types of radiation, why side effects happen, which ones you might have, and more.

  10. Breast radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - breast - discharge ... away around 4 to 6 weeks after the radiation treatment is over. You may notice changes in ... breast looks or feels (if you are getting radiation after a lumpectomy). These changes include: Soreness or ...

  11. Foam radiators for transition radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Gavrilenko, I.; Potekhin, M.; Romaniouk, A.; Sosnovtsev, V.

    1993-02-01

    A wide variety of foam radiators, potentially useful in the design of a transition radiation detector, the possible particle identification tool in collider experiments, have been tested in the beam. Various characteristics of these radiators are compared, and the conclusion is reached that certain brands of polyethylene foam are best suited for use in the detector. Comparison is made with a "traditional" radiator, which is a periodic structure of plastic foils.

  12. LAURISTON S. TAYLOR LECTURE ON RADIATION PROTECTION AND MEASURMENTS: WHAT MAKES PARTICLE RADIATION SO EFFECTIVE?

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2012-01-01

    The scientific basis for the physical and biological effectiveness of particle radiations has emerged from many decades of meticulous basic research. A diverse array of biologically relevant consequences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism level have been reported, but what are the key processes and mechanisms that make particle radiation so effective, and what competing processes define dose dependences? Recent studies have shown that individual genotypes control radiation-regulated genes and pathways in response to radiations of varying ionization density. The fact that densely ionizing radiations can affect different gene families than sparsely ionizing radiations, and that the effects are dose- and time-dependent has opened up new areas of future research. The complex microenvironment of the stroma, and the significant contributions of the immune response have added to our understanding of tissue-specific differences across the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. The importance of targeted vs. nontargeted effects remain a thorny, but elusive and important contributor to chronic low dose radiation effects of variable LET that still needs further research. The induction of cancer is also LET-dependent, suggesting different mechanisms of action across the gradient of ionization density. The focus of this 35th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture is to chronicle the step-by-step acquisition of experimental clues that have refined our understanding of what makes particle radiation so effective, with emphasis on the example of radiation effects on the crystalline lens of the human eye. PMID:23032880

  13. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  14. Complications of Recanalization of Chronic Total Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanasundaram, Arun; Lombardi, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) of Chronic Total Occlusions (CTO) is an accepted revascularization procedure. These complex procedures carry with them certain risks and potential complications. Complications of PCI such as contrast induced renal dysfunction, radiation, etc, assume more relevance given the length and complexity of these procedures. Further, certain complications such as donor vessel injury, foreign body entrapment are unique to CTO PCI. A thorough understanding of the potential complications is important in mitigating risk during these complex procedures.

  15. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice.

    PubMed

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-07-01

    Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited.

  16. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods: BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Results: Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited. PMID:27635206

  17. The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Traulsen, Arne; Dingli, David

    2009-08-07

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an acquired neoplastic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder characterized by the expression of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein. This gene product is necessary and sufficient to explain the chronic phase of CML. The only known cause of CML is radiation exposure leading to a mutation of at least one HSC, although the vast majority of patients with CML do not have a history of radiation exposure. Nonetheless, in humans, significant radiation exposure (after exposure to atomic bomb fallout) leads to disease diagnosis in 3-5 years. In murine models, disease dynamics are much faster and CML is fatal over the span of a few months. Our objective is to develop a model that accounts for CML across all mammals. In the following, we combine a model of CML dynamics in humans with allometric scaling of hematopoiesis across mammals to illustrate the natural history of chronic phase CML in various mammals. We show how a single cell can lead to a fatal illness in mice and humans but a higher burden of CML stem cells is necessary to induce disease in larger mammals such as elephants. The different dynamics of the disease is rationalized in terms of mammalian mass. Our work illustrates the relevance of animal models to understand human disease and highlights the importance of considering the re-scaling of the dynamics that accrues to the same biological process when planning experiments involving different species.

  18. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases A ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  19. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Marrero Calvo, M; Merino Arribas, J; Rodrigo Palacios, J; Bartolomé Albistegui, M; Camino Fernández, A; Grande Sáez, C

    2001-02-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a rare disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by multiple bone lesions and a variable clinical course. We present a 10 year old boy with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis who improved after treatment with naproxen.

  20. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... related, condition. Chronic Pain and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is chronic pain a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  1. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  2. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Fighting Chronic Pain Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... diagnose, health care professionals and scientists know that chronic pain is very complex. Below are some of the ...

  3. Farriery for chronic laminitis.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Stephen E

    2010-08-01

    Laminitis is considered chronic once the distal phalanx has displaced within the hoof capsule. Chronic laminitis generally occurs as a direct sequel to acute laminitis. Clinical evaluation of chronic laminitis is best performed with a thorough clinical examination and radiography. The mainstay of hoof care is therapeutic farriery. In this article, the goals and principles of hoof care, the appropriate trim and various shoes that form the bulk of farriery for chronic laminitis, and surgical treatments are discussed.

  4. Medical Surveillance Requirements For Nonionizing Radiation Workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, James A.

    1980-10-01

    The potential value of medical surveillance examinations for laser workers and other workers potentially exposed to high intensity optical radiation is evaluated. A review of the known adverse biological effects leads to the conclusion that most effects are related to acute and subacute exposures which do not lend themselves to effective medical surveillance. In addition, surveys of thousands of laser workers conducted since 1965 demonstrated that routine periodic medical surveillance has been unnecessary and/or impractical using currently available ophthalmic screening methods. Examination techniques to detect early changes in cataract formation or retinal degeneration (two potential chronic effects of optical radiation) are not sufficiently reliable or specific to be of value as routine screening tests. Epidemiologic studies of large worker groups are suggested to evaluate the potential for these chronic conditions to develop as the result of job exposure; however, specific recommendations for routine medical surveillance are limited to preplacement and termination examinations with appropriate evaluation of individuals following acute injury.

  5. Radiation and People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freilich, Florence G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the development of radiation as a tool of medicine. Includes topics on history of radiation, electromagnetic spectrum, X-ray tubes, high energy machines, radioactive sources, artificial radioactivity, radioactive scanning, units, present radiation background, and effect of radiation on living tissue. (DS)

  6. Radiation and People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freilich, Florence G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the development of radiation as a tool of medicine. Includes topics on history of radiation, electromagnetic spectrum, X-ray tubes, high energy machines, radioactive sources, artificial radioactivity, radioactive scanning, units, present radiation background, and effect of radiation on living tissue. (DS)

  7. Radiation transport calculations for cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Sato, T

    2012-01-01

    The radiation environment inside and near spacecraft consists of various components of primary radiation in space and secondary radiation produced by the interaction of the primary radiation with the walls and equipment of the spacecraft. Radiation fields inside astronauts are different from those outside them, because of the body's self-shielding as well as the nuclear fragmentation reactions occurring in the human body. Several computer codes have been developed to simulate the physical processes of the coupled transport of protons, high-charge and high-energy nuclei, and the secondary radiation produced in atomic and nuclear collision processes in matter. These computer codes have been used in various space radiation protection applications: shielding design for spacecraft and planetary habitats, simulation of instrument and detector responses, analysis of absorbed doses and quality factors in organs and tissues, and study of biological effects. This paper focuses on the methods and computer codes used for radiation transport calculations on cosmic radiation, and their application to the analysis of radiation fields inside spacecraft, evaluation of organ doses in the human body, and calculation of dose conversion coefficients using the reference phantoms defined in ICRP Publication 110. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Thermal radiation heat transfer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Howell, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of heat transfer by thermal radiation is presented, including the radiative behavior of materials, radiation between surfaces, and gas radiation. Among the topics considered are property prediction by electromagnetic theory, the observed properties of solid materials, radiation in the presence of other modes of energy transfer, the equations of transfer for an absorbing-emitting gas, and radiative transfer in scattering and absorbing media. Also considered are radiation exchange between black isothermal surfaces, radiation exchange in enclosures composed of diffuse gray surfaces and in enclosures having some specularly reflecting surfaces, and radiation exchange between nondiffuse nongray surfaces. The use of the Monte Carlo technique in solving radiant-exchange problems and problems of radiative transfer through absorbing-emitting media is explained.

  9. Chronic autoimmune urticaria.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2012-04-01

    Chronic urticaria is common and patients may present with transient eruption of itchy, eruthematous, edematous swellings of the dermis, which lasts more than six weeks. One type of chronic idiopathic urticaria, and part of it, is the chronic autoimmune urticaria. The chronic autoimmune urticaria is caused by high affinity of IgE receptors (anti-FcRI) and less frequently by anti-IgE autoantibodies, also the role of complement activation, that leads to mast and basophil activation. Despite many recent advances in the understanding of chronic autoimmune urticaria, this condition remains a major challenge in the terms of its etiology, investigations, and management.

  10. Radiation effects in the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Coggle, J E; Lambert, B E; Moores, S R

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the principles of radiobiology that can explain the time of onset, duration, and severity of the complex reactions of the lung to ionizing radiation. These reactions have been assayed biochemically, cell kinetically, physiologically, and pathologically. Clinical and experimental data are used to describe the acute and late reactions of the lung to both external and internal radiation including pneumonitis, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. Acute radiation pneumonitis, which can be fatal, develops in both humans and animals within 6 months of exposure to doses greater than or equal to 8 Gy of low LET radiation. It is divisible into a latent period lasting up to 4 weeks; an exudative phase (3-8 weeks) and with an acute pneumonitic phase between 2 and 6 months. The latter is an inflammatory reaction with intra-alveolar and septal edema accompanied by epithelial and endothelial desquamation. The critical role of type II pneumonocytes is discussed. One favored hypothesis suggests that the primary response of the lung is an increase in microvascular permeability. The plasma proteins overwhelm the lymphatic and other drainage mechanisms and this elicits the secondary response of type II cell hyperplasia. This, in its turn, produces an excess of surfactant that ultimately causes the fall in compliance, abnormal gas exchange values, and even respiratory failure. The inflammatory early reaction may progress to chronic fibrosis. There is much evidence to suggest that pneumonitis is an epithelial reaction and some evidence to suggest that this early damage may not be predictive of late fibrosis. However, despite detailed work on collagen metabolism, the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis remains unknown. The data on radiation-induced pulmonary cancer, both in man and experimental animals from both external and internal irradiation following the inhalation of both soluble and insoluble alpha and beta emitting radionuclides are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on

  11. Radiation stability in optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitov, Farit Alimovich; Litvinova, Nadezhda Nikolaevna; Savitskii, Vladimir Grigor'evich; Sredin, Viktor Gennadievich

    The book deals with various aspects of the radiation stability of some commonly used semiconductor optoelectronic instruments, such as radiation sources and detectors, solar energy converters, and certain types of glasses and fibers. In particular, attention is given to the classification and principal physical characteristics of ionizing radiations, principal types of optoelectronic semiconductor instruments, effect of ionizing radiation on photosensitive and light-emitting semiconductor structures, and effect of ionizing radiation on semiconducting materials.

  12. Wireless radiation sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, Jr, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Kress, Reid L.

    2016-08-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting radiation. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a radiation sensitive material coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The radiation sensitive material is operable to change a tensile stress of the ferromagnetic metal upon exposure to radiation. The radiation is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  13. Approaching chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Sarber, Kathleen M; Dion, Gregory Robert; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a common disease that encompasses a number of syndromes that are characterized by sinonasal mucosal inflammation. Chronic sinusitis can be defined as two or more of the following symptoms lasting for more than 12 consecutive weeks: discolored rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, nasal obstruction, facial pressure or pain, or decreased sense of smell. Chronic sinusitis is further classified as chronic sinusitis with polyposis, chronic sinusitis without polyposis, or allergic fungal sinusitis using physical examination, and histologic and radiographic findings. Treatment methods for chronic sinusitis are based upon categorization of the disease and include oral and inhaled corticosteroids, nasal saline irrigations, and antibiotics in selected patients. Understanding the various forms of chronic sinusitis and managing and ruling out comorbidities are key to successful management of this common disorder.

  14. Radiation image photographic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Sekihara, K.; Shiono, H.; Suzuki, T.; Yanaka, S.

    1984-11-27

    A radiation-image photographing apparatus comprises a radiation source, a radiation detector disposed in opposition to the radiation source for detecting radiation through an object to be examined and to generate an electrical signal proportional to the amount of incident radiation, a scanning device for changing the relative, positional relationship between the radiation source and the radiation detector, an analog-to-digital converter for converting the output signal from the radiation detector to a digital quantity, a memory for storing the digital signal, an arithmetic unit, and a display unit. A plurality of measurements of a two-dimensional radiation absorption distribution of the object disposed between the radiation source and the radiation detector is obtained while the relative positional relationship between the radiation source and the radiation detector is being changed, and a linear arithmetic operation is performed on the plurality of image measurements, or a set of data passing a point within the object to be photographed, thereby displaying a cross-sectional image on a given cross-section approximately parallel to the radiation detector plane within the object to be examined.

  15. Radioprotectors and Mitigators of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Baum, Bruce J.; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation is used in the treatment of a broad range of malignancies. Exposure of normal tissue to radiation may result in both acute and chronic toxicities that can result in an inability to deliver the intended therapy, a range of symptoms, and a decrease in quality of life. Radioprotectors are compounds that are designed to reduce the damage in normal tissues caused by radiation. These compounds are often antioxidants and must be present before or at the time of radiation for effectiveness. Other agents, termed mitigators, may be used to minimize toxicity even after radiation has been delivered. Herein, we review agents in clinical use or in development as radioprotectors and mitigators of radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Few agents are approved for clinical use, but many new compounds show promising results in preclinical testing. PMID:20413641

  16. [Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation-induced enteritis].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Baranyai, Zsolt; Nemeskéri, Csaba; Teknos, Dániel; Jósa, Valéria; Hegedus, László; Mayer, Arpád

    2010-09-05

    The number of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant diseases is increasing worldwide. During the radiotherapy of tumors in the minor pelvis and abdomen intestinal inflammation of different degree may occur even if special attention is paid. Irradiation to the minor pelvis causes in half of the cases radiation induced acute enteritis, whereas in 25% chronic enteritis and colitis will develop. Chronic enteritis following radiotherapy raises a number of diagnostic and therapeutic problems that can be solved only with cooperation of different specialties. Authors present a short review regarding therapeutical options of radiation induced enteritis.

  17. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  18. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  19. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  20. Radiation protection guidelines for radiation emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, E.T.; Meinhold, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The system of dose limitation and present guidance for emergency workers and guidance for intervention on behalf of the public are discussed. There are three elements for the system of dose limitation: justification, optimization and dose limits. The first element is basically a political process in this country. Justification is based on a risk-benefit analysis, and justification of the use of radioactive materials or radiation is generally not within the authority of radiation protection managers. Radiation protection managers typically assess detriments or harm caused by radiation exposure and have very little expertise in assessing the benefits of a particular practice involving nuclear material.

  1. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  2. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  3. Cancer Risk Assessment for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    is predominantly used for assessing cancer risk caused by space radiation, and that is the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Fact #2: The atomic-bomb-survivor database, itself a remarkable achievement, contains uncertainties. These include the actual exposure to each individual, the radiation quality of that exposure, and the fact that the exposure was to acute doses of predominantly low-LET radiation, not to chronic exposures of high-LET radiation expected on long-duration interplanetary manned missions.

  4. Cancer Risk Assessment for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    is predominantly used for assessing cancer risk caused by space radiation, and that is the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Fact #2: The atomic-bomb-survivor database, itself a remarkable achievement, contains uncertainties. These include the actual exposure to each individual, the radiation quality of that exposure, and the fact that the exposure was to acute doses of predominantly low-LET radiation, not to chronic exposures of high-LET radiation expected on long-duration interplanetary manned missions.

  5. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  6. [Skin and occupational artificial UV-radiation].

    PubMed

    Fartasch, M; Wittlich, M; Broding, H C; Gellert, B; Blome, H; Brüning, T

    2012-10-01

    In various areas of professional activity, exposure of skin to ultraviolet radiation coming from artificial sources may occur. These UV rays differ from the solar UV radiation due to their intensity and spectrum. We review current developments with the introduction of statutory exposure limit values for jobs with UV radiation from artificial sources, a selection of relevant activities with artificial UV exposure and an overview of the occurrence of skin disorders and dermatologically relevant skin diseases caused by these specific occupational exposures. The latter is relevant for medical advice in occupational dermatology and occupational medicine. On the basis of existing studies on welders and studies regarding occupations with "open flames" (using the example of the glassblower) it is evident that so far no reliable data exist regarding the chronic photodamage or the occurrence of UV-typical skin cancers, but instead clear evidence exists regarding the regular occurrence of acute light damage in these occupations.

  7. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Michael I [Dublin, CA

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  8. Introduction to radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.

    1998-12-31

    This lecture will present time-dependent radiation transport where the radiation is coupled to a static medium, i.e., the material is not in motion. In reality, radiation exerts a pressure on the materials it propagates through and will accelerate the material in the direction of the radiation flow. This fully coupled problem with radiation transport and materials in motion is referred to as radiation-hydrodynamics (or in a shorthand notation: rad-hydro) and is beyond the scope of this lecture.

  9. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extrempohile Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    diverse areas, including bioremediation , long-term enzyme storage, towards pre-exposure and post-exposure interventions against ionizing radiation...implications of the highest order, including bioremediation of high-level radioactive waste sites, and metabolic interventions at the cellular level...ability to grow luxuriantly under high-level chronic γ-radiation. This holds the prospect of bioremediation (cleanup) of radioactive waste sites with

  10. Radiation protection at synchrotron radiation facilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Vylet, V

    2001-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation (SR) facility typically consists of an injector, a storage ring, and SR beamlines. The latter two features are unique to SR facilities, when compared to other types of accelerator facilities. The SR facilities have the characteristics of low injection beam power, but high stored beam power. The storage ring is generally above ground with people occupying the experimental floor around a normally thin concrete ring wall. This paper addresses the radiation issues, in particular the shielding design, associated with the storage ring and SR beamlines. Normal and abnormal beam losses for injection and stored beams, as well as typical storage ring operation, are described. Ring shielding design for photons and neutrons from beam losses in the ring is discussed. Radiation safety issues and shielding design for SR beamlines, considering gas bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, are reviewed. Radiation source terms and the methodologies for shielding calculations are presented.

  11. [Chronic wounds: differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja

    2013-10-01

    Wound is a disruption of anatomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. According to the healing process, wounds are classified as acute and chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if standard medical procedures do not lead to the expected healing, or if the wound does not heal within six weeks. Chronic wounds are classified as typical and atypical. Typical wounds include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic wounds. Diabetic foot and decubitus ulcers stand out as a specific entity among typical wounds. About 80 percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder are mostly neuropathic ulcers. About 95 percent of chronic wounds manifest as one of the above-mentioned entities. Other forms of chronic wounds are atypical chronic wounds, which can be caused by autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, vascular diseases and vasculopathies, metabolic and genetic diseases, neoplasm, external factors, psychiatric disorders, drug related reactions, etc. Numerous systemic diseases can present with atypical wounds. The primary cause of the wound can be either systemic disease itself (Crohn's disease) or aberrant immune response due to systemic disease (pyoderma gangrenosum, paraneoplastic syndrome). Although atypical wounds are a rare cause of chronic wounds, it should always be taken in consideration during diagnostic procedure.

  12. [Radiation protectors within the radiation safety system for extended duration exploration missions].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Vasin, M V

    2011-01-01

    Radiation environment in extended duration exploration missions is scrutinized in the context of the probability of the risks of deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Though the probability of severe radiation damage due to solar flare is very low, nonetheless it is requisite that the crew must be provided with appropriate, including pharmacological safeguards. The current nomenclature of radiation protectors composes short-term agents against acute radiation damage. Among the others, preparation B-190 is distinguished by particularly high effectiveness and universal action, and good tolerance even when organism is exposed to the extreme factors of space flight Regimen of B-290 therapy alone and with combination with aminothiol preparations have been developed to render treatment following multiple solar events. Effectiveness of radioprotectors can be increased substantially by local shielding of the abdomen and pelvis. The most promising nonspecific stimulators of total resistance of organism are riboxin (inosin) and combined preparation aminotetravit as well as vitamins tocopherol and retinol. Therapy combining B-190 with riboxin and aminotetravit is also under discussion. Cytokine neipogen is also viewed as a candidate agent for early therapy. Concern is raised about possible development of chronic oxidative stress in long-duration exploration missions. Highlighted is the significance of adequate nutrition supplemented with fresh vegetables as a source of the most valuable bioflavonoids. Antioxidants L-selenomethionine and melatonin proved their effectiveness against heavy nuclei of galactic radiation. An open issue is how to make natural antioxidants beneficial to oxidative stress control and attenuation of low-intensity galactic radiation.

  13. Recent advances in the management of radiation colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kountouras, Jannis; Zavos, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Radiation colitis, an insidious, progressive disease of increasing frequency, develops 6 mo to 5 years after regional radiotherapy for malignancy, owing to the deleterious effects of the latter on the colon and the small intestine. When dealing with radiation colitis and its complications, the most conservative modality should be employed because the areas of intestinal injury do not tend to heal. Acute radiation colitis is mostly self-limited, and usually, only supportive management is required. Chronic radiation colitis, a poorly predictable progressive disease, is considered as a precancerous lesion; radiation-associated malignancy has a tendency to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and to bear a dismal prognosis. Therefore, management of chronic radiation colitis remains a major challenge owing to the progressive evolution of the disease, including development of fibrosis, endarteritis, edema, fragility, perforation, partial obstruction, and cancer. Patients are commonly managed conservatively. Surgical intervention is difficult to perform because of the extension of fibrosis and alterations in the gut and mesentery, and should be reserved for intestinal obstruction, perforation, fistulas, and severe bleeding. Owing to the difficulty in managing the complications of acute and chronic radiation colitis, particular attention should be focused onto the prevention strategies. Uncovering the fibrosis mechanisms and the molecular events underlying radiation bowel disease could lead to the introduction of new therapeutic and/or preventive approaches. A variety of novel, mostly experimental, agents have been used mainly as a prophylaxis, and improvements have been made in radiotherapy delivery, including techniques to reduce the amount of exposed intestine in the radiation field, as a critical strategy for prevention. PMID:19109862

  14. ERLN Radiation Focus Area

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As part of the Environmental Response Laboratory Network, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) here provides your laboratory with access to radiation-specific laboratory guidance documents and training courses.

  15. Radiation Protection Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A handbook which sets forth the Kennedy Space Center radiation protection policy is presented. The book also covers administrative direction and guidance on organizational and procedural requirements of the program. Only ionizing radiation is covered.

  16. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment. The radiation may be delivered by a machine outside the body ( external-beam radiation therapy ), or ... by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. CT scans are often used in treatment planning ...

  17. Radiation and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... amounts of radiation. Can radiation from the 2011 nuclear power plant accident in Japan affect you now in the United States? Since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan in 2011, very ...

  18. Fluorescent radiation converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  19. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented. (ACR)

  20. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. When you have radiation treatment for cancer, you may have some changes ...

  1. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can include incontinence (inability to control urination) and impotence (inability to achieve erection). More recently, several centers ... Radiation therapy (either external radiation or brachytherapy) causes impotence in some men. The rate of impotence is ...

  2. Space Radiation Program Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenek, Sam

    2008-01-01

    This poster presentation shows the various elements of the Space Radiation Program. It reviews the program requirements: develop and validate standards, quantify space radiation human health risks, mitigate risks through countermeasures and technologies, and treat and monitor unmitigated risks.

  3. Radiation Oncology Treatment Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients to be advocates. View more information Treatment Team Quick Links Meet the Treatment Team Radiation Oncologist ... as medical oncologists and surgeons to maximize radiation’s effectiveness. Radiation oncologists are the only physicians with the ...

  4. Inspecting Juno Radiation Vault

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-12

    A technician inspects the special radiation vault being installed atop the propulsion module of NASA Juno spacecraft; the vault has titanium walls to protect the spacecraft electronic brain and heart from Jupiter harsh radiation environment.

  5. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to three years. If I choose surgery, will radiation treatment still be required? If your surgery is ... option with your physician team. If I choose radiation therapy, will surgical treatment still be an option? ...

  6. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  7. Radiation Protection in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Williams, N.

    1965-01-01

    The main emphasis of a provincial radiation protection program is on ionizing radiation produced by machines, although assistance is given to the Federal Radiation Protection Division in its program relating to radioactive substances. The basis for the Saskatchewan program of radiation protection is the Radiological Health Act 1961. An important provision of the Act is annual registration of radiation equipment. The design of the registration form encourages a “do-it-yourself” radiation and electrical safety inspection. Installations are inspected every two years by a radiation health officer. Two hundred and twenty-one deficiencies were found during inspection of 224 items of radiation equipment, the commonest being failure to use personal film badges. Insufficient filtration of the beam, inadequate limitation of the beam, and unnecessary exposure of operators were other common faults. Physicians have a responsibility to weigh the potential advantages against the hazards when requesting radiographic or fluoroscopic procedures. PMID:14282164

  8. Radiation Measurements on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-09

    Micrograys are unit of measurement for absorbed radiation dose. The vertical axis is in micrograys per day. The RAD instrument on NASA Curiosity Mars rover monitors the natural radiation environment at the surface of Mars.

  9. Lowering Juno Radiation Vault

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-12

    Technicians lowered a special radiation vault onto the propulsion module of NASA Juno spacecraft. The vault will dramatically slow the aging effect radiation has on the electronics for the duration of the mission.

  10. Radiation from hard objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    The inference of the diameter of hard objects is insensitive to radiation efficiency. Deductions of radiation efficiency from observations are very sensitive - possibly overly so. Inferences of the initial velocity and trajectory vary similarly, and hence are comparably sensitive.

  11. Cell Radiation Experiment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    The cell radiation experiment system (CRES) is a perfused-cell culture apparatus, within which cells from humans or other animals can (1) be maintained in homeostasis while (2) being exposed to ionizing radiation during controlled intervals and (3) being monitored to determine the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage. The CRES can be used, for example, to determine effects of drug, radiation, and combined drug and radiation treatments on both normal and tumor cells. The CRES can also be used to analyze the effects of radiosensitive or radioprotectant drugs on cells subjected to radiation. The knowledge gained by use of the CRES is expected to contribute to the development of better cancer treatments and of better protection for astronauts, medical-equipment operators, and nuclear-power-plant workers, and others exposed frequently to ionizing radiation.

  12. Evaluation of Reproductive Function for Patients with Chronic Radiation Sickness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    was the age at menopause . However, no difference was noted between the exposed and control populations with regard to fertility, spontaneous...with CRS. The information on age at menarche and that at menopause , duration of the menstrual cycle, pains and quantity of discharge, was collected...age, pathological conditions in the premenstrual period, climacteric syndrome, etc. The menstrual syndrome will be discussed in detail in the next

  13. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage from Chronic Laser Radiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-31

    that dose - response curve . Threshold has been fairly well determined for the 457.9 nm line and this is obviously a much lower threshold than the 514.5...significant. The next figure, marked Figure 3, gives the cumulative Gaussian dose - response curve using the laser lines of 514.5 and 488 nm and broadband

  14. CHANGES OF PULMONARY BLOOD VESSELS IN CHRONIC RADIATION SICKNESS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    revealed during angiocardiography. In the initial period of disease in connection with dystonia , developed in contraction of big vessels and...the characteristics of vascular circulator dystonia are absent or are weakly expressed, but the unusual flow of contrast medium from the arteries

  15. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    PubMed

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  16. External radiation surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  17. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOEpatents

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  18. Gamma greenhouse: A chronic facility for crops improvement and agrobiotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, M. Ahsanulkhaliqin, A. W.

    2014-02-12

    Gamma irradiation is one of the most common procedures in plant mutagenesis and agrobiotechnology activities. The procedures consist of chronic and acute gamma radiation. Generally, {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs are gamma radiation sources for radiation processing with relatively high energy (half-life 5.27 years for {sup 60}Co and 30.1 years for {sup 137}Cs). The energy associated with gamma radiation is high enough to break the molecular bonds and ionize atoms without affecting structure of the atomic nucleus (avoiding induction of radioactivity). The Gamma Green House (GGH) is the only chronic irradiation facility in Malaysia, located at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). GGH is used for induction of mutation in plants and other biological samples at low dose radiation over period of time depending on the nature and sensitivity of the plant species. The GGH consist of circular green house with 30 meters radius, control room and irradiator with interlock system. The irradiator produces low dose gamma radiation derived from Caesium-137 radioactive source. The biological samples can be exposed to low dose radiation in days, weeks, months or years. The current irradiation rate for GGH is 2.67 Gy/hr at 1 meter from the source. Chronic gamma irradiation produces a wider mutation spectrum and useful for minimizing radiation damages towards obtaining new improved traits for research and commercial values. The prospect of the gamma greenhouse is its uses in research, educations and services on induced mutation techniques for the improvement of plant varieties and microbes. In generating awareness and attract users to the facility, Nuclear Malaysia provides wide range of irradiation services for plant species and mutagenesis consultancies to academicians, students scientists, and plant breeders, from local universities, other research institutes, and growers. Charges for irradiation and consultancy services are at nominal rates. The utilization activities of the

  19. Gamma greenhouse: A chronic facility for crops improvement and agrobiotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, M.; Ahsanulkhaliqin, A. W.

    2014-02-01

    Gamma irradiation is one of the most common procedures in plant mutagenesis and agrobiotechnology activities. The procedures consist of chronic and acute gamma radiation. Generally, 60Co and 137Cs are gamma radiation sources for radiation processing with relatively high energy (half-life 5.27 years for 60Co and 30.1 years for 137Cs). The energy associated with gamma radiation is high enough to break the molecular bonds and ionize atoms without affecting structure of the atomic nucleus (avoiding induction of radioactivity). The Gamma Green House (GGH) is the only chronic irradiation facility in Malaysia, located at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). GGH is used for induction of mutation in plants and other biological samples at low dose radiation over period of time depending on the nature and sensitivity of the plant species. The GGH consist of circular green house with 30 meters radius, control room and irradiator with interlock system. The irradiator produces low dose gamma radiation derived from Caesium-137 radioactive source. The biological samples can be exposed to low dose radiation in days, weeks, months or years. The current irradiation rate for GGH is 2.67 Gy/hr at 1 meter from the source. Chronic gamma irradiation produces a wider mutation spectrum and useful for minimizing radiation damages towards obtaining new improved traits for research and commercial values. The prospect of the gamma greenhouse is its uses in research, educations and services on induced mutation techniques for the improvement of plant varieties and microbes. In generating awareness and attract users to the facility, Nuclear Malaysia provides wide range of irradiation services for plant species and mutagenesis consultancies to academicians, students scientists, and plant breeders, from local universities, other research institutes, and growers. Charges for irradiation and consultancy services are at nominal rates. The utilization activities of the gamma greenhouse mainly

  20. Spacecraft radiator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Grant A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spacecraft radiator system designed to provide structural support to the spacecraft. Structural support is provided by the geometric "crescent" form of the panels of the spacecraft radiator. This integration of radiator and structural support provides spacecraft with a semi-monocoque design.

  1. (Mis)Understanding Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Stephen Bruce

    2016-02-10

    This set of slides discusses radiation and fears concerning it at a non-technical level. Included are some misconceptions and practical consequences resulting from these. The concept of radiation hormesis is explained. The author concludes that a number of significant societal benefits are being foregone because of overly cautious concerns about low-level radiation.

  2. Environmental Radiation Data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Environmental Radiation Data (ERD) is an electronic and print journal compiled and distributed quarterly by the Office of Radiation and Indoor Air's National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama. It contains data from RadNet (previously known as ERAMS.)

  3. Radiation port dermatophytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, T.; Dupuy, J.; Maor, M.; Altman, A.

    1988-12-01

    We report two cases in which dermatophytic infection developed almost entirely within a radiation field mimicking an acute radiation effect. Radiotherapists and dermatologists should be aware of this possibility and be able to differentiate it from radiation dermatitis. Topical antifungal agents are the recommended treatment after diagnosis is established.

  4. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Rozhko, T V

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1--absence of effects (stress recognition), 2--activation (adaptive response), and 3--inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure.

  5. Ionizing Radiation: The issue of radiation quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prise, Kevin; Schettino, Giuseppe

    Types of Ionising radiations are differentiated from each other by fundamental characteristics of their energy deposition patterns when they interact with biological materials. At the level of the DNA these non-random patterns drive differences in the yields and distributions of DNA damage patterns and specifically the production of clustered damage or complex lesions. The complex radiation fields found in space bring significant challenges for developing a mechanistic understanding of radiation effects from the perspective of radiation quality as these consist of a diverse range of particle and energy types unique to the space environment. Linear energy transfer, energy deposited per unit track length in units of keV per micron, has long been used as a comparator for different types of radiation but has limitations in that it is an average value. Difference in primary core ionizations relative to secondary delta ray ranges vary significantly with particle mass and energy leading to complex interrelationships with damage production at the cellular level. At the cellular level a greater mechanistic understanding is necessary, linking energy deposition patterns to DNA damage patterns and cellular response, to build appropriate biophysical models that are predictive for different radiation qualities and mixed field exposures. Defined studies using monoenergetic beams delivered under controlled conditions are building quantitative data sets of both initial and long term changes in cells as a basis for a great mechanistic understanding of radiation quality effects of relevance to not only space exposures but clinical application of ion-beams.

  6. Battling Chronic Absenteeism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nauer, Kim

    2016-01-01

    While the principal of a New York elementary school (P.S. 48) took on chronic absenteeism from 2011 to 2013, a research team at the Center for New York City Affairs followed her efforts. The school drove down chronic absenteeism almost 10 percentage points. School staff routinely touched base with students, outside "success mentors"…

  7. Battling Chronic Absenteeism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nauer, Kim

    2016-01-01

    While the principal of a New York elementary school (P.S. 48) took on chronic absenteeism from 2011 to 2013, a research team at the Center for New York City Affairs followed her efforts. The school drove down chronic absenteeism almost 10 percentage points. School staff routinely touched base with students, outside "success mentors"…

  8. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males.

  9. Chronic and subacute meningitis.

    PubMed

    Zunt, Joseph R; Baldwin, Kelly J

    2012-12-01

    This article describes the background, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of selected etiologies of subacute and chronic meningitis. Key diagnostic considerations when evaluating a patient presenting with chronic inflammation of the CNS are discussed, and several specific infectious, neoplastic, and autoimmune etiologies are reviewed in detail. With recent advancement in serologic and CSF diagnostic testing, specific infectious, neoplastic, or autoimmune etiologies of chronic meningitis can be identified. Eliminating previous diagnostic uncertainty of chronic inflammation in the CNS has led to rapid and specific treatment regimens that ultimately improve patient outcomes. Recent advances in imaging have also aided clinicians in both their diagnostic approach and the detection of inflammatory complications such as hydrocephalus, hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. Meningitis is defined as inflammation involving the meninges of the brain and spinal cord. Meningitis can be categorized as acute, subacute, or chronic based on duration of inflammation. This article focuses on the most common causes of subacute and chronic meningitis. Chronic meningitis is commonly defined as inflammation evolving during weeks to months without resolution of CSF abnormalities. Determining the time course of meningitis is important for creating a differential diagnosis. Most organisms causing acute meningitis rarely persist more than a few weeks. Although numerous etiologies of subacute and chronic meningitis have been identified, this article focuses on the most common etiologies: (1) infectious, (2) autoimmune, and (3) neoplastic.

  10. Coping with Chronic Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Having a long-term, or chronic, illness can disrupt your life in many ways. You may often be tired and in pain. Your illness might affect your ... able to work, causing financial problems. For children, chronic illnesses can be frightening, because they may not ...

  11. Radiation necrosis after treatment of solitary intracranial metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, N.; Galicich, J.H.; Deck, M.D.; Tomita, T.

    1981-03-01

    During the period from July 1977 to June 1980, 75 patients underwent the surgical excision of solitary brain metastases, and 61 of these patients received whole brain radiation. Three patients developed chronic radiation necrosis. In the 3 patients with necrosis, computed tomography suggested recurrent tumor; the histological diagnosis of necrosis only was obtained at operation in 2 of these patients and by autopsy in the third. Radiation damage resulted in the death of 1 patient, a chronic vegetative state in another, and severe neurological deficit in the third. An additional 4 patients had neurological complications probably related to radiation therapy. As the survival of such patients is prolonged by aggressive treatment, the incidence of radiation-induced complications is likely to increase. The optimal dose of radiation necessary to destroy microscopic foci of tumor after the surgical resection of a single brain metastasis is unknown. Because of the significant incidence of damage after radiation as currently delivered, studies using graded, lower doses are indicated.

  12. Infrared radiation has potential antidepressant and anxiolytic effects in animal model of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Jotaro; Kawahara, Yoshinari; Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Hatano, Koji; Hoaki, Nobuhiko; Mori, Ayumi; Goto, Shinjiro; Tsuru, Jusen; Matsushita, Hirotaka; Hanada, Hiroaki; Kodama, Kensuke; Isogawa, Koichi; Kitamura, Hirokazu; Fujikura, Yoshihisa

    2011-04-01

    Bright light therapy has been shown to have antidepressant and anxiolytic effects in humans. The antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of infrared radiation were evaluated using an experimental animal model. Rats were randomly assigned to either an acutely or chronically exposed infrared radiation group or to a nonexposed control group. Acutely exposed rats were treated with an infrared radiation machine for one session, whereas chronically exposed animals were treated with an infrared radiation for 10 sessions. Control group rats were exposed to the sound of the infrared radiation machine as a sham treatment. After infrared radiation or control exposure, rats underwent behavioral evaluation, including elevated plus maze test, light/dark box, and forced swim test. Chronic infrared radiation exposure decreased indicators of depression- and anxiety-like behavior. No significant effect on general locomotor activity was observed. The number of BrdU-positive cells in CA1 of the hippocampus was significantly increased in both acutely and chronically exposed infrared radiation groups compared with the control group. These results indicate that chronic infrared radiation might produce antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upper GI What is Radiation Therapy? Find a Radiation Oncologist Last Name: Facility: City: State: Zip Code: ... infections. This is refered to as immunotherapy . Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy given during surgery is called ...

  14. Chronic gastritis - an update.

    PubMed

    Varbanova, Mariya; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main aetiologic factor for chronic gastritis worldwide. The degree of inflammation and the evolution of this form of chronic gastritis can vary largely depending on bacterial virulence factors, host susceptibility factors and environmental conditions. Autoimmune gastritis is another cause of chronic inflammation in the stomach, which can occur in all age groups. This disease presents typically with vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anaemia. The presence of anti-parietal cell antibodies is highly specific for the diagnosis. The role of H. pylori as a trigger for autoimmune gastritis remains uncertain. Other rare conditions for chronic gastritis are chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease or on the background of lymphocytic or collagenous gastroenteropathies.

  15. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  16. Solar radiation measurement project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Xavier solar radiation measurement project and station are described. Measurements of the total solar radiation on a horizontal surface from an Eppley pyranometer were collected into computer data files. Total radiation in watt hours was converted from ten minute intervals to hourly intervals. Graphs of this total radiation data are included. A computer program in Fortran was written to calculate the total extraterrestrial radiation on a horizontal surface for each day of the month. Educational and social benefits of the project are cited.

  17. Radiation protection in space

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, E.A.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1995-02-01

    The challenge for planning radiation protection in space is to estimate the risk of events of low probability after low levels of irradiation. This work has revealed many gaps in the present state of knowledge that require further study. Despite investigations of several irradiated populations, the atomic-bomb survivors remain the primary basis for estimating the risk of ionizing radiation. Compared to previous estimates, two new independent evaluations of available information indicate a significantly greater risk of stochastic effects of radiation (cancer and genetic effects) by about a factor of three for radiation workers. This paper presents a brief historical perspective of the international effort to assure radiation protection in space.

  18. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. R., Jr.; Tada, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the degradation of a solar array in a space radiation environment. Solar cell technology which emphasizes the cell parameters that degrade in a radiation environment, is discussed along with the experimental techniques used in the evaluation of radiation effects. Other topics discussed include: theoretical aspects of radiation damage, methods for developing relative damage coefficients, nature of the space radiation environment, method of calculating equivalent fluence from electron and proton energy spectrums and relative damage coefficients, and comparison of flight data with estimated degradation.

  19. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Melvin A.; Davies, Terence J.; Morton, III, John R.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

  20. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  1. PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR

    DOEpatents

    Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

    1961-12-26

    A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

  2. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  3. Acute radiation disease and biological dosimetry in 1993.

    PubMed

    Vorobiev, A I

    1997-01-01

    Mankind is at risk for accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. The experience in evaluating and treating victims of radiation exposure is briefly reviewed based upon accidents occurring over the past 25 years. Individual cases of acute toxicities to the skin, gastrointestinal tract, liver and bone marrow are presented. Biodosimetry (utilizing chromosome analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow and electron spin resonance spectrometry of dental enamel) has been utilized in radiation accidents to assess individual dose. Variability in the dose of ionizing radiation received is typical among the population affected by the Chernobyl accident. Whereas the acute radiation syndrome resulting in a high mortality has been well-documented, little information is available regarding the effects of chronic, low-level exposure from the Chernobyl accident.

  4. [About Dose-Effect Relationship in the Environment Radiation Protection].

    PubMed

    Udalova, A A

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important stages in the development of a methodology for the environment radiation protection is the assessment and justification of critical radiation exposure levels for ecosystem components. In this study application of the approach for critical dose level estimation is demonstrated on the example of the data about ionizing radiation effect on reproduction and survival of agricultural plants after acute and chronic exposures. Influence of the type of dose-effect relationship on the estimated values of the critical doses and dose rates is studied using three models (linear, logarithmic and logistic). The findings obtained do not provide any robust recommendations in favor of one of the three tested functions. The models of dose-effect relationship (threshold or non-threshold) and types of radiation-induced effects (stochastic and deterministic) are discussed from the viewpoint of developing a system for radiation protection of human and non-human biota.

  5. Radiation-induced small bowel disease: latest developments and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Rhodri

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is commonly used to treat a number of malignancies. Although highly effective and now more targeted, many patients suffer side effects. The number of cancer survivors has increased and so there are more patients presenting with symptoms that have arisen as a result of radiotherapy. Radiation damage to small bowel tissue can cause acute or chronic radiation enteritis producing symptoms such as pain, bloating, nausea, faecal urgency, diarrhoea and rectal bleeding which can have a significant impact on patient’s quality of life. This review outlines the pathogenesis of radiation injury to the small bowel along with the prevention of radiation damage via radiotherapy techniques plus medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, statins and probiotics. It also covers the treatment of both acute and chronic radiation enteritis via a variety of medical (including hyperbaric oxygen), dietetic, endoscopic and surgical therapies. PMID:24381725

  6. Photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection of human skin by means of sunscreens or daily skin-care products is traditionally centered around the prevention of acute (e.g. sunburn) and chronic (e.g. skin cancer and photoaging) skin damage that may result from exposure to ultraviolet rays (UVB and UVA). Within the last decade, however, it has been appreciated that wavelengths beyond the ultraviolet spectrum, in particular visible light and infrared radiation, contribute to skin damage in general and photoaging of human skin in particular. As a consequence, attempts have been made to develop skin care/sunscreen products that not only protect against UVB or UVA radiation but provide photoprotection against visible light and infrared radiation as well. In this article, we will briefly review the current knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for visible light/infrared radiation-induced skin damage and then, based on this information, discuss strategies that have been successfully used or may be employed in the future to achieve photoprotection of human skin beyond ultraviolet radiation. In this regard we will particularly focus on the use of topical antioxidants and the challenges that result from the task of showing their efficacy.

  7. Radiation, Inflammation, and Immune Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has emerged as one of the hallmarks of cancer. Inflammation also plays a pivotal role in modulating radiation responsiveness of tumors. As discussed in this review, ionizing radiation (IR) leads to activation of several transcription factors modulating the expression of numerous mediators in tumor cells and cells of the microenvironment promoting cancer development. Novel therapeutic approaches thus aim to interfere with the activity or expression of these factors, either in single-agent or combinatorial treatment or as supplements of the existing therapeutic concepts. Among them, NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 play a crucial role in radiation-induced inflammatory responses embedded in a complex inflammatory network. A great variety of classical or novel drugs including nutraceuticals such as plant phytochemicals have the capacity to interfere with the inflammatory network in cancer and are considered as putative radiosensitizers. Thus, targeting the inflammatory signaling pathways induced by IR offers the opportunity to improve the clinical outcome of radiation therapy by enhancing radiosensitivity and decreasing putative metabolic effects. Since inflammation and sex steroids also impact tumorigenesis, a therapeutic approach targeting glucocorticoid receptors and radiation-induced production of tumorigenic factors might be effective in sensitizing certain tumors to IR. PMID:22675673

  8. COHERENCE PROPERTIES OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , COHERENT SCATTERING), (*COHERENT SCATTERING, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), LIGHT, INTERFERENCE, INTENSITY, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, QUANTUM THEORY, BOSONS, INTERFEROMETERS, CHINA

  9. Radiation curing of epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.; Singh, Ajit

    The literature on radiation polymerization of epoxy compounds has been reviewed to assess the potential use of radiation for curing these industrially important monomers. Chemical curing of epoxies may proceed by either cationic or anionic mechanisms depending on the nature of the curing agent, but most epoxies polymerize by cationic mechanisms under the influence of high-energy radiation. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of epoxy compounds is inhibited by trace quantities of water because of proton transfer from the chain-propagating epoxy cation to water. Several different methods with potential for obtaining high molecular weight polymers by curing epoxies with high-energy radiation have been studied. Polymeric products with epoxy-like properties have been produced by radiation curing of epoxy oligomers with terminal acrylate groups and mixtures of epoxies with vinyl monomers. Both of these types of resin have good potential for industrial-scale curing by radiation treatment.

  10. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  11. Americans' Average Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2000-08-11

    We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

  12. RF radiation from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation from lightning in the RF band from 3-300 MHz were monitored. Radiation in this frequency range is of interest as a potential vehicle for monitoring severe storms and for studying the lightning itself. Simultaneous measurements were made of RF radiation and fast and slow field changes. Continuous analogue recordings with a system having 300 kHz of bandwidth were made together with digital records of selected events (principally return strokes) at greater temporal resolution. The data reveal patterns in the RF radiation for the entire flash which are characteristic of flash type and independent of the frequency of observation. Individual events within the flash also have characteristic RF patterns. Strong radiation occurs during the first return strokes, but delayed about 20 micron sec with respect to the begining of the return stroke; whereas, RF radiation from subsequent return strokes tends to be associated with cloud processes preceding the flash with comparatively little radiation occurring during the return stroke itself.

  13. The Radiation Transport Conundrum in Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2005-03-18

    The summary of this paper is: (1) The conundrum in the title is whether to treat radiation in the lab frame or the comoving frame in a radiation-hydrodynamic problem; (2) Several of the difficulties are associated with combining a somewhat relativistic treatment of radiation with a non-relativistic treatment of hydrodynamics; (3) The principal problem is a tradeoff between easily obtaining the correct diffusion limit and describing free-streaming radiation with the correct wave speed; (4) The computational problems of the comoving-frame formulation in more than one dimension, and the difficulty of obtaining both exact conservation and full u/c accuracy argue against this method; (5) As the interest in multi-D increases, as well as the power of computers, the lab-frame method is becoming more attractive; and (6) The Monte Carlo method combines the advantages of both lab-frame and comoving-frame approaches, its only disadvantage being cost.

  14. Platelet gel in cutaneous radiation dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Iervolino, Vincenzo; Di Costanzo, Gaetano; Azzaro, Rosa; Diodato, Anna Maria; Di Macchia, Catia Addolorata; Di Meo, Tommaso; Petruzziello, Arnolfo; Loquercio, Giovanna; Muto, Paolo; Apice, Gaetano; Cacciapuoti, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy, alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery, is a fundamental and irreplaceable method of treating tumours. Nonetheless, although the technological advances made during recent years and the associated improvements in this type of treatment have reduced the incidence of complications, 5-15 % of patients still experience damage to the healthy tissues exposed to radiation. Cutaneous and mucosal lesions are severe collateral effects of radiotherapy that have an enormous impact on a patient's quality of life. Unfortunately, however, the efficacy of conventional treatments, while demonstrably useful in acute lesions, remains disputed in chronic cases. Nevertheless, numerous studies and clinical findings have demonstrated that topical, non-transfusional plasma-rich platelet gel is able to accelerate the regeneration and repair of tissues through the action of the various growth factors contained within the alpha granules of platelets. We therefore set out to evaluate the efficacy of autologous platelet gel, chosen for its limited cost and ease of preparation, in chronic cutaneous radiation dermatitis. "Home-made" platelet gel was produced by treating platelets with autologous thrombin. The safety of the product was ensured by microbiological tests. The autologous platelet gel was applied topically once a week, for a mean duration of 35 days, to chronic third- and fourth-degree (European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel classification and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events score) cutaneous radiation dermatitis in a group of ten patients previously treated for moderate-to-high grade (histology G2-G3) limb sarcoma by tumour excision and post-surgical radiotherapy (dose 50-64 Gy). The radiation dermatitis had appeared at different intervals after treatment and had all proved resistant to conventional treatments. The autologous platelet gel was found to be successful in seven out of the ten patients treated. The various phases of the healing

  15. High-power radiating plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles underlying the use of radiating plasmas for the optical pumping of lasers are described. Particular consideration is given to the properties of radiating plasmas; radiation selectivity; the dynamics, equilibrium, and stability of radiating plasmas; the radiative Reynolds number; and experimental results on radiating discharges.

  16. Novel Tissue Protective Agents for the Treatment of Acute Radiation-induced BMF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Soluble P- selectin during a single hemodialysis session in patients with chronic renal failure and erythropoietin treatment. Clin. Appl. Thromb. Off...for bone marrow failure caused by acute radiation injury. A whole body dose of radiation even at levels as low as 1Gy can result in Bone Marrow... Failure . Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome is characterized by bone marrow failure with life threatening neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. In

  17. Management of cutaneous radiation injuries: diagnostic and therapeutic principles of the cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peter, Ralf Uwe; Gottlöber, Petra

    2002-02-01

    The cutaneous symptoms that appear after radiation exposure are caused by a combination of inflammatory processes and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of transcriptionally activated proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. The symptoms follow a time course consisting of prodromal erythema, manifestation, chronic stage, and late stage; these symptoms are referred to as cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS). The time course depends on several factors such as the applied radiation dose, radiation quality, individual radiation sensitivity, extent of contamination and absorption, and volume of skin exposed. For diagnosis of CRS, the following procedures are used: 7.5 to 20 MHz B-scan sonography, thermography, capillary microscopy, profilometry, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, bone scintigraphy, and histology. Based on the results of previous experimental and clinical research, pharmacotherapy of CRS can include topical or systemic application of corticosteroids, gamma interferon, pentoxifylline and vitamin E, and superoxide dismutase. The treatment varies according to the stage of CRS. Due to the complexity of the clinical manifestations of radiation disease in most patients, interdisciplinary treatment at specialized centers is necessary. In most cases, dermatologists are asked to provide lifelong therapy and follow-up of the patients.

  18. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  19. Thermal radiation measuring arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, H.L.; Sprout, J.C.

    1983-02-08

    In a thermal radiation measuring arrangement, a thermal radiation detector is located at the focal point of a collecting mirror, upon which incident thermal radiation from a surface, such as a building wall, is directed. The thermal radiation detector may be, for example, a thermopile, and provides an output signal having a magnitude proportional to the amount of thermal radiation which it receives. The temperature detection means detects the temperature of the thermal radiation detector and, for example, may detect the cold junction of the thermopile. In a first operating condition, a signal summing means receives the output signal from the thermal radiation detector and the temperature detection means and provides a third output signal proportional to the sum of these first and second output signals. In a second operating condition, a signal biasing means is connected into the signal summing means. The signal biasing means provides a signal to the signal summing means to cause the third output signal to become zero when radiation is received from a reference surface. When the arrangement is in the second operating condition and directed to receive thermal radiation from a second surface different from the reference surface, the signal biasing means maintains the same level of bias to the signal summing means as it did when detecting the radiation from the reference surface.

  20. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carlos AC; Gimenez, Andréa; Kuranishi, Lilian; Storrer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP) is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary. PMID:27703382