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Sample records for chronic leprosy-related arthritis

  1. How undifferentiated arthritis evolves into chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, D; Toes, R E M; Scherer, H U

    2014-08-01

    Undifferentiated arthritis (UA) is a frequently occurring clinical presentation with a variable outcome. While some forms of UA will spontaneously remit, other forms will progress to chronic arthritis; an outcome that would preferably be prevented. Which immunological factors are normally at the basis of resolution of inflammation, and what, on the other hand, causes inflammation to persist? This review provides an overview of the immunological mechanisms involved in these two scenarios, including specific examples of how these mechanisms apply, or can be influenced in rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, what do we know about risk factors for chronic arthritis, such as the development of autoantibodies? The recent years have provided many insights concerning risk factors for autoantibody-positive versus autoantibody-negative rheumatoid arthritis, which are discussed along with a possible pathophysiological model incorporating autoantibodies into the larger process of disease development. Finally, the evolution of the autoantibody response over time is described.

  2. Juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Southwood, T R; Woo, P

    1995-05-01

    The nomenclature and classification criteria for arthritis in children should be dealt with initially as separate issues, although they are undoubtedly intertwined. The classification criteria should aim to delineate homogeneous patient populations, yet should be flexible enough to incorporate advances in disease knowledge. It should be recognized that arriving at an international consensus for classification criteria will merely provide a set of operational definitions to facilitate research, and not a set of diagnostic criteria. Indeed the only point to obtaining consensus is to begin a process of systematic ongoing review of the criteria. The labels attached to any of these diseases should facilitate accurate communication. In view of the heterogeneous nature of childhood arthritis, consideration should be given to using a broad umbrella term such as juvenile or childhood arthritis only for communicating with the lay public. Medical nomenclature should be formulated to reflect accurately homogeneous subgroups of arthritis, and should not artificially proscribe a relationship between paediatric and adult disease.

  3. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography. Images PMID:1444631

  4. Chronic arthritis in chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Lourdes; Roure, Silvia

    2017-07-24

    Chikungunya virus infection causes arthralgia and arthritis in the acute phase of the disease but, in more than half of the cases, musculoskeletal manifestations can be prolonged over time and, in some cases, become chronic. Although polyarthralgia is the most frequent chronic manifestation, forms with polyarthritis, tenosynovitis and enthesopathy are also common. To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent articular manifestations after infection with the Chikungunya virus. Report of 3 cases of chronic arthritis after infection with chikungunya virus diagnosed at outpatient care in a university hospital of Catalonia, all of them imported after exposure in areas of epidemic infection between 2013-2015. All three patients had inflammatory joint pain for more than one year after acute disease (3, 2 and 1 years, respectively). In all cases, it appeared as polyarthritis with involvement of small joints of hands and feet (pseudorheumatoid arthritis-like). Laboratory tests showed a slight elevation of acute phase reactants, and analyses for immune markers were negative. Two of the patients required treatment with glucocorticoids and hydroxychloroquine. The course led to slow clinical improvement, but only one of them came to be completely asymptomatic. In the differential diagnosis of chronic polyarthritis, Chikungunya virus disease should also be considered in areas in which it is not endemic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  5. Decreased fibrinolytic activity in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mussoni, L; Pintucci, G; Romano, G; De Benedetti, F; Massa, M; Martini, A

    1990-12-01

    The basal fibrinolytic activity in 17 children with active juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) was investigated. It was found that patients with JCA, and particularly those with the systemic form, show decreased plasma fibrinolytic activity and a marked increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor. Additionally, it was found that patients with systemic JCA, but not those with the polyarticular or pauciarticular form, have increased circulating levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator, and endothelial cell protein, suggesting possible endothelial cell participation in systemic JCA.

  6. [Candida arthritis of the TM joint complicating chronic otitis media].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; Nassar, I; Fikri, M; El Quessar, A; El Hassani, Mr; Chakir, N; Jiddane, M

    2004-11-01

    Infectious arthritis of the temporomandibular joint is very uncommon, and arthritis of the TM joint as a result of candida albicans infection has not previously been reported. The authors describe a patient treated for chronic otitis media complicated by arthritis of the temporomandibular joint. The diagnosis was made using CT scan and bacteriologic sampling.

  7. Decreased fibrinolytic activity in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mussoni, L; Pintucci, G; Romano, G; De Benedetti, F; Massa, M; Martini, A

    1990-01-01

    The basal fibrinolytic activity in 17 children with active juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) was investigated. It was found that patients with JCA, and particularly those with the systemic form, show decreased plasma fibrinolytic activity and a marked increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor. Additionally, it was found that patients with systemic JCA, but not those with the polyarticular or pauciarticular form, have increased circulating levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator, and endothelial cell protein, suggesting possible endothelial cell participation in systemic JCA. PMID:2125408

  8. Effect and Treatment of Chronic Pain in Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pain is the most common reason patients with inflammatory arthritis see a rheumatologist. Patients consistently rate pain as one of their highest priorities, and pain is the single most important determinant of patient global assessment of disease activity. Although pain is commonly interpreted as a marker of inflammation, the correlation between pain intensity and measures of peripheral inflammation is imperfect. The prevalence of chronic, non-inflammatory pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia is higher among patients with inflammatory arthritis than in the general population. Inflammatory arthritis patients with fibromyalgia have higher measures of disease activity and lower quality of life than inflammatory patients who do not have fibromyalgia. This review article focuses on current literature involving the effects of pain on disease assessment and quality of life for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It also reviews non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for treatment of pain for patients with inflammatory arthritis, focusing on the implications of comorbidities and concurrent disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy. Although several studies have examined the effects of reducing inflammation for patients with inflammatory arthritis, very few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of treatment directed specifically towards pain pathways. Most studies have been small, have focused on rheumatoid arthritis or mixed populations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis plus osteoarthritis), and have been at high risk of bias. Larger, longitudinal studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of pain in inflammatory arthritis and to determine the safety and efficacy of analgesic medications in this specific patient population. PMID:23292816

  9. School attendance and juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sturge, C; Garralda, M E; Boissin, M; Doré, C J; Woo, P

    1997-11-01

    We studied the school attendance of 113 children and adolescents (mean age 11 yr, S.D. 3.8, range 3-18 yr) with juvenile chronic arthritis (73 with pauci- and 40 with polyarthritis). The mean attendance rate for the group was 92% (equivalent to 15 absent days a year) with a median of 97%. Attendance was significantly lower in the more severely affected poly group (90% vs 98% in the pauci group; P = 0.03). We found associations of school absence (i) with decreased compliance with physical treatments (r = -0.35, P < 0.05 for compliance with physiotherapy) in the poly group and (ii) with child psychological deviance (r = 0.36 for parentally rated and r = 0.42 for teacher-rated psychological deviance; both P < 0.05) in the pauci group. We conclude that school attendance can be good in severely affected children. Severity of illness, treatment compliance and psychological problems in the child may affect school attendance.

  10. Effect of pine pollen extract on experimental chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hee; Choi, Eun-Mi

    2009-05-01

    The effects of pine pollen extract (PE) on Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were investigated. The oral administration of PE (100 and 200 mg/kg per day) for 21 days after subcutaneous immunization with FCA, significantly reduced hindpaw swelling and the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6) compared with the FCA-induced arthritis group. Treatment with the PE (100 mg/kg) also decreased the serum levels of LDL-cholesterol and increased HDL-cholesterol contents compared with those of the arthritis group. Since CIA is a model of some types of human autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the study examined whether PE is efficacious against CIA in mice and investigated the possible antioxidant potential of PE on CIA. Arthritis in DBA/1J mice was induced by subcutaneous immunization with bovine type II collagen. PE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered once daily for 49 days after initial immunization with type II collagen. The arthritis score and paw edema were markedly suppressed in the groups treated with PE. Moreover, administration of PE (100 mg/kg) for 49 days reduced the serum levels of rheumatoid factor, anti-type II collagen antibody, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, protein carbonyl, advanced glycation endproducts, malondialdehyde and LDL-cholesterol compared with that of CIA mice. These results suggest that the pine pollen might be beneficial in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders.

  11. Long term treatment of chronic Lyme arthritis with benzathine penicillin.

    PubMed Central

    Cimmino, M A; Accardo, S

    1992-01-01

    The cases are reported of two patients with chronic Lyme arthritis resistant to the recommended antibiotic regimens who were cured by long term treatment with benzathine penicillin. It is suggested that the sustained therapeutic levels of penicillin were effective either by the inhibition of germ replication or by lysis of the spirochaetes when they were leaving their sanctuaries. PMID:1417107

  12. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Psoriatic Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Fast Facts Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic arthritis. ... appear before the skin disorder. What is psoriatic arthritis? Psoriasis is a disease in which scaly red ...

  13. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile Arthritis Fast Facts Arthritis in children is treatable. It ... as fevers or rash. What is juvenile idiopathic arthritis? Several types of arthritis, all involving chronic (long- ...

  14. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD.

  15. The foot in chronic rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Vidigal, E; Jacoby, R K; Dixon, A S; Ratliff, A H; Kirkup, J

    1975-01-01

    The feet of 200 consecutive admissions with classical or definite rheumatoid arthritis were studied. 104 were found to have pain or deformity. Clinical involvement of the joints was seen more often than radiological joint damage in the ankle, but the reverse was the case in the midtarsal joints. The metatarsophalangeal joints were involved most frequently both clinically and radiologically. Sixty per cent of the patients required modified shoes but only a third of these had received them. The need for more shoes is clear, and although this is a highly selected group of patients they were all under specialist care. The increased expenditure on special footwear would benefit the patient, firstly by improving ambulation, and secondly perhaps by reducing the number of operations necessary. Hallux valgus was very common and occurred with similar frequency to disease in the other metatarsophalangeal joints. Although not exclusive to rheumatoid arthritis, hallux valgus must have been caused for the most part by the rheumatoid arthritis and if so, then it is suggested that the provision of suitable shoes for patients may be less costly than subsequent surgical treatment. Images PMID:1190849

  16. Diabetes, coeliac disease, multiple sclerosis and chronic arthritis in first-degree relatives of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pohjankoski, Heini; Kautiainen, Hannu; Kotaniemi, Kaisu; Korppi, Matti; Savolainen, Anneli

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of autoimmune diseases in first-degree relatives of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and to compare the figures with published population data. Families of the 362 children with recently diagnosed JIA admitted to Rheumatism Foundation Hospital, Finland, from 1996 to 2001 were contacted by questionnaires regarding autoimmune diseases in family members. Data were collected on type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease, multiple sclerosis and chronic arthritis, consisting mainly of JIA, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathy or psoriatic arthritis. In all, 21.4% of the 355 families with a patient with JIA had members with type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease, multiple sclerosis or chronic arthritis. Thirty-three mothers and 23 fathers had type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease, multiple sclerosis or chronic arthritis in 15.2% (95% CI 11.6-19.4) of the families, and 23 mothers and 15 fathers had chronic arthritis in 10.7% (95% CI 7.7-14.5) of the families. When compared with available research data, the prevalences of rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis, paediatric type 1 diabetes and JIA (in siblings) were increased in JIA families. Coeliac disease was as prevalent as in the population. Autoimmune diseases cluster in families with a child with JIA. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  17. Impaired NK cell functionality and increased TNF-α production as biomarkers of chronic chikungunya arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thanapati, Subrat; Ganu, Mohini; Giri, Prashant; Kulkarni, Shruti; Sharma, Meenal; Babar, Prasad; Ganu, Ashok; Tripathy, Anuradha S

    2017-04-01

    The chronic chikungunya arthritis symptoms closely mimic the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) symptoms, thus making it difficult to distinguish between these two clinical entities. The current comparative study characterizes NK (CD3(-)CD56(+)) and NK-like T (CD3(+)CD56(+)) cell responses in patients with chronic chikungunya arthritis and RA. Phenotype and functions of NK and NK-like T cells repertoire were assessed in 56 chronic chikungunya arthritis, 26 RA patients and 82 controls using flow cytometry. TNF-α and IFN-γ-secreting NK-like T cells were high in both chronic arthritis patients than in controls. Percentage of TNF-α(+) NK cells was higher in RA patients than in controls. Percentage of perforin(+) NK cells was low in both chronic arthritis patient groups. Among the patient groups, expressions of perforin(+) and IFN-γ(+) NK-like T cells were higher in RA. Overall, our data show reduced frequency of NK-like T cells, lower expression of perforin(+) NK, higher expression of TNF-α(+) NK-like T and IFN-γ(+) NK-like T cells as the markers of chronic arthritic diseases. In the absence of any specific treatment for chronic chikungunya induced arthritis and promising results of anti-TNF-α therapy against RA, current data may form the basis for future in vivo studies and has scope as possible therapeutics against chikungunya.

  18. Evolving spectrum of LRBA deficiency-associated chronic arthritis: is there a causative role in juvenile idiopathic arthritis?

    PubMed

    Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M; Naji, Hamzah; Alismail, Khalid; Alazami, Anas M; Sheikh, Farrukh; Conca, Walter; Al-Mousa, Hamoud

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-responsive, beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency causes common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) disorders and autoimmunity. LRBA deficiency has become a clinically variable syndrome with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. We report a patient with LRBA deficiency associated chronic non-erosive arthritis. This report highlights the spectrum of arthritis in such patients and the potential causative role of LRBA gene in juvenile arthritis.

  19. Chlorambucil induced chromosome damage in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, R G; Varonos, S; Doré, C J; Denman, A M; Ansell, B M

    1985-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchanges, a sensitive measure of chromosome damage, were counted in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 23 patients with juvenile chronic arthritis receiving long term, low dose chlorambucil treatment. Thirty five patients with juvenile chronic arthritis who had not been treated with cytotoxic drugs served as controls. All of the treated patients have cells with abnormal sister chromatid exchange frequencies. Damage is related to the daily dose and may, in part, be determined by the duration of treatment. Sister chromatid exchanges from nine patients who had received chlorambucil at some time in the past remained high for at least five months after stopping the drug. Long term follow up will determine whether sister chromatid exchange analysis can help predict those most at risk of drug induced malignancies. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4073932

  20. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection mimicking rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tănăsescu, C; Ionescu, R A

    2003-01-01

    We present the case of a young female patient diagnosed two years ago with rheumatoid arthritis (AR) for which she is taking methotrexate (MTX), who develops cutaneous lesions highly suggestive of porphyria cutanea tarda, diagnosis confirmed by biochemical means. It is noteworthy that she was regularly taking oral contraceptives until the moment of appearance of the skin lesions. The association of those two illnesses, particularly in the case of MTX treatment can raise some problems regarding the potential direct causality relationship. This is why we tried a new diagnostic hypothesis: is chronic hepatitis C virus infection, hypothesis that we verified by means of the presence of anti-VHC and of RNA-VHC. It is well known now the association between chronic viral C infection, rheumatoid syndrome and porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The latter are extrahepatic manifestations of that viral infection, thus representing a major indication for antiviral treatment. Our patient received that treatment and she had a very good outcome of the skin lesions. We suggest that the differential diagnosis of any arthritis should always comprise chronic hepatitis C viral infection.

  1. Giant iliopsoas bursitis: a complication of chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire-Louise; Meaney, James F M; Rana, Haider; McCarthy, Eoghan M; Howard, Donough; Cunnane, Gaye

    2010-03-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis is a poorly recognized cause of hip pain that requires early recognition to avoid potentially serious complications caused by compression of adjacent structures. It can occur in the setting of trauma in athletes or those who engage in heavy labor and is also associated with acute or chronic arthritis. We describe the cases of 2 patients, one of whom developed a femoral neuropathy, while the other had marked venous compression of the lower limb resulting from enlargement of the iliopsoas bursa. Magnetic resonance imaging offers the most accurate information on the extent of the problem. Recalcitrant cases may require bursectomy in addition to treatment of the underlying cause.

  2. Impact of arthritis and multiple chronic conditions on selected life domains - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Theis, Kristina A; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Baker, Nancy A; Brady, Teresa J

    2015-06-05

    About half of U.S. adults have at least one chronic health condition, and the prevalence of multiple (two or more) chronic conditions increased from 21.8% in 2001 to 25.5% in 2012. Chronic conditions profoundly affect quality of life, are leading causes of death and disability, and account for 86% of total health care spending. Arthritis is a common cause of disability, one of the most common chronic conditions, and is included in prevalent combinations of multiple chronic conditions. To determine the impact of having arthritis alone or as one of multiple chronic conditions on selected important life domains, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Having one or more chronic conditions was associated with significant and progressively higher prevalences of social participation restriction, serious psychological distress, and work limitations. Adults with arthritis as one of their multiple chronic conditions had higher prevalences of adverse outcomes on all three life domains compared with those with multiple chronic conditions but without arthritis. The high prevalence of arthritis, its common co-occurrence with other chronic conditions, and its significant adverse effect on life domains suggest the importance of considering arthritis in discussions addressing the effect of multiple chronic conditions and interventions needed to reduce that impact among researchers, health care providers, and policy makers.

  3. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  4. Metabolic syndrome and chronic arthritis: effects of anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    Maruotti, Nicola; d'Onofrio, Francesca; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2015-11-01

    TNF-α plays a key role in the inflammatory cytokine cascade involved in the pathogenesis of chronic arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Systemic inflammation and the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these patients may favor the onset of metabolic syndrome. In patients affected by chronic arthritis, TNF-α is considered as one of the factors responsible for favouring insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, which are important features of the metabolic syndrome. Even if TNF-α is a single player in the great molecular cauldron of inflammation, the use of TNF-α inhibitors may be an important approach for not only treating articular and cutaneous symptoms but also for ameliorating glucose and lipid metabolism. Nevertheless, further research and clinical trials are needed to better determine the effects of biologic therapies on metabolic components in chronic arthritis patients and to identify the most appropriate strategies on the basis of the comorbidities in these patients.

  5. Interventions to reduce the impact of chronic disease: community-based arthritis patient education.

    PubMed

    Goeppinger, J; Lorig, K

    1997-01-01

    Systematic development and testing of the efficacy of educational interventions to improve functioning, prevent disability, and reduce the impact of chronic disease has been limited, perhaps because many chronic diseases disable, do not kill, and because they are managed largely within home, work, and community environments and not within the medical care system. Until recently, these factors contributed to a paucity of arthritis educational interventions. But since the impetus provided by the establishment of the Multipurpose Arthritis Centers Program of the NIH (1977), a number of arthritis patient education programs have been established and evaluated. This chapter summarizes findings from community-based arthritis patient education studies conducted between 1980 and 1995, critiques the methods of these studies, and provides guidance for state-of-the-art community-based intervention research aimed at reducing the individual and social impact of arthritis and other chronic diseases.

  6. Responding to the challenge of leprosy-related disability and ultra-poverty.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Bob; Singh, Suren; Kuipers, Pim

    2014-09-01

    The Millennium Development Goals have provided much needed attention to extreme poverty reduction. However, people with disabilities are disproportionately affected by poverty and in some countries, even the goal of US$1 per day is far out of reach. For people with leprosy-related disability living in ultra-poverty (on less than 50 cents a day), many mainstream poverty reduction strategies are inaccessible and inappropriate. A project in north-west Bangladesh developed a more contextually meaningful definition of ultra-poverty according to nutrition energy intake. A total of 2372 people with leprosy-related disability were surveyed. Of those, 1285 individuals fell below the ultra-poverty line. Individualised interventions were implemented over an extended period of time, comprised of targeted practical assistance, enhancing community links, advocacy for entitlements, and further linking with other initiatives. Follow-up data available for 856 individuals showed an average increase in per capita income of 83%. Personal contribution to the family income increased by 65%. There was a 51% increase in families having access to a latrine. Finally families reported eating 30% more meals per day, up from an average of two meals per day. The initiative sought to address poverty in a wide variety of ways, using minimal inputs. Over several years, the results indicate a significant change in the economic situation of individuals with leprosy related disabilities. Other organisations are encouraged to duplicate the intervention and share their results.

  7. Septic arthritis caused by Bordetella holmesii in an adolescent with chronic haemolytic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Moissenet, Didier; Leverger, Guy; Mérens, Audrey; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Guiso, Nicole; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2011-11-01

    We describe a case of septic arthritis caused by Bordetella holmesii in a 15-year-old boy with chronic haemolytic anaemia. B. holmesii was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The patient outcome was favourable. To our knowledge, this is the first case of B. holmesii septic arthritis in an asplenic patient.

  8. HLA B27 associated chronic arthritis in children: review of 65 cases.

    PubMed

    Prieur, A M

    1987-01-01

    The study of sixty-five children with antigen HLA B27 associated chronic rheumatism was performed. There was a male preponderance, and mean age at onset was ten. A family history was available in half patients. After a 5-year follow up study, 32% of the patients were diagnosed as having ankylosing spondylitis or Reiter's syndrome or psoriatic arthritis or arthritis associated to inflammatory bowel disease. The other patients should be considered as having an HLA B27 associated juvenile chronic arthritis with special features such as enthesopathy, acute joint pain or sausage-like digits. Three patients had a very severe outcome with considerable joint lesion seen on X Ray.

  9. Leprosy-related mortality in Brazil: a neglected condition of a neglected disease.

    PubMed

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Assunção-Ramos, Adriana Valéria; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães; Wand-Del-Rey de Oliveira, Maria Leide; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2015-10-01

    Leprosy is a public health problem and a neglected condition of morbidity and mortality in several countries of the world. We analysed time trends and spatiotemporal patterns of leprosy-related mortality in Brazil. We performed a nationwide population-based study using secondary mortality data. We included all deaths that occurred in Brazil between 2000 and 2011, in which leprosy was mentioned in any field of death certificates. Leprosy was identified in 7732/12 491 280 deaths (0.1%). Average annual age-adjusted mortality rate was 0.43 deaths/100 000 inhabitants (95% CI 0.40-0.46). The burden of leprosy deaths was higher among males, elderly, black race/colour and in leprosy-endemic regions. Lepromatous leprosy was the most common clinical form mentioned. Mortality rates showed a significant nationwide decrease over the period (annual percent change [APC]: -2.8%; 95% CI -4.2 to -2.4). We observed decreasing mortality rates in the South, Southeast and Central-West regions, while the rates remained stable in North and Northeast regions. Spatial and spatiotemporal high-risk clusters for leprosy-related deaths were distributed mainly in highly endemic and socio-economically deprived regions. Leprosy is a neglected cause of death in Brazil since the disease is preventable, and a cost-effective treatment is available. Sustainable control measures should include appropriate management and systematic monitoring of leprosy-related complications, such as severe leprosy reactions and adverse effects to multidrug therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. GCF Resistin As A Novel Marker in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Manoj; Hassan, Basit; Desai, Khushboo; Duseja, Shilpa; Kumar, Santosh; Reddy, Sharaschandra G

    2015-04-01

    The associational studies between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis are less documented, although they are found to have similar inflammatory pathogenesis. Resistin, a novel adipokine is suggested to be a common link between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the present study was to reinforce the inter-relationship between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis by using resistin as a potent inflammatory marker. Hundred patients (aged >30 y) of either sex were selected for this study and were divided equally into four groups of 25 patients each. Group A consisted of healthy individuals, Group B consisted of patients with chronic periodontitis, Group C of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and Group D had patients suffering from both arthritis and periodontitis. Periodontal parameters assessed were plaque index (PI), modified gingival index (GI) and probing depth (PD). Panoramic radiographs were taken to confirm the diagnosis of periodontitis. Rheumatoid arthritis was confirmed by the rheumatologists and seropositivity for rheumatoid factor (RF) was checked. Resistin levels were analysed in GCF collected from all the four groups and statistical analysis was done by using Pearson correlation coefficient. The GCF of all the patients showed presence of resistin. The level of resistin was highest in Group D patients and least in Group A patients. On analysing the samples together positive co-relation was found between GCF resistin and PD, PI, GI and RF. Resistin levels are increased in both chronic periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, the increased level of GCF resistin can be regarded as potential inflammatory marker for periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Low-intensity laser therapy efficacy evaluation in FVB mice subjected to acute and chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Trawitzki, Bianca Ferreira; Ervolino, Edilson; Macedo, Ana Paula; Lilge, Lothar

    2017-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune inflammation, has a high prevalence in the population, and while therapy is available, it required often injection of drugs causing discomfort to patients. This study evaluates the clinical and histological effect of low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) as an alternative treatment, in a murine model of acute and chronic inflammation. FVB mice received either a Zymosan A injection into one knee joint inducing acute inflammation, followed after 15 min or 24 h by LILT or a collagen bovine type II injection emulsified in "Freund's Complete Adjuvant" to induce chronic arthritis, followed at 4 weeks with multiple LILT sessions. LILT mediated by either 660, 808, or 905 nm and tissue response was evaluated based on clinical symptoms and histological analysis of inflammatory infiltrate and damage to the articular surfaces. LILT can be effective in elevating clinical symptoms, so Kruskal-Wallis testing indicated no significant differences between knees affected by acute arthritis and treated once with LILT and an injured knee without treatment (p > 0.05) for 660 and 808 nm with some improvements for the 905-nm LILT. Mice receiving two treatments for acute arthritis showed exacerbation of inflammation and articular resorption following therapy with a 660-nm continuous laser (p < 0.05). For chronic inflammation, differences were not noted between LILT treated and untreated injured knee joints (p > 0.05). Among the lasers, the 905 nm tends to show better results for anti-inflammatory effect in acute arthritis, and the 660 nm showed better results in chronic arthritis. In conclusion, LILT wavelength selection depends on the arthritis condition and can demonstrate anti-inflammatory effects for chronic arthritis and reduced resorption area in this murine model.

  12. Pregnancy and early onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musiej-Nowakowska, E.; Ploski, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study interaction of early onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis (EOP-JCA) and pregnancy in the Polish population, in particular to confirm the ameliorating effect of pregnancy on disease activity reported by others and to analyse the factors that govern the occurrence of postpartum flare, with emphasis on the potential role of breast feeding.
METHODS—The reproductive outcome and disease status in 39 adult women with history of EOP- JCA was examined by means of a questionnaire and an interview. In all patients the disease onset occurred before the 6th birthday, 19 had persistent pauciarticular JCA (PeEOP-JCA) and 20 had extended pauciarticular JCA (ExEOP-JCA).
RESULTS—23 women had at least one successful pregnancy, seven had unsuccessful pregnancies but all of them had also one or more successful pregnancies. Among those who have never been pregnant (n=16) there was a higher frequency of eye disease and ExEOP-JCA compared with the rest of the group. In almost all cases pregnancy was associated with remission of disease activity, however a postpartum flare appeared after 22 pregnancies (52%). The flares were more frequent in women who had an active disease before pregnancy, had a flare after a previous pregnancy and/or were breast feeding.
CONCLUSIONS—In EOP-JCA patients pregnancy generally has a good outcome and induces amelioration of disease activity. After delivery, however, a flare of disease often appears, especially in women who were breast feeding, had a postparum flare previously or had an active disease before pregnancy. The pattern of interaction between disease and pregnancy found in EOP-JCA makes EOP-JCA similar in this respect to RA, but different from systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis.

 PMID:10419865

  13. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  14. Prevalence of chronic arthritis in four geographical areas of the Scottish Highlands.

    PubMed Central

    Steven, M M

    1992-01-01

    A survey of the prevalence of chronic arthritic conditions was carried out on a population of 35,251 patients registered with 29 general practitioners in the highlands of Scotland. Symptomatic osteoarthritis had an overall prevalence of 65 per 1000 but rose from one in 20 of those aged 40-50 years to one quarter of those over 70 years of age. Rheumatoid arthritis was present in 5.5 per 1000 with a two to threefold female preponderance and there was an unexplained threefold difference between the regions with the highest and lowest prevalence. Seronegative arthritides were found in 2.1 per 1000, polymyalgia rheumatica/temporal arteritis in 1.2 per 1000, and gout in 3.4 per 1000. Juvenile chronic arthritis had a prevalence of 0.39 per 1000 (2.0 per 1000 in those aged 15 years and younger) and connective tissue disease 0.45 per 1000. There was considerable variation in the prevalence of inflammatory arthritis throughout the region. The highest prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis was 14.5 per 1000 women in one east coast area and the lowest 5.2 per 1000 women in the west. The difference did not seem to be due to misclassification. A consultant's review of a questionnaire sent to all except those with osteoarthritis changed the proportions of patients who could be confirmed to have the respective inflammatory arthritides (rheumatoid arthritis between 3.4 and 5.0 per 1000, seronegative arthritides 2.0 per 1000, juvenile chronic arthritis 0.52 per 1000), and a third of those diagnosed as having rheumatoid arthritis failed to meet hospital oriented diagnostic criteria. PMID:1550402

  15. Oral methotrexate therapy for chronic rheumatoid arthritis ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, L R; Espinoza, C G; Vasey, F B; Germain, B F

    1986-09-01

    Eight patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and cutaneous vasculitis ulcerations resistant to conventional therapy were treated successfully with a low-dose intermittent regimen of oral methotrexate. Objective clinical response was prompt and complete resolution was observed at about 12 weeks of therapy. The drug was well tolerated. Mild gastrointestinal side effects were the most common untoward reaction. We conclude that methotrexate therapy is an effective agent for some of the extraarticular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis including vasculitis, and further clinical evaluation should be a consideration.

  16. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints Infection, most often by bacteria or virus Crystals such as uric acid or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate ... common types of inflammatory arthritis include: Ankylosing ... calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease Juvenile rheumatoid ...

  17. Cationic Yersinia antigen-induced chronic allergic arthritis in rats. A model for reactive arthritis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, A K; Batsford, S R; Curschellas, E; Kist, M J; Gondolf, K B

    1991-01-01

    Cationic antigens are known to have considerable arthritogenic potential in experimental systems. During a systematic search for suitable, naturally occurring candidates an intracellular protein was isolated from the ribosomal pellet of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3, a bacterial strain associated with reactive arthritis in humans. The protein is highly cationic, contains two 19-kD polypeptide chains linked by a disulfide bond, and reveals a strong tendency for spontaneous aggregation. It is suggested to be a nucleic acid binding protein. We tested this antigen for its ability to induce arthritis after intra-articular challenge in preimmunized rats. An acute inflammatory phase followed by transition to chronicity was observed both by technetium-99m scintigraphy and from histology. Massive polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration of the synovium was seen early on and fibrosis and thickening of the joint capsule occurred in later stages. Control groups showed no evidence of inflammation. Western blot and ELISA analysis of unselected sera from Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3-infected patients revealed antibodies to the antigen in the majority of cases, whereas healthy individuals rarely reacted. This is the first report of a naturally occurring cationic antigen capable of inducing immunologic tissue injury; it justifies the speculation that cationic antigens from prokaryotic cells could trigger reactive arthritis in humans. Images PMID:1864972

  18. Family Health and Characteristics in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Emotional Disorders of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Luiza; Garralda, M. Elena; Jeffs, Jim; Rose, Gillian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare family health and characteristics in children with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and emotional disorders. Method: Parents of 28 children and adolescents aged 11 to 18 years with CFS, 30 with JRA, and 27 with emotional disorders (i.e., anxiety and/or depressive disorders) were…

  19. Family Health and Characteristics in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Emotional Disorders of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Luiza; Garralda, M. Elena; Jeffs, Jim; Rose, Gillian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare family health and characteristics in children with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and emotional disorders. Method: Parents of 28 children and adolescents aged 11 to 18 years with CFS, 30 with JRA, and 27 with emotional disorders (i.e., anxiety and/or depressive disorders) were…

  20. Pharmacology Update on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Weatherspoon, Deborah; Weatherspoon, Christopher A; Abbott, Brianna

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a brief review and summarizes current therapies for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, major depression, and rheumatoid arthritis. One new pharmaceutical agent is highlighted for each of the topics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical activity advice to manage chronic conditions for adults with arthritis or hypertension, 2007.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Susan A; Maynard, L Michele; Fulton, Janet E; Hootman, Jennifer M; Yoon, Paula W

    2009-01-01

    To describe the prevalence and characteristics of persons with arthritis or hypertension who received advice from their health-care professional to manage their condition. Data from 9 states were obtained from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Two modules (Arthritis Management and Actions to Control High Blood Pressure) were analyzed (sample sizes: arthritis 29,698, hypertension 29,783). Fifty-five percent of persons with arthritis and 75.8% of persons with hypertension reported that their health-care professional ever suggested physical activity or exercise to help manage their condition. Correlates for being less likely to receive advice were lower levels of education, longer time since last routine doctor visit, being physically inactive, and having lower body mass index. Among inactive, normal weight persons, 43.0% (95% CI: 38.7, 47.4) with arthritis and 50.0% (95% CI: 44.4, 55.6) with hypertension reported receiving advice; among inactive, obese patients, 59.1% (95% CI: 55.8, 62.3) with arthritis and 74.0% (95% CI: 70.5, 77.3) with hypertension reported receiving advice. Findings suggest that health-care professionals may base physical activity counseling more on body mass index than a patient's activity level. To manage chronic health conditions, health-care professionals should assess patient's physical activity and offer all patients appropriate counseling.

  2. Salivary TNFα levels in groups of subjects with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gamel, Ehsan B; Hashim, Nada T; Satti, Asim; Gismalla, Bakri G

    2017-01-07

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic periodontitis are the most common chronic inflammatory diseases with significant pathological and clinical similarities. Numerous studies have indicated a relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to compare the TNF-α levels in saliva among patients with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic periodontitis as well as healthy subjects. One hundred and seventy-one patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Fifty-seven patients diagnosed of RA, 57 patients with chronic periodontitis and 57 healthy subjects. These patients have been examined with regard to TNF-α level from salivary samples. Their teeth were examined with regard to Plaque Index , Gingival Index, probing depth and clinical attachment level.All patients were non-smokers. The results revealed a significant difference in all periodontal parameters among the three groups. The chronic periodontitis group showed a significantly higher value in all clinical periodontal parameters in comparison to both the RA and healthy groups. No significant difference was found between salivary TNF-α level among the three study groups. Patients with chronic periodontitis had the highest periodontal indices. However there was no significant difference regarding the level of salivary TNF-α. Hence, suppression of proinflammatory cytokines might prove beneficial in suppressing periodontal diseases among RA patients.

  3. [Septic arthritis in connective tissue diseases and other chronic arthropathies].

    PubMed

    Stecher, D R; Gusis, S E; Maldonado Cocco, J A

    1991-01-01

    In order to describe the features of septic arthritis (SA) in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTDs), a series of 17 CTD cases with SA episodes were studied retrospectively. The most common CTDs were systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Involvement was oligoarticular in 64% of cases and mono-articular in the remainder. Clinical, radiological and laboratory findings proved insufficient to allow differential diagnosis between SA and an underlying arthritic flare-up, which could only be carried out by bacterial isolation from synovial fluid. The most frequent etiological agent was Staphylococcus aureus (Table 1). Throughout, patients were treated by needle drainage together with antibiotics, first by parenteral (average 17 days) and later by oral route (average 46 days). Cases with greater diagnostic delay and initiation of therapy were those requiring arthrotomy and those who presented more complications mainly osteomyelitis and permanent disability (Table 2).

  4. Chronic arthritis and cardiovascular disease: altered blood parameters give rise to a prothrombotic propensity.

    PubMed

    Beinsberger, Jilke; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Cosemans, Judith M E M

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, and to a lesser extent ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, associates with increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular complications. We hypothesized that the increased risk of cardiovascular disease is reflected by changes in blood parameters that are compatible with a prothrombotic propensity. To substantiate this notion, we performed an extensive literature search identifying such parameters. A search through PubMed (1970-2013) was done to find primary articles with the following search terms: rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis or synovial fluid. These were combined with keywords reflecting processes of atherothrombosis: atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, coagulation, endothelial, fibrinolysis, mean platelet volume, microparticle, platelet, platelet count and mass, thrombosis, and thrombus. The published studies point to a multitude of blood-related processes that can contribute to a prothrombotic propensity in chronic inflammatory diseases. These include an increase in platelet mass; low-level platelet activation, enforced by interaction with leukocytes and the formation of proinflammatory cytokines; a locally activated endothelium; and an increased coagulant activity. Patient treatment with methotrexate or TNF-α blockers appears to result in normalization of several of these prothrombotic parameters. This analysis provides a first identification of the mechanisms by which inflammatory arthritis can aggravate cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. RANKL synthesized by articular chondrocytes contributes to juxta-articular bone loss in chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The receptor activator nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) diffuses from articular cartilage to subchondral bone. However, the role of chondrocyte-synthesized RANKL in rheumatoid arthritis-associated juxta-articular bone loss has not yet been explored. This study aimed to determine whether RANKL produced by chondrocytes induces osteoclastogenesis and juxta-articular bone loss associated with chronic arthritis. Methods Chronic antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was induced in New Zealand (NZ) rabbits. Osteoarthritis (OA) and control groups were simultaneously studied. Dual X-ray absorptiometry of subchondral knee bone was performed before sacrifice. Histological analysis and protein expression of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were evaluated in joint tissues. Co-cultures of human OA articular chondrocytes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors were stimulated with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), then further stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Results Subchondral bone loss was confirmed in AIA rabbits when compared with controls. The expression of RANKL, OPG and RANKL/OPG ratio in cartilage were increased in AIA compared to control animals, although this pattern was not seen in synovium. Furthermore, RANKL expression and RANKL/OPG ratio were inversely related to subchondral bone mineral density. RANKL expression was observed throughout all cartilage zones of rabbits and was specially increased in the calcified cartilage of AIA animals. Co-cultures demonstrated that PGE2-stimulated human chondrocytes, which produce RANKL, also induce osteoclasts differentiation from PBMCs. Conclusions Chondrocyte-synthesized RANKL may contribute to the development of juxta-articular osteoporosis associated with chronic arthritis, by enhancing osteoclastogenesis. These results point out a new mechanism of bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22709525

  6. The Endogenous Adjuvant Squalene Can Induce a Chronic T-Cell-Mediated Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Barbro C.; Jansson, Åsa M.; Larsson, Anders; Bucht, Anders; Lorentzen, Johnny C.

    2000-01-01

    Squalene is a cholesterol precursor, which stimulates the immune system nonspecifically. We demonstrate that one intradermal injection of this adjuvant lipid can induce joint-specific inflammation in arthritis-prone DA rats. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed erosion of bone and cartilage, and that development of polyarthritis coincided with infiltration of αβ+ T cells. Depletion of these cells with anti-αβ TcR monoclonal antibody (R73) resulted in complete recovery, whereas anti-CD8 and anti-γδ TcR injections were ineffective. The apparent dependence on CD4+ T cells suggested a role for genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and this was concluded from comparative studies of MHC congenic rat strains, in which DA.1H rats were less susceptible than DA rats. Furthermore, LEW.1AV1 and PVG.1AV1 rats with MHC identical to DA rats were arthritis-resistant, demonstrating that non-MHC genes also determine susceptibility. Some of these genetic influences could be linked to previously described arthritis susceptibility loci in an F2 intercross between DA and LEW.1AV1 rats (ie, Cia3, Oia2 and Cia5). Interestingly, some F2 hybrid rats developed chronic arthritis, a phenotype not apparent in the parental inbred strains. Our demonstration that an autoadjuvant can trigger chronic, immune-mediated joint-specific inflammation may give clues to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, and it raises new questions concerning the role of endogenous molecules with adjuvant properties in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:10854227

  7. Chronic arthritis in children and adolescents in two Indian health service user populations

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, Joyce; Cameron, H Dan; Jeanotte, Diane; Solomon, Glenn; Jarvis, James N

    2004-01-01

    Background High prevalence rates for rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus have been described in American Indian and Alaskan Native adults. The impact of these diseases on American Indian children has not been investigated. Methods We used International Classification of Diseases-9 (ICD-9) codes to search two Indian Health Service (IHS) patient registration databases over the years 1998–2000, searching for individuals 19 years of age or younger with specific ICD-9-specified diagnoses. Crude estimates for disease prevalence were made based on the number of individuals identified with these diagnoses within the database. Results Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) / juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) was the most frequent diagnosis given. The prevalence rate for JRA in the Oklahoma City Area was estimated as 53 per 100,000 individuals at risk, while in the Billings Area, the estimated prevalence was nearly twice that, at 115 per 100,000. These rates are considerably higher than those reported in the most recent European studies. Conclusion Chronic arthritis in childhood represents an important, though unrecognized, chronic health challenge within the American Indian population living in the United States. PMID:15333136

  8. Profiling risk factors for chronic uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a new model for EHR-based research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Chronic uveitis is a common and serious comorbid condition of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, with insidious presentation and potential to cause blindness. Knowledge of clinical associations will improve risk stratification. Based on clinical observation, we hypothesized that allergic conditions are associated with chronic uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients. Methods This study is a retrospective cohort study using Stanford’s clinical data warehouse containing data from Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital from 2000–2011 to analyze patient characteristics associated with chronic uveitis in a large juvenile idiopathic arthritis cohort. Clinical notes in patients under 16 years of age were processed via a validated text analytics pipeline. Bivariate-associated variables were used in a multivariate logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, and race. Previously reported associations were evaluated to validate our methods. The main outcome measure was presence of terms indicating allergy or allergy medications use overrepresented in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with chronic uveitis. Residual text features were then used in unsupervised hierarchical clustering to compare clinical text similarity between patients with and without uveitis. Results Previously reported associations with uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients (earlier age at arthritis diagnosis, oligoarticular-onset disease, antinuclear antibody status, history of psoriasis) were reproduced in our study. Use of allergy medications and terms describing allergic conditions were independently associated with chronic uveitis. The association with allergy drugs when adjusted for known associations remained significant (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.22–5.4). Conclusions This study shows the potential of using a validated text analytics pipeline on clinical data warehouses to examine practice

  9. [Fear of progression in patients with cancer, diabetes mellitus and chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Dankert, A; Duran, G; Engst-Hastreiter, U; Keller, M; Waadt, S; Henrich, G; Herschbach, P

    2003-06-01

    Fear of an increasing disease progression (fear of progression) is among the main psychological stresses in patients with cancer, diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2) and chronic arthritis. The questions the study seeks to answer are: (1) Which are the main fears of these patients?, (2) How and in which circumstances in life do they occur?, (3) Which are the triggers of the fear? To answer these questions, a sample of 65 patients were researched through interviews. The results indicate that the predominant fears of cancer patients are the fear of dying and the unpredictability of the progression of the disease. Patients with chronic arthritis most frequently fear being physically dependent on someone else. The most common anxiety of diabetes patients are long-term complications. For all three groups of patients job-related fears cause a high amount of distress. These results contribute to the development of a standardised fear of progression questionnaire.

  10. Success rates of first-line antibiotics for culture-negative sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chuckpaiwong, Bavornrit; Phoompoung, Saravut

    2014-09-01

    A combination of surgical and medical treatment is normally required for patients with septic arthritis. Antibiotics selected for use on these patients are normally based on tissue culture results. However, in sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis cases, the results of the culture are usually negative as a result of prior treatment. The present study will investigate the incidence of culture-negative septic arthritis and the outcomes based on the use of first-line drug antibiotics for the treatment of sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis. For the present study, the authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of surgically treated septic arthritis cases over the past 10 years at Siriraj Hospital. The patient culture results, the antibiotics used, and the results of treatment were all recorded and analyzed. One hundredfifty-three septic arthritis patients were reviewed. Sixty-two patients were classified as having been diagnosed with either sub-acute or chronic septic arthritis. Thirty-six of 62 patients (58.1%) had a negative culture result. In the culture-positive patients, 42.3% had Streptococcus, 26.9% had Staphylococcus aureus, 11.5% had other gram positive bacteria, 15.4% had gram-negative bacteria, and 3.8% had tuberculus infection. In the culture-negative sub-acute and chronic group (36 of 62), 23 patients received Cefazolin, nine patients received Cloxacillin, and four patients received Clindamycin. Successful results were 69.9%, 66.7% and 75%, respectively. The present study reflects that the incidence ofculture-negative, sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis is approximately 58.1%. The first-line class of antibiotics remains the appropriate antibiotic choice for these patients because they are still effective for treatment of septic arthritis in up to 70% of all cases.

  11. [Total hip prosthesis for chronic juvenile arthritis. A review of a series of 34 prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Journeau, P; Mabesoone, F; Touzet, P; Prieur, A M; Rigault, P

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of total hip arthroplasty for chronic juvenile arthritis in order to evaluate risks, problems and benefits of this procedure. Between 1984 and 1992, 34 total hip prostheses were implanted for chronic juvenile arthritis in 20 patients. Most prosthesis were Zweymuller cementless prosthesis. Mean follow up was 5 years. Results were good. In 85 per cent of cases, patients had a normal activity recovery. Pain relief was very good since in 80 per cent cases patients had a total indolence. Beyond these good clinical results at this mean follow-up, the main interest of this study is to characterize two different periods in the surgical technique. The first period when cemented prosthesis was employed and the second one when cementless femoral implants with screwed acetabular component were used. Cementless prostheses appear to be a satisfying solution in this disease, preserving bones and showing very good radiological and functional results. Furthermore, the very low complication rate despite general discomfort may prompt us to use total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of chronic juvenile arthritis.

  12. Role of endogenous and exogenous female sex hormones in arthritis and osteoporosis development in B10.Q-ncf1*/* mice with collagen-induced chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an often-used murine model for human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Earlier studies have shown potent anti-arthritic effects with the female sex hormone estradiol and the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene in CIA in DBA/1-mice. B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice are B10.Q mice with a mutated Ncf1 gene. In B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice, CIA develops as a chronic relapsing disease, which more accurately mimics human RA. We investigated the role of endogenous and exogenous sex steroids and raloxifene in the course of this model of chronic arthritis. We also examined whether treatment would prevent the development of inflammation-triggered generalized osteoporosis. Methods Female B10.Q-ncf1*/*mice were sham-operated or ovariectomized, and CIA was induced. 22 days later, when 30% of the mice had developed arthritis, treatment with raloxifene, estradiol or vehicle was started, and the clinical disease was evaluated continuously. Treatment was continued until day 56 after immunization. At termination of the experiment (day 73), bone mineral density (BMD) was analyzed, paws were collected for histological examination, and sera were analyzed for markers of cartilage turnover and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results Raloxifene and estradiol treatment, as well as endogenous estrogen, decreased the frequency of arthritis, prevented joint destruction and countered generalized osteoporosis. These effects were associated with lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Conclusions This is the first study to show that raloxifene and estradiol can ameliorate established erosive arthritis and inflammation-triggered osteoporosis in this chronic arthritis model. We propose that treatment with raloxifene could be a beneficial addition to the treatment of postmenopausal RA. PMID:21159208

  13. Association between chronic periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Rosamma; Rajappan, Sreeraj; Nath, Sameera G; Paul, Binoy J

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic periodontitis are the most common chronic inflammatory diseases with remarkable pathological and clinical similarities. A lot of similarities exist between RA and periodontitis at cellular and molecular levels. The relationship between these two chronic inflammatory diseases is still unclear. This case-control study was undertaken to determine the possible association between chronic inflammatory diseases like RA and periodontitis. The case group consisted of 100 patients attending the Rheumatology clinic who have rheumatoid arthritis (RA group). Age- and gender-matched 112 patients without RA attending the Outpatient wing of Department of General Medicine formed the control group (NRA group). The number of missing teeth, gingival index (GI), oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment levels (CAL) were evaluated in both the groups. Rheumatoid disease activity was assessed by DAS-28 score system. Systemic markers of inflammation like erythrocytic sedimentation rate (ESR) and serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed. There was a statistically significant difference in GI, OHI-S, PPD, CAL, ESR and CRP levels between cases (RA group) and controls (NRA group) (P < 0.05). Among subjects with RA, there was no association between the rheumatoid disease activity and the severity of periodontal disease. The occurrence and severity of periodontitis was found to be higher in RA subjects as compared to subjects without RA, suggesting a positive relation between these two chronic inflammatory diseases.

  14. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  15. Conserved 33-kb haplotype in the MHC class III region regulates chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Houtman, Miranda; Padyukov, Leonid; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed many genetic loci associated with complex autoimmune diseases. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the MHC gene HLA-DRB1 is the strongest candidate predicting disease development. It has been suggested that other immune-regulating genes in the MHC contribute to the disease risk, but this contribution has been difficult to show because of the strong linkage disequilibrium within the MHC. We isolated genomic regions in the form of congenic fragments in rats to test whether there are additional susceptibility loci in the MHC. By both congenic mapping in inbred strains and SNP typing in wild rats, we identified a conserved, 33-kb large haplotype Ltab-Ncr3 in the MHC-III region, which regulates the onset, severity, and chronicity of arthritis. The Ltab-Ncr3 haplotype consists of five polymorphic immunoregulatory genes: Lta (lymphotoxin-α), Tnf, Ltb (lymphotoxin-β), Lst1 (leukocyte-specific transcript 1), and Ncr3 (natural cytotoxicity-triggering receptor 3). Significant correlation in the expression of the Ltab-Ncr3 genes suggests that interaction of these genes may be important in keeping these genes clustered together as a conserved haplotype. We studied the arthritis association and the spliceo-transcriptome of four different Ltab-Ncr3 haplotypes and showed that higher Ltb and Ncr3 expression, lower Lst1 expression, and the expression of a shorter splice variant of Lst1 correlate with reduced arthritis severity in rats. Interestingly, patients with mild RA also showed higher NCR3 expression and lower LST1 expression than patients with severe RA. These data demonstrate the importance of a conserved haplotype in the regulation of complex diseases such as arthritis. PMID:27303036

  16. Physical fitness and its relationship to other indices of health status in children with chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Malleson, P N; Bennett, S M; MacKinnon, M; Jespersen, D K; Coutts, K D; Turner, S P; McKenzie, D C

    1996-06-01

    To compare aerobic and anaerobic fitness of a group of children w-th chronic arthritis with that of healthy controls, and to explore the relationship between physical fitness and other indices of health status in these children. Thirty-one children aged 8 to 17 years with chronic arthritis of varying type and severity and 16 physically healthy controls participated in the study. Using a cycle ergometer, aerobic fitness was assessed by measuring peak oxygen uptake achieved in a 15 s period during exercise to volitional fatigue. Anaerobic fitness was assessed by measuring peak power in the legs in a 5 s period and total work completed (Wingate test). Joint pain experienced over the week before testing and during testing was measured using a 10 cm visual analog scale. Self-esteem was measured using the Self Perception Profile for Children Questionnaire. There were no significant differences between mean peak O2 uptake or mean peak anaerobic power for patients and controls; however, the mean values for both controls and patients were significantly lower than reported values for healthy children. Peak O2 uptake controlled for age, sex, and sum of skinfolds was negatively associated with disease severity, measured by physician global assessment (p = 0.04), but peak power was not. Neither aerobic nor anaerobic fitness were associated with disease activity measured by physician global assessment or active joint count, or with disease duration. There was a tendency for children with active arthritis to experience less pain during fitness testing than over the previous week (p = 0.06). Testing did not seem to exacerbate joint symptoms. Self-ratings of athletic competence were significantly correlated with peak O2 uptake achieved for children with arthritis (r = 0.43, p = 0.02), but not for controls. Global self-esteem was moderately correlated with self-rated athletic competence in controls (r = 0.49, p = 0.09), but was not in children with arthritis. In this sample of

  17. Simultaneous inhibition of JAK and SYK kinases ameliorates chronic and destructive arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Llop-Guevara, Alba; Porras, Mónica; Cendón, Carla; Di Ceglie, Irene; Siracusa, Francesco; Madarena, Federica; Rinotas, Vagelis; Gómez, Lluís; van Lent, Peter L; Douni, Eleni; Chang, Hyun Dong; Kamradt, Thomas; Román, Juan

    2015-12-10

    Despite the broad spectrum of antirheumatic drugs, RA is still not well controlled in up to 30-50 % of patients. Inhibition of JAK kinases by means of the pan-JAK inhibitor tofacitinib has demonstrated to be effective even in difficult-to-treat patients. Here, we discuss whether the efficacy of JAK inhibition can be improved by simultaneously inhibiting SYK kinase, since both kinases mediate complementary and non-redundant pathways in RA. Efficacy of dual JAK + SYK inhibition with selective small molecule inhibitors was evaluated in chronic G6PI-induced arthritis, a non-self-remitting and destructive arthritis model in mice. Clinical and histopathological scores, as well as cytokine and anti-G6PI antibody production were assessed in both preventive and curative protocols. Potential immunotoxicity was also evaluated in G6PI-induced arthritis and in a 28-day TDAR model, by analysing the effects of JAK + SYK inhibition on hematological parameters, lymphoid organs, leukocyte subsets and cell function. Simultaneous JAK + SYK inhibition completely prevented mice from developing arthritis. This therapeutic strategy was also very effective in ameliorating already established arthritis. Dual kinase inhibition immediately resulted in greatly decreased clinical and histopathological scores and led to disease remission in over 70 % of the animals. In contrast, single JAK inhibition and anti-TNF therapy (etanercept) were able to stop disease progression but not to revert it. Dual kinase inhibition decreased Treg and NK cell counts to the same extent as single JAK inhibition but overall cytotoxicity remained intact. Interestingly, treatment discontinuation rapidly reversed such immune cell reduction without compromising clinical efficacy, suggesting long-lasting curative effects. Dual kinase inhibition reduced the Th1/Th17 cytokine cascade and the differentiation and function of joint cells, in particular osteoclasts and fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Concurrent JAK

  18. Activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in serum and synovial fluid in patients with chronic Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pancewicz, Slawomir; Popko, Janusz; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Knaś, Malgorzata; Grygorczuk, Sambor; Guszczyn, Tomasz; Bruczko, Marta; Szajda, Slawomir; Zajkowska, Joanna; Kondrusik, Maciej; Sierakowski, Stanislaw; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal exoglycosidases participate in the destruction of the articular cartilage by cleaving glycoside bonds in glycoproteins and proteoglycans. The aim of the study was to determine the activity of exoglycosidases: hexosaminidase, beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, alpha-mannosidase and alpha-fucosidase in serum and synovial fluid of patients with Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis. The study group consisted of 10 patients with chronic Lyme arthritis (age 18 - 74 y), 13 with rheumatoid arthritis (age 32 - 70 y) and 10 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (age 8 - 17 y). The control group consisted of 9 healthy volunteers (age 24 - 62 y). The activity of the exoglycosidases was determined with the p-nitrophenyl derivatives of sugars as substrates. A significant increase of the activity of all the exoglycosidases in serum and in synovial fluid of the patients with different forms of arthritis was found. The ratio of synovial fluid/serum activity of exoglycosidases was above 2.0 in LA but not in JIA and RA patients. As the main source of exoglycosidases in the joint is the synovial membrane, this result supports the appropriateness of therapeutic synovectomy in chronic Lyme arthritis with knee effusion. The serum activity of hexosaminidase may be used in monitoring the course of Lyme arthritis and the efficiency of treatment.

  19. Chronic gonococcal arthritis with C5 deficiency presenting with brief flare-ups: case study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Davido, B; Dinh, A; Lagrange, A; Mellon, G; de Truchis, P; Perronne, C; Cremieux, A C

    2014-09-01

    Gonococcal arthritis is typically acute and appears within 3 weeks after initial infection. Chronic gonococcal arthritis is now exceptionally rare, since the advent of the antibiotic era. Numerous host factors are involved in gonococcal dissemination, such as complement deficiency, HIV and gonococcus strain characteristics. Gonococcal arthritis shares the same risk factors. In this instance, our patient was a 16-year-old girl suffering from persistent polyarthralgia with joint swelling presenting with brief flare-ups for a period of 1 year. She disclosed a single episode of unprotected sexual intercourse 1 year ago, i.e. just before developing her first rheumatological symptoms. Therefore, we performed a joint aspiration (arthrocentesis), and synovial fluid was inoculated directly into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles, which tested positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae within 24 h. Clinical presentation was consistent with previous reports of chronic gonococcal arthritis. Further investigation revealed a C5 complement deficiency, which might explain the chronic Neisseria process. A favourable outcome was reached after a ten-day course of IV ceftriaxone, with no apparent sequelae found during follow-up 6 weeks later. This case demonstrates an unusual gonococcal arthritis with brief flare-ups for the course of a year, followed by a subacute form. N. meningitidis infections, similar to N. gonorrhoeae, are typically acute and may sometimes be involved in chronic processes. However, this characteristic appears to be rare in the case of N. gonorrhoeae. Risk factors for this chronic process will be discussed with a review of the literature.

  20. Management of chronic arthritis pain in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Lussier, David; Shir, Yoram

    2010-06-01

    Musculoskeletal pain in the elderly is common and disabling. As the conditions causing rheumatic pain, including osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis and soft-tissue conditions such as tendonitis and bursitis, are, for the most part, not curable, pain control is paramount in order to maintain quality of life. Pain management should be multimodal and tailored to the individual patient, and will likely include a combination of both nonpharmacological and pharmacological interventions. Nonpharmacological treatments begin with education of the patient, encouragement to practise self-management strategies and attention to healthy life habits such as weight control and regular physical activity and exercise. Advice in this regard may be effectively given by healthcare professionals other than physicians. Although herbal products and nutritional supplements are commonly used by patients, studies of their efficacy and safety, especially in the elderly, are limited. In contrast, topical applications, and in particular those containing NSAIDs, are being used more frequently, are associated with fewer adverse effects than oral preparations and offer a new and safer treatment alternative. Similarly, intra-articular and soft-tissue injections of corticosteroids provide an easy and cost-effective option for symptom relief with minimal risk. The use of any pharmacological agent in the elderly should be tempered with caution regarding increased sensitivity to medications, drug-drug interactions and associated co-morbidities. Therefore, the elderly will often require down-adjustment of dosage and careful attention to the risk/benefit ratio of the treatment. There is, however, no single ideal pain medication for management of rheumatic pain. The four broad categories of treatments, namely simple analgesics (i.e. paracetamol [acetaminophen]), NSAIDs, stronger analgesics (i.e. opioids) and adjuvant drugs, each have unique and particular concerns regarding their adverse effect

  1. Hypercholesterolemia boosts joint destruction in chronic arthritis. An experimental model aggravated by foam macrophage infiltration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether hypercholesterolemia increases articular damage in a rabbit model of chronic arthritis. Methods Hypercholesterolemia was induced in 18 rabbits by administrating a high-fat diet (HFD). Fifteen rabbits were fed normal chow as controls. Chronic antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was induced in half of the HFD and control rabbits, previously immunized, by intra-articular injections of ovalbumin. After sacrifice, lipid and systemic inflammation markers were analyzed in blood serum. Synovium was analyzed by Krenn score, multinucleated cell counting, immunohistochemistry of RAM11 and CD31, and TNF-α and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) gene expression. Active bone resorption was assessed by protein expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and quantification of cathepsin K, contact surface and the invasive area of pannus into bone. Results Rabbits receiving the HFD showed higher total serum cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides and CRP levels than rabbits fed a normal diet. Synovitis score was increased in HFD, and particularly in AIA and AIA + HFD groups. AIA + HFD synovium was characterized by a massive infiltration of RAM11+ cells, higher presence of multinucleated foam cells and bigger vascularization than AIA. Cathepsin K+ osteoclasts and the contact surface of bone resorbing pannus were also increased in rabbits with AIA + HFD compared with AIA alone. Synovial TNF-α and MCP-1 gene expression was increased in AIA and HFD rabbits compared with healthy animals. RANKL protein expression in AIA and AIA + HFD groups was higher compared with either HFD or normal groups. Conclusions This experimental model demonstrates that hypercholesterolemia increments joint tissue damage in chronic arthritis, with foam macrophages being key players in this process. PMID:23941259

  2. Comparison between Local Injections of Silicone Oil and Hydrocortisone Acetate in Chronic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Mary; Seifert, Martin H.; Hacking, Celia; Webb, Sylvia

    1970-01-01

    One of three preparations—silicone oil, hydrocortisone acetate, and hydrocortisone acetate plus saline—was injected into 22 osteoarthritic and 49 rheumatoid knees. Silicone injected into stiff, dry, grating knees which were the site of chronic arthritis did not promote better movement than did hydrocortisone alone. Hydrocortisone plus saline, however, appeared to be more effective than silicone or hydrocortisone alone in increasing movement in rheumatoid knees. The maximum increase in movement was found to occur three weeks after each of the three different injection preparations. PMID:5411599

  3. Effects of TGFbeta1 and extracts from Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe on acute and chronic arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Woon; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kang, Bong-Seok; Kim, Dong-Soo; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-07-23

    To elucidate the pharmacological activities of deer antler acupuncture and TGF61538;1 on the acute and chronic phases of rheumatoid arthritis diseases. Polyarthritis rats were administered with TGF61538;1 and water extract of deer antler acupunture (DAA), prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe. TGF61538; (0.1 to 2 61549;g/animal) and DAA (5-100 61549;g/kg animal) were initiated 1 day before an arthritogenic dose of streptococcal cell wall fragments to see the effects on the joint swelling and distortion during the acute phase and the chronic phase of the disease. Arthritic index suppression of rat arthritis model was examined by TGF61538; and DAA administrations. TGF61538;1 and DAA diminished the polyarthritis development in rats. TGF61538; and DAA eliminated the joint swelling and distortion observed during the acute phase and the chronic phase of the disease. The TGF61538; and DAA suppressed the arthritis progress when administration was begun after acute phase of arthritis. Consistent with the inhibition of inflammatory cell recruitment into the synovium, TGF61538;1 and DAA reversed the leukocytosis associated with the chronic phase of the arthritis, respectively.

  4. A pilot evaluation of Arthritis Self-Management Program by lay leaders in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Kwan, Jackie; Chan, Patsy; Poon, Peter K K; Leung, Christine; Tam, Lai-Shan; Li, Edmund K; Kwok, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the efficacy of a community-based lay-led Arthritis Self-Management Program (ASMP) among patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and evaluate the effectiveness of "shared care collaboration" between hospital and community. We trained 17 lay leaders and recruited patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis via a new shared-care model between hospital rheumatology centers and community organizations. Participants were allocated to interventional group or a wait list control group. Evaluations were completed before, after (6 weeks), and 3 months after ASMP. We performed analysis of covariance with adjustment with age, sex, marital status, education, employment, duration of illness, and disability at baseline. A total of 65 participants and 32 controls completed the study. The mean (SD) age and duration of illness were 52.0 (11.4) and 5.6 (7.3) years, 90.7 % were female, 80.4 % had rheumatoid arthritis; 25.8, 53.6, and 12.4 % referrals were from hospitals, community organizations, and patient self-help groups, respectively. The interventional group had significantly less pain (p = 0.049 at 6 weeks), used more cognitive coping methods (p = 0.008 at 6 weeks, p = 0.041 at 3 months) and practiced more aerobic exercise (p = 0.049 at 6 weeks, p = 0.008 at 3 months) after adjustment of covariance. The interventional group had a trend of improvement in self-efficacy, fatigue, self-rated health, and health distress. A community-based lay-led ASMP showed positive beneficial effects on participants with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Shared-care collaboration between hospitals, community organizations, and patient self-help groups was demonstrated.

  5. The use of computed tomography to diagnose chronic shoulder arthritis in an American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Michelle C.; Parker, Dennilyn L.

    2015-01-01

    An American white pelican was presented with a complete left wing droop and no abnormal findings on conventional radiography. Computed tomography was used to diagnose chronic shoulder arthritis as a sequela to a suspected traumatic compressive fracture. This is the first case report to describe use of computed tomography to evaluate the avian shoulder joint. PMID:25750446

  6. Modeling best practices in chronic disease management: the Arthritis Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lorna; Mierdel, Sandra; Thorne, Carter

    2012-01-01

    Researchers, hospital administrators and governments are striving to define competencies in interprofessional care and education, as well as to identify effective models in chronic disease management. For more than 25 years The Arthritis Program (TAP) at Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket, Ontario, has actively practiced within these two interrelated priorities, which are now at the top of the healthcare agenda in Ontario and Canada. The approximately 135 different rheumatic conditions are the primary cause of long-term disability in Canada, affecting those from youth to the senior years, with an economic burden estimated at $4.4 billion (CAD$) annually, and growing. For the benefit of healthcare managers and their clients with chronic conditions, this article discusses TAP's history and demonstrable success, predicated on an educational model of patient self-management and self-efficacy. Also outlined are TAP's contributions in supporting evidence-based best practices in interprofessional collaboration and chronic disease management; approaches that are arguably understudied and under-practiced. Next steps for TAP include a larger role in empirical research in chronic-disease management and integration of a formal training program to benefit health professionals launching or expanding their interprofessional programs using TAP as the dynamic clinical example.

  7. [Value of procalcitonin measurement in the diagnosis of bacterial infections in patients with fever and flare of chronic gouty arthritis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jian; Long, Li; Zhou, Qiao; Cheng, Jia; Zhou, Bin

    2015-08-18

    We assessed serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels to distinguish bacterial infections from non-bacterial infections in patients with fever and flare of chronic gouty arthritis. One hundred febrile patients with chronic tophaceous gout flare-ups were collected consecutively between November 2011 and January 2014 from the Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital. These patients were divided into non-infectious febrile group (68 patients) and bacterial infectious febrile group (32 patients, including 6 cases of pulmonary infection, 3 cases of infectious arthritis and 21 cases of skin infection, 2 patients died from severe infection were excluded), and 30 patients with flare of chronic gouty arthritis without fever and infection. Serum PCT, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell (WBC) count and neutrophil ratio were determined. 57.3% (39/68) patients in the non-infectious febrile group had PCT levels ≥ 0.5 × 10³ ng/L and the ratio in the infectious febrile group was 66.7% (20/30) . No statistically significant difference was detected between them (P>0.05). 16.7% (5/30) patients had PCT levels ≥ 0.5 × 10³ ng/L in the afebrile group and both the differences between the afebrile group and the two febrile groups were significant (P<0.05). The differences of ESR, CRP, WBC count and neutrophil ratio between the two febrile groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). In the chronic gouty arthritis patients with fever, the sensitivity and specificity of high PCT level (≥ 0.5 × 10³ ng/L) for detection of bacterial infections was 33.9% and 74.4%, the positive predictive value was 36.9% and the negative predictive value was 71.9%. The area under the curve (AUC) of PCT, CRP, ESR, WBC count and neutrophil ratio in patients with fever and chronic gouty arthritis was 0.598, 0.636, 0.612, 0.596 and 0.727, respectively. Serum PCT levels may be not a good marker for detection of bacterial

  8. [Preference for etanercept pen versus syringe in patients with chronic arthritis. Nurse education workshop].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Diaz, Silvia; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Roig-Vilaseca, Daniel; Reina, Delia; Cerdà, Dacia; González, Marina; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Fíguls, Ramon; Corominas, Hèctor

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to evaluate the level of fear of post-injection pain prior to the administration, the difficulty in handling the device, and the level of satisfaction of patients using a pre-filled syringe versus an etanercept pen, as well as to evaluate the usefulness of the training given by nursing staff prior to starting with the pen, and the preferences of patients after using both devices. A prospective study was designed to follow-up a cohort of patients during a 6 months period. The data was collected using questionnaires and analyzed with SPSS 18.00. Rank and McNemar tests were performed. Statistical significance was pre-set at an α level of 0.05. A total of 29 patients were included, of whom 69% female, and with a mean age 52.5±10.9 years. Of these, 48% had rheumatoid arthritis, 28% psoriatic arthritis, 21% ankylosing spondylitis, and 3% undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy. There were no statistically significant differences either with the fear or pain or handling of the device between the syringe and the pen (P=.469; P=.812; P=.169 respectively). At 6 months, 59% of patients referred to being satisfied or very satisfied with the pen. Almost all (93%) found useful or very useful the training given by nursing staff prior to using the pen, and 55% preferred the pen over the pre-filled syringe. The etanercept pen is another subcutaneous device option for patients with chronic arthritis. According to the present study, nursing educational workshops before starting this therapy are recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychological predictors of pain severity, pain interference, depression, and anxiety in rheumatoid arthritis patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Seamus; McGuire, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic and progressive autoimmune disorder with symptoms sometimes including chronic pain and depression. The current study aimed to explore some of the psychological variables which predict both pain-related outcomes (pain severity and pain interference) and psychological outcomes (depression and anxiety) amongst patients with rheumatoid arthritis experiencing chronic pain. In particular, this study aimed to establish whether either self-concealment, or the satisfaction of basic psychological needs (autonomy, relatedness, and competence), could explain a significant portion of the variance in pain outcomes and psychological outcomes amongst this patient group. Online questionnaires were completed by 317 rheumatoid arthritis patients with chronic pain, providing data across a number of predictor and outcome variables. Hierarchical multiple linear regressions indicated that the predictive models for each of the four outcome variables were significant, and had good levels of fit with the data. In terms of individual predictor variables, higher relatedness significantly predicted lower depression, and higher autonomy significantly predicted lower anxiety. The model generated by this study may identify factors to be targeted by future interventions with the goal of reducing depression and anxiety amongst patients with rheumatoid arthritis experiencing chronic pain. The findings of this study have shown that the autonomy and the relatedness of patients with rheumatoid arthritis play important roles in promoting psychological well-being. Targeted interventions could help to enhance the lives of patients despite the presence of chronic pain. What is already known about the subject? Amongst a sample of chronic pain patients who primarily had a diagnosis of fibromyalgia, it was found that higher levels of self-concealment were associated with higher self-reported pain levels and reduced well-being (as measured by anxiety/depression), and these

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of heel pain in chronic inflammatory arthritis using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, G; Brophy, D P; Gibney, R G; FitzGerald, O

    1996-06-01

    The authors examined the role of ultrasound (US) in diagnosis and management of heel pain in chronic inflammatory arthritis. Nineteen patients underwent US examination. Eight patients (2 with previously unsuccessful nonguided injections), had 11 US-guided corticosteroid injections for treatment of retrocalcaneal bursitis (n = 6), plantar fasciitis (n = 3), and posterior tibial tenosynovitis (n = 2). US-demonstrated Achilles tendon rupture (n = 2), Achilles tendinitis (n = 8), posterior tibial tenosynovitis (n = 6), peroneus longus tenosynovitis (n = 2), retrocalcaneal bursitis (n = 13), and plantar fasciitis (n = 4). Loss of smooth bone contour (n = 13) correlated with bone erosions on plain radiographs in all but one case. Ten of 11 guided injections resulted in full resolution of heel pain. The diverse causes of heel pain are highlighted, and the ability of US to provide information with management implications is confirmed. US-guided corticosteroid injection is beneficial, especially after failure of nonguided injection.

  11. The Mechanisms Underlying Chronic Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis from the Perspective of the Epigenetic Landscape

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that is characterized by synovial hyperplasia and progressive joint destruction. The activation of RA synovial fibroblasts (SFs), also called fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), contributes significantly to perpetuation of the disease. Genetic and environmental factors have been reported to be involved in the etiology of RA but are insufficient to explain it. In recent years, accumulating results have shown the potential role of epigenetic mechanisms, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and microRNAs, in the development of RA. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate chromatin state and gene transcription without any change in DNA sequence, resulting in the alteration of phenotypes in several cell types, especially RASFs. Epigenetic changes possibly provide RASFs with an activated phenotype. In this paper, we review the roles of epigenetic mechanisms relevant for the progression of RA. PMID:28116320

  12. Autoantibodies in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis and their immediate family relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Southwood, T R; Roberts-Thomson, P J; Ahern, M J; Shepherd, K; McEvoy, R; Ziegler, J B; Edmonds, J

    1990-01-01

    Antibodies to nuclear antigens were assessed in 23 children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) and 66 of their first degree relatives. Serum samples from 16 patients with JCA (70%) and nine relatives (14%) had antinuclear antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Antibodies against nuclear antigens in rabbit thymus extract or an erythroblastoid cell line (K562) were detected by countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis and immunoblotting in 16 patients (70%) and 39 family relatives (59%). Immunoblotting did not show any banding patterns common to all patients with JCA, though bands in the 43-45 kD range were detected in 5/23 patients. Anticardiolipin antibodies were found in 7/23 patients. In total, 18/20 families (90%) had members other than the probands with detectable autoantibodies. In five families immunoblotting showed common banding patterns between the probands and other members. This suggests that there might be an inherited trend towards autoimmune responses in some families of patients with JCA. PMID:2270968

  13. Determination of salicylic acid by HPLC in plasma and saliva from children with juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M E; Acitores, E; Valverde, F

    1992-12-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for measuring salicylic acid in the plasma and saliva of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). Samples were extracted with diethyl ether and, after drying, redissolved in methanol to be chromatographed. Quantitation of salicylic acid was performed by reverse phase HPLC on a spherisorb ODS-2 column, using methanol: water: acetic acid as mobile phase. Phenolic was monitored by absorbance at 237 nm. Linearity between the amount of mass injected and the response in the detector was determined. This method was applied to compare concentrations of salivary and plasma salicylic acid. The method also permitted the quantitation of salivary salicylate as a non-invasive, indirect method for monitoring the concentration of plasma salicylate in patients with JCA.

  14. Monoarticular Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Vogelgesang, Scott A

    2017-05-01

    Monoarticular arthritis is inflammation characterized by joint pain, swelling, and sometimes periarticular erythema. Although chronic causes are seen, the onset is often acute. An infected joint can quickly lead to permanent damage, making it a medical emergency. However, acute gout presenting as monoarticular arthritis is often so uncomfortable it requires urgent attention. Monoarticular crystalline arthritis is common and a septic joint is a medical emergency so it is no surprise that these diagnoses come to mind with complaint of inflammation in 1 joint. However, there are many causes of monoarticular arthritis that clinicians must consider. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... following conditions increase your risk for septic arthritis: Artificial joint implants Bacterial infection somewhere else in your body Presence of bacteria in your blood Chronic illness or disease (such as diabetes, rheumatoid ...

  16. Switching TNF antagonists in patients with chronic arthritis: an observational study of 488 patients over a four-year period

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Carmona, Loreto

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze the survival of infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab in patients who have switched among tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists for the treatment of chronic arthritis. BIOBADASER is a national registry of patients with different forms of chronic arthritis who are treated with biologics. Using this registry, we have analyzed patient switching of TNF antagonists. The cumulative discontinuation rate was calculated using the actuarial method. The log-rank test was used to compare survival curves, and Cox regression models were used to assess independent factors associated with discontinuing medication. Between February 2000 and September 2004, 4,706 patients were registered in BIOBADASER, of whom 68% had rheumatoid arthritis, 11% ankylosing spondylitis, 10% psoriatic arthritis, and 11% other forms of chronic arthritis. One- and two-year drug survival rates of the TNF antagonist were 0.83 and 0.75, respectively. There were 488 patients treated with more than one TNF antagonist. In this situation, survival of the second TNF antagonist decreased to 0.68 and 0.60 at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Survival was better in patients replacing the first TNF antagonist because of adverse events (hazard ratio (HR) for discontinuation 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34–0.84)), and worse in patients older than 60 years (HR 1.10 (95% CI 0.97–2.49)) or who were treated with infliximab (HR 3.22 (95% CI 2.13–4.87)). In summary, in patients who require continuous therapy and have failed to respond to a TNF antagonist, replacement with a different TNF antagonist may be of use under certain situations. This issue will deserve continuous reassessment with the arrival of new medications. PMID:16507128

  17. Significance of Circulating and Crevicular Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 in Rheumatoid Arthritis-Chronic Periodontitis Association

    PubMed Central

    Silosi, Isabela; Cojocaru, Manole; Foia, Lili; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Petrescu, Florin; Biciusca, Viorel

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, statistically significant associations between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease have been identified. Emerging as a chronic inflammatory joint disease, RA displays various features and pathogenetic events similar to chronic periodontitis (CP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of determining systemic and crevicular levels of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) as potential biomarkers for association between RA and CP. A total of fifty-six patients were included in the study. The subjects were categorized into four groups as follows: healthy-control (n = 21), active RA (n = 16), CP (n = 14), and RA-CP association (n = 12). Assessment of serum and crevicular concentrations of total MMP-9 (active and pro-MMP-9) was based on ELISA technique. The results of this study showed statistically significant differences of serum MMP-9 between patients groups and control. Serum levels of MMP-9 were similar in RA and RA-CP associated patients. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) recorded increased MMP-9 levels in RA-CP association subjects as compared to CP. Considering that RA-CP association is characterized by a disregulation of the inflammatory response, MMP-9 may play a role in the pathogenesis of RA-CP association. MMP-9 is therefore a sensitive tool in the diagnosis and management of patients affected by this binomial association. PMID:25821836

  18. Psychological Distress in Out-Patients Assessed for Chronic Pain Compared to Those with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rice, D.; Mehta, S.; Shapiro, A.; Pope, J.; Harth, M.; Morley-Forster, P.; Sequeira, K.; Teasell, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients diagnosed with chronic pain (CP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) represent two samples with overlapping symptoms, such as experiencing significant pain. Objectives. To compare the level of psychological distress among patients diagnosed CP attending a specialist pain clinic with those attending a specialist RA clinic. Measures. A cross-sectional study was conducted at an academic specialist chronic pain and rheumatology clinic. Participants. 330 participants included a CP group (n = 167) and a RA group (n = 163) completed a booklet of questionnaires regarding demographic characteristics, duration, and severity of their pain. Psychological and personality variables were compared between the CP and RA participants using a Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA). Results. Level of psychological distress based on the subscales of the DASS (depression, anxiety, and stress), PASS (escape avoidance, cognitive anxiety, fear of pain, and physiological anxiety), and PCS (rumination, magnification, and helplessness) was significantly higher in the CP group compared to the RA group. Categorization of individuals based on DASS severity resulted in significant differences in rates of depression and anxiety symptoms between groups, with a greater number of CP participants displaying more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms. Discussion and Conclusions. This study found greater levels of psychological distress among CP individuals referred to an academic pain clinic when compared to RA patients referred to an academic rheumatology clinic. PMID:27445623

  19. Effect of chronic periodontitis on oxidative status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Ufuk; Erciyas, Kamile; Ustün, Kemal; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Şenyurt, Süleyman Ziya; Aksoy, Nurten; Tarakçıoğlu, Mehmet; Taysı, Seyithan; Onat, Ahmet Mesut

    2013-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic periodontitis (CP) are the most common chronic inflammatory diseases and have remarkable similar pathologies. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of periodontal status on oxidative stress in patients with RA by evaluating serum oxidative parameters and prolidase levels. For this cross-sectional comparative study, the following four groups were composed of 20 individuals each (80 individuals total): 1) RA with CP (RA-CP group); 2) RA but periodontally healthy (RA-C group); 3) systemically healthy with CP (CP group); and 4) systemically and periodontally healthy (C group). Demographic, periodontal, rheumatological, and serum oxidative parameters as determined by serum total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, oxidative stress index (OSI), lipid hydroperoxide levels, paraoxonase, arylesterase, and ceruloplasmin activity, prolidase level, and total sulfhydryl groups were evaluated. The OSI values of the RA-CP group were statistically significantly higher than those of the C group (P <0.05). The prolidase levels of the RA-C, RA-CP groups and the CP group were statistically higher than those of the C group (P = 0.001, P = 0.007, and P = 0.001, respectively). Although CP and RA each increase oxidative stress, in a small sample size these effects are only significant when both CP and RA are combined relative to neither exposure. In addition, increased prolidase levels in patients with RA and CP may be related to increased oxidative tissue damage.

  20. Marked QTc Prolongation and Torsades de pointes in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo; Bertolozzi, Iacopo; Morozzi, Gabriella; Lorenzini, Sauro; Simpatico, Antonella; Selvi, Enrico; Bacarelli, Maria Romana; Acampa, Maurizio; Lazaro, Deana; El-Sherif, Nabil; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Laghi-Pasini, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that in chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA), QTc prolongation is frequent and correlates with systemic inflammatory activation. Notably, basic studies demonstrated that inflammatory cytokines induce profound changes in potassium and calcium channels resulting in a prolonging effect on cardiomyocyte action potential duration, thus on the QT interval on the electrocardiogram. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the risk of sudden cardiac death is significantly increased when compared to non-RA subjects. Conversely, to date no data are available about torsades de pointes (TdP) prevalence in CIA, and the few cases reported considered CIA only an incidental concomitant disease, not contributing factor to TdP development. We report three patients with active CIA developing marked QTc prolongation, in two cases complicated with TdP degenerating to cardiac arrest. In these patients, a blood sample was obtained within 24 h from TdP/marked QTc prolongation occurrence, and levels of IL-6, TNFα, and IL-1 were evaluated. In all three cases, IL-6 was markedly elevated, ~10 to 100 times more than reference values. Moreover, one patient also showed high circulating levels of TNFα and IL-1. In conclusion, active CIA may represent a currently overlooked QT-prolonging risk factor, potentially contributing in the presence of other “classical” risk factors to TdP occurrence. In particular, a relevant role may be played by elevated circulating IL-6 levels via direct electrophysiological effects on the heart. This fact should be carefully kept in mind, particularly when recognizable risk factors are already present and/or the addition of QT-prolonging drugs is required. PMID:27703966

  1. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  2. Striatal opioid receptor availability is related to acute and chronic pain perception in arthritis: does opioid adaptation increase resilience to chronic pain?

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Matthews, Julian; Fairclough, Michael; McMahon, Adam; Barnett, Elizabeth; Al-Kaysi, Ali; El-Deredy, Wael; Jones, Anthony K P

    2015-11-01

    The experience of pain in humans is modulated by endogenous opioids, but it is largely unknown how the opioid system adapts to chronic pain states. Animal models of chronic pain point to upregulation of opioid receptors (OpR) in the brain, with unknown functional significance. We sought evidence for a similar relationship between chronic pain and OpR availability in humans. Using positron emission tomography and the radiotracer (11)C-diprenorphine, patients with arthritis pain (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 9) underwent whole-brain positron emission tomography scanning to calculate parametric maps of OpR availability. Consistent with the upregulation hypothesis, within the arthritis group, greater OpR availability was found in the striatum (including the caudate) of patients reporting higher levels of recent chronic pain, as well as regions of interest in the descending opioidergic pathway including the anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. The functional significance of striatal changes were clarified with respect to acute pain thresholds: data across patients and controls revealed that striatal OpR availability was related to reduced pain perception. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic pain may upregulate OpR availability to dampen pain. Finally, patients with arthritis pain, compared with healthy controls, had overall less OpR availability within the striatum specifically, consistent with the greater endogenous opioid binding that would be expected in chronic pain states. Our observational evidence points to the need for further studies to establish the causal relationship between chronic pain states and OpR adaptation.

  3. Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Chronic Pain Display Enhanced Alpha Power Density at Rest.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Francisco M; Queirós, Fernanda C; Montoya, Pedro; Miranda, José G V; Dubois-Mendes, Selena M; Sá, Katia N; Luz-Santos, Cleber; Baptista, Abrahão F

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain due to neuropathy or musculoskeletal injury frequently exhibit reduced alpha and increased theta power densities. However, little is known about electrical brain activity and chronic pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For this purpose, we evaluated power densities of spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) band frequencies (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) in females with persistent pain due to RA. This was a cross-sectional study of 21 participants with RA and 21 healthy controls (mean age = 47.20; SD = 10.40). EEG was recorded at rest over 5 min with participant's eyes closed. Twenty electrodes were placed over five brain regions (frontal, central, parietal, temporal, and occipital). Significant differences were observed in depression and anxiety with higher scores in RA participants than healthy controls (p = 0.002). Participants with RA exhibited increased average absolute alpha power density in all brain regions when compared to controls [F (1.39) = 6.39, p = 0.016], as well as increased average relative alpha power density [F (1.39) = 5.82, p = 0.021] in all regions, except the frontal region, controlling for depression/anxiety. Absolute theta power density also increased in the frontal, central, and parietal regions for participants with RA when compared to controls [F (1, 39) = 4.51, p = 0.040], controlling for depression/anxiety. Differences were not exhibited on beta and delta absolute and relative power densities. The diffuse increased alpha may suggest a possible neurogenic mechanism for chronic pain in individuals with RA.

  4. Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Chronic Pain Display Enhanced Alpha Power Density at Rest

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Francisco M.; Queirós, Fernanda C.; Montoya, Pedro; Miranda, José G. V.; Dubois-Mendes, Selena M.; Sá, Katia N.; Luz-Santos, Cleber; Baptista, Abrahão F.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain due to neuropathy or musculoskeletal injury frequently exhibit reduced alpha and increased theta power densities. However, little is known about electrical brain activity and chronic pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). For this purpose, we evaluated power densities of spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) band frequencies (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) in females with persistent pain due to RA. This was a cross-sectional study of 21 participants with RA and 21 healthy controls (mean age = 47.20; SD = 10.40). EEG was recorded at rest over 5 min with participant's eyes closed. Twenty electrodes were placed over five brain regions (frontal, central, parietal, temporal, and occipital). Significant differences were observed in depression and anxiety with higher scores in RA participants than healthy controls (p = 0.002). Participants with RA exhibited increased average absolute alpha power density in all brain regions when compared to controls [F(1.39) = 6.39, p = 0.016], as well as increased average relative alpha power density [F(1.39) = 5.82, p = 0.021] in all regions, except the frontal region, controlling for depression/anxiety. Absolute theta power density also increased in the frontal, central, and parietal regions for participants with RA when compared to controls [F(1, 39) = 4.51, p = 0.040], controlling for depression/anxiety. Differences were not exhibited on beta and delta absolute and relative power densities. The diffuse increased alpha may suggest a possible neurogenic mechanism for chronic pain in individuals with RA. PMID:27540360

  5. Gratitude uniquely predicts lower depression in chronic illness populations: A longitudinal study of inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sirois, Fuschia M; Wood, Alex M

    2017-02-01

    Although gratitude has been identified as a key clinically relevant trait for improving well-being, it is understudied within medical populations. The current study addressed this gap and extended previous and limited cross-sectional research by examining the longitudinal associations of gratitude to depression in 2 chronic illness samples, arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Two chronic illness samples, arthritis (N = 423) and IBD (N = 427), completed online surveys at Time 1 (T1). One hundred sixty-three people with arthritis and 144 people with IBD completed the 6-month follow-up survey (T2). Depression, gratitude, illness cognitions, perceived stress, social support, and disease-related variables were assessed at T1 and T2. At T2, 57.2% of the arthritis sample and 53.4% of the IBD sample met the cut off scores for significant depression. T1 gratitude was negatively associated with depressive symptoms at T1 and T2 in both samples (rs from -.43 to -.50). Regression analyses revealed that T1 gratitude remained a significant and unique predictor of lower T2 depression after controlling for T1 depression, relevant demographic variables, illness cognitions, changes in illness-relevant variables, and another positive psychological construct, thriving, in both samples. As the first investigation of the longitudinal associations of gratitude to psychological well-being in the context of chronic illness, the current study provides important evidence for the relevance of gratitude for health-related clinical populations. Further intervention-based research is warranted to more fully understand the potential benefits of gratitude for adjustment to chronic illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Current perspective on the role of the interleukin-23/interleukin-17 axis in inflammation and disease (chronic arthritis and psoriasis).

    PubMed

    Cauli, Alberto; Piga, Matteo; Floris, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    TH17 is a lymphocyte subset, which is characterized by its polarization to secrete interleukin (IL)-17. IL-23 is the pivotal mediator responsible for TH17 differentiation and the IL-23/IL-17 axis has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of several immune mediated diseases, in particular chronic arthritis and skin psoriasis. This review will summarize the basic immunology and the new monoclonal antibodies, which antagonize this pathway allowing a new therapeutic approach.

  7. Robust Therapeutic Efficacy of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Cleavable Fas-1-RGD Peptide Complex in Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Keum Hee; Sung, Shijin; Park, Jae Yong; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, In San; Kang, Young Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Therapeutic agents that are transformable via introducing cleavable linkage by locally enriched MMP-2 within inflamed synovium would enhance therapeutic efficacy on chronic inflammatory arthritis. Transforming growth factor-β-inducible gene-h3 (βig-h3), which consists of four fas-1 domains and an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif, intensifies inflammatory processes by facilitating adhesion and migration of fibroblast-like synoviocyte in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether a MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex consisting of a fas-1 domain and an RGD peptide blocks the interaction between βig-h3 and resident cells and leads to the amelioration of inflammatory arthritis. Methods We designed βig-h3-derivatives, including the fourth fas-1 domain truncated for H1 and H2 sequences of mouse (MFK00) and MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex (MFK902). MMP-2 selectivity was examined by treatment with a series of proteases. MFK902 efficacy was determined by the adhesion and migration assay with NIH3T3 cells in vitro and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model using male DBA/1J mice in vivo. The mice were treated intraperitoneally with MFK902 at different dosages. Results MFK902 was specifically cleaved by active MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner, and βig-h3-mediated adhesion and migration were more effectively inhibited by MFK902, compared with RGD or MFK00 peptides. The arthritis activity of murine CIA, measured by clinical arthritis index and incidence of arthritic paws, was significantly ameliorated after treatment with all dosages of MFK902 (1, 10, and 30 mg/kg). MFK902 ameliorated histopathologic deterioration and reduced the expression of inflammatory mediators simultaneously with improvement of clinical features. In addition, a favorable safety profile of MFK902 was demonstrated in vivo. Conclusion The present study revealed that MMP-2-cleavable peptide complex based on βig-h3 structure is a potent and safe

  8. Challenges associated with the management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Rodolfo V; Guzman, Nicolas J

    2012-10-01

    As many as half of all patients with gouty arthritis have some degree of renal impairment. The goal of this systematic review is to provide physicians with a comprehensive examination of available data on the risks and benefits of gouty arthritis treatment options when used in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a systematic literature review to determine what information is available to guide treatment decisions in this patient population. PubMed was searched for English-language articles indexed through July 2011 containing the terms "gout" or "hyperuricemia" and synonyms for renal impairment in combination with drug names. Publications were deemed relevant if they reported results from clinical studies, case reports, or prescribing practices of the drug of interest in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are oftentimes not considered appropriate in patients with CKD. Corticosteroids may be an effective alternative in this population; however, their efficacy has not been confirmed in randomized controlled trials and these agents can cause serious side effects. Allopurinol can be used for the prophylactic management of chronic hyperuricemia in patients with CKD, but the recommended decreased dosage may limit efficacy and serious hypersensitivity reactions may preclude its use. Febuxostat and pegloticase are new treatment options for chronic urate-lowering prophylaxis; however, the safety of these drugs in patients with advanced CKD has not yet been reported. There is currently an unmet need for additional treatment options for the management of gouty arthritis in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Rare Case of Cardiac Tamponade Induced by Chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Tariq; Kramer, Jason; Kopiec, Adam; Bulwa, Zachary; Sanyal, Shuvani; Ziffra, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease primarily involving the joint synovium. RA is a systemic disease which has many known extra-articular manifestations. We present a unique case of a patient with long standing RA who presented with a primary complaint of chest and back pain. Echocardiography revealed borderline normal left ventricular function and a large pericardial effusion with the finding of elevated intrapericardial pressure suspicious for cardiac tamponade. Infectious workup was all found to be negative. The presence and elevation of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein (CRP) confirmed the patient was having an active flare-up of RA. It was determined that this flare-up was the cause of the cardiac tamponade. A pericardiocentesis was performed and 850 mL of bloody fluid was drained. The patient remained stable following the pericardiocentesis. At his follow-up visit, repeat echocardiogram showed no signs for pericardial effusion. Although there has been extensive study of RA, there are only a few documented cases noting the occurrence of cardiac tamponade in these patients. Therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of and recognize this potentially serious cardiac outcome associated with a common rheumatologic condition.

  10. Homeopathic drug therapy. Homeopathy in Chikungunya Fever and Post-Chikungunya Chronic Arthritis: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Gyandas G

    2013-07-01

    To observe the effect of homeopathic therapy in Chikungunya Fever (CF) and in Post-Chikungunya Chronic Arthritis (PCCA) in a primary health care setting. A prospective observational study was conducted at Delhi Government Homeopathic Dispensary, Aali Village, New Delhi, India, for a period of 6 months, from 1st October 2010 to 31st March 2011. 126 patients (75 CF, 51 PCCA) were enrolled based on predefined inclusion criteria. A single homeopathic medicine was prescribed for each patient after case taking with the help of Materia Medica and/or Repertory. Results were evaluated on the basis of visual analogue scale and symptom scores. Complete recovery was seen in 84.5% CF cases in a mean time of 6.8 days. 90% cases of PCCA recovered completely in a mean time of 32.5 days. Homeopathic therapy may be effective in CF and PCCA. A randomized controlled trial should be considered. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The extent of leprosy-related disabilities in Istanbul Leprosy Hospital, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cakiner, T; Yüksel, A; Eğït, A S; Cağri, G; Karaçorlu, M; Kültür, A

    1997-03-01

    This study was carried out between January and December 1992 at the Istanbul Leprosy Hospital. Seven hundred and eleven leprosy patients were evaluated according to their age, gender and type of disease and disability according to the WHO disability grading system (1980). There were 527 males (74.2%) and 184 females (25.8%) in the group. The average age was 50.0 +/- 13.5 years and the average duration of disease was 25.9 +/- 13.2 years. Six hundred and seventy-eight patients (95.4%) were in borderline (BL) and lepromatous (LL) leprosy. The extent of disabilities was very high in 711 leprosy patients. It was found that 539 of the patients (75.8%) had eye disabilities, 511 of them (71.8%) had hand disabilities, 521 of them (73.3%) had foot disabilities. The most frequent eye, hand and foot disabilities were a decrease of vision (52.7), acute or chronic iridocyclitis (48.8%), slightly-marked corneal sensory loss (43.2%), mobile claw hand (33.3%), palmar insensitivity (16.3%), plantar ulcer (37.2%) and plantar insensitivity (19.8%). Eye deformities were the most common of the three affected areas in this study.

  12. Inflammation as a Risk of Developing Chronic Kidney Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kochi, Masako; Kohagura, Kentaro; Shiohira, Yoshiki; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Ohya, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between chronic inflammation and the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remained not-clear in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study aims to examine the relationship between persistently high C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and the incidence of CKD in RA. We retrospectively examined the relationship between the levels of CRP and incidence of CKD in 345 RA patients. The outcome of interest was incidence of CKD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or positive dipstick testing for proteinuria for ≥3 months. We defined high CRP, as >3.0 mg/L. On the basis of three measurements of CRP for 6-months period, patients were divided into three groups: group 1, including patients with no high CRP values; group 2, patients with transient high CRP values (once or twice) and group 3, patients with persistently high CRP values. During a median follow-up period of 89 months, 14% of all patients developed CKD. The cumulative incidence of CKD was 7% in group 1, 14% in group 2 and 22% in group 3 (P = 0.008, log-rank test). In a multivariate analysis, including classical risk factors for CKD, persistently high CRP was an independent predictor of the incidence of CKD (hazard ratio, 3.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-8.53; P = 0.01). Persistently high CRP was a significant risk factor for the incidence of CKD. Results suggest that persistent inflammation is a marker for the high risk of CKD in RA.

  13. Inflammation as a Risk of Developing Chronic Kidney Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kochi, Masako; Kohagura, Kentaro; Shiohira, Yoshiki; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Ohya, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Objective The relationship between chronic inflammation and the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remained not-clear in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study aims to examine the relationship between persistently high C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and the incidence of CKD in RA. Methods We retrospectively examined the relationship between the levels of CRP and incidence of CKD in 345 RA patients. The outcome of interest was incidence of CKD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or positive dipstick testing for proteinuria for ≥3 months. We defined high CRP, as >3.0 mg/L. On the basis of three measurements of CRP for 6-months period, patients were divided into three groups: group 1, including patients with no high CRP values; group 2, patients with transient high CRP values (once or twice) and group 3, patients with persistently high CRP values. Results During a median follow-up period of 89 months, 14% of all patients developed CKD. The cumulative incidence of CKD was 7% in group 1, 14% in group 2 and 22% in group 3 (P = 0.008, log-rank test). In a multivariate analysis, including classical risk factors for CKD, persistently high CRP was an independent predictor of the incidence of CKD (hazard ratio, 3.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.23–8.53; P = 0.01). Conclusions Persistently high CRP was a significant risk factor for the incidence of CKD. Results suggest that persistent inflammation is a marker for the high risk of CKD in RA. PMID:27537204

  14. Aggressive periodontitis and chronic arthritis: blood mononuclear cell gene expression and plasma protein levels of cytokines and cytokine inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Lars K; Havemose-Poulsen, Anne; Bendtzen, Klaus; Holmstrup, Palle

    2009-02-01

    Cytokines and cytokine inhibitors have been associated with many immunoinflammatory diseases. In the present study, we examined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression mirrors the corresponding plasma levels of clinically important pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors in patients with periodontitis and patients with arthritis representing two examples of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis and arthritis. To identify possible disease-specific characteristics of subjects with periodontitis relative to subjects with chronic inflammation in general, patients with arthritis (juvenile idiopathic arthritis [JIA] and rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) were included. The study population consisted of white adults <35 years of age diagnosed with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP; n = 18), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP; n = 27), JIA (n = 10), and RA (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 25). PBMC transcripts of interleukin (IL) 1 alpha (IL1A), IL 1 beta (IL1B), IL 1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN), IL6, IL10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA), TNF alpha receptor I (TNFRI), and TNFRII were measured using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and compared to the corresponding plasma protein levels measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a multiplex antibody bead assay. Compared to controls, soluble (s) TNF-RII levels were significantly elevated in patients with GAgP (P = 0.001) or JIA (P = 0.002), and PBMC TNFA transcript levels were lower in patients with JIA (P = 0.001). A negative correlation was found between IL6 expression and IL-6 plasma levels in patients with JIA versus controls, and a positive correlation/association was found between TNFRI expression and sTNF-RI plasma levels in patients with LAgP and RA. The study demonstrated only a few changes in the PBMC expression of various cytokine and cytokine inhibitor genes in aggressive periodontitis and chronic arthritis

  15. Characteristics of chronic arthritis and other rheumatic condition-related ambulatory care visits, united states, 1997.

    PubMed

    Hootman; Helmick; Schappert

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize ambulatory medical care visits among persons with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions, the leading cause of disability.METHODS: The 1997 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) collect annual data on the utilization of ambulatory medical services provided by non-federal office-based physicians and hospital outpatient and emergency departments. Arthritis-related visits were defined using a predetermined set of ICD9-CM diagnostic codes developed by an expert panel and designed to include all potential diagnoses for arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. Visits related to acute conditions such as injuries were not included. National estimates and rates of arthritis-related ambulatory care visits were calculated by age, race, and sex groups.RESULTS: In 1997, there were an estimated 959.3 million ambulatory care visits, of which over 38 million (4.0%) were related to arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. Arthritis-related visits were more likely to be made by females (65.4%), white persons (82.2%), non-Hispanic persons (72.7%) and persons aged 25-64 years (61.9%). More than one-third of arthritis-related visits were for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and unspecified myalgia/myositis. About half (50.2%) of the office visits for arthritis were made to general/family physicians or internists, while an additional 16.2% were to rheumatologists. Counseling or education related to exercise, diet/nutrition and injury prevention were provided at 18.9%, 9.2% and 2.2% of office and outpatient department visits respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Arthritis and other rheumatic conditions are common conditions associated with ambulatory medical care. These results suggest missed opportunities for counseling patients regarding public health prevention messages for arthritis, including increasing moderate physical activity, weight management and injury prevention.

  16. Protection of chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia against collagen-induced arthritis in rat through increasing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Cui, Fang; Liu, Ai-Jing; Li, Jiao; Ma, Hui-Juan; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2011-04-25

    The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIHH) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rat. Fifty male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: CIHH pre-treatment group (Pre-T), pre-control group (Pre-C), CIHH post-treatment group (Post-T), post-control group (Post-C) and blank control group (Con). The rats in Pre-T and Post-T groups were exposed to 28 d of hypobaric hypoxia (simulated 3 000 m altitude, 5 h per day, pO2 = 108.8 mmHg, 14% O2) in a hypobaric chamber before and 12 days after CIA induction, respectively. The rats in Pre-C and Post-C groups were only experienced CIA induction, being control groups for Pre-T and Post-T groups, respectively. The rats in Con group were not given any treatment. The thickness of two-hind paw of rat was measured with spiral micrometer and the degree of arthritis was evaluated by arthritis index (AI). Morphological changes of ankle joint were observed through HE staining. The apoptotic rate in synovial tissue was measured by terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and the apoptotic rate of CD3(+) T lymphocyte in spleen was measured by flow cytometry technique. The protein expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were measured using immunohistochemistry SP method. The results showed that incidence rate of CIA in Pre-T rats was lower than that in Pre-C rats (P < 0.05). AI in Pre-T and Post-T rats were smaller than those in Pre-C and Post-C, respectively (P < 0.05). In Pre-C and Post-C rats, there were hyperplasia of synovial cell, pannus forming, infiltration with inflammatory cell, and destroyed cartilage and bone in ankle joint. On the contrary, pathological changes of ankle joint were alleviated significantly in Pre-T and Post-T rats. Compared with Pre-C and Post-C rats, apoptotic rates of synovial cell and T lymphocyte in Pre-T and Post-T rats were increased (P < 0.05). As to the possible anti-apoptosis mechanism, CIHH, no matter before and after CIA induction

  17. A case of septic arthritis caused by a Mycoplasma salivarium strain resistant towards Ciprofloxacin and Clarithromycin in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Büchsel, Martin; Pletschen, Lars; Fleiner, Michael; Häcker, Georg; Serr, Annerose

    2016-09-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium is a rare agent of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of septic arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia who underwent chemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustin. Therapy of arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium is difficult because there are almost no susceptibility data available. The present case illustrates that antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma strains is not necessarily predictable and that antibiotic therapy should therefore be guided by in vitro susceptibility testing.

  18. Hypouricemic and arthritis relapse-reducing effects of compound tufuling oral-liquid in intercritical and chronic gout

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhijun; Wu, Huaxiang; Jing, Xiaoqing; Li, Xiuyang; Li, Yasong; Han, Yongmei; Gao, Xiangfu; Tang, Xiaopo; Sun, Jing; Fan, Yongshen; Wen, Chengping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Trial Design: In the double-blind, randomized, controlled trial, we aimed to evaluate the effects of compound tufuling oral liquid (CoTOL) on serum uric acid (sUA) levels and recurrence of acute gouty arthritis in intercritical and chronic gout treatment. Methods: A total of 210 patients with gout were screened from 8 hospitals to observe the sUA and acute gouty arthritis recurrence rate-reducing effects of CoTOL in intercritical and chronic gout during a 12-week treatment. We treated 139 and 71 patients with CoTOL and the placebo, respectively, and evaluated their sUA levels, acute gouty arthritis recurrence rate, and adverse events at week 0, 6, and 12. Results: Twenty-five and 12 patients in the treatment and control groups, respectively, had interrupted treatments, whereas 114 and 59 cases, respectively, completed their treatments. At the end of the 12-week treatment, the average decrease in sUA was 74.26 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.74–91.77 μmol/L) and 28.81 μmol/L (95% CI: 4.91–52.71 μmol/L) in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.004). The average decrease rate of sUA was 12.76% (95% CI: 9.82%–15.70%) and 4.57% (95% CI: 0.42%–8.71%) in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.004), and the gouty arthritis recurrence rate of the treatment group was lower than that of the control group (from week 6 to 12, 21.93% and 50.88% in the treatment and control group, respectively, P < 0.001; from baseline to week 12, 38.5% and 63.16%, respectively, P = 0.003). Severe adverse events were not observed in either groups, and fewer leucopenia incidences were observed in the treatment group than those in the control group (3/139 vs. 7/71, respectively, P = 0.033). Conclusion: CoTOL reduced sUA levels and effectively prevented acute arthritis recurrence in intercritical and chronic gout without serious adverse events. PMID:28296744

  19. Psychological, behavioural, and social adjustment in children and adolescents with juvenile chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Huygen, A; Kuis, W; Sinnema, G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the psychological, behavioural and social adjustment of children (7-11 years) and adolescents (12-16 years) with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). Higher rates of maladjustment were expected to be found in these patients.
METHODS—Self report questionnaires were used within the context of personal interviews. Family functioning and social support were studied as well. Forty seven patients with JCA, 52 healthy peers and their respective parents participated in the study.
RESULTS—Self esteem, perceived competence and body image in patients with JCA were as positive as they were in healthy participants. There were no differences between ill and healthy youngsters with respect to the incidence of psychopathology. Patients with JCA, in general, perceived themselves as socially competent, but they seemed to have somewhat less opportunity or energy to participate in social activities. Children with JCA showed a high level of aspiration to cope with social expectations. This aspiration seemed to be even stronger in case the disease caused more strains, for example, in periods of inflammation and in the systemic onset type. The high level of social adjustment in children with JCA seemed to be supported by highly cohesive family structures. Generally, adolescents with JCA experienced much social support.
CONCLUSIONS—In contrast with our expectation, children and adolescents with JCA seemeed to cope quite well with the psychological and social consequences of their long term condition. For future studies, it is hypothesised that the high levels of adaptation might imply an enduring psychological strain, which is reflected in an altered function of the autonomic nervous system.

 PMID:10733474

  20. Nanomedicines for chronic non-infectious arthritis: The clinician’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Israel; Weinberg, Guy L.

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are prevalent chronic health conditions. However, despite recent advances in medical therapeutics, their treatment still represents an unmet medical need because of safety and efficacy concerns with currently prescribed drugs. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to develop and test new drugs for RA and OA that selectively target inflamed joints thereby mitigating damage to healthy tissues. Conceivably, biocompatible, biodegradable, disease-modifying antirheumatic nanomedicines (DMARNs) could represent a promising therapeutic approach for RA and OA. To this end, the unique physicochemical properties of drug-loaded nanocarriers coupled with pathophysiological characteristics of inflamed joints amplify bioavailability and bioactivity of DMARNs and promote their selective targeting to inflamed joints. This, in turn, minimizes the amount of drug required to control articular inflammation and circumvents collateral damage to healthy tissues. Thus, nanomedicine could provide selective control both in space and time of the inflammatory process in affected joints. However, bringing safe and efficacious DMARNs for RA and OA to the marketplace is challenging because regulatory agencies have no official definition of nanotechnology, and rules and definitions for nanomedicines are still being developed. Although existing toxicology tests may be adequate for most DMARNs, as new toxicity risks and adverse health effects derived from novel nanomaterials with intended use in humans are identified, additional toxicology tests would be required. Hence, we propose that detailed pre-clinical in vivo safety assessment of promising DMARNs leads for RA and OA, including risks to the general population, must be conducted before clinical trials begin. PMID:22640912

  1. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population.

    PubMed

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-31

    To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem to affect the results. Moderate periodontitis was more frequent in

  2. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population

    PubMed Central

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Design Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. Settings and participants The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Outcome measures Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Results Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem

  3. Association of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) with chronic plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rh Ll; Hébert, H L; Massey, J; Bowes, J; Marzo-Ortega, H; Ho, P; McHugh, N J; Worthington, J; Barton, A; Griffiths, C E M; Warren, R B

    2016-04-01

    Family studies have provided overwhelming evidence for an underlying genetic component to psoriasis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key transmembrane proteins in both the innate and adaptive immune responses which are known to be integral processes in psoriasis. Recent functional studies support this notion having suggested a role for TLR4 in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Furthermore a missense polymorphism in the TLR4 gene has been associated with a number of autoimmune conditions, including Crohn diseases, making TLR4 a viable candidate gene for investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate polymorphisms across the TLR4 region with a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel in a large cohort of patients with chronic plaque type psoriasis. Twenty SNPs were successfully genotyped using Sequenom iPLEX Gold platform in 2826 UK chronic plaque type psoriasis patients including subgroup data on presence of confirmed psoriatic arthritis (n = 1839) and early-onset psoriasis (n = 1466) was available. Allele frequencies for psoriasis patients were compared against imputed Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium controls (n = 4861). Significant association was observed between a missense variant rs4986790 of TLR4 (Asp229Gly) and plaque type psoriasis (p = 2 × 10(-4)) which was also notable in those with psoriatic arthritis (p = 2 × 10(-4)) and early-onset psoriasis (p = 8 × 10(-4)). We present data suggestive of an association between a functional variant and an intronic variant of TLR4 and chronic plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, validation of this association in independent cohorts will be necessary.

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  5. A Review of Persuasive Principles in Mobile Apps for Chronic Arthritis Patients: Opportunities for Improvement.

    PubMed

    Geuens, Jonas; Swinnen, Thijs Willem; Westhovens, Rene; de Vlam, Kurt; Geurts, Luc; Vanden Abeele, Vero

    2016-10-13

    Chronic arthritis (CA), an umbrella term for inflammatory rheumatic and other musculoskeletal diseases, is highly prevalent. Effective disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for CA are available, with the exception of osteoarthritis, but require a long-term commitment of patients to comply with the medication regimen and management program as well as a tight follow-up by the treating physician and health professionals. Additionally, patients are advised to participate in physical exercise programs. Adherence to exercises and physical activity programs is often very low. Patients would benefit from support to increase medication compliance as well as compliance to the physical exercise programs. To address these shortcomings, health apps for CA patients have been created. These mobile apps assist patients in self-management of overall health measures, health prevention, and disease management. By including persuasive principles designed to reinforce, change, or shape attitudes or behaviors, health apps can transform into support tools that motivate and stimulate users to achieve or keep up with target behavior, also called persuasive systems. However, the extent to which health apps for CA patients consciously and successfully employ such persuasive principles remains unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the number and type of persuasive principles present in current health apps for CA patients. A review of apps for arthritis patients was conducted across the three major app stores (Google Play, Apple App Store, and Windows Phone Store). Collected apps were coded according to 37 persuasive principles, based on an altered version of the Persuasive System Design taxonomy of Oinas-Kukkonen and Harjuma and the taxonomy of Behavior Change Techniques of Michie and Abraham. In addition, user ratings, number of installs, and price of the apps were also coded. We coded 28 apps. On average, 5.8 out of 37 persuasive principles were used in each app. The most

  6. A Review of Persuasive Principles in Mobile Apps for Chronic Arthritis Patients: Opportunities for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, Thijs Willem; Westhovens, Rene; de Vlam, Kurt; Geurts, Luc; Vanden Abeele, Vero

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic arthritis (CA), an umbrella term for inflammatory rheumatic and other musculoskeletal diseases, is highly prevalent. Effective disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for CA are available, with the exception of osteoarthritis, but require a long-term commitment of patients to comply with the medication regimen and management program as well as a tight follow-up by the treating physician and health professionals. Additionally, patients are advised to participate in physical exercise programs. Adherence to exercises and physical activity programs is often very low. Patients would benefit from support to increase medication compliance as well as compliance to the physical exercise programs. To address these shortcomings, health apps for CA patients have been created. These mobile apps assist patients in self-management of overall health measures, health prevention, and disease management. By including persuasive principles designed to reinforce, change, or shape attitudes or behaviors, health apps can transform into support tools that motivate and stimulate users to achieve or keep up with target behavior, also called persuasive systems. However, the extent to which health apps for CA patients consciously and successfully employ such persuasive principles remains unknown. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the number and type of persuasive principles present in current health apps for CA patients. Methods A review of apps for arthritis patients was conducted across the three major app stores (Google Play, Apple App Store, and Windows Phone Store). Collected apps were coded according to 37 persuasive principles, based on an altered version of the Persuasive System Design taxonomy of Oinas-Kukkonen and Harjuma and the taxonomy of Behavior Change Techniques of Michie and Abraham. In addition, user ratings, number of installs, and price of the apps were also coded. Results We coded 28 apps. On average, 5.8 out of 37 persuasive

  7. Effects of an eight-week physical conditioning program on disease signs and symptoms in children with chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Klepper, S E

    1999-02-01

    To investigate the effects of an 8-week, 24-session weight-bearing physical conditioning program on disease signs and symptoms in children with chronic arthritis. In a within-subjects, repeated measures design, 25 subjects, ages 8-17 years, with chronic polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), were assessed at study entry, after an 8-week control period, and after an 8-week exercise period, for 1) disease status, based on joint count (JC) and articular severity index (ASI) (sum of scores for joint swelling, pain on motion, tenderness, and limitations of motion); 2) worst pain during the past week, using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), and 3) aerobic endurance, using the 9-minute run-walk test of the Health Related Physical Fitness Test battery. The 60-minute conditioning program included warm-up (10 minutes), low-impact aerobics (25 minutes), strengthening (15 minutes), and cool-down and flexibility exercises (10 minutes). Subjects exercised twice a week at their rheumatology center and once a week at home, using a commercial exercise video-tape supplied by the investigator. Significant improvement was found in the ASI (Friedman analysis of variance [ANOVA]), JC, and 9-minute run-walk test (repeated measures ANOVA) from the pre- to post-exercise tests. Mean VAS pain scores decreased 16% from study entry to the post-exercise test. Statistically significant improvement (reliable change index > 1.96) occurred in 80% of subjects on the ASI and 72% on the JC. Children and adolescents with chronic polyarticular JRA can improve their aerobic endurance through participation in weight-bearing physical conditioning programs without disease exacerbation or increased pain, and may achieve decreased joint signs and symptoms through increased physical activity.

  8. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  9. A Case of Initially Undiagnosed Chikungunya Arthritis Developing into Chronic Phase in a Nonendemic Area

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Moon Ho

    2017-01-01

    This case report described a 40-year-old lady presented with fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, and impaired liver function after returning from the Philippines. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and dengue serology were negative. Eight weeks after initial presentation, she experienced inflammatory polyarthritis mimic rheumatoid arthritis. This time CHIKV-IgM was detected, together with a >4-fold rise of CHIKV-polyvalent-antibody titre. The first CHIKV-IgM negative sample was reexamined and was CHIKV-PCR positive. CHIKV infection was confirmed and diagnosis of CHIKV-related arthritis was made. A quarter of CHIKV infected individuals develop post-CHIKV rheumatisms that affect quality of life and may need treatment with Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs. This case highlights the importance of considering CHIKV infection in patients present with symmetrical polyarthritis particularly after travel to endemic regions. Testing of both CHIKV acute and convalescent-phase serum for CHIKV antibodies and PCR is recommended in suspicious case. PMID:28408930

  10. A rare case of pulmonary toxoplasmosis in a patient with undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis on chronic methotrexate and corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Abdulkareem, Abdullateef; D'Souza, Ryan Steven; Patel, Nitin; Donato, Anthony A

    2017-08-23

    Pulmonary toxoplasmosis is a serious pulmonary condition caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii It typically affects immunocompromised patients presenting acutely with cough, fever, myalgias, arthralgias and lymphadenopathy, and chronically with persistent cough and dyspnoea. Because of its protean features, it can mimic many more common lung conditions in the immunocompromised patient, including atypical pneumonia, Pneumocystis pneumonia and interstitial lung disease. In this article, we present the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with persistent dyspnoea and cough, initially suspected to have an arthritis-related interstitial lung disease. She received a final diagnosis of pulmonary toxoplasmosis after lung biopsy demonstrated Toxoplasma cysts, later confirmed by serology. Treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resulted in significant improvement of her respiratory symptoms after 3 months. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. [Chosen problems of mental functioning in patients with chronic systemic connective tissue diseases base on example of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Nasiłowska-Barud, Alicja; Żuk, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    Disorders in mental functioning are indicated as the cause of all connective tissue diseases and also as their consequences. That is why psychologist's help may be very important for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Psychological observations of patients with chronic systemic connective tissue diseases show a number of negative emotional states such as fear, anxiety, insecurity, depressed mood, depression, impatience, anger and a sense of loss These patients constantly experience pain of varying intensity and location. In many of them progressive disease leads to the advancement of mental crisis. Methods of psychological therapy must be focused on strenghtening mental resilience and helping in surviving mental crisis. Psychological therapy should concentrate on raising self-esteem, training interpersonal skills and teaching relaxation techniques to cope better with pain and suffering. Psychological therapy should support the patient in struggling with the problems caused by the disease and developing ways of adapting to life with the disease.

  12. Placement of a collagen glaucoma drainage device to control intraocular pressure and chronic iritis secondary to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Price, Francis W; Ziemba, Steven L

    2002-01-01

    A patient with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and chronic iritis is reported with intraocular pressure near 30 mm Hg and previous episodes of intraocular pressure as high as 50 mm Hg despite maximally tolerated medical therapy. Because of the potential risk involved with a full-thickness filtration procedure, it was decided that a nonpenetrating deep sclerectomy would be appropriate, followed by placement of a collagen glaucoma drainage device to maintain aqueous outflow. Immediately postoperatively, intraocular pressure was stabilized. At 24 months postoperatively, intraocular pressure was well controlled at 15 mm Hg with patient receiving only Lotemax. No significant complications were noted at any point in the postoperative course. Because of the patient's predisposition for serious complications frequently associated with trabeculectomy, nonpenetrating deep sclerectomy with the collagen glaucoma drainage device was an effective alternative for this patient.

  13. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  14. Characterization of chronic arthritis in a multicenter study of 852 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ana Paula; Silva, Clovis Artur; Ferriani, Mariana Paes Leme; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Bonfá, Eloisa; Saad-Magalhães, Claudia; Okuda, Eunice; Appenzeller, Simone; Gomes, Francisco Hugo; Cunha, Ana Luiza Garcia; Salume, Mirna Henriques Tomich; Piotto, Daniela Petry; Terreri, Maria Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Chronic arthritis (CA) is an unusual condition in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) and data in children is very limited. The aim of the study is to assess CA in a large population of cSLE patients, in a multicenter cross-sectional study including 852 cSLE patients followed in ten Pediatric Rheumatology referral services in state of São Paulo, Brazil. CA was observed in 32/852 (3.7 %) cSLE patients mostly in hands and ankles. Chronic monoarthritis was diagnosed in four cSLE patients, oligoarthritis in nine and polyarthritis in 19. In the latter group, six had rhupus syndrome. Two oligoarticular patients had Jaccoud's arthropathy. CA was an isolated manifestation observed at disease onset in 13/32 (41 %) cSLE patients, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was the first diagnosis in 18/32 (56 %). The comparison of last visit of patients with CA and without this manifestation revealed higher frequency of splenomegaly (28 vs. 11 %, p = 0.002). The median of SLICC/ACR-DI score [1(0-9) vs. 0(0-7), p = 0.003] was significantly higher in CA patients compared to patients without this manifestation, likewise the frequency of musculoskeletal damage (31 vs. 9 % p = 0.001). Frequencies of treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (75 vs. 26 %, p < 0.0001), hydroxychloroquine sulfate (87 vs. 59 %, p = 0.001) and methotrexate (47 vs. 22 %, p = 0.001) were significantly higher in CA patients. This large multicenter study allowed us to characterize CA as a rare and early manifestation of cSLE, frequently mimicking JIA at disease onset. It is predominantly polyarticular, involving more often hands and ankles and it is associated with significant musculoskeletal accrual damage.

  15. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  16. Juvenile chronic arthritis and the craniovertebral junction in the paediatric patient: review of the literature and management considerations.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Jasper F C; Arts, Mark P; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) is a systemic disease of childhood affecting particularly joints. JCA is a heterogeneous group of inflammatory joint disorders with onset before the age of 16 years and is comprised of 7 subtype groups. The pathogenesis of JCA seen in the cervical spine is synovial inflammation, hyperaemia, and pannus formation at the occipitoatlantoaxial joints resulting in characteristic craniovertebral junction findings. Treatment of craniovertebral junction instability as a result of JCA is a challenge. The best treatment strategy may be difficult because of various radiological and clinical severities. A review of the literature and management considerations is presented. No randomised controlled trial or systematic review on this subject has been published. Only experts' opinions, case reports, and case series have been described. Thirty-four studies have been reviewed in this study. Involvement of the cervical spine in patients with JCA can lead to pain and functional disability. The subtypes that usually affect the cervical spine are the polyarticular type and systemic onset type and rarely the pauciarticular type. The most common cervical spine changes related to JCA are as follows: (1) apophyseal joint ankylosis at C2-C3, (2) atlantoaxial subluxation, (3) atlantoaxial impaction, (4) atlantoaxial rotatory fixation, and (5) growth disturbances of the cervical spine. The incidence of severe subluxations has decreased in the last decade as result of antirheumatoid drugs and biologicals. However, neurological compromise still occurs in JCA patients necessitating surgical treatment. Whenever the cervical spine is involved in rheumatoid arthritis patients without neurological deficits, conservative treatment is legitimate. Once patients develop neurological signs and symptoms, surgical treatment should be considered with particular focus to age, severity of the disease, and general health condition. Skilled anaesthesia is crucial and the surgical

  17. Periodontal therapy in chronic periodontitis lowers gingival crevicular fluid interleukin-1beta and DAS28 in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Bıyıkoğlu, Başak; Buduneli, Nurcan; Aksu, Kenan; Nalbantsoy, Ayşe; Lappin, David F; Evrenosoğlu, Evren; Kinane, Denis F

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes and effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels in chronic periodontitis patients with/without rheumatoid arthritis (RA), fifteen RA patients with chronic periodontitis (RA-P) and 15 systemically healthy non-RA chronic periodontitis patients (H-P) were recruited. Clinical periodontal recordings, GCF, and blood samples were obtained at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months after periodontal treatment. GCF, serum IL-1β, TNF-α levels were analyzed by ELISA. Disease activity score 28 (DAS28) was used to assess RA clinical morbidity. Study groups were compared by Mann-Whitney U test. Wilcoxon test was used to compare the data at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months after periodontal therapy within the same group. DAS28 decreased significantly after periodontal therapy in RA-P group (p < 0.01). Serum TNF-α concentrations of H-P group were significantly higher than those of RA-P group (p < 0.01), whereas IL-1β levels were similar. No significant change was observed in serum levels of these cytokines after periodontal therapy. GCF IL-1β amounts decreased significantly in both groups following treatment (p < 0.01). At 6-months, H-P GCF IL-1β concentrations were significantly lower than baseline. DAS28 and GCF IL-1β correlated with clinical periodontal indices (p < 0.01). Significant decreases in DAS28 and GCF IL-1β amounts after periodontal treatment suggest that periodontal therapy synergizes with systemic RA therapy to improve RA status.

  18. Inflammatory biomarkers, disease activity index, and self-reported disability may be predictors of chronic arthritis after chikungunya infection: brief report.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Delgado, J; Vera-Lastra, O L; Trujillo-Murillo, K; Canseco-Ávila, L M; Sánchez-González, R A; Gómez-Cruz, O; Lugo-Trampe, A; Fernández-Salas, I; Danis-Lozano, R; Contreras-Contreras, A; Mendoza-Torres, A; Domínguez-Arrevillaga, S; Mena-Vela, B A; Ocaña-Sibilla, M; Ramirez-Valdespino, J C; Jara, L J

    2017-03-01

    The chikungunya virus (ChikV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that causes disabling chronic arthritis. The relationship between clinical evolution and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with ChikV-induced arthritis has not been fully described. We performed a prospective case series to evaluate the association among joint involvement, self-reported disability, and inflammatory biomarkers. Patients with ChikV infection were followed for 1 year. Joint involvement and self-reported disability were evaluated with disease activity index 28 (DAS-28) and World Health Organization Disablement Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS-II). Interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and rheumatoid factor (RF) were used as biomarkers. Ten patients with mean age 48 ±15.04 years were included. Symptoms at diagnosis were fever, arthralgias, myalgias, rash, arthritis, nausea, vomiting, and back pain. Polyarticular involvement was present in seven cases. At diagnosis, measures were as follows: DAS-28, 5.08±1.11; WHODAS-II score, 72.3±10.3 %; CRP, 5.09±7.23 mg/dL; ESR, 33.5±17.5 mm/h; RF, 64±21.7 IU/mL; and IL-6, 17.6±10.3 pg/mL. Six patients developed subacute and chronic symptoms. During follow-up, DAS-28 index, WHODAS-II score, ESR, and IL-6 were statistically different in patients with subacute and chronic symptoms compared to those who resolved in the acute phase (p < 0.05). DAS-28 index, WHODAS-II score, and IL-6 were related to chronicity of articular symptoms and could be used as predictors of ChikV-induced arthritis.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug May Not Ease Chronic Fatigue Syndrome After All

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug May Not Ease Chronic Fatigue Syndrome After All With disappointing study results, there's still no cure ... March 6, 2017 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2017 HealthDay . All rights reserved. News stories are written and provided ...

  20. Reactive arthritis or post-infectious arthritis?

    PubMed

    Hannu, Timo; Inman, Robert; Granfors, Kaisa; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta

    2006-06-01

    The term 'reactive arthritis' was first used in 1969 to describe the development of sterile inflammatory arthritis as a sequel to remote infection, often in the gastrointestinal or urogenital tract. The demonstration of antigenic material (e.g. Salmonella and Yersinia lipopolysaccharide), DNA and RNA, and, in occasional cases, evidence of metabolically active Chlamydia spp. in the joints has blurred the boundary between reactive and post-infectious forms of arthritis. No validated and generally agreed diagnostic criteria exist, but the diagnosis of reactive arthritis is mainly clinical based on acute oligoarticular arthritis of larger joints that develops within 2-4 weeks of the preceding infection. In about 25% of patients, the infection can be asymptomatic. Diagnosis of the triggering infection is very helpful for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis. This is mainly achieved by isolating the triggering infection (stools, urogenital tract) by cultures (stool cultures for enteric microbes) or ligase reaction (Chlamydia trachomatis). However, after the onset of arthritis, this is less likely to be possible. Therefore, the diagnosis must rely on various serological tests to demonstrate evidence of previous infection, but, these serological tests are unfortunately not standardized. Treatment with antibiotics to cure Chlamydia infection is important, but the use of either short or prolonged courses of antibiotics in established arthritis has not been found to be effective for the cure of arthritis. The long-term outcome of reactive arthritis is usually good; however, about 25-50% of patients, depending on the triggering infections and possible new infections, subsequently develop acute arthritis. About 25% of patients proceed to chronic spondyloarthritis of varying activity.

  1. Circulating anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deng-Ho; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Wang, Shou-Cheng; Wei, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2014-07-01

    Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody is highly specific for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Cigarette smoking is a lifestyle and environmental factor associated with anti-CCP production and is strongly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study assessed levels of anti-CCP antibodies and rheumatoid factor (RF) among patients with RA and COPD. The study sample comprised 63 patients with RA and 70 patients with COPD, all of whom underwent assessment of anti-CCP antibody and RF levels. Testing revealed that 54.2% of RA patients and 0% of COPD patients were positive for anti-CCP antibodies. Additionally, 82.5% of RA patients and 42% of COPD patients were positive for RF. Among RA patients, levels of anti-CCP antibodies were higher among smokers than among nonsmokers (242.7 ± 128.3 vs. 68.1 ± 112.1, P < 0.001). COPD patients had low titers of RF but were negative for anti-CCP antibodies. The presence of anti-CCP antibodies was a reliable serologic marker in RA diagnosis and was associated with cigarette smoking.

  2. The negative bone effects of the disease and of chronic corticosteroid treatment in premenopausal women affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fassio, A; Idolazzi, L; Jaber, M A; Dartizio, C; Viapiana, O; Rossini, M; Gatti, D

    2016-09-09

    Osteoporosis is a well-known extra-articular complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The chronic corticosteroid treatment, the functional impairment associated with RA and the disease itself appear to be the most relevant determinants. Most of the previous studies involved postmenopausal women, in whom the estrogenic deficiency might amplify the negative effect towards bone of both RA and corticosteroid therapy. We decided to evaluate bone health in a cohort of premenopausal RA patients. The study population includes 47 premenopausal women attending our outpatient clinic for RA and twice as many healthy age-matched control women selected from the hospital personnel. The bone density at the spine and femoral neck were significantly lower in patients with RA as compared with controls. When spine bone mineral density (BMD) values were adjusted for the cumulative glucocorticoid (GC) dose alone and for the cumulative GC dose plus body mass index (BMI) the mean differences between two groups decreased but they remained statistically significant. We found no difference when the spine BMD was adjusted for cumulative GC dose, BMI and health assessment questionnaire. The difference in femoral neck BMD remained statistically significant also after all the same adjustments. In conclusion, our study shows that a BMD deficiency is frequent also in premenopausal women affected by RA, especially at femoral site and that the main determinants of this bone loss are not only the disease-related weight loss, corticosteroid therapy and functional impairment, but also the systemic effects of the disease itself.

  3. Self-perceived oral health and periodontal parameters in chronic periodontitis patients with and without rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Javed, Fawad; Ahmed, Hameeda Bashir; Mehmood, Abid; Mikami, Toshinari; Malmstrom, Hans; Romanos, Georgios E

    2016-02-01

    It is hypothesized that self-perceived oral health and periodontal status are worse in chronic periodontitis (CP) patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to CP patients without RA. The aim of the present study was to assess self-perceived oral health and periodontal parameters in CP patients with and without RA. Fifty CP patients with RA and 50 CP patients without RA were included. Information regarding sociodemographic characteristics and self-perceived oral symptoms were collected using a questionnaire. Periodontal parameters (plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing depth, clinical attachment loss, number of missing teeth, and marginal bone loss) were recorded. There was no significant difference in socioeconomic status, education status, self-perceived oral symptoms, and periodontal parameters among CP patients with and without RA. Self-perceived oral health and periodontal parameters are mainly governed by the intensity of CP, and the role of RA in this context seems to be rather secondary. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis.

  6. Role of LncRNA-AF085935, IL-10 and IL-17 in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Sabry, Dina; Elamir, Azza; Mahmoud, Rania Hosny; Abdelaziz, Ahmed Ali; Fathy, Wael

    2017-01-01

    Background The current study aimed at testing the effect of corticosteroid therapy on serum levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-17 as well as lncRNA-AF085935 in patients of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and evaluating the usefulness of using these parameters to predict the therapeutic efficacy of steroids in these patients. Methods Thirty healthy control subjects and 65 chronic HCV patients with RA were included in our study. Patients were subjected to clinical examination, abdominal ultrasound, and liver biopsy and received 6-methyl-prednisolone (PDN) 16 mg/day for 48 weeks. Blood samples were collected from all subjects and serum was separated to assess IL-10 and IL-17 by ELISA and HCV RNA and lncRNA-AF085935 by qRT-PCR. Results Our study revealed that there were significant increases in serum levels of IL-10, IL-17 and lncRNA-AF085935 in RA patients associated with HCV compared with healthy control subjects. Also there were significant increases in serum levels of IL-10 and HCV RNA and a significant decrease in serum level of IL-17 in patients after corticosteroid therapy, while lncRNA-AF085935 is not significantly changed. Conclusion LncRNA-AF085935 might be a useful candidate biomarker for the early detection of RA associated with HCV, providing potential new strategies for early screening and therapy of these patients. IL-17 is a non-invasive prognostic marker to predict the efficacy of corticosteroid therapy in RA patients associated with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:28392862

  7. Health status, physical disability, and obesity among adult Mississippians with chronic joint symptoms or doctor-diagnosed arthritis: findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2003.

    PubMed

    James, Nadine T; Miller, Carl W; Fos, Peter J; Zhang, Lei; Wall, Peggy; Welch, Cindy

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze 2003 Mississippi Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data to describe the health of Mississippians with arthritis or chronic joint pain. For this study, we made statistical estimates of the extent of arthritis burden among the respondents and delineated measurable differences in sociodemographic factors, health status, and the prevalence of associated risk factors. Our findings compare health-related quality of life, physical activity, and key demographic characteristics and obesity rates, controlling for differences among the subgroups by age, sex, educational attainment, income, and race/ethnicity. Respondents to Mississippi's 2003 BRFSS were assigned to 1 of 5 distinct and mutually exclusive subgroups: 1) those with intermittent joint symptoms (IJS), 2) those with chronic joint symptoms (CJS), 3) those with doctor-diagnosed arthritis without CJS (DDA-CJS), 4) those with doctor-diagnosed arthritis with chronic joint symptoms (DDA+CJS), and 5) those with no joint symptoms (NJS). To determine the prevalence of arthritis and the continuum of disease progression, we compared the health-related quality of life, physical activity, and obesity of the respondents. Respondents with DDA+CJS were older than those with NJS (mean age, 57.1 years vs 38.7 years); they were more likely to be female (60.5% vs 51.7%), to have a high school diploma or less education (59.3% vs 45.4%), to be in fair to poor health (odds ratio [OR], 10.0), to be physically inactive (OR, 2.7), and to be overweight or obese (OR, 2.5). Health status, physical disability, and weight control may be substantially improved through heightened levels of physical activity. However, in spite of the potential for marked improvement, adult Mississippians, especially those clients with DDA+CJS, remain reluctant to commit to exercise regimens. Findings from this study suggest a need to encourage Mississippians with DDA+CJS to engage in some regular physical

  8. The prevention of leprosy related disability as an integral component of the government health delivery programme in Indonesia: perspectives on implementation.

    PubMed

    Cross, Hugh

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a record of three interviews with groups of Ministry of Health personnel and consultants that took place in Jakarta, Indonesia in May 2012. Those contributing to the first interview were provincial and district supervisors with responsibility for leprosy. Those contributing to the second interview were consultants, three of whom were seconded to the Ministry of Health and one was a WHO consultant. A third interview was conducted with the Head and a technical staff member of the Sub Directorate of Leprosy and Yaws Control Programme, Ministry of Health, Indonesia. Leprosy control in Indonesia had been targeted for further enquiry after it became apparent, through an earlier survey of national programme managers and consultants, that the programme had been relatively successful in integrating POD into the government health delivery programme. The perspectives of significant representatives and actors in the national programme were recorded through the interviews undertaken in Jakarta. Limitations This report does not purport to be a study of integration of leprosy services in Indonesia. The perspectives of representatives and significant actors are offered here to enhance understanding of factors that contributed to POD becoming a routine component of general health care in Indonesia. It is also declared here that no independent verification of statements was undertaken and that the effectiveness of measures taken to integrate leprosy related POD has not been independently evaluated.

  9. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  10. [Resection of a carpal bone row in a Pustertaler Sprinze cow with chronic purulent arthritis of the carpal joint and osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Kofler, J; Peterbauer, C

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical and radiographic findings and the surgical treatment of a serofibrinous arthritis of the antebrachiocarpal joint and of a chronic purulent arthritis of the intercarpal and carpometacarpal joints with osteomyelitis of the distal carpal bones and subchondral osteomyelitis of the proximal metacarpal bones in a cow of the breed "Pustertaler Sprinze". The therapy comprised an arthrotomy of both joint spaces and the resection of the distal row of the carpal bones. The right forelimb had been immobilised for 70 days by a full limb cast. After this period, radiographs revealed an ob- vious ankylosis of the carpal joint, and the cow showed only a slight lameness. Six years postoperatively this cow was still in the herd and had produced six calves.

  11. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Novel Semicarbazide-Sensitive Amine-Oxidase Inhibitor SzV-1287 in Chronic Arthritis Models of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Ádám; Menghis, Awt; Botz, Bálint; Borbély, Éva; Kemény, Ágnes; Tékus, Valéria; Csepregi, Janka Zsófia; Mócsai, Attila; Juhász, Tamás; Zákány, Róza; Bogdán, Dóra; Mátyus, Péter; Keeble, Julie; Pintér, Erika; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2017-01-01

    Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) catalyses oxidative deamination of primary amines. Since there is no data about its function in pain and arthritis mechanisms, we investigated the effects of our novel SSAO inhibitor SzV-1287 in chronic mouse models of joint inflammation. Effects of SzV-1287 (20 mg/kg i.p./day) were investigated in the K/BxN serum-transfer and complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-evoked active immunization models compared to the reference SSAO inhibitor LJP-1207. Mechanonociception was assessed by aesthesiometry, oedema by plethysmometry, clinical severity by scoring, joint function by grid test, myeloperoxidase activity by luminescence, vascular leakage by fluorescence in vivo imaging, histopathological changes by semiquantitative evaluation, and cytokines by Luminex assay. SzV-1287 significantly inhibited hyperalgesia and oedema in both models. Plasma leakage and keratinocyte chemoattractant production in the tibiotarsal joint, but not myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by SzV-1287 in K/BxN-arthritis. SzV-1287 did not influence vascular and cellular mechanisms in CFA-arthritis, but significantly decreased histopathological alterations. There was no difference in the anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory actions of SzV-1287 and LJP-1207, but only SzV-1287 decreased CFA-induced tissue damage. Unlike SzV-1287, LJP-1207 induced cartilage destruction, which was confirmed in vitro. SzV-1287 exerts potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory actions in chronic arthritis models of distinct mechanisms, without inducing cartilage damage. PMID:28067251

  12. Hypouricemic and arthritis relapse-reducing effects of compound tufuling oral-liquid in intercritical and chronic gout: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhijun; Wu, Huaxiang; Jing, Xiaoqing; Li, Xiuyang; Li, Yasong; Han, Yongmei; Gao, Xiangfu; Tang, Xiaopo; Sun, Jing; Fan, Yongshen; Wen, Chengping

    2017-03-01

    In the double-blind, randomized, controlled trial, we aimed to evaluate the effects of compound tufuling oral liquid (CoTOL) on serum uric acid (sUA) levels and recurrence of acute gouty arthritis in intercritical and chronic gout treatment. A total of 210 patients with gout were screened from 8 hospitals to observe the sUA and acute gouty arthritis recurrence rate-reducing effects of CoTOL in intercritical and chronic gout during a 12-week treatment. We treated 139 and 71 patients with CoTOL and the placebo, respectively, and evaluated their sUA levels, acute gouty arthritis recurrence rate, and adverse events at week 0, 6, and 12. Twenty-five and 12 patients in the treatment and control groups, respectively, had interrupted treatments, whereas 114 and 59 cases, respectively, completed their treatments. At the end of the 12-week treatment, the average decrease in sUA was 74.26 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.74-91.77 μmol/L) and 28.81 μmol/L (95% CI: 4.91-52.71 μmol/L) in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.004). The average decrease rate of sUA was 12.76% (95% CI: 9.82%-15.70%) and 4.57% (95% CI: 0.42%-8.71%) in the treatment and control groups, respectively (P = 0.004), and the gouty arthritis recurrence rate of the treatment group was lower than that of the control group (from week 6 to 12, 21.93% and 50.88% in the treatment and control group, respectively, P < 0.001; from baseline to week 12, 38.5% and 63.16%, respectively, P = 0.003). Severe adverse events were not observed in either groups, and fewer leucopenia incidences were observed in the treatment group than those in the control group (3/139 vs. 7/71, respectively, P = 0.033). CoTOL reduced sUA levels and effectively prevented acute arthritis recurrence in intercritical and chronic gout without serious adverse events.

  13. Assessment of interleukin-6 receptor inhibition therapy on periodontal condition in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Okada, Moe; Ito, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ishida, Kohei; Kojima, Anri; Narita, Ichiei; Murasawa, Akira; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2014-01-01

    Overproduction of interleukin (IL)-6 may play a pathologic role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic periodontitis (CP). The present study assesses IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) inhibition therapy on the periodontal condition of patients with RA and CP. The study participants were 28 patients with RA and CP during treatment with IL-6R inhibitor, and 27 patients with RA and CP during treatment without IL-6R inhibitor. Periodontal and rheumatologic parameters and serum levels of cytokine and inflammatory markers and immunoglobulin G against periodontopathic bacteria were examined after medication with IL-6R inhibitor for 20.3 months on average (T1) and again 8 weeks later (T2). No differences were observed between the groups in any parameter values at T1, except for serum IL-6 levels. The anti-IL-6R group showed a significantly greater decrease in gingival index, bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and serum levels of IL-6 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 from T1 to T2 than the control group (P <0.05). A significant correlation was found between changes in serum anticyclic citrullinated peptide levels and those in PD and CAL in the anti-IL-6R group (P <0.05), whereas both groups exhibited a significant association between changes in serum MMP-3 levels and those in BOP (P <0.05). Changes in periodontal and serum parameter values were different between the patients with RA and CP during treatment with and without IL-6R inhibitor.

  14. Importance of patient history and physical examination in rheumatoid arthritis compared to other chronic diseases: results of a physician survey.

    PubMed

    Castrejón, Isabel; McCollum, Lauren; Tanriover, Mine Durusu; Pincus, Theodore

    2012-08-01

    To survey physicians' opinions concerning the relative importance of 5 clinical encounter components-vital signs, patient history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and ancillary studies-in the diagnosis and management of 8 chronic diseases. A SurveyMonkey internet survey was e-mailed to 7,265 US physicians, including 3,542 rheumatologists and 3,723 nonrheumatologists, with the following query: "Please indicate the relative importance of 5 sources of information-vital signs, patient history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and ancillary studies-in diagnosis of congestive heart failure (CHF), diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, lymphoma, pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ulcerative colitis." The response options were 0-20%, 21-40%, 41-60%, 61-80%, and 81-100%. A second query with an identical structure addressed management of the 8 diseases. The proportions of physicians who estimated each component as most (or tied for most) important in diagnosis or in management were computed. The survey was completed by 313 physicians (154 rheumatologists and 159 nonrheumatologists). More than 90% estimated vital signs as most important for hypertension, and laboratory tests for diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia. More than 70% estimated ancillary studies as most important for lymphoma, pulmonary fibrosis, and ulcerative colitis. Patient history and physical examination were estimated as most important for RA and CHF by ≥50% of nonrheumatologists. RA and CHF were the only 2 of the 8 diseases studied for which ≥50% of nonrheumatologists estimated a patient history and physical examination as most important for diagnosis and management. Confirmation and extension of these observations in actual care may have implications for reimbursement and organization of clinical care. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. TRPA1 contributes to chronic pain in aged mice with CFA-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Sheldon R.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Investigate age-related differences in mechanical sensitivity and determine the contribution of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) to mechanical hypersensitivity during chronic inflammation in young and aged animals. Methods Mechanical sensitivity in young (3-month) and aged (24-month) wild-type (TRPA1+/+) and TRPA1-deficient (TRPA1-/-) mice was measured behaviorally for 8-weeks following injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the plantar hindpaw. Histological analysis and hindpaw measurements evaluated inflammation. Ex-vivo skin-saphenous nerve preparations quantified C-fiber sensitivity. Results In naïve wild-type mice, aged animals were less sensitive to mechanical stimuli than young. Afferent recordings from TRPA1-/- mice indicate that TRPA1 contributes to the normal mechanical sensitivity in both age groups. Following CFA injection, both young and aged TRPA1+/+ mice exhibited mechanical hypersensitivity. Development of mechanical hypersensitivity was delayed until week 4 in young TRPA1-/- mice, when they exhibited a sharp decrease (9-fold) in mechanical thresholds. In contrast, CFA-injected aged TRPA1-/- mice did not exhibit mechanical hypersensitivity at any time during the entire 8-weeks. Recordings of C-fibers supported these findings and showed that action potential firing increased in both young (25%) and aged (60%) TRPA1+/+ mice 8 weeks after CFA. Interestingly, mechanical firing increased markedly in C-fibers from young TRPA1-/- mice (80%) but not in C-fibers from aged TRPA1-/- mice after CFA. Conclusions These data reveal marked differences in long-term mechanical behavioral sensitivity of aged and young mice, and suggest that TRPA1 may be a key contributor to the transition from acute to chronic inflammatory mechanical pain and nociceptor sensitization selectively in aged mice. PMID:24891324

  16. The effectiveness of Echinacea extract or composite glucosamine, chondroitin and methyl sulfonyl methane supplements on acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Nadia Ms; Hamuda, Hayam M; Melek, Samuel T; Darwish, Sahar K

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of the oral administration for 15 days of either Echinacea (E) or genuphil (a composite of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane [GCM]) nutraceutical supplements on female rat model of acute or chronic arthritis induced by bacterial outer membrane protein (OMP) from faecal flora of healthy and rheumatic humans. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) values increased (p < 0.05) in both arthritic groups as compared to normal values. The rheumatic markers anti-CCP2, CRP and RF values decreased significantly in E- and GCM-treated groups compared to arthritic none-treated acute or chronic groups. The results of RF values of GCM-treated groups in acute and chronic models decreased exhibiting no statistical difference compared with the normal value. Histological examinations of the hind paw sections revealed moderate inflammation, oedema and mild proliferation of synovial cells in acute arthritic rats and more damage to cartilage and bone with severe inflammation in chronic ones. Echinacea acute treated group showed edema with proliferated synovial membrane and partial damage in cartilage and bone. While in the E-chronic treated group, rough edge with destructed cartilage and bone existed. However, the acute GCM group revealed mild cartilage damage. But the chronic GCM group showed mild synovial cells proliferation and revealed no inflammation with mild cartilage damage edge. Results demonstrated the OMP arthropathic property and through promising light on arthritis treatment using E- or GCM, with the advantage of GMC results over that of E-. The composite GCM is needed for further studies over the dose and duration to assess its preventive effects against the bacterial OMP arthrogenicity.

  17. Sarcopaenia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Targowski, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016 a new independent disease called sarcopaenia (according to ICD-10 classification) appeared. According to the recommendation of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), sarcopaenia is defined as abnormally low muscle mass plus low skeletal muscle strength or low physical performance. Sarcopaenia, as a primary disease, is mainly observed in older people, but it can also appear in younger adults in the course of many clinical chronic conditions. One of the most frequent chronic diseases associated with chronic inflammation and functional limitation of skeletal system is rheumatoid arthritis. In the present article, current knowledge on the epidemiology of sarcopaenia and its association with rheumatoid arthritis is presented.

  18. Towards an ICF Core Set for chronic musculoskeletal conditions: commonalities across ICF Core Sets for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, low back pain and chronic widespread pain.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, S R; Ewert, T; Dreinhöfer, K E; Cieza, A; Stucki, G

    2008-11-01

    The objective of the study was to identify commonalities among the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets of osteoarthritis (OA), osteoporosis (OP), low back pain (LBP), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim is to identify relevant categories for the development of a tentative ICF Core Set for musculoskeletal and pain conditions. The ICF categories common to the five musculoskeletal and pain conditions in the Brief and Comprehensive ICF Core Sets were identified in three steps. In a first step, the commonalities across the Brief and Comprehensive ICF Core Sets for these conditions were examined. In a second and third step, we analysed the increase in commonalities when iteratively excluding one or two of the five conditions. In the first step, 29 common categories out of the total number of 120 categories were identified across the Comprehensive ICF Core Sets of all musculoskeletal and pain conditions, primarily in the component activities and participation. In the second and third step, we found that the exclusion of CWP across the Comprehensive ICF Core Sets increased the commonalities of the remaining four musculoskeletal conditions in a maximum of ten additional categories. The Brief ICF Core Sets of all musculoskeletal and pain conditions contain four common categories out of a total number of 62 categories. The iterative exclusion of a singular condition did not significantly increase the commonalities in the remaining. Based on our analysis, it seems possible to develop a tentative Comprehensive ICF Core Set across a number of musculoskeletal conditions including LBP, OA, OP and RA. However, the profile of functioning in people with CWP differs considerably and should not be further considered for a common ICF Core Set.

  19. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  20. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  2. Near-infrared lymphatic imaging demonstrates the dynamics of lymph flow and lymphangiogenesis during the acute versus chronic phases of arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Wood, Ronald; Schwarz, Edward M; Wang, Yong-Jun; Xing, Lianping

    2010-07-01

    To develop an in vivo imaging method to assess lymphatic draining function in the K/BxN mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. Indocyanine green, a near-infrared fluorescent dye, was injected intradermally into the footpads of wild-type mice, mouse limbs were illuminated with an 806-nm near-infrared laser, and the movement of indocyanine green from the injection site to the draining popliteal lymph node (LN) was recorded with a CCD camera. Indocyanine green near-infrared images were analyzed to obtain 5 measures of lymphatic function across time. Images of K/BxN arthritic mice and control nonarthritic littermates were obtained at 1 month of age, when acute joint inflammation commenced, and again at 3 months of age, when joint inflammation became chronic. Lymphangiogenesis in popliteal LNs was assessed by immunochemistry. Indocyanine green and its transport within lymphatic vessels were readily visualized, and quantitative measures were derived. During the acute phase of arthritis, the lymphatic vessels were dilated, with increased indocyanine green signal intensity and lymphatic pulses, and popliteal LNs became fluorescent quickly. During the chronic phase, new lymphatic vessels were present near the foot. However, the appearance of indocyanine green in lymphatic vessels was delayed. The size and area of popliteal LN lymphatic sinuses progressively increased in the K/BxN mice. Our findings indicate that indocyanine green near-infrared lymphatic imaging is a valuable method for assessing the lymphatic draining function in mice with inflammatory arthritis. Indocyanine green-near-infrared imaging of K/BxN mice identified 2 distinct lymphatic phenotypes during the acute and chronic phase of inflammation. This technique can be used to assess new therapies for lymphatic disorders.

  3. Near infrared lymphatic imaging demonstrates the dynamics of lymph flow and lymphangiogenesis during the acute vs. chronic phases of arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wood, Ronald; Schwarz, Edward M.; Wang, Yong-Jun; Xing, Lianping

    2010-01-01

    Objective Development of an in vivo imaging method to assess lymphatic draining function in the K/B×N mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. Methods Indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, was injected intradermally into the footpad of wild-type mice, the limb was illuminated with an 806 nm NIR laser, and the movement of ICG from the injection site to the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN) was recorded with a CCD camera. ICG-NIR images were analyzed to obtain 5 measures of lymphatic function across time. K/B×N arthritic mice and control non-arthritic littermates were imaged at one-month of age when acute joint inflammation commenced, and repeated at 3 months when joint inflammation became chronic. Lymphangiogenesis in PLNs was assessed by immunochemistry. Results ICG and its transport within lymphatic vessels were readily visualized and quantitative measures derived. During the acute phase of arthritis, the lymphatic vessels were dilated with increased ICG signal intensity and lymphatic pulses, and PLNs became fluorescent quickly. During the chronic phase, new lymphatic vessels were present near the foot. However, ICG appearance in lymphatic vessels was delayed. The size and area of PLN lymphatic sinuses progressively increased in the K/B×N mice. Conclusion ICG-NIR lymphatic imaging is a valuable method to assess the lymphatic draining function in mice with inflammatory arthritis. ICG-NIR imaging of K/B×N mice identified two distinct lymphatic phenotypes during the acute and chronic phase of inflammation. This technique can be used to assess new therapies for lymphatic disorders. PMID:20309866

  4. Effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor agents for familial mediterranean fever patients with chronic arthritis and/or sacroiliitis who were resistant to colchicine treatment.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Sule Apras; Kilic, Levent; Akdogan, Ali; Kiraz, Sedat; Kalyoncu, Umut; Karadag, Omer; Ertenli, Ihsan; Dogan, Ismail; Calguneri, Meral

    2011-10-01

    Effectiveness of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents in colchicine-resistant familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients has attracted attention in recent years. We analyzed the effect of anti-TNF agents on clinical findings of colchicine-resistant FMF patients with chronic arthritis and/or sacroiliitis. Data from 10 FMF patients (5 male and 5 female patients: mean age, 30.1 [SD, 8.5] years) with chronic arthritis and/or sacroiliitis who were on anti-TNF agents are reviewed. Frequency of FMF attacks before and after treatment with anti-TNF agents was recorded from hospital files. The effects of the anti-TNF treatment were determined by using the number of tender and/or swollen joints, serum acute phase reactant levels, and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index scores. Change in urine protein loss was also evaluated in patients with amyloidosis. In 6 patients, FMF attacks had been considered to be unresponsive to colchicine, and 4 patients were partial responders before treatment with anti-TNF agents. Mean attack frequency of the patients in the 3 months' period before anti-TNF agent treatment was 3.8 (SD, 3.1). After anti-TNF treatment, in 3 patients, FMF attack frequency decreased, and in the remaining 7 patients, no attack occurred. Serum acute phase reactant levels were decreased significantly at 3 and 6 months after anti-TNF treatment (P < 0.05 for all). After anti-TNF treatment Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index scores were also decreased significantly (6.2 [SD], 1.7 vs. 2.1 [SD], 1.7; P = 0.012). In all 3 patients with amyloidosis, urine protein loss decreased without any increase in serum creatinine levels. Anti-TNF treatment can have beneficial effects for controlling FMF attacks in FMF patients with chronic arthritis and/or sacroiliitis.

  5. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptor is involved in chronic arthritis: in vivo study using TRPA1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Ádám; Tékus, Valéria; Boros, Melinda; Pozsgai, Gábor; Botz, Bálint; Borbély, Éva; Szolcsányi, János; Pintér, Erika; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-08

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a calcium-permeable cation channel that is expressed on capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons, endothelial and inflammatory cells. It is activated by a variety of inflammatory mediators, such as methylglyoxal, formaldehyde and hydrogen sulphide. Since only few data are available about the role of TRPA1 in arthritis and related pain, we investigated its involvement in inflammation models of different mechanisms. Chronic arthritis was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), knee osteoarthritis by monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) in TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice and C57Bl/6 wildtype mice. For comparison, carrageenan- and CFA-evoked acute paw and knee inflammatory changes were investigated. Thermonociception was determined on a hot plate, cold tolerance in icy water, mechanonociception by aesthesiometry, paw volume by plethysmometry, knee diameter by micrometry, weight distribution with incapacitance tester, neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity and vascular leakage by in vivo optical imaging, and histopathological alterations by semiquantitative scoring. CFA-induced chronic mechanical hypersensitivity, tibiotarsal joint swelling and histopathological alterations, as well as myeloperoxidase activity in the early phase (day 2), and vascular leakage in the later stage (day 7), were significantly reduced in TRPA1 KO mice. Heat and cold sensitivities did not change in this model. Although in TRPA1 KO animals MIA-evoked knee swelling and histopathological destruction were not altered, hypersensitivity and impaired weight bearing on the osteoarthritic limb were significantly decreased. In contrast, carrageenan- and CFA-induced acute inflammation and pain behaviours were not modified by TRPA1 deletion. TRPA1 has an important role in chronic arthritis/osteoarthritis and related pain behaviours in the mouse. Therefore, it might be a promising target for novel analgesic/anti-inflammatory drugs.

  6. Profile of arthritis disability.

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, L. M.; Juarez, L.

    2001-01-01

    Using the 1994-95 National Health Interview Supplement Disability Supplement, the authors study levels of disabilities and accommodations among US adults with arthritis disability, compared to people with disability due to other conditions. Arthritis-disabled people are defined in two ways. One definition covers a broad range of arthritis and rheumatic conditions, and the other concentrates solely on arthritis. The authors find that arthritis-disabled people have more total disabilities than other-disabled peop e. However, their disabilities are less severe, have shorter durations, and accumulate more gradually over time. Despite more disabilities, people with arthritis disability use fewer assistive and service accommodations than other-disabled people. They do use more mobility aids. Because arthritis is the leading chronic condition for middle-aged and older adults, th s profile of extensive but mild-to-moderate disability is experienced by many millions of adults. Accommodations for arthritis may also be extensive but aimed more toward self-care than toward assistive and medical services. PMID:11889283

  7. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNFα blockers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNF α blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNF α therapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNF α blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  8. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  9. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  10. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  11. Kartagener syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rébora, Martin Esteban; Cuneo, Julia Ana; Marcos, Josefina; Marcos, Juan Carlos

    2006-02-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old female patient, affected with Kartagener syndrome (primary ciliary dyskinesia), who developed seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis. According to our review, there are only 6 cases reported so far with this association without a definite etiopathogenic linkage recognized in common. Chronic infections resulting from the ciliary dysfunction might be a trigger for rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Personality: A Controlled Study*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Dermot J.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence in support of claims for the existence of a special relationship between personality and rheumatoid arthritis is conflicting. In this study four groups—one of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, one of patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis, one of neurotic patients, and a normal control group—were compared by means of the Maudsley Personality Inventory (M.P.I.) and a neurotic trait in childhood (N.T.C.) score. Both arthritis groups had a lower M.P.I. neuroticism score than the normal control group, with greater significance in the chronic arthritis group. The neurotic group had a significantly higher neuroticism score than the other three groups. Both arthritis groups had a lower extraversion score than normal controls, again with greater significance in the chronic arthritis group. The neurotic group scored significantly less than normal controls on the extraversion scale and intermediately between the early and chronic arthritis groups. There was no significant difference between the arthritis groups and the normal control group in the N.T.C. score, but it was significantly increased in the neurotic group. These findings suggest that people with rheumatoid arthritis differ significantly in personality from normal and from neurotic people, that the differences are accentuated with chronicity in the rheumatoid process, and that the differences develop as a result of the arthritis. PMID:4102507

  13. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody in patients with wood-smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) without rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sigari, Naseh; Moghimi, Nasrin; Shahraki, Farhad Saber; Mohammadi, Shilan; Roshani, Daem

    2015-01-01

    Citrullination, a post-translational modification of proteins, is increased in inflammatory processes and is known to occur in smokers. It can induce anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, the most specific serologic marker for rheumatoid arthritis. Thus far, the incidence of autoimmunity in patients with wood-smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) resulting in anti-CCP production has not been examined. We hypothesise that anti-CCP antibody level in these patients should be higher than that in healthy subjects. A total of 112 non-rheumatoid arthritis patients, including 56 patients with wood-smoke-induced COPD and 56 patients with tobacco-induced COPD, and 56 healthy non-smoker controls were included. The serum anti-CCP antibody levels were measured and compared between the groups and against smoke exposure and clinical characteristics. The mean anti-CCP antibody levels in wood-smoke-induced COPD group were significantly higher than those in tobacco-induced COPD group (p = 0.03) and controls (p = 0.004). Furthermore, 8 (14.2 %) patients with wood-smoke-induced COPD, 4 (7.14 %) with tobacco-induced COPD and 2 (3.57 %) controls exceeded the conventional cut-off of anti-CCP antibody positivity. No relationship was found between the anti-CCP antibody level and age, gender, duration of disease, Pack-years of smoking, and duration of exposure to wood smoke. Moreover, correlations between anti-CCP antibodies and severity of airflow limitation, CAT scores, mMRC scores of dyspnoea, and GOLD staging of COPD severity were not significant. Wood-smoke-induced COPD could significantly increase the anti-CCP antibody level in non-rheumatoid arthritis patients when compared with that in patients with tobacco-induced COPD and healthy controls.

  15. The microbiome and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eppinga, Hester; Konstantinov, Sergey R; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Thio, H Bing

    2014-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, seen in combination with the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis and belonging to the family of spondylarthritides (SpA). A link is recognized between psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Environmental factors seem to induce inflammatory disease in individuals with underlying genetic susceptibility. The microbiome is a subject of increasing interest in the etiology of these inflammatory immune-mediated diseases. The intestinal microbiome is able to affect extra-intestinal distant sites, including the joints, through immunomodulation. At this point, evidence regarding a relationship between the microbiome and psoriatic arthritis is scarce. However, we hypothesize that common immune-mediated inflammatory pathways seen in the "skin-joint-gut axis" in psoriatic arthritis are induced or at least mediated by the microbiome. Th17 has a crucial function in this mechanism. Further establishment of this connection may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for psoriatic arthritis.

  16. Limitations of clinical trials in chronic diseases: is the efficacy of methotrexate (MTX) underestimated in polyarticular psoriatic arthritis on the basis of limitations of clinical trials more than on limitations of MTX, as was seen in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Pincus, Theodore; Bergman, Martin J; Yazici, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are the optimal method to establish efficacy of a drug versus placebo or another drug. Nonetheless, important limitations are seen, particularly in chronic diseases over long periods, although most are ignored. Pragmatic limitations of clinical trials include a relatively short observation period, suboptimal dosage schedules, suboptimal surrogate markers for long-term outcomes, statistically significant results which may not be clinically unimportant and vice versa. Even ideal clinical trials have intrinsic limitations, including the influence of design on results, data reported in groups which ignore individual variation, non-standard observer-dependent interpretation of a balance of efficacy and toxicity, and distortion of a "placebo effect." Limitations are seen in many clinical trials of methotrexate (MTX) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The first MTX clinical trial in rheumatology documented excellent efficacy in PsA, but frequent adverse events in 1964, explained by intravenous doses up to 150 kg. MTX was abandoned until the 1980s for RA, while gold salts and penicillamine were termed "remission-inducing," on the basis limitations of clinical trials. In the most recent MTX in PsA (MIPA) trial, all outcomes favoured MTX, but only patient and physician global estimates met the p<0.05 criterion. A conclusion of "no evidence for MTX improving synovitis" appears explained by insufficient statistical power, wide individual variation, no subsets, low doses, and other limitations. MTX appears less efficacious in PsA than RA, but may be underestimated in PsA, similar to historical problems in RA, resulting more from limitations of clinical trials than from limitations of MTX.

  17. Survey on attitudes regarding EULAR recommendations for the role of nurses involved in medical care of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fusama, Mie; Nakahara, Hideko; van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Oliver, Susan; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2017-09-01

    We seek to evaluate the opinions of nurses and doctors in Japan regarding EULAR recommendations for nurses' roles in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis. This is a cross-sectional survey within Japan. We randomly selected nurses and doctors engaged in consultation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and assessed their agreement and opinions on the feasibility of implementing EULAR recommendations, including potential barriers. 431 nurses and 128 doctors completed the questionnaire. For both nurses and doctors, levels of feasibility showed statistically significant lower results compared with those of agreement for all items. When compared between nurses and doctors, agreement showed no statistically significant differences, while nurses' answers were statistically significant lower for feasibility. Insufficient time, staff and knowledge, lack of established procedures and facilities, and lack of an education system for nurses were cited as barriers to the feasibility of implementing EULAR recommendations. This is the first survey within Japan evaluating opinions regarding EULAR recommendations for nurses' roles. We found that while agreement was high, feasibility was generally believed to be low. We recommend further research and collaboration between medical professionals in order to implement these recommendations in Japan.

  18. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  19. Thumb Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... A joint is where bones connect and move. Arthritis is thinning of the cartilage, which is the ...

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000431.htm Rheumatoid arthritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long-term disease. It leads ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... men. About two to three times as many women as men have the disease. Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis Video length: 2 min 54 sec Click to watch this video Learn more about how rheumatoid arthritis occurs. Effects Vary Rheumatoid arthritis affects people differently. Some people ...

  2. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marks, Ray

    2017-09-27

    Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises-practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique-may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of glycosaminoglycan derived from Gryllus bimaculatus (a type of cricket, insect) on adjuvant-treated chronic arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Han, Jea Woong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Lee, Byung Mu

    2014-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus, Gb) were investigated in a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritic rat model. This GAG produced a significant anti-edema effect as evidenced by inhibition of C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor, and interfered with atherogenesis by reducing proinflammatory cytokine levels of (1) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), (2) interleukin-6, (3) prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in RAW 264.7 cells, and (4) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in normal splenocytes, in a dose-dependent manner. This GAG was also found to induce nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVEC cells and elevated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity levels. Histological findings demonstrated the fifth lumbar vertebrae (LV) dorsal root ganglion, which was linked to the paw treated with Gb GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Further, combined indomethacin (5 mg/kg)-Gb GAG (10 mg/kg) inhibited more effectively CFA-induced paw edema at 3 h and 2 or 3 d after treatment to levels comparable to only the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Ultraviolet (UV)-irritated skin inflammation also downregulated nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activity in transfected HaCaT cells. Data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of GAG obtained from cricket (Gb) may be useful for treatment of inflammatory diseases including chronic arthritis.

  4. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... IBD Help Center Home > Resources > Arthritis Go Back Arthritis Email Print + Share Arthritis, or inflammation of the ... joints and a reduction in flexibility. TYPES OF ARTHRITIS In IBD, arthritis may appear in three different ...

  5. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  6. Screening for latent tuberculosis infection in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: discrepancies between tuberculin skin test and interferon-γ release assay results.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Félicie; de Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Rat, Anne-Christine; Loeuille, Damien; Dintinger, Hervé; Béné, Marie C; Faure, Gilbert; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is mandatory before initiating biologics in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA). However, few studies have evaluated the discrepancies between the results of tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-γ release assays (IGRA) in these patients. The purpose of our study was to investigate factors associated with TST and IGRA results in a large cohort of patients with CIA before the introduction of biologics. A total of 563 consecutive patients with CIA (293 rheumatoid arthritis, 270 spondyloarthritis) and eligible for biologics were prospectively enrolled. Demographic, clinical, and biological data were recorded. Risk factors for LTBI were assessed. All patients underwent a TST, a chest radiograph, and an IGRA test (T-SPOT.TB). Agreement between the 2 tests was low (κ = 0.16). The bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) status was significantly associated with discordance between the 2 tests (p = 0.004). The TST positivity rate was 34.8%. Factors associated with a negative TST were female sex (p = 0.02) and immunosuppressive treatment (p = 0.003). The only LTBI risk factor associated with TST positivity was an abnormal chest radiograph (p = 0.02). T-SPOT.TB was positive in 21.7% of patients and indeterminate in 15.6%. Previous active TB and chest radiograph abnormalities were associated with IGRA positivity (p = 0.008 and p = 3.9 × 10(-5), respectively). The BCG vaccination was associated with negative IGRA (p = 3 × 10(-4)). Indeterminate IGRA results were associated with age, C-reactive protein, and immunosuppressive treatment (p = 0.005, 0.007, and 0.004, respectively). Our data support the combined use of T-SPOT.TB and TST in patients with CIA before biologics introduction. However, despite these good diagnostic values, indeterminate results may complicate the use of IGRA.

  7. Role of Tachykinin 1 and 4 Gene-Derived Neuropeptides and the Neurokinin 1 Receptor in Adjuvant-Induced Chronic Arthritis of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, Éva; Hajna, Zsófia; Sándor, Katalin; Kereskai, László; Tóth, István; Pintér, Erika; Nagy, Péter; Szolcsányi, János; Quinn, John; Zimmer, Andreas; Stewart, James; Paige, Christopher; Berger, Alexandra; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Objective Substance P, encoded by the Tac1 gene, is involved in neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia via neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor activation. Its non-neuronal counterpart, hemokinin-1, which is derived from the Tac4 gene, is also a potent NK1 agonist. Although hemokinin-1 has been described as a tachykinin of distinct origin and function compared to SP, its role in inflammatory and pain processes has not yet been elucidated in such detail. In this study, we analysed the involvement of tachykinins derived from the Tac1 and Tac4 genes, as well as the NK1 receptor in chronic arthritis of the mouse. Methods Complete Freund’s Adjuvant was injected intraplantarly and into the tail of Tac1−/−, Tac4−/−, Tacr1−/− (NK1 receptor deficient) and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Paw volume was measured by plethysmometry and mechanosensitivity using dynamic plantar aesthesiometry over a time period of 21 days. Semiquantitative histopathological scoring and ELISA measurement of IL-1β concentrations of the tibiotarsal joints were performed. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was significantly reduced from day 11 in Tac4−/− and Tacr1−/− animals, while paw swelling was not altered in any strain. Inflammatory histopathological alterations (synovial swelling, leukocyte infiltration, cartilage destruction, bone damage) and IL-1β concentration in the joint homogenates were significantly smaller in Tac4−/− and Tac1−/−/Tac4−/− mice. Conclusions Hemokinin-1, but not substance P increases inflammation and hyperalgesia in the late phase of adjuvant-induced arthritis. While NK1 receptors mediate its antihyperalgesic actions, the involvement of another receptor in histopathological changes and IL-1β production is suggested. PMID:23626716

  8. [Arthritis and clinical history].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lígia; Sampaio, Luzia; Pinto, José; Ventura, Francisco S

    2011-01-01

    In front of a patient with arthritis, clinical good-sense tells that the most probable diagnosis are the most prevalent ones. Nevertheless, we have to exclude a multiplicity of other aetiologies, less frequent, but with highest implications in the therapeutic conduct. Infections by Brucella and by Borrelia are rare causes of chronic arthritis, yet are diagnosis to consider, even when the clinical manifestations aren't the most typical, as there still exist endemic areas in Portugal. Here we report two clinical cases about patients with arthritis for more than one year, subject to ineffective exams ant treatments. Only the clinical history could put on evidence clinical-epidemiological data, suggestive of Brucellosis and Lyme Disease, namely the professional contact with infected animals, and the history of probable erythema migrans, that pointed toward the correct diagnosis. So, with directed therapeutic, there was complete resolution of the inflammatory symptoms.

  9. Modulation of SERCA in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis as a possible adaptation mechanism of redox imbalance.

    PubMed

    Strosova, Miriam; Karlovska, Jana; Spickett, Corinne M; Orszagova, Zuzana; Ponist, Silvester; Bauerova, Katarina; Mihalova, Danica; Horakova, Lubica

    2009-09-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) is a condition that involves systemic oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, it was found that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2 +)-ATPase (SERCA) activity was elevated in muscles of rats with AA compared to controls, suggesting possible conformational changes in the enzyme. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site but rather in the transmembrane domain according to the tryptophan polar/non-polar fluorescence ratio. Higher relative expression of SERCA, higher content of nitrotyrosine but no increase in phospholipid oxidation in AA SR was found. In vitro treatments of SR with HOCl showed that in AA animals SERCA activity was more susceptible to oxidative stress, but SR phospholipids were more resistant and SERCA could also be activated by phosphatidic acid. It was concluded that increased SERCA activity in AA was due to increased levels of SERCA protein and structural changes to the protein, probably induced by direct and specific oxidation involving reactive nitrogen species.

  10. Efficacy, tolerability and safety of cannabinoids in chronic pain associated with rheumatic diseases (fibromyalgia syndrome, back pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis): A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Fitzcharles, M-A; Baerwald, C; Ablin, J; Häuser, W

    2016-02-01

    In the absence of an ideal treatment for chronic pain associated with rheumatic diseases, there is interest in the potential effects of cannabinoid molecules, particularly in the context of global interest in the legalization of herbal cannabis for medicinal use. A systematic search until April 2015 was conducted in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, www.cannabis-med.org and clinicaltrials.gov for randomized controlled trials with a study duration of at least 2 weeks and at least ten patients per treatment arm with herbal cannabis or pharmaceutical cannabinoid products in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), osteoarthritis (OA), chronic spinal pain, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pain. Outcomes were reduction of pain, sleep problems, fatigue and limitations of quality of life for efficacy, dropout rates due to adverse events for tolerability, and serious adverse events for safety. The methodology quality of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was evaluated by the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Two RCTs of 2 and 4 weeks duration respectively with nabilone, including 71 FMS patients, one 4-week trial with nabilone, including 30 spinal pain patients, and one 5-week study with tetrahydrocannbinol/cannabidiol, including 58 RA patients were included. One inclusion criterion was pain refractory to conventional treatment in three studies. No RCT with OA patients was found. The risk of bias was high for three studies. The findings of a superiority of cannabinoids over controls (placebo, amitriptyline) were not consistent. Cannabinoids were generally well tolerated despite some troublesome side effects and safe during the study duration. Currently, there is insufficient evidence for recommendation for any cannabinoid preparations for symptom management in patients with chronic pain associated with rheumatic diseases.

  11. FcgammaR expression on macrophages is related to severity and chronicity of synovial inflammation and cartilage destruction during experimental immune-complex-mediated arthritis (ICA)

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Arjen B; van Lent, Peter L; van Vuuren, Hanneke; Holthuysen, Astrid E; Jacobs, Cor; van de Putte, Leo B; van de Winkel, Jan G; van den Berg, Wim B

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) present on cells of the haematopoietic lineage communicate with IgG-containing immune complexes that are abundant in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In mice, three classes of FcγR (RI, RII, and RIII) have been described. Binding of these receptors leads to either activation (FcγRI and RIII) or deactivation (FcγRII) of intracellular transduction pathways. Together, the expression of activating and inhibitory receptors is thought to drive immune-complex-mediated diseases. Earlier studies in our laboratory showed that macrophages of the synovial lining are of utmost importance in the onset and propagation of immune-complex-driven arthritic diseases. Selective depletion of macrophages in the joint downregulated both inflammation and cartilage destruction. As all three classes of FcγR are expressed on synovial macrophages, these cells are among the first that come in contact with immune complexes deposited in the joint. Recently, we observed that when immune complexes were injected into the knee joints of mice, strains susceptible to collagen-type-II arthritis (DBA/1, B10.RIII) developed more severe arthritis than nonsusceptible strains did, or even developed chronic arthritis. One reason why these strains are more susceptible might be their higher levels of FcγRs on macrophage membranes. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of FcγRs in inflammation and cartilage damage during immune-complex-mediated arthritis (ICA). First, we studied arthritis and subsequent cartilage damage in mice lacking functional FcγRI and RIII (FcR γ-chain-/- mice). Next, DBA/1 mice, which are prone to develop collagen-type-II arthritis (`collagen-induced arthritis'; CIA) and are hypersensitive to immune complexes, were compared with control C57BL/6 mice as regards cartilage damage and the expression and function of FcγRs on their macrophages. Aims: To examine whether FcγR expression on macrophages is

  12. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  13. Septic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... septic arthritis. Knees are most commonly affected, but septic arthritis also can affect hips, shoulders and other joints. The infection can quickly and severely damage the cartilage and bone within the joint, so prompt treatment is crucial. Treatment involves draining the joint with ...

  14. Cachexia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walsmith, Joseph; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2002-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating, chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that causes destruction of joint cartilage and bone. It generally occurs between the fourth and sixth decades of life, and affects two to three times more women than men. It is characterized by joint stiffness, pain, and swelling, and is accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in skeletal muscle, but also occurs in the viscera and immune system. Thus, rheumatoid cachexia leads to muscle weakness and a loss of functional capacity, and is believed to accelerate morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis. Currently there is no established mechanism for rheumatoid cachexia, but it is accompanied by elevated resting energy expenditure, accelerated whole-body protein catabolism, and excess production of the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is probably the central mediator of muscle wasting in rheumatoid arthritis, and is known to act synergistically with interleukin-1beta to promote cachexia. In general, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta are thought to alter the balance between protein degradation and protein synthesis in rheumatoid arthritis to cause muscle wasting. The precise mechanism by which they do this is not known. Reduced peripheral insulin action and low habitual physical activity are important consequences of rheumatoid arthritis, and have also been implicated as mediators of rheumatoid cachexia. Insulin inhibits muscle protein degradation. Consequently, reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is thought to be permissive to cytokine-driven muscle loss. The cause of reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is not known, but tumor necrosis factor-alpha has been shown to interfere with insulin receptor signaling and is probably an important contributor. Low habitual physical

  15. Behavioral Problems in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Controlled Study to Examine the Risk of Psychopathology in a Chronic Pediatric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chamanara, Elham; Raeeskarami, Seyed-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are prone to the problems that can delay their psychosocial development; however, the existing literature has not reached a consensus on the psychological problems related to JIA. A total of 51 children and adolescents with JIA and 75 healthy controls aged 6 to 18 years were examined using the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL). Our results represented that 70 percent of JIA group reached “borderline clinical” range or “clinical” range in internalizing problems, while this percentage in the control group was 18 percent. In addition, our results indicated that JIA group has gotten significantly higher scores (more than twofold) in externalizing behaviors compared to control group. Furthermore, children with JIA showed higher rate of anxiety/depression, withdrawal/depression, somatic complaints, rule breaking behaviors, and aggressive behaviors as well as thought and social problems compared to control group (p < 0.001). As a conclusion, children and adolescents with JIA compared to healthy controls may show higher rate of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Furthermore, our novel findings on externalizing, social, and thought problems in JIA warrant further investigation on affected children who may be at greater risk of future psychopathologies. PMID:27656678

  16. Methotrexate is not associated with increased liver cirrhosis in a population-based cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Hung, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Lin, Ching-Heng; Chen, Der-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A few studies showed that long-term methotrexate (MTX) use exacerbates liver fibrosis and even leads to liver cirrhosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. We therefore conducted a population-based cohort study to investigate the impact of long-term MTX use on the risk of chronic hepatitis B (CHB)-related cirrhosis among RA patients. We analyzed data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan and identified 631 incident cases of RA among CHB patients (358 MTX users and 273 MTX non-users) from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2007. After a median follow-up of more than 6 years since the diagnosis of CHB, a total of 41 (6.5%) patients developed liver cirrhosis. We did not find an increased risk of liver cirrhosis among CHB patients with long-term MTX use for RA. Furthermore, there was no occurrence of liver cirrhosis among 56 MTX users with a cumulative dose ≧3 grams after 97 months' treatment. In conclusion, our data showed that long-term MTX use is not associated with an increased risk for liver cirrhosis among RA patients with CHB. However, interpretation of the results should be cautious due to potential bias in the cohort.

  17. Expansions of Cytotoxic CD4+CD28− T Cells Drive Excess Cardiovascular Mortality in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Chronic Inflammatory Conditions and Are Triggered by CMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Broadley, Iain; Pera, Alejandra; Morrow, George; Davies, Kevin A.; Kern, Florian

    2017-01-01

    A large proportion of cardiovascular (CV) pathology results from immune-mediated damage, including systemic inflammation and cellular proliferation, which cause a narrowing of the blood vessels. Expansions of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells characterized by loss of CD28 (“CD4+CD28− T cells” or “CD4+CD28null cells”) are closely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), in particular coronary artery damage. Direct involvement of these cells in damaging the vasculature has been demonstrated repeatedly. Moreover, CD4+CD28− T cells are significantly increased in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune conditions. It is striking that expansions of this subset beyond 1–2% occur exclusively in CMV-infected people. CMV infection itself is known to increase the severity of autoimmune diseases, in particular RA and has also been linked to increased vascular pathology. A review of the recent literature on immunological changes in CVD, RA, and CMV infection provides strong evidence that expansions of cytotoxic CD4+CD28− T cells in RA and other chronic inflammatory conditions are limited to CMV-infected patients and driven by CMV infection. They are likely to be responsible for the excess CV mortality observed in these situations. The CD4+CD28− phenotype convincingly links CMV infection to CV mortality based on a direct cellular-pathological mechanism rather than epidemiological association. PMID:28303136

  18. Methotrexate is not associated with increased liver cirrhosis in a population-based cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Lin, Ching-Heng; Chen, Der-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    A few studies have shown that methotrexate (MTX) use exacerbates liver fibrosis and even leads to liver cirrhosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, although the risk is low compared to psoriatics. We therefore conducted a population-based cohort study to investigate the impact of long-term MTX use on the risk of chronic hepatitis C (CHC)-related cirrhosis among RA patients. We analyzed data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan and identified 450 incident cases of RA among CHC patients (255 MTX users and 195 MTX non-users) from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2007. After a median follow-up of more than 5 years since the diagnosis of CHC, a total of 55 (12%) patients developed liver cirrhosis. We did not find an increased risk of liver cirrhosis among CHC patients with long-term MTX use for RA. Furthermore, there was no occurrence of liver cirrhosis among the 43 MTX users with a cumulative dose ≧3 grams after 108 months of treatment. In conclusion, our data showed that long-term MTX use is not associated with an increased risk for liver cirrhosis among RA patients with CHC. However, these results should be interpreted with caution due to potential bias in the cohort. PMID:27609026

  19. The effects of chronic periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis on serum and gingival crevicular fluid total antioxidant/oxidant status and oxidative stress index.

    PubMed

    Esen, Cağrı; Alkan, Banu Arzu; Kırnap, Mehmet; Akgül, Ozgür; Işıkoğlu, Semra; Erel, Ozcan

    2012-06-01

    Chronic periodontitis (CP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) appear to share many pathologic features. Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of both CP and RA. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between these two chronic inflammatory diseases with regard to antioxidant and oxidant status. A total of 80 participants were divided into four groups of 20 each: group RA-CP (patients with RA and CP), group RA (periodontally healthy patients with RA), group CP (systemically healthy patients with CP), and group C (periodontally and systemically healthy volunteers) were included in the study. After assessment of periodontal measurements, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were taken at one incisor, premolar, and molar tooth and stored with serum samples at -80°C for the antioxidant/oxidant assay. Although all clinical measurements in groups RA-CP and CP were statistically higher compared to those of C and RA groups (P <0.001), there were no differences between CP and RA-CP groups (P >0.05). GCF total oxidant status (TOS) values of CP and RA-CP groups were higher than those of the RA group (P <0.05). GCF oxidative stress index (OSI) values of the RA-CP group were higher than those of the RA group (P <0.05). There were no differences among the groups in terms of serum TOS and OSI values (P >0.05). Local OSI values in groups with patients with CP were higher, whereas systemic OSI values showed no difference among the groups. The presence of RA seems not to affect local and systemic OSI values in patients with CP.

  20. Tuberculous arthritis of the elbow joint: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yazıcı, Ayten; Kayan, Gökçen; Yaylacı, Selçuk; Demir, Mustafa Volkan; Karakeçe, Engin; Tamer, Ali; Karabay, Oğuz

    2016-09-01

    Tuberculous arthritis of the elbow joint is rare. A 57-year-old male patient presented with swelling, pain, and redness of the elbow. The symptoms first appeared one month ago; he was given antibiotic treatment after the diagnosis of septic arthritis at another center. The patient who did not improve with treatment was diagnosed with tuberculous arthritis according to the culture and was started on antituberculosis treatment. Tuberculous arthritis usually presents with chronic arthritis. However, it can also present in patients with septic arthritis.

  1. Vital Signs: Prevalence of Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis and Arthritis-Attributable Activity Limitation - United States, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Boring, Michael; Brady, Teresa J

    2017-03-10

    In the United States, doctor-diagnosed arthritis is a common and disabling chronic condition. Arthritis can lead to severe joint pain and poor physical function, and it can negatively affect quality of life. CDC analyzed 2013-2015 data from the National Health Interview Survey, an annual, nationally representative, in-person interview survey of the health status and behaviors of the noninstitutionalized civilian U.S. adult population, to update previous prevalence estimates of arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitations. On average, during 2013-2015, 54.4 million (22.7%) adults had doctor-diagnosed arthritis, and 23.7 million (43.5% of those with arthritis) had arthritis-attributable activity limitations (an age-adjusted increase of approximately 20% in the proportion of adults with arthritis reporting activity limitations since 2002 [p-trend <0.001]). Among adults with heart disease, diabetes, and obesity, the prevalences of doctor-diagnosed arthritis were 49.3%, 47.1%, and 30.6%, respectively; the prevalences of arthritis-attributable activity limitations among adults with these conditions and arthritis were 54.5% (heart disease), 54.0% (diabetes), and 49.0% (obesity). The prevalence of arthritis is high, particularly among adults with comorbid conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Furthermore, the prevalence of arthritis-attributable activity limitations is high and increasing over time. Approximately half of adults with arthritis and heart disease, arthritis and diabetes, or arthritis and obesity are limited by their arthritis. Greater use of evidence-based physical activity and self-management education interventions can reduce pain and improve function and quality of life for adults with arthritis and also for adults with other chronic conditions who might be limited by their arthritis.

  2. Phospholipase D1 Has a Pivotal Role in Interleukin-1β-Driven Chronic Autoimmune Arthritis through Regulation of NF-κB, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α, and FoxO3a

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Woo; Park, Mi-Kyung; Oh, Hye-Joa; Lee, Dong-Gun; Park, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Kang-Yell; Cho, Mi-La

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a potent proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine playing an important role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the signaling network of IL-1β in synoviocytes from RA patients is still poorly understood. Here, we show for the first time that phospholipase D1 (PLD1), but not PLD2, is selectively upregulated in IL-1β-stimulated synoviocytes, as well as synovium, from RA patients. IL-1β enhanced the binding of NF-κB and ATF-2 to the PLD1 promoter, thereby enhancing PLD1 expression. PLD1 inhibition abolished the IL-1β-induced expression of proinflammatory mediators and angiogenic factors by suppressing the binding of NF-κB or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α to the promoter of its target genes, as well as IL-1β-induced proliferation or migration. However, suppression of PLD1 activity promoted cell cycle arrest via transactivation of FoxO3a. Furthermore, PLD1 inhibitor significantly suppressed joint inflammation and destruction in IL-1 receptor antagonist-deficient (IL-1Ra−/−) mice, a model of spontaneous arthritis. Taken together, these results suggest that the abnormal upregulation of PLD1 may contribute to the pathogenesis of IL-1β-induced chronic arthritis and that a selective PLD1 inhibitor might provide a potential therapeutic molecule for the treatment of chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorders. PMID:23689131

  3. APLAR rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chak Sing; Chia, Faith; Harrison, Andrew; Hsieh, Tsu-Yi; Jain, Rahul; Jung, Seung Min; Kishimoto, Mitsumasa; Kumar, Ashok; Leong, Khai Pang; Li, Zhanguo; Lichauco, Juan Javier; Louthrenoo, Worawit; Luo, Shue-Fen; Nash, Peter; Ng, Chin Teck; Park, Sung-Hwan; Suryana, Bagus Putu Putra; Suwannalai, Parawee; Wijaya, Linda Kurniaty; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Yang, Yue; Yeap, Swan Sim

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition that affects approximately 1% of the world's population. There are a wide number of guidelines and recommendations available to support the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the evidence used for these guidelines is predominantly based on studies in Caucasian subjects and may not be relevant for rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, the Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology established a Steering Committee in 2013 to address this issue. The AGREE II instrument and the ADAPTE Collaboration framework were applied to systematically identify, appraise, synthesize, and adapt international rheumatoid arthritis guidelines for use in the Asia-Pacific region. Forty rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations, based on evidence and expert opinion, were drafted and are presented in this report. The Asia Pacific of Associations for Rheumatology rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations are intended to serve as a reference for best practice management of rheumatoid arthritis in Asia-Pacific, focusing on local issues to ensure the delivery of basic care for these patients, and to improve their outcomes. In addition, the document will serve as a reference for national rheumatology associations in Asia-Pacific for developing guidelines in their respective countries. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) ... people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people as much ...

  5. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  6. Cytokines in chronic inflammatory arthritis. II. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in rheumatoid synovial effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W D; Firestein, G S; Taetle, R; Kaushansky, K; Zvaifler, N J

    1989-01-01

    A liquid culture technique was used to study 23 synovial fluids (SF) (21 from inflammatory joint diseases and 2 noninflammatory SF) and supernatants of two cultured rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissues for colony-stimulating factor (CSF). The proliferative responses of human peripheral blood macrophage-depleted non-T cells treated with synovial fluids, supernatants of synovial tissue explants, and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage (rGM)-CSF were compared. Aggregates of cells that formed in long-term cultures (15 d) were similar for each applied agent and consisted of macrophages, eosinophils, and large blasts. Tritiated thymidine incorporation was proportional to the concentration of rGM-CSF and was accompanied by an increase in number and size of cellular aggregates formed in the cultures. CSF activity was observed in inflammatory SF, with tritiated thymidine uptake of 3,501 +/- 1,140 cpm in the presence of RA samples (n = 15) compared to 1,985 +/- 628 for non-RA inflammatory SF (n = 7) (P less than 0.05) and 583 +/- 525 for medium (n = 6) (P less than 0.01). The proliferative response to RA SF was often more apparent when the samples were diluted, because at higher concentrations the RA SF was inhibitory. Two RA SF were fractionated by Sephadex G100 column chromatography; low levels of CSF activity were detected in fractions corresponding to Mr of 70-100 kD, but the major CSF activity was found in the 20-24-kD fractions. A polyclonal rabbit anti-GM-CSF antibody eliminated the stimulating activity from both rGM-CSF and RA SF. Finally, a specific RIA identified significant levels of GM-CSF (40-140 U/ml) in the culture supernatants of 3 additional RA synovial tissues. These data document the local production of GM-CSF in rheumatoid synovitis and are the first description of this cytokine at a site of disease activity. Images PMID:2646320

  7. Evaluation of quality of life in chronic, progressing rheumatic diseases based on the example of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wysocka-Skurska, Izabela; Sierakowska, Matylda; Kułak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatic diseases, irrespective of etiology and clinical course, influence different areas of a patient’s life. Adapting to disability and limitations caused by an illness is very difficult for many patients. The main goal of a therapeutic procedure should be improvement of health-related quality of life (QoL). Objective Evaluation of the factors that influence the QoL that are conditioned by the state of health of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The study group consisted of 198 patients diagnosed with OA, according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria (1988), and 100 patients diagnosed with RA, according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria (2010). A diagnostic survey using visual analog scale of pain, health assessment questionnaire disability index, and 36-item short form health survey were used in this study. Results The average age of patients with OA was 59.16 (±15.87) years and patients with RA was 55.22 (±14.87) years. The average duration of illness examined for OA was 5.5 (±4.32) years, whereas for RA, it was slightly more at 6.8 (±5.21) years. Overall the QoL in both study groups was of medium level. Among patients with OA and RA, lower evaluation of QoL was mainly affected by age (OA – physical sphere [PCS] rs=−0.177, P<0.012; MCS rs=−0.185, P=0.008; RA – PCS rs=−0.234, P=0.019; MCS rs=−0.208, P=0.038), the level of physical disability (OA – PCS rp=−0.532, P<0.001; MCS rs=−0.467, P<0.001; RA – PCS rp=−0.326, P<0.001; MCS rs=−0.229, P<0.001), and pain (OA – PCS rp=−0.425, P<0.001; mental sphere/mental functioning (MCS) rs=−0.359, P<0.001; RA – PCS rp=−0.313, P<0.001; MCS rp=−0.128, P<0.001). Conclusion Patients with OA, despite their average older age, had a higher evaluated QoL than patients with RA. Overall QoL in terms of mental functioning in both rheumatic diseases was assessed at a higher level than in the area of physical

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walk Test (SMWT) Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) Fracture Risk ... Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in ...

  9. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walk Test (SMWT) Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) Fracture Risk ... Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in ...

  10. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  11. Anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies in the serum of heavy smokers without rheumatoid arthritis. A differential effect of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Esquide, Virginia; Gómara, María José; Peinado, Víctor I; Gómez Puerta, José Alfredo; Barberá, Joan Albert; Cañete, Juan de Dios; Haro, Isabel; Sanmartí, Raimon

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse the frequency and levels of anti-citrullinated peptide/protein antibodies (ACPA) in the serum of non-rheumatoid arthritis (RA) heavy smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare them with healthy never smokers and patients with RA. Serum samples of 110 heavy smokers without RA, 209 healthy never smokers and 134 patients with RA were tested for ACPA using a commercial anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (CCP2) test and a homemade chimeric fibrin/filaggrin citrullinated synthetic peptide (anti-CFFCP) ELISA test. The frequency of positive results and autoantibody levels were compared between groups. The prevalence of the two types of ACPA was slightly higher in heavy smokers than in never smokers, although the difference was not significant, and significantly lower than in RA patients. The highest prevalence of positive ACPA in heavy smokers was found in subjects with COPD (7.4% of positive anti-CFFCP in patients with COPD in comparison with 2.4% in never smokers: OR 3.26; 95% CI 0.85-12.6, p = 0.089). Mean serum levels of ACPA in heavy smokers were not significantly different from those of never smokers. Heavy smokers with COPD had significantly higher levels of anti-CFFCP than those without COPD, although almost all patients had serum levels below the cut-off values. The prevalence of ACPA in heavy smokers without RA is low, but seems to be higher in heavy smokers with COPD. Larger studies are necessary to confirm these findings and determine the relationship between ACPA and lung disease.

  12. Pregnancy and infant outcomes including major congenital malformations among women with chronic inflammatory arthritis or psoriasis, with and without etanercept use.

    PubMed

    Carman, Wendy J; Accortt, Neil A; Anthony, Mary S; Iles, Janet; Enger, Cheryl

    2017-09-01

    Objectives were to quantify prevalence estimates of pregnancy and infant outcomes including major congenital malformations (MCMs) by etanercept (ETN) exposure among infants born to women with chronic inflammatory arthritis (cIA) or psoriasis (PsO). Claims-based data delineated pregnancy exposures and outcomes of live or nonlive births among women with cIA and PsO (ETN exposed, unexposed) and general population (GP) comparators. Infant outcomes were determined for live-born infants covered by the mother's insurer. Medical records were obtained from all accessible mother-infant pairs with claims for MCMs and a random sample of mothers. Multivariable logistic regression estimated the odds ratios (ORs) of having at least one algorithm-defined MCM in the ETN-exposed cohorts versus unexposed comparators. Prevalence estimates for pregnancy outcomes were comparable across cIA and PsO cohorts. Algorithm-defined prevalence estimates of having at least one MCM were 6.1% (ETN exposed), 5.5% (unexposed), and 5.7% (GP cohort) for the cIA cohort; PsO cohort estimates were 2.0%, 4.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. The ETN-exposure ORs for having at least one algorithm-defined MCM among infants of cIA mothers was 1.03 (95%CI: 0.51-2.10) and 0.39 (95%CI: 0.05-2.98) among infants of PsO mothers. Logistic regression with inverse probability of treatment weighting that included disease state resulted in an OR of 0.65 (0.24, 1.72). Overall, this study did not identify any new safety concerns associated with the use of etanercept during pregnancy. Etanercept, along with the other TNFis, remains a treatment without well-controlled clinical trials in pregnant women. Patients should continue to consult their doctor regarding benefit risk decisions of TNFi therapy during pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Factor structure of the Arthritis-Related Health Belief instrument in ethnically diverse community-dwelling older adults with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyoung; Clement, Russell; Hooyman, Nancy; Cavalie, Katia; Ouslander, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment of chronic pain in older people can be effective but attitudes and adherence to use of this treatment may differ by ethnicity. This study supports that a modified 14-item instrument based on the modified Health Belief Model-the arthritis-related health belief instrument (AHBI)-can be used across ethnically diverse older adults (i.e., European Americans, Hispanics, African Americans, and Afro-Caribbeans). Confirmatory factor analysis tested the factor structure of the AHBI to eliminate items inappropriate for this population. Structural equation modeling tested expected relationships among four latent variables-severity, susceptibility, barriers, and benefits-across the four ethnic groups. Findings suggest that the modified 14-item AHBI (eliminating two items from the original AHBI) adequately described the four latent factors pertaining to use of nonpharmacological pain therapy in this sample. All items registered substantial loadings (.41-.95) on the hypothesized factors, operating similarly across the four ethnic groups. The modified 14-item AHBI may be useful in (a) assessing how individual perceptions influence access to nonpharmacological pain therapy among ethnically diverse community-dwelling older adults, with the goal to develop and implement effective pain treatment for this population; and (b) measuring the likelihood of using nonpharmacological pain therapy by older adults. The modified 14-item AHBI can help health care providers to provide accurate pain assessment and examine domains that could affect use of nonpharmacological pain therapy by ethnically diverse older adults and guide practice with them by identifying barriers to use of such therapies and providing education to encourage their use.

  14. Report - Recurrent hip arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tung-Ming; Yang, Kuender D; Yong, Su-Boon

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. It is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. In this report, the case of a child who suffered recurrent alternative hip arthritis with bilateral hip arthritis is examined, in which he was finally diagnosed as suffering from Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A 14-year-old boy of Taiwanese origin presented with a normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 10, right-side hip joint pain was experienced, which later migrated to the left side. On further inspection, synovium hypertrophy, cartilage erosion and hip turbid fluid accumulation were found and aseptic arthritis was presumed to be the primary cause. However, after re-examining both his clinical history and presentation, Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was the final diagnosis. Any child presenting with repeat joint swelling are at risk of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is still to be the case if symptoms recede or heal and no initial diagnosis is made. Therefore, a better understanding of the risk of recurrent arthritis is needed. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that Juvenile idiopathic arthritis should be suspected at all times when a child suffers from recurrent aseptic arthritis of the hip joint.

  15. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Yoginder N; Dunnavant, F Daniel; Royal, Stuart A; Beukelman, Timothy; Stoll, Matthew L; Cron, Randy Q

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is extremely common but frequently asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast remains the gold standard for identifying TMJ arthritis in JIA. A reliable scoring system with published MRI examples of typical acute and chronic TMJ arthritis changes will be invaluable for future prospective treatment trials of TMJ arthritis in JIA. MRIs were collected from routine clinical studies assessing TMJ arthritis in JIA. Representative images were selected for publication to depict acute (synovial fluid, bone marrow edema, and synovial enhancement) and chronic (pannus, disc derangement, and condylar head flattening and erosions) TMJ arthritis findings. A preliminary MRI-based scoring system for assessing degrees of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis was developed and tested for inter- and intrareader reliability. TMJ MRIs representative of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis in JIA were selected from among thousands taken (>500 TMJ MRI studies annually at Children's of Alabama) since September 2007. Moreover, computed tomography scans depicting select bony changes (osteophyte formation, micrognathia) were chosen for publication. A description of the MRI protocol for assessing TMJ arthritis is included. A preliminary scoring system weighted for degree of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis MRI findings was found to have substantial inter- and intrareader reliability. A published set of MRIs depicting representative acute and chronic changes will help establish a standardized scoring system to assess TMJ arthritis in children with JIA. Future validation will aid in assessing improvement during treatment trials of TMJ arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Chronic oral or intraarticular administration of docosahexaenoic acid reduces nociception and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant–induced knee arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that supplementation with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) reduce joint destruction and inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of individual ω-3 PUFAs on chronic arthritic pain have not been evaluated to date. Thus, our aim in this study was to examine whether purified docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an ω-3 PUFA) reduces spontaneous pain-related behavior and knee edema and improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of knee arthritis. Methods Unilateral arthritis was induced by multiple injections of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) into the right knee joints of male ICR adult mice. Mice that received CFA injections were then chronically treated from day 15 until day 25 post–initial CFA injection with oral DHA (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg daily) or intraarticular DHA (25 and 50 μg/joint twice weekly). Spontaneous flinching of the injected extremity (considered as spontaneous pain-related behavior), vertical rearing and horizontal exploratory activity (considered as functional outcomes) and knee edema were assessed. To determine whether an endogenous opioid mechanism was involved in the therapeutic effect of DHA, naloxone (NLX, an opioid receptor antagonist, 3 mg/kg subcutaneously) was administered in arthritic mice chronically treated with DHA (30 mg/kg by mouth) at day 25 post–CFA injection. Results The intraarticular CFA injections resulted in increasing spontaneous flinching and knee edema of the ipsilateral extremity as well as worsening functional outcomes as time progressed. Chronic administration of DHA, given either orally or intraarticularly, significantly improved horizontal exploratory activity and reduced flinching behavior and knee edema in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of NLX did not reverse the antinociceptive effect of DHA. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to demonstrate DHA’s antinociceptive and

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  18. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically.

  19. Prevalence of arthritis in older Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    al Snih, S; Markides, K S; Ray, L; Freeman, J L; Goodwin, J S

    2000-12-01

    This study examines the prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis symptoms and their relationship to functional limitations in Mexican American elderly. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a probability sample of 2,873 non-institutionalized Mexican American men and women aged 65 or older, residing in the southwestern United States. Measures included self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis, morning pain or stiffness, pain when standing, global health rating, activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), depressive symptoms, presence of chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart attack, stroke), and body mass index. The Mantel-Haenszel chi-square statistic was used to test differences by arthritis status, and a logistic regression model was used to predict the odds of having arthritis. The overall prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis in the sample was 40.8 percent, 50.0 percent among women and 28.8 percent among men (P < 0.001). Morning pain or stiffness was reported by 37.7 percent of respondents and pain when standing or walking by 31.9 percent. All comorbid conditions, and both IADL and ADL limitations, were more prevalent in those with arthritis than in those without arthritis. Female sex and several medical conditions were independently associated with self-reported arthritis. Self-reported physician-diagnosed arthritis is common among older Mexican Americans. Functional limitation and disability are more prevalent among subjects with arthritis than among those without arthritis.

  20. Proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in gingival crevicular fluid and serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Burcu; Guzeldemir, Esra; Ogus, Ersin; Bulut, Sule

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic periodontitis (CP) patients to assess whether cytokine profiles distinguish patients with RA and patients with CP while using healthy patients as background controls. A total of 49 patients, 17 patients with RA (three males and 14 females; mean age: 47.82 ± 10.74 years), 16 patients with CP (10 males and six females; mean age: 44.00 ± 7.00 years), and 16 controls (eight males and eight females; mean age: 28.06 ± 6.18 years) were enrolled. Patients with RA were under the supervision of rheumatologists; 15 of the patients with RA were being treated with methotrexate-sulfasalazine combined therapy, and two of the patients were being treated with leflunomid therapy. Periodontal parameters (plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level) were recorded. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined in GCF and IL-1β and IL-10 in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There were significant differences found among RA, CP, and control groups for all periodontal parameters (P <0.05). The total amount and concentration of GCF IL-1 β, IL-4, IL-10, and TNF-α were similar in RA and CP patients (P >0.05). Although the total amount and concentration of serum IL-10 was not significantly different among the groups (P >0.05), serum IL-1β was significantly lower in the RA group compared to CP patients and controls and was higher in GCF of the RA group compared to the CP group. Although clinical periodontal disease parameters indicated more severe periodontal disease in CP compared to RA patients, immunologic evaluation did not reveal consistent results regarding proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels. This might be a result of the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatoid agents by patients with

  1. Short-term efficacy to conventional blind injection versus ultrasound-guided injection of local corticosteroids in tenosynovitis in patients with inflammatory chronic arthritis: A randomized comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Marwin; Di Matteo, Andrea; Rosemffet, Marcos; Cazenave, Tomas; Rodriguez-Gil, Gustavo; Diaz, Cristina Hernandez; Rios, Lucio Ventura; Zamora, Natalia; Guzman, Maria del Carmen Gonzalez; Carrillo, Ignacio; Okano, Tadashi; Salaffi, Fausto; Pineda, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    To compare the short-term efficacy of conventional blind injection (CBI) versus ultrasound-guided injection (USGI) of corticosteroids (CS) injection in tenosynovitis in patients with chronic arthritis and to investigate if the USGI is a less painful procedure and if there are differences in the changes of US findings during the post injection follow-up. Patients presenting tenosynovitis requiring CS injection were involved. After clinical and US evaluation, patients were randomized to receive CBI or USGI. Efficacy of procedure was assessed by the improvement in both Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS), including procedure-VAS global-VAS and local-VAS, after 1 and 4 weeks post-procedure. Power Doppler (PD) and greyscale (GS) US findings were also object of the follow-up. CBI or USGI under an aseptic technique were performed according the local guidelines using 20mg of methylprednisolone acetate. A total of 114 patients were randomized to receive CBI (54 patients) or USGI (60 patients) procedure. No significant difference was observed in terms of gender, age and pain duration among CBI and USGI groups at baseline. USGI proved to be significantly less painful than CBI (P=0.0001). AUC analysis showed that during the follow up visits, the USGI procedure had significantly better response in HAQ, local-VAS and global-VAS (P=0.0001, P=0.012 and P=0.0001 respectively) compared to CBI. During the follow up period, a significant greater reduction in the PD scores was found in the USGI group compared to the CBI group (P=0.0002), whereas no statistical differences were found in the GS findings between the groups (P=0.5627). Our study demonstrates superiority of USGI over CBI for CS injections in painful tenosynovitis, having better short-term outcomes measured by functional, clinical and US scores. These data support the use of USGI for tenosynovits in typical inpatient and/or outpatient in rheumatological practices. Copyright © 2015 Soci

  2. [Sarcopenia in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena

    The clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis covers the condition of chronic inflammation connected to the increased concentration of inflammatory mediators, reduced physical activity, immobilization caused by pain, stiffness and joint destruction as well as accompanying hormonal and metabolic disorders. It all may lead to extra-articular complications, also to the loss of muscle mass with the weakness of muscle strength, adding to the disability and significantly lowering the patients' quality of life. Sarcopenia is an advanced form of muscle mass loss which constitutes an independent and vital threat for dexterity. Attempts are made to define and classify sarcopenia basing on the measurements of muscle mass where the examinations are conducted by the method of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, absorptiometry of two X-ray beams of various energies, electric bioimpedance and anthropometric methods. The data gained in few studies conducted in order to estimate the reduction of muscle mass in patients with rheumatoid arthritis confirm the significant increase of sarcopenia occurence in this group. Procedure with rheumatoid arthritis covers primarily treatment of the inflammatory process with traditional and biological medicaments that modify the course of illness. Such treatment seems to diminish the risk of equal sarcopenia occurrence. The effectiveness of using anabolic medicaments and high protein diet has not been proved. Currently, regular physical activity including aerobic exercise and exercises with load is considered a good method of muscle mass loss prevention and a procedure in case of confirmed muscle mass loss.

  3. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: review of the literature and case report.

    PubMed

    Beena, J P

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), previously known as juvenile chronic arthritis or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, is a chronic disease of childhood with a spectrum of joint involvement and associated systemic involvement. The cause of JIA is poorly understood, and no drugs can cure the disease currently. Pediatric dentists should be familiar with the symptoms, complications, and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage the disease and provide quality care to these patients. The purpose of this case report is to review the condition and to describe the case of an adolescent with polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, focusing on specific recommendations for dental management.

  4. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  5. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Fungal Infections Infectious Arthritis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare ... for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D. ...

  6. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  7. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy.

  8. Fatigue - an underestimated symptom in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    The nature of fatigue is very complex and involves physiological, psychological and social phenomena at the same time, and the mechanisms leading to occurrence and severity of fatigue are still poorly understood. The condition of chronic inflammation associated with psoriatic arthritis can be regarded as a potential factor affecting development of fatigue. Only a few studies so far have focused on the occurrence of fatigue in psoriatic arthritis. The problem of chronic fatigue is underestimated in everyday clinical practice. Identification and analysis of subjective fatigue components in each patient can provide an objective basis for optimal fatigue treatment in daily practice. This review presents a definition of chronic fatigue and describes mechanisms that may be associated with development of fatigue, highlighting the role of chronic inflammation, selected fatigue measurement methods and relations of fatigue occurrence with clinical aspects of psoriatic arthritis.

  9. Arthritis in America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Arthritis in America Time to Take Action! Language: English ( ... by about 40% by being physically active. Problem Arthritis is common and a growing health threat. Arthritis ...

  10. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: 10:20 Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  11. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic ... can affect people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people ...

  12. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rule out other conditions or infections, such as Lyme disease , that may cause similar symptoms or occur along ... ESR) Bones, Muscles, and Joints Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Word! Arthritis Arthritis Lupus Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ( ...

  13. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs Five Key Public Health Messages Arthritis Types Fibromyalgia Gout Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Management Risk Factors ... the Unites States is osteoarthritis followed by gout, fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis. Top of Page What are ...

  14. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  15. Septic arthritis due to Clostridium ramosum.

    PubMed

    García-Jiménez, Antonio; Prim, Núria; Crusi, Xavier; Benito, Natividad

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium species are anaerobic bacilli that are rarely reported as etiologic agents of infectious arthritis. Previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium ramosum have not been reported. We describe the first 2 cases of C. ramosum arthritis. We reviewed the etiology of arthritis in our hospital during the previous 15 years. Both patients had underlying immunocompromising conditions and their infections involved a joint with preexisting disease: patient 1 had rheumatic arthritis and a prosthetic joint; patient 2, chronic renal failure on dialysis and hip osteoarthritis. The infection was hematogenously acquired and the course was indolent but destructive in both the cases. Management included open arthrotomy and resection arthroplasty. The infection had a persisting and relapsing course, and prolonged antibiotic treatment was required. In the literature review, we found 55 previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium species between 1966 and 2014; Clostridium perfringens was the most common infecting species; the infection was traumatically acquired in most of the cases. A total of 15 patients have been described with infections caused by C. ramosum; none had septic arthritis. The majority were elderly or immunocompromised adults. Proper collection, transportation and processing of clinical specimens is essential for diagnosing clostridial infections. More information about the best management of clostridial arthritis are needed. We describe the first 2 cases of septic arthritis caused by C. ramosum. They shared several pathogenic and clinical features. The possibility of anaerobic arthritis should always be considered when collecting diagnostic specimens. An increasing number of clostridial arthritis cases are likely to be diagnosed in future years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. S100A9 is not essential for disease expression in an acute (K/BxN) or chronic (CIA) model of inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rampersad, R R; Esserman, D; McGinnis, M W; Lee, D M; Patel, D D; Tarrant, T K

    2009-01-01

    S100A8 (calgranulin A, MRP8) and S100A9 (calgranulin B, MRP14) are calcium-binding proteins highly expressed by activated myeloid cells and thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Circulating levels of S100A8/S100A9 are elevated in both human and experimental models of autoimmune disease, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Mice deficient in S100A9 (S100A9 - /-) and wild-type controls were immunized using standard techniques for the K/BxN serum transfer or the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. S100A9 - /- animals, with defective expression of both S100A8 and S100A9 proteins, had similar arthritis and histopathology to that of wild-type controls in both mouse models. S100A8 and S100A9 are not essential for disease expression in either the K/BxN serum transfer or the CIA model of inflammatory arthritis.

  17. Comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turesson, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory condition, which is associated with an increased risk of comorbidity from other diseases. RA disease severity is a major predictor of development of cardiovascular disease, serious infections and malignant lymphoma. This reflects the role of chronic inflammation in the underlying pathology. Recent surveys indicate that although clinical outcomes have improved in patients with RA, mainly owing to access to more efficient pharmacotherapy, comorbidity remains a major issue in many patients. Register-based observational studies are useful sources of information on the impact of comorbidity and the efficacy and safety of antirheumatic treatment in patients with coexisting diseases. As a part of strategies to improve further the management of patients with RA, multidisciplinary collaboration for prevention and early detection of comorbidities is of major importance.

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

  19. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  20. Psoriatic arthritis of the temporomandibular joints with ankylosis. Literature review and case reports.

    PubMed

    Koorbusch, G F; Zeitler, D L; Fotos, P G; Doss, J B

    1991-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is currently defined as psoriasis associated with chronic, erosive inflammatory arthritis, which is seronegative for rheumatoid factor. A review of the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment is accompanied by two unusual case reports of psoriatic arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joints with ankylosis.

  1. Prevalence and Impact of Arthritis: Opportunities for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ray; Allegrante, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Due to its chronic nature and its associated impact on physical function and life quality, arthritis in its various forms imposes a significant burden on society. Objective: To critically review and evaluate: (1) what has been documented about the burden of arthritis, (2) what is being done in treatment, and (3) what might be done at…

  2. Sporotrichosis arthritis. A case presentation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khan, M I; Goss, G; Gotsman, A; Asvat, M S

    1983-12-31

    Mimicry by fungal infection of other chronic bone and joint diseases may easily result in a tardy diagnosis with subsequent needless surgery or permanent damage to the joint and its function. A case of sporotrichosis arthritis involving both wrists and knee joints is described. Diagnostic pitfalls and therapeutic dilemmas are outlined. The literature on this apparently 'rare' form of arthritis is reviewed.

  3. Prevalence and Impact of Arthritis: Opportunities for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ray; Allegrante, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Due to its chronic nature and its associated impact on physical function and life quality, arthritis in its various forms imposes a significant burden on society. Objective: To critically review and evaluate: (1) what has been documented about the burden of arthritis, (2) what is being done in treatment, and (3) what might be done at…

  4. Gonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucurull, E; Espinoza, L R

    1998-05-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection is the most common systemic complication of acute gonorrhea and occurs in 0.5% to 3.0% of patients with untreated mucosal infection. It is also the most common cause of septic arthritis in patients less than 30 years of age. Fortunately, the incidence of gonorrhea is decreasing dramatically in the United States and Western Europe, although it is still high in developing countries. Increasing resistance to antibiotics requires continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to determine the efficacy of current therapeutic measures.

  5. Gastrocnemius Contracture in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jastifer, James R; Green, Adam

    2017-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease affecting multiple joints of the body. More than 90% of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis develop foot or ankle pain over the course of their disease. The purpose of the current study was to report ankle dorsiflexion in rheumatoid arthritis patients as well as a control group utilizing a validated measurement instrument. Using a previously validated device, 70 patients presenting with rheumatoid arthritis and 70 controls were measured for ankle range motion and isolated gastrocnemius contractures. Clinical and goniometer measurement of ankle range of motion was also performed. The rheumatoid arthritis group had a mean dorsiflexion of 12.3 degrees compared to a mean of 17.3 degrees in the control group ( P < .05). The difference in dorsiflexion was significantly less utilizing a goniometer than using the validated device, which may be due to measurement technique and external landmarks ( P < .05). Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had less ankle dorsiflexion than the control group. The clinical significance of this study is that it provides evidence that patients with rheumatoid arthritis have decreased ankle dorsiflexion even despite a lack of foot and ankle pain. In light of the high lifetime incidence of foot and ankle pain in these patients, this study provides some evidence that the decreased ankle dorsiflexion may be a contributing factor in foot and ankle pain, but further studies are needed. Level II, prospective cohort study.

  6. Nanomedicine for Intra-Articular Drug Delivery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Mary, Hannah; Del Rincόn, Inmaculada; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation within the joint. Recent developments in the understanding of inflammation have led to an increased interest in the use of nanomedicine in the treatment and diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The ability of nanomedicine, such as nanoparticles, to permeate into and/or retain within the inflamed joint after intravenous and/or intra-articular administration has proven to be beneficial in improving rheumatoid arthritis therapy while reducing systemic exposure of patients to potentially toxic anti-arthritic drugs. This review aims at explaining the major applications of nanomedicine in rheumatoid arthritis treatment and diagnosis.

  7. Can Depression Up Odds for Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can Depression Up Odds for Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis? Mood disorder may increase inflammation throughout the body, ... in people with the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis increases the risk of getting the joint condition ...

  8. Methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules are highly effective in the control of inflammation in synovial cells and a chronic arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Boechat, Antônio Luiz; de Oliveira, Catiúscia Padilha; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; da Costa, Allyson Guimarães; Malheiro, Adriana; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease in the word, affecting 1% of the population. Long-term prognosis in RA was greatly improved following the introduction of highly effective medications such as methotrexate (MTX). Despite the importance of this drug in RA, 8%–16% of patients must discontinue the treatment because of adverse effects. Last decade, we developed a promising new nanocarrier as a drug-delivery system, lipid-core nanocapsules. Objective The aim of the investigation reported here was to evaluate if methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (MTX-LNC) reduce proinflammatory and T-cell-derived cytokines in activated mononuclear cells derived from RA patients and even in functional MTX-resistant conditions. We also aimed to find out if MTX-LNC would reduce inflammation in experimentally inflammatory arthritis at lower doses than MTX solution. Methods Formulations were prepared by self-assembling methodology. The adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats (AIA) and the effect on edema formation, TNF-α levels, and interleukin-1 beta levels after treatment was evaluated. Mononuclear cells obtained from the synovial fluid of RA patients during articular infiltration procedures were treated with MTX solution and MTX-LNC. For in vitro experiments, the same dose of MTX was used in comparing MTX and MTX-LNC, while the dose of MTX in the MTX-LNC was 75% lower than the drug in solution in in vivo experiments. Results Formulations presented nanometric and unimodal size distribution profiles, with D[4.3] of 175±17 nm and span of 1.6±0.2. Experimental results showed that MTX-LNC had the same effect as MTX on arthritis inhibition on day 28 of the experiment (P<0.0001); however, this effect was achieved earlier, on day 21 (P<0.0001), by MTX-LNC, and this formulation had reduced both TNF-α (P=0.001) and IL-1α (P=0.0002) serum levels by the last day of the experiment. Further, the MTX-LNC were more effective at reducing the

  9. Canine rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Heuser, W

    1980-11-01

    A miniature poodle was presented with a history of a chronic, insidious hind limb lameness. As part of the clinical approach to the case, a serum electrophoresis was done which revealed a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Analysis of stife and carpal joint fluid revealed an elevated white cell count, that consisted of about 75% neutrophils and 25% monocytes. The joint fluid was sterile on bacteriological culture. Radiographs of the carpal joints indicated some narrowing of joint spaces and subchondral lucencies. Rheumatoid factor was identified on serological testing. Histopathology of carpal joint biopsies indicated a nonsuppurative synovitis. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The dog was treated with prednisone on a long term basis. Response to treatment has been good.

  10. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  11. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  12. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  13. The Role of C Fibers in Spinal Microglia Induction and Possible Relation with TRPV3 Expression During Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gazerani, Sasan; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Manaheji, Homa; Golabi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stimulation of peptidergic fibers activates microglia in the dorsal horn. Microglia activation causes fractalkine (FKN) release, a neuron-glia signal, which enhances pain. The transient vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) mediates the release of neuropeptides, which can subsequently activate glia. TRPV1 and TRPV2 are generally expressed on C and Aδ fibers, respectively. Expression of both proteins is upregulated during inflammation, but expression of TRPV3 after induction of inflammation is unclear. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were used in all experiments. Arthritis was induced in them by single subcutaneous injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) in their right hindpaws. Resiniferatoxin (RTX) was used to eliminate peptidergic fibers. We examined the relation between FKN and TRPV3 expression by administration of anti-FKN antibody. Results: Our study findings indicated that 1) spinal TRPV3 was mostly expressed on nonpeptidergic fibers, 2) expression of spinal TRPV3 increased following inflammation, 3) elimination of peptidergic fibers decreased spinal TRPV3 expression, 4) alteration of hyperalgesia was compatible with TRPV3 changes in RTX-treated rat, and 5) anti-FKN antibody reduced spinal TRPV3 expression. Discussion: It seems that the hyperalgesia variation during different phases of CFA-induced arthritis correlates with spinal TRPV3 expression variation on peptidergic fibers. Moreover, spinal microglial activation during CFA inflammation is involved in TRPV3 expression changes via FKN signaling. PMID:27563416

  14. Endomorphins in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jessop, David S; Fassold, Alexander; Wolff, Christine; Hofbauer, Rafael; Chover-Gonzalez, Antonio; Richards, Louise J; Straub, Rainer H

    2010-04-01

    The opioid tetrapeptides endomorphins (EM)-1 and EM-2 are widely expressed in central nervous system and immune tissues of rats and humans. Their analgesic properties are well characterized but they also have anti-inflammatory properties. EM-1 significantly attenuated the onset of hindpaw inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of EMs in T cells, macrophages, and fibroblasts in synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In an ex vivo superfusion system, EM-1 potently inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or RA. These results demonstrate that EMs are endogenously synthesized within human immune cells and have the potential to act as potent therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. We discuss the clinical potential for EM analogues chemically modified to resist proteolytic degradation and identify modified protease-resistant analogues with enhanced bioactivity.

  15. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O’Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease. PMID:26084368

  16. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  17. Nutritional considerations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Touger-Decker, R

    1988-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. The severity of the disease process adversely affects nutritional status. Articular changes, such as small joint deformities and temporomandibular joint syndrome, alter the ability to self-feed. The inflammatory process may increase metabolic rate. Ingestion, digestion, absorption, and excretion may be compromised by secondary manifestations of the disease. Comprehensive nutrition assessment incorporates evaluation of disease and treatment-specific factors, along with the usual assessment parameters. Abnormal values for certain assessment parameters do not necessarily reflect nutritional status. Treatment methods, including medications, may have an impact on nutritional status, assessment tools, and self-feeding. Nutrition management goals focus on identification and implementation of feeding strategies. Evaluation of the ability to feed oneself includes consideration of functional status, secondary manifestations, and medical treatment. Multiple feeding modalities may be required. Oral supplements, tube feedings, and parenteral nutrition may be employed to meet the nutrition needs of the individual with rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. MP Joint Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... important for both pinching and gripping. MP joint arthritis is most common in the thumb and index ...

  19. Sex and Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pre Meeting and Ticketed Sessions Knowledge Bowl Thieves Market Call for Proposals Faculty Abstracts Abstract Submission Abstract ... Arthritis Fast Facts Sex and arthritis can coexist. Open and honest communication between partners about feelings, desires, ...

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  1. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spondylitis, Q&A Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q& ... role. For example, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and fibromyalgia are more common among women. Other Rheumatic Diseases ...

  2. Arthritis - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  3. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs. PMID:20615240

  4. Phenotypic, Functional, and Gene Expression Profiling of Peripheral CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ CD4+CD25+CD127(low) Treg Cells in Patients With Chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walter, Gina J; Fleskens, Veerle; Frederiksen, Klaus S; Rajasekhar, Megha; Menon, Bina; Gerwien, Jens G; Evans, Hayley G; Taams, Leonie S

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding the suppressive capacity of Treg cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to determine whether Treg cells are intrinsically defective in RA. Using a range of assays on PB samples from patients with chronic RA and healthy controls, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127(low) Treg cells from the CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ T cell compartments were analyzed for phenotype, cytokine expression (ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation), suppression of Teff cell proliferation and cytokine production, suppression of monocyte-derived cytokine/chemokine production, and gene expression profiles. No differences between RA patients and healthy controls were observed with regard to the frequency of Treg cells, ex vivo phenotype (CD4, CD25, CD127, CD39, or CD161), or proinflammatory cytokine profile (interleukin-17 [IL-17], interferon-γ [IFNγ], or tumor necrosis factor [TNF]). FoxP3 expression was slightly increased in Treg cells from RA patients. The ability of Treg cells to suppress the proliferation of T cells or the production of cytokines (IFNγ or TNF) upon coculture with autologous CD45RO+ Teff cells and monocytes was not significantly different between RA patients and healthy controls. In PB samples from some RA patients, CD45RO+ Treg cells showed an impaired ability to suppress the production of certain cytokines/chemokines (IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-7, CCL3, or CCL4) by autologous lipopolysaccharide-activated monocytes. However, this was not observed in all patients, and other cytokines/chemokines (TNF, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-15, or CCL5) were generally suppressed. Finally, gene expression profiling of CD45RA+ or CD45RO+ Treg cells from the PB revealed no statistically significant differences between RA patients and healthy controls. Our findings indicate that there is no global defect in either CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ Treg cells in the PB of patients with chronic RA. © 2016 The Authors

  5. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  6. Gonococcal and nongonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo

    2009-02-01

    Acute bacterial arthritis usually is caused by gonococcal or nongonococcal infection of the joints. Nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis are the most potentially dangerous and destructive forms of acute arthritis. These bacterial infections of the joints are usually curable with treatment, but morbidity and mortality are still significant in patients who have underlying rheumatoid arthritis, patients who have prosthetic joints, elderly patients, and patients who have severe and multiple comorbidities. This article reviews the risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis.

  7. Impact of arthritis on disability among older Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Al Snih, S; Markides, K S; Ostir, G V; Goodwin, J S

    2001-01-01

    To estimate the impact of self-reported diagnosis of arthritis at baseline on the two year incidence of limitation in activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living in initially non-disabled Mexican-American elderly. Longitudinal study. SETTING Southwestern United States (Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona and California). A probability sample of 2,167 non-institutionalized Mexican-American men and women, aged 65 or older. Having ever been told by a doctor that a subject had arthritis, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), depressive symptomatology, presence of chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, heart attack, stroke, cancer), and body mass index (BMI). Among non-disabled persons at baseline, 11.2% of subjects with arthritis reported at least one ADL limitation after two years, compared to 6.9% of subjects without arthritis. Similarly, among non-disabled persons at baseline, 34.7% of subjects with arthritis reported at least one IADL limitation after two years, compared to 27.0% of subjects without arthritis. In logistic regression analysis, depression, diabetes, and arthritis were found to be predictive of the development of ADL disability, controlling for sociodemographic variables. Depression was the only condition that significantly predicted IADL disability. Subjects with arthritis were more likely to develop ADL and IADL disability over a two-year period than those without arthritis.

  8. [Gonococcus-associated arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bodmer, K

    1989-04-01

    The various forms of arthritis associated with a gonococcus infection are pathogenetically and clinically differentiated. Whereas an infectious systemic process with different clinical symptoms is said to be underlying the arthritis-dermatitis syndrome as well as the septic GO-arthritis, the third form is para-infectious reactive arthritis. It is often difficult to diagnose an infectious GO-arthritis, as direct evidence of the virus found in joint and blood is rarely positive, so that the diagnosis can be affirmed or negated on the basis of clinical facts of the reaction of arthritis after an appropriate antibiotic therapy. Differential diagnostic considerations may help to find the correct diagnosis in view of an acute urethritis arthritis.

  9. The role of physiological elements in the future therapies of rheumatoid arthritis. II. The relevance of energy redistribution in the process of chronic inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for development of chronic inflammation are complex and not fully understood. One of the factors affecting the prolongation of inflammation is changes in cell metabolism, occurring at the center of the inflammatory process. In chronic inflammation there is an imbalance between the processes of storage and consumption of energy reserves. Hypoxia that is a consequence of edema results in transition of white blood cells to anaerobic metabolism. Neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages produce active oxygen metabolites which on one hand facilitate the elimination of pathogens, and on the other hand, can cause damage to healthy cells located in the inflamed tissue. In this paper, we discuss the importance of disturbed redistribution of energy as one of the main reasons for transformation of the acute inflammatory process into the chronic one. PMID:27407224

  10. Anakinra for myocarditis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Movva, Rajesh; Brown, Suzanne B; Morris, D Lynn; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    A 20-year-old pregnant woman with a history of juvenile idiopathic arthritis presented with flu-like symptoms, systemic inflammation with myocarditis, and severe cardiomyopathy. Six weeks earlier, her chronic-arthritis therapy had been changed from anakinra, an interleukin-1β receptor antagonist, to etanercept. When she resumed taking anakinra, her condition improved dramatically, including a complete recovery of ventricular function. Myocarditis is a well-recognized complication of systemic vasculitides. This unusual case emphasizes the important pathophysiologic role of interleukin receptors in the successful treatment of myocarditis. We suggest that clinical cardiologists be aware of the therapeutic usefulness of biological agents such as anakinra in patients with rheumatic conditions.

  11. ICPMS analysis of proteins separated by Native-PAGE: Evaluation of metaloprotein profiles in human synovial fluid with acute and chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Mario F; Mariño-Repizo, Leonardo; Tamashiro, Héctor; Villegas, Liliana; Acosta, Mariano; Gil, Raúl A

    2016-07-01

    The role of trace elements bound to proteins in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. In this sense, the identification and detection of metalloproteins has a strong and growing interest. Metalloprotein studies are currently carried out by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and despite that complete information can be obtained for metals such as Fe, Cu and Zn, difficulties due to poor sensitivity for other trace elements such as Sn, As, etc, are currently faced. In the present work, a simple and fast method for the determination of trace metals bound to synovial fluid (SF) proteins was optimized. Proteins from SF (long and short-term RA) were separated in ten fractions by native PAGE, then dissolved in nitric acid and peroxide hydrogen, and analyzed by ICPMS. Fifteen metals were determined in each separated protein fraction (band). Adequate calibration of proteins molecular weight allowed stablishing which protein type were bound to different metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of Arthritis and Arthritis-Attributable Activity Limitation by Urban-Rural County Classification - United States, 2015.

    PubMed

    Boring, Michael A; Hootman, Jennifer M; Liu, Yong; Theis, Kristina A; Murphy, Louise B; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Brady, Terry J; Croft, Janet B

    2017-05-26

    Rural populations in the United States have well documented health disparities, including higher prevalences of chronic health conditions (1,2). Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is one of the most prevalent health conditions (22.7%) in the United States, affecting approximately 54.4 million adults (3). The impact of arthritis is considerable: an estimated 23.7 million adults have arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL). The age-standardized prevalence of AAAL increased nearly 20% from 2002 to 2015 (3). Arthritis prevalence varies widely by state (range = 19%-36%) and county (range = 16%-39%) (4). Despite what is known about arthritis prevalence at the national, state, and county levels and the substantial impact of arthritis, little is known about the prevalence of arthritis and AAAL across urban-rural areas overall and among selected subgroups. To estimate the prevalence of arthritis and AAAL by urban-rural categories CDC analyzed data from the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The unadjusted prevalence of arthritis in the most rural areas was 31.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 31.0%-32.5%) and in the most urban, was 20.5% (95% CI = 20.1%-21.0%). The unadjusted AAAL prevalence among adults with arthritis was 55.3% in the most rural areas and 49.7% in the most urban. Approximately 1 in 3 adults in the most rural areas have arthritis and over half of these adults have AAAL. Wider use of evidence-based interventions including physical activity and self-management education in rural areas might help reduce the impact of arthritis and AAAL.

  13. Chikungunya Arthritis Mechanisms in the Americas (CAMA): A cross sectional analysis of chikungunya arthritis patients 22 months post infection demonstrates a lack of viral persistence in synovial fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-30

    rheumatoid arthritis are being tested in this patient population. However, such therapeutics could be 76 dangerous if active virus is still present...validated rheumatoid 164 arthritis (RA) assessment tool that is a composite score of the number of tender joints, swollen joints, global 165 disease...comorbidities, n (%) 0 1 (13%) 0 0.19 Comorbidity n(%) Rheumatoid arthritis Osteoarthritis Ischemic heart disease Chronic kidney disease

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of enthesitis-related arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Pamela F

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic, inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) JIA category describes a clinically heterogeneous group of children including some who have predominately enthesitis, enthesitis and arthritis, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, or inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthropathy. ERA accounts for 10%–20% of JIA. Common clinical manifestations of ERA include arthritis, enthesitis, and acute anterior uveitis. Axial disease is also common in children with established ERA. Treatment regimens for ERA, many of them based on adults with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, include the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and biologic agents either individually or in combination. PMID:23236258

  15. [Nutrition and chronic polyarthritis].

    PubMed

    Diethelm, U

    1993-03-23

    Patients suffering from chronic and incurable diseases often try to influence their symptoms by dietary modification. The effect of complete fasting on pain in rheumatoid arthritis is remarkable, but not fully understood. Polyunsaturated fatty-acids, specially omega-3-fatty-acids from fish oil, are significant as precursors of mediators for inflammation. In rare instances food allergy may cause or aggravate arthritis. The actual knowledge is presented in a concentrated form and some practical advice is given.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  17. Is air pollution a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Essouma, Mickael; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory debilitating disease triggered by a complex interaction involving genetic and environmental factors. Active smoking and occupational exposures such as silica increase its risk, suggesting that initial inflammation and generation of rheumatoid arthritis-related autoantibodies in the lungs may precede the clinical disease. This hypothesis paved the way to epidemiological studies investigating air pollution as a potential determinant of rheumatoid arthritis. Studies designed for epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis found a link between traffic, a surrogate of air pollution, and this disease. Furthermore, a small case-control study recently found an association between wood smoke exposure and anticyclic citrullinated protein/peptide antibody in sera of patients presenting wood-smoke-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, reports addressing impact of specific pollutants on rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity across populations are somewhat conflicting. In addition to the link reported between other systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and particulate matters/gaseous pollutants, experimental observation of exacerbated rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity in mice models of collagen-induced arthritis after diesel exhaust particles exposure as well as hypovitaminosis D-related autoimmunity can help understand the role of air pollution in rheumatoid arthritis. All these considerations highlight the necessity to extend high quality epidemiological researches investigating different sources of atmospheric pollution across populations and particularly in low-and-middle countries, in order to further explore the biological plausibility of air pollution's effect in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This should be attempted to better inform policies aiming to reduce the burden of rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Prevalence and occupational impact of arthritis in Saskatchewan farmers.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Gjevre, Regina M; Trask, Catherine; King, Nathan; Koehncke, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural workers have physically demanding occupations. In this study of Saskatchewan farmers, the authors examined (1) self-reported prevalence of physician-diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis; and (2) the impact of these chronic arthridities on engagement in physical tasks related to farming. This study was conducted through a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Saskatchewan Farm Injury Cohort Study in which 2,473 adult residents upon 1,216 farms participated. Collected survey data included demographic and health information; regional musculoskeletal symptoms for each participant assessed via the Standard Nordic Questionnaire; and engagement in various specific physical tasks or activities associated with mixed farming practices. Of the 2,473 respondents, 13% reported chronic arthritic diagnoses (10% osteoarthritis, 4% rheumatoid arthritis, with 1% from each category overlapping with both forms of arthritis). Participants reporting arthritis were more likely to also report disabling musculoskeletal symptoms involving their shoulders, elbows, hands, lower back, hips, knees, and ankles. Farmers with arthritis reported less participation in all physical farming activities studied, including various machinery operations, herd maintenance and veterinary activities, overhead work, shoveling/pitchfork work, and lifting/carrying. When adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, operation of combines and shoveling/pitchfork work continued to be significantly less engaged in by farmers with arthritis. The overall prevalence of arthritis was consistent with general population prevalence, although the category of rheumatoid arthritis was overrepresented. Farmers with arthritis were significantly less likely to participate in combine operation and shoveling/pitchfork chores compared with their counterparts without arthritis.

  19. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  20. A review of behaviour change theories and techniques used in group based self-management programmes for chronic low back pain and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Alison; Tully, Mark A; Matthews, James; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2015-12-01

    Medical Research Council (MRC) guidelines recommend applying theory within complex interventions to explain how behaviour change occurs. Guidelines endorse self-management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) and osteoarthritis (OA), but evidence for its effectiveness is weak. This literature review aimed to determine the use of behaviour change theory and techniques within randomised controlled trials of group-based self-management programmes for chronic musculoskeletal pain, specifically CLBP and OA. A two-phase search strategy of electronic databases was used to identify systematic reviews and studies relevant to this area. Articles were coded for their use of behaviour change theory, and the number of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) was identified using a 93-item taxonomy, Taxonomy (v1). 25 articles of 22 studies met the inclusion criteria, of which only three reported having based their intervention on theory, and all used Social Cognitive Theory. A total of 33 BCTs were coded across all articles with the most commonly identified techniques being 'instruction on how to perform the behaviour', 'demonstration of the behaviour', 'behavioural practice', 'credible source', 'graded tasks' and 'body changes'. Results demonstrate that theoretically driven research within group based self-management programmes for chronic musculoskeletal pain is lacking, or is poorly reported. Future research that follows recommended guidelines regarding the use of theory in study design and reporting is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  2. The pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Thiele, Ralf G

    2010-11-01

    The characteristic radiographic hallmarks of chronic gouty arthritis are the presence of macroscopic tophi and erosions with overhanging edges and relative preservation of the joint space. In recent years there has been more insight into the processes underlying the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. This review discusses the mechanical, pathological, cellular and immunological factors that may have a role in the pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. It highlights the evidence suggesting that monosodium urate crystal deposition is associated with the presence of underlying osteoarthritis and the important role of osteoclasts and the receptor for activation of nuclear factor κ B (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANK-RANKL) pathway in the pathogenesis of gouty erosions. Gouty arthritis is primarily driven by interleukin 1β (IL-1β). IL-1β has been implicated in bone destruction and erosions in other inflammatory arthridities. Thus, future IL-1 inhibitors may prevent and treat erosion formation due to tophaceous gouty arthritis. This review discusses imaging modalities and highlights ultrasongraphic evidence suggesting a significant relationship between the presence of the gouty tophus and bone erosions as well as the frequent presence of persistent low-grade inflammation in asymptomatic chronic tophaceous gouty arthritis on high-resolution ultrasonography. It is the tophus eroding the underlying bone that is pivotal for the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis.

  3. Bilateral hip arthritis in a case of renal osteodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Nyokabi, David Ndegwa; Vaish, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Chronic renal disease is often associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPP) and rarely with tertiary HPP. Hip arthritis with protrusio acetabuli, secondary to tertiary HPP, is a rare case scenario and has not been described well in the literature. We present a rare case of bilateral hip arthritis with protrusio acetabuli secondary to renal osteodystrophy due to tertiary HPP. The diagnosis and aetiology of hip arthritis and its treatment have been discussed along with a detailed review of literature of skeletal lesions due to HPP. PMID:24554674

  4. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chronic asymmetric sacroileitis. Physicians should be aware of possible reactive arthritis after staphylococcal coagulase negative bacteremia. PMID:20062603

  5. Bilateral hip arthritis in a case of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Nyokabi, David Ndegwa; Vaish, Abhishek

    2014-02-19

    Chronic renal disease is often associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPP) and rarely with tertiary HPP. Hip arthritis with protrusio acetabuli, secondary to tertiary HPP, is a rare case scenario and has not been described well in the literature. We present a rare case of bilateral hip arthritis with protrusio acetabuli secondary to renal osteodystrophy due to tertiary HPP. The diagnosis and aetiology of hip arthritis and its treatment have been discussed along with a detailed review of literature of skeletal lesions due to HPP.

  6. Amplifying elements of arthritis and joint destruction.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Wim B; van Lent, Peter L; Joosten, Leo A B; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Koenders, Marije I

    2007-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by chronic joint inflammation and variable degrees of bone and cartilage erosion. Studies in animal models of arthritis provide insight into elements which can amplify destructive features. The presence of immune complexes in the joint makes arthritis more erosive. Although considerable bone erosion still occurs in the absence of FcgammaR triggering by immune complexes, through cytokine-induced RANKL and direct osteoclast activation, cartilage erosion is heavily dependent on the FcgammaR pathway. T cell factors such as IFNgamma and IL17 further amplify erosion through upregulation of the damaging FcgammaRI and stimulation of the influx of granulocytes, respectively. Apart from immune elements, environmental pressure and components of tissue damage contribute through innate pathways. Spontaneous T cell-dependent arthritis in IL1Ra-/- mice is absent under germ-free conditions, and markedly suppressed in TLR4-deficient mice. Moreover, TLR4 blocking with a receptor antagonist suppresses erosive arthritis.

  7. Update on Therapeutic Approaches for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Gomes, Andreia; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common chronic inflammatory and destructive arthropathy that consumes considerable personal, social and economic costs. It consists of a syndrome of pain, stiffness and symmetrical inflammation of the synovial membrane (synovitis) of freely moveable joints such as the knee (diarthrodial joints). Although the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis is unclear, the disease is characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining of diarthrodial joints, high synovial proliferation and an influx of inflammatory cells, macrophages and lymphocytes through angiogenic blood vessels. Diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs slow disease progression and can induce disease remission in some patients. Methotrexate is the first line therapy, but if patients become intolerant to this drug, biologic agents should be used. The development of biological substances for the treatment of rheumatic conditions has been accompanied by ongoing health economic discussions regarding the implementation of these highly effective, but accordingly, highly priced drugs are the standard treatment guidelines of rheumatic diseases. In this way, more efficient strategies have to be identified. Despite numerous reviews in rheumatoid arthritis in the last years, this area is in constant development and updates are an urgent need to incorporate new advances in rheumatoid arthritis research. This review highlights the immunopathogenesis rationale for the current therapeutic strategies in rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Amplifying elements of arthritis and joint destruction

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Wim B; van Lent, Peter L; Joosten, Leo A B; Abdollahi‐Roodsaz, Shahla; Koenders, Marije I

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by chronic joint inflammation and variable degrees of bone and cartilage erosion. Studies in animal models of arthritis provide insight into elements which can amplify destructive features. The presence of immune complexes in the joint makes arthritis more erosive. Although considerable bone erosion still occurs in the absence of FcγR triggering by immune complexes, through cytokine‐induced RANKL and direct osteoclast activation, cartilage erosion is heavily dependent on the FcγR pathway. T cell factors such as IFNγ and IL17 further amplify erosion through upregulation of the damaging FcγRI and stimulation of the influx of granulocytes, respectively. Apart from immune elements, environmental pressure and components of tissue damage contribute through innate pathways. Spontaneous T cell‐dependent arthritis in IL1Ra–/– mice is absent under germ‐free conditions, and markedly suppressed in TLR4‐deficient mice. Moreover, TLR4 blocking with a receptor antagonist suppresses erosive arthritis. PMID:17934095

  9. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child.

    PubMed

    Shivamurthy, V M; Gantt, Soren; Reilly, Christopher; Tilley, Peter; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features.

  10. Role of viscosupplementation in osteo-arthritis of knee joint.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rajesh; Mahajan, Sumit

    2013-05-01

    Osteo-arthritis is the chronic degenerative disease associated with joint pain and loss of joint function. It is caused by 'wear and tear' on a joint. Knee is the most commonly Involved joint. Disease is so crippling that patient is unable to walk independently from bed to bathroom. The major causes of osteo-arthritis are age, gender, obesity, medical condition and hereditary. The signs and symptoms of osteo-arthritis are pain, joint stiffness, joint swelling, and loss of function. No blood tests are helpful in diagnosing osteo-arthritis. Management of osteo-arthritis includes non-pharmacological, pharmacological and surgical. A relatively new procedure is viscosupplementation, in which a preparation of hyaluronic acid is injected into the knee joint. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance found in the synovial fluid. It acts as a lubricant to enable bones to move smoothly over each other and a shock absorber for joint loads. The decrease in the elastic and viscous properties of synovial fluid in osteo-arthritis results from both a reduced molecular size and a reduced concentration of hyaluronic acid in the synovial fluid. Viscosupplementation may be a therapeutic option for individuals with osteo-arthritis of the knee. Viscosupplementation has been shown to relieve pain in many patients who cannot get relief from non-medicinal measures or analgesic drugs. This article is to know the mechanism of action, patients' selection criteria, rationale and efficacy of viscosupplimentation in the management of osteo-arthritis of knee.

  11. [Possible association of gynecological cancer and rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Mercado, Ulises

    2012-06-01

    The association between rheumatoid arthritis and cancer is controversial. Previous studies have shown a correlation between rheumatoid arthritis and the development of lymphoma. Describe a case of rheumatoid arthritis and associated breast cancer plus the identification of the clinical features of a set of cases in which arthritis and cancer go along. This is a retrospective clinical series study. A database of Hospital General ISSSTECALI of Mexicali, Mexico, containing information on patients suffering from both rheumatoid arthritis and cancer until 2012 was checked. The medical files confirmed the diagnoses. The data available included age, date of arthritis diagnosis, date of cancer diagnosis, related conditions, results of serological tests, type of cancer, treatments used and follow-up information. Fifteen cases of women suffering from both rheumatoid arthritis and cancer were identified on the database of the Hospital General ISSSTECALI in Mexicali. The case described here is the number four on that list. The average age was 54 years and the average time between arthritis and cancer diagnoses was four years. Ten patients were administered methotrexate. Nine patients (60%) suffered from breast cancer and six more from cervical cancer. Three patients suffered from cervical dysplasia. These cases emphasize the need of strict follow-up on patients suffering from inflammatory rheumatoid condition. If cancer follows chronic inflammation, immunosuppression, or it is pure coincidence, is still a matter of debate.

  12. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender and the treatment of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and psoriasis are immune-mediated inflammatory diseases with similarities in pathophysiology, and all can be treated with similar biological agents. Previous studies have shown that there are gender differences with regard to disease characteristics in RA and IBD, with women generally having worse scores on pain and quality of life measurements. The relationship is less clear for psoriasis. Because treatment differences between men and women could explain the dissimilarities, we investigated gender differences in the disease characteristics before treatment initiation and in the biologic treatment prescribed. Methods Data on patients with RA or IBD were collected from two registries in which patients treated with biologic medication were enrolled. Basic demographic data and disease activity parameters were collected from a time point just before the initiation of the biologic treatment. For patients with psoriasis, the data were taken from the 2010 annual report of the Swedish Psoriasis Register for systemic treatment, which included also non-biologic treatment. For all three diseases, the prescribed treatment and disease characteristics were compared between men and women. Results In total, 4493 adult patients were included in the study (1912 with RA, 131 with IBD, and 2450 with psoriasis). Most of the treated patients with RA were women, whereas most of the patients with IBD or psoriasis were men. There were no significant differences between men and women in the choice of biologics. At treatment start, significant gender differences were seen in the subjective disease measurements for both RA and psoriasis, with women having higher (that is, worse) scores than men. No differences in objective measurements were found for RA, but for psoriasis men had higher (that is, worse) scores for objective disease activity measures. A similar trend to RA was seen in IBD. Conclusions Women with RA or

  14. Readiness to manage arthritis: a pilot study using a stages-of-change measure for arthritis rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Arthur, A Barbara; Kopec, Jacek A; Klinkhoff, Alice V; Adam, Paul M; Carr, Susan L; Prince, Jane M; Dumont, Kelly E; Nigg, Claudio R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the Readiness to Manage Arthritis Questionnaire (RMAQ), a new multibehavior measure of readiness for change in arthritis management. Data were obtained from 46 patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis admitted for intensive treatment. Test-retest reliability, correlations with clinical variables and theoretically related constructs, and responsiveness to change were assessed. Test-retest reliability indicated reasonable stability, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.30 to 0.75. A significant association was observed between psychological well-being and readiness status. Clinical variables of disease duration, disease severity, pain, and function were not related to readiness status. Correlations between stages-of-change scores and self-efficacy for managing arthritis symptoms were mostly nonsignificant, with the exception of modest agreement between readiness to engage in physical activity and exercise self-efficacy (0.43). Significant changes were observed in mean RMAQ scores from initial assessment to 12 weeks posttreatment for the behaviors of using joint protection, dealing with frustration, learning about arthritis, engaging in physical activity, and stress management. Findings from this pilot study suggest that the RMAQ has adequate psychometric properties in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and can be used to assess an individual's readiness to adopt important arthritis self-management behaviors.

  15. Spinal epidural abscess associated with infliximab treatment for psoriatic arthritis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam P; Musacchio, Michael J; O'Toole, John E

    2008-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors are used to treat numerous chronic inflammatory and rheumatological diseases, such as Crohn disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. Because the mechanism of these inhibitors is to decrease the body's inflammatory response, the primary complication of treatment is infection. The authors present the first case of a spinal epidural abscess in a patient receiving long-term infliximab therapy for severe psoriatic arthritis. Infliximab and its side-effect profile are discussed, along with other associated complications.

  16. Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Mark; Swift, Kathie

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are chronic, often debilitating and potentially life-threatening conditions that collectively affect up to 23.5 million Americans, and their incidence is rising.1 They are heterogeneous in pathology but share common etiopathogenic factors such as intestinal hyperpermeability.2 Although up to 100 ADs have been identified, there are likely more.1 Genetics plays a clear role in the predisposition for the development and phenotype of AD, but various combinations of factors, such as toxins, endogenous hormone imbalances, microbes (including of GI origin), infections, stress and food antigens, are involved in disease expression.2–5 Standard treatments include NSAIDs, steroids, antineoplastic agents and tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists. These tools have potentially devastating side effects and are often applied regardless of the diagnosis. Frequently, they are only modestly effective in relieving symptoms and limiting the advancing disease process. Direct health-care costs of AD are estimated at around 100 billion dollars per year in the United States. By comparison, cancer care costs about 57 billion dollars per year.1 The rising incidence of this debilitating and costly group of conditions dictates that safe, alternative approaches to treatment be considered now. PMID:24278833

  17. Psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Hyman, Mark; Swift, Kathie

    2012-09-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are chronic, often debilitating and potentially life-threatening conditions that collectively affect up to 23.5 million Americans, and their incidence is rising.(1) They are heterogeneous in pathology but share common etiopathogenic factors such as intestinal hyperpermeability.(2) Although up to 100 ADs have been identified, there are likely more.(1) Genetics plays a clear role in the predisposition for the development and phenotype of AD, but various combinations of factors, such as toxins, endogenous hormone imbalances, microbes (including of GI origin), infections, stress and food antigens, are involved in disease expression.(2-5) Standard treatments include NSAIDs, steroids, antineoplastic agents and tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists. These tools have potentially devastating side effects and are often applied regardless of the diagnosis. Frequently, they are only modestly effective in relieving symptoms and limiting the advancing disease process. Direct health-care costs of AD are estimated at around 100 billion dollars per year in the United States. By comparison, cancer care costs about 57 billion dollars per year.(1) The rising incidence of this debilitating and costly group of conditions dictates that safe, alternative approaches to treatment be considered now.

  18. Dissemination and evaluation of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the role of the nurse in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis: results of a multinational survey among nurses, rheumatologists and patients.

    PubMed

    van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Buss, Beate; Fayet, Françoise; Moretti, Antonella; Ryan, Sarah; Savel, Carine; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; van Tubergen, Astrid

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this study were to disseminate, assess agreement with, assess the application of and identify potential barriers for implementation of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the role of nurses in the management of chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA) using a survey of nurses, rheumatologists and patients. A Web-based survey was distributed across Europe and the USA using snowball sampling. Levels of agreement and application were assessed using a 0-10 rating scale (0 = none, 10 = full agreement/application). Reasons for disagreement and potential barriers to application of each recommendation were sought. Regional differences with respect to agreement and application were explored. In total, 967 nurses, 548 rheumatologists and 2034 patients from 23 countries participated in the survey. Median level of agreement was high in all three groups, ranging from 8 to 10 per recommendation. Median level of application was substantially lower, ranging from 0 to 8 per recommendation. Agreement and application were lowest in Eastern and Central Europe. The most commonly reported reasons for incomplete agreement were too many other responsibilities (nurses), doubts about knowledge of the nurse (rheumatologists) and fear of losing contact with the rheumatologist (patients). The most commonly reported barriers to the application were time constraints and unavailability of service. Rheumatologists responses suggested that nurses had insufficient knowledge to provide the recommended care. The EULAR recommendations for the role of nurses in the management of CIA have been disseminated among nurses, rheumatologists and patients across Europe and the USA. Agreement with these recommendations is high, but application is lower and differed across regions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Living with Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone might fall or be injured in a car accident. Then, years after the individual’s knee has apparently healed, he might get arthritis in his knee joint. Rheumatoid arthritis happens when the body’s own defense system doesn’t work properly. It affects joints and bones (often of ...

  20. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  1. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis.

  2. Cable Television and Health Promotion: A Feasibility Study with Arthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a study undertaken to ascertain the extent to which arthritis patients could be targeted by arthritis-related programming over a local cable system. Some conceptual and practical issues involved in targeting chronic patient groups for health programming are discussed. (Author/CT)

  3. Cable Television and Health Promotion: A Feasibility Study with Arthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a study undertaken to ascertain the extent to which arthritis patients could be targeted by arthritis-related programming over a local cable system. Some conceptual and practical issues involved in targeting chronic patient groups for health programming are discussed. (Author/CT)

  4. Use of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate and gallium-67 citrate scans after intraarticular injection of Staphylococcus aureus into knee joints of rabbits with chronic antigen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, M.L.; Raskind, J.R.; Peterson, L.; Gerding, D.; Raddatz, D.A.; Shafer, R.

    1986-08-01

    Numerous clinical studies have questioned the ability of radionuclide scans to differentiate septic from aseptic joint inflammation. A clinical study may not be able to document an underlying disease process or duration of infection and, thus, may make conclusions about the accuracy of scan interpretations open to debate. In this study, the Dumonde-Glynn model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits was used as the experimental model to study technetium and gallium scans in Staphylococcus aureus infection of arthritic and normal joints. Gallium scans were negative in normal rabbits, usually negative in antigen-induced arthritis, but positive in septic arthritis. The bone scan was usually negative in early infection but positive in late septic arthritis, a finding reflecting greater penetration of bacteria into subchondral bone because of the underlying inflammatory process.

  5. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  6. Agmatine ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis and inflammatory cachexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacological effect of agmatine in Complete Freud Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis and cachexia in rats. The rats were injected with CFA (0.1ml/rat) to induced symptoms of arthritis. Day 8 onwards of CFA administration, rats were injected daily with agmatine for next 7days, and arthritis score, body weights and food intake were monitored daily (g). Since cachexia is known to produce severe inflammation, malnutrition and inhibition of albumin gene expression, we have also monitored the total proteins, albumin, TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritic rats and its modulation by agmatine. In the present study, CFA treated rats showed a progressive reduction in both food intake and body weight. In addition analysis of blood serum of arthritis animals showed a significant reduction in proteins and albumin and significant elevation in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and Interleukins (IL)-6. Chronic agmatine (20-40mg/kg, ip) treatment not only attenuated the signs of arthritis but also reverses anorexia and body weight loss in CFA treated rats. In addition, agmatine restored total protein and albumin and reduces TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritis rats. These results suggest that agmatine administration can prevent the body weights loss and symptoms of arthritis via inhibition of inflammatory cytokines.

  7. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  8. Septic arthritis after ureteroneocystostomy.

    PubMed

    Allen, W R

    1979-04-01

    Acute infectious arthritis is an uncommon disease that is most commonly caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or gram-positive cocci. Gram-negative bacteria are an infrequent and highly virulent cause of septic arthritis and most commonly enter the circulation through the urinary tract, as in this case after ureteroneocystostomy. The resulting arthritis carries a mortality of 25% and a morbidity of 80%. Early recognition and treatment with appropriate antibiotics and mechanical drainage is imperative. Needle drainage of the affected joint has been shown superior to open surgical drainage.

  9. Psoriasis and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cats, A

    1990-10-01

    The exact association between psoriasis and arthritis remains an enigma. Some investigators consider that the two disorders constitute a disease entity, psoriatic arthritis, while others support the thesis that psoriasis and arthritis are common diseases and occur simultaneously by chance. The author upholds the latter view as viable. To underscore his viewpoint he presents a comprehensive overview of the controversial opinions through an historical perspective as well as reporting on his epidemiologic and clinical findings from large population studies in the Netherlands. Therapeutic regimens for the management of both skin and joint problems are presented.

  10. Current status of gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, J; Koch, H; Meijer, H; Granrath, M; Schulitz, K P; Wehling, P

    1999-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of the disease, at present little effective pharmacological treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is available. Novel approaches utilising biological agents have resulted in the development of new antiarthritic and antiinflammatory agents, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha)-specific antibodies and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Local gene therapy not only allows the pharmaceutical use of these biologicals, but also allows for continuous drug supply, which is necessary for chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. We discuss the basics of rheumatoid arthritis therapy, candidate genes and possible gene transfer methods. A current clinical gene therapy trial is focusing on the IL-1 system using IL-1ra as a transgene. The transfer system, clinical protocol and preliminary results are described. After treatment of 11 patients we feel that gene therapy will offer potential as a new avenue to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  12. Diagnosis of arthritis through fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sachidanand; Kumar, Atul; Panneerselvam, K; Vennila, J Jannet

    2012-06-01

    Expert or knowledge-based systems are the most common type of AIM (artificial intelligence in medicine) system in routine clinical use. They contain medical knowledge, usually about a very specifically defined task, and are able to reason with data from individual patients to come up with reasoned conclusion. Although there are many variations, the knowledge within an expert system is typically represented in the form of a set of rules. Arthritis is a chronic disease and about three fourth of the patients are suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis which are undiagnosed and the delay of detection may cause the severity of the disease at higher risk. Thus, earlier detection of arthritis and treatment of its type of arthritis and related locomotry abnormalities is of vital importance. Thus the work was aimed to design a system for the diagnosis of Arthitis using fuzzy logic controller (FLC) which is, a successful application of Zadeh's fuzzy set theory. It is a potential tool for dealing with uncertainty and imprecision. Thus, the knowledge of a doctor can be modelled using an FLC. The performance of an FLC depends on its knowledge base which consists of a data base and a rule base. It is observed that the performance of an FLC mainly depends on its rule base, and optimizing the membership function distributions stored in the data base is a fine tuning process.

  13. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  15. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  16. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... beans that may play a role. Psoriatic arthritis: Psoriasis is often thought of as a skin disorder, ... affect the joints as well. On the skin, psoriasis appears as dry, scaly patches. Not all people ...

  17. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  18. Arthritis in hip (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage normally protects the joint, allowing for smooth movement. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on ... like when walking. Arthritis involves the breakdown of cartilage. Without the usual amount of cartilage, the bones ...

  19. Clinical patterns of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of disorders with different disease manifestations among various populations. There are few reports of JIA among indigenous Africans especially sub-Saharan Africa. We present herein the clinical patterns of JIA encountered at a tertiary hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. Method Hospital records of patients with a diagnosis of chronic arthritis with onset at the age of 16 years or less presenting to University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia for the periods 1994–98 and 2006–2010 were retrospectively reviewed and reclassified as Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) based on the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILA R) JIA diagnostic criteria. Results In total, 126 patients with chronic arthritis of onset at age 16 years or less were evaluated over these periods at the hospital. Of these, 85 could further be analyzed by ILAR JIA criteria but 7 (8.24%) were HIV seropositive and were assessed separately. The average age at disease onset among the 78 JIA patients was 8.70 years (range: 1–15 years) with average age at first visit to hospital being 11.3 years (range: 2 to 25 years) and with a female to male ratio of 1.2:1. Polyarticular rheumatoid factor negative JIA, at 34.62%, was the most frequent type of chronic arthritis encountered. Oligoarthritis was found in 32.05% while 11.54% and 14.10% were polyarticular rheumatoid factor positive and systemic JIA, respectively. Enthesitis-related arthritis was found in 6.41% and only 1.28% were determined to have psoriatic arthritis among this population. Conclusion JIA is predominantly a polyarticular rheumatoid factor negative disease in Zambia. Late presentation is an issue with major implications for educational input and resource acquisition. There is need to elucidate the genetics and environmental factors of JIA in this region. PMID:24034206

  20. A nurse-led rheumatology clinic versus rheumatologist-led clinic in monitoring of patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis undergoing biological therapy: a cost comparison study in a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ingrid; Fridlund, Bengt; Arvidsson, Barbro; Teleman, Annika; Svedberg, Petra; Bergman, Stefan

    2015-11-16

    Recommendations for rheumatology nursing management of chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIA) from European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) states that nurses should take part in the monitoring patients' disease and therapy in order to achieve cost savings. The aim of the study was to compare the costs of rheumatology care between a nurse-led rheumatology clinic (NLC), based on person-centred care (PCC), versus a rheumatologist-led clinic (RLC), in monitoring of patients with CIA undergoing biological therapy. Patients with CIA undergoing biological therapy (n = 107) and a Disease Activity Score of 28 ≤ 3.2 were randomised to follow-up by either NLC or RLC. All patients met the rheumatologist at inclusion and after 12 months. In the intervention one of two annual monitoring visits in an RLC was replaced by a visit to an NLC. The primary outcome was total annual cost of rheumatology care. A total of 97 patients completed the RCT at the 12 month follow-up. Replacing one of the two annual rheumatologist monitoring visits by a nurse-led monitoring visit, resulted in no additional contacts to the rheumatology clinic, but rather a decrease in the use of resources and a reduction of costs. The total annual rheumatology care costs including fixed monitoring, variable monitoring, rehabilitation, specialist consultations, radiography, and pharmacological therapy, generated € 14107.7 per patient in the NLC compared with € 16274.9 in the RCL (p = 0.004), giving a € 2167.2 (13 %) lower annual cost for the NLC. Patients with CIA and low disease activity or in remission undergoing biological therapy can be monitored with a reduced resource use and at a lower annual cost by an NLC, based on PCC with no difference in clinical outcomes. This could free resources for more intensive monitoring of patients early in the disease or patients with high disease activity. The trial is registered as a clinical trial at the ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01071447). Registration date: October 8

  1. Rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Parsons, Wendy J; Atteno, Mariangela; Ferrara, Nicola

    2009-08-01

    This article summarizes the state of the art of rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Very little evidence was available to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation. Some data were borrowed from studies on ankylosing spondylitis. Covering certain aspects of the disease by the standard measure of functioning was difficult. However, rehabilitation was considered by the GRAPPA Group (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis), as part of treatment of axial PsA.

  2. Osteoporosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Parisi, Anna; Atteno, Mariangela; Montalbano, Simona; Vitiello, Maria; Esposito, Carmela; Bertolini, Nicoletta; Foglia, Francesca; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk of fracture. The prevalence of OP in the general population is very high as established in several studies, and OP represents one of the possible aspects of bone involvement in arthritis. In psoriatic arthritis this involvement is particularly complex because it affects not only mechanisms of bone loss but also of bone formation. We will discuss these aspects and the available epidemiological data.

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Salivary Biomarkers of Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirrielees, Jeffrey; Crofford, Leslie J.; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J.; Dawson, Dolphus R.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis influenced levels of salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease. Methods Medical assessments, periodontal examinations, and pain ratings were obtained from 35 rheumatoid arthritis, 35 chronic periodontitis and 35 age and gender-matched healthy controls in a cross-sectional, case-controlled study. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were analyzed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), matrix-metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-α concentrations. Results The arthritis and healthy groups had significantly less oral disease than the periodontitis group (p<0.0001), with the arthritis group having significantly more sites bleeding on probing (BOP) than matched controls (p=0.012). Salivary levels of MMP-8 and IL-1β were significantly elevated in the periodontal disease group (p≤0.002), and IL-1β was the only biomarker with significantly higher levels in the arthritis group compared with controls (p=0.002). Arthritis patients receiving anti-TNF-α antibody therapy had significantly lower IL-1β and TNF-α levels compared with arthritis patients not on anti-TNF-α therapy (p=0.016, p=0.024) and healthy controls (p<0.001, p=0.011), respectively. Conclusion Rheumatoid arthritis patients have higher levels of periodontal inflammation than healthy controls, ie. increased BOP. Systemic inflammation appears to influence levels of select salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease, and anti-TNF-α antibody-based disease modifying therapy significantly lowers salivary IL-1β and TNF-α levels in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:20880053

  4. Prevalence of Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis at State and County Levels - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Boring, Michael; Zhang, Xingyou; Lu, Hua; Holt, James B

    2016-05-20

    Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is a common chronic condition that affects approximately 52.5 million (22.7%) adults in the United States and is a leading cause of disability (1,2). The prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis has been well documented at the national level (1), but little has been published at the state level and the county level, where interventions are carried out and can have their greatest effect. To estimate the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis among adults at the state and county levels, CDC analyzed data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that, for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) overall, the age-standardized median prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis was 24% (range = 18.8%-35.5%). The age-standardized model-predicted prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis varied substantially by county, with estimates ranging from 15.8% to 38.6%. The high prevalence of arthritis in all counties, and the high frequency of arthritis-attributable limitations (1) among adults with arthritis, suggests that states and counties might benefit from expanding underused, evidence-based interventions for arthritis that can reduce arthritis symptoms and improve self-management.

  5. [Arthritis and infections].

    PubMed

    Cimaz, R; Meregalli, E; Biggioggero, M; Casadei, A; Careddu, P

    2005-08-01

    Arthritis caused by infectious agents can be secondary to direct invasion of the joint space or to immune mechanisms (subsequent to or concomitant to an infection). Septic arthritis refers to a situation when bacteria can be cultured in synovial fluid. Arthritis can complicate for example meningococcemia or infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Haemophilus influenzae. Reactive (postinfectious) arthritides are an important diagnostic category within a pediatric rheumatology practice. Yersinia and, less frequently, Salmonella, play an important role in postdiarrheal disorders. The arthritis that can ensue is usually oligoarticular and occurs 1-2 weeks after the enteric infection. Reiter's syndrome, rare in the pediatric age, is characterized by the triad urethritis-conjunctivitis-arthritis. Postviral arthritides can occur after a variety of viral infections, including Parvovirus B19, rubella, and others (e.g. hepatitis B, Epstein-Barr virus, chickenpox, mumps). Especially in patients with acute arthritis, the presence of preceding infections should always be investigated. Although the majority of postinfectious arthritides are self-limiting in nature and do not require specific treatment, conditions such as Lyme borreliosis and rheumatic fever can be associated with significant morbidity, and sometimes can be even lethal.

  6. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  7. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  8. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures.

  9. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Research Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of ... a project plan to address relevant challenges for rheumatoid arthritis. Read Part 1 on Lupus in MedlinePlus magazine, ...

  10. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... debilitating when it affects the hands and fingers. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common forms of ...

  11. Psoriatic arthritis update.

    PubMed

    Mease, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis occurring in up to 30% of patients with psoriasis. Its clear distinction from rheumatoid arthritis has been described clinically, genetically, and immunohistologically. Updated classification criteria have been recently derived from a large international study. Key pathophysiologic cellular processes are being elucidated, increasing our understanding of potential targets of therapy. Therapies that target cells, such as activated T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), are rational to pursue. Outcome measures have been "borrowed" from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis studies. A variety of domains are assessed including joints, skin, enthesium, dactylitis, spine, function, quality of life, and imaging assessment of disease activity and damage. The performance qualities of outcome measures in these various domains is being evaluated by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), and improved measures are being developed and validated specifically for psoriatic arthritis. Traditional therapies for psoriatic arthritis have included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, oral immunomodulatory drugs, topical creams, and light therapy. These therapies have been helpful in controlling both musculoskeletal and dermatologic aspects of the disease, but they may not be fully effective in all disease domains, may eventually show diminished benefit, and may produce treatment-limiting toxicities. In the past several years, use of biologic agents has generally yielded greater benefit across more domains, yielding significant and enduring benefits for clinical manifestations, function, and quality of life, and especially with the anti-TNF agents, inhibition of structural damage. Adverse effects with these agents can be significant but are usually manageable. Cost is also significant, but cost-effectiveness analysis is demonstrating reasonable

  12. Streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in F344----Lewis and in Lewis----F344 bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    van Bruggen, M.C.; van den Broek, M.F.; van den Berg, W.B. )

    1991-09-01

    Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis and adjuvant arthritis (AA) are rat models for chronic, erosive polyarthritis. Both models can be induced in susceptible Lewis rats, whereas F344 rats are resistant. In AA as well as in SCW arthritis, antigen-specific T lymphocytes have been demonstrated to be crucial for chronic disease. In this communication the authors describe their studies to probe the cellular mechanism responsible for the difference in susceptibility of Lewis and F344, using bone marrow chimeras. By transplanting bone marrow cells from F344 into lethally irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to SCW arthritis induction. F344 rats reconstituted with Lewis bone marrow, i.e., Lewis----F344 chimeras, develop an arthritis upon SCW injection. For AA comparable results were obtained. These data suggest that both resistance and susceptibility to bacterium-induced chronic arthritis are mediated by hemopoietic/immune cells and that the recipiental environment does not influence the susceptibility to chronic joint inflammation.

  13. CERVICAL SPINE LESIONS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Macovei, Luana-Andreea; Rezuş, Elena

    2016-01-01

    to gather clinical and laboratory data on rheumatoid arthritis patients with cervical spine damage (incidence and prevalence, correlation between duration of disease and the time of lesion onset, to assess signs and symptoms and the role of laboratory investigations). The spine is an axial organ with an important role in support and resistance. It is a pillar with a very complex morphological and functional structure. The vertebral column is crossed by many kinematic chains. The main problem of the cervical spine caused by rheumatoid arthritis is cervical instability which describes all cervical lesions that can lead to neurovascular damage or major disturbance of pain generating statics at movement. The evolving disease shows chronic inflammation of the synovium, which is a self-maintained process and an immunologically induced phenomenon. The chronic inflammation of the synovium forms granulation tissue that invades peripheral joints towards the center and causes ligament cartilage and bone damage. The present paper investigated cervical spine lesions in 107 rheumatoid arthritis patients who were admitted to the 1st Rheumatology Clinic of Iasi Rehabilitation Hospital between January 2013 and December 2014. Our study focused on assessing signs and symptoms seen in spine affected by rheumatic disease. the disease causes destructive lesions due to granulomatous infiltration of rachidian structures and medullary sheaths. These lesions lead to damaged discs and instability that produces subluxations and dislocations. The suboccipital region is most affected; in other regions of the spine, high lesions of C4-C5 prevail, where osteolysis damage of spinal apophyses are found. In atlas and axis joints, rheumatoid arthritis causes the inflammation of bursa, synovium and joint capsule and leads to synovial pannus formation. This causes the destruction of cartilage and subchondral bone. Atlantoaxial dislocation is caused by erosive synovitis of atlanto-epistrophic joint

  14. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  15. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dan, M

    1983-11-01

    To assess and correlate the microbiology of neonatal septic arthritis with the clinical presentation, we reviewed the records of nine infants with neonatal septic arthritis (NSA) diagnosed at Edmonton hospitals between 1964 and 1981, and evaluated 92 other cases reported in the English literature since 1960. Our analysis revealed that the microbiology of NSA seemed to be dependent on whether it was hospital or community acquired. In the hospital-acquired cases, staphylococci were the predominant isolates (62%), followed by Candida species (17%) and gram-negative enteric bacilli (15%). Community-acquired arthritis was caused most often by streptococci (52%), followed by staphylococci (26%) and gonococci (17%). Since 1970, the relative infrequency of staphylococcal (5%) in favor of streptococcal (75%) isolates in community-acquired NSA is even more pronounced.

  16. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Arthritis in Roman Britain.

    PubMed Central

    Thould, A K; Thould, B T

    1983-01-01

    The pattern of arthritis in Roman Britain was investigated by examining the skeletons of 416 adults from the Roman cemetery at Poundbury Camp near Dorchester, Dorset. The mean height of the people was not much less than that of the current British population, and the prevalence of right handedness was similar to our own. There was a high prevalence of osteoarthritis for such a relatively young community, with particularly severe changes in the vertebral column. The pattern of joints affected by osteoarthritis was different from that seen now, but the prevalence of vertebral ankylosing hyperostosis was much the same. Rheumatoid arthritis was seen as often as the expected rat would indicate, given that the population died young, but it was rare. Other forms of arthritis, including gout and ankylosing spondylitis, were not seen. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6418269

  18. Expression of cytokine mRNA in lentivirus-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, F.; Vogt, H. R.; Seow, H. F.; Bertoni, G.; Cheevers, W. P.; von Bodungen, U.; Zurbriggen, A.; Peterhans, E.

    1997-01-01

    Infection of goats with the lentivirus caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) leads to persistent infection and development of chronic arthritis. We analyzed the expression of cytokines and viral RNA in the joints of goats at early time points after experimental infection with CAEV and in those of animals suffering from chronic arthritis as a result of natural infection. In situ hybridization experiments showed that the pattern of cytokine expression in caprine arthritis was similar to that found in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with a few cells expressing the lymphocyte-derived cytokines interferon (IFN)-gamma and interleukin (IL)-2 and rather more cells expressing monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. IFN-gamma mRNA expression in experimentally infected joints peaked at day 12 and was mostly detected in areas containing viral RNA. At later time points, no IFN-gamma- or virus-expressing cells were found in inflamed joints but both were again detected in goats with severe arthritis. Interestingly, at the clinical stage of arthritis reflecting the chronic stage of infection, the inflammatory lesion was found to be immunologically compartmentalized. Humoral immune responses and cell-mediated immune responses appeared to concurrently occur in distinct areas of the synovial membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9327739

  19. Arthritis-associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Osial, T A; Cash, J M; Eisenbeis, C H

    1993-12-01

    There are a number of diseases characterized by inflammatory arthropathy that, although not as commonly seen as rheumatoid arthritis, often present to the family physician as difficult diagnostic problems. The diagnosis is frequently most difficult during the early course of these diseases. During recent years, new and altered concepts have arisen regarding both diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging group of arthropathies. This article presents a review of the more common arthritis-associated syndromes with emphasis on the differential diagnosis and medicinal therapeutics.

  20. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of exercise in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Metsios, George S; Stavropoulos-Kalinoglou, Antonis; Kitas, George D

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with significant functional impairment and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Along with pharmacological therapy, exercise seems to be a very promising intervention to improve disease-related outcomes, including functional ability and systemic manifestations, such as the increased cardiovascular risk. In this review, we discuss the physiological mechanisms by which exercise improves inflammation, cardiovascular risk and psychological health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and describe in detail how exercise can be incorporated in the management of this disease using real examples from our clinical practice.

  2. Physiotherapy in pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Case study.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Beata; Kaczor, Zofia; Zuk-Drążyk, Berenika; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood and adolescence. This term encompasses a group of chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of the connective tissue which cause arthritis in patients under 16 years of age lasting at least 6 weeks. The authors presented the characteristic features of physiotherapy based on functional examination results on the basis of two cases of girls with pauciarticular JIA treated according to an established pharmacological regimen. Physiotherapy should be introduced at an early stage of the disease. Kinesiotherapy preceded by history-taking and a functional examination of the patient, has to focus on both primary and secondary joint lesions.

  3. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child

    PubMed Central

    Shivamurthy, V. M.; Gantt, Soren; Reilly, Christopher; Tilley, Peter; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features. PMID:27366165

  4. Associations Between Arthritis and Change in Physical Function in U.S. Retirees.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nancy A; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Zack, Matthew M; Al Snih, Soham

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine among retirees: the associations of arthritis with limitations in physical functions, and whether these associations changed differently with age for those with arthritis versus without arthritis. We identified retirees from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal panel study of U.S. adults ≥51 years old. We calculated incidence density ratios (IDRs) using Poisson regression modeling with generalized estimating equations to estimate the associations between arthritis and limitations in four physical function measures (large muscle tasks, mobility, activities of daily living, and instrumental activities of daily living) adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, total household income, depression, obesity, smoking, chronic conditions, physical activity, and cohort status. We examined interaction effects between arthritis and age to determine if the rate of change in physical function differed by arthritis status across age. Over 8 years (2004-2012), significantly more retirees with arthritis had limitations with large muscle tasks (IDR 2.1: 95% confidence interval 1.6, 2.8), mobility (IDR 1.6: 1.2, 2.2), activities of daily living (IDR 2.2: 1.0, 4.7), and instrumental activities of daily living (IDR 3.7: 1.9, 7.4) than retirees without arthritis. Retirees with arthritis did not develop limitations in mobility, activities of daily living, and instrumental activities of daily living at a different rate as they aged compared to those without arthritis. Arthritis was associated with a greater prevalence of physical function limitations. Preventing limitations caused by arthritis is a key strategy to prevent disability in retirees. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Comparison of Two Assays to Determine Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis in relation to Other Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases: Assaying Anti-Modified Citrullinated Vimentin Antibodies Adds Value to Second-Generation Anti-Citrullinated Cyclic Peptides Testing

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Toscano, Miriam Lizette; Olivas-Flores, Eva Maria; Zavaleta-Muñiz, Soraya Amali; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Ponce-Guarneros, Manuel; Castro-Contreras, Uriel; Nava, Arnulfo; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Celis, Alfredo; Fajardo-Robledo, Nicte Selene; Corona-Sanchez, Esther Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Determination of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) plays a relevant role in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To date, it is still unclear if the use of several tests for these autoantibodies in the same patient offers additional value as compared to performing only one test. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of using two assays for ACPA: second-generation anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides antibodies (anti-CCP2) and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) antibodies for the diagnosis of RA. We compared three groups: RA (n = 142), chronic inflammatory disease (CIRD, n = 86), and clinically healthy subjects (CHS, n = 56) to evaluate sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios (LR) of these two assays for the presence of RA. A lower frequency of positivity for anti-CCP2 was found in RA (66.2%) as compared with anti-MCV (81.0%). When comparing RA versus other CIRD, sensitivity increased when both assays were performed. This strategy of testing both assays had high specificity and LR+. We conclude that adding the assay of anti-MCV antibodies to the determination of anti-CCP2 increases the sensitivity for detecting seropositive RA. Therefore, we propose the use of both assays in the initial screening of RA in longitudinal studies, including early onset of undifferentiated arthritis. PMID:25025037

  6. Comparison of two assays to determine anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis in relation to other chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: assaying anti-modified citrullinated vimentin antibodies adds value to second-generation anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides testing.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Toscano, Miriam Lizette; Olivas-Flores, Eva Maria; Zavaleta-Muñiz, Soraya Amali; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Ponce-Guarneros, Manuel; Castro-Contreras, Uriel; Nava, Arnulfo; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Celis, Alfredo; Fajardo-Robledo, Nicte Selene; Corona-Sanchez, Esther Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Determination of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) plays a relevant role in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To date, it is still unclear if the use of several tests for these autoantibodies in the same patient offers additional value as compared to performing only one test. Therefore, we evaluated the performance of using two assays for ACPA: second-generation anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides antibodies (anti-CCP2) and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) antibodies for the diagnosis of RA. We compared three groups: RA (n = 142), chronic inflammatory disease (CIRD, n = 86), and clinically healthy subjects (CHS, n = 56) to evaluate sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios (LR) of these two assays for the presence of RA. A lower frequency of positivity for anti-CCP2 was found in RA (66.2%) as compared with anti-MCV (81.0%). When comparing RA versus other CIRD, sensitivity increased when both assays were performed. This strategy of testing both assays had high specificity and LR+. We conclude that adding the assay of anti-MCV antibodies to the determination of anti-CCP2 increases the sensitivity for detecting seropositive RA. Therefore, we propose the use of both assays in the initial screening of RA in longitudinal studies, including early onset of undifferentiated arthritis.

  7. [Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Mariacher-Gehler, S; Wyss-Näther, A; Aeschlimann, A G

    2001-08-01

    Both Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) are chronic, inflammatory systemic diseases. RA predominantly manifests itself in the peripheral joints, whereas AS most prominently in the spine. As time progresses the roles of active and physical therapy become increasingly important. The aims of intensive and dynamic exercise for patients with RA and AS are formulated following the ICIDH-2. Thus, the aims are a direct equation of body function, activities and participation. The benefits of exercise therapy are increased joint mobility, increased muscle strength, improved functional ability and better cardiorespiratory function without incurring a flare of the disease.

  8. What next for rheumatoid arthritis therapy?

    PubMed

    Blake, Simon M; Swift, Barbara A

    2004-06-01

    Introduction of biological agents for the treatment of the chronic inflammatory joint disease rheumatoid arthritis has reinvigorated research into this debilitating disease. These agents have been shown to both act on the signs and symptoms of disease, as well as retard the progression of joint destruction. However, these agents are not efficacious in all cases and their expense and route of administration can severely limit their use. Therefore the search continues not only for additional targets to help those individuals refractive to current therapy but also for more affordable orally active small molecule alternatives to biological agents.

  9. Lipid abnormalities in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Erum, Uzma; Ahsan, Tasnim; Khowaja, Danish

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of dyslipidemia in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional, observational study, conducted at the ‘Rheumatology Clinic’ of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center (JPMC), Karachi, from November 2013 to May 2014. A total of 200 patients of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), diagnosed according to the ACR/EULAR criteria 2010, were included in the study. Laboratory investigations including creatinine, ALT, CBC, TSH and fasting lipid profile (LDL, HDL, and Total cholesterol) were done for all patients. Results: Out of 200 patients, 23 (11.5%) were male and 177 (88.5%) were female. The mean age was 36.31±10.46 years and the mean duration of disease was 3.82±3.03 years. A total of 107 (53.5%) patients had dyslipidemia, and the commonest abnormality was a low HDL, seen in 83 (41.5 %) patients. Conclusion: Dyslipidemia was frequently observed in Rheumatoid Arthritis. This may be considered as a secondary impact of chronic inflammatory state, seen in RA. Lipid abnormalities should be sought at regular intervals, and corrective actions taken to mitigate increased cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:28367205

  10. Modulation of IL-17 and Foxp3 Expression in the Prevention of Autoimmune Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Joana; Agua-Doce, Ana; Oliveira, Vanessa G.; Fonseca, João Eurico; Graca, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic immune mediated disease associated with deregulation of many cell types. It has been reported that different T cell subsets have opposite effects in disease pathogenesis, in particular Th17 and Treg cells. Methodology and Findings We investigated whether non-depleting anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, which have been reported as pro-tolerogenic, can lead to protection from chronic autoimmune arthritis in SKG mice – a recently described animal model of RA – by influencing the Th17/Treg balance. We found that non-depleting anti-CD4 prevented the onset of chronic autoimmune arthritis in SKG mice. Moreover, treated mice were protected from the induction of arthritis up to 60 days following anti-CD4 treatment, while remaining able to mount CD4-dependent immune responses to unrelated antigens. The antibody treatment also prevented disease progression in arthritic mice, although without leading to remission. Protection from arthritis was associated with an increased ratio of Foxp3, and decreased IL-17 producing T cells in the synovia. In vitro assays under Th17-polarizing conditions showed CD4-blockade prevents Th17 polarization, while favoring Foxp3 induction. Conclusions Non-depleting anti-CD4 can therefore induce long-term protection from chronic autoimmune arthritis in SKG mice through reciprocal changes in the frequency of Treg and Th17 cells in peripheral tissues, thus shifting the balance towards immune tolerance. PMID:20479941

  11. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  12. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... If arthritis is due to damaged ligaments, the support structures of the joint may be unstable or “loose.” ... dominant hand is affected • Your personal goals, home support structure, and ability to understand the treatment and comply ...

  13. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the possible causes of juvenile arthritis. They are studying genetic and environmental factors that they think are involved. They are also trying to improve current treatments and find new medicines that will work better with fewer side effects. Research supported by ...

  14. Dapsone in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, D J; Lamothe, M; Stevens, R M; Sigal, L H

    1996-06-01

    Dapsone, a synthetic sulfone with chemical similarities to sulfapyridine, has been used for a number of years to treat leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis. Recently, a number of prospective, randomized, double-blind trials have shown their success in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, with dapsone being superior to placebo and comparable to chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. Its mode of anti-inflammatory actions in rheumatoid arthritis is not clearly understood, but modulation of neutrophil activity or inhibition of neutrophil inflammatory product formation or release appear to play a role. The major limiting side effect is hemolytic anemia, which may be mitigated through careful patient selection, conservative drug dosing, close monitoring, and possibly, concurrent administration of antioxidants or cytochrome P450 inhibitors. Methemoglobinemia is another common finding among patients receiving dapsone therapy, but rarely does it result in prominent symptoms other than transient pallor. Less common adverse events to dapsone include the idiosyncratic reactions of leukopenia and agranulocytosis, cutaneous eruptions, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis, toxic hepatitis, cholestatic jaundice, nephrotic syndrome, renal papillary necrosis, severe hypoalbuminemia without proteinuria, an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome, and minor neurological and gastrointestinal complaints. In this report, two patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis, who were safely and effectively treated with dapsone after failure with other second-line agents, are described and the literature is reviewed. We suggest that dapsone is an effective second-line agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. [Usefulness of examinations of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases 1, MMP-3, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1, hyaluronic acid and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide in Lyme arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and patients with arthritic complaints].

    PubMed

    Czeczuga, Anna; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem disease that can affect skin, nervous system, heart and joints. Lyme arthritis can develope in about 60% of "not treated" Lyme disease patients, 10% of patients may develope chronic arthritis. Lyme arhritis symptoms (especially chronic arthritis) is similar to rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to establish the usefulness of examinations of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-3, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1), hialuronic acid (HA) and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) in Lyme arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and patients with arthritic complaints. Plasma levels of MMP-3, HA and anti-CCP were significantly higher in RA group than in Lyme arthritis group and patients with arthritic complaints. There were no significant differences in serum levels of MMP-3, MMP-9, TIMP-1, HA, anti-CCP between Lyme arthritis patients and patients with arthritic complaints and these parameters are not usefull in differential diagnoses of Lyme arthritis.

  16. [Juvenile idiopathic systemic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Baksiene, Dalia; Kasparaviciene, Jūrate; Zebiene, Migla; Puteliene, Brigita

    2003-01-01

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY was to evaluate the peculiarities of the clinical features, laboratory parameters and tactics of treatment in juvenile idiopatic systematic arthritis. A retrospective data review of 41 children (26 boys and 15 girls) who underwent treatment for systemic arthritis (according to ILAR criteria) in our institution between 1992 and 2002 was performed. The disease started with fever of unknown origin in all cases. In 73% of patients it lasted longer than one month, in 54% fever was with twice daily spikers in the morning and in the evening. The rash during the rise of temperature appeared in 49%, in most cases (70%) there was a maculo-papular rash. Lymphadenopathy and serositis were observed in 32%, hepatomegaly in 29%, and splenomegaly in 24%. Arthritis coincided with the fever in 29% of patients, in majority of cases it was progressing to a severe persistent arthritis after the systematic phase. There was no specific laboratory findings: neutrophilic leucocytosis was found in 73%, anemia - in 80.5%, trombocytosis - in 36.6%, elevated CRP - in 63.4%, dysproteinemia - in 79% of patients. Antinuclear factors were absent in all examined children. For all patients intravenous methylprednisolone pulses have been administered (10-22 mg/kg/infusion). Prednisolone was also continued orally (1-2 mg/kg/day). 24.4% of patients required in addition immunosupressive agents such as methotrexate, azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. Puls-therapy of methylprednisolone is a safe and sufficiently effective method of treatment in most cases of the systematic juvenile arthritis.

  17. The making of expert patients: the role of online health communities in arthritis self-management.

    PubMed

    Willis, Erin

    2014-12-01

    Chronic disease is an epidemic, one that requires patients to play an active role in managing symptoms and disease affect. This study used ethnomethodology (N = 8231) to understand how patients with arthritis use online health communities to exchange disease-related information to better manage their chronic disease. The findings show that online health communities facilitate self-management behaviors through the exchange of health information and disease experience. These online health communities act as self-management programs led by peers with the same chronic disease through the exchange of health information based on experience, working to improve members' health literacy related to arthritis. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Our experiences in treatment of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mekić, Mevludin; Ristić, Miomir

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systematic inflammation illness characterized by progressive damage of joints. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is individual, programmed and complex and consists of general measures, application of adequate medication, physical procedures, balneotherapy and various surgical techniques as necessary. The objective of research is to show success of therapy in use of medication and other types of treatment for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. The following were applied: non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications (NAIL), metotrexate, gold salts, corticosteroids, sulphasalzine, Chlorochin, cyclophosphamide and others. Metotrexate was often applied in our research and good results were achieved with it, but very good results were also achieved by combination of 2 or more immunodatulatory medications, including interarticular application of medication, physical, balneo and orthopedic therapy, as well as other alternative therapy. Success of therapy based on Richie index shows statistically significant improvement, meaning that there was movement from grade 3 and 4 into grades 1 and 2.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Rheumatoid Arthritis: In Depth Share: On This Page Key Points ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease—a ...

  2. Arthritis and suicide attempts: findings from a large nationally representative Canadian survey.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Ramzan, Natasha; Baird, Stephanie L

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the odds of suicide attempts among those with arthritis compared with those without and to see what factors attenuate this association and (2) to identify which factors are associated with suicide attempts among adults with arthritis. Secondary data analysis of the nationally representative 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health (CCHS-MH) was performed. For objective 1, those with and without arthritis were included (n = 21,744). For objective 2, only individuals who had arthritis (n = 4885) were included. A series of binary logistic regression analyses of suicide attempts were conducted for each objective, with adjustments for socio-demographics, childhood adversities, lifetime mental health and chronic pain. After full adjustment for the above listed variables, the odds of suicide attempts among adults with arthritis were 1.46. Among those with arthritis, early adversities alone explained 24 % of the variability in suicide attempts. After full adjustment, the odds of suicide attempts among those with arthritis were significantly higher among those who had experienced childhood sexual abuse (OR = 3.77), chronic parental domestic violence (OR = 3.97) or childhood physical abuse (1.82), those who had ever been addicted to drugs or alcohol (OR = 1.76) and ever had a depressive disorder (OR = 3.22) or an anxiety disorder (OR = 2.34) and those who were currently in chronic pain (OR = 1.50). Younger adults with arthritis were more likely to report having attempted suicide. Future prospective research is needed to uncover plausible mechanisms through which arthritis and suicide attempts are linked.

  3. Pathogenetic difference between collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Daily treatment with cyclosporin at a dose of 25 mg/kg for 14 d gave complete suppression of the development of collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats during an observation period of 45 d. To study whether the immunologic unresponsiveness produced by cyclosporin is antigen specific, we rechallenged the cyclosporin- protected rats with either type II collagen or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) after discontinuation of cyclosporin treatment. Type II collagen-immunized, cyclosporin-protected rats did not develop arthritis in response to reimmunization with type II collagen, but, they did develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA. Similarly, CFA-injected, cyclosporin-protected rats showed a suppressed arthritogenic reaction in response to reinjection of CFA, whereas their response to a subsequent immunization with type II collagen was unaffected. On the other hand, the rats that were treated with cyclosporin without any prior antigenic challenge could develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA or type II collagen after cessation of cyclosporin treatment. These results indicate that specific immunologic unresponsiveness can be induced by cyclosporin in the two experimental models of polyarthritis, collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis, and that there is no cross-reactivity between type II collagen and the mycobacterial cell wall components. The results further indicate that immunity to type II collagen plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of collagen arthritis but that its pathogenetic role in adjuvant arthritis is insignificant. PMID:6201583

  4. Oral phosphatidylcholine pretreatment alleviates the signs of experimental rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Erős, Gabor; Ibrahim, Saleh; Siebert, Nikolai; Boros, Mihály; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine-derived metabolites exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in various stress conditions. We hypothesized that dietary phosphatidylcholine may potentially function as an anti-inflammatory substance and may decrease inflammatory activation in a chronic murine model of rheumatoid arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis). Methods The experiments were performed on male DBA1/J mice. In groups 1 to 3 (n = 10 each), collagen-induced arthritis was induced by administration of bovine collagen II. In group 2 the animals were fed ad libitum with phosphatidylcholine-enriched diet as a pretreatment, while the animals of group 3 received this nourishment as a therapy, after the onset of the disease. The severity of the disease and inflammation-linked hyperalgesia were evaluated with semiquantitative scoring systems, while the venular leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions and functional capillary density were assessed by means of in vivo fluorescence microscopy of the synovial tissue. Additionally, the mRNA expressions of cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2, TNFα and endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase were determined, and classical histological analysis was performed. Results Phosphatidylcholine pretreatment reduced the collagen-induced arthritis-induced hypersensitivity, and decreased the number of leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions and the extent of functional capillary density as compared with those of group 1. It also ameliorated the tissue damage and decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. The expressions of the cannabinoid receptors and TNFα were not influenced by the phosphatidylcholine intake. Phosphatidylcholine-enriched food administrated as therapy failed to evoke the aforementioned changes, apart from the reduction of the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Conclusions Phosphatidylcholine-enriched food as pretreatment, but not as therapy, appears to exert beneficial effects

  5. Pharmacological Value of Murine Delayed-type Hypersensitivity Arthritis: A Robust Mouse Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline

    2017-02-01

    In this MiniReview, we summarize the body of knowledge on the delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model, a recently developed arthritis model with 100% incidence, low variation and synchronized onset in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, and compare it to other murine arthritis models. It is desirable to have robust arthritis models in B6 mice, as many transgene strains are bred on this background. However, several of the most widely used mouse model of arthritis cannot be induced in B6 mice without the drawback of lower incidence, reduced severity and higher variation, if at all. DTHA is induced by modifying a classical methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA)-induced DTH response by administering a cocktail of anti-type II collagen antibodies (anti-CII) between immunization and challenge. Arthritis affects one, predefined paw in which acute inflammation and severe arthritis rapidly develop and peak after 4-7 days. Disease is self-resolving over the course of around 3 weeks. Disease manifestations resemble those seen in other arthritis models and include bone erosion, cartilage destruction, oedema, pannus and new bone formation. Induction of DTHA is dependent on CD4(+) T cells while B cells are dispensable. The DTHA model is set apart from other murine arthritis models in that it can be induced in B6 mice with 100% incidence and with high and consistent severity. This is the clearest advantage of the model, as the mechanisms of disease and clinical manifestations can be found in other arthritis models. The model holds potential for future modifications that may improve the lack of chronicity.

  6. Mimicry of lyme arthritis by synovial hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Hospach, Toni; Langendörfer, M; Kalle, T V; Tewald, F; Wirth, T; Dannecker, G E

    2011-12-01

    To report on the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma due to similar clinical and radiological signs and symptoms. A 15-year-old boy presented at the age of 9 with recurrent rather painless swelling of the right knee. Altogether four episodes lasting for 1-2 weeks each occurred over a period of 18 months before medical advice was sought. Physical examination revealed only a slightly limited range of motion. Living in an endemic area of borreliosis, he reported a tick bite 6 months prior to onset of his symptoms with erythema migrans and was treated for 10 days with amoxicillin. Serology revealed two positive unspecific bands in IgG immunoblot (p41 and 66) with slight positivity for ELISA. Ultrasound revealed synovial thickening and increased fluid. Despite the weak positive serology a diagnosis of lyme arthritis could not be excluded and intravenous antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone was started. After two further relapses antiinflammatory therapy including intraarticular steroids were introduced with no long lasting effect. A chronical disease developed with alternate periods of swelling and almost complete remission. Ultrasound as well as MRI demonstrated ongoing signs of synovitis, therefore after further progression, a diagnostic arthroscopy was performed showing an inconspicuous knee joint. A second MRI showed focal suprapatellar enhancement and was followed by open arthrotomy revealing a histopathological proven synovial cavernous juxtaarticular hemangioma. To our knowledge, the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma has not yet been reported despite obvious clinical similarities. In conclusion, in children and adolescents synovial hemangioma has to be considered in differential diagnosis of recurrent knee swelling. Early diagnosis is important to prevent prolonged suffering from chronic joint swelling with probable joint damages, unnecessary treatment procedures and as well school and sports

  7. Cable television and health promotion: a feasibility study with arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Katz, D

    1985-01-01

    Community access cable television channels can be used to provide low-cost health programming in many communities. This article describes a study undertaken to ascertain the extent to which arthritis patients could be targeted by arthritis-related programming over a local cable system. A number of publicity sources were used to advertise the programs to a preidentified group and the public at large. Telephone and written surveys revealed that the programming garnered a moderate viewing audience composed preponderantly of arthritis patients. Some conceptual and practical issues involved in targeting chronic patient groups for health programming are discussed.

  8. Inflammatory arthritis mimicking Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) in a child: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Egilmez, Zeliha; Turgut, Selin Turan; Icagasioglu, Afitap; Bicakci, Irem

    2016-01-01

    Joint complaints in childhood are seen frequently and differential diagnosis can be difficult. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatological disease of childhood. It involves peripheral joint arthritis, chronic synovitis, and extra-articular manifestations. Accurate diagnosis can take a long time and sometimes multiple diagnoses are used while following the patient until a final diagnosis can be reached. Arthritis may be triggered by trauma and confused with other diseases like complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), in which trauma plays a role in the etiology. In the present case, ankle pain in an 8-year-old girl was misdiagnosed as CRPS. PMID:28058400

  9. Inflammatory arthritis mimicking Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) in a child: A case report.

    PubMed

    Egilmez, Zeliha; Turgut, Selin Turan; Icagasioglu, Afitap; Bicakci, Irem

    2016-01-01

    Joint complaints in childhood are seen frequently and differential diagnosis can be difficult. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatological disease of childhood. It involves peripheral joint arthritis, chronic synovitis, and extra-articular manifestations. Accurate diagnosis can take a long time and sometimes multiple diagnoses are used while following the patient until a final diagnosis can be reached. Arthritis may be triggered by trauma and confused with other diseases like complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), in which trauma plays a role in the etiology. In the present case, ankle pain in an 8-year-old girl was misdiagnosed as CRPS.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  11. Beta haemolytic streptococci and reactive arthritis in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Deighton, C

    1993-01-01

    There is an increasing occurrence of reactive group A beta haemolytic streptococci (BHS) phenomena. This review makes a case for considering BHS in the differential diagnosis of adult reactive arthritis. This is based on (a) published reports over the past 45 years describing first attacks of rheumatic fever in adults; (b) the longstanding observation that polyarthritis is the most commonly expressed Jones major criterion in adults; (c) the broad spectrum of clinical expression of disease following streptococcal infection, with the re-emergence of the term 'poststreptococcal reactive arthritis'. The arthritis in adult rheumatic fever is characterised by sequential involvement of large weightbearing joints. Recurrent, severe, prolonged arthritis has been a prominent feature of adult poststreptococcal reactive arthritis. Carditis has been reported in 33% of adult patients with rheumatic fever. Consequently long term antibiotic prophylaxis for adults with reactive BHS phenomena should be strongly considered, and guidelines are suggested for this in individual patients. Further areas for research are discussed, particularly the interrelations between bacteria and host in disease expression, and the possibility that BHS might play a part in chronic arthritides and vasculitides. PMID:8323403

  12. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  13. Alternative for anti-TNF antibodies for arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  14. Remission in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current facts.

    PubMed

    Shenoi, Susan; Wallace, Carol A

    2010-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic inflammatory arthritic disease affecting children. Despite the availability of potent disease-modifying antirheumatic medications, most children still experience a chronic course with long periods of active disease. Goals of treatment should include achievement of disease remission with optimal physical functioning that allows children to lead normal lives with no structural joint damage. The term remission implies a complete lack of disease activity. This article focuses on recently developed preliminary criteria for inactive disease and remission in JIA. Recent studies using these new definitions demonstrate only modest rates of achievement of remission favoring children with persistent oligoarticular JIA. Children with rheumatoid factor-positive polyarticular JIA are least likely to achieve remission. Therapeutic strategies to achieve remission are also discussed.

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients.

  16. Campylobacter Reactive Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet E.; Krizova, Adriana; Garg, Amit X.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Ouimet, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Methods A Medline (PubMed) search identified studies from 1966–2006 that investigated the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Search terms included: “reactive arthritis”, “spondyloarthropathy”, “Reiter’s syndrome”, “gastroenteritis”, “diarrhea”, “epidemiology”, “incidence”, “prevalence”, and “Campylobacter”. Results The literature available to date suggests that the incidence of Campylobacter reactive arthritis may occur in 1 to 5% of those infected. The annual incidence of ReA after Campylobacter or Shigella may be 4.3 and 1.3 respectively per 100,000. The duration of acute ReA varies considerably between reports, and the incidence and impact of chronic reactive arthritis from Campylobacter infection is virtually unknown. Conclusions Campylobacter associated ReA incidence and prevalence varies widely from reviews such as: case ascertainment differences, exposure differences, lack of diagnostic criteria for ReA and perhaps genetics and ages of exposed individuals. At the population level it may not be associated with HLA-B27 and inflammatory back involvement is uncommon. Follow up for long-term sequelae is largely unknown. Five percent of Campylobacter ReA may be chronic or relapsing (with respect to musculoskeletal symptoms). PMID:17360026

  17. Oxidation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Carol A; El-Gabalawy, Hani S

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the course of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and by activated phagocytic cells during oxidative bursts, exceed the physiological buffering capacity and result in oxidative stress. The excessive production of ROS can damage protein, lipids, nucleic acids, and matrix components. They also serve as important intracellular signaling molecules that amplify the synovial inflammatory–proliferative response. Repetitive cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation associated with changes in synovial perfusion are postulated to activate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and nuclear factor-κB, two key transcription factors that are regulated by changes in cellular oxygenation and cytokine stimulation, and that in turn orchestrate the expression of a spectrum of genes critical to the persistence of synovitis. An understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways might allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15535839

  18. Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carette, Simon

    1984-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disease, for which every physician should have a sound approach. This paper details the global management of the disease. Guidelines are given for educating the patient and assessing the level of disease activity. Common questions about the indications and uses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local corticosteroid injections, slow-acting agents, immunosuppressive drugs and steroids are discussed. PMID:21278947

  19. Urinary proteomics can define distinct diagnostic inflammatory arthritis subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Stefan; Porter, Duncan; Paterson, Caron; Hampson, Rosie; Gaya, Daniel; Latosinska, Agnieszka; Mischak, Harald; Schanstra, Joost; Mullen, William; McInnes, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests applied to inflammatory arthritis lack the necessary specificity to appropriately categorise patients. There is a need for novel approaches to classify patients with these conditions. Herein we explored whether urinary proteomic biomarkers specific for different forms of arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), osteoarthritis (OA)) or chronic inflammatory conditions (inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)) can be identified. Fifty subjects per group with RA, PsA, OA or IBD and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. Two-thirds of these populations were randomly selected to serve as a training set, while the remaining one-third was reserved for validation. Sequential comparison of one group to the other four enabled identification of multiple urinary peptides significantly associated with discrete pathological conditions. Classifiers for the five groups were developed and subsequently tested blind in the validation test set. Upon unblinding, the classifiers demonstrated excellent performance, with an area under the curve between 0.90 and 0.97 per group. Identification of the peptide markers pointed to dysregulation of collagen synthesis and inflammation, but also novel inflammatory markers. We conclude that urinary peptide signatures can reliably differentiate between chronic arthropathies and inflammatory conditions with discrete pathogenesis. PMID:28091549

  20. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response.

    PubMed

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup; Zhang, Xianwei; Laustsen, Julie Kristine; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hetland, Merete Lund; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Junker, Peter; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Hvid, Malene; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Deleuran, Bent

    2016-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18) in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4) supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab. Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab. The plasma sCD18 levels were altered in patients with RA, in mice with

  1. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup; Zhang, Xianwei; Laustsen, Julie Kristine; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hetland, Merete Lund; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Junker, Peter; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Hvid, Malene; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Deleuran, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18) in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4) supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab. Results Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab. Conclusions The plasma sCD18 levels were altered

  2. [Sport and rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Proschek, D; Rehart, S

    2014-06-01

    Sport is becoming increasingly more important in our society. Due to the changing age spectrum with a greater number of elderly and substantially more active people, an increasing number of people with underlying orthopedic diseases are becoming interested in participating in sport. This article deals with the possibilities and effects of sporting activities for people with rheumatoid arthritis within the framework of a conservative therapy. A literature search was carried out using medical search engines, in particular PubMed, and also via the recommendations of specialist societies and patient help groups. The quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis consists of physical, mental and social components. Sport as a means of rehabilitation influences all of these components. Sport should be comprehended as a form of therapy and be adapted to the needs of the individual patient. The willingness to actively participate in sport should always be highly rated and encouraged. Sport is therefore an important pillar of therapy in a conservative total concept. The main aspects of sport therapeutic activities are functional, pedagogical and experience-oriented aspects. The clinical symptoms, extent of damage and physical impairment must, however, be evaluated and taken into consideration for the therapeutic concept. The amount of data on the complex topic of sport and rheumatoid arthritis is low and is mainly dealt with as retrospective reviews. A prospective randomized study basis is lacking. The aim must therefore be to confirm the currently available recommendations for various types of sport in controlled studies.

  3. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  4. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  5. What PASSes for good? Experience-based Swedish and hypothetical British EuroQol 5-Dimensions preference sets yield markedly different point estimates and patient acceptable symptom state cut-off values in chronic arthritis patients on TNF blockade.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A; Wallman, J K; Gülfe, A

    2016-11-01

    Health utilities derived from answers to generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires such as the EuroQol 5-Dimensions (EQ-5D) are often used in cost-utility analyses (CUAs) of new and expensive treatments. Different preference sets (tariffs) used in the computation of utility values and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) from questionnaire responses (health states) yield varying results, potentially affecting decisions of resource allocation. The objective of the present study was to compare British (UK), hypothetical, and Swedish (SE), experience-based, EQ-5D utilities using data from clinical practice. UK and SE EQ-5D utilities were computed in an observational cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, comparing point estimates and patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) cut-off levels. SE utilities were found to be consistently higher than UK utilities, and PASS cut-offs were essentially stable over time. With higher baseline utilities, there may be less room for improvement after an intervention and thus less accumulation of QALYs in CUAs applying the SE, as opposed to the UK, EQ-5D tariff.

  6. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding.

  7. Axial disease in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Dafna D

    2007-12-01

    The definition of axial disease in psoriatic arthritis has varied from isolated unilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis to criteria similar to those used for ankylosing spondylitis. Depending on the definition used, the prevalence of axial disease varies from 25% to 70% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the prevalence, clinical and radiologic features, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of psoriatic spondylitis.

  8. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    with other inflam- matory rheumatic diseases, including gout (n 4), pseudogout (n 2), psoriatic arthritis (n 1), spondyloarthritis (n 3...Expression and function of CXCL16 in a novel model of gout . Arthritis Rheum 2010;62:2536–44. 23. Koch AE, Burrows JC, Marder R, Domer PH, Leibovich SJ

  9. Evaluation of the Arthritis Foundation's Camine Con Gusto Program for Hispanic Adults With Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Leigh F; Rivadeneira, Alfredo; Altpeter, Mary; Vilen, Leigha; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Sepulveda, Victoria E; Hackney, Betsy; Reuland, Daniel S; Rojas, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Camine Con Gusto (CCG) is the Hispanic version of an evidence-based walking program for people with arthritis. This study examined CCG outcomes, feasibility, tolerability, safety, and acceptability and potential tailoring. A pre and post 6-week evaluation was conducted in Hispanic people with arthritis. Outcomes included pain, stiffness, fatigue, functional capacity, helplessness, and self-efficacy. A formative evaluation with program participants and key stakeholders explored program tailoring. Participants' mean age was 46.9 years, 44.4% had a high school degree or less, 2.5% were born in United States, 60.1% spoke only Spanish, and 74.7% were female. Moderate effect sizes were found: 0.50 for pain, 0.75 for fatigue, 0.49 for stiffness, 0.33 for function, 0.26 for helplessness, and 0.24 for self-efficacy. There were 285 participants recruited with an 82% 6-week retention (feasibility), no adverse events were reported (safety), and 98% reported program satisfaction (acceptability). Recommended adaptations included simpler language, more pictures and content addressing nutrition and chronic conditions, shortened materials, and inclusion of motivational strategies. CCG showed improvement in outcomes in Hispanic individuals comparable to those noted in non-Hispanic White and Black individuals with arthritis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Management of hepatitis C virus-related arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, E; Yeshurun, D; Rosner, I

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is often associated with extrahepatic manifestations among which arthropathy is common, affecting up to 20% of HCV-infected individuals. This arthropathy is to be distinguished from the more superficially prominent myalgias and fatigue. HCV-related arthritis is commonly presented as rheumatoid-like, symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis involving mainly small joints, or, less commonly, as mono- or oligoarthritis, usually of the large joints. HCV arthritis usually runs a relatively benign course that, in contrast to 'true' rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is typically non-deforming and is not associated with articular bony erosions. In addition, unlike 'classic' RA, erythrocyte sedimentation rate is elevated only in about half of the patients and subcutaneous nodules are absent. In about two-thirds of the affected individuals morning stiffness may be severe, resolving after more than an hour. Several pathogenetic mechanisms may be involved: HCV arthritis may be part of the syndrome of mixed cryoglobulinaemia, or may be directly or indirectly mediated by HCV. Such possible, but yet not proven, mechanisms include direct invasion of synovial cells by the virus eliciting local inflammatory response, cytokine-induced disease or immune complex disease, particularly in genetically susceptible individuals. The diagnosis of HCV arthritis in patients with positive rheumatoid factor and chronic inflammatory polyarthritis may be difficult. Positive HCV antibody and HCV RNA, and the absence of bony erosions, subcutaneous nodules and antikeratin antibodies, may be useful in distinguishing between HCV-related arthritis and RA. The optimal treatment of HCV-related arthritis has not yet been established. Concerns may be raised regarding the use of immunosuppressive or potentially hepatotoxic drugs. However, it may be suggested that once the diagnosis of HCV-associated arthritis is made, combination antiviral treatment with interferon-alpha and ribavirin

  11. [Chronic knee joint discomfort].

    PubMed

    Wittke, R

    2005-06-23

    Chronic pain in the knee joint is frequently a sign of arthrosis in adults. This must be clearly differentiated from other knee problems. Patellofemoral stress syndrome (occurs mostly in young people) and arthritis with effusion in the knee joint after long and mostly unusual stress also allow only a reduced function of the knee joint. However, even when the knee joint is still fully functional, chronic problems could already exist: For example, for joggers, iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee) or after high unphysiological stress, patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee). These must be differentiated from pes anserinus syndrome and a plica mediopatellaris.

  12. Subtype specific genetic associations for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: ERAP1 with the enthesitis related arthritis subtype and IL23R with juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an umbrella term for all chronic childhood arthropathies and can be divided into seven subtypes. It includes the enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) subtype which displays symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile-onset psoriatic arthritis which has similarities to psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis (Ps). We, therefore, hypothesized that two well-established susceptibility loci for AS and Ps, ERAP1 and IL23R, could also confer susceptibility to these JIA subtypes. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ERAP1 (rs30187) and IL23R (rs11209026) were genotyped in JIA cases (n = 1,054) and healthy controls (n = 5,200). Genotype frequencies were compared between all JIA cases and controls using the Cochrane-Armitage trend test implemented in PLINK. Stratified analysis by ILAR subtype was performed. Results The ERA subtype showed strong association with ERAP1 SNP (P trend = 0.005). The IL23R SNP showed significant association in the PsA subtype (P trend = 0.04). The SNPs were not associated with JIA overall or with any other subtype. Conclusions We present evidence for subtype specific association of the ERAP1 gene with ERA JIA and the IL23R gene with juvenile-onset PsA. The findings will require validation in independent JIA datasets. These results suggest distinct pathogenic pathways in these subtypes. PMID:21281511

  13. Hepatitis C Virus-related Arthritis: Bone Scintigraphic Appearances

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Gul Ege; Sarikaya, Ali; Kandemir, Ozan

    2017-01-01

    A symptomatic joint involvement and arthralgia are frequent in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, HCV infection-related arthritis (HCVrA) affects up to 4-11% of the subjects suffering from disease. We reported a patient with HCVrA presented with the commonly accepted diagnostic clinical signs and laboratory parameters. The painful joints distinctly demonstrated increased uptake of Tc-99 m methylene diphosphonate in scintigraphy and normal findings in radiography. PMID:28242981

  14. [Pyoderma gangrenosum associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Beber, André Avelino Costa; Knob, Cristiane Faccin; Shons, Karen Regina Rosso; Neumaier, Walter; da Silva, João Carlos Nunes; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, which is associated with non-infectious systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. It is more common in adults and may present with four distinct clinical forms, all leading to ulceration of the skin affected. Its diagnosis is clinical and demands exclusion of other causes. Treatment should be performed with local care and systemic therapy.

  15. Overinfection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in Gouty Crystal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla-Abadía, F.; Vélez, J. D.; Zárate-Correa, L. C.; Carrascal, E.; Guarín, N.; Castañeda-Ramírez, C. R.; Cañas, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is an endemic South American systemic mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (P. brasiliensis). The main clinical form of disease is pulmonary, but all organs may be involved. We report a case of overinfection by P. brasiliensis in chronic gouty arthritis affecting the proximal phalanx of the right hallux. The patient required proximal amputation and long-term antifungal therapy. PMID:23251162

  16. Capillaroscopic pattern in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina Nikolova; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    Background There are limited data about the role of nailfold capillaroscopy in inflammatory arthritis. Objectives To study the role of capillaroscopy in inflammatory arthritis — rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and early arthritis. Methods Patients from the following groups were included in the study: 62 patients with RA; 34 patients with PsA with involvement of the joints of the hands; 9 women with early arthritis. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed with videocapillaroscope. Results Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) was found in 30.6% (19/62) of RA patients, in 32.4% (11/34) of PsA patients and 44.4%, (4/9) of cases with early arthritis. The most frequent found capillaroscopic changes in RA patients were presence of elongated capillaries in 58% of cases (36/62) and prominent subpapillary plexus in 69% (43/62). Dilated capillaries were found in 78.9% (15/19) of patients with secondary RP and in 62.8% (27/43) of those without RP. “Scleroderma-like” capillaroscopic pattern was observed with low frequency in RA patients (14.5%/9/62). “Scleroderma-like” capillaroscopic pattern was also found in 11.1% (1/9) in the group of patients with early arthritis. The low frequency of the last type of capillaroscopic pattern in RA requires patients with such changes to be observed during regular follow-up for the development of systemic rheumatic disease different from inflammatory arthritis. In patients with PsA capillaries with specific morphology (tight terminal convolutions) were found in 58.8% (20/34) of cases. Conclusions Results from the present study confirm the necessity for inclusion of the nailfold capillaroscopy in the diagnostic algorithm in patients with inflammatory arthritis. PMID:22426123

  17. TDAG8, TRPV1, and ASIC3 involved in establishing hyperalgesic priming in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wei-Shan; Kung, Chia-Chi; Huang, Shir-Ly; Lin, Shih-Chang; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2017-08-21

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), characterized by chronic inflammation of synovial joints, is often associated with ongoing pain and increased pain sensitivity. High hydrogen ion concentration (acidosis) found in synovial fluid in RA patients is associated with disease severity. Acidosis signaling acting on proton-sensing receptors may contribute to inflammation and pain. Previous studies focused on the early phase of arthritis (<5 weeks) and used different arthritis models, so elucidating the roles of different proton-sensing receptors in the chronic phase of arthritis is difficult. We intra-articularly injected complete Freund's adjuvant into mice once a week for 4 weeks to establish chronic RA pain. Mice with knockout of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) or transient receptor potential/vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV1) showed attenuated chronic phase (>6 weeks) of RA pain. Mice with T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) knockout showed attenuated acute and chronic phases of RA pain. TDAG8 likely participates in the initiation of RA pain, but all three genes, TDAG8, TRPV1, and ASIC3, are essential to establish hyperalgesic priming to regulate the chronic phase of RA pain.

  18. The role of health literacy and social networks in arthritis patients' health information-seeking behavior: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Janette; Mullan, Judy; Worsley, Anthony; Pai, Nagesh

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients engage in health information-seeking behaviour to maintain their wellbeing and to manage chronic diseases such as arthritis. Health literacy allows patients to understand available treatments and to critically appraise information they obtain from a wide range of sources. Aims. To explore how arthritis patients' health literacy affects engagement in arthritis-focused health information-seeking behaviour and the selection of sources of health information available through their informal social network. Methods. An exploratory, qualitative study consisting of one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Twenty participants with arthritis were recruited from community organizations. The interviews were designed to elicit participants' understanding about their arthritis and arthritis medication and to determine how the participants' health literacy informed selection of where they found information about their arthritis and pain medication. Results. Participants with low health literacy were less likely to be engaged with health information-seeking behaviour. Participants with intermediate health literacy were more likely to source arthritis-focused health information from newspapers, television, and within their informal social network. Those with high health literacy sourced information from the internet and specialist health sources and were providers of information within their informal social network. Conclusion. Health professionals need to be aware that levels of engagement in health information-seeking behaviour and sources of arthritis-focused health information may be related to their patients' health literacy.

  19. Skin Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, and Spondyloarthritides.

    PubMed

    Chua-Aguilera, Carolyn Jean; Möller, Burkhard; Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2017-07-27

    Extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and various spondyloarthritides including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis often involve the skin and may occur before or after diagnosis of these rheumatic diseases. Cutaneous manifestations encompass a wide range of reactions that may have a notable negative impact not only on the physical but especially on the emotional and psychosocial well-being of these patients. Several cutaneous manifestations have been related to rheumatoid arthritis such as subcutaneous nodules including classical rheumatoid nodules, accelerated rheumatoid nodulosis, and rheumatoid nodulosis; vascular disorders like rheumatoid vasculitis, livedo racemosa, and Raynaud's phenomenon; and neutrophilic and/or granulomatous diseases like pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet's syndrome, rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatitis, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis, as well as palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the main cutaneous manifestations include an evanescent rash, rheumatoid nodules, as well as plaque and guttate psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis is also the main skin disease involved in spondyloarthritides. Furthermore, other forms of psoriasis including guttate, inverse, erythrodermic, pustular, and particularly nail psoriasis may also occur. In addition, a variety of drug-induced skin reactions may also appear in these diseases. Early recognition and understanding of these different dermatologic manifestations together with an interdisciplinary approach are often needed to optimize management of these diseases.

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis and salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Mirrielees, Jeffrey; Crofford, Leslie J; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J; Dawson, Dolphus R; Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Miller, Craig S

    2010-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) influenced levels of salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease. Medical assessments, periodontal examinations and pain ratings were obtained from 35 RA, 35 chronic periodontitis and 35 age- and gender-matched healthy controls in a cross-sectional, case-controlled study. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were analysed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations. The arthritis and healthy groups had significantly less oral disease than the periodontitis group (P<0.0001), with the arthritis group having significantly more sites bleeding on probing (BOP) than matched controls (P=0.012). Salivary levels of MMP-8 and IL-1β were significantly elevated in the periodontal disease group (P<0.002), and IL-1β was the only biomarker with significantly higher levels in the arthritis group compared with controls (P=0.002). Arthritis patients receiving anti-TNF-α antibody therapy had significantly lower IL-1β and TNF-α levels compared with arthritis patients not on anti-TNF-α therapy (P=0.016, 0.024) and healthy controls (P<0.001, P=0.011), respectively. RA patients have higher levels of periodontal inflammation than healthy controls, i.e., an increased BOP. Systemic inflammation appears to influence levels of select salivary biomarkers of periodontal disease, and anti-TNF-α antibody-based disease-modifying therapy significantly lowers salivary IL-1β and TNF-α levels in RA. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Classification of degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, N. S.; Cruess, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the former division of degenerative arthritis into idiopathic types and those secondary to some disease process is no longer valid. Recent studies have indicated that abnormal concentrations of force on cartilage lead to the development of this disease. A classification is presented that is based on the assumption that the process is initiated by abnormal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix, normal concentrations of force on abnormal cartilage matrix or normal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix that is supported by bone of abnormal consistency. PMID:907947

  2. Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Rakhi; Hadley, Susan

    2005-12-01

    Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis are uncommon diseases and generally present in an indolent fashion. The incidence of fungal bone and joint dis-ease is increasing with an increase in the prevalence of factors predisposing to invasive fungal disease, such as the use of central venous catheters, broad spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppression, and abdominal surgery. Definitive diagnosis relies on bone or synovial culture or biopsy. Successful management has traditionally consisted of amphotericin B in combination with surgical debridement. Given the rarity of this disease, treatment is not well defined, but reports of success with the use of azole antifungal agents, including itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, are promising.

  3. An atypical pneumococcal arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Pascal; Granel, Brigitte; Mouly, Philippe; Demoux, Anne-Laurence; Le Mée, Fanny; Bernard, Fanny; Faugère, Gerard; Francès, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Bone and joint infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae usually occur in patients who are immunocompromised, and involve one site. The unique case of a 49-year-old immunocompetent man, with an unremarkable medical history, with septicaemia and polyarticular septic arthritis involving the shoulder and knee and with cervical spondylodiscitis due to S pneumoniae, is described. In this case, S pneumoniae probably originated from the gingiva, which is commonly colonised in children and adults. S pneumoniae should be considered routinely when facing bone and joint infections, and multiple locations should be carefully sought owing to the possible lack of symptoms. PMID:22790283

  4. The relationship between body mass index, waist circumference and psoriatic arthritis in the Turkish population

    PubMed Central

    Onsun, Nahide; Topukçu, Bugce; Su, Ozlem; Bahalı, Anil Gulsel; Dizman, Didem; Rezvani, Aylin; Uysal, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease predominantly affecting the skin, with a complex aetiology. Recently it has been suggested that the chronic inflammation of psoriasis may cause metabolic and vascular disorders. The relationship between obesity and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is not clear, and there are insufficient prospective studies addressing this subject. Aim To investigate the relationship between psoriatic arthritis, severity of psoriasis and obesity in the Turkish population. Material and methods Patient data from psoriasis outpatient clinics from February 2007 to July 2013 were reviewed retrospectively using the Psoriasis-Turkey (PSR-TR) registration system. Patients’ age, onset age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, psoriasis area and severity index (PASI), and arthritis information were reviewed. In the outpatient clinics, patients who had joint pain consulted rheumatology clinics. The CASPAR criteria were used for the diagnosis of arthritis. Results A total of 443 males and 495 females enrolled in this study. The mean age of females was 43.9 years (18–93 years) and the mean age of males was 44.6 years (18–89 years). A total of 231 (25%) patients had psoriatic arthritis. Investigation of the relationship between PASI, BMI, waist circumference (WC) and arthritis revealed a statistically significant relationship between each variable. Conclusions In this study we observed a relationship between PsA and high BMI, high WC and high PASI. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder and a chronic inflammatory state induced by adiposity may lead to PsA. PMID:27512358

  5. Arthritis instantaneously causes collagen type I and type II degradation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Landewé, R B M; Geusens, P; van der Heijde, D M F M; Boers, M; van der Linden, S J; Garnero, P

    2006-01-01

    Background Markers of collagen type I (CTX‐1) and type II (CTX‐II) degradation, reflecting bone and cartilage breakdown, appear to predict long term radiographic progression in chronic persistent arthritis. Objective To analyse longitudinally whether changes in arthritis severity are linked to immediate changes in the level of CTX‐I and CTX‐II degradation. Methods CTX‐I and CTX‐II were measured in urine samples from 105 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis who had participated in the COBRA trial at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the start of treatment. The course of the biomarkers over time was compared with the course of ESR, swollen and tender joint counts, and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS28), measured at the same time points, with adjustment for rheumatoid factor, treatment, and baseline radiographic damage, by generalised estimating equations (GEE) with first order autoregression. Results GEE showed that CTX‐I was longitudinally associated with DAS28, but not with ESR, swollen joint count, or tender joint count. CTX‐II, however, was longitudinally associated with ESR, swollen joint count and DAS28, but not with tender joint count. The longitudinal association implies that an increase in the extent of arthritis is immediately followed by an increase in collagen type II degradation, and to a lesser extent collagen type I degradation. Conclusions Cartilage degradation as measured by CTX‐II and to a lesser extent bone degradation as measured by CTX‐I closely follows indices of arthritis. Clinically perceptible arthritis is responsible for immediate damage, which will become visible on plain x rays only much later. PMID:16126801

  6. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale-8 (ASES-8) in a rheumatoid arthritis population.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Cui; Li, Miao-Miao; Yuan, Ji-Qing; Cui, Xue-Jun; Shi, Bao-Xin

    2017-05-01

    The Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale-8 (ASES-8) is a valid tool to measure patients' arthritis-specific self-efficacy. However, evidence about reliability and validity of the ASES-8 in Chinese arthritis patients is lacking. This study aimed to culturally adapt and test the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the ASES-8. Chinese ASES-8 was translated from original English version using translation and back-translation procedures. Validation survey was then conducted in a university-affiliated hospital by a set of questionnaires comprised Chinese ASES-8, pain-VAS, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue (FACIT-F), and Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) physical functioning subscale. A convenience sample of 134 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was recruited from the department of rheumatology. Validity was assessed by Pearson's correlation analysis and exploratory factor analysis. Reliability was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's alpha. Exploratory factor analysis extracted one dimension that explained of the 71.35% variation. Significant negative correlations were found between the ASES-8 and pain-VAS, HADS-D, HADS-A scores (r -0.487 to -0.656, p < 0.01), while positive correlations were found between the ASES-8 and SF-36 PH (r = 0.561, p < 0.01), FACIT-F (r = 0.660, p < 0.01). Excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.98) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.942) were demonstrated. The Chinese version of the ASES-8 had statistically acceptable levels of reliability and validity for assessing self-efficacy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This disease-specific scale is particularly valuable for use among patients with rheumatoid arthritis from the Chinese population.

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis: a review and dental care considerations.

    PubMed

    Grover, H S; Gaba, N; Gupta, A; Marya, C M

    2011-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is a chronic multisystem disease of presumed autoimmune etiology. Medical complications due to RA and its treatment may affect the provision of oral health care. Associated syndromes may contribute to a patient's susceptibility to infections and impaired hemostasis. Therefore oral health care providers need to recognize and identify modificationsof dental care based on the medical status of patients with RA. As with many other chronic conditions, early intervention can reduce the severity of the disease. Furthermore, oral health care providers play an important role in the overall care of these patients as it relates to early recognition, as well as control of the disease.

  8. Arterial stiffness is not increased in patients with short duration rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dzieża-Grudnik, Anna; Sulicka, Joanna; Strach, Magdalena; Siga, Olga; Klimek, Ewa; Korkosz, Mariusz; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of CV events. The aim of the study was to assess arterial stiffness and inflammatory markers in patients with short duration chronic arthritis. We assessed carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), traditional CV risk factors and inflammatory and endothelial markers in 71 chronic arthritis patients (RA and AS) and in 29 healthy controls. We did not find differences in PWV (for RA, AS and controls, respectively: 10 [8.8-10.9] versus 10.7 [9.1-11.8] versus 9.2 [8.3-11.4] m/s; p = .14) and AIx (for RA, AS and controls, respectively: 24.3 ± 11.5 versus 5.7 ± 12.4 versus 10 ± 12.8%; p = .22). Both groups of arthritis patients had active disease with significantly elevated inflammatory markers compared to controls. There were no correlations between endothelial and inflammatory markers and parameters of arterial stiffness in arthritis patients. When analyzing arthritis patients according to median of PVW, there were no significant differences in inflammatory and endothelial markers. We found that in patients with short duration active RA and AS arterial stiffness was not increased and furthermore, there was no association between markers of systemic inflammation and arterial stiffness.

  9. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Anxiety, and Depression Levels in Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    BAYRAM, Korhan; EROL, Almıla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The close relationship between chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and childhood traumatic experiences is well known. The aim of this study is to investigate childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression levels in patients with fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, which are diseases that cause chronic pain. Method A total of 30 patients with fibromyalgia, 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 30 healthy controls, matched with patients with respect to gender, age, and education, were included in the study (90 participants in total). All participants were given a form for sociodemographic characteristics, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). Patients were also asked to complete a numeric pain scale (NPS). Results Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for HAD anxiety than both healthy controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Pain scores of patients with fibromyalgia were higher than in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Participants who had scores over the threshold on HAD anxiety and depression had significantly higher scores on CTQ sexual abuse. Conclusion Both patients with fibromyalgia and patients with rheumatoid arthritis have high levels of childhood traumatic experiences and depression. Patients with pain-related disorders should be examined for childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression for better treatment outcomes.

  10. Cost of arthritis: a systematic review of methodologies used for direct costs.

    PubMed

    Lo, T K T; Parkinson, Lynne; Cunich, Michelle; Byles, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A substantial amount of healthcare and costs are attributable to arthritis, which is a very common chronic disease. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of arthritis cost studies published from 2008 to 2013. MEDLINE, Embase, EconLit databases were searched, as well as governmental and nongovernmental organization websites. Seventy-one reports met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, and 24 studies were included in the review. Among these studies, common methods included the use of individual-level data, bottom-up costing approach, use of both an arthritis group and a control group to enable incremental cost computation of the disease, and use of regression methods such as generalized linear models and ordinary least squares regression to control for confounding variables. Estimates of the healthcare cost of arthritis varied considerably across the studies depending on the study methods, the form of arthritis and the population studied. In the USA, for example, the estimated healthcare cost of arthritis ranged from $1862 to $14,021 per person, per year. The reviewed study methods have strengths, weaknesses and potential improvements in relation to estimating the cost of disease, which are outlined in this paper. Caution must be exercised when these methods are applied to cost estimation and monitoring of the economic burden of arthritis.

  11. Self-Management Education Participation Among US Adults With Arthritis: Who's Attending?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Louise B; Brady, Teresa J; Boring, Michael A; Theis, Kristina A; Barbour, Kamil E; Qin, Jin; Helmick, Charles G

    2017-09-01

    Self-management education (SME) programs teach people with chronic conditions skills to manage their health conditions. We examined patterns in SME program participation among US adults with arthritis ages ≥18 years. Respondents with arthritis were those who reported ever being diagnosed with arthritis by a doctor or health care provider. We analyzed 2014 National Health Interview Survey data to estimate the percentage (unadjusted and age-standardized) who ever attended an SME program overall and for selected subgroups, representativeness of SME participants relative to all adults with arthritis, and trends in SME course participation. In 2014, 1 in 9 US adults with arthritis (11.3% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 10.4-12.3]; age-standardized 11.4% [95% CI 10.0-12.9]) had ever participated in an SME program. SME participation (age-standardized) was highest among those with ≥8 health care provider visits in the past 12 months (16.0% [95% CI 13.1-19.4]). Since 2002, the number of adults with arthritis who have ever participated in SME has increased by 1.7 million, but the percentage has remained constant. Despite its many benefits, SME participation among US adults with arthritis remains persistently low. By recommending that their patients attend SME programs, health care providers can increase the likelihood that their patients experience SME program benefits. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. The effect of resveratrol on the recurrent attacks of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zheng, Shucong; Wang, Yuankai; Zhu, Huiqing; Liu, Qiong; Xue, Yu; Qiu, Jianhua; Zou, Hejian; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Gouty arthritis is characterized by inflammation induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition, which is resulted by an increase of serum urate concentration. The management of gout, especially the recurrent acute attacks of chronic gouty arthritis, is still a problem to be resolved. In this study, we aimed to develop the preventive and therapeutic effect of resveratrol on gouty arthritis. MSU was used to induce gouty arthritis in the foot pad of C57BL/6 mice. Yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate were used to induce hyperuricemia in Kunming mice. Resveratrol was intraperitoneal injected to the mice in the treatment group. The pad inflammation and the level of serum uric acid were investigated to estimate the effect of resveratrol in gouty arthritis. Hyperuricemia was significantly detected in the mice treated with yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate, and gouty arthritis was successfully induced with MSU in mice. We further identified that resveratrol inhibited pad swelling and pad 99mTc uptake in gouty mice. Moreover, serum uric acid level was also decreased by resveratrol in hyperuricemia mice. This study highlighted that resveratrol might be applied to prevent the recurrent acute attack of gouty arthritis because of its inhibition of articular inflammation and down-regulation of serum uric acid.

  13. SND-117, a sinomenine bivalent alleviates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Ren; Zhao, Yang; Bao, Bei-Hua; Li, Jian-Xin

    2015-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder that affects about 1% of the population worldwide. RA is mainly manifested by persistent synovitis and progressive joint destruction. The aim of the present study was to examine the anti-arthritis effects of SND-117, a sinomenine bivalent that is obtained from the structure modification of a clinically available anti-RA drug, sinomenine. The arthritis model (CIA) was established by immunizing DBA/1 mice with type II collagen, and the arthritis scores including inflammation, joint destruction and bone erosion were assessed after booster immunization for 3weeks. The levels of cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were analyzed by quantitative PCR and ELISA. The TNF-α induced NF-κB activation in fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLSCs) was analyzed by Western blot. SND-117 significantly relieved the inflammatory symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis, reduced bone erosion and joint destruction in CIA mice. The serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α of CIA mice were markedly decreased by SND-117. SND-117 also strongly inhibited the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in FLSCs upon TNF-α stimulation. These data demonstrated that SND-117 could effectively block the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis in CIA mice via inhibition of NF-κB signaling, and might provide potential clinic benefits in rheumatoid arthritis management.

  14. Serotonin Is Involved in Autoimmune Arthritis through Th17 Immunity and Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Chabbi-Achengli, Yasmine; Coman, Tereza; Collet, Corinne; Callebert, Jacques; Corcelli, Michelangelo; Lin, Hilène; Rignault, Rachel; Dy, Michel; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Côté, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that results in a disabling and painful condition as it progresses to destruction of the articular cartilage and ankylosis of the joints. Although the cause of the disease is still unknown, evidence argues that autoimmunity plays an important part. There are increasing but contradictory views regarding serotonin being associated with activation of immunoinflammatory pathways and the onset of autoimmune reactions. We studied serotonin's involvement during collagen-induced arthritis in wild-type and Tph1(-/-) mice, which have markedly reduced peripheral serotonin levels. In wild-type mice, induction of arthritis triggered a robust increase in serotonin content in the paws combined with less inflammation. In Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a marked increase in the clinical and pathologic arthritis scores was noticed. Specifically, in Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a significant increase in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption was observed with an increase in IL-17 levels in the paws and in Th17 lymphocytes in the draining lymph nodes, whereas T-regulatory cells were dampened. Ex vivo serotonin and agonists of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors restored IL-17 secretion from splenocytes and Th17 cell differentiation in Tph1(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that serotonin plays a fundamental role in arthritis through the regulation of the Th17/T-regulatory cell balance and osteoclastogenesis.

  15. Review article: moving towards common therapeutic goals in Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Allen, P B; Olivera, P; Emery, P; Moulin, D; Jouzeau, J-Y; Netter, P; Danese, S; Feagan, B; Sandborn, W J; Peyrin-Biroulet, L

    2017-04-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis are chronic, progressive and disabling conditions that frequently lead to structural tissue damage. Based on strategies originally developed for rheumatoid arthritis, the treatment goal for CD has recently moved from exclusively controlling symptoms to both clinical remission and complete mucosal healing (deep remission), with the final aim of preventing bowel damage and disability. To review the similarities and differences in treatment goals between CD and rheumatoid arthritis. This review examined manuscripts from 1982 to 2016 that discussed and/or proposed therapeutic goals with their supportive evidence in CD and rheumatoid arthritis. Proposed therapeutic strategies to improve outcomes in both rheumatoid arthritis and CD include: (i) evaluation of musculoskeletal or organ damage and disability, (ii) tight control, (iii) treat-to-target, (iv) early intervention and (v) disease modification. In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis, there is a paucity of disease-modification trials in CD. Novel therapeutic strategies in CD based on tight control of objective signs of inflammation are expected to change disease course and patients' lives by halting progression or, ideally, preventing the occurrence of bowel damage. Most of these strategies require validation in prospective studies, whereas several disease-modification trials have addressed these issues in rheumatoid arthritis over the last decade. The recent approval of new drugs in CD such as vedolizumab and ustekinumab should facilitate initiation of disease-modification trials in CD in the near future. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  17. [Constrictive pericarditis and rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Baubion, N; Vacheron, A; Heulin, A; Gilles, R; Le Sourd, P; Le Parc, J M; Di Matteo, J

    1979-09-01

    Pericarditis is the commonest cardiac manifestation of rhumatoid arthritis. It is often clinically latent but it may evolve to constriction or less often to tamponade. The case presented is of a 60 year-old woman with a 5 year history of seropositive nodular rhumatoid arthritis in whom bilateral pleural effusions and constrictive pericarditis were observed after sudden termination of corticotherapy. She was treated successfully by pericardectomy. This complication is far from being exceptional (55 cases already reported). It justifies a systematic search for pericarditis in rhumatoid arthritis, especially by echocardiography.

  18. Septic Arthritis of Native Joints.

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2017-03-30

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency that may lead to disability or death. Prompt evacuation of the joint, either by arthrocentesis at the bedside, open or arthroscopic drainage in the operating room, or imaging-guided drainage in the radiology suite, is mandatory. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major cause of septic arthritis in the United States. MRSA joint infection seems to be associated with worse outcomes. Antibiotic courses of 3 to 4 weeks in duration are usually adequate for uncomplicated bacterial arthritis. Treatment duration should be extended to 6 weeks if there is imaging evidence of accompanying osteomyelitis.

  19. NOD2-Associated Pediatric Granulomatous Arthritis (PGA)

    PubMed Central

    Rosé, Carlos D; Aróstegui, Juan I.; Martin, Tammy M; Espada, Graciela; Scalzi, Lisabeth; Yagüe, Jordi; Modesto, Consuelo; Arnal, Maria Cristina; Merino, Rosa; Consuegra, Julia García; Carballo, María Antonia; Wouters, Carine H

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the phenotypic characteristics of the largest to date cohort of patients with Pediatric Granulomatous Arthritis (PGA) and documented NOD2 mutations. Methods Merged data from two prospective cohorts and systematic review of medical records of interest. Results Forty-five individuals with PGA (23 sporadic and 22 from familial pedigrees) and documented NOD2 mutations were identified and are the basis of this report. In this series, 18 patients have the R334W-encoding mutation, 18 the R334Q, four the E383K, three the R587C, one the C495Y and one the W490L. The majority of patients manifested the typical triad of dermatitis, uveitis and arthritis. Conversely, in 12 patients, the following “atypical” manifestations were found: fever, sialadenitis, lymphadenopathy, erythema nodosum, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, transient neuropathy, granulomatous glomerular and interstitial nephritis, interstitial lung disease, arterial hypertension, pericarditis, pulmonary embolism, hepatic granulomatous infiltration, splenic involvement and chronic renal failure. In addition, 4 individuals with an asymptomatic carrier status of a disease causing mutation were documented. Conclusion NOD2-associated PGA can be a multi-systemic disorder with significant visceral involvement. Treating physicians should be aware of the systemic nature of this condition since some of these manifestations may entail long-term morbidity. PMID:19479837

  20. [Optic neuritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient].

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Daniela M R; Buscatti, Izabel M; Lourenço, Benito; Monti, Fernanda C; Paz, José Albino; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) was rarely reported in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, particularly in those under anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockage. However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of ON in JIA population has not been studied. Therefore, 5,793 patients were followed up at our University Hospital and 630 (11%) had JIA. One patient (0.15%) had ON and was reported herein. A 6-year-old male was diagnosed with extended oligoarticular JIA, and received naproxen and methotrexate subsequently replaced by leflunomide. At 11 years old, he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, followed by a partial motor seizure with secondary generalization. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram showed diffuse disorganization of the brain electric activity and leflunomide was suspended. Seven days later, the patient presented acute ocular pain, loss of acuity for color, blurred vision, photophobia, redness and short progressive visual loss in the right eye. A fundoscopic exam detected unilateral papilledema without retinal exudates. Orbital MRI suggested right ON. The anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody was negative. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was administered for five days, and subsequently with prednisone, he had clinical and laboratory improvement. In conclusion, a low prevalence of ON was observed in our JIA population. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody and the normal brain MRI do not exclude the possibility of demyelinating disease associated with chronic arthritis. Therefore, rigorous follow up is required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. An unusual cause of factitious arthritis.

    PubMed

    Süha, T; Ali, A; Ozgen, C G; Ozgür, T; Yunus, K

    2013-04-01

    Septic arthritis and toxic synovitis are clinical conditions that can develop in association with various causes and involve symptoms such as pain, swelling, redness, sensitivity and restricted movement in the joint. A 42-year-old male presented to the emergency department with severe joint pain and nausea after injecting a 1-cc mixture of turpentine oil, eucalyptus oil, mint oil and thyme oil, which he purchased from an alternative medicine store, into his right knee with a syringe because of chronic knee pain. Ballottement and sensitivity were present at physical examination. Knee puncture yielded 60 cc of cloudy fluid. There was no growth in the material obtained. Improvement was observed following subsequent arthroscopic washing of the joint space and IV antibiotherapy, and the patient was discharged on day 21 of hospitalization with oral antibiotic and analgesic therapy. Intra-articular injection of foreign bodies into the knee joint space for therapeutic purposes, as in this case report, is a very rare occurrence, but may lead to potentially complicated arthritis.

  2. Nocardia Arthritis: 3 Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chaussade, Hélène; Lebeaux, David; Gras, Guillaume; Catherinot, Emilie; Rammaert, Blandine; Poiree, Sylvain; Lecuyer, Hervé; Zeller, Valérie; Bernard, Louis; Lortholary, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nocardia are Gram-positive filamentous bacteria responsible for infections ranging from opportunistic life-threatening disseminated diseases to chronic skin and soft-tissue infections. Even if virtually all organs can be infected, articular involvement is rare. Therefore, we report 3 recent cases and performed a literature review of cases of Nocardia arthritis in order to describe clinical features, therapeutic challenges, and outcome of these patients. Among 34 patients (31 in the literature plus our 3 cases), 21 (62%) were due to hematogenous dissemination, 9 (26%) were due to direct bacterial inoculation through the skin, and in 4 cases, the mechanism of infection was unknown. Four out of these 34 cases occurred on prosthetic joints. Whereas hematogenous infections mostly occurred in immunocompromised hosts (17 of 21, 81%), direct inoculation was mostly seen in immunocompetent patients. Eighty-two percent of patients (28 out of 34) received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-containing regimens and median antibiotic treatment duration was 24 weeks (range, 12–120) for hematogenous infections and 12 weeks (range, 6–24) for direct inoculations. Outcome was favorable in 27 cases despite unsystematic surgical management (17 cases) without sequelae in 70% of the cases. Nocardia arthritis is rare but its management is complex and should rely on a combined approach with rheumatologist, infectious diseases expert, and surgeon. PMID:26496274

  3. Clinical use of cyclosporin in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C; Emery, P

    1995-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic immune-mediated disease characterised by an inflammatory synovitis and extra-articular manifestations. There is an expanding body of evidence to indicate that the activation of T lymphocytes is central in the initiation and perpetuation of this disease. Cyclosporin is an immunomodulator and a highly specific inhibitor of T-lymphocyte function, and has demonstrated disease-modifying properties in clinical studies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A concern with the use of cyclosporin has been the development of dose-dependent adverse effects, in particular renal dysfunction. Cyclosporin is lipophilic by nature and the conventional oral formulation (Sandimmun) was subject to incomplete and highly variable absorption, resulting in substantial inter- and intrasubject variations in peak concentrations and systemic bioavailability. A microemulsion-based formulation of cyclosporin (Neoral) has recently been developed, and possesses more predictable and improved absorption with a consequent increased peak concentration and systemic bioavailability. The improved predictability of absorption, and hence blood concentrations, facilitates the ability to 'tailor' therapy to an individual patient, which, in theory, could translate into an improved efficacy and safety profile.

  4. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors. PMID:27429984

  5. Risk of periodontitis in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Egeberg, A; Mallbris, L; Gislason, G; Hansen, P R; Mrowietz, U

    2017-02-01

    Psoriasis and periodontitis are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping inflammatory pathways, but data on risk of periodontitis in psoriasis are scarce and a possible pathogenic link is poorly understood. We investigated the association between psoriasis and periodontitis in a nationwide cohort study. All Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,470,428), including 54 210 and 6988 patients with mild and severe psoriasis, and 6428 with psoriatic arthritis, were linked through administrative registers. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression. Incidence rates of periodontitis per 10 000 person-years were 3.07 (3.03-3.12), 5.89 (1.07-6.84), 8.27 (5.50-12.45) and 11.12 (7.87-15.73) for the reference population, mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis respectively. Adjusted IRRs were (1.66; 1.43-1.94) for mild psoriasis, (2.24; 1.46-3.44) for severe psoriasis and (3.48; 2.46-4.92) for psoriatic arthritis. Similar results were found when a case-control design was applied. We found a significant psoriasis-associated increased risk of periodontitis, which was highest in patients with severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. The Discovery of Novel Experimental Therapies for Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Malemud, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    Conventional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have revolutionized the medical therapy of inflammatory arthritis. However, it remains unclear as to what can be done to treat immune-mediated chronic inflammation after patients become refractory to these therapies or develop serious side-effects and/or infections forcing drug withdrawal. Because of these concerns it is imperative that novel targets be continuously identified and experimental strategies designed to test potential arthritis interventions in vitro, but more importantly, in well-validated animal models of inflammatory arthritis. Over the past few years, sphingosine-1-phosphate, interleukin-7 receptor, spleen tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase 5/p38 kinase regulated/activated protein kinase, micro-RNAs, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand and the polyubiquitin-proteasome pathway were identified as promising novel targets for potential antiarthritis drug development. Indeed several experimental compounds alter the biological activity of these targets and have shown clinical efficacy in animal models of arthritis. A few of them have even entered the first phase of human clinical trials. PMID:20339519

  7. Periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kaur, S; White, S; Bartold, P M

    2013-05-01

    This systematic review considers the evidence available for a relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, DOSS, Embase, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, MedNar, and ProQuest Theses and Dissertations were searched from the inception of the database until June 2012 for any quantitative studies that examined the association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Nineteen studies met our inclusion criteria. Good evidence was found to support an association between these conditions with regard to tooth loss, clinical attachment levels, and erythrocyte sedimentation rates. Moderate evidence was noted for C-reactive protein and interleukin-1β. Some evidence for a positive outcome of periodontal treatment on the clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis was noted. These results provide moderate evidence based on biochemical markers and stronger evidence with regard to clinical parameters that common risk factors or common pathologic processes may be responsible for an association between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease. Further studies are required to fully explore both the biochemical processes and clinical relationships between these 2 chronic inflammatory conditions. There is a need to move from case-control studies to more rigorous studies using well-defined populations and well-defined biochemical and clinical outcomes as the primary outcome measures with consideration of potential confounding factors.

  8. Stat3 as a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oike, Takatsugu; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Miyamoto, Kana; Nakamura, Satoshi; Kaneko, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Shu; Harato, Kengo; Saya, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Niki, Yasuo; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2017-09-08

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multi-factorial disease characterized by chronic inflammation and destruction of multiple joints. To date, various biologic treatments for RA such as anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies have been developed; however, mechanisms underlying RA development remain unclear and targeted therapy for this condition has not been established. Here, we provide evidence that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) promotes inflammation and joint erosion in a mouse model of arthritis. Stat3 global KO mice show early embryonic lethality; thus, we generated viable Stat3 conditional knockout adult mice and found that they were significantly resistant to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), the most common RA model, compared with controls. We then used an in vitro culture system to screen ninety-six existing drugs to select Stat3 inhibitors and selected five candidate inhibitors. Among them, three significantly inhibited development of arthritis and joint erosion in CIA wild-type mice. These findings suggest that Stat3 inhibitors may serve as promising drugs for RA therapy.

  9. Correlation between clotting and collagen metabolism markers in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gabazza, E C; Osamu, T; Yamakami, T; Ibata, H; Sato, T; Sato, Y; Shima, T

    1994-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused essentially by an immune-mediated mechanism. However, abnormalities of the clotting system have also been incriminated as having an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. This study aims at assessing the clotting system and collagen metabolism alterations and the relationship between perturbances of the hemostatic pathway and the destructive and fibroproliferative processes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The coagulation system was evaluated by measuring thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and antithrombin III (AT-III). The fibrinolysis system was assessed by measuring fibrin degradation products (FDP), fibrinogen (FBG), alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2-PI), D-dimer (DD) and plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complex (PAP). As markers of collagen metabolism, the type III procollagen peptide (PIIIP) and the 7S domain of type IV collagen (7S-collagen) were determined. Blood concentrations of DD, PAP, TAT, PIIIP, and 7S-collagen were significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients compared to controls. Serum levels of PIIIP were significantly correlated with PT, APTT, AT-III, FDP, and DD. 7S-collagen levels were inversely related to AT-III and FBG values. This study demonstrated the occurrence of a subclinical intravascular coagulation in rheumatoid arthritis and suggested the important role of blood coagulation in the alteration of the extracellular matrix metabolism in this disease.

  10. Brucellar arthritis: a study of 39 Peruvian families.

    PubMed Central

    Gotuzzo, E; Seas, C; Guerra, J G; Carrillo, C; Bocanegra, T S; Calvo, A; Castañeda, O; Alarcón, G S

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to characterise the articular manifestation of Brucella melitensis within a family in Peru. From January 1981 to June 1986, 39 families with 232 individuals were evaluated. Brucellosis was diagnosed in 118 family members (attack rate of 50.9%). A lower attack rate was observed in children less than 10 years' old compared with other age groups (p less than 0.02). Complete clinical data were available in 92 of the 118 affected members. Moderate and severe forms of the diseases were more prevalent in women than in men (41.8% v 13.5%; p less than 0.001). Twenty eight of the 92 patients developed some brucellar complications; the articular involvement was the most prevalent (23.9%). Arthritis was also more common in women than in men (34.5% v 8.1%; p less than 0.01). Children appeared to have less articular involvement. Overall, the following pattern was observed: peripheral arthritis (54.5%); unilateral sacroiliitis (23.0%); mixed arthritis (4.5%), and spondylitis (9.1%). Spondylitis was seen only in the elderly with chronic brucellosis. Four patients developed extra-articular rheumatism. Within members of family groups, brucellar arthritis occurred less frequently than in individual patients from the same hospital. This suggests that many family cases were diagnosed in the early stages. PMID:3662637

  11. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. RESULTS: Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. CONCLUSIONS: psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function. PMID:26019683

  12. Characteristics of resistin in rheumatoid arthritis angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen-Ming; Huang, Chun-Yin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    Adipokines have been reported to be involved in the regulation of various physiological processes, including the immune response. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an example of a systemic immune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the synovium and bone destruction in the joint. Recent therapeutic strategies based on the understanding of the role of cytokines and cellular mechanisms in RA have improved our understanding of angiogenesis. On the other hand, endogenous endothelial progenitor cells, which are a population isolated from peripheral blood monocytes have recently been identified as a homing target for pro-angiogeneic factor and vessel formation. In this review, we summarize the effects of common adipokines, such as adiponectin, leptin and resistin in RA pathogenesis and discuss other potential mechanisms of relevance for the therapeutic treatment of RA.

  13. Benefits of Exercise in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Jennifer K.; Law, Rebecca-Jane; Matschke, Verena; Lemmey, Andrew B.; Moore, Jonathan P.; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Jones, Jeremy G.; Maddison, Peter; Thom, Jeanette M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to highlight the importance of exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to demonstrate the multitude of beneficial effects that properly designed exercise training has in this population. RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease characterised by decrements to joint health including joint pain and inflammation, fatigue, increased incidence and progression of cardiovascular disease, and accelerated loss of muscle mass, that is, “rheumatoid cachexia”. These factors contribute to functional limitation, disability, comorbidities, and reduced quality of life. Exercise training for RA patients has been shown to be efficacious in reversing cachexia and substantially improving function without exacerbating disease activity and is likely to reduce cardiovascular risk. Thus, all RA patients should be encouraged to include aerobic and resistance exercise training as part of routine care. Understanding the perceptions of RA patients and health professionals to exercise is key to patients initiating and adhering to effective exercise training. PMID:21403833

  14. Gene Polymorphisms and Pharmacogenetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic and inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with genetic predisposition. The advent of new biological agents, as well as the more traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, has resulted in highly efficient therapies for reducing the symptoms and signs of RA; however, not all patients show the same level of response in disease progression to these therapies. These variations suggest that RA patients may have different genetic regulatory mechanisms. The extensive polymorphisms revealed in non-coding gene-regulatory regions in the immune system, as well as genetic variations in drug-metabolizing enzymes, suggest that this type of variation is of functional and evolutionary importance and may provide clues for developing new therapeutic strategies. Pharmacogenetics is a rapidly advancing area of research that holds the promise that therapies will soon be tailored to an individual patient’s genetic profile. PMID:19506728

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Role for Immunosenescence?

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Robinson, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is accompanied by a progressive decline in the integrity of the immune system, a process known as immunosenescence. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disease whose incidence increases with age, is characterized by pathological features typical of immune dysfunction in the elderly, encompassing dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent evidence suggests that certain features of immunosenescence, such as the decrease in T-cell generation and diversity, may contribute to the development of RA. Thus, physiological immunosenescence may render the elderly susceptible to RA, while premature immunosenescence may contribute to the development of RA in young adults. In addition, other features of immunosenescence may result from the chronic immune stimulation that occurs in RA and lead to worsening of the disease. Here we review the immunopathological features common to aging and RA, and discuss the mechanisms by which immunosenescence may contribute to the development or progression of RA. PMID:20942872

  16. MicroRNAs in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ceribelli, Angela; Nahid, Md A.; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and severe autoimmune disease that affects joint tissues, bone, and cartilage. However, the pathogenesis of RA is still unclear. Autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide are useful tools for early diagnosis, monitoring disease activity, and predicting prognosis. Recently, many groups have focused their attention on the role of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of RA, as well as a potential biomarker to monitor RA. In fact, the expression of some microRNAs, such as miR-146a, is upregulated in different cell types and tissues in RA patients. MicroRNAs in RA could also be considered as possible future targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:21600203

  17. Two new drugs for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    2017-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, progressive autoimmune disease that causes inflammation and destruction of the joints.(1-3) It can also affect the eyes, the heart and the lungs and is associated with significant disability and increased mortality. RA is estimated to affect just under 1% of the population aged over 16 years, equating to more than 400,000 people in the UK.(4) ▼Baricitinib (Olumiant) and ▼tofacitinib (Xeljanz) were launched in the UK in April 2017 and represent a new therapeutic class of medicines known as targeted synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs.(5,6) Here, we review the evidence for the safety and effectiveness of these new oral agents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Glucocorticoid use in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Harris, E D

    1983-09-01

    Although the early hopes and enthusiasm held for glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis therapy have been greatly modified, there is still a secondary therapeutic role for these drugs, one which has been refined by clinical experience.

  19. T Cell Aging in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Cornelia M.; Yang, Zhen; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review With progressive age, the immune system and the propensity for abnormal immunity change fundamentally. Individuals >50 years of age are more susceptible to infection and cancer, but also at higher risk for chronic inflammation and immune-mediated tissue damage. The process of immunosenescence is accelerated in rheumatoid arthritis. Recent findings Premature T cell senescence occurs not only in RA, it has also been involved in morbidity and mortality of chronic HIV infection. Senescent cells acquire the “senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP)”, which promotes and sustains tissue inflammation. Molecular mechanisms underlying T cell aging are beginning to be understood. Besides the contraction of T cell diversity due to uneven clonal expansion, senescent T cells have defects in balancing cytoplasmic kinase and phosphatase activities, changing their activation thresholds. Also, leakiness in repairing DNA lesions and uncapped telomeres imposes genomic stress. Age-induced changes in the tissue microenvironment may alter T cell responses. Summary Gain- and loss-of-function in senescent T cells undermine protective immunity and create the conditions for chronic tissue inflammation, a combination typically encountered in RA. Genetic programs involved in T cell signaling and DNA repair are of high interest in the search for underlying molecular defects. PMID:24296720

  20. Peptidylarginine Deiminase 4 Contributes to Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Induced Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shelef, Miriam A.; Sokolove, Jeremy; Lahey, Lauren J.; Wagner, Catriona A.; Sackmann, Eric K.; Warner, Thomas F.; Wang, Yanming; Beebe, David J.; Robinson, William H.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objective Peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is a citrullinating enzyme that has multiple associations with inflammation. In rheumatoid arthritis, PAD4 and protein citrullination are increased in inflamed joints, and anti–citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) form against citrullinated antigens are formed. ACPA immune complexes can deposit in the joint and induce the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), a critical inflammatory cytokine in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further, in other settings, TNFα has been shown to induce PAD4 activity and modulate antibody formation. We undertook this study to investigate whether TNFα and PAD4 may synergistically exacerbate autoantibody production and inflammatory arthritis. Methods To determine whether TNFα and PAD4 augment autoantibody production and inflammatory arthritis, we first used a multiplex assay to determine whether mice with chronic inflammatory arthritis due to overexpression of TNFα develop autoantibodies against native and citrullinated antigens. With TNF+ PAD4+/+ and TNF+PAD4−/− mice, we then compared serum autoantibody levels by multiplex array, lymphocyte activation by flow cytometry, total serum IgG levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, arthritis by clinical and histologic scoring, and systemic inflammation using microfluidic devices. Results TNFα-overexpressing mice had increased levels of autoantibodies reactive against native and citrullinated antigens. PAD4−/− mice with TNFα-induced arthritis had lower levels of autoantibodies reactive against native and citrullinated antigens, decreased T cell activation and total IgG levels, and reduced inflammation and arthritis compared to PAD4+/+ TNFα-overexpressing mice. Conclusion PAD4 mediates autoantibody production and inflammatory arthritis downstream of TNFα. PMID:24497204

  1. The Immunoglobulin (IgG) Antibody Response to OspA and OspB Correlates with Severe and Prolonged Lyme Arthritis and the IgG Response to P35 Correlates with Mild and Brief Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Evren; McHugh, Gail L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Fikrig, Erol; Steere, Allen C.

    1999-01-01

    In an effort to implicate immune responses to specific Borrelia burgdorferi proteins that may have a role in chronic Lyme arthritis, we studied the natural history of the antibody response to B. burgdorferi in serial serum samples from 25 patients monitored throughout the course of Lyme disease. In these patients, the immunoglobulin G (IgM) and IgG antibody responses to 10 recombinant B. burgdorferi proteins, determined during early infection, early arthritis, and maximal arthritis, were correlated with the severity and duration of maximal arthritis. The earliest responses were usually to outer surface protein C (OspC), P35, P37, and P41; reactivity with OspE, OspF, P39, and P93 often developed weeks later; and months to years later, 64% of patients had responses to OspA and OspB. During early infection and early arthritis, the levels of IgG antibody to P35 correlated inversely with the subsequent severity or duration of maximal arthritis. In contrast, during periods of maximal arthritis, the levels of IgG antibody to OspA and OspB, especially to a C-terminal epitope of OspA, correlated directly with the severity and duration of arthritis. Thus, the higher the IgG antibody response to P35 earlier in the infection, the milder and briefer the subsequent arthritis, whereas during maximal arthritis, the higher the IgG response to OspA and OspB, the more severe and prolonged the arthritis. PMID:9864212

  2. Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Melodie; Bergman, Martin Jan

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a dynamic systemic disease that can have a profound affect on a patient’s self-esteem. Fortunately, numerous therapeutic advances have been made over the last 10 years. In order to help patients manage their disease, healthcare providers should be aware of the modifiable risk factors that may exacerbate psoriasis. Additionally, exploring the impact the disease has on a patient and how it may change over their lifespan will help ensure appropriate therapies are used. Patients are unique so one medication will not fit all of our patients’ needs. In this paper, the authors look at available treatment options for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Educating psoriasis patients, in addition to collaborating with patients and other healthcare providers, may help initiate therapies that will result in patients living their lives to the fullest. PMID:28360971

  3. Psoriatic Arthritis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Peter; Ryan, Caitriona; Menter, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a debilitating condition, which affects approximately one-quarter of psoriasis patients. Recent findings have furthered our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of PsA. There have been major advances in the identification of genes associated with joint involvement but not with cutaneous disease alone. The elucidation of key immunologic pathways has allowed the development of novel targeted therapies that are in the research pipeline. Currently, good screening tests and biomarkers to diagnose early PsA and to guide therapy are limited. In this paper, we present recent findings with regard to the immunopathogenesis and genetics of PsA, biomarkers, and screening tools and review the targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. PMID:23209897

  4. Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Katz, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the current information on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Severe fatigue is common among individuals with RA and has a significant impact on quality of life (QOL). RA-related factors (e.g., inflammation, pain) are associated with greater fatigue, but other factors, such as obesity, physical inactivity, sleep disturbance, and depression, explain the majority of variation in fatigue. Medications targeting RA have little effect on fatigue. Instead, the most effective interventions seem to address non-RA-specific factors such as physical inactivity or use cognitive behavioral approaches. No recommendations have been made for tools to measure fatigue in RA, leading to potential difficulty comparing studies. Although fatigue has great impact on patients' QOL, effective interventions that are feasible for broad dissemination remain elusive. Additional multi-faceted research is needed to identify modifiable sources of fatigue. Such research would be enhanced by harmonization of fatigue measurement across studies.

  5. Niki de Saint Phalle's lifelong dialogue between art and diseases: psychological trauma of sexual abuse, transient selective IgA deficiency, occupational exposure to toxic plastic material, chronic lung disease, rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Henning

    2013-05-01

    The French artist Niki de Saint Phalle (1930-2002) is one of the most famous female painter and sculptor of the 20th century. Her eventful live was full of emotional and physical burdens such as abuse by the father as a adolescent, early separation from family, nervous collapse, turbulent relationship with the artist Jean Tinguely, and last not least serious diseases. The psychological trauma of sexual abuse together with a "nervous breakdown" years later was the start of a life as an artist and is also a key to her art of the early years. She was affected from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and was treated over 20 years with prednisolone and antimalarials leading to a good functional outcome and limited erosions of the wrist joint. Additionally, she had lifelong pulmonary disorders finally leading to death, which she attributed to polyester, the material used for her sculptures. An analysis of medical documents collected by her and provided by treating physicians gives another surprising explanation: selective IgA deficiency with multiple recurrent respiratory infections, asthma, milk intolerance, autoimmune thyroiditis, and RA compatible with hypogammaglobulinemia. Very unique in case of Niki de Saint Phalle is that IgA deficiency was transient. Nevertheless, it may be possible that the occupational exposure with art materials (polystyrene, polyester) has contributed in part or temporarily to her health problems. Altogether, her enormous artistic productivity represents an outstanding example of creative coping with RA and other lifelong health problems. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Autotaxin expression from synovial fibroblasts is essential for the pathogenesis of modeled arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Oikonomou, Nikos; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Sevastou, Ioanna; Nikolaidou-Katsaridou, Nefeli; Zhao, Zhenwen; Mersinias, Vassilis; Armaka, Maria; Xu, Yan; Masu, Masayuki; Mills, Gordon B.; Gay, Steffen; Kollias, George

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive arthropathy characterized by chronic synovial inflammation that imposes a substantial socioeconomic burden. Under the influence of the proinflammatory milieu, synovial fibroblasts (SFs), the main effector cells in disease pathogenesis, become activated and hyperplastic, releasing proinflammatory factors and tissue-remodeling enzymes. This study shows that activated arthritic SFs from human patients and animal models express significant quantities of autotaxin (ATX; ENPP2), a lysophospholipase D that catalyzes the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX expression from SFs was induced by TNF, and LPA induced SF activation and effector functions in synergy with TNF. Conditional genetic ablation of ATX in mesenchymal cells, including SFs, resulted in disease attenuation in animal models of arthritis, establishing the ATX/LPA axis as a novel player in chronic inflammation and the pathogenesis of arthritis and a promising therapeutic target. PMID:22493518

  7. The Unique Macroscopic Appearance of Gouty Arthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Mittl, Gregory S; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    2015-07-01

    Patients with significant gouty arthritis can develop disabling joint pain secondary to monosodium urate (MSU) articular deposition. We report a case of white, chalky MSU crystal deposition covering the articular surfaces of the knee as discovered by total knee arthroplasty. A 65-year-old male with a history of gout presented with bilateral knee pain. His radiographic imaging was negative for gouty tophi, and he elected to undergo left total knee arthroplasty. Intraoperatively a distinct chalky, white paste consistent with MSU deposition was observed covering the articular surfaces of the knee consistent with the diagnosis of gouty arthritis. Gout is the most common inflammatory arthritis affecting more than 3 million people in the USA. The inflammation results from the phagocytosis of monosodium urate crystals (MSU) and the release of inflammatory cytokines within the joint. Gout progresses from acute to chronic over many years and frequently causes chronic arthropathy. When significant knee pain and disability is associated with gouty arthropathy, total knee arthroplasty is certainly an option. The pathological appearance of gouty joints is characteristic. Macroscopic examination of joints affected by gout reveals a nodular, white, chalky appearance. Polarized microscopy of gout demonstrates negative birefringent needle-shaped MSU crystals. In this case report, we describe the characteristic chalky, white MSU deposit that covers the articular surfaces of a knee joint in a patient with a history of gout undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The investigators have obtained the patient's informed written consent for print and electronic publication of the case report.

  8. Siebrandus Sixtius: evidence of rheumatoid arthritis of the robust reaction type in a seventeenth century Dutch priest.

    PubMed Central

    Dequeker, J

    1992-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis of the robust reaction type has been diagnosed in a seventeenth century Dutch priest, Siebrandus Sixtius, based on pictorial evidence of typical hand deformities and historical evidence affirming that he had chronic nodular rheumatism for many years. This case report, in conjunction with other pictorial depictions of probable rheumatoid arthritis, questions the view that rheumatoid arthritis is a modern disease which prevailed in the New World and was found in the Old World only after the discovery of America. Images PMID:1586264

  9. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R(2)  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use by Normal Weight, Overweight, and Obese Patients with Arthritis or Other Musculoskeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mbizo, Justice; Okafor, Anthony; Sutton, Melanie A; Burkhart, Erica N; Stone, Leauna M

    2016-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 50 million Americans have been diagnosed with arthritis and other musculoskeletal diseases. The purpose of the current study was to (1) estimate the prevalence of overall complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and (2) examine the role of body mass index (BMI) on CAM use among normal weight, overweight, and obese persons with chronic lower back pain, chronic neck pain, chronic/rheumatoid arthritis, or musculoskeletal diseases, while controlling for other covariates. Cross-sectional design using secondary data for 9724 adults from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Data were weighted and analyzed by using Stata 12 for Windows (Stata Corp., College Station, TX). Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression statistics were computed. The participants were randomly surveyed from U.S. households. CAM use was measured as reported use of any modality within the five National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health domains. CAM use was statistically significantly associated with female sex; race/ethnicity; having chronic neck pain, lower back pain, or chronic/rheumatoid arthritis; having limitations due to chronic disease; and geographic region (p < 0.05). Factors significantly associated with decreased odds of CAM use included age 50-64 years, income categorized as "other/missing," and having musculoskeletal diseases. Stratification by body mass index suggested increased odds of CAM use among normal/underweight persons with chronic neck pain but decreased odds for those with chronic musculoskeletal diseases. For overweight patients, increased odds of CAM use were significant for chronic lower back pain, musculoskeletal diseases, and chronic/rheumatoid arthritis. Musculoskeletal diseases and arthritis represent important public health problems with economic implications for the well-being of individuals and society. Identifying CAM use trends by patient weight can be

  11. Sympathetic fiber sprouting in inflamed joints and adjacent skin contributes to pain-related behavior in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Longo, Geraldine; Osikowicz, Maria; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo

    2013-06-12

    Although chronic pain is the most common symptom of arthritis, relatively little is known about the mechanisms driving it. Recently, a sprouting of autonomic sympathetic fibers into the upper dermis of the skin, an area that is normally devoid of them, was found in the skin following chronic inflammation of the rat hindpaw. While this sprouting only occurred when signs of joint and bone damage were present, it remained to be clarified whether it was a consequence of the chronic inflammation of the skin or of the arthritis and whether it also occurred in the joint. In the present study, we used a model of arthritis in which complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the rat ankle joint. At 4 weeks following CFA treatment, there was an increase in sympathetic and peptidergic fiber density in the ankle joint synovium. We also observed a sympathetic, but not peptidergic, fiber sprouting in the skin over the joint, which may be a consequence of the increased levels of mature nerve growth factor levels in skin, as revealed by Western blot analysis. The pharmacological suppression of sympathetic fiber function with systemic guanethidine significantly decreased the pain-related behavior associated with arthritis. Guanethidine completely suppressed the heat hyperalgesia and attenuated mechanical and cold hypersensitivity. These results suggest that transmitters released from the sprouted sympathetic fibers in the synovial membrane and upper dermis contribute to the pain-related behavior associated with arthritis. Blocking the sympathetic fiber sprouting may provide a novel therapeutic approach to alleviate pain in arthritis.

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis: scientific development from a critical point of view.

    PubMed

    Schöffel, Norman; Mache, Stefanie; Quarcoo, David; Scutaru, Cristian; Vitzthum, Karin; Groneberg, David A; Spallek, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is classified as a chronic, progressive, systemic autoimmune disorder leading to inflammation, stiffness, defective position and destruction of joints. Finally a complete loss of mobility and functioning can be the result. The fraction of disability varies strongly, for example, a systematic review shows a 50% disability in a period from first occurrence to disability from 4.5 to 22 years. Scientific efforts focused strongly on therapeutic and diagnostic methods during recent years. So far, there is no scientometric approach of the topic rheumatoid arthritis available although there is an increased need to evaluate quality and quantity of scientific research. Density-equalizing algorithms, scientometric methods and large scale data analysis were applied to evaluate the quality and quantity of scientific efforts in the field of rheumatoid arthritis. Data were gained from Pubmed and ISI-Web. During the period 1901-2007, 78,128 items were published by 129 countries including the USA, UK and Germany being the most productive suppliers, representing 45.7% of all publications. Another 23 countries published more than 100 items. In terms of international cooperation the USA proved to be the most successful partner. "Arthritis and Rheumatism", "Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases" and the "Journal of Rheumatology" are the most prolific journals. The current study is the first analysis of "rheumatoid arthritis" research activities and output. Our analysis revealed single areas of interest, the most prolific journals, authors and institutions dealing with the topic. Nevertheless, statements concerning the scientific quality should be considered critical due to a bias according to self-citation and co-authorship.

  13. Differences in pathophysiology between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lories, R J; Baeten, D L P

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis are common and severe chronic inflammatory skeletal diseases. Recognizing the differences rather than emphasizing similarities is important for a better understanding of the disease processes, the identification of specific therapeutic targets and in the long-term better treatment options for the individual patients. We discuss a number of pathophysiological differences between rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis by looking at the anatomical characteristics, differences and similarities in the autoimmune and autoinflammatory reactions, association with other immune mediated inflammatory diseases, structural outcome, and their potential significance for further therapeutic developments. Further research into the differences between these diseases should focus on the specific nature of the immune/inflammatory components, the role of resident cells in the joint and joint-associated tissues, the types and mechanisms of tissue remodeling and the characteristics of the articular cartilage. Better insights into their individual characteristics may lead to better therapeutic strategies, specific targets and useful biomarkers.

  14. Angiogenesis and rheumatoid arthritis: pathogenic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Colville-Nash, P R; Scott, D L

    1992-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis can be considered as one of the family of 'angiogenesis dependent diseases'. Angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis is controlled by a variety of factors found in the synovial fluid and pannus tissue. Modulation of the angiogenic component of the disease may alter the pathogenesis of the condition, and subsequent cartilage and joint destruction, by reducing the area of the endothelium in the pannus and restricting pannus growth. Current therapeutic strategies exert, to varying extents, an inhibitory effect on the angiogenic process. In particular, the mode of action of the slow acting antirheumatic drugs may be due to their effect on the angiogenic response. The development of novel angiostatic treatments for chronic inflammatory joint disease may lead to a new therapeutic approach in controlling disease progression. PMID:1378718

  15. Arthritis, eosinophilia, and autoimmune liver disease: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Farani, Júlia Boechat; Albuquerque, Carolina Berzoini; de Oliveira, Juliano Machado; de Assis, Emílio Augusto Campos Pereira; de Oliveira Ayres Pinto, Eduardo; de Lacerda Bonfante, Herval

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic liver disease of unknown etiology. It is composed of immune-mediated liver injury and significant immunological aspects. Arthritis can be observed in patients with AIH before recognition of the disease, which can lead to a diagnostic challenge. Although there are few reported cases in literature, peripheral blood eosinophilia might also play a part in such diagnosis. We report an intriguing case of a 41-year-old man who presented to our service with arthritis and eosinophilia as initial manifestations and was eventually diagnosed with overlap syndrome: AIH and primary sclerosing cholangitis. The present report aims to include eosinophilia among the clinical features of AIH, highlighting the possibility of its detection before the onset of either articular or hepatic disturbances.

  16. Fish Eaters Report Less Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_166848.html Fish Eaters Report Less Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain Study suggests most fish may play role ... significantly reduce the pain and swelling associated with rheumatoid arthritis, a new study says. Prior studies have shown ...

  17. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  18. Miscellaneous conditions associated with arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, J T

    1986-10-01

    Miscellaneous conditions associated with arthritis in children are reviewed as distinct entities in the differential diagnosis of the many types of juvenile arthritis reviewed here and in other articles.

  19. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 ... Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with ...

  20. Can Botox Injections Relieve Arthritis Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Botox injections relieve arthritis pain? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Botox injections into arthritic joints ... focus of most arthritis treatment plans. With April Chang-Miller, M.D. References Hameed F, et al. ...

  1. Dance-Based Exercise and Tai Chi and Their Benefits for People with Arthritis: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ray

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The first aim of this review article is to systematically summarise, synthesise, and critically evaluate the research base concerning the use of two art forms, namely, dance-based exercises and Tai Chi, as applied to people with arthritis (a chronic condition that results in considerable disability and, particularly in later life,…

  2. Do You Have a Child with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis in Your Class?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Jean; Fujishige, Carole

    The booklet provides information to help teachers understand juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). JRA is a chronic disease involving one or more joint(s); its cause is unknown. The five types of JRA are monarticular, pauciarticular of young girls, pauciarticular of boys, polyarticular, and systemic. Aspirin is the main treatment medication and…

  3. Dance-Based Exercise and Tai Chi and Their Benefits for People with Arthritis: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ray

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The first aim of this review article is to systematically summarise, synthesise, and critically evaluate the research base concerning the use of two art forms, namely, dance-based exercises and Tai Chi, as applied to people with arthritis (a chronic condition that results in considerable disability and, particularly in later life,…

  4. Geode of the femur: an uncommon manifestation potentially reflecting the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonuk; Terk, Michael R; Hu, Bing; Garber, Elayne K; Weisman, Michael H

    2006-12-01

    Geodes are noted frequently in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but large geodes of the femur are uncommon. We describe a patient with RA and a large geode in his femur; histological findings were consistent with a rheumatoid nodule and chronically inflamed synovium. We review the literature of large femoral geodes and what this particular manifestation may reflect about the pathogenesis of RA.

  5. Do You Have a Child with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis in Your Class?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Jean; Fujishige, Carole

    The booklet provides information to help teachers understand juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). JRA is a chronic disease involving one or more joint(s); its cause is unknown. The five types of JRA are monarticular, pauciarticular of young girls, pauciarticular of boys, polyarticular, and systemic. Aspirin is the main treatment medication and…

  6. Inflammatory arthritis in children with osteochondrodysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scuccimarri, R.; Azouz, E; Duffy, K.; Fassier, F.; Duffy, C.

    2000-01-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic skeletal dysplasias. Patients with these diseases commonly develop an early degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis. Occasional observations of inflammatory arthritis have been made in this population but such observations are based on clinical grounds alone without confirmatory imaging studies. Four patients followed up in a paediatric rheumatology clinic with three different skeletal dysplasias, who had both clinical and radiological evidence of an inflammatory arthritis and coexistent degenerative arthritis, are described.

 PMID:11053062

  7. Inflammatory arthritis in children with osteochondrodysplasias.

    PubMed

    Scuccimarri, R; Azouz, E M; Duffy, K N; Fassier, F; Duffy, C M

    2000-11-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic skeletal dysplasias. Patients with these diseases commonly develop an early degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis. Occasional observations of inflammatory arthritis have been made in this population but such observations are based on clinical grounds alone without confirmatory imaging studies. Four patients followed up in a paediatric rheumatology clinic with three different skeletal dysplasias, who had both clinical and radiological evidence of an inflammatory arthritis and coexistent degenerative arthritis, are described.

  8. Antibiotic treatment and long term prognosis of reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laasila, K; Laasonen, L; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether a three month course of lymecycline has an effect on the long term prognosis of reactive arthritis (ReA). Methods: In 1987–88 a double-blind controlled study with three month course of lymecycline/placebo was conducted. 17 of 23 patients treated at the outpatient department of Helsinki University Central Hospital volunteered to take part in a follow up study, where a physical examination were performed, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints and of symptomatic peripheral joints were examined. Results: 16/17 (94%) patients reported some kind of back pain and 10/17 (59%) peripheral joint symptoms during the follow up. Two patients had unilateral grade 1 sacroiliitis, one patient grade 4 sacroiliitis, and one patient bilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis. In one patient the disease had progressed to ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and in another to chronic spondyloarthropathy. In addition, two patients had small erosions in radiocarpal joints. No statistically significant differences were found between placebo and lymecycline groups in the development of chronic arthritis, sacroiliitis, or AS. Conclusion: The results of the initial study showed that long term treatment with lymecycline in patients with acute ReA decreased the duration of arthritis in those with Chlamydia trachomatis triggered ReA, but not in other patients with ReA. Ten years after the acute arthritis one patient had developed AS, and three had radiological sacroiliitis, three patients had radiological changes at peripheral joints. Long term lymecycline treatment did not change the natural history of the disease. PMID:12810429

  9. Antibiotic treatment and long term prognosis of reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laasila, K; Laasonen, L; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate whether a three month course of lymecycline has an effect on the long term prognosis of reactive arthritis (ReA). In 1987-88 a double-blind controlled study with three month course of lymecycline/placebo was conducted. 17 of 23 patients treated at the outpatient department of Helsinki University Central Hospital volunteered to take part in a follow up study, where a physical examination were performed, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints and of symptomatic peripheral joints were examined. 16/17 (94%) patients reported some kind of back pain and 10/17 (59%) peripheral joint symptoms during the follow up. Two patients had unilateral grade 1 sacroiliitis, one patient grade 4 sacroiliitis, and one patient bilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis. In one patient the disease had progressed to ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and in another to chronic spondyloarthropathy. In addition, two patients had small erosions in radiocarpal joints. No statistically significant differences were found between placebo and lymecycline groups in the development of chronic arthritis, sacroiliitis, or AS. The results of the initial study showed that long term treatment with lymecycline in patients with acute ReA decreased the duration of arthritis in those with Chlamydia trachomatis triggered ReA, but not in other patients with ReA. Ten years after the acute arthritis one patient had developed AS, and three had radiological sacroiliitis, three patients had radiological changes at peripheral joints. Long term lymecycline treatment did not change the natural history of the disease.

  10. Celecoxib for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fidahic, Mahir; Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Radic, Mislav; Puljak, Livia

    2017-06-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic auto-immune disorder that causes widespread and persistent inflammation of the synovial lining of joints and tendon sheaths. Presently, there is no cure for rheumatoid arthritis and treatment focuses on managing symptoms such as pain, stiffness and mobility, with the aim of achieving stable remission and improving mobility. Celecoxib is a selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for treatment of people with rheumatoid arthritis. To assess the benefits and harms of celecoxib in people with rheumatoid arthritis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase and clinical trials registers (ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization trials portal) to May 18, 2017. We also searched the reference and citation lists of included studies. We included prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared oral celecoxib (200 mg and 400 mg daily) versus no intervention, placebo or a traditional NSAID (tNSAID) in people with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis, of any age and either sex. We excluded studies with fewer than 50 participants in each arm or had durations of fewer than four weeks treatment. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included eight RCTs with durations of 4 to 24 weeks, published between 1998 and 2014 that involved a total of 3988 adults (mean age = 54 years), most of whom were women (73%). Participants had rheumatoid arthritis for an average of 9.2 years. All studies were assessed at high or unclear risk of bias in at least one domain. Overall, evidence was assessed as moderate-to-low quality. Five studies were funded by pharmaceutical companies. Celecoxib versus placeboWe included two studies (N = 873) in which participants received 200 mg daily or 400 mg daily or placebo. Participants who received celecoxib showed significant clinical improvement compared with those receiving placebo (15% absolute

  11. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Havemose-Poulsen, Anne; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj; Skjødt, Henrik; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Locht, Henning; Bendtzen, Klaus; Holmstrup, Palle

    2006-02-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases. The study population consisted of white adults (or=4 mm, CAL>or=2 mm, and ABL>or=2 mm compared to controls. The percentage of sites with CAL>or=2 mm significantly correlated with the levels of IgM-RF and IgA-RF. Missing teeth in JIA and RA patients were not lost due to periodontitis. Patients with GAgP showed higher levels of leukocytes, including neutrophils, and CRP compared to controls. In part, JIA and RA patients showed similar results. Young adults with RA may develop periodontal destruction, and these patients require professional attention. Both differences and similarities in periodontal and hematological variables were seen in individuals with periodontitis, JIA, and RA.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Members of the America 2 Anywhere 4 Arthritis (A2A4A) running group after finishing a marathon. Through ...

  13. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  14. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0408 5c...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT It is now well established that there is a preclinical period of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development that is

  15. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  16. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  17. Resolvin D3 Is Dysregulated in Arthritis and Reduces Arthritic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arnardottir, Hildur H; Dalli, Jesmond; Norling, Lucy V; Colas, Romain A; Perretti, Mauro; Serhan, Charles N

    2016-09-15

    Uncontrolled inflammation is a unifying component of many chronic inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis. Resolvins (Rvs) are a new family from the endogenous specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) that actively stimulate resolution of inflammation. In this study, using lipid mediator metabololipidomics with murine joints we found a temporal regulation of endogenous SPMs during self-resolving inflammatory arthritis. The SPMs present in self-resolving arthritic joints include the D-series Rvs, for example, RvD1, RvD2, RvD3, and RvD4. Of note, RvD3 levels were reduced in inflamed joints from mice with delayed-resolving arthritis when compared with self-resolving inflammatory arthritis. RvD3 was also reduced in serum from rheumatoid arthritis patients compared with healthy controls. RvD3 administration reduced joint leukocytes as well as paw joint eicosanoids, clinical scores, and edema. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for dysregulated endogenous RvD3 levels in inflamed paw joints and its potent actions in reducing murine arthritis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. The effect of resveratrol on the recurrent attacks of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zheng, Shucong; Wang, Yuankai; Zhu, Huiqing; Liu, Qiong; Xue, Yu; Qiu, Jianhua; Zou, Hejian; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2014-11-26

    Gouty arthritis is characterized by inflammation induced by monosodium urate crystal (MSU) deposition, which is resulted by increase of serum urate concentration. The management of gout, especially the recurrent attacks of chronic gouty arthritis, is still a problem to be resolved. In this study, we aimed to develop the preventive and therapeutic effects of resveratrol on gouty arthritis. Monosodium urate crystal (MSU) was used to induce gouty arthritis in foot pad of C57BL/6 mice. Yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate were used to induce hyperuricemia in Kunming mice. Resveratrol was intraperitoneally injected to the mice in the treatment group. Article inflammation and serum uric acid level were investigated to estimate the effect of resveratrol in gout. Yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate were used to induce hyperuricemia in mice, and MSU to induce gouty arthritis. We identified that resveratrol inhibited foot swelling and inflammation-associated 99mTc uptake in gouty mice. Moreover, serum uric acid level was also decreased by resveratrol in hyperuricemia mice. This study highlighted that resveratrol might be applied to prevent the recurrent attack of gouty arthritis because of its inhibition of articular inflammation and down-regulation of serum uric acid.

  19. Resolvin D3 is dysregulated in arthritis and reduces arthritic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Hildur H.; Dalli, Jesmond; Norling, Lucy V.; Colas, Romain A.; Perretti, Mauro; Serhan, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation is a unifying component of many chronic inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis. Resolvins (Rv) are a new family from the endogenous specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPM) that actively stimulate resolution of inflammation. Herein, using lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomics with murine joints we found a temporal regulation of endogenous SPM during self-resolving inflammatory arthritis. The SPMs present in self-resolving arthritic joints include the D-series resolvins, e.g. Resolvin (Rv) D1, RvD2, RvD3 and RvD4. Of note, RvD3 levels were reduced in inflamed joints from mice with delayed-resolving arthritis when compared to self-resolving inflammatory arthritis. RvD3 was also reduced in serum from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients compared to healthy controls. RvD3 administration reduced joint leukocytes as well as paw joint eicosanoids, clinical scores and edema. Together, these findings provide evidence for dysregulated endogenous RvD3 levels in inflamed paw joints and its potent actions in reducing murine arthritis. PMID:27534559

  20. Why we need a process on breaking news of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Chausset, Aurélie; Gominon, Anne-Laure; Montmaneix, Nathalie; Echaubard, Stéphane; Guillaume-Czitrom, Séverine; Cambon, Benoit; Miele, Cécile; Rochette, Emmanuelle; Merlin, Etienne

    2016-05-21

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis is the most common chronic pediatric rheumatic disease. The announcement of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis poses for parents a number of challenges that make it hard to accept a diagnosis of the disease for their child; yet to our knowledge, no study to date has focused on the time period immediately surrounding the diagnosis. This study sets out to describe parents' experiences in engaging with their child's diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. This is a mixed methods study. Semi-structured interviews of families with a Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis child were conducted. A grounded-theory thematic analysis was performed. Items that emerged in the interviews were compiled into a self-administered questionnaire. Eleven families participated in the qualitative study. Sixty families responded to the questionnaire. The path of parents was characterized by doubt (before, during and after diagnosis) while the disease tended to take center stage. Doubt was generated through mismatches in perspectives between the parents' circle of acquaintances, physicians, and the parents' own subjective experiences of symptoms. This study also found that social support and parent associations occupied an ambiguous position between help and stigmatization. Doubt fuels self-energizing spirals that take root as parents learn the news that their child has Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. These spirals of doubt may influence parents' experiences at every stage throughout the course of disease. Our data support the implementation of a specific process dedicated to breaking the news of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis to parents.

  1. Differential Diagnosis of Polyarticular Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pujalte, George G A; Albano-Aluquin, Sheila A

    2015-07-01

    Polyarticular arthritis is commonly encountered in clinical settings and has multiple etiologies. The first step is to distinguish between true articular pain and nonarticular or periarticular conditions by recognizing clinical patterns through the history and physical examination. Once pain within a joint or joints is confirmed, the next step is to classify the pain as noninflammatory or inflammatory in origin. Noninflammatory arthritis, which is mostly related to osteoarthritis, has a variable onset and severity and does not have inflammatory features, such as warm or swollen joints. Osteoarthritis usually presents with less than one hour of morning stiffness and pain that is aggravated by activity and improves with rest. A review of systems is usually negative for rashes, oral ulcers, or other internal organ involvement. In contrast, inflammatory arthritis generally causes warm, swollen joints; prolonged morning stiffness; and positive findings on a review of systems. Once inflammatory arthritis is suspected, possible diagnoses are sorted by the pattern of joint involvement, which includes number and type of joints involved, symmetry, and onset. The suspicion for inflammatory arthritis should be confirmed by the appropriate serologic/tissue and/or imaging studies in the clinical setting or in consultation with a subspecialist.

  2. Self-Management of Arthritis Symptoms by Complementary and Alternative Medicine Movement Therapies.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, Thelma J; Xiao, Changfu; Callahan, Leigh F

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the association between current use of different complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) movement therapies (MTs) and arthritis symptoms (pain, fatigue, difficulty with physical function, and feelings of helplessness). By using a cross-sectional design, 2140 participants with arthritis or chronic joint symptoms completed a survey about CAM use. Adjusted means for arthritis symptoms were reported by current use of CAM MTs and current use of yoga. Approximately 19% (n = 398) of the total respondents were "currently using" some form of MT. Of those reporting current use, 89.2% of the participants reported current use of yoga. After adjustment for a variety of characteristics, relative to participants who reported no current CAM MT use, participants with current use of CAM MT had significantly increased pain symptoms and a higher level of perceived helplessness. This descriptive study indicates that patients with arthritis or chronic joint symptoms selecting CAM MT for self-management may be doing so because of more symptom involvement, specifically more pain and feelings of helplessness. Because of its increasing use, yoga warrants special attention by practitioners as a nonpharmacologic self-management therapy for arthritis symptoms.

  3. Angiopoietin-like 4: A molecular link between insulin resistance and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masuko, Kayo

    2016-12-22

    Recent evidence suggests that common factor(s) or molecule(s) might regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation, and bone and cartilage degeneration. These findings may be particularly relevant for cases of rheumatoid arthritis, in which chronic inflammation occurs in an autoimmune context and causes the degradation of articular joints as well as insulin resistance and cardiovascular complications. Candidates for this common regulatory system include signals mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated regulator and its response factor, angiopoietin-like 4. The expression and bioactivity of angiopoietin-like 4, an adipocytokine that was originally reported to have an angiogenic function, have been detected not only in the vascular system and adipose tissue but also in rheumatoid joints. An essential role for angiopoietin-like 4 has been established in dyslipidemia, and recent reports indicate that it may modulate bone and cartilage catabolism in rheumatoid arthritis. The enhanced expression of angiopoietin-like 4 in rheumatoid arthritis may explain the occurrence of insulin resistance, cardiovascular risk, and joint destruction, thereby suggesting that this molecule could be a potential target for anti-rheumatoid arthritis strategies. This review describes recent research on the role of angiopoietin-like 4 in chronic inflammatory conditions and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as potential therapeutic candidates. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  4. Improving inflammatory arthritis management through tighter monitoring of patients and the use of innovative electronic tools.

    PubMed

    van Riel, Piet; Alten, Rieke; Combe, Bernard; Abdulganieva, Diana; Bousquet, Paola; Courtenay, Molly; Curiale, Cinzia; Gómez-Centeno, Antonio; Haugeberg, Glenn; Leeb, Burkhard; Puolakka, Kari; Ravelli, Angelo; Rintelen, Bernhard; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Treating to target by monitoring disease activity and adjusting therapy to attain remission or low disease activity has been shown to lead to improved outcomes in chronic rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Patient-reported outcomes, used in conjunction with clinical measures, add an important perspective of disease activity as perceived by the patient. Several validated PROs are available for inflammatory arthritis, and advances in electronic patient monitoring tools are helping patients with chronic diseases to self-monitor and assess their symptoms and health. Frequent patient monitoring could potentially lead to the early identification of disease flares or adverse events, early intervention for patients who may require treatment adaptation, and possibly reduced appointment frequency for those with stable disease. A literature search was conducted to evaluate the potential role of patient self-monitoring and innovative monitoring of tools in optimising disease control in inflammatory arthritis. Experience from the treatment of congestive heart failure, diabetes and hypertension shows improved outcomes with remote electronic self-monitoring by patients. In inflammatory arthritis, electronic self-monitoring has been shown to be feasible in patients despite manual disability and to be acceptable to older patients. Patients' self-assessment of disease activity using such methods correlates well with disease activity assessed by rheumatologists. This review also describes several remote monitoring tools that are being developed and used in inflammatory arthritis, offering the potential to improve disease management and reduce pressure on specialists.

  5. Improving inflammatory arthritis management through tighter monitoring of patients and the use of innovative electronic tools

    PubMed Central

    van Riel, Piet; Combe, Bernard; Abdulganieva, Diana; Bousquet, Paola; Courtenay, Molly; Curiale, Cinzia; Gómez-Centeno, Antonio; Haugeberg, Glenn; Leeb, Burkhard; Puolakka, Kari; Ravelli, Angelo; Rintelen, Bernhard; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2016-01-01

    Treating to target by monitoring disease activity and adjusting therapy to attain remission or low disease activity has been shown to lead to improved outcomes in chronic rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Patient-reported outcomes, used in conjunction with clinical measures, add an important perspective of disease activity as perceived by the patient. Several validated PROs are available for inflammatory arthritis, and advances in electronic patient monitoring tools are helping patients with chronic diseases to self-monitor and assess their symptoms and health. Frequent patient monitoring could potentially lead to the early identification of disease flares or adverse events, early intervention for patients who may require treatment adaptation, and possibly reduced appointment frequency for those with stable disease. A literature search was conducted to evaluate the potential role of patient self-monitoring and innovative monitoring of tools in optimising disease control in inflammatory arthritis. Experience from the treatment of congestive heart failure, diabetes and hypertension shows improved outcomes with remote electronic self-monitoring by patients. In inflammatory arthritis, electronic self-monitoring has been shown to be feasible in patients despite manual disability and to be acceptable to older patients. Patients' self-assessment of disease activity using such methods correlates well with disease activity assessed by rheumatologists. This review also describes several remote monitoring tools that are being developed and used in inflammatory arthritis, offering the potential to improve disease management and reduce pressure on specialists. PMID:27933206

  6. [Tocilizumab in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rueda Gotor, Javier; Blanco Alonso, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the receptor for IL-6, approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan, Europe and the US. Wide clinical development has shown the efficacy of TCZ in most of the possible situations of RA: RA without prior failure to MTX (AMBITION), RA unresponsive to MTX (SATORI, OPTION, LITHE) or any DMARD (TOWARD, ROSE) as well as RA refractory to anti-TNFa agents (RADIATE). In addition to its early onset, efficacy was constant and even increased as time passed (GROWTH95, GROWTH96). TCZ has shown great efficacy in correcting laboratory alterations in RA, both in acute phase reactants as well as anemia of inflammatory disease. Although in RA TCZ us initially indicated in combination with MTX, it has also shown its efficacy as monotherapy (AMBITION). TCZ is equally effective in the prevention of structural damage (SAMURAI, LITHE). In addition, it has shown to be a safe and well-tolerated drug, similar to other biologic therapies. All of these aspects make TCZ an adequate therapeutic alternative to be considered in any RA scenario.

  7. Epigenetics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kerstin; Gay, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    To give an overview of recently published articles addressing the role of epigenetic modifications in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we focused on DNA methylation and posttranslational histone modifications. Recent studies attempted to link epigenetic modifications with genetic or environmental risk factors for RA. There is evidence that histone deacetylases confer effects of environmental triggers such as smoking, diet or therapy on expression levels of target genes. Additionally, disturbed methylation patterns and cell-type specific histone methylation marks were identified as potential mediators of genetic risk in RA. Altered methylome signatures were found in several cell types in RA, first of all RA synovial fibroblasts, and contribute to the intrinsic fibroblast activation. The reversal of DNA hypomethylation by inhibiting the polyamine recycling pathway was suggested as new epigenetic therapy in RA. Moreover, targeting epigenetic reader proteins, such as bromodomain proteins, emerged as a new field in drug development and the first studies underscored the potential of these drugs not only in malignant and inflammatory conditions but also in autoimmune diseases. Epigenetic factors represent a promising area to link genetics, regulation of gene expression and environmental risk factors.

  8. Pregnancy and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Vishal R; Sharma, Sudhaa; Mahajan, Annil; Khajuria, Vijay; Kumar, Ajay

    2006-08-01

    Pregnancy in most cases, is associated with remission of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but a quarter of patients continue to have active disease or even worsening of the disease and most patients who improve, relapse in the postpartum period. The pathophysiology of this improvement in disease activity during pregnancy remains unknown, but hormonal, cell-mediated immunological and humoral immunological changes during pregnancy, have been proposed responsible for this. Most of the pregnant women with RA have an uneventful course, with no significant complications. In general, no significant increase in maternal or fetal morbidity seems to be attributable to RA. Patients with RA do not have decreased fertility. A majority of patients with RA may go in remission and anti-rheumatic treatment may not be required as soon as women become pregnant. But other patients who continue with the disease activity require treatment. The preferred disease-modifying agents during pregnancy are sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine. Azathioprine and cyclosporine can be used if the benefits outweigh the risks. Paracetamol and low dose prednisone are preferred and considered safe, both for mother and fetus. Methotrexate and lefunomide are contraindicated and must be prophylactically withdrawn before a planned pregnancy. Biologics generally should be stopped when pregnancy is discovered. An overall rational approach is highly warranted to treat RA during pregnancy.

  9. [Pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lequerré, Thierry; Richez, Christophe

    2012-10-01

    These last years were especially marked by the best understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms at the onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the processes of joint inflammation and joint destruction. RA is more and more considered as a syndrome with at least two clinical entities with different phenotype and profiles: seronegative RA and seropositive RA. In RA with ACPA, it is the process of immunization, that is the immunological reaction against citrullinated peptides, that leads to the disease. The peptide citrullination is directly favored by environmental factors such as tobacco, infection to Porphyromonas gingivalis and alcohol. The immunization supposes a genetic predisposition including approximately 22 genetic factors including the molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and PTPN22. Finally, joint damage result at the same time from an excess of destruction (RANK/RANKL, TNFalpha) and from a defect of bone reparation by the way Wnt/Frizzled. It is thanks to the best understanding of RA physiopathology that leads to development of targeted treatments and specially processing for this disease.

  10. Pregnancy and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ince-Askan, Hilal; Dolhain, Radboud J E M

    2015-01-01

    Fertility is impaired in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is related to disease activity and the use of certain medication. During pregnancy, disease activity usually improves, but less than previously thought. Especially in women with high disease activity, the pregnancy outcome is also impaired. All of this underscores the importance of strict control of disease activity in RA patients who wish to conceive. Management of RA disease activity during pregnancy might be a challenge as the treatment options are limited. Evidence is accumulating that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers can be safely used during pregnancy, particularly during the first trimester and the beginning of the second trimester. Far less is known about the problems faced by male RA patients who wish to conceive, in terms of not only fertility and pregnancy outcome but also the safety of medication. In this paper, the fertility issues in patients with RA, the pregnancy-associated improvement of RA, the pregnancy outcomes, including the long-term effects on the offspring, and treatment options, including those during lactation and for male patients wishing to conceive, will be reviewed.

  11. Vaccinations for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Perry, Lisa M; Winthrop, Kevin L; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2014-08-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer an increased burden of infectious disease-related morbidity and mortality and have twice the risk of acquiring a severe infection compared to the general population. This increased risk is not only a result of the autoimmune disease but is also attributed to the immunosuppressive therapies that are commonly used in this patient population. Given the increase in infection-related risks in RA, there is great interest in mitigating such risk. A number of vaccines are available to the rheumatologist, with a handful that are of importance for RA patients in the United States. The goal of this paper is to highlight the most recent literature on the key vaccines and the specific considerations for the rheumatologist and their RA patients, with a particular focus on influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster vaccines. It is important for rheumatologist to understand and be aware of which vaccines are live and what potential contraindications exist for giving vaccines to RA patients.

  12. Labour force participation and the influence of having arthritis on financial status.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah J; Callander, Emily J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J; Passey, Megan E

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the impact that having arthritis has on income poverty status and accumulated wealth in Australia. Cross-sectional analysis of Health&WealthMOD, a microsimulation model built on data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics' Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers and STINMOD, an income and savings microsimulation model. Across all categories of labour force participation status (employed full time, part time or not in the labour force at all), those with arthritis were significantly more likely to be in poverty. Those employed full time with no health condition had 0.82 times the odds of being in income poverty (95 % CI 0.80-0.84) compared with those employed full time with arthritis. Those not in the labour force with no chronic health conditions had 0.36 times the odds of being in income poverty compared with those not in the labour force due to arthritis (95 % CI 0.36-0.37). For people not in the labour force with no long-term health condition, the total value of their wealth was 211 % higher (95 % CI 38-618 %) than the amount of wealth accumulated by those not in the labour force due to arthritis. Similarly, those employed part time with no chronic health condition had 50 % more wealth than those employed part time with arthritis (95 % CI 3-116 %). Arthritis has a profound impact upon the economic circumstances of individuals, which adds a further dimension to the detrimental living standards of older individuals suffering from the condition.

  13. [Chronic tophaceous gout].

    PubMed

    González-Rozas, M; Prieto de Paula, J M; Franco Hidalgo, S; López Pedreira, M R

    2013-09-01

    Gout is a common illness, usually of unknown etiology, is more frequent in men, and with a prevalence that increases with age. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of acute arthritis due to the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in joints. The underlying disorder in most cases is hyperuricemia, usually as a consequence of impairment in its renal excretion. Although it is generally believed that both the diagnosis and treatment are simple, the truth is that the level of adherence of clinical decisions using the existing guidelines is poor. We describe a case of chronic tophaceous gout, and review the general characteristics of this condition.

  14. IMPROVING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN ARTHRITIS CLINICAL TRIAL (IMPAACT): STUDY DESIGN, RATIONALE, RECRUITMENT, AND BASELINE DATA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rowland W.; Semanik, Pamela A.; Lee, Jungwha; Feinglass, Joseph; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Dunlop, Dorothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Over 21 million Americans report an arthritis-attributable activity limitation. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are two of the most common/disabling forms of arthritis. Various forms of physical activity (PA) can improve a variety of health outcomes and reduce health care costs, but the proportion of the US population engaging in the recommended amount of PA is low and even lower among those with arthritis. The Improving Motivation for Physical Activity in Arthritis Clinical Trial (IMPAACT) is a randomized clinical trial that studied the effects of a lifestyle PA promotion intervention on pain and physical function outcomes. The IMPAACT intervention was based on a chronic care/disease management model in which allied health professionals promote patient self-management activities outside of traditional physician office encounters. The program was a motivational interviewing-based, individualized counseling and referral intervention, directed by a comprehensive assessment of individual patient barriers and strengths related to PA performance. The specific aims of IMPAACT were to test the efficacy of the IMPAACT intervention for persons with arthritis (N=185 persons with RA and 155 persons with knee OA) in improving arthritis-specific and generic self-reported pain and physical function outcomes, observed measures of function, and objectively measured and self-reported PA levels. Details of the stratified-randomized study design, subject recruitment, and data collection are described. The results from IMPAACT will generate empiric evidence pertaining to increasing PA levels in persons with arthritis and result in widely applicable strategies for health behavior change. PMID:25183043

  15. Improving physical activity in arthritis clinical trial (IMPAACT): study design, rationale, recruitment, and baseline data.

    PubMed

    Chang, Rowland W; Semanik, Pamela A; Lee, Jungwha; Feinglass, Joseph; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Dunlop, Dorothy D

    2014-11-01

    Over 21 million Americans report an arthritis-attributable activity limitation. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are two of the most common/disabling forms of arthritis. Various forms of physical activity (PA) can improve a variety of health outcomes and reduce health care costs, but the proportion of the US population engaging in the recommended amount of PA is low and even lower among those with arthritis. The Improving Motivation for Physical Activity in Arthritis Clinical Trial (IMPAACT) is a randomized clinical trial that studied the effects of a lifestyle PA promotion intervention on pain and physical function outcomes. The IMPAACT intervention was based on a chronic care/disease management model in which allied health professionals promote patient self-management activities outside of traditional physician office encounters. The program was a motivational interviewing-based, individualized counseling and referral intervention, directed by a comprehensive assessment of individual patient barriers and strengths related to PA performance. The specific aims of IMPAACT were to test the efficacy of the IMPAACT intervention for persons with arthritis (N=185 persons with RA and 155 persons with knee OA) in improving arthritis-specific and generic self-reported pain and Physical Function outcomes, observed measures of function, and objectively measured and self-reported PA levels. Details of the stratified-randomized study design, subject recruitment, and data collection are described. The results from IMPAACT will generate empiric evidence pertaining to increasing PA levels in persons with arthritis and result in widely applicable strategies for health behavior change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Differential diagnosis of acute arthritis].

    PubMed

    Eviltis, Egidijus

    2003-01-01

    Acute arthritis can first present as a symptom of dangerous and rapidly progressing disease. It is quite easy to differentiate between arthritis and periarthritis. More problematical is correct early differential diagnosis of the acute arthritis. Determining whether one, several or many joints are affected can narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Arthrocentesis and synovial fluid testing provide much information and should be done at initial evaluation if possible. The presence or absence of fever, rash, family history of joint disease and exposure to infective organisms can further direct diagnostic studies and treatment. In general, to avoid masking clues, drug therapy should be delayed for mild symptoms until diagnosis is complete. This article is designed mostly for primary care physicians, residents and includes author's original data and review of recommended reading.

  17. Mechanisms in Chronic Multisymptom Illnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    small number of baseline predictors provide excellent prediction of persistent musculoskeletal pain after MVC at both 1-month and 6-month follow-up... Musculoskeletal Pain and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms after Motor Vehicle Collision Share ED Symptom Risk Factors and Outcomes. Arthritis and Rheumatism...Whalen G, Cunningham J, Clauw DJ. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of opioid peptides in fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. BMC Musculoskelet Disord

  18. Definition of arthritis candidate risk genes by combining rat linkage-mapping results with human case-control association data.

    PubMed

    Bäckdahl, L; Guo, J P; Jagodic, M; Becanovic, K; Ding, B; Olsson, T; Lorentzen, J C

    2009-12-01

    To define genomic regions that link to rat arthritis and to determine the potential association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the corresponding human genomic regions. Advanced intercross lines (AIL) between arthritis susceptible DA rats and arthritis resistant PVG.1AV1 rats were injected with differently arthritogenic oils to achieve an experimental situation with substantial phenotypic variation in the rat study population. Genotyping of microsatellite markers was performed over genomic regions with documented impact on arthritis, located on rat chromosomes 4, 10 and 12. Linkage between genotypes and phenotypes were determined by R/quantitative trait loci (QTL). Potential association with RA of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous human chromosome regions was evaluated from public Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) data derived from 2000 cases and 3000 controls. A high frequency of arthritis (57%) was recorded in 422 rats injected with pristane. Maximum linkage to pristane-induced arthritis occurred less than 130 kb from the known genetic arthritis determinants Ncf1 and APLEC, demonstrating remarkable mapping precision. Five novel quantitative trait loci were mapped on rat chromosomes 4 and 10, with narrow confidence intervals. Some exerted sex-biased effects and some were linked to chronic arthritis. Human homologous genomic regions contain loci where multiple nearby SNPs associate nominally with RA (eg, at the genes encoding protein kinase Calpha and interleukin 17 receptor alpha). High-resolution mapping in AIL populations defines limited sets of candidate risk genes, some of which appear also to associate with RA and thus may give clues to evolutionarily conserved pathways that lead to arthritis.

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis were administered with collagen II (CII) emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, caliper measurement of the paws, mRNA expression, paw micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, histology, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase for osteoclast detection (TRAP)-positive immunohistochemistry. Serum and reactivated splenocytes were evaluated for cytokine expression. Results Mice induced for PD and/or arthritis developed periodontal disease, shown by decreased alveolar bone and alteration of mRNA expression in gingival tissues and submandibular lymph nodes compared to vehicle. P. gingivalis oral infection increased paw swelling and osteoclast numbers in mice immunized with CFA/CII. Arthritis incidence and severity were increased by P. gingivalis in mice that received IFA/CII immunizations. Increased synovitis, bone erosions, and osteoclast numbers in the paws were observed following IFA/CII immunizations in mice infected with P gingivalis. Furthermore, cytokine analysis showed a trend toward increased serum Th17/Th1 ratios when P. gingivalis infection was present in mice receiving either CFA/CII or IFA/CII immunizations. Significant cytokine increases induced by P. gingivalis oral infection were mostly associated to Th17-related cytokines of reactivated splenic cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-22 in the CFA

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, Julie Teresa; Gerow, Elizabeth Ann; Schaff, Riley; Taut, Andrei Dan; Shin, Seung-Yun; Sugai, James; Brand, David; Burberry, Aaron; Jorns, Julie; Lundy, Steven Karl; Nuñez, Gabriel; Fox, David A; Giannobile, William V

    2013-11-12

    Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis were administered with collagen II (CII) emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, caliper measurement of the paws, mRNA expression, paw micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, histology, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase for osteoclast detection (TRAP)-positive immunohistochemistry. Serum and reactivated splenocytes were evaluated for cytokine expression. Mice induced for PD and/or arthritis developed periodontal disease, shown by decreased alveolar bone and alteration of mRNA expression in gingival tissues and submandibular lymph nodes compared to vehicle. P. gingivalis oral infection increased paw swelling and osteoclast numbers in mice immunized with CFA/CII. Arthritis incidence and severity were increased by P. gingivalis in mice that received IFA/CII immunizations. Increased synovitis, bone erosions, and osteoclast numbers in the paws were observed following IFA/CII immunizations in mice infected with P gingivalis. Furthermore, cytokine analysis showed a trend toward increased serum Th17/Th1 ratios when P. gingivalis infection was present in mice receiving either CFA/CII or IFA/CII immunizations. Significant cytokine increases induced by P. gingivalis oral infection were mostly associated to Th17-related cytokines of reactivated splenic cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-22 in the CFA/CII group and IL-1β, tumor necrosis

  1. Refractory sarcoid arthritis in World Trade Center-exposed New York City firefighters: a case series.

    PubMed

    Loupasakis, Konstantinos; Berman, Jessica; Jaber, Nadia; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Webber, Mayris P; Glaser, Michelle S; Moir, William; Qayyum, Basit; Weiden, Michael D; Nolan, Anna; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kelly, Kerry J; Prezant, David J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe cases of sarcoid arthritis in firefighters from the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) who worked at the World Trade Center (WTC) site. All WTC-exposed FDNY firefighters with sarcoidosis and related chronic inflammatory arthritis (n = 11) are followed jointly by the FDNY-WTC Health Program and the Rheumatology Division at the Hospital for Special Surgery. Diagnoses of sarcoidosis were based on clinical, radiographic, and pathological criteria. Patient characteristics, WTC exposure information, smoking status, date of diagnosis, and pulmonary findings were obtained from FDNY-WTC database. Joint manifestations (symptoms and duration, distribution of joints involved), radiographic findings, and treatment responses were obtained from chart review. Nine of 60 FDNY firefighters who developed sarcoidosis since 9/11/2001 presented with polyarticular arthritis. Two others diagnosed pre-9/11/2001 developed sarcoid arthritis after WTC exposure. All 11 were never cigarette smokers, and all performed rescue/recovery at the WTC site within 3 days of the attacks. All had biopsy-proven pulmonary sarcoidosis, and all required additional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for adequate control (stepwise progression from hydroxychloroquine to methotrexate to anti-tumor necrosis factor α agents) of their joint manifestations. Chronic inflammatory polyarthritis appears to be an important manifestation of sarcoidosis in FDNY firefighters with sarcoidosis and WTC exposure. Their arthritis is chronic and, unlike arthritis in non-WTC-exposed sarcoid patients, inadequately responsive to conventional oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, often requiring anti-tumor necrosis factor α agents. Further studies are needed to determine the generalizability of these findings to other groups with varying levels of WTC exposure or with other occupational/environmental exposures.

  2. Refractory Sarcoid Arthritis in World Trade Center- Exposed New York City Firefighters: a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Loupasakis, Konstantinos; Berman, Jessica; Jaber, Nadia; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Webber, Mayris P.; Glaser, Michelle S.; Moir, William; Qayyum, Basit; Weiden, Michael D.; Nolan, Anna; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Kelly, Kerry J.; Prezant, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe cases of sarcoid arthritis in firefighters from the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) who worked at the World Trade Center (WTC) site. Methods All WTC-exposed FDNY firefighters with sarcoidosis and related chronic inflammatory arthritis (n=11) are followed jointly by the FDNY-WTC Health Program and the Rheumatology Division at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). Diagnoses of sarcoidosis were based on clinical, radiographic and pathological criteria. Patient characteristics, WTC-exposure information, smoking status, date of diagnosis and pulmonary findings were obtained from FDNY-WTC database. Joint manifestations (symptoms and duration, distribution of joints involved), radiographic findings, treatment responses were obtained from chart review. Results Nine of 60 FDNY firefighters who developed sarcoidosis since 9/11/2001 presented with polyarticular arthritis. Two others diagnosed pre-9/11/2001 developed sarcoid arthritis post-WTC-exposure. All 11 were never cigarette smokers and all performed rescue/recovery at the WTC-site within 3 days of the attacks. All had biopsy-proven pulmonary sarcoidosis and all required additional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for adequate control (stepwise progression from hydroxychloroquine to methotrexate to anti-TNFα agents) of their joint manifestations. Conclusion Chronic inflammatory polyarthritis appears to be an important manifestation of sarcoidosis in FDNY firefighters with sarcoidosis and WTC-exposure. Their arthritis is chronic, and unlike arthritis in non-WTC-exposed sarcoid patients, inadequately responsive to conventional oral DMARDs, often requiring anti-TNFα agents. Further studies are needed to determine the generalizability of these findings to other groups with varying levels of WTC-exposure or with other occupational/environmental exposures. PMID:25539429

  3. A role for fungal β-glucans and their receptor Dectin-1 in the induction of autoimmune arthritis in genetically susceptible mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Brown, Gordon D.; Tagami, Tomoyuki; Sakihama, Toshiko; Hirota, Keiji; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Takashi; Miki, Ichiro; Gordon, Siamon; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2005-01-01

    A combination of genetic and environmental factors can cause autoimmune disease in animals. SKG mice, which are genetically prone to develop autoimmune arthritis, fail to develop the disease under a microbially clean condition, despite active thymic production of arthritogenic autoimmune T cells and their persistence in the periphery. However, in the clean environment, a single intraperitoneal injection of zymosan, a crude fungal β-glucan, or purified β-glucans such as curdlan and laminarin can trigger severe chronic arthritis in SKG mice, but only transient arthritis in normal mice. Blockade of Dectin-1, a major β-glucan receptor, can prevent SKG arthritis triggered by β-glucans, which strongly activate dendritic cells in vitro in a Dectin-1–dependent but Toll-like receptor-independent manner. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment against fungi can prevent SKG arthritis in an arthritis-prone microbial environment. Multiple injections of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid double-stranded RNA also elicit mild arthritis in SKG mice. Thus, specific microbes, including fungi and viruses, may evoke autoimmune arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis by stimulating innate immunity in individuals who harbor potentially arthritogenic autoimmune T cells as a result of genetic anomalies or variations. PMID:15781585

  4. A role for fungal {beta}-glucans and their receptor Dectin-1 in the induction of autoimmune arthritis in genetically susceptible mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Brown, Gordon D; Tagami, Tomoyuki; Sakihama, Toshiko; Hirota, Keiji; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Takashi; Miki, Ichiro; Gordon, Siamon; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2005-03-21

    A combination of genetic and environmental factors can cause autoimmune disease in animals. SKG mice, which are genetically prone to develop autoimmune arthritis, fail to develop the disease under a microbially clean condition, despite active thymic production of arthritogenic autoimmune T cells and their persistence in the periphery. However, in the clean environment, a single intraperitoneal injection of zymosan, a crude fungal beta-glucan, or purified beta-glucans such as curdlan and laminarin can trigger severe chronic arthritis in SKG mice, but only transient arthritis in normal mice. Blockade of Dectin-1, a major beta-glucan receptor, can prevent SKG arthritis triggered by beta-glucans, which strongly activate dendritic cells in vitro in a Dectin-1-dependent but Toll-like receptor-independent manner. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment against fungi can prevent SKG arthritis in an arthritis-prone microbial environment. Multiple injections of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid double-stranded RNA also elicit mild arthritis in SKG mice. Thus, specific microbes, including fungi and viruses, may evoke autoimmune arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis by stimulating innate immunity in individuals who harbor potentially arthritogenic autoimmune T cells as a result of genetic anomalies or variations.

  5. Improving recognition of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conaghan, Philip G; Coates, Laura C

    2009-12-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common form of inflammatory arthritis but is underdiagnosed. Psoriasis affects over 1.5% of the UK population. Around 15% of these patients will be diagnosed with PsA, but up to 40% may have evidence of arthritis if reviewed thoroughly. PsA can be difficult to diagnose as patients present with a variety of different patterns of arthritis. Most patients with PsA have relatively mild skin psoriasis, but some have more significant disease. Only 10-20% develop arthritis before their skin disease. Many patients have mild skin psoriasis that they are unaware of, or have not had diagnosed. Joint involvement is far more variable in PsA, compared with rheumatoid arthritis, and patients may present with: monoarthritis; oligoarthritis; involvement of the distal interphalangeal joints; a rheumatoid arthritis-like picture with multiple joints involved including the small joints in the hand or axial disease producing symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis. Features such as dactylitis (uniform sausage-like swelling of the whole digit either finger or toe) and enthesitis (inflammation at the sites of muscle or tendon attachment to bone) may also help diagnose PsA. Skin disease is present in the majority of patients although not all. Hidden areas for psoriasis include: behind the ears; at the top of the natal cleft and around the umbilicus. Larger joints, particularly the knees, can develop very big effusions causing obvious swelling. Areas to test for enthesitis should include the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, costochondral joints and the elbow. Patients with suspected PsA should be referred promptly to a rheumatologist for further assessment and treatment. Diagnosis of PsA can be made on clinical grounds but blood tests and radiographs are performed routinely to aid diagnosis. Initial therapy for PsA should include NSAIDs to ease pain and stiffness. Local injections of corticosteroids are recommended for peripheral arthritis (given IA) and

  6. Current Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kamin, Edward J.; Multz, Carter V.

    1969-01-01

    The well informed and well motivated patient with rheumatoid arthritis today has an excellent chance of avoiding serious disability and deformity. No available pharmacologic agent can permanently alter the course of the disease, and no pharmacologic agent can preclude the need for a balanced program emphasizing moderation, rest and constant attention to physical therapy. Early synovectomy is enjoying increasing popularity although the long-term benefits have yet to be established. The several drugs now undergoing trial hold little promise of materially altering the management of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. The skills of physician, surgeon, and physiatrist must be brought to bear to provide optimal care. PMID:4883503

  7. Management of Arthritis and Rheumatism

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Duncan

    1970-01-01

    The principles of successful management of the patient with arthritis depend on adequate patient education and various medical and physical therapy measures to control pain and maintain function. In many instances psychiatric and orthopaedic consultations are invaluable. The treatment of arthritis at any age, however, must depend on a precise diagnosis. This may require examination of synovial fluid including polarizing microscopy, serological studies, arthrographic procedures and an awareness of factors which may influence the level of serum uric acid. The establishment of a diagnosis alone may be insufficient for proper evaluation and the physician may be assisted by physio, occupational therapy and medical social work assessments. Imagesp37-a PMID:20468462

  8. Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Terry L.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. Immune complexes (ICs) have been detected in patients’ sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column, C1q solid-phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these ICs has shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF), isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of the immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We will further address possible therapeutic modalities that could be instituted as a result of the information gathered by the presence of ICs in JIA. PMID:27242784

  9. Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Terry L

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. Immune complexes (ICs) have been detected in patients' sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column, C1q solid-phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these ICs has shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF), isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of the immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We will further address possible therapeutic modalities that could be instituted as a result of the information gathered by the presence of ICs in JIA.

  10. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  11. Rituximab for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marc D; Keystone, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed at the CD20 molecule on the surfaces of some but not all B cells. It depletes almost all peripheral B cells, but other niches of B cells are variably depleted, including synovium. Its mechanism of action in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is only partially understood. Rituximab was efficacious in clinical trials of patients with RA, including those who are methotrexate naïve, those with an incomplete response to methotrexate, and those with an incomplete response to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. The need for a concomitant traditional disease-modifying drug, the optimal dose of rituximab, and the optimal interval for retreatment remain somewhat uncertain. Rituximab seems to be most efficacious in seropositive patients and those with an incomplete response to only one tumor necrosis factor inhibitor. Rituximab has a reasonable safety profile, with a small risk of serious infectious events, which is stable over time and repeat courses. Opportunistic infections are rare. Reactivation of hepatitis B remains a concern. The possible association of rituximab and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may still require vigilance. Malignancies and cardiovascular events do not appear to be increased. Infusion reactions are more likely with the initial infusion, and are usually mild. Rituximab may cause hypogammaglobulinemia, but any risk of subsequent risk of increased infectious events is not yet well established. Before initiating rituximab, patient screening for hypersensitivity to murine proteins, infections, congestive heart failure, pregnancy, and hypogammaglobulinemia is imperative. Vaccinations should be administered prior to treatment whenever possible. Rituximab has been a significant addition to the rheumatologists' armamentarium for the treatment of RA.

  12. [Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Florea, Aurora; Job-Deslandre, Chantal

    2008-11-01

    During pregnancy, oestrogen and progesterone levels are increased. Consequently the initial predominant immune cellular response (Th1 type) is decreased, whereas humoral response (Th2 type) is increased. Due to this switch, a lot of Th2 anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 are synthesized. During the last months of pregnancy Treg lymphocytes level is elevated leading to overexpression of IL-4 and IL-10. Due to these mechanisms, reduce disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) occurred. Impaired fertility has not been demonstrated in women with RA. However, some studies suggest that polyarthritis could induced a reduced weight at birth and more frequent pregnancy and delivery complications. Methotrexate and biotherapies have demonstrated no effect on fertility; however these drugs must be stopped before conception for a period equal to seven fold of the half live of the molecule. No teratogenic effect are known for sulfazalasine and hydroxychloroquine; these drugs could be used during pregnancy. It is also the same for ciclosporine, which used is quite unfrequent in RA. Methotrexate is teratogenic in animal models and is forbidden during pregnancy. For leflunomide which is metabolised in A771726, highly teratogenic, a washout period of 3,5 months is necessary. All commercially available TNFalpha inhibitors are classified by the food and Drug Administration as pregnancy risk category B: no adverse pregnancy adverse effects have been observed in animal studies, but there have been insufficient controlled human studies. The published experiences with TNFalpha inhibition in pregnancy is limited to some case reports and ongoing registry. More recently some cases of Vater syndromes (polymalformations) were possibly related to TNFalpha blocking agents. Such treatment must be avoided during pregnancy. Only few case reports are published concerning rituximab use during pregnancy. No data have been found for abatacept.

  13. [Understanding rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Jean; Sordet, Christelle; Mrabet, Dalila; Wachsmann, Dominique

    2005-12-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common and severe inflammatory rheumatic disease, for which the immune mechanisms are being decoded little by little. The pathogenic ncludes significant cellular actors of innate immunity (fibroblastic synoviocytes, macrophages, mastocytes...) and adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocytes). These actors interact through the production of and response to specific (cytokines, chemokines and auto-antibodies) and non-specific (prostaglandins, nitrous oxide [NO], complement, proteases) mediators. The chronology of this rheumatoid synovitis is becoming progressively clearer. Its initiation could be the consequence of a precocious activation of the innate immunity, induced by bacterial agents or debris (PAMP). The activation of the synoviocytes and the macrophages via specific receptors (PPR) unleashes an intense inflammatory reaction that triggers a cascade of events. The ongoing nature of this synovitis leads to the intra-articular recruitment of different cells of immunity. This cellular afflux amplifies the macrophagic and synoviocytic activation and proliferation. All of these interactive phenomena end in the production of large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFa, IL1, IL6, IL15, IL17, IL18) but also other pathogenic mediators (auto-antibodies, complement, prostaglandins, nitrous oxide...). This synovitis persists, as it is no longer regulated by a sufficient production of physiological regulators (soluble receptors and inhibitors of cytokines). The consequence of this intense inflammation and synovial proliferation leads to osteo-articular destruction by the production of proteases and the activation of osteoclasts by the RANK/RANK-ligand pathway under the effect of cytokines (TNFa, IL5, IL1, IL6, IL17) and other mediators (prostaglandins) liberated by synoviocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes. The decryption of this puzzle has already created new therapeutic orientations. The identification of new targets is one of the major

  14. Uveitis in spondyloarthritis including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T

    2015-06-01

    Uveitis is a common complication of spondyloarthritis. The "phenotype" of the uveitis characteristic of ankylosing spondylitis (sudden onset, anterior, unilateral, recurrent, more often male) may differ from the phenotype often seen with either psoriatic arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease (insidious onset, anterior and intermediate, bilateral, chronic, and/or more often female). The frequency of uveitis is also much greater in association with ankylosing spondylitis than with either inflammatory bowel disease or psoriasis. Uveitis may affect the choice of therapy and can rarely be a complication of therapy. Uveitis and arthritis also co-exist in several animal models.

  15. The role of intravenous immunoglobulins in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Katz-Agranov, Nurit; Khattri, Saakshi; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele

    2015-08-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) are beneficial and safe for various diseases other than primary immunodeficiencies. Over the years, IVIG has been given for autoimmune diseases as an off-label adjunct therapy. While other biologic agents are indicated for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), IVIG may have a role for specific subgroups of RA patients where anti-cytokine blockers or rituximab may be unwarranted. Such subgroups may include patients with vasculitis, overlap rhupus syndrome, severe infections with active disease, and pregnancy. In addition, IVIG may be considered for juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) and adult Still's disease. We review the literature for IVIG treatment in RA patients and for these subgroups.

  16. Sleep Disturbances in Adults With Arthritis: Prevalence, Mediators, and Subgroups at Greatest Risk. Data From the 2007 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    LOUIE, GRANT H.; TEKTONIDOU, MARIA G.; CABAN-MARTINEZ, ALBERTO J.; WARD, MICHAEL M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of sleep disturbances in adults with arthritis in a nationally representative sample, mediators of sleep difficulties, and subgroups of individuals with arthritis at greatest risk. Methods Using data on US adults ages ≥18 years participating in the 2007 National Health Interview Survey, we computed the prevalence of 3 measures of sleep disturbance (insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and sleep duration <6 hours) among persons with arthritis. We used logistic regression analysis to examine if the association of arthritis and sleep disturbances was independent of sociodemographic characteristics and comorbidities, and to identify potential mediators. We used classification trees to identify subgroups at higher risk. Results The adjusted prevalence of insomnia was higher among adults with arthritis than those without arthritis (23.1% versus 16.4%; P < 0.0001), but was similar to those with other chronic diseases. Adults with arthritis were more likely than those without arthritis to report insomnia (unadjusted odds ratio 2.92, 95% confidence interval 2.68 –3.17), but adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbidities attenuated this association. Joint pain and limitation due to pain mediated the association between arthritis and insomnia. Among adults with arthritis, those with depression and anxiety were at highest risk for sleep disturbance. Results for excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep duration <6 hours were similar. Conclusion Sleep disturbance affects up to 10.2 million US adults with arthritis, and is mediated by joint pain and limitation due to pain. Among individuals with arthritis, those with depression and anxiety are at greatest risk. PMID:20890980

  17. An Evaluation of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roman-Torres, Caio V.G; Neto, José S; Souza, Marcio A; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto O; Brandt, William C; Diniz, Ricardo E.A.S

    2015-01-01

    aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of periodontal scaling and oral hygiene instruction for patients with mild chronic periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis through clinical periodontal parameters and laboratory tests for CRP (C- reactive protein) and ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Twelve individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 12 healthy individuals were evaluated, with a mean age of 45.38 and 46.75 respectively, all female and with mild, chronic periodontitis. The participants were evaluated clinically and periapical radiographs were taken (T1), after which periodontal treatment was instituted. After ninety days (T2), new clinical and laboratory data were obtained. Probing depth, bleeding index, and plaque indexes were observed in both groups, and the results demonstrated reductions but no statistical differences. Laboratory tests for CRP and ESR produced higher values for the rheumatoid arthritis group with T1- T2 reductions on the average, but the values were still higher than in the health group. We conclude that periodontal therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mild chronic periodontitis showed a improvement in the periodontal clinical parameters and laboratory tests that were evaluated. PMID:26140059

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension: Clinical challenges reflecting the diversity of pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, Evangelia; Sourla, Evdokia; Kotoulas, Serafim Xrisovalantis; Akritidou, Sofia; Bikos, Vasileios; Bagalas, Vasileios; Stanopoulos, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    The present article reports three clinical cases in order to elucidate the diversity of the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension. The condition's three major causes are: interstitial lung disease, vasculitis, and chronic thromboembolic disease, but it should be noted that the multiple pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, can all contribute to chronic lung disease or hypoxia. The first patient in this report suffered from moderate restriction due to fibrosis and was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension during an episode of life threatening hypoxia. Early upfront combination therapy prevented intubation and reversed hypoxia to adequate levels. The second presented patient was a case of isolated pulmonary hypertension attributable to vasculopathy. The patient maintained normal lung volumes but low diffusion capacity and echocardiography dictated the need for right heart catheterization. Finally, the third patient presented severe functional limitation due to several manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, but a past episode of acute pulmonary embolism was also reported although it had never been evaluated. Chronic thromboembolic disease was eventually proved to be one major cause of the patient's pulmonary hypertension. The importance of early identification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is therefore emphasized, especially since multiple treatment options are available, symptoms can be treated, and right heart failure can be avoided.

  19. An Evaluation of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Roman-Torres, Caio V G; Neto, José S; Souza, Marcio A; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto O; Brandt, William C; Diniz, Ricardo E A S

    2015-01-01

    aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of periodontal scaling and oral hygiene instruction for patients with mild chronic periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis through clinical periodontal parameters and laboratory tests for CRP (C- reactive protein) and ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Twelve individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 12 healthy individuals were evaluated, with a mean age of 45.38 and 46.75 respectively, all female and with mild, chronic periodontitis. The participants were evaluated clinically and periapical radiographs were taken (T1), after which periodontal treatment was instituted. After ninety days (T2), new clinical and laboratory data were obtained. Probing depth, bleeding index, and plaque indexes were observed in both groups, and the results demonstrated reductions but no statistical differences. Laboratory tests for CRP and ESR produced higher values for the rheumatoid arthritis group with T1- T2 reductions on the average, but the values were still higher than in the health group. We conclude that periodontal therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mild chronic periodontitis showed a improvement in the periodontal clinical parameters and laboratory tests that were evaluated.

  20. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 88 KB) Related Resources Alcoholism Anorexia Nervosa Arthritis Artritis (Arthritis) Arthritis and Osteoporosis: Common But Different Asthma ... Partner Resources Rheumatoid Arthritis (NIAMS) ¿Qué es la artritis reumatoide? (NIAMS) What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis ( 繁體中文 )(NIAMS) '); ...