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Sample records for chronic low-dose exposure

  1. [The advance of model of action in low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Zhang, Zhengbao; Chen, Liping; Chen, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Benzene is classified as Group 1 carcinogen by IARC. It has been found that benzene induces hematotoxicity even in low dose exposure. The identification of key events during benzene induced hematotoxicty leads to adjustment of occupational exposure limits of benzene. In this review, we focus on the exposure, metabolism, target organs, key epigenetic changes, toxicty effects and end points of low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity and finally discuss the perspectives on the future study of this area.

  2. Chronic Low Dose Chlorine Exposure Aggravates Allergic Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Activates Inflammasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Park, Da-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic clinical studies suggested that chronic exposure to chlorine products is associated with development of asthma and aggravation of asthmatic symptoms. However, its underlying mechanism was not clearly understood. Studies were undertaken to define the effects and mechanisms of chronic low-dose chlorine exposure in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Methods Six week-old female BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA in the presence and absence of chronic low dose chlorine exposure of naturally vaporized gas of 5% sodium hypochlorite solution. Airway inflammation and AHR were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell recovery and non-invasive phlethysmography, respectively. Real-time qPCR, Western blot assay, and ELISA were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expressions of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. Human A549 and murine epithelial (A549 and MLE12) and macrophage (AMJ2-C11) cells were used to define the responses to low dose chlorine exposure in vitro. Results Chronic low dose chlorine exposure significantly augmented airway inflammation and AHR in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The expression of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-33 were significantly increased in OVA/Cl group compared with OVA group. The chlorine exposure also activates the major molecules associated with inflammasome pathway in the macrophages with increased expression of epithelial alarmins IL-33 and TSLP in vitro. Conclusion Chronic low dose exposure of chlorine aggravates allergic Th2 inflammation and AHR potentially through activation of inflammasome danger signaling pathways. PMID:25202911

  3. Chronic low dose chlorine exposure aggravates allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness and activates inflammasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Park, Da-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic clinical studies suggested that chronic exposure to chlorine products is associated with development of asthma and aggravation of asthmatic symptoms. However, its underlying mechanism was not clearly understood. Studies were undertaken to define the effects and mechanisms of chronic low-dose chlorine exposure in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Six week-old female BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA in the presence and absence of chronic low dose chlorine exposure of naturally vaporized gas of 5% sodium hypochlorite solution. Airway inflammation and AHR were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell recovery and non-invasive phlethysmography, respectively. Real-time qPCR, Western blot assay, and ELISA were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expressions of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. Human A549 and murine epithelial (A549 and MLE12) and macrophage (AMJ2-C11) cells were used to define the responses to low dose chlorine exposure in vitro. Chronic low dose chlorine exposure significantly augmented airway inflammation and AHR in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The expression of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-33 were significantly increased in OVA/Cl group compared with OVA group. The chlorine exposure also activates the major molecules associated with inflammasome pathway in the macrophages with increased expression of epithelial alarmins IL-33 and TSLP in vitro. Chronic low dose exposure of chlorine aggravates allergic Th2 inflammation and AHR potentially through activation of inflammasome danger signaling pathways.

  4. Micro RNA responses to chronic or acute exposures to low dose ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad; Omaruddin, Romaica A.; Kreger, Bridget; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    Human health risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation remain ambiguous and are the subject of intense debate. A wide variety of biological effects are induced after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain to be completely understood. We hypothesized that low dose c-radiation-induced effects are controlled by the modulation of micro RNA (miRNA) that participate in the control of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in many cellular processes. We monitored the expression of several miRNA in human cells exposed to acute or chronic low doses of 10 cGy or a moderate dose of 400 cGy of 137Cs γ-rays. Dose, dose rate and time dependent differences in the relative expression of several miRNA were investigated. The expression patterns of many miRNA differed after exposure to either chronic or acute 10 cGy. The expression of miRNA let-7e, a negative regulator of RAS oncogene, and the c-MYC miRNA cluster were upregulated after 10 cGy chronic dose but were downregulated after 3 h of acute 10 cGy. The miR-21 was upregulated in chronic or acute low dose and moderate dose treated cells and its target genes hPDCD4, hPTEN, hSPRY2, and hTPM1 were found to be downregulated. These findings provide evidence that low dose and dose rate c-irradiation dictate the modulation of miRNA, which can result in a differential cellular response than occurs at high doses. This information will contribute to understanding the risks to human health after exposure to low dose radiation. PMID:22367372

  5. Neurotoxicity of chronic low-dose exposure to organic solvents: a skeptical review.

    PubMed

    Lees-Haley, P R; Williams, C W

    1997-11-01

    The health effects of long-term, low-level exposure to organic solvents have been studied for many years. While the volume of literature is great, definitive conclusions regarding chronic neurobehavioral effects of environmental exposure are premature. Methodological shortcomings in research preclude confidence in studies allegedly supporting a causal link between chronic low-dose solvent exposure and lasting neurobehavioral deficits. In this article, the shortcomings reviewed include selection bias in recruitment of research subjects, overreliance on subjective recall in determining levels and duration of exposure, between-study variability in kinds of solvents examined, variability in tests selected to assess neurobehavioral functioning, and diversity in reported findings. The implications of these for characterizing the state of organic solvent research are discussed.

  6. Chronic exposure of low dose salinomycin inhibits MSC migration capability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    SCHERZAD, AGMAL; HACKENBERG, STEPHAN; FROELICH, KATRIN; RAK, KRISTEN; HAGEN, RUDOLF; TAEGER, JOHANNES; BREGENZER, MAXIMILLIAN; KLEINSASSER, NORBERT

    2016-01-01

    Salinomycin is a polyether antiprotozoal antibiotic that is used as a food additive, particularly in poultry farming. By consuming animal products, there may be a chronic human exposure to salinomycin. Salinomycin inhibits the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. As human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may differentiate into different mesenchymal cells, it thus appeared worthwhile to investigate whether chronic salinomycin exposure impairs the functional properties of MSC and induces genotoxic effects. Bone marrow MSC were treated with low-dose salinomycin (100 nM) (MSC-Sal) for 4 weeks, while the medium containing salinomycin was changed every other day. Functional changes were evaluated and compared to MSC without salinomycin treatment (MSC-control). MSC-Sal and MSC-control were positive for cluster of differentiation 90 (CD90), CD73 and CD44, and negative for CD34. There were no differences observed in cell morphology or cytoskeletal structures following salinomycin exposure. The differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes was not counteracted by salinomycin, and proliferation capability was not inhibited following salinomycin exposure. The migration of MSC-Sal was attenuated significantly as compared to the MSC-control. There were no genotoxic effects after 4 weeks of salinomycin exposure. The present study shows an altered migration capacity as a sign of functional impairment of MSC induced by chronic salinomycin exposure. Further in vitro toxicological investigations, particularly with primary human cells, are required to understand the impact of chronic salinomycin consumption on human cell systems. PMID:26998269

  7. Chronic exposure of low dose salinomycin inhibits MSC migration capability in vitro.

    PubMed

    Scherzad, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Froelich, Katrin; Rak, Kristen; Hagen, Rudolf; Taeger, Johannes; Bregenzer, Maximillian; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Salinomycin is a polyether antiprotozoal antibiotic that is used as a food additive, particularly in poultry farming. By consuming animal products, there may be a chronic human exposure to salinomycin. Salinomycin inhibits the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. As human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may differentiate into different mesenchymal cells, it thus appeared worthwhile to investigate whether chronic salinomycin exposure impairs the functional properties of MSC and induces genotoxic effects. Bone marrow MSC were treated with low-dose salinomycin (100 nM) (MSC-Sal) for 4 weeks, while the medium containing salinomycin was changed every other day. Functional changes were evaluated and compared to MSC without salinomycin treatment (MSC-control). MSC-Sal and MSC-control were positive for cluster of differentiation 90 (CD90), CD73 and CD44, and negative for CD34. There were no differences observed in cell morphology or cytoskeletal structures following salinomycin exposure. The differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes was not counteracted by salinomycin, and proliferation capability was not inhibited following salinomycin exposure. The migration of MSC-Sal was attenuated significantly as compared to the MSC-control. There were no genotoxic effects after 4 weeks of salinomycin exposure. The present study shows an altered migration capacity as a sign of functional impairment of MSC induced by chronic salinomycin exposure. Further in vitro toxicological investigations, particularly with primary human cells, are required to understand the impact of chronic salinomycin consumption on human cell systems.

  8. Subjective complaints in persons under chronic low-dose exposure to lower polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

    PubMed

    Broding, Horst Christoph; Schettgen, Thomas; Hillert, Andreas; Angerer, Jürgen; Göen, Thomas; Drexler, Hans

    2008-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been in widespread industrial use in the 1960s and 1970s. Despite a worldwide reduction, environmental exposure remains an issue especially in contaminated buildings. Due to the ubiquitous presence and poor degradation of PCBs, public health concerns continue to exist; however, evidence on the actual health effects of chronic low-dose exposure is scanty. The objective of the present study is an assessment of subjective complaints of exposed subjects in comparison to a non-exposed control group and their inter-relation to plasma levels of PCB congeners. The plasma concentrations of PCB congeners were measured in 583 subjects who had worked for an average of 14.7+/-9.6 years in a contaminated building in Germany, and 205 control subjects working in a non-contaminated building. Subjective complaints were assessed with the 24-item 'Giessen Subjective Complaints List' (GSCL-24). The subjects under chronic low-dose exposure scored significantly higher values on all the GSCL subscales except 'stomach complaints' in comparison to the non-exposed subjects and a 'normal' sample derived from the literature. However, thorough statistical analysis revealed no correlation of symptoms and PCB congener plasma concentration; the scores on the subscale 'exhaustion were even higher in subjects with low PCB concentration. Subjects working in a PCB-contaminated building report more subjective complaints in comparison to non-exposed subjects, but the complaints are not related to current PCB plasma concentrations.

  9. Low-dose, Chronic Exposure to Silver Nanoparticles Causes Mild Mitochondrial Alterations in the Liver of Sprague-Dawley Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0032 Low-dose, chronic exposure to silver nanoparticles causes mild mitochondrial alterations in the liver...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low-dose, chronic exposure to silver nanoparticles causes mild mitochondrial alterations in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rat 5a...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Nanoparticles (NPs) are, by definition

  10. Chronic exposure to low dose bacterial lipopolysaccharide inhibits leptin signaling in vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    de La Serre, Claire B; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-02-01

    Bacterially derived factors are implicated in the causation and persistence of obesity. Ingestion of a high fat diet in rodents and obesity in human subjects is associated with chronic elevation of low plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a breakdown product of Gram-negative bacteria. The terminals of vagal afferent neurons are positioned within the gut mucosa to convey information from the gut to the brain to regulate food intake and are responsive to LPS. We hypothesized that chronic elevation of LPS could alter vagal afferent signaling. We surgically implanted osmotic mini-pumps that delivered a constant, low-dose of LPS into the intraperitoneal cavity of rats (12.5 μg/kg/hr for 6 weeks). LPS-treated rats developed hyperphagia and showed marked changes in vagal afferent neuron function. Chronic LPS treatment reduced vagal afferent leptin signaling, characterized by a decrease in leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, LPS treatment decreased cholecystokinin-induced satiety. There was no alteration in leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. These findings offer a mechanism by which a change in gut microflora can promote hyperphagia, possibly leading to obesity.

  11. Chronic exposure of adult rats to low doses of methylmercury induced a state of metabolic deficit in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hang-Kin; Wong, Ming-Hung; Chan, Hing-Man; Lo, Samuel Chun-Lap

    2013-11-01

    Because of the ever-increasing bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in the marine food chain, human consumers are exposed to low doses of MeHg continually through seafood consumption. Epidemiological studies strongly suggest that chronic prenatal exposure to nanomolar of MeHg has immense negative impacts on neurological development in neonates. However, effects of chronic exposure to low doses (CELDs) of MeHg in adult brains on a molecular level are unknown. The current study aims to investigate the molecular effects of CELD of MeHg on adult somatosensory cortex in a rat model using proteomic techniques. Young adult rats were fed with a low dose of MeHg (40 μg/kg body weight/day) for a maximum of 12 weeks. Whole proteome expression of the somatosensory cortex (S1 area) of normal rats and those with CELD to MeHg were compared. Levels of MeHg, total calcium, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and pyruvate were also measured. Comparative proteomic studies of the somatosensory cortexes revealed that 94 proteins involved in the various metabolic processes (including carbohydrate metabolism, generation of precursors for essential metabolites, energy, proteins, cellular components for morphogenesis, and neurotransmission) were down-regulated. Consequently, levels of important end products of active metabolism including ATP, pyruvate, and total calcium were also found to be significantly reduced concomitantly. Our results showed that CELD of MeHg induced a state of metabolic deficit in the somatosensory cortex of adult rats.

  12. Cancer and non-cancer brain and eye effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background According to a fundamental law of radiobiology (“Law of Bergonié and Tribondeau”, 1906), the brain is a paradigm of a highly differentiated organ with low mitotic activity, and is thus radio-resistant. This assumption has been challenged by recent evidence discussed in the present review. Results Ionizing radiation is an established environmental cause of brain cancer. Although direct evidence is lacking in contemporary fluoroscopy due to obvious sample size limitation, limited follow-up time and lack of focused research, anecdotal reports of clusters have appeared in the literature, raising the suspicion that brain cancer may be a professional disease of interventional cardiologists. In addition, although terminally differentiated neurons have reduced or mild proliferative capacity, and are therefore not regarded as critical radiation targets, adult neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb, and is important for mood, learning/memory and normal olfactory function, whose impairment is a recognized early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases. The head doses involved in radiotherapy are high, usually above 2 Sv, whereas the low-dose range of professional exposure typically involves lifetime cumulative whole-body exposure in the low-dose range of < 200 mSv, but with head exposure which may (in absence of protection) arrive at a head equivalent dose of 1 to 3 Sv after a professional lifetime (corresponding to a brain equivalent dose around 500 mSv). Conclusions At this point, a systematic assessment of brain (cancer and non-cancer) effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiologists and staff is needed. PMID:22540409

  13. Effects on human bronchial epithelial cells following low-dose chronic exposure to nanomaterials: A 6-month transformation study.

    PubMed

    Phuyal, Santosh; Kasem, Mayes; Rubio, Laura; Karlsson, Hanna L; Marcos, Ricard; Skaug, Vidar; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh

    2017-10-01

    The most plausible exposure route to manufactured nanomaterials (MNM) remains pulmonary inhalation. Yet, few studies have attempted to assess carcinogenic properties in vitro following long-term exposure of human pulmonary cells to low and occupationally relevant doses. The most advanced in vitro tests for carcinogenicity, the cell transformation assay (CTA), rely mostly on rodent cells and short-term exposure. We hypothesized that long-term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells with a normal phenotype could be a valuable assay for testing carcinogenicity of nanomaterials. Therefore, this study (performed within the framework of the FP7-NANoREG project) assessed carcinogenic potential of chronic exposure (up to 6months) to low doses of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, NM-400 and NM-401) and TiO2 materials (NM62002 and KC7000). In order to harmonize and standardize the experiments, standard operating protocols of MNM dispersion (NANOGENOTOX) were used by three different NANoREG project partners. All nanomaterials showed low cytotoxicity in short-term tests for the tested doses (0.96 and 1.92μg/cm(2)). During long-term exposure, however, NM-401 clearly affected cell proliferation. In contrast, no cell transformation was observed for NM-401 by any of the partners. NM-400 and NM62002 formed some colonies after 3months. We conclude that agglomerated NM-401 in low doses affect cell proliferation but do not cause cell transformation in the CTA assay used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of chronic exposure to low doses of trichloroethylene on steroid hormone and insulin levels in normal men.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, V H; Chia, S E; Ong, C N

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the serum levels of insulin and some adrenal steroid hormones in men chronically exposed to low doses of trichloroethylene (TCE). A total of 85 workers participated in this study. Each worker had urine collected and analyzed for trichloroacetic acids (UTCA) on the same day that a blood sample was taken for analyses of serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), androstenedione, cortisol, aldosterone, and insulin. The mean concentration of environmental TCE was 29.6 ppm and the mean UTCA was 22.4 mg/g creatinine (range 0.8-136.4). TCE exposure did not cause any significant changes to the adrenal steroid hormone productions. The results showed that UTCA was significantly correlated to serum insulin levels. Insulin and SHBG responded in tandem, with the highest levels found in workers exposed to TCE for less than 2 years; levels of both parameters were significantly lowered in those exposed for more than 2 years. A triphasic response in insulin levels to TCE, which depended on the duration of exposure, was noted. Initial exposure caused an acute rise in insulin levels. This was followed by a fall to normal levels in those exposed 2-4 years and then a slight rise in those exposed for more than 6 years. The mechanism for this pattern of response to TCE exposure is yet unknown. PMID:9417767

  15. Chronic low-dose exposure in the Techa River Cohort: risk of mortality from circulatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Krestinina, Lyudmila Yurievna; Epifanova, Svetlana; Silkin, Stanislav; Mikryukova, Lyudmila; Degteva, Marina; Shagina, Natalia; Akleyev, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the mortality from circulatory diseases for about 30,000 members of the Techa River cohort over the period 1950-2003, and to investigate how these rates depend on radiation doses. This population received both external and internal exposures from (90)Sr, (89)Sr, (137)Cs, and other uranium fission products as a result of waterborne releases from the Mayak nuclear facility in the Southern Urals region of the Russian Federation. The analysis included individualized estimates of the total (external plus internal) absorbed dose in muscle calculated based on the Techa River Dosimetry System 2009. The cohort-average dose to muscle tissue was 35 mGy, and the maximum dose was 510 mGy. Between 1950 and 2003, 7,595 deaths from circulatory diseases were registered among cohort members with 901,563 person years at risk. Mortality rates in the cohort were analyzed using a simple parametric excess relative risk (ERR) model. For all circulatory diseases, the estimated excess relative risk per 100 mGy with a 15-year lag period was 3.6 % with a 95 % confidence interval of 0.2-7.5 %, and for ischemic heart disease it was 5.6 % with a 95 % confidence interval of 0.1-11.9 %. A linear ERR model provided the best fit. Analyses with a lag period shorter than 15 years from the beginning of exposure did not reveal any significant risk of mortality from either all circulatory diseases or ischemic heart disease. There was no evidence of an increased mortality risk from cerebrovascular disease (p > 0.5). These results should be regarded as preliminary, since they will be updated after adjustment for smoking and alcohol consumption.

  16. Chronic Exposure to Low-Dose Arsenic Modulates Lipogenic Gene Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adebayo, Adeola O.; Zandbergen, Fokko; Kozul-Horvath, Courtney D.; Gruppuso, Philip A.; Hamilton, Joshua W.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic, a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, can affect lipid metabolism through mechanisms that are not well understood. We studied the effect of arsenic on serum lipids, lipid-regulating genes, and transcriptional regulator sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c). C57BL/6 mice were administered 0 or 100 ppb sodium arsenite in drinking water for 5 weeks. Arsenic exposure was associated with decreased liver weight but no change in body weight. Serum triglycerides level fell in arsenic-exposed animals, but not in fed animals, after short-term fasting. Hepatic expression of SREBP-1c was reduced in arsenic-exposed fed animals, with a 16-fold change in reduction. Similar effects were seen for SREBP-1c in white adipose tissue. However, fasting resulted in dissociation of the expression of SREBP-1c and its targets, and SREBP-1c protein content could not be shown to correlate with its mRNA expression. We conclude that arsenic modulates hepatic expression of genes involved in lipid regulation through mechanisms that are independent of SREBP-1c expression. PMID:25155036

  17. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice.

    PubMed

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima; Trak-Smayra, Viviane; Martinais, Sophie; Porceddu, Mathieu; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10⁶ ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10⁶ ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10²-10³ ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice

    SciTech Connect

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima; Trak-Smayra, Viviane; Martinais, Sophie; Porceddu, Mathieu; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10{sup 6} ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10{sup 6} ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants. - Highlights: • The contamination of drinking water with drugs may have harmful effects on health. • Some drugs can be more hepatotoxic in the context of obesity and fatty liver. • Effects of chronic exposure of trace drugs were studied in lean and obese mouse liver. Drugs and obesity present additive effects on circadian gene expression and toxicity. • Trace

  19. Synaptotoxicity of chronic low-dose pre- and post-natal ethanol exposure: A new animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Walewski, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chronic Low-dose Pre- and Post-natal Ethanol exposure (CLPPEE) is the most frequent cause of teratogenically induced mental deficiency in the Western world. Although the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAAS) is associated with high levels of alcohol consumption, the relative teratogenic risk of moderate ethanol consumption is not well defined. CLPPEE may affect some processes involved in synapse formation, affecting the proper development and maturation of the nervous system. Ethanol was admixed (3 v/v%) with high-protein liquid diet (Bio-Serve) as the only nutrient source. The controls received an isocaloric sucrose liquid diet mixture. Ethanol treatment began on day 8 of pregnancy. 3 v/v% ethanol did not significantly reduce the body weights or diet consumption of dams, nor the gross growth of ethanol-exposed pups. Standard neuromuscular twitch preparations in vivo, utilizing the sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle, were done on 1, 2, 3 and 7 week old pups. The physiologic functional tests of nursing pups (1-3 weeks), indicated that the ethanol-treated pups had abnormal responses to indirect stimulation. The deficit was determined to be pre-synaptic. The ethanol-exposed at these ages demonstrated abnormal responses to presynaptic challenge. Histochemical staining revealed motor nerve terminal morphology. In 2 and 3 week ethanol-treated pups, the number of nerve terminal branches, and endplate lengths were significantly reduced. Reversibility was examined by allowing the pups to mature while receiving only standard rat chow and water. Tests were repeated at 7 weeks of age. The responses of the ethanol-exposed to pharmacologic challenge, and motor nerve terminal morphology were still significantly different in the young adult animals. CLPPEE, at doses sub-threshold for FAS, affects the normal development of the skeletal neuromuscular system, with long-lasting effects on motor nerve terminal function and morphology.

  20. Transcriptome profile analysis reflects rat liver and kidney damage following chronic ultra-low dose Roundup exposure.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Arno, Matthew; Costanzo, Manuela; Malatesta, Manuela; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Antoniou, Michael N

    2015-08-25

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) are the major pesticides used worldwide. Converging evidence suggests that GBH, such as Roundup, pose a particular health risk to liver and kidneys although low environmentally relevant doses have not been examined. To address this issue, a 2-year study in rats administering 0.1 ppb Roundup (50 ng/L glyphosate equivalent) via drinking water (giving a daily intake of 4 ng/kg bw/day of glyphosate) was conducted. A marked increased incidence of anatomorphological and blood/urine biochemical changes was indicative of liver and kidney structure and functional pathology. In order to confirm these findings we have conducted a transcriptome microarray analysis of the liver and kidneys from these same animals. The expression of 4224 and 4447 transcript clusters (a group of probes corresponding to a known or putative gene) were found to be altered respectively in liver and kidney (p < 0.01, q < 0.08). Changes in gene expression varied from -3.5 to 3.7 fold in liver and from -4.3 to 5.3 in kidneys. Among the 1319 transcript clusters whose expression was altered in both tissues, ontological enrichment in 3 functional categories among 868 genes were found. First, genes involved in mRNA splicing and small nucleolar RNA were mostly upregulated, suggesting disruption of normal spliceosome activity. Electron microscopic analysis of hepatocytes confirmed nucleolar structural disruption. Second, genes controlling chromatin structure (especially histone-lysine N-methyltransferases) were mostly upregulated. Third, genes related to respiratory chain complex I and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were mostly downregulated. Pathway analysis suggests a modulation of the mTOR and phosphatidylinositol signalling pathways. Gene disturbances associated with the chronic administration of ultra-low dose Roundup reflect a liver and kidney lipotoxic condition and increased cellular growth that may be linked with regeneration in response to toxic effects causing damage

  1. Urinary bladder carcinogenesis induced by chronic exposure to persistent low-dose ionizing radiation after Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Alina; Kakehashi, Anna; Morimura, Keiichirou; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Wei, Min; Vozianov, Alexander; Fukushima, Shoji

    2009-11-01

    Urinary bladder urothelium as well as cells in the microenvironment of lamina propria (endothelial elements, fibroblasts and lymphocytes) demonstrate a number of responses to chronic persistent long-term, low-dose ionizing radiation (IR). Thus, oxidative stress occurs, accompanied by up-regulation of at least two signaling pathways (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB cascades) and activation of growth factor receptors, in the bladder urothelium of people living in Cesium 137-contaminated areas of Ukraine, resulting in chronic inflammation and the development of proliferative atypical cystitis, so-called Chernobyl cystitis, which is considered a possible pre-neoplastic condition in humans. Furthermore, significant alterations in regulation of cell cycle transitions are associated with increased cell proliferation, along with up-regulated ubiquitination and sumoylation processes as well as inefficient DNA repair (base and nucleotide excision repair pathways) in the affected urothelium. The microenvironmental changes induced by chronic long-term, low-dose IR also appear to promote angiogenesis and remodeling of the extracellular matrix that could facilitate invasion as well as progression of pre-existing initiated cells to malignancy. Based on the available findings, new strategies have been developed for predicting and treatment of Chernobyl cystitis-a first step in urinary bladder carcinogenesis in humans.

  2. Chronic Dietary Exposure to a Low-Dose Mixture of Genistein and Vinclozolin Modifies the Reproductive Axis, Testis Transcriptome, and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Eustache, Florence; Mondon, Françoise; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie Chantal; Lesaffre, Corinne; Fulla, Yvonne; Berges, Raymond; Cravedi, Jean Pierre; Vaiman, Daniel; Auger, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background The reproductive consequences and mechanisms of action of chronic exposure to low-dose endocrine disruptors are poorly understood. Objective We assessed the effects of a continuous, low-dose exposure to a phytoestrogen (genistein) and/or an antiandrogenic food contaminant (vinclozolin) on the male reproductive tract and fertility. Methods Male rats were exposed by gavage to genistein and vinclozolin from conception to adulthood, alone or in combination, at low doses (1 mg/kg/day) or higher doses (10 and 30 mg/kg/day). We studied a number of standard reproductive toxicology end points and also assessed testicular mRNA expression profiles using long-oligonucleotide microarrays. Results The low-dose mixture and high-dose vinclozolin produced the most significant alterations in adults: decreased sperm counts, reduced sperm motion parameters, decreased litter sizes, and increased post implantation loss. Testicular mRNA expression profiles for these exposure conditions were strongly correlated. Functional clustering indicated that many of the genes induced belong to the “neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions” family encompassing several hormonally related actors (e.g., follicle-stimulating hormone and its receptor). All exposure conditions decreased the levels of mRNAs involved in ribosome function, indicating probable decreased protein production. Conclusions Our study shows that chronic exposure to a mixture of a dose of a phytoestrogen equivalent to that in the human diet and a low dose—albeit not environmental—of a common anti-androgenic food contaminant may seriously affect the male reproductive tract and fertility. PMID:19672408

  3. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Loseva, Olga; Shubbar, Emman; Haghdoost, Siamak; Evers, Bastiaan; Helleday, Thomas; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats

    2014-01-01

    The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR) exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h) of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS). We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) is mechanistically involved. PMID:28250385

  4. Measuring DNA Damage and Repair in Mouse Splenocytes After Chronic In Vivo Exposure to Very Low Doses of Beta- and Gamma-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Flegal, Matthew; Blimkie, Melinda S; Wyatt, Heather; Bugden, Michelle; Surette, Joel; Klokov, Dmitry

    2015-07-03

    Low dose radiation exposure may produce a variety of biological effects that are different in quantity and quality from the effects produced by high radiation doses. Addressing questions related to environmental, occupational and public health safety in a proper and scientifically justified manner heavily relies on the ability to accurately measure the biological effects of low dose pollutants, such as ionizing radiation and chemical substances. DNA damage and repair are the most important early indicators of health risks due to their potential long term consequences, such as cancer. Here we describe a protocol to study the effect of chronic in vivo exposure to low doses of γ- and β-radiation on DNA damage and repair in mouse spleen cells. Using a commonly accepted marker of DNA double-strand breaks, phosphorylated histone H2AX called γH2AX, we demonstrate how it can be used to evaluate not only the levels of DNA damage, but also changes in the DNA repair capacity potentially produced by low dose in vivo exposures. Flow cytometry allows fast, accurate and reliable measurement of immunofluorescently labeled γH2AX in a large number of samples. DNA double-strand break repair can be evaluated by exposing extracted splenocytes to a challenging dose of 2 Gy to produce a sufficient number of DNA breaks to trigger repair and by measuring the induced (1 hr post-irradiation) and residual DNA damage (24 hrs post-irradiation). Residual DNA damage would be indicative of incomplete repair and the risk of long-term genomic instability and cancer. Combined with other assays and end-points that can easily be measured in such in vivo studies (e.g., chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei frequencies in bone marrow reticulocytes, gene expression, etc.), this approach allows an accurate and contextual evaluation of the biological effects of low level stressors.

  5. Chronic Exposure to Low Doses of HgCl2 Avoids Calcium Handling Impairment in the Right Ventricle after Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Thaís de Oliveira; Costa, Gustavo Pinto; Almenara, Camila Cruz Pereira; Angeli, Jhuli Keli; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Paula Frizera

    2014-01-01

    Right ventricle systolic dysfunction is a major risk factor for death and heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI). Heavy metal exposure has been associated with the development of several cardiovascular diseases, such as MI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic exposure to low doses of mercury chloride (HgCl2) enhances the functional deterioration of right ventricle strips after MI. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Control (vehicle); HgCl2 (exposure during 4 weeks- 1st dose 4.6 µg/kg, subsequent dose 0.07 µg/kg/day, i.m. to cover daily loss); MI surgery induced and HgCl2-MI groups. One week after MI, the morphological and hemodynamic measurements and isometric tension of right ventricle strips were investigated. The chronic HgCl2 exposure did not worsen the injury compared with MI alone in the morphological or hemodynamic parameters evaluated. At basal conditions, despite similar maximum isometric force at L-max, relaxation time was increased in the MI group but unaffected in the HgCl2-MI compared to the Control group. Impairment of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function and reduction in the sarcolemmal calcium influx were observed in MI group associated with SERCA2a reduction and increased PLB protein expression. Induction of MI in chronic HgCl2 exposed rats did not cause any alteration in the developed force at L-max, lusitropic function or −dF/dt except for a tendency of a reduction SR function. These findings could be partially explained by the normalization in the sarcolemmal calcium influx and the increase in NCX protein expression observed only in this group. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low doses of HgCl2 prevents the impaired SR function and the reduced sarcolemmal calcium influx observed in MI likely by acting on NCX, PLB and SERCA2a protein expression. PMID:24748367

  6. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. Low doses induce protective effects, and these adaptive responses are part of a general response to low stress. Adaptive responses have been tightly conserved during evolution, from single celled organisms up to humans, indicating their importance. Here we examine cellular and animal studies that show the influence of radiation induced protective effects on diverse diseases, and examine the radiation dose range that is effective for different tissues in the same animal. The concept of a dose window, with upper and lower effective doses, as well as the effect of multiple stressors and the influence of genetics will also be examined. The effect of the biological variables on low dose responses will be considered from the point of view of the limitations they may impose on any revised radiation protection regulations. PMID:26672725

  7. Chronic exposure of adult, postnatal and in utero rat models to low-dose 137Cesium: impact on circulating biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Manens, Line; Grison, Stéphane; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Lestaevel, Philippe; Guéguen, Yann; Benderitter, Marc; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Souidi, Maâmar

    2016-01-01

    The presence of 137Cesium (137Cs) in the environment after nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and more recently Fukushima Daiichi raises many health issues for the surrounding populations chronically exposed through the food chain. To mimic different exposure situations, we set up a male rat model of exposure by chronic ingestion of a 137Cs concentration likely to be ingested daily by residents of contaminated areas (6500 Bq.l−1) and tested contaminations lasting 9 months for adult, neonatal and fetal rats. We tested plasma and serum biochemistry to identify disturbances in general indicators (lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and electrolytes) and in biomarkers of thyroid, heart, brain, bone, kidney, liver and testis functions. Analysis of the general indicators showed increased levels of cholesterol (+26%), HDL cholesterol (+31%), phospholipids B (+15%) and phosphorus (+100%) in the postnatal group only. Thyroid, heart, brain, bone and kidney functions showed no blood changes in any model. The liver function evaluation showed changes in total bilirubin (+67%) and alkaline phosphatase (–11%) levels, but only for the rats exposed to 137Cs intake in adulthood. Large changes in 17β-estradiol (–69%) and corticosterone (+36%) levels affected steroidogenesis, but only in the adult model. This study showed that response profiles differed according to age at exposure: lipid metabolism was most radiosensitive in the postnatal model, and steroid hormone metabolism was most radiosensitive in rats exposed in adulthood. There was no evidence of deleterious effects suggesting a potential impact on fertility or procreation. PMID:27466399

  8. Chronic exposure of adult, postnatal and in utero rat models to low-dose 137Cesium: impact on circulating biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Manens, Line; Grison, Stéphane; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Lestaevel, Philippe; Guéguen, Yann; Benderitter, Marc; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Souidi, Maâmar

    2016-11-01

    The presence of (137)Cesium ((137)Cs) in the environment after nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and more recently Fukushima Daiichi raises many health issues for the surrounding populations chronically exposed through the food chain. To mimic different exposure situations, we set up a male rat model of exposure by chronic ingestion of a (137)Cs concentration likely to be ingested daily by residents of contaminated areas (6500 Bq.l(-1)) and tested contaminations lasting 9 months for adult, neonatal and fetal rats. We tested plasma and serum biochemistry to identify disturbances in general indicators (lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and electrolytes) and in biomarkers of thyroid, heart, brain, bone, kidney, liver and testis functions. Analysis of the general indicators showed increased levels of cholesterol (+26%), HDL cholesterol (+31%), phospholipids B (+15%) and phosphorus (+100%) in the postnatal group only. Thyroid, heart, brain, bone and kidney functions showed no blood changes in any model. The liver function evaluation showed changes in total bilirubin (+67%) and alkaline phosphatase (-11%) levels, but only for the rats exposed to (137)Cs intake in adulthood. Large changes in 17β-estradiol (-69%) and corticosterone (+36%) levels affected steroidogenesis, but only in the adult model. This study showed that response profiles differed according to age at exposure: lipid metabolism was most radiosensitive in the postnatal model, and steroid hormone metabolism was most radiosensitive in rats exposed in adulthood. There was no evidence of deleterious effects suggesting a potential impact on fertility or procreation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  9. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-07-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear energy transfer radiation. A linear, no-threshold model has been applied to assessment of the risks resulting from exposure to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation; however, a statistically significant increase has hardly been described for radiation doses below 100 mSv. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the physical and biological features of low-dose radiation and discusses the possibilities of induction of cancer by low-dose radiation.

  10. Chronic Internal Exposure to Low Dose 137Cs Induces Positive Impact on the Stability of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Reducing Inflammation in ApoE-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Le Gallic, Clélia; Phalente, Yohann; Manens, Line; Dublineau, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Gueguen, Yann; Lehoux, Stephanie; Ebrahimian, Teni G.

    2015-01-01

    After Chernobyl and Fukushima Daï Chi, two major nuclear accidents, large amounts of radionuclides were released in the environment, mostly caesium 137 (137Cs). Populations living in contaminated territories are chronically exposed to radionuclides by ingestion of contaminated food. However, questions still remain regarding the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic internal exposure to 137Cs on atherosclerosis in predisposed ApoE-/- mice. Mice were exposed daily to 0, 4, 20 or 100 kBq/l 137Cs in drinking water, corresponding to range of concentrations found in contaminated territories, for 6 or 9 months. We evaluated plaque size and phenotype, inflammatory profile, and oxidative stress status in different experimental groups. Results did not show any differences in atherosclerosis progression between mice exposed to 137Cs and unexposed controls. However, 137Cs exposed mice developed more stable plaques with decreased macrophage content, associated with reduced aortic expression of pro-inflammatory factors (CRP, TNFα, MCP-1, IFNγ) and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin). Lesions of mice exposed to 137Cs were also characterized by enhanced collagen and smooth muscle cell content, concurrent with reduced matrix metalloproteinase MMP8 and MMP13 expression. These results suggest that low dose chronic exposure of 137Cs in ApoE-/- mice enhances atherosclerotic lesion stability by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine and MMP production, resulting in collagen-rich plaques with greater smooth muscle cell and less macrophage content. PMID:26046630

  11. Chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum disrupts corticosterone receptor signalling in a tissue-specific manner in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Lattin, Christine R.; Romero, L. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Stress-induced concentrations of glucocorticoid hormones (including corticosterone, CORT) can be suppressed by chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum. However, endocrine-disrupting chemicals could interfere with CORT signalling beyond the disruption of hormone titres, including effects on receptors in different target tissues. In this study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of exposure to a petroleum-laced diet (1% oil weight:food weight) on tissue mass and intracellular CORT receptors in liver, fat, muscle and kidney (metabolic tissues), spleen (an immune tissue) and testes (a reproductive tissue). In the laboratory, male house sparrows were fed either a 1% weathered crude oil (n = 12) or a control diet (n = 12); glucocorticoid receptors and mineralocorticoid receptors were quantified using radioligand binding assays. In oil-exposed birds, glucocorticoid receptors were lower in one metabolic tissue (liver), higher in another metabolic tissue (fat) and unchanged in four other tissues (kidney, muscle, spleen and testes) compared with control birds. We saw no differences in mineralocorticoid receptors between groups. We also saw a trend towards reduced mass of the testes in oil-exposed birds compared with controls, but no differences in fat, kidney, liver, muscle or spleen mass between the two groups. This is the first study to examine the effects of petroleum on CORT receptor density in more than one or two target tissues. Given that a chronic low dose of ingested petroleum can affect stress-induced CORT titres as well as receptor density, this demonstrates that oil can act at multiple levels to disrupt an animal’s response to environmental stressors. This also highlights the potential usefulness of the stress response as a bioindicator of chronic crude oil exposure. PMID:27293679

  12. Chronic Internal Exposure to Low Dose 137Cs Induces Positive Impact on the Stability of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Reducing Inflammation in ApoE-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Gallic, Clélia; Phalente, Yohann; Manens, Line; Dublineau, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Gueguen, Yann; Lehoux, Stephanie; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2015-01-01

    After Chernobyl and Fukushima Daï Chi, two major nuclear accidents, large amounts of radionuclides were released in the environment, mostly caesium 137 (137Cs). Populations living in contaminated territories are chronically exposed to radionuclides by ingestion of contaminated food. However, questions still remain regarding the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic internal exposure to 137Cs on atherosclerosis in predisposed ApoE-/- mice. Mice were exposed daily to 0, 4, 20 or 100 kBq/l 137Cs in drinking water, corresponding to range of concentrations found in contaminated territories, for 6 or 9 months. We evaluated plaque size and phenotype, inflammatory profile, and oxidative stress status in different experimental groups. Results did not show any differences in atherosclerosis progression between mice exposed to 137Cs and unexposed controls. However, 137Cs exposed mice developed more stable plaques with decreased macrophage content, associated with reduced aortic expression of pro-inflammatory factors (CRP, TNFα, MCP-1, IFNγ) and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin). Lesions of mice exposed to 137Cs were also characterized by enhanced collagen and smooth muscle cell content, concurrent with reduced matrix metalloproteinase MMP8 and MMP13 expression. These results suggest that low dose chronic exposure of 137Cs in ApoE-/- mice enhances atherosclerotic lesion stability by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine and MMP production, resulting in collagen-rich plaques with greater smooth muscle cell and less macrophage content.

  13. [Influence of chronic exposure to low doses of space ionizing radiation on the character of formation of microbial assemblage in the habitat of orbital station].

    PubMed

    Tsetlin, V V; Deshevaia, E A

    2003-01-01

    Statistically valid relations between radiation conditions in compartments of MIR station and the micromicete population (CFU number) on the surface of the equipment and the interior have been established. It was found that in conditions of a chronic exposure to space radiation the number of CFU increased in one thousand and more times with increasing of absorbed dose rate from 200 up to 1000 microGy/day. The results of land-based model experiments confirmed morphological changes in the "flight" strains of funguses under exposure to low doses of gamma (100-800 microGy/day) and neutron (0.2-2 neutron/cm2.s) radiation. It was found that the morphological changes in the control (museum) cultures of funguses of the same species, which were expressed in the weak increase of vegetative mycelium, were detected only after repeated gamma- and gamma + neutron irradiation.

  14. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing 137CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The 137Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the 137CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the 137Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the 137Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively. PMID:26825299

  15. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing (137)CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The (137)Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the (137)CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the (137)Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the (137)Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively.

  16. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation.

    PubMed

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Liza S; Osipov, Andrian N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    2015-09-01

    The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism's cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1×Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab DNA and TM values may provide the information about the human organism's cell resistivity to chronic exposure to the low-dose IR and about the development of the adaptive response in the organism that is aimed, firstly, at the effective cfDNA elimination from the blood circulation, and, secondly - at survival of the cells, including the cells with the damaged DNA.

  17. Environmentally Relevant Chronic Low-Dose Tritium and Gamma Exposures do not Increase Somatic Intrachromosomal Recombination in pKZ1 Mouse Spleen.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Laura; Serran, Mandy; Bertrand, Lindsey; Klokov, Dmitry; Wyatt, Heather; Blimkie, Melinda; Gueguen, Yann; Priest, Nicholas; Jourdain, Jean-René; Sykes, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    The toxicity of tritium is a public health concern given its presence and mobility in the environment. For risk predictions using radiological protection models, it is essential to allocate an appropriate radiation weighting factor (WR). This in turn should be consistent with the observed relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta radiation. Although the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently recommends a WR of 1 for the calculation of committed effective dose for X rays, gamma rays and electrons of all energies, including tritium energies, there are concerns that tritium health risks are underestimated and that current regulatory tritium drinking water standards need revision. In this study, we investigated potential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in mouse spleen after one month and eight months of chronic exposure to low-dose tritiated water (HTO). The dose regimes studied were designed to mimic human chronic consumption of HTO at levels of 10 kBq/l, 1 MBq/l and 20 MBq/l. The total doses from these radiation exposures ranged from 0.01 to 180 mGy. We also compared the biological effects of exposure to HTO with equivalent exposure to external whole-body (60)Co gamma rays. Changes in spleen weight and somatic intrachromosomal recombination (DNA inversions) in spleen tissue of pKZ1(Tg/+) mice were monitored. Our results showed no overall changes in either spleen organ weights and no increase mouse splenic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies, indicating that current drinking water standards for tritium exposure in the form of HTO are likely to be adequately protective against cytotoxic and genotoxic damage in spleen. These results demonstrate no evidence for cytotoxicity or genotoxicity in mouse spleen following chronic exposures to HTO activities (or equivalent gamma doses) up to 20 MBq/L.

  18. Neurobehavioral deficits and brain oxidative stress induced by chronic low dose exposure of persistent organic pollutants mixture in adult female rat.

    PubMed

    Lahouel, Asma; Kebieche, Mohamed; Lakroun, Zohra; Rouabhi, Rachid; Fetoui, Hamadi; Chtourou, Yassine; Djamila, Zama; Soulimani, Rachid

    2016-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are long-lived organic compounds that are considered one of the major risks to ecosystem and human health. Recently, great concerns are raised about POPs mixtures and its potential toxicity even in low doses of daily human exposure. The brain is mostly targeted by these lipophilic compounds because of its important contain in lipids. So, it would be quite interesting to study the effects of exposure to these mixtures and evaluate their combined toxicity on brain cells. The present study was designed to characterize the cognitive and locomotors deficits and brain areas redox status in rat model. An orally chronic exposure to a representative mixture of POPs composed of endosulfan (2.6 μg/kg), chlorpyrifos (5.2 μg/kg), naphthalene (0.023 μg/kg) and benzopyrane (0.002 μg/kg); the same mixture with concentration multiplied by 10 and 100 was also tested. Exposed rats have shown a disturbance of memory and a decrease in learning ability concluded by Morris water maze and the open field tests results and anxiolytic behaviour in the test of light/dark box compared to control. Concerning brain redox homeostasis, exposed rats have shown an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) amount and an alteration in glutathione (GSH) levels in both the brain mitochondria and cytosolic fractions of the cerebellum, striatum and hippocampus. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in levels of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) and a highly significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. The current study suggests that environmental exposure to daily even low doses of POPs mixtures through diet induces oxidative stress status in the brain and especially in the mitochondria with important cognitive and locomotor behaviour variations in the rats.

  19. N-Acetyl cysteine does not prevent liver toxicity from chronic low-dose plus subacute high-dose paracetamol exposure in young or old mice.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice Elizabeth; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; Mach, John; McKenzie, Catriona; Mitchell, Sarah Jayne; de Cabo, Rafael; Jones, Brett; Cogger, Victoria; Le Couteur, David G; Hilmer, Sarah Nicole

    2016-06-01

    Paracetamol is an analgesic commonly used by people of all ages, which is well documented to cause severe hepatotoxicity with acute overexposures. The risk of hepatotoxicity from nonacute paracetamol exposures is less extensively studied, and this is the exposure most common in older adults. Evidence on the effectiveness of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) for nonacute paracetamol exposures, in any age group, is lacking. This study aimed to examine the effect of long-term exposure to therapeutic doses of paracetamol and subacute paracetamol overexposure, in young and old mice, and to investigate whether NAC was effective at preventing paracetamol hepatotoxicity induced by these exposures. Young and old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a paracetamol-containing (1.33 g/kg food) or control diet for 6 weeks. Mice were then dosed orally eight times over 3 days with additional paracetamol (250 mg/kg) or saline, followed by either one or two doses of oral NAC (1200 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic low-dose paracetamol exposure did not cause hepatotoxicity in young or old mice, measured by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation, and confirmed by histology and a DNA fragmentation assay. Subacute paracetamol exposure caused significant hepatotoxicity in young and old mice, measured by biochemistry (ALT) and histology. Neither a single nor double dose of NAC protected against this toxicity from subacute paracetamol in young or old mice. This finding has important clinical implications for treating toxicity due to different paracetamol exposure types in patients of all ages, and implies a need to develop new treatments for subacute paracetamol toxicity. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  20. Chronic Exposure to Low Doses of Dioxin Promotes Liver Fibrosis Development in the C57BL/6J Diet-Induced Obesity Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Caroline; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima; Leblanc, Alix F.; Touch, Sothea; Emond, Claude; Guerre-Millo, Michèle; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Barouki, Robert; Aggerbeck, Martine; Coumoul, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been associated with the progression of chronic liver diseases, yet the contribution of POPs to the development of fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition closely linked to obesity, remains poorly documented. Objectives: We investigated the effects of subchronic exposure to low doses of the POP 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand, on NAFLD progression in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a 10% low-fat (LFD) or a 45% high-fat (HFD) purified diet for 14 weeks and TCDD-exposed groups were injected once a week with 5 μg/kg TCDD or the vehicle for the last 6 weeks of the diet. Results: Liver histology and triglyceride levels showed that exposure of HFD fed mice to TCDD worsened hepatic steatosis, as compared to either HFD alone or LFD plus TCDD and the mRNA levels of key genes of hepatic lipid metabolism were strongly altered in co-treated mice. Further, increased liver collagen staining and serum transaminase levels showed that TCDD induced liver fibrosis in the HFD fed mice. TCDD in LFD fed mice increased the expression of several inflammation and fibrosis marker genes with no additional effect from a HFD. Conclusions: Exposure to TCDD amplifies the impairment of liver functions observed in mice fed an enriched fat diet as compared to a low fat diet. The results provide new evidence that environmental pollutants promote the development of liver fibrosis in obesity-related NAFLD in C57BL/6J mice. Citation: Duval C, Teixeira-Clerc F, Leblanc AF, Touch S, Emond C, Guerre-Millo M, Lotersztajn S, Barouki R, Aggerbeck M, Coumoul X. 2017. Chronic exposure to low doses of dioxin promotes liver fibrosis development in the C57BL/6J diet-induced obesity mouse model. Environ Health Perspect 125:428–436; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP316 PMID:27713108

  1. In vivo exposure of swiss albino mice to chronic low dose of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) lowers poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR) of bone marrow cell and blood lymphocyte proteins.

    PubMed

    Kma, L; Sharan, R N

    2006-08-01

    Efforts to identify an easy and convenient biomarker of carcinogenesis with potentials of application in mass screening program continue. In a series of investigations on mice exposed to different carcinogens, poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR) of cellular proteins of different tissues has been shown to be a potential biomarker of carcinogenesis. Because blood based biomarker of carcinogenesis offers significant advantage in its use in a cancer screening program, this investigation was undertaken to find correlations between initiation of carcinogenesis and PAR of bone marrow cell (BMC) and blood lymphocyte (BL) proteins in mice chronically exposed to low dose of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) for up to four weeks in vivo. The exposure was either alone or in combination with 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), an inhibitor of PAR. Total PAR of cellular proteins and of histone H1 protein were monitored by slot and Western blot immunoprobe assays, respectively. The PAR of total cellular proteins as well as of histone H1 was down-regulated in duration of exposure dependent manners. The results suggest that BMC and BL mirrored status of PAR in other tissues. This finding opens up the possibility of using PAR as a biomarker of carcinogenesis in a blood based test utilizing immunoprobe assay of cellular PAR.

  2. Multiomics reveal non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats following chronic exposure to an ultra-low dose of Roundup herbicide.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Renney, George; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Ward, Malcolm; Antoniou, Michael N

    2017-01-09

    The impairment of liver function by low environmentally relevant doses of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) is still a debatable and unresolved matter. Previously we have shown that rats administered for 2 years with 0.1 ppb (50 ng/L glyphosate equivalent dilution; 4 ng/kg body weight/day daily intake) of a Roundup GBH formulation showed signs of enhanced liver injury as indicated by anatomorphological, blood/urine biochemical changes and transcriptome profiling. Here we present a multiomic study combining metabolome and proteome liver analyses to obtain further insight into the Roundup-induced pathology. Proteins significantly disturbed (214 out of 1906 detected, q < 0.05) were involved in organonitrogen metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation. Proteome disturbances reflected peroxisomal proliferation, steatosis and necrosis. The metabolome analysis (55 metabolites altered out of 673 detected, p < 0.05) confirmed lipotoxic conditions and oxidative stress by showing an activation of glutathione and ascorbate free radical scavenger systems. Additionally, we found metabolite alterations associated with hallmarks of hepatotoxicity such as γ-glutamyl dipeptides, acylcarnitines, and proline derivatives. Overall, metabolome and proteome disturbances showed a substantial overlap with biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its progression to steatohepatosis and thus confirm liver functional dysfunction resulting from chronic ultra-low dose GBH exposure.

  3. Multiomics reveal non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats following chronic exposure to an ultra-low dose of Roundup herbicide

    PubMed Central

    Mesnage, Robin; Renney, George; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Ward, Malcolm; Antoniou, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    The impairment of liver function by low environmentally relevant doses of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) is still a debatable and unresolved matter. Previously we have shown that rats administered for 2 years with 0.1 ppb (50 ng/L glyphosate equivalent dilution; 4 ng/kg body weight/day daily intake) of a Roundup GBH formulation showed signs of enhanced liver injury as indicated by anatomorphological, blood/urine biochemical changes and transcriptome profiling. Here we present a multiomic study combining metabolome and proteome liver analyses to obtain further insight into the Roundup-induced pathology. Proteins significantly disturbed (214 out of 1906 detected, q < 0.05) were involved in organonitrogen metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation. Proteome disturbances reflected peroxisomal proliferation, steatosis and necrosis. The metabolome analysis (55 metabolites altered out of 673 detected, p < 0.05) confirmed lipotoxic conditions and oxidative stress by showing an activation of glutathione and ascorbate free radical scavenger systems. Additionally, we found metabolite alterations associated with hallmarks of hepatotoxicity such as γ-glutamyl dipeptides, acylcarnitines, and proline derivatives. Overall, metabolome and proteome disturbances showed a substantial overlap with biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its progression to steatohepatosis and thus confirm liver functional dysfunction resulting from chronic ultra-low dose GBH exposure. PMID:28067231

  4. Interaction of four low dose toxic metals with essential metals in brain, liver and kidneys of mice on sub-chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Cobbina, Samuel Jerry; Chen, Yao; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Wu, Xueshan; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Li, Qian; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Wu, Xiangyang; Yang, Liuqing

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on interactions between low dose toxic and essential metals. Low dose Pb (0.01mg/L), Hg (0.001mg/L), Cd (0.005mg/L) and As (0.01mg/L) were administered singly to four groups of 3-week old mice for 120 days. Pb exposure increased brain Mg and Cu by 55.5% and 266%, respectively. Increased brain Mg resulted from metabolic activity of brain to combat insults, whiles Cu overload was due to alteration and dysfunction of CTR1 and ATP7A molecules. Reduction of liver Ca by 56.0% and 31.6% (on exposure to As and Cd, respectively) resulted from inhibition of Ca-dependent ATPase in nuclei and endoplasmic reticulum through binding with thiol groups. Decreased kidney Mg, Ca and Fe was due to uptake of complexes of As and Cd with thiol groups from proximal tubular lumen. At considerably low doses, the study establishes that, toxic metals disturb the homeostasis of essential metals.

  5. Impact of low-dose chronic exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) on adult male zebrafish adaption to the environmental complexity: Disturbing the color preference patterns and reliving the anxiety behavior.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Sun, Ming-Zhu; Li, Xu; Zhang, Shu-Hui; Dai, Liang-Ti; Liu, Xing-Yu; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Dong-Yan; Feng, Xi-Zeng

    2017-11-01

    The extensive usage of xenobiotic endocrine disrupting chemicals (XEDCs), such as Bisphenol A (BPA), has created obvious threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Although a comprehensive understanding of the adverse effect of BPA on behaviors and physiology have been proven, the potential impact of low-dose BPA on altering the basic ability of aquatic organism in adapting to the surrounded complex environment still remains elusive. In this research, we report that treatment of adult male zebrafish with chronic (7 weeks) low-dose (0.22 nM-2.2 nM) BPA, altered the ability in adapting the complex environment by disturbing the natural color preference patterns. In addition, chronic 50 ng/L (0.22 nM) BPA exposure alleviated the anxiety behavior of male zebrafish confronted with the novel environment by enhancing the preference towards light in the light/dark preference test. This phenotype was associated with less expression of serotonin (5-TH) in the hypothalamus and the down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in brain tissues. As such, our results show that low-dose BPA remnant in surface waters altered zebrafish behavior that are known to have ecological and evolutionary consequences. Here we reported that the impact of chronic low-dose BPA exposure on the basic capability of zebrafish to adapt to the environmental complexity. Specifically, BPA at low concentration, under the environmental safety level and 3000-fold lower than the accepted human daily exposure, interfered with the ability to discriminate color and alleviate anxiety induced by the novel environment, which finally altered the capability of male zebrafish to adapt to the environmental complexity. These findings revealed the ecological effect of low-dose BPA and regular BPA concentration standard are not necessarily safe. The result also provided the consideration of retuning the hazard concentration level of BPA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  7. Health Benefits of Exposure to Low-dose Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy

    2016-03-01

    Although there is no doubt that exposure to high doses of radiation (delivered at a high dose-rate) induces harmful effects, the health risks and benefits of exposure to low levels (delivered at a low dose-rate) of toxic agents is still a challenging public health issue. There has been a considerable amount of published data against the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for assessing risk of cancers induced by radiation. The LNT model for risk assessment creates "radiophobia," which is a serious public health issue. It is now time to move forward to a paradigm shift in health risk assessment of low-dose exposure by taking the differences between responses to low and high doses into consideration. Moreover, future research directed toward the identification of mechanisms associated with responses to low-dose radiation is critically needed to fully understand their beneficial effects.

  8. Long-term effects of simulated microgravity and/or chronic exposure to low-dose gamma radiation on behavior and blood–brain barrier integrity

    PubMed Central

    Bellone, John A; Gifford, Peter S; Nishiyama, Nina C; Hartman, Richard E; Mao, Xiao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts on lengthy voyages will be exposed to an environment of microgravity and ionizing radiation that may have adverse effects on physical abilities, mood, and cognitive functioning. However, little is known about the long-term effects of combined microgravity and low-dose radiation. We exposed mice to gamma radiation using a cobalt-57 plate (0.01 cGy/h for a total dose of 0.04 Gy), hindlimb unloading to simulate microgravity, or a combination of both for 3 weeks. Mice then underwent a behavioral test battery after 1 week, 1 month, 4 months, and 8 months to assess sensorimotor coordination/balance (rotarod), activity levels (open field), learned helplessness/depression-like behavior (tail suspension test), risk-taking (elevated zero maze), and spatial learning/memory (water maze). Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression was assessed in the brain after behavioral testing to determine blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Mice that received unloading spent significantly more time in the exposed portions of the elevated zero maze, were hypoactive in the open field, and spent less time struggling on the tail suspension test than mice that did not receive unloading. Mice in the combination group expressed more AQP4 immunoactivity than controls. Elevated zero maze and AQP4 data were correlated. No differences were seen on the water maze or rotarod, and no radiation-only effects were observed. These results suggest that microgravity may lead to changes in exploratory/risk-taking behaviors in the absence of other sensorimotor or cognitive deficits and that combined microgravity and a chronic, low dose of gamma radiation may lead to BBB dysfunction. PMID:28725731

  9. Are radiosensitivity data derived from natural field conditions consistent with data from controlled exposures? A case study of Chernobyl wildlife chronically exposed to low dose rates.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Laplace, J; Geras'kin, S; Della-Vedova, C; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Hinton, T G; Real, A; Oudalova, A

    2013-07-01

    The discrepancy between laboratory or controlled conditions ecotoxicity tests and field data on wildlife chronically exposed to ionising radiation is presented for the first time. We reviewed the available chronic radiotoxicity data acquired in contaminated fields and used a statistical methodology to support the comparison with knowledge on inter-species variation of sensitivity to controlled external γ irradiation. We focus on the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and effects data on terrestrial wildlife reported in the literature corresponding to chronic dose rate exposure situations (from background ~100 nGy/h up to ~10 mGy/h). When needed, we reconstructed the dose rate to organisms and obtained consistent unbiased data sets necessary to establish the dose rate-effect relationship for a number of different species and endpoints. Then, we compared the range of variation of radiosensitivity of species from the Chernobyl-Exclusion Zone with the statistical distribution established for terrestrial species chronically exposed to purely gamma external irradiation (or chronic Species radioSensitivity Distribution - SSD). We found that the best estimate of the median value (HDR50) of the distribution established for field conditions at Chernobyl (about 100 μGy/h) was eight times lower than the one from controlled experiments (about 850 μGy/h), suggesting that organisms in their natural environmental were more sensitive to radiation. This first comparison highlights the lack of mechanistic understanding and the potential confusion coming from sampling strategies in the field. To confirm the apparent higher sensitive of wildlife in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, we call for more a robust strategy in field, with adequate design to deal with confounding factors.

  10. [Characteristics of micromycets Fusarium oxysporum recovered from an artificial soil for space greenhouse after chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Smolianina, S O; Tsetlin, V V; Berkovich, Iu A; Korsak, I V

    2007-01-01

    Growth and development of Fusarium oxysporum intact strain and strains subjected to irradiation by low gamma-neutron doses were studied during cultivation on intact substrate and substrate irradiated by a gamma-source at 29 microGy. There was a striking difference in growth and sporification between the strains cultivated on irradiated and intact substrates. Irradiated Fusarium oxysporum strains exhibited manifest antagonism to one another and the non-irradiated strain. Electroconductivity of substrate after gamma-irradiation at low doses was noted to slow down markedly. The authors come to the conclusion that nutrient molecules may become more available to micromycets because of alteration of proton activity in consequence of preliminary irradiation.

  11. Influence of Exposure to Chronic Persistent Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Tumor Biology of Clear-Cell Renal-Cell Carcinoma. An Immunohistochemical and Morphometric Study of Angiogenesis and Vascular Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saurí, Amparo; Valencia-Villa, Gerardo; Romanenko, Alina; Pérez, Jesús; García, Raúl; García, Heydi; Benavent, José; Sancho-Tello, María; Carda, Carmen; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Increased angiogenesis is related to boosted growth and malignancy in carcinomas. "Chronic Persistent Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation" (CPLDIR) exposure increases incidence and aggressive behavior of clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma (CCRCC). The aim was to study the biology of angiogenesis, including microvessel density (MVD), in human clear-cell renal-cell carcinomas (CCRCC) originating from a radio-contaminated geographical area (Ukraine) and to compare with similar tumors diagnosed in non-contaminated regions of Europe (Spain, Valencia) and Latin America (Colombia, Barranquilla). MVD was comparatively examined in 124 patients diagnosed with CCRCC from three geographical areas by means of digital micro-imaging and computerized analysis. Additionally, 50 adult normal kidneys were used for controls (autopsy kidneys from Valencia and Barranquilla). Furthermore, an immunohistochemical study of several vascular related growth factors was undertaken using a similar methodology. MVD as well as VEFG are the most discriminating factors associated with an aggressive behavior of CCRCC. Their expression increased in proportion to the level of exposure to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation in Ukrainian patients in the 25 years since the Chernobyl accident substantiated by comparison with the two control groups of renal carcinomas present in non-irradiated areas (Spain and Colombia). No major biological differences relating to angiogenesis appear to exist between the CCRCC diagnosed in two distant geographical areas of the world. HIF-1α expression was similar in all groups, with no statistical significance. Present findings demonstrate the existence of a significant relationship between MVD and VEGF in CCRCC: an increased expression of VEGF is associated with a high level of angiogenesis.

  12. Low dose TBT exposure decreases amphipod immunocompetence and reproductive fitness.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese; Sundelin, Brita; Yang, Gongda; Ford, Alex T

    2011-01-17

    The antifouling agent tributyltin (TBT) is a highly toxic pollutant present in many aquatic ecosystems. Despite of regulations on the usage of TBT, it remains in high concentrations in sediments both in harbors and in off-shore sites. The toxicity of TBT in mollusks is well documented. However, adverse effects in other aquatic organisms, such as crustaceans, are less well known. This study is an effort to assess the effects of environmentally realistic concentrations of TBT on an ecologically important species in Swedish fresh and brackish water ecosystems, the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis. Field collected animals were exposed during gonad maturation to TBT (70 and 170 ng/g sediment d wt) for five weeks in static microcosms with natural sediment. Exposure concentrations were chosen to reflect effects at concentrations found in Swedish coastal sediment, but below expected effects on survival. TBT exposure resulted in a statistically significant adverse effect on oocyte viability and a doubling of the prevalence of microsporidian parasites in females, from 17% in the control to 34% in the 170 ng TBT/g sediment d wt exposure. No effects on survival were observed. Borderline significant effects were observed on male sexual maturation in the 70 ng TBT/g d wt exposure and on ecdysteroid levels in the 170 ng/g sediment d wt exposure. Both reproduction and parasite infection effects are of ecological importance since they have the potential to affect population viability in the field. This study gives further evidence to the connection between low dose contaminant exposure and increases in microsporidian parasite infection.

  13. Exposure of luminous marine bacteria to low-dose gamma-radiation.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Petrova, A S; Dementyev, D V; Bondar, A A

    2017-04-01

    The study addresses biological effects of low-dose gamma-radiation. Radioactive (137)Cs-containing particles were used as model sources of gamma-radiation. Luminous marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum was used as a bioassay with the bioluminescent intensity as the physiological parameter tested. To investigate the sensitivity of the bacteria to the low-dose gamma-radiation exposure (≤250 mGy), the irradiation conditions were varied as follows: bioluminescence intensity was measured at 5, 10, and 20°С for 175, 100, and 47 h, respectively, at different dose rates (up to 4100 μGy/h). There was no noticeable effect of gamma-radiation at 5 and 10°С, while the 20°С exposure revealed authentic bioluminescence inhibition. The 20°С results of gamma-radiation exposure were compared to those for low-dose alpha- and beta-radiation exposures studied previously under comparable experimental conditions. In contrast to ionizing radiation of alpha and beta types, gamma-emission did not initiate bacterial bioluminescence activation (adaptive response). As with alpha- and beta-radiation, gamma-emission did not demonstrate monotonic dose-effect dependencies; the bioluminescence inhibition efficiency was found to be related to the exposure time, while no dose rate dependence was found. The sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose gamma radiation. The exposure time that caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition was suggested as a test parameter for radiotoxicity evaluation under conditions of chronic low-dose gamma irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Gayle Woloschak

    2009-12-16

    As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

  15. Chronic very low dose naltrexone administration attenuates opioid withdrawal expression.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Gottheil, Edward; Peoples, James F; Oropeza, Veronica C; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2004-08-15

    Different regimens of agonist and antagonist drugs have been used in opioid withdrawal management, with variable results. We examined whether administering extremely small quantities of opiate antagonists in the presence of opiate agonist drugs reduces withdrawal expression. Forty-one male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with morphine or placebo pellets for eight days. Starting on day 3, some rats received naltrexone in their drinking water (5 mg/L), or unadulterated water. On day 8, rats were injected with saline or naltrexone (100 mg/kg) and evaluated for behavioral signs of withdrawal. Next, sections through the locus coeruleus (LC) and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), brainstem areas exhibiting cellular activation following opiate withdrawal, were processed for c-Fos to detect early gene expression. Finally, the same nuclei were examined for protein kinase A regulatory subunit II (PKA) and phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (pCREB), using Western blot analysis. Withdrawal was attenuated and c-Fos, PKA, and pCREB expression was decreased in the NTS and LC of rats receiving chronic very low doses of naltrexone. Reduction of withdrawal upon chronic very low naltrexone administration may be due in part to decreased activation of brainstem noradrenergic neurons in morphine dependent rats.

  16. Costs, benefits and redundant mechanisms of adaption to chronic low-dose stress in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz-Potoczny, Marta; Lydall, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT All organisms live in changeable, stressful environments. It has been reported that exposure to low-dose stresses or poisons can improve fitness. However, examining the effects of chronic low-dose chemical exposure is challenging. To address this issue we used temperature sensitive mutations affecting the yeast cell division cycle to induce low-dose stress for 40 generation times, or more. We examined cdc13-1 mutants, defective in telomere function, and cdc15-2 mutants, defective in mitotic kinase activity. We found that each stress induced similar adaptive responses. Stress-exposed cells became resistant to higher levels of stress but less fit, in comparison with unstressed cells, in conditions of low stress. The costs and benefits of adaptation to chronic stress were reversible. In the cdc13-1 context we tested the effects of Rad9, a central player in the response to telomere defects, Exo1, a nuclease that degrades defective telomeres, and Msn2 and Msn4, 2 transcription factors that contribute to the environmental stress response. We also observed, as expected, that Rad9 and Exo1 modulated the response of cells to stress. In addition we observed that adaptation to stress could still occur in these contexts, with associated costs and benefits. We conclude that functionally redundant cellular networks control the adaptive responses to low dose chronic stress. Our data suggests that if organisms adapt to low dose stress it is helpful if stress continues or increases but harmful should stress levels reduce. PMID:27628486

  17. Analysis of the Mortality Experience amongst U.S. Nuclear Power Industry Workers after Chronic Low-Dose Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, Jack J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2004-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). While associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15 countries will have greater power for testing the main hypotheses

  18. Analysis of the Effect of Chronic and Low-Dose Radiation Exposure on Spermatogenic Cells of Male Large Japanese Field Mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Takino, Sachio; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Sugano, Yukou; Fujishima, Yohei; Nakata, Akifumi; Kasai, Kosuke; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Shinoda, Hisashi; Miura, Tomisato; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2017-02-01

    In this study we analyzed the effect of chronic and low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation on spermatogenic cells of large Japanese field mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident. In March 2014, large Japanese field mice were collected from two sites located in, and one site adjacent to, the FNPP ex-evacuation zone: Tanashio, Murohara and Akogi, respectively. Testes from these animals were analyzed histologically. External dose rate from radiocesium (combined (134)Cs and (137)Cs) in these animals at the sampling sites exhibited 21 μGy/day in Tanashio, 304-365 μGy/day in Murohara and 407-447 μGy/day in Akogi. In the Akogi group, the numbers of spermatogenic cells and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells per seminiferous tubule were significantly higher compared to the Tanashio and Murohara groups, respectively. TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells tended to be detected at a lower level in the Murohara and Akogi groups compared to the Tanashio group. These results suggest that enhanced spermatogenesis occurred in large Japanese field mice living in and around the FNPP ex-evacuation zone. It remains to be elucidated whether this phenomenon, attributed to chronic exposure to LDR radiation, will benefit or adversely affect large Japanese field mice.

  19. The effects of chronic, low doses of Ra-226 on cultured fish and human cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaopei; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2016-07-01

    To determine the chronic low-dose radiation effects caused by α-particle radiation from (226)Ra over multiple cell generations in CHSE/F fish cells and HaCaT human cells. CHSE/F cells and HaCaT cells were cultured in medium containing (226)Ra to deliver the chronic low-dose α-particle radiation. Clonogenic assay was used to test the clonogenic survival fractions of cells with or without being exposed to radiation from (226)Ra. The chronic low-dose radiation from (226)Ra does have effects on the clonogenic survival of CHSE/F cells and HaCaT cells. When CHSE/F cells were cultured in (226)Ra-medium over 9 passages for about 134 days, the clonogenic surviving fractions for cells irradiated at dose rates ranging from 0.00066 to 0.66mGy/d were significantly lower than that of cells sham irradiated. For HaCaT cells grown in medium containing the same range of (226)Ra activity, the clonogenic surviving fraction decreased at first and reached the lowest value at about 42 days (8 passages). After that, the clonogenic survival began to increase, and was significantly higher than that of control cells by the end of the experimental period. The chronic, low-dose high LET radiation from (226)Ra can influence the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. CHSE/F cells were sensitized by the radiation, and HaCaT cells were initially sensitized but later appeared to be adapted. The results could have implications for determining risk from chronic versus acute exposures to radium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human circulating ribosomal DNA content significantly increases while circulating satellite III (1q12) content decreases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma- neutron and tritium beta-radiation.

    PubMed

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Elizaveta S; Skorodumova, Elena N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Volkova, Irina V; Stepanova, Elena V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    A single exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) results in an elevated cell-free DNA (cfDNA) content in the blood plasma. In this case, the cfDNA concentration can be a marker of the cell death in the organism. However, a chronic exposure to a low-dose IR enhances both the endonuclease activity and titer of antibodies to DNA in blood plasma, resulting in a decrease of the total concentration of circulating cfDNA in exposed people. In this case, the total cfDNA concentration should not be considered as a marker of the cell death in an exposed body. We assumed that a pool of the cfDNA circulating in the exposed people contains DNA fragments, which are resistant to a double-strand break formation in the environment of the elevated plasma endonuclease activity, and can be accumulated in the blood plasma. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the content of GC-rich sequences (69%GC) of the transcribed region of human ribosomal repeat (rDNA), as well as the content of AT-rich repeat (63%AT) of satellite III (1q12) in the cfDNA samples obtained from 285 individuals. We have found that a chronic exposure to gamma-neutron radiation (N=88) and tritium β-radiation (N=88) evokes an increase of the rDNA content (RrDNA index) and a decrease of the satellite III content (RsatIII index) in the circulating cfDNA as compared with the cfDNA of non-exposed people (N=109). Such index that simultaneously displays both the increase of rDNA content and decrease of satellite III content in the cfDNA (RrDNA/RsatIII) can be recommended as a marker of chronic processes in the body that involve the elevated cell death rate and/or increased blood plasma endonuclease activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Daniels, R D; Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2011-06-01

    More than 400,000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case-control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure-response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of protracted radiation exposures.

  2. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. Study selection We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case–control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure–response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Methods Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. Results We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Conclusions Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of

  3. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, T.-M. . E-mail: tsungming.a.shih@us.army.mil; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-09-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD{sub 5} dose of sarin (42 {mu}g/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD{sub 5} of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD{sub 5} of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD{sub 5} sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0

  4. Non linear processes modulated by low doses of radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Alloni, Daniele; Babini, Gabriele; Morini, Jacopo; Baiocco, Giorgio

    The perturbation induced by radiation impinging on biological targets can stimulate the activation of several different pathways, spanning from the DNA damage processing to intra/extra -cellular signalling. In the mechanistic investigation of radiobiological damage this complex “system” response (e.g. omics, signalling networks, micro-environmental modifications, etc.) has to be taken into account, shifting from a focus on the DNA molecule solely to a systemic/collective view. An additional complication comes from the finding that the individual response of each of the involved processes is often not linear as a function of the dose. In this context, a systems biology approach to investigate the effects of low dose irradiations on intra/extra-cellular signalling will be presented, where low doses of radiation act as a mild perturbation of a robustly interconnected network. Results obtained through a multi-level investigation of both DNA damage repair processes (e.g. gamma-H2AX response) and of the activation kinetics for intra/extra cellular signalling pathways (e.g. NFkB activation) show that the overall cell response is dominated by non-linear processes - such as negative feedbacks - leading to possible non equilibrium steady states and to a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Together with experimental data of radiation perturbed pathways, different modelling approaches will be also discussed.

  5. Low-dose mercury exposure in early life: relevance of thimerosal to fetuses, newborns and infants.

    PubMed

    Dórea, José G

    2013-01-01

    This review explores the different aspects of constitutional factors in early life that modulate toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of low-dose mercury resulting from acute ethylmercury (etHg) exposure in Thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCV). Major databases were searched for human and experimental studies that addressed issues related to early life exposure to TCV. It can be concluded that: a) mercury load in fetuses, neonates, and infants resulting from TCVs remains in blood of neonates and infants at sufficient concentration and for enough time to penetrate the brain and to exert a neurologic impact and a probable influence on neurodevelopment of susceptible infants; b) etHg metabolism related to neurodevelopmental delays has been demonstrated experimentally and observed in population studies; c) unlike chronic Hg exposure during pregnancy, neurodevelopmental effects caused by acute (repeated/cumulative) early life exposure to TCV-etHg remain unrecognized; and d) the uncertainty surrounding low-dose toxicity of etHg is challenging but recent evidence indicates that avoiding cumulative insults by alkyl-mercury forms (which include Thimerosal) is warranted. It is important to a) maintain trust in vaccines while reinforcing current public health policies to abate mercury exposure in infancy; b) generally support WHO policies that recommend vaccination to prevent and control existing and impending infectious diseases; and c) not confuse the 'need' to use a specific 'product' (TCV) by accepting as 'innocuous' (or without consequences) the presence of a proven 'toxic alkyl-mercury' (etHg) at levels that have not been proven to be toxicologically safe.

  6. Low-dose cardiac imaging: reducing exposure but not accuracy.

    PubMed

    Small, Gary R; Chow, Benjamin J W; Ruddy, Terrence D

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac imaging techniques that use ionizing radiation have become an integral part of current cardiology practice. However, concern has arisen that ionizing radiation exposure, even at the low levels used for medical imaging, is associated with the risk of cancer. From a single diagnostic cardiac imaging procedure, such risks are low. On a population basis, however, malignancies become more likely on account of stochastic effects being more probable as the number of procedures performed increases. In light of this, and owing to professional and industrial commitment to the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle, over the last decade major strides have been made to reduce radiation dose in cardiac imaging. Dose-reduction strategies have been most pronounced in cardiac computed tomography. This was important since computed tomography has rapidly become a widely used diagnostic alternative to invasive coronary angiography, and initial protocols were associated with relatively high radiation exposures. Advances have also been made in nuclear cardiology and in invasive coronary angiography, and these reductions in patient exposure have all been achieved with maintenance of image quality and accuracy. Improvements in imaging camera technology, image acquisition protocols and image processing have lead to reductions in patient radiation exposure without compromising imaging diagnostic accuracy.

  7. Comparison of high dose inhaled steroids, low dose inhaled steroids plus low dose theophylline, and low dose inhaled steroids alone in chronic asthma in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Lim, S.; Jatakanon, A.; Gordon, D.; Macdonald, C.; Chung, K. F.; Barnes, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Theophylline is widely used in the treatment of asthma, and there is evidence that theophylline has anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory effects. A study was undertaken to determine whether theophylline added to low dose inhaled steroids would be as efficacious as high dose inhaled steroids in asthma.
METHODS—In a study in general practice of 155 recruited asthmatic patients with continuing symptomatic asthma while on 400 µg beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) daily and inhaled β2 agonist as required, the effect of (1) continuing low dose inhaled steroids alone (LDS, 200 µg BDP twice daily), (2) low dose inhaled steroids plus low dose theophylline (LDT, 400 mg daily), or (3) high dose inhaled steroids (HDS, 500 µg BDP) over a six month period was examined.
RESULTS—One hundred and thirty patients completed the study. Between group comparison using analysis of variance showed no overall differences in peak flow measurements, diurnal variation, and symptom scores. Changes in evening peak flows approached significance at the 5% level (p=0.077). The mean improvement in evening peak flow in the LDT compared with the LDS group was 20.6 l/min (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.5 to 38.8). In the LDT group there was an increase in evening peak flows at the end of the study compared with entry values (22.5 l/min), while in the LDS and HDS groups evening peak flows increased by 1.9 and 8.3 l/min, respectively. There was no significant difference in exacerbations or in side effects.
CONCLUSION—There were no overall significant differences between the low dose steroid, low dose steroid with theophylline, and the high dose steroid groups. The greatest within-group improvement in evening peak flows was found after theophylline. A larger study may be necessary to show significant effects.

 PMID:10992535

  8. Low-Dose Oxygen Enhances Macrophage-Derived Bacterial Clearance following Cigarette Smoke Exposure.

    PubMed

    Bain, William G; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Mandke, Pooja; Gans, Jonathan H; D'Alessio, Franco R; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K; Aggarwal, Neil R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, smoking-related lung disease. Patients with COPD frequently suffer disease exacerbations induced by bacterial respiratory infections, suggestive of impaired innate immunity. Low-dose oxygen is a mainstay of therapy during COPD exacerbations; yet we understand little about whether oxygen can modulate the effects of cigarette smoke on lung immunity. Methods. Wild-type mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 5 weeks, followed by intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) and 21% or 35-40% oxygen. After two days, lungs were harvested for PAO1 CFUs, and bronchoalveolar fluid was sampled for inflammatory markers. In culture, macrophages were exposed to cigarette smoke and oxygen (40%) for 24 hours and then incubated with PAO1, followed by quantification of bacterial phagocytosis and inflammatory markers. Results. Mice exposed to 35-40% oxygen after cigarette smoke and PAO1 had improved survival and reduced lung CFUs and inflammation. Macrophages from these mice expressed less TNF-α and more scavenger receptors. In culture, macrophages exposed to cigarette smoke and oxygen also demonstrated decreased TNF-α secretion and enhanced phagocytosis of PAO1 bacteria. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate a novel, protective role for low-dose oxygen following cigarette smoke and bacteria exposure that may be mediated by enhanced macrophage phagocytosis.

  9. [Cytogenetic indices for somatic mutagenesis in mammals exposed to chronic low-dose irradiation].

    PubMed

    Kostenko, S A; Ermakova, O V; Sushko, S N; Fyedorova, E V; Dzhus, P P; Baschlykova, L A; Kurylenko, Yu F; Raskosha, O V; Savin, A O; Shaforost, A S

    2015-01-01

    We used cytogenetic analysis in the studies of the biological effects of a radiation factor of natural and artificial origin (under conditions ofthe 30-km exclusion zone ofthe Chernobyl experimental landfills in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia). The studies have been performed on various types of mammals: domestic animals--cows, pigs, horses and rodents--root voles, the Af mouse line, and yellow necked field mouse, bank voles. We found significant changes in the level of MN and chromosomal aberrations in the animals that were exposed to the conditions of chronic low-dose radiation for a long time (bothin the habitat and upon exposure in the Chernobyl zone) regardless of the type of animal and nature of contamination.

  10. Effects of chronic low-dose ultraviolet B radiation on DNA damage and repair in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D L; Greinert, R; de Gruijl, F R; Guikers, K L; Breitbart, E W; Byrom, M; Gallmeier, M M; Lowery, M G; Volkmer, B

    1999-06-15

    Chronic exposure to sunlight causes skin cancer in humans, yet little is known about how habitual exposure to low doses of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) affects DNA damage in the skin. We treated Skh-1 hairless mice with daily doses of suberythemal UVB for 40 days and analyzed the amount and distribution of DNA photodamage using RIAs and immunofluorescence micrography. We found that DNA damage accumulated in mouse skin as a result of chronic irradiation and that this damage persisted in the dermis and epidermis for several weeks after the chronic treatment was terminated. Although the persistent damage was evenly distributed throughout the dermis, it remained in the epidermis as a small number of heavily damaged cells at the dermal-epidermal boundary. Rates of DNA damage induction and repair were determined at different times over the course of chronic treatment in response to a higher challenge dose of UVB light. The amount of damage induced by the challenge dose increased in response to chronic exposure, and excision repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone dimers was significantly reduced. The sensitization of mouse epidermal DNA to photoproduct induction, the reduction in excision repair, and the accumulation of nonrepairable DNA damage in the dermis and epidermis suggest that chronic low-dose exposure to sunlight may significantly enhance the predisposition of mammalian skin to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis.

  11. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    PubMed

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses.

  12. Ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates chronic morphine-induced gliosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of analgesic tolerance following chronic morphine administration can be a significant clinical problem. Preclinical studies demonstrate that chronic morphine administration induces spinal gliosis and that inhibition of gliosis prevents the development of analgesic tolerance to opioids. Many studies have also demonstrated that ultra-low doses of naltrexone inhibit the development of spinal morphine antinociceptive tolerance and clinical studies demonstrate that it has opioid sparing effects. In this study we demonstrate that ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates glial activation, which may contribute to its effects on attenuating tolerance. Results Spinal cord sections from rats administered chronic morphine showed significantly increased immuno-labelling of astrocytes and microglia compared to saline controls, consistent with activation. 3-D images of astrocytes from animals administered chronic morphine had significantly larger volumes compared to saline controls. Co-injection of ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuated this increase in volume, but the mean volume differed from saline-treated and naltrexone-treated controls. Astrocyte and microglial immuno-labelling was attenuated in rats co-administered ultra-low dose naltrexone compared to morphine-treated rats and did not differ from controls. Glial activation, as characterized by immunohistochemical labelling and cell size, was positively correlated with the extent of tolerance developed. Morphine-induced glial activation was not due to cell proliferation as there was no difference observed in the total number of glial cells following chronic morphine treatment compared to controls. Furthermore, using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, no increase in spinal cord cell proliferation was observed following chronic morphine administration. Conclusion Taken together, we demonstrate a positive correlation between the prevention of analgesic tolerance and the inhibition of spinal gliosis by treatment with

  13. Ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates chronic morphine-induced gliosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Theresa-Alexandra M; Milne, Brian; Cahill, Catherine M

    2010-04-16

    The development of analgesic tolerance following chronic morphine administration can be a significant clinical problem. Preclinical studies demonstrate that chronic morphine administration induces spinal gliosis and that inhibition of gliosis prevents the development of analgesic tolerance to opioids. Many studies have also demonstrated that ultra-low doses of naltrexone inhibit the development of spinal morphine antinociceptive tolerance and clinical studies demonstrate that it has opioid sparing effects. In this study we demonstrate that ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates glial activation, which may contribute to its effects on attenuating tolerance. Spinal cord sections from rats administered chronic morphine showed significantly increased immuno-labelling of astrocytes and microglia compared to saline controls, consistent with activation. 3-D images of astrocytes from animals administered chronic morphine had significantly larger volumes compared to saline controls. Co-injection of ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuated this increase in volume, but the mean volume differed from saline-treated and naltrexone-treated controls. Astrocyte and microglial immuno-labelling was attenuated in rats co-administered ultra-low dose naltrexone compared to morphine-treated rats and did not differ from controls. Glial activation, as characterized by immunohistochemical labelling and cell size, was positively correlated with the extent of tolerance developed. Morphine-induced glial activation was not due to cell proliferation as there was no difference observed in the total number of glial cells following chronic morphine treatment compared to controls. Furthermore, using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, no increase in spinal cord cell proliferation was observed following chronic morphine administration. Taken together, we demonstrate a positive correlation between the prevention of analgesic tolerance and the inhibition of spinal gliosis by treatment with ultra-low dose naltrexone

  14. LINK BETWEEN LOW-DOSE ENVIRONMENTALLY RELEVANT CADMIUM EXPOSURES AND ASTHENOZOOSPERMIA IN A RAT MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Benoff, Susan; Auborn, Karen; Marmar, Joel L.; Hurley, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To define the mechanism(s) underlying an association between asthenozoospermia and elevated blood, seminal plasma and testicular cadmium levels in infertile human males using a rat model of environmentally relevant cadmium exposures. Setting University medical center andrology research laboratory. Animals Male Wistar rats (n = 60), documented to be sensitive to the testicular effects of cadmium. Interventions Rats were given ad libitum access to water supplemented with 14% sucrose and 0, 5, 50 or 100 mg/L cadmium for 1, 4 or 8 weeks being at puberty. Main outcome measure(s) Testicular cadmium levels were determined by atomic absorption, cauda epididymal sperm motility by visual inspection, and testicular gene expression by DNA microarray hybridization. Results Chronic, low dose cadmium exposures produced a time- and dose-dependent reduction in sperm motility. Transcription of genes regulated by calcium and expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel mRNA splicing variants were altered by cadmium exposure. Expression of calcium binding proteins involved in modulation of sperm motility was unaffected. Conclusions A causal relationship between elevated testicular cadmium and asthenozoospermia was identified. Aberrrant sperm motility was correlated with altered expression of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel isoforms found on the sperm tail, which regulate calcium and cadmium influx. PMID:18308070

  15. Selective brain responses to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray irradiation in males and females.

    PubMed

    Silasi, Greg; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Besplug, Jill; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Titov, Viktor; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2004-12-24

    Radiation exposure is known to have profound effects on the brain, leading to precursor cell dysfunction and debilitating cognitive declines [Nat. Med. 8 (2002) 955]. Although a plethora of data exist on the effects of high radiation doses, the effects of low-dose irradiation, such as ones received during repetitive diagnostic and therapeutic exposures, are still under-investigated [Am. J. Otolaryngol. 23 (2002) 215; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97 (2000) 889; Curr. Opin. Neurol. 16 (2003) 129]. Furthermore, most studies of the biological effects of ionizing radiation have been performed using a single acute dose, while clinically and environmentally relevant exposures occur predominantly under chronic/repetitive conditions. Here, we have used a mouse model to compare the effects of chronic/repetitive and acute low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure (0.5Gy) to ionizing radiation on the brain in vivo. We examined the LDR effects on p42/44 MAPK (ERK1/ERK2), CaMKII, and AKT signaling-the interconnected pathways that have been previously shown to be crucial for neuronal survival upon irradiation. We report perturbations in ERK1/2, AKT, and CREB upon acute and chronic/repetitive low-dose exposure in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice. These studies were paralleled by the analysis of radiation effects on neurogenesis and cellular proliferation. Repetitive exposure had a much more pronounced effect on cellular signaling and neurogenesis than acute exposure. These results suggest that studies of single acute exposures might be limited in terms of their predictive value. We also present the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced signaling in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. We show the role of estrogens in brain radiation responses and discuss the implications of the observed changes.

  16. Current trends in estimating risk of cancer from exposure to low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Majer, Marija; Knežević, Zeljka; Saveta, Miljanić

    2014-09-29

    Although ionising radiation has proven beneficial in the diagnosis and therapy of a number of diseases, one should keep in mind that irradiating healthy tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In order to justify an exposure to radiation, both the benefits and the risks must be evaluated and compared. The deleterious effects of medium and high doses are well known, but it is much less clear what effects arise from low doses (below 0.1 Gy), which is why such risk estimates are extremely important. This review presents the current state, important assumptions and steps being made in deriving cancer risk estimates for low dose exposures.

  17. Safety and efficacy of low-dose, subacute exposure of mature ewes to sodium chlorate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to determine the safety and efficacy of low-dose, subacute exposure of mature ewes to NaClO3 in the drinking water. Twenty-five ewes (BW = 62.5 ± 7.3 kg) were placed indoors in individual pens with ad libitum access to water and feed. After 7 d of adaptation, ewes were assigned ran...

  18. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  19. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation. PMID:26795421

  20. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-22

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  1. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  2. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials.

  3. Low-dose cadmium exposure induces peribronchiolar fibrosis through site-specific phosphorylation of vimentin.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu Jun; Surolia, Ranu; Li, Huashi; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Gang; Liu, Rui-Ming; Mirov, Sergey B; Athar, Mohammad; Thannickal, Victor J; Antony, Veena B

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to cadmium (Cd) has been associated with development of chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). The mechanisms and signaling pathways whereby Cd causes pathological peribronchiolar fibrosis, airway remodeling, and subsequent airflow obstruction remain unclear. We aimed to evaluate whether low-dose Cd exposure induces vimentin phosphorylation and Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) activation leading to peribronchiolar fibrosis and subsequent airway remodeling. Our data demonstrate that Cd induces myofibroblast differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition around small (<2 mm in diameter) airways. Upon Cd exposure, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and the production of ECM proteins, including fibronectin and collagen-1, are markedly induced in primary human lung fibroblasts. Cd induces Smad2/3 activation and the translocation of both Smad2/3 and Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) into the nucleus. In parallel, Cd induces AKT and cdc2 phosphorylation and downstream vimentin phosphorylation at Ser(39) and Ser(55), respectively. AKT and cdc2 inhibitors block Cd-induced vimentin fragmentation and secretion in association with inhibition of α-SMA expression, ECM deposition, and collagen secretion. Furthermore, vimentin silencing abrogates Cd-induced α-SMA expression and decreases ECM production. Vimentin-deficient mice are protected from Cd-induced peribronchiolar fibrosis and remodeling. These findings identify two specific sites on vimentin that are phosphorylated by Cd and highlight the functional significance of vimentin phosphorylation in YAP1/Smad3 signaling that mediates Cd-induced peribronchiolar fibrosis and airway remodeling. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Perinatal Exposure to Low-Dose Methoxychlor Impairs Testicular Development in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaohong; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Yuanwu; Yu, Wanpeng; Huang, Chaobin; Li, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, has adverse effects on male reproduction at toxicological doses. Humans and wild animals are exposed to MXC mostly through contaminated dietary intake. Higher concentrations of MXC have been found in human milk, raising the demand for the risk assessment of offspring after maternal exposure to low doses of MXC. In this study, pregnant mice (F0) were given intraperitoneal daily evening injections of 1 mg/kg/d MXC during their gestational (embryonic day 0.5, E0.5) and lactational periods (postnatal day 21.5, P21.5), and the F1 males were assessed. F1 testes were collected at P0.5, P21.5 and P45.5. Maternal exposure to MXC disturbed the testicular development. Serum testosterone levels decreased, whereas estradiol levels increased. To understand the molecular mechanisms of exposure to MXC in male reproduction, the F1 testes were examined for changes in the expression of steroidogenesis- and spermatogenesis- related genes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that MXC significantly decreased Cyp11a1 and increased Cyp19a1; furthermore, it downregulated certain spermatogenic genes (Dazl, Boll, Rarg, Stra8 and Cyclin-a1). In summary, perinatal exposure to low-dose MXC disturbs the testicular development in mice. This animal study of exposure to low-dose MXC in F1 males suggests similar dysfunctional effects on male reproduction in humans. PMID:25048109

  5. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Suk Chul; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kang, Yu Mi; Kim, Kwanghee; Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo; Kim, Chong Soon; Kim, Hee Sun

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  6. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  7. Data integration reveals key homeostatic mechanisms following low dose radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-15

    , ROS/RNS and DNA repair pathways detected • Low dose exposure alters metabolites involved in nitric oxide biosynthesis and wound healing. • Computationally predicted regulators of primary mechanisms were experimentally validated.

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Low Dose Arsenic and Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Santana, Alison R.; Li, Dan; Rice, Robert H.; Rocke, David M.; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2008-01-01

    Human exposure to arsenic and ionizing radiation occur environmentally at low levels. While the human health effects of arsenic and ionizing radiation have been examined separately, there is little information regarding their combined effects at doses approaching environmental levels. Arsenic toxicity may be affected by concurrent ionizing radiation especially given their known individual carcinogenic actions at higher doses. We found that keratinocytes responded to either low dose arsenic and/or low dose ionizing radiation exposure, resulting in differential proteomic expression based on 2DGE, immunoblotting and statistical analysis. Seven proteins were identified that passed a rigorous statistical screen for differential expression in 2DGE and also passed a strict statistical screen for follow-up immunoblotting. These included: α-enolase, epidermal-fatty acid binding protein, heat shock protein 27, histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1, lactate dehydrogenase A, protein disulfide isomerase precursor and S100A9. Four proteins had combined effects that were different than would be expected based on the response to either individual toxicant. These data demonstrate a possible reaction to the combined insult that is substantially different from that of either separate treatment. Several proteins had different responses than what has been seen from high dose exposures, adding to the growing literature suggesting that the cellular responses to low dose exposures are distinct. PMID:19294697

  9. Mesothelioma: cases associated with non-occupational and low dose exposures

    PubMed Central

    Hillerdal, G.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the importance of low dose exposure to asbestos on the risk of mesothelioma. METHODS: A review of the literature. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence of a threshold level below which there is no risk of mesothelioma. Low level exposure more often than not contains peak concentrations which can be very high for short periods. There might exist a background level of mesothelioma occurring in the absence of exposure ot asbestos, but there is no proof of this and this "natural level" is probably much lower than the 1- 2/million/year which has been often cited.   PMID:10492646

  10. Adverse reproductive effects of maternal low-dose melamine exposure during pregnancy in rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ching Yan; Tang, Ling Ying; Li, Lu; Shum, Alisa Sau Wun; Fung, Kwok Pui; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2017-01-01

    Melamine is a heterocyclic, aromatic amine and nitrogen-enriched environmental toxicant, found in not only adulterated foodstuffs but also industrial household tableware and paints. Previous studies demonstrated adverse effects of high-dose melamine on human infants and pregnant animals, but effects of low-dose melamine on pregnancy have not been reported. In this study, reproductive effects of low-dose melamine were investigated in pregnant rats. Melamine in the range of 12.5-50 mg/kg was administered to pregnant rats at different gestational stages. Maternal weight gain was not significantly affected, and other maternal morbidity was not observed. Low-dose melamine exposure during pregnancy increased fetal size but reduced somite number in gastrulation (GD8.5-GD10.5) and organogenesis (GD10.5-GD16.5) periods, and increased incidence of stillbirth in whole gestational period (GD0.5 to delivery). Embryotoxicity of melamine was further confirmed by whole embryo culture in vitro that melamine retarded embryonic growth, impaired development of brain and heart, and induced open neural tube and atrioventricular defects with increased apoptosis. In conclusion, adverse reproductive effects of low-dose melamine during pregnancy were identified in the developing rat embryos and the perinatal effects of melamine were gestational and developmental stage dependent. Detailed hazard and risk assessment of melamine in reproduction system are warrant. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 131-138, 2017.

  11. Short Communication: Viremic Control Is Independent of Repeated Low-Dose SHIVSF162p3 Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Tara R.; Hanson, Debra; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Butler, Katherine; Dobard, Charles; Garcia-Lerma, Gerardo; Radzio, Jessica; Smith, James; McNicholl, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The repeat low-dose virus challenge model is commonly used in nonhuman primate studies of HIV transmission and biomedical preventions. For some viruses or challenge routes, it is uncertain whether the repeated exposure design might induce virus-directed innate or adaptive immunity that could affect infection or viremic outcomes. Retrospective cohorts of male Indian rhesus (n=40) and female pigtail (n=46) macaques enrolled in repeat low-dose rectal or vaginal SHIVSF162p3 challenge studies, respectively, were studied to compare the relationship between the number of previous exposures and peak plasma SHIV RNA levels or viral load area under the curve (AUC), surrogate markers of viral control. Repeated mucosal exposures of 10 or 50 TCID50 of virus for rectal and vaginal exposures, respectively, were performed. Virus levels were measured by quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR. The cumulative number of SHIVSF162p3 exposures did not correlate with observed peak virus levels or with AUC in rectally challenged rhesus macaques [peak: rho (ρ)=0.04, p=0.8; AUC: ρ=0.33, p=0.06] or vaginally challenged pigtail macaques (peak: ρ=−0.09, p=0.7; AUC: ρ=0.11, p=0.6). Infections in these models occur independently of exposure history and provide assurance that neither inoculation route nor number of exposures required for infection correlates with postinfection viremia. These data also indicate that both the vaginal and rectal repeated low-dose virus exposure models using SHIVSF162p3 provide a reliable system for nonhuman primate studies. PMID:25313448

  12. Low-dose sarin exposure produces long term changes in brain neurochemistry of mice.

    PubMed

    Oswal, Dhawal P; Garrett, Teresa L; Morris, Mariana; Lucot, James B

    2013-01-01

    Sarin is a toxic organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent that has been reported to cause long-term alterations in behavioral and neuropsychological processes. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of low dose sarin exposure on the monoamine neurotransmitter systems in various brain regions of mice. The rationale was to expand our knowledge about the noncholinergic neurochemical alterations associated with low dose exposure to this cholinesterase inhibitor. We analyzed the levels of monoamines and their metabolites in different brain areas after exposure of male C57BL/6 mice to a subclinical dose of sarin (0.4 LD50). Mice did not show any signs of cholinergic toxicity or pathological changes in brain tissue. At 1, 4 and 8 weeks post-sarin exposure brains were collected for neurochemical analysis. A significant decrease in the dopamine (DA) turnover, as measured by the metabolite to parent ratio, was observed in the frontal cerebral cortex (FC) at all time points tested. DA turnover was significantly increased in the amygdala at 4 weeks but not at 1 or 8 weeks after exposure. The caudate nucleus displayed a decrease in DA turnover at 1 week but no significant change was observed at 4 and 8 weeks suggesting a reversible effect. In addition to this, serotonin (5-HT) levels were transiently altered at various time points in all the brain regions studied (increase in FC, caudate nucleus and decrease in amygdala). Since there were no signs of cholinergic toxicity or cell death after sarin exposure, different non-cholinergic mechanisms may be involved in regulating these effects. Our results demonstrate that non-symptomatic dose of OP nerve agent sarin has potent long-term, region-specific effects on the monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems. Data also suggests differential effects of sarin on the various DA projections. These neurochemical alterations could be associated with long term behavioral and neuropsychological changes associated with low dose OP

  13. OPERATOR DEPENDENCY OF THE RADIATION EXPOSURE IN CARDIAC INTERVENTIONS: FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA LOW DOSE LEVELS.

    PubMed

    Ozpelit, Mehmet Emre; Ercan, Ertugrul; Ozpelit, Ebru; Pekel, Nihat; Tengiz, Istemihan; Ozyurtlu, Ferhat; Yilmaz, Akar

    2017-04-15

    Mean radiation exposure in invasive cardiology varies greatly between different centres and interventionists. The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the EURATOM Council stipulate that, despite reference values, 'All medical exposure for radiodiagnostic purposes shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). The purpose of this study is to establish the effects of the routine application of ALARA principles and to determine operator and procedure impact on radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. A total of 240 consecutive cardiac interventional procedures were analysed. Five operators performed the procedures, two of whom were working in accordance with ALARA principles (Group 1 operators) with the remaining three working in a standard manner (Group 2 operators). Radiation exposure levels of these two groups were compared. Total fluoroscopy time and the number of radiographic runs were similar between groups. However, dose area product and cumulative dose were significantly lower in Group 1 when compared with Group 2. Radiation levels of Group 1 were far below even the reference levels in the literature, thus representing an ultra-low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. By use of simple radiation reducing techniques, ultra-low-dose radiation exposure is feasible in interventional cardiology. Achievability of such levels depends greatly on operator awareness, desire, knowledge and experience of radiation protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Low-dose gamma irradiation of food protein increases its allergenicity in a chronic oral challenge.

    PubMed

    Vaz, A F M; Souza, M P; Medeiros, P L; Melo, A M M A; Silva-Lucca, R A; Santana, L A; Oliva, M L V; Perez, K R; Cuccovia, I M; Correia, M T S

    2013-01-01

    Few chronic food protein models have described the relationship between allergenicity and the molecular structure of food protein after physical processing. The effect of γ-radiation on the structure of food protein was measured by fluorescence, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally sensitized and then given non-irradiated and irradiated Con-A by daily gavage for 28days. The tendency to form insoluble amorphous aggregates and partially unfolded species was observed after irradiation. The administration of non-irradiated and irradiated samples at low-dose significantly increased weight loss as well as plasma levels of eotaxin in animals repeatedly exposed to Con-A. Significant lymphocytic infiltrate filling completely the stroma of microvilli and tubular glands was observed in the small intestinal of the group given Con-A irradiated at a low dose. This phenotype was not observed in animals treated with Con-A irradiated at a high dose.

  15. Cardiovascular diseases related to ionizing radiation: The risk of low-dose exposure (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Baselet, Bjorn; Rombouts, Charlotte; Benotmane, Abderrafi Mohammed; Baatout, Sarah; Aerts, An

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, non-cancer diseases are not considered as health risks following exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. Indeed, non-cancer diseases are classified as deterministic tissue reactions, which are characterized by a threshold dose. It is judged that below an absorbed dose of 100 mGy, no clinically relevant tissue damage occurs, forming the basis for the current radiation protection system concerning non-cancer effects. Recent epidemiological findings point, however, to an excess risk of non-cancer diseases following exposure to lower doses of ionizing radiation than was previously thought. The evidence is the most sound for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cataract. Due to limited statistical power, the dose-risk relationship is undetermined below 0.5 Gy; however, if this relationship proves to be without a threshold, it may have considerable impact on current low-dose health risk estimates. In this review, we describe the CVD risk related to low doses of ionizing radiation, the clinical manifestation and the pathology of radiation-induced CVD, as well as the importance of the endothelium models in CVD research as a way forward to complement the epidemiological data with the underlying biological and molecular mechanisms. PMID:27748824

  16. Renal screening in children after exposure to low dose melamine in Hong Kong: cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Winnie C W; Wong, William; Chan, Dorothy F Y; Wong, Ka T; Ahuja, Anil T

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the renal outcomes of children after exposure to low dose melamine in Hong Kong. Design Cross sectional study. Setting Special assessment centres, Hong Kong. Participants 3170 children (1422 girls and 1748 boys) aged 12 years or less referred from territory-wide primary care clinics after daily consumption for one month or more of milk products tainted with melamine. Main outcome measures Presence of renal stones and haematuria. Results One child had a confirmed renal stone, seven were suspected of having melamine related renal deposits, and 208 (6.6%) were positive for blood in urine by reagent strip. A proportion of these children were followed up at the special assessment centre, but only 7.4% of those positive for blood on reagent strip were confirmed by microscopy, suggesting an overall estimated prevalence of less than 1% for microscopic haematuria. Conclusions No severe adverse renal outcomes, such as acute renal failure or urinary tract obstruction, were detected in children after exposure to low dose melamine. Our results were similar to territory-wide findings in Hong Kong. Even including the seven children with suspected renal deposits, the prevalence of suspected melamine related abnormalities on ultrasonography was only 0.2%. None of these children required specific treatment. The prevalence of microscopic haematuria was probably overestimated by the reagent strip. These data suggest that large scale and urgent screening programmes may not be informative or cost effective for populations who have been exposed to low dose melamine. PMID:19097976

  17. Severe Tardive Dystonia on Low Dose Short Duration Exposure to Atypical Antipsychotics: Factors Explored

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Nilanjan C.; Sheth, Shabina A.; Mehta, Ritambhara Y.; Dave, Kamlesh R.

    2017-01-01

    Tardive dystonia (TD) is a serious side effect of antipsychotic medications, more with typical antipsychotics, that is potentially irreversible in affected patients. Studies show that newer atypical antipsychotics have a lower risk of TD. As a result, many clinicians may have developed a false sense of security when prescribing these medications. We report a case of 20-year-old male with hyperthymic temperament and borderline intellectual functioning, who developed severe TD after low dose short duration exposure to atypical antipsychotic risperidone and then olanzapine. The goal of this paper is to alert the reader to be judicious and cautious before using casual low dose second generation antipsychotics in patient with no core psychotic features, hyperthymic temperament, or borderline intellectual functioning suggestive of organic brain damage, who are more prone to develop adverse effects such as TD and monitor the onset of TD in patients taking atypical antipsychotics. PMID:28250568

  18. Low-Dose CT of the Paranasal Sinuses: Minimizing X-Ray Exposure with Spectral Shaping.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Wolfgang; May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192x0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 × 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDIvol 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p < 0.001). Spectral optimization (tin filtration at 100 kV) allows for visualization of the paranasal sinus with sufficient image quality at a very low radiation exposure. • Spectral optimization (tin filtration) is beneficial to low-dose parasinus CT • Tin filtration at 100 kV yields sufficient image quality for pre-operative planning • Diagnostic parasinus CT can be performed with an effective dose <0.05 mSv.

  19. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water impairs early life lung mechanics in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Larcombe, Alexander N; Sly, Peter D; Zosky, Graeme R

    2013-02-18

    Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a significant environmental issue affecting millions of people around the world. Exposure to arsenic during foetal development has been shown to impair somatic growth and increase the risk of developing chronic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to determine if in utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water is capable of altering lung growth and postnatal lung mechanics. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were given drinking water containing 0, 10 (current World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum contaminant level) or 100 μg/L arsenic from gestational day 8 to birth. Birth outcomes and somatic growth were monitored. Plethysmography and the forced oscillation technique were used to collect measurements of lung volume, lung mechanics, pressure-volume curves and the volume dependence of lung mechanics in male and female offspring at two, four, six and eight weeks of age. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water resulted in low birth weight and impaired parenchymal lung mechanics during infancy. Male offspring were more susceptible to the effects of arsenic on growth and lung mechanics than females. All alterations to lung mechanics following in utero arsenic exposure were recovered by adulthood. Exposure to arsenic at the current WHO maximum contaminant level in utero impaired somatic growth and the development of the lungs resulting in alterations to lung mechanics during infancy. Deficits in growth and lung development in early life may contribute to the increased susceptibility of developing chronic respiratory disease in arsenic exposed human populations.

  20. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water impairs early life lung mechanics in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a significant environmental issue affecting millions of people around the world. Exposure to arsenic during foetal development has been shown to impair somatic growth and increase the risk of developing chronic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to determine if in utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water is capable of altering lung growth and postnatal lung mechanics. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were given drinking water containing 0, 10 (current World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum contaminant level) or 100μg/L arsenic from gestational day 8 to birth. Birth outcomes and somatic growth were monitored. Plethysmography and the forced oscillation technique were used to collect measurements of lung volume, lung mechanics, pressure-volume curves and the volume dependence of lung mechanics in male and female offspring at two, four, six and eight weeks of age. Results In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water resulted in low birth weight and impaired parenchymal lung mechanics during infancy. Male offspring were more susceptible to the effects of arsenic on growth and lung mechanics than females. All alterations to lung mechanics following in utero arsenic exposure were recovered by adulthood. Conclusions Exposure to arsenic at the current WHO maximum contaminant level in utero impaired somatic growth and the development of the lungs resulting in alterations to lung mechanics during infancy. Deficits in growth and lung development in early life may contribute to the increased susceptibility of developing chronic respiratory disease in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:23419080

  1. Combination of low-dose mirtazapine and ibuprofen for prophylaxis of chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, L; Buchgreitz, L; Ashina, S; Jensen, R

    2007-02-01

    Chronic headaches are difficult to treat and represent the biggest challenge in headache centres. Mirtazapine has a prophylactic and ibuprofen an acute effect in tension-type headache. Combination therapy may increase efficacy and lower side effects. We aimed to evaluate the prophylactic effect of a combination of low-dose mirtazapine and ibuprofen in chronic tension-type headache. Ninety-three patients were included in the double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel trial. Following a 4-week run-in period they were randomized to four groups for treatment with a combination of mirtazapine 4.5 mg and ibuprofen 400 mg, placebo, mirtazapine 4.5 mg or ibuprofen 400 mg daily for 8 weeks. Eighty-four patients completed the study. The primary efficacy parameter, change in area under the headache curve from run-in to the last 4 weeks of treatment, did not differ between combination therapy (190) and placebo (219), P = 0.85. Explanatory analyses revealed worsening of headache already in the third week of treatment with ibuprofen alone. In conclusion, the combination of low-dose mirtazapine and ibuprofen is not effective for the treatment of chronic tension-type headache. Moreover, the study suggests that daily intake of ibuprofen worsens headache already after few weeks in chronic tension-type headache.

  2. Short-term, low-dose cadmium exposure induces hyperpermeability in human renal glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqun; Dong, Fengyun; Xu, Dongmei; Du, Linna; Yan, Suhua; Hu, Hesheng; Lobe, Corrinne G; Yi, Fan; Kapron, Carolyn M; Liu, Ju

    2016-02-01

    The kidney is the principal organ targeted by exposure to cadmium (Cd), a well-known toxic metal. Even at a low level, Cd damages glomerular filtration. However, little is known about the effects of Cd on the glomerular endothelium, which performs the filtration function and directly interacts with Cd in blood plasma. In this study, we cultured human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) in the presence of serum with treatment of a short term (1 h) and low concentration (1 μm) of Cd, which mimics the pattern of glomerular endothelium exposure to Cd in vivo. We found that this short-term, low-dose Cd exposure does not induce cytotoxicity, but increases permeability in HRGECs monolayers and redistributes adherens junction proteins vascular endothelial-cadherin and β-catenin. Though short-term, low-dose Cd exposure activates all three major mitogen activated protein kinases, only the inhibitor of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase partially prevents Cd-induced hyperpermeability in HRGECs. Our data indicate that the presence of Cd in blood circulation might directly disrupt the glomerular endothelial cell barrier and contribute to the development of clinical symptoms of glomerular diseases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Adaption By Low Dose Radiation Exposure: A Look at Scope and Limitations for Radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Mitchel, Ron E J

    2015-01-01

    The procedures and dose limitations used for radiation protection in the nuclear industry are founded on the assumption that risk is directly proportional to dose, without a threshold. Based on this idea that any dose, no matter how small, will increase risk, radiation protection regulations generally attempt to reduce any exposure to "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA). We know however, that these regulatory assumptions are inconsistent with the known biological effects of low doses. Low doses induce protective effects, and these adaptive responses are part of a general response to low stress. Adaptive responses have been tightly conserved during evolution, from single celled organisms up to humans, indicating their importance. Here we examine cellular and animal studies that show the influence of radiation induced protective effects on diverse diseases, and examine the radiation dose range that is effective for different tissues in the same animal. The concept of a dose window, with upper and lower effective doses, as well as the effect of multiple stressors and the influence of genetics will also be examined. The effect of the biological variables on low dose responses will be considered from the point of view of the limitations they may impose on any revised radiation protection regulations.

  4. Emesis as a Screening Diagnostic for Low Dose Rate (LDR) Total Body Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Camarata, A. S.; Switchenko, J. M.; Demidenko, E.; Flood, A. B.; Swartz, H. M.; Ali, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Current radiation disaster manuals list the time-to-emesis (TE) as the key triage indicator of radiation dose. The data used to support TE recommendations were derived primarily from nearly instantaneous, high dose rate exposures as part of variable condition accident databases. To date, there has not been a systematic differentiation between triage dose estimates associated with high and low dose rate (LDR) exposures, even though it is likely that after a nuclear detonation or radiologic disaster, many surviving casualties would have received a significant portion of their total exposure from fallout (LDR exposure) rather than from the initial nuclear detonation or criticality event (high dose rate exposure). This commentary discusses the issues surrounding the use of emesis as a screening diagnostic for radiation dose after LDR exposure. As part of this discussion, previously published clinical data on emesis after LDR total body irradiation (TBI) is statistically re-analyzed as an illustration of the complexity of the issue and confounding factors. This previously published data includes 107 patients who underwent TBI up to 10.5 Gy in a single fraction delivered over several hours at 0.02 to 0.04 Gy/min. Estimates based on these data for the sensitivity of emesis as a screening diagnostic for low dose rate radiation exposure range from 57.1% to 76.6%, and the estimates for specificity range from 87.5% to 99.4%. Though the original data contain multiple confounding factors, the evidence regarding sensitivity suggests that emesis appears to be quite poor as a medical screening diagnostic for LDR exposures. PMID:26910032

  5. Long term neurocognitive impact of low dose prenatal methylmercury exposure in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hugh Simon; Kwok, Ka Ming; Chan, Peggy Hiu Ying; So, Hung Kwan; Li, Albert Martin; Ng, Pak Cheung; Fok, Tai Fai

    2013-04-01

    International studies suggest that low dose prenatal methylmercury exposure (>29 nmol/L) has long-term adverse neurocognitive effects. There is evidence that the majority of children in Hong Kong exceed this level as a result of high fish consumption of mothers during pregnancy. To study whether there are any associations between low-dose prenatal methylmercury exposure and neurocognitive outcomes in Hong Kong children. All 1057 children from the original birth cohort were eligible for entry into the study, except children with conditions that would affect neurocognitive development, but were unrelated to methylmercury exposure. Subjects were assessed by a wide panel of tests covering a broad range of neurocognitive functions: Hong Kong Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (HK-WISC), Hong Kong List Learning Test (HKLLT), Tests of Everyday Attention for Children (TEACH), Boston Naming Test, and Grooved Pegboard Test. 608 subjects were recruited (median age 8.2 years, IQR 7.3, 8.8; 53.9% boys). After correction by confounders including child age and sex, multivariate analysis showed that cord blood mercury concentration was significantly associated with three subtests: Picture Arrangement of HK-WISC (coefficient -0.944, P=0.049) and Short and Long Delay Recall Difference of the HKLLT (coefficient -1.087, P=0.007 and coefficient -1.161, P=0.005, respectively), i.e., performance worsened with increasing prenatal methylmercury exposure in these subtests. Small, but statistically significant adverse associations between prenatal methylmercury exposure and long-term neurocognitive effects (a visual sequencing task and retention ability of verbal memory) were found in our study. These effects are compatible with findings of studies with higher prenatal methylmercury exposure levels and suggest that safe strategies to further reduce exposure levels in Hong Kong are desirable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Specific metabolic fingerprint of a dietary exposure to a very low dose of endosulfan.

    PubMed

    Canlet, Cécile; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Gautier, Roselyne; Molina, Jérôme; Métais, Benjamin; Blas-Y Estrada, Florence; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Like other persistent organochlorine pesticides, endosulfan residues have been detected in foods including fruit, vegetables, and fish. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of a dietary exposure to low doses of endosulfan from foetal development until adult age on metabolic homeostasis in mice and to identify biomarkers of exposure using an (1)H-NMR-based metabonomic approach in various tissues and biofluids. We report in both genders an increase in plasma glucose as well as changes in levels of factors involved in the regulation of liver oxidative stress, confirming the prooxidant activities of this compound. Some metabolic changes were distinct in males and females. For example in plasma, a decrease in lipid LDL and choline content was only observed in female. Lactate levels in males were significantly increased. In conclusion, our results show that metabolic changes in liver could be linked to the onset of pathologies like diabetes and insulin resistance. Moreover from our results it appears that the NMR-based metabonomic approach could be useful for the characterization in plasma of a dietary exposure to low dose of pesticide in human.

  7. Mitochondrial proteomic alterations caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure in mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuemei; Wei, Gang; Huang, Zhijun; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Yang, Xifei

    2016-11-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in neurotoxicity caused by exposure of various chemicals such as copper. However, the effects of long-term low-dose copper exposure on mitochondrial proteome remain unclear. In this study, we found the treatment of copper (0.13ppm copper sulfate in drinking water) for 12 months caused abnormal expression of a total of 13 mitochondrial proteins (7 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated) as revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry in mouse cortex. Protein functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressed proteins mainly included apoptosis-associated proteins, axon guidance-associated proteins, axonogenesis-associated proteins and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex. Among these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins, GRP75 (75kDa glucose-regulated protein) and GRP78 (78kDa glucose-regulated protein) were found to be significantly down-regulated as confirmed by Western-blot analysis. The down-regulation of GRP75 was shown to promote apoptosis. The down-regulation of GRP78/BiP could up-regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediators and thus cause apoptosis. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins such as GRP75 and GRP78 could be involved in neurotoxicity caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure and serve as potential molecular targets for the treatment of copper neurotoxicity.

  8. Effect of chronic low-dose tadalafil on penile cavernous tissues in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Mohamed E; Senbel, Amira M; Mostafa, Taymour

    2013-06-01

    To assess the effect of chronic low-dose administration of tadalafil (Td) on penile cavernous tissue in induced diabetic rats. The study investigaged 48 adult male albino rats, comprising a control group, sham controls, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and induced diabetic rats that received Td low-dose daily (0.09 mg/200 g weight) for 2 months. The rats were euthanized 1 day after the last dose. Cavernous tissues were subjected to histologic, immunohistochemical, morphometric studies, and measurement of intracavernosal pressure and mean arterial pressure in anesthetized rats. Diabetic rats demonstrated dilated cavernous spaces, smooth muscles with heterochromatic nuclei, degenerated mitochondria, vacuolated cytoplasm, and negative smooth muscle immunoreactivity. Nerve fibers demonstrated a thick myelin sheath and intra-axonal edema, where blood capillaries exhibited thick basement membrane. Diabetic rats on Td showed improved cavernous organization with significant morphometric increases in the area percentage of smooth muscles and elastic tissue and a significant decrease of fibrous tissue. The Td-treated group showed enhanced erectile function (intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure) at 0.3, 0.5, 1, 3, and 5 Hz compared with diabetic group values at the respective frequencies (P <.05) that approached control values. Chronic low-dose administration of Td in diabetic rats is associated with substantial improvement of the structure of penile cavernous tissue, with increased smooth muscles and elastic tissue, decreased fibrous tissue, and functional enhancement of the erectile function. This raises the idea that the change in penile architecture with Td treatment improves erectile function beyond its half-life and its direct pharmacologic action on phosphodiesterase type 5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE−/− Alzheimer's mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Stefan J.; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Braga-Tanaka, Ignacia; Tanaka, Satoshi; Neff, Frauke; Saran, Anna; Larsen, Martin R.; Tapio, Soile

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer's model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates. The radiation-induced changes in the phosphoproteome were associated with the control of synaptic plasticity, calcium-dependent signalling and brain metabolism. An inhibition of CREB signalling was found at both dose rates whereas Rac1-Cofilin signalling was found activated only at the lower dose rate. Similarly, the reduction in the number of activated microglia in the molecular layer of hippocampus that paralleled with reduced levels of TNFα expression and lipid peroxidation was significant only at the lower dose rate. Adult neurogenesis, investigated by Ki67, GFAP and NeuN staining, and cell death (activated caspase-3) were not influenced at any dose or dose rate. This study shows that several molecular targets induced by chronic low-dose-rate radiation overlap with those of Alzheimer's pathology. It may suggest that ionising radiation functions as a contributing risk factor to this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27708245

  10. Consequences of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure on the Hippocampal Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Patel, Neal H.; Craver, Brianna M.; Tran, Katherine K.; Giedzinski, Erich; Tseng, Bertrand P.; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    The response of the brain to irradiation is complex, involving a multitude of stress inducible pathways that regulate neurotransmission within a dynamic microenvironment. While significant past work has detailed the consequences of CNS radiotherapy following relatively high doses (≥ 45 Gy), few studies have been conducted at much lower doses (≤ 2 Gy), where the response of the CNS (like many other tissues) may differ substantially from that expected from linear extrapolations of high dose data. Low dose exposure could elicit radioadaptive modulation of critical CNS processes such as neurogenesis, that provide cellular input into hippocampal circuits known to impact learning and memory. Here we show that mice deficient for chemokine signaling through genetic disruption of the CCR2 receptor exhibit a neuroprotective phenotype. Compared to wild type (WT) animals, CCR2 deficiency spared reductions in hippocampal neural progenitor cell survival and stabilized neurogenesis following exposure to low dose irradiation. While radiation-induced changes in microglia levels were not found in WT or CCR2 deficient animals, the number of Iba1+ cells did differ between each genotype at the higher dosing paradigms, suggesting that blockade of this signaling axis could moderate the neuroinflammatory response. Interestingly, changes in proinflammatory gene expression were limited in WT animals, while irradiation caused significant elevations in these markers that were attenuated significantly after radioadaptive dosing paradigms in CCR2 deficient mice. These data point to the importance of chemokine signaling under low dose paradigms, findings of potential significance to those exposed to ionizing radiation under a variety of occupational and/or medical scenarios. PMID:26042591

  11. Consequences of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the hippocampal microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Patel, Neal H; Craver, Brianna M; Tran, Katherine K; Giedzinski, Erich; Tseng, Bertrand P; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    The response of the brain to irradiation is complex, involving a multitude of stress inducible pathways that regulate neurotransmission within a dynamic microenvironment. While significant past work has detailed the consequences of CNS radiotherapy following relatively high doses (≥ 45 Gy), few studies have been conducted at much lower doses (≤ 2 Gy), where the response of the CNS (like many other tissues) may differ substantially from that expected from linear extrapolations of high dose data. Low dose exposure could elicit radioadaptive modulation of critical CNS processes such as neurogenesis, that provide cellular input into hippocampal circuits known to impact learning and memory. Here we show that mice deficient for chemokine signaling through genetic disruption of the CCR2 receptor exhibit a neuroprotective phenotype. Compared to wild type (WT) animals, CCR2 deficiency spared reductions in hippocampal neural progenitor cell survival and stabilized neurogenesis following exposure to low dose irradiation. While radiation-induced changes in microglia levels were not found in WT or CCR2 deficient animals, the number of Iba1+ cells did differ between each genotype at the higher dosing paradigms, suggesting that blockade of this signaling axis could moderate the neuroinflammatory response. Interestingly, changes in proinflammatory gene expression were limited in WT animals, while irradiation caused significant elevations in these markers that were attenuated significantly after radioadaptive dosing paradigms in CCR2 deficient mice. These data point to the importance of chemokine signaling under low dose paradigms, findings of potential significance to those exposed to ionizing radiation under a variety of occupational and/or medical scenarios.

  12. Environmental exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation. Effects on early nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Bellés, Montserrat; Gonzalo, Sergio; Serra, Noemí; Esplugas, Roser; Arenas, Meritxell; Domingo, José Luis; Linares, Victoria

    2017-03-31

    Nuclear accidents of tremendous magnitude, such as those of Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011), mean that individuals living in the contaminated areas are potentially exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). However, the dose-response relationship for effects of low doses of radiation is not still established. The present study was aimed at investigating in mice the early effects of low-dose internal radiation exposure on the kidney. Adult male (C57BL/6J) mice were divided into three groups. Two groups received a single subcutaneous (s.c.) doses of cesium ((137)Cs) with activities of 4000 and 8000Bq/kg bw. A third group (control group) received a single s.c. injection of 0.9% saline. To evaluate acute and subacute effects, mice (one-half of each group) were euthanized at 72h and 10 days post-exposure to (137)Cs, respectively. Urine samples were collected for biochemical analysis, including the measurement of F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) levels. Moreover, the concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a sensitive marker of oxidative DNA damage, were measured in renal tissue. Urinary excretion of total protein significantly increased at 72h in mice exposed to Cs4000. Uric acid and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) decreased significantly at both times post-exposure in animals exposed to Cs8000. After 72h and 10d of exposure to Cs4000, a significant increase in the γ-glutamil transferase (GGT) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities was observed. In turn, F2-IsoP levels increased -mainly in the Cs4000 group- at 72h post-exposure. Following irradiation ((137)Cs), the highest level of KIM-1 was corresponded to the Cs4000 group at 72h. Likewise, the main DNA damage was detected in mice exposed to Cs4000, mainly at 10d after irradiation. The alterations observed in several biomarkers suggest an immediate renal damage following exposure to low doses of IR (given as (137)Cs). Further investigations are required to clarify

  13. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society

    PubMed Central

    Langie, Sabine A.S.; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H.; Brown, Dustin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K.; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A.; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome’s integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis. PMID:26106144

  14. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society.

    PubMed

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H; Brown, Dustin G; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R

    2015-06-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis.

  15. Behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities after exposure to low doses of high-energy iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Walter A.; Joseph, James A.; Rabin, Bernard M.

    Exposure of rats to high-energy iron particles (600 MeV/amu) has been found to alter behavior after doses as low as 10 rads. The performance of a task that measures upper body strength was significantly degraded after irradiation. In addition, an impairment in the regulation of dopamine release in the caudate nucleus (a motor center in the brain), lasting at least 6 months, was also found and correlated with the performance deficits. A general indication of behavioral toxicity and an index of nausea and emesis, the conditioned taste aversion, was also evident. The sensitivity to iron particles was 10-600 times greater than to gamma photons. These results suggest that behavioral and neurobiological damage may be a consequence of exposure to low doses of heavy particles and that this possibility should be extensively studied.

  16. Schizophrenia-like GABAergic gene expression deficits in cerebellar Golgi cells from rats chronically exposed to low-dose phencyclidine.

    PubMed

    Bullock, W Michael; Bolognani, Federico; Botta, Paolo; Valenzuela, C Fernando; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I

    2009-12-01

    One of the most consistent findings in schizophrenia is the decreased expression of the GABA synthesizing enzymes GAD(67) and GAD(65) in specific interneuron populations. This dysfunction is observed in distributed brain regions including the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. In an effort to understand the mechanisms for this GABA deficit, we investigated the effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist phencyclidine (PCP), which elicits schizophrenia-like symptoms in both humans and animal models, in a chronic, low-dose exposure paradigm. Adult rats were given PCP at a dose of 2.58 mg/kg/day i.p. for a month, after which levels of various GABAergic cell mRNAs and other neuromodulators were examined in the cerebellum by qRT-PCR. Administration of PCP decreased the expression of GAD(67), GAD(65), and the presynaptic GABA transporter GAT-1, and increased GABA(A) receptor subunits similar to those seen in patients with schizophrenia. Additionally, we found that the mRNA levels of two Golgi cell selective NMDAR subunits, NR2B and NR2D, were decreased in PCP-treated rats. Furthermore, we localized the deficits in GAD(67) expression solely to these interneurons. Slice electrophysiological studies showed that spontaneous firing of Golgi cells was reduced by acute exposure to low-dose PCP, suggesting that these neurons are particularly vulnerable to NMDA receptor antagonism. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic exposure to low levels of PCP in rats mimics the GABAergic alterations reported in the cerebellum of patients with schizophrenia (Bullock et al., 2008. Am. J. Psychiatry 165, 1594-1603), further supporting the validity of this animal model.

  17. Low-dose thoracoabdominal irradiation for the treatment of refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Robin, Marie; Guardiola, Philippe; Girinsky, Théodore; Hernandez, Gabriella; Espérou, Hélène; Ribaud, Patricia; Rocha, Vanderson; Garnier, Federico; Socié, Gérard; Gluckman, Eliane; Devergie, Agnès

    2005-09-15

    Half of the patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) do not achieve a complete remission with first-line therapy. No clear recommendations are available regarding second-line treatments. We retrospectively report our single-center experience of low-dose thoracoabdominal irradiation (1-Gy TAI) in 41 patients with refractory extensive chronic GvHD from 1983 to 2000. Median time from extensive chronic GvHD to TAI was one year (median GvHD episodes before TAI, n = 4). Eighty-two percent of the patients achieved a clinical response at a median of 34 days after TAI (range, 15-180). Best response rates were observed in fasciitis (79%), and oral GvHD lesions (73%). A complete clinical response was achieved in 11 patients by 2 years postTAI. Fifty-seven percent of the patients had at least a 50% reduction of their corticosteroid daily dose by 6 months postTAI. Probability of corticosteroid discontinuation was 38% by 2 years postTAI (95% CI, 23-56%). Two-year chronic GvHD relapse incidence was 34%. Ten-year survival from irradiation was 57% (95% CI, 42-78%); patients with fasciitis, lymphocytes >1.0 x 10/L, and platelets >200 x 10/L had a better outcome. TAI is a safe and efficient option in patients with refractory chronic GvHD, leading to a significant tapering of systemic corticosteroid dose in most cases.

  18. Investigations of putative reproductive toxicity of low-dose exposures to vinclozolin in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Flick, Burkhard; Schneider, Steffen; Melching-Kollmuss, Stephanie; Fussell, Karma C; Gröters, Sibylle; Buesen, Roland; Strauss, Volker; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2017-04-01

    The current investigation examines whether the fungicide vinclozolin, which has an anti-androgenic mode of action, is capable of disrupting endocrine homeostasis at very low doses. The data generated clarify whether a non-monotonic dose-response relationship exists to enhance the current debate about the regulation of endocrine disruptors. Moreover, it is part of a series of investigations assessing the dose-response relationship of single and combined administration of anti-androgenic substances. A pre-postnatal in vivo study design was chosen which was compliant with regulatory testing protocols. The test design was improved by additional endpoints addressing hormone levels, morphology and histopathological examinations. Doses were chosen to represent an effect level (20 mg/kg bw/d), the current NOAEL (4 mg/kg bw/d), and a dose close to the "ADI" (0.005 mg/kg bw/d) for the detection of a possible non-monotonic dose-response curve. Anti-androgenic changes were observable at the effect level but not at lower exposures. Nipple/areola counts appeared to be the most sensitive measure of effect, followed by male sex organ weights at sexual maturation, and finally gross and histopathological findings. The results indicate the absence of evidence for effects at low or very low dose levels. A non-monotonic dose-response relationship was not evident.

  19. Low-dose CT screening for lung cancer with automatic exposure control: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Shiho; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Tsuchiya, Ryosuke; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2008-07-01

    We conducted a study to determine optimal scan conditions for automatic exposure control (AEC) in computed tomography (CT) of low-dose chest screening in order to provide consistent image quality without increasing the collective dose. Using a chest CT phantom, we set CT-AEC scan conditions with a dose-reduction wedge (DR-Wedge) to the same radiation dose as those for low-tube current, fixed-scan conditions. Image quality was evaluated with the use of the standard deviation of the CT number, contrast-noise ratios (CNR), and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. At the same radiation dose, in the scan conditions using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge, the SD of the CT number of each slice position was stable. The CNR values were higher at the lung apex and lung base under CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge than under standard scan conditions (p < 0.0002). In addition, ROC analysis of blind evaluation by four radiologists and three technologists showed that the image quality was improved for the lung apex (p < 0.009), tracheal bifurcation (p < 0.038), and lung base (p < 0.022) in the scan conditions using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge. We achieved improvement of image quality without increasing the collective dose by using CT-AEC with the DR-Wedge under low-dose scan conditions.

  20. Pre- and Postnatal Exposure to Low Dose Glufosinate Ammonium Induces Autism-Like Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laugeray, Anthony; Herzine, Ameziane; Perche, Olivier; Hébert, Betty; Aguillon-Naury, Marine; Richard, Olivier; Menuet, Arnaud; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Lesné, Laurianne; Briault, Sylvain; Jegou, Bernard; Pichon, Jacques; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Mortaud, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Glufosinate ammonium (GLA) is one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture. As is the case for most pesticides, potential adverse effects of GLA have not been studied from the perspective of developmental neurotoxicity. Early pesticides exposure may weaken the basic structure of the developing brain and cause permanent changes leading to a wide range of lifelong effects on health and/or behavior. Here, we addressed the developmental impact of GLA by exposing female mice to low dose GLA during both pre- and postnatal periods and analyzed potential developmental and behavioral changes of the offspring during infancy and adulthood. A neurobehavioral test battery revealed significant effects of GLA maternal exposure on early reflex development, pup communication, affiliative behaviors, and preference for social olfactory cues, but emotional reactivity and emotional memory remained unaltered. These behavioral alterations showed a striking resemblance to changes seen in animal models of Autistic Spectrum Disorders. At the brain level, GLA maternal exposure caused some increase in relative brain weight of the offspring. In addition, reduced expression of Pten and Peg3 – two genes implicated in autism-like deficits – was observed in the brain of GLA-exposed pups at postnatal day 15. Our work thus provides new data on the link between pre- and postnatal exposure to the herbicide GLA and the onset of autism-like symptoms later in life. It also raises fundamental concerns about the ability of current safety testing to assess risks of pesticide exposure during critical developmental periods. PMID:25477793

  1. In utero exposure to low doses of environmental pollutants disrupts fetal ovarian development in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Paul A.; Dorà, Natalie J.; McFerran, Helen; Amezaga, Maria R.; Miller, David W.; Lea, Richard G.; Cash, Phillip; McNeilly, Alan S.; Evans, Neil P.; Cotinot, Corinne; Sharpe, Richard M.; Rhind, Stewart M.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of the impact of environmental chemicals on reproductive health demonstrate consequences of exposure but establishing causative links requires animal models using ‘real life’ in utero exposures. We aimed to determine whether prolonged, low-dose, exposure of pregnant sheep to a mixture of environmental chemicals affects fetal ovarian development. Exposure of treated ewes (n = 7) to pollutants was maximized by surface application of processed sewage sludge to pasture. Control ewes (n = 10) were reared on pasture treated with inorganic fertilizer. Ovaries and blood were collected from fetuses (n = 15 control and n = 8 treated) on Day 110 of gestation for investigation of fetal endocrinology, ovarian follicle/oocyte numbers and ovarian proteome. Treated fetuses were 14% lighter than controls but fetal ovary weights were unchanged. Prolactin (48% lower) was the only measured hormone significantly affected by treatment. Treatment reduced numbers of growth differentiation factor (GDF9) and induced myeloid leukaemia cell differentiation protein (MCL1) positive oocytes by 25–26% and increased pro-apoptotic BAX by 65% and 42% of protein spots in the treated ovarian proteome were differently expressed compared with controls. Nineteen spots were identified and included proteins involved in gene expression/transcription, protein synthesis, phosphorylation and receptor activity. Fetal exposure to environmental chemicals, via the mother, significantly perturbs fetal ovarian development. If such effects are replicated in humans, premature menopause could be an outcome. PMID:18436539

  2. Complex mixtures: relevance of combined exposure to substances at low dose levels.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Winfried R; Krul, Lisette; Houben, Geert F

    2013-08-01

    Upon analysis of chemically complex food matrices a forest of peaks is likely to be found. Identification of these peaks and concurrent determination of the toxicological relevance upon exposure is very time consuming, expensive and often requires animal studies. Recently, a safety assessment framework based on the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) was published to assess the safety of chemically complex matrices more efficiently. In this safety assessment framework, the toxicological relevance of exposure to unidentified substances in chemically complex food matrices can be related to the Cramer class III TTC threshold, currently set at 90 μg/day. However, possible additive or synergistic effects of combined exposure is not covered. The current evaluation describes the relevance of combined low dose exposure to unidentified substances in chemically complex food matrices. It is concluded that to some extent cumulative effects at exposure levels for each substance at or below the Cramer class III TTC threshold, being present in a complex mixture including food, might occur. However the health relevance of possible cumulative effects at this dose level is considered to be that low that a need for a correction factor to cover possible cumulative effects is very low to absent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Radiation situation prognosis for deep space: reactions of water and living systems to chronic low-dose ionizing irradiation].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Tsetlin, V V; Moisa, S S

    2013-01-01

    The authors review the findings of researches into the effects of low-dose ionizing irradiation on diverse biological objects (embryonic Japanese quails, Aspergillus niger, Spirostomum ambiguum Ehrbg., mesenchymal stem cells from mouse marrow, dry higher plants seeds, blood lymphocytes from pilots and cosmonauts). Model experiments with chronic exposure to ionizing radiation doses comparable with the measurements inside orbital vehicles and estimations for trips through the interplanetary space resulted in morphological disorders (embryonic Japanese quails, Aspergillus niger), radiation hormesis (Aspergillus niger, MSCs from mouse marrow), increase in the seed germination rate, inhibition of Spirostomum spontaneous activity, DNA damages, chromosomal aberrations, and increase of the blood lymphocytes reactivity to additional radiation loading. These facts give grounds to assume that the crucial factor in the radiation outcomes is changes in liquid medium. In other words, during extended orbiting within the magnetosphere region and interplanetary missions ionizing radiation affects primarily liquids of organism and, secondarily, its morphofunctional structures.

  4. Low-Dose Inorganic Mercury Increases Severity and Frequency of Chronic Coxsackievirus-Induced Autoimmune Myocarditis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nyland, Jennifer F.; Fairweather, DeLisa; Shirley, Devon L.; Davis, Sarah E.; Rose, Noel R.; Silbergeld, Ellen K.

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a widespread environmental contaminant with neurotoxic impacts that have been observed over a range of exposures. In addition, there is increasing evidence that inorganic mercury (iHg) and organic mercury (including methyl mercury) have a range of immunotoxic effects, including immune suppression and induction of autoimmunity. In this study, we investigated the effect of iHg on a model of autoimmune heart disease in mice induced by infection with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). We examined the role of timing of iHg exposure on disease; in some experiments, mice were pretreated with iHg (200 μg/kg, every other day for 15 days) before disease induction with virus inoculation, and in others, they were treated with iHg after the acute (viral) phase of disease but before the development of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). iHg alone had no effect on heart pathology. Pretreatment with iHg before CVB3 infection significantly increased the severity of chronic myocarditis and DCM compared with control animals receiving vehicle alone. In contrast, treatment with iHg after acute myocarditis did not affect the severity of chronic disease. The increased chronic myocarditis, fibrosis, and DCM induced by iHg pretreatment were not due to increased viral replication in the heart, which was unaltered by iHg treatment. iHg pretreatment induced a macrophage infiltrate and mixed cytokine response in the heart during acute myocarditis, including significantly increased interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels. IL-17 levels were also significantly increased in the spleen during chronic disease. Thus, we show for the first time that low-dose Hg exposure increases chronic myocarditis and DCM in a murine model. PMID:21984480

  5. Gene expression profiling in the fetal cardiac tissue after folate and low dose trichloroethylene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Patricia T.; Manziello, Ann; Howard, Jamie; Palbykin, Brittany; Runyan, Raymond B.; Selmin, Ornella

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies show gene expression alterations in rat embryo hearts and cell lines that correspond to the cardio-teratogenic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) in animal models. One potential mechanism of TCE teratogenicity may be through altered regulation of calcium homeostatic genes with a corresponding inhibition of cardiac function. It has been suggested that TCE may interfere with the folic acid/methylation pathway in liver and kidney and alter gene regulation by epigenetic mechanisms. According to this hypothesis, folate supplementation in the maternal diet should counteract TCE effects on gene expression in the embryonic heart. Approach To identify transcriptional targets altered in the embryonic heart after exposure to TCE, and possible protective effects of folate, we used DNA microarray technology to profile gene expression in embryonic mouse hearts with maternal TCE exposure and dietary changes in maternal folate. Results Exposure to low doses of TCE (10ppb) caused extensive alterations in transcripts encoding proteins involved in transport, ion channel, transcription, differentiation, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis. Exogenous folate did not offset the effects of TCE exposure on normal gene expression and both high and low levels of folate produced additional significant changes in gene expression. Conclusions A mechanism where TCE induces a folate deficiency does not explain altered gene expression patterns in the embryonic mouse heart. The data further suggest that use of folate supplementation, in the presence of this toxin, may be detrimental and non-protective of the developing embryo. PMID:19813261

  6. Prenatal Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure in CD-1 Mice: Low-Dose Developmental Effects and Internal Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Macon, Madisa B.; Villanueva, LaTonya R.; Tatum-Gibbs, Katoria; Zehr, Robert D.; Strynar, Mark J.; Stanko, Jason P.; White, Sally S.; Helfant, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an environmental contaminant that causes adverse developmental effects in laboratory animals. To investigate the low-dose effects of PFOA on offspring, timed-pregnant CD-1 mice were gavage dosed with PFOA for all or half of gestation. In the full-gestation study, mice were administered 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg PFOA/kg body weight (BW)/day from gestation days (GD) 1–17. In the late-gestation study, mice were administered 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg PFOA/kg BW/day from GD 10–17. Exposure to PFOA significantly (p < 0.05) increased offspring relative liver weights in all treatment groups in the full-gestation study and in the 1.0 mg PFOA/kg group in the late-gestation study. In both studies, the offspring of all PFOA-treated dams exhibited significantly stunted mammary epithelial growth as assessed by developmental scoring. At postnatal day 21, mammary glands from the 1.0 mg/kg GD 10–17 group had significantly less longitudinal epithelial growth and fewer terminal end buds compared with controls (p < 0.05). Evaluation of internal dosimetry in offspring revealed that PFOA concentrations remained elevated in liver and serum for up to 6 weeks and that brain concentrations were low and undetectable after 4 weeks. These data indicate that PFOA-induced effects on mammary tissue (1) occur at lower doses than effects on liver weight in CD-1 mice, an observation that may be strain specific, and (2) persist until 12 weeks of age following full-gestational exposure. Due to the low-dose sensitivity of mammary glands to PFOA in CD-1 mice, a no observable adverse effect level for mammary developmental delays was not identified in these studies. PMID:21482639

  7. Analysis of a Low Dose Protocol to Reduce Patient Radiation Exposure During Percutaneous Coronary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Maccagni, Davide; Godino, Cosmo; Latib, Azeem; Azzalini, Lorenzo; Pazzanese, Vittorio; Chieffo, Alaide; Margonato, Alberto; Colombo, Antonio

    2017-01-15

    The cardiac catheterization laboratory is an important source of radiation for patients and operators and it is good practice to limit exposure as much as possible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of a radiological low dose protocol (LDP) in terms of reduction in patient radiation exposure during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). From November 2014 to October 2015, 906 consecutive patients who underwent PCI were evaluated. Of these, 571 patients (63%) were treated with the standard dose protocol (SDP) of 15 frames per second for cine acquisition and standard settings for fluoroscopy, and 335 patients (37%) with the LDP of 7.5 frames per second for cine acquisition and low-dose settings for fluoroscopy. In the LDP group, we observed a significant reduction of kerma area product (53.3 LDP vs 115 SDP Gycm(2), p <0.0001) and air kerma at interventional reference point (0.79 LDP vs 1.976 SDP Gy, p <0.0001). Marked differences were observed regarding the exceeding of International Commission on Radiological Protection and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements' air kerma at interventional reference point trigger level (cutoff for potential skin injuries), which were significantly lower in the LDP group (1.8% vs 7.2%, p <0.0001). Such difference was more relevant in complex PCI. In conclusion, the implementation of LDP allowed a marked reduction in patient dosimetric parameters for PCI and significantly reduced the risk of exceeding the International Commission on Radiological Protection/National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements trigger levels for potential skin injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Effect of long-term exposure to low dose gamma-irradiation on the rat thyroid status].

    PubMed

    Nadol'nik, L I; Netsetskaia, Z V; Vinogradov, V V

    2004-01-01

    The effect of long-term exposure to low-dose external radiation on the rat thyroid status was studied. The experiments were carried out on Wistar female rats. The single doses absorbed were 0.1; 0.25; 0.5 Gy. The rats were irradiated 20 times (5 days x 4 weeks). The animals were decapitated after 1, 30 and 180 days following the last irradiation. Blood serum was assayed for content of thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) radioimmunologically. The liver was spectrophotometrically assayed for thyroid-induced NADP-malatedehydrogenase (NADP-MDH). It was shown that the long-term 0.5-Gy irradiation of the animals induced a decrease in blood T4 and T3 concentrations 1.34-1.71-fold and 1.24-1.43-fold after 1, 30 and 180 days, respectively. The T3 level was diminished most pronouncedly after 1 day, whereas that of T4--after 30 days following the exposure. With the doses of 0.1 and 0.25 Gy absorbed, the T4 and T3 concentration remained unchanged throughout all the periods studied. The activity of NADP-MDH was decreased 1.55-2.46-fold in all the experimental animals, and it was held decreased after 180 days (1.43-1.50-fold) in 0.25- and 0.5-Gy-irradiated groups, which indicates a disturbance in thyroid hormone metabolism in rats exposed chronically to low-dose radiation. After 180 days, the experimental animals experienced an elevation of thyroid gland weight on 15-20%. The thyroid status disturbance seemed to be due to both inhibited T4 and T3 biosynthesis in thyroid and disturbed hormone peripheral metabolism under radiation exposure.

  9. Achieving Consistent Multiple Daily Low-Dose Bacillus anthracis Spore Inhalation Exposures in the Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Barnewall, Roy E.; Comer, Jason E.; Miller, Brian D.; Gutting, Bradford W.; Wolfe, Daniel N.; Director-Myska, Alison E.; Nichols, Tonya L.; Taft, Sarah C.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated low-level exposures to biological agents could occur before or after the remediation of an environmental release. This is especially true for persistent agents such as B. anthracis spores, the causative agent of anthrax. Studies were conducted to examine aerosol methods needed for consistent daily low aerosol concentrations to deliver a low-dose (less than 106 colony forming units (CFU) of B. anthracis spores) and included a pilot feasibility characterization study, acute exposure study, and a multiple 15 day exposure study. This manuscript focuses on the state-of-the-science aerosol methodologies used to generate and aerosolize consistent daily low aerosol concentrations and resultant low inhalation doses to rabbits. The pilot feasibility characterization study determined that the aerosol system was consistent and capable of producing very low aerosol concentrations. In the acute, single day exposure experiment, targeted inhaled doses of 1 × 102, 1 × 103, 1 × 104, and 1 × 105 CFU were used. In the multiple daily exposure experiment, rabbits were exposed multiple days to targeted inhaled doses of 1 × 102, 1 × 103, and 1 × 104 CFU. In all studies, targeted inhaled doses remained consistent from rabbit-to-rabbit and day-to-day. The aerosol system produced aerosolized spores within the optimal mass median aerodynamic diameter particle size range to reach deep lung alveoli. Consistency of the inhaled dose was aided by monitoring and recording respiratory parameters during the exposure with real-time plethysmography. Overall, the presented results show that the animal aerosol system was stable and highly reproducible between different studies and over multiple exposure days. PMID:22919662

  10. DNA fragmentation in leukocytes following repeated low dose sarin exposure in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Dave, J R; Connors, R A; Genovese, R F; Whipple, R A; Chen, R W; DeFord, S M; Moran, A V; Tortella, E C

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine levels of DNA fragmentation in blood leukocytes and parietal cortex from guinea pigs following repeated low-level exposure to the chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) sarin. Guinea pigs were injected (s.c.) once a day for 10 days with saline, or 0.1, 0.2, or 0.4 LD50 (50% mean lethal dose) sarin dissolved in sterile physiological saline. Blood and parietal cortex was collected after injection at 0, 3, and 17 days recovery and evaluated for DNA fragmentation using single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). Cells were imaged using comet analysis software and three parameters of DNA fragmentation measured: tail length, percent DNA in the tail, and tail moment arm. Repeated low-dose exposure to sarin produced a dose-dependent response in leukocytes at 0 and 3 days post-exposure. There was a significant increase in all measures of DNA fragmentation at 0.2 and 0.4 LD50, but not at 0.1 LD50. There was no significant increase in DNA fragmentation in any of the groups at 17 days post-exposure. Sarin did not produce a systematic dose-dependent response in parietal cortex at any of the time points. However, significant increases in DNA fragmentation at 0.1 and 0.4 LD50 were observed at 0 and 3 days post-exposure. All measures of DNA fragmentation in both leukocytes and neurons returned to control levels by 17 days post-exposure, indicating a small and non-persistent increase in DNA fragmentation following repeated low-level exposure to sarin.

  11. Exposure to Low-Dose X-Ray Radiation Alters Bone Progenitor Cells and Bone Microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Lima, Florence; Swift, Joshua M; Greene, Elisabeth S; Allen, Matthew R; Cunningham, David A; Braby, Leslie A; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation during medical treatment exerts well-documented deleterious effects on bone health, reducing bone density and contributing to bone growth retardation in young patients and spontaneous fracture in postmenopausal women. However, the majority of human radiation exposures occur in a much lower dose range than that used in the radiation oncology clinic. Furthermore, very few studies have examined the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on bone integrity and results have been inconsistent. In this study, mice were irradiated with a total-body dose of 0.17, 0.5 or 1 Gy to quantify the early (day 3 postirradiation) and delayed (day 21 postirradiation) effects of radiation on bone microarchitecture and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Female BALBc mice (4 months old) were divided into four groups: irradiated (0.17, 0.5 and 1 Gy) and sham-irradiated controls (0 Gy). Micro-computed tomography analysis of distal femur trabecular bone from animals at day 21 after exposure to 1 Gy of X-ray radiation revealed a 21% smaller bone volume (BV/TV), 22% decrease in trabecular numbers (Tb.N) and 9% greater trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) compared to sham-irradiated controls (P < 0.05). We evaluated the differentiation capacity of bone marrow stromal cells harvested at days 3 and 21 postirradiation into osteoblast and adipocyte cells. Osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation was decreased when cells were harvested at day 3 postirradiation but enhanced in cells isolated at day 21 postirradiation, suggesting a compensatory recovery process. Osteoclast differentiation was increased in 1 Gy irradiated BMSCs harvested at day 3 postirradiation, but not in those harvested at day 21 postirradiation, compared to controls. This study provides evidence of an early, radiation-induced decrease in osteoblast activity and numbers, as well as a later recovery effect after exposure to 1 Gy of X-rays, whereas osteoclastogenesis was enhanced. A better

  12. Low-dose enoximone improves exercise capacity in chronic heart failure. Enoximone Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lowes, B D; Higginbotham, M; Petrovich, L; DeWood, M A; Greenberg, M A; Rahko, P S; Dec, G W; LeJemtel, T H; Roden, R L; Schleman, M M; Robertson, A D; Gorczynski, R J; Bristow, M R

    2000-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-dose enoximone on exercise capacity. At higher doses the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, enoximone, has been shown to increase exercise capacity and decrease symptoms in heart failure patients but also to increase mortality. The effects of lower doses of enoximone on exercise capacity and adverse events have not been evaluated. This is a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial (nine U.S. centers) conducted in 105 patients with New York Heart Association class II to III, ischemic or nonischemic chronic heart failure (CHF). Patients were randomized to placebo or enoximone at 25 or 50 mg orally three times a day. Treadmill maximal exercise testing was done at baseline and after 4, 8 and 12 weeks of treatment, using a modified Naughton protocol. Patients were also evaluated for changes in quality of life and for increased arrhythmias by Holter monitoring. By the protocol-specified method of statistical analysis (the last observation carried-forward method), enoximone at 50 mg three times a day improved exercise capacity by 117 s at 12 weeks (p = 0.003). Enoximone at 25 mg three times a day also improved exercise capacity at 12 weeks by 115 s (p = 0.013). No increases in ventricular arrhythmias were noted. There were four deaths in the placebo group and 2 and 0 deaths in the enoximone 25 mg three times a day and enoximone 50 mg three times a day groups, respectively. Effects on degree of dyspnea and patient and physician assessments of clinical status favored the enoximone groups. Twelve weeks of treatment with low-dose enoximone improves exercise capacity in patients with CHF, without increasing adverse events.

  13. Investigations of putative reproductive toxicity of low-dose exposures to flutamide in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Fussell, Karma C; Schneider, Steffen; Buesen, Roland; Groeters, Sibylle; Strauss, Volker; Melching-Kollmuss, Stephanie; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2015-12-01

    The current investigation examines whether the model anti-androgenic substance flutamide is capable of disrupting endocrine homeostasis at very low doses. The data generated clarify whether a non-monotonic dose-response relationship exists to enhance the current debate about the regulation of endocrine disruptors. Moreover, it is part of a series of investigations assessing the dose-response relationship of single and combined administration of anti-androgenic substances. A pre-postnatal in vivo study design was chosen, which was compliant with regulatory testing protocols. The test design was improved by additional endpoints addressing hormone levels, morphology, and histopathological examinations. Doses were chosen to represent a clear effect level (2.5 mg/kg bw/d), a low endocrine effect level (LOAEL, 0.25 mg/kg bw/d), a NOAEL for endocrine effects (0.025 mg/kg bw/d), a further dose at 0.0025 mg/kg bw/d flutamide, as well as an "ADI" (0.00025 mg/kg bw/d or 100-fold below the NOAEL) for the detection of a possible non-monotonic dose-response curve. Anti-androgenic changes were observable at LOAEL and the clear effect dose level but not at lower exposures. Nipple retention appeared to be the most sensitive measure of anti-androgenic effects, followed by age at sexual maturation, anogenital distance/anogenital index and male sex organ weights, as well as gross and histopathological findings. The results of all five doses indicate the absence of evidence for effects at very low dose levels. A non-monotonic dose-response relationship was not evident for the anti-androgenic drug flutamide.

  14. Effects of low-dose alcohol exposure on simulated merchant ship piloting by maritime cadets.

    PubMed

    Howland, J; Rohsenow, D J; Cote, J; Gomez, B; Mangione, T W; Laramie, A K

    2001-03-01

    The US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulates on-the-job alcohol use by operators of certain categories of commercial transport. For aircraft, trains, and commercial vessels, operators are subject to sanctions for having > or = 0.04 g% blood alcohol concentration (BAC). This study examines the effects of alcohol (between 0.04 and 0.05 g% BAC) on simulated merchant ship handling. A two-group randomized factorial design was used to compare beverage alcohol to placebo while controlling for baseline performance on a previous day. The study was conducted in the Maritime Simulation Center at Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME. Participants were 38 volunteer deck officer cadets in their junior or senior year, at least 21 years of age, with previous experience on a bridge simulator. Following a baseline trial on Day 1, on Day 2 participants were randomized to receive alcohol (0.6 g/kg for males and 0.5 g/kg for females) or placebo. After allowing time for absorption, participants completed a bridge simulator task. For baseline and performance trials, participants were randomized to one of four bridge simulator scenarios, each representing passage of a fully loaded container vessel through a channel with commercial traffic. The aggregate scenario score given by blinded maritime educators measured performance. A main effect for alcohol was found indicating that performance was significantly impaired by this low dose of alcohol relative to performance in the placebo condition. These findings are consistent with current federal regulations that limit low-dose alcohol exposure for the operators of commercial transport vehicles. Further research is required to determine effects at lower BACs.

  15. Thyroid Cancer Following Childhood Low-Dose Radiation Exposure: A Pooled Analysis of Nine Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Jay H; Adams, M Jacob; Shore, Roy; Holmberg, Erik; Schneider, Arthur B; Hawkins, Michael M; Robison, Leslie L; Inskip, Peter D; Lundell, Marie; Johansson, Robert; Kleinerman, Ruth A; de Vathaire, Florent; Damber, Lena; Sadetzki, Siegal; Tucker, Margaret; Sakata, Ritsu; Veiga, Lene H S

    2017-07-01

    The increased use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that involve radiation raises concerns about radiation effects, particularly in children and the radiosensitive thyroid gland. Evaluation of relative risk (RR) trends for thyroid radiation doses <0.2 gray (Gy); evidence of a threshold dose; and possible modifiers of the dose-response, e.g., sex, age at exposure, time since exposure. Pooled data from nine cohort studies of childhood external radiation exposure and thyroid cancer with individualized dose estimates, ≥1000 irradiated subjects or ≥10 thyroid cancer cases, with data limited to individuals receiving doses <0.2 Gy. Cohorts included the following: childhood cancer survivors (n = 2); children treated for benign diseases (n = 6); and children who survived the atomic bombings in Japan (n = 1). There were 252 cases and 2,588,559 person-years in irradiated individuals and 142 cases and 1,865,957 person-years in nonirradiated individuals. There were no interventions. Incident thyroid cancers. For both <0.2 and <0.1 Gy, RRs increased with thyroid dose (P < 0.01), without significant departure from linearity (P = 0.77 and P = 0.66, respectively). Estimates of threshold dose ranged from 0.0 to 0.03 Gy, with an upper 95% confidence bound of 0.04 Gy. The increasing dose-response trend persisted >45 years after exposure, was greater at younger age at exposure and younger attained age, and was similar by sex and number of treatments. Our analyses reaffirmed linearity of the dose response as the most plausible relationship for "as low as reasonably achievable" assessments for pediatric low-dose radiation-associated thyroid cancer risk.

  16. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure, Oxidative Stress and Epigenetic Programing of Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Sreetharan, Shayenthiran; Kulesza, Adomas V; Boreham, Douglas R; Tai, T C

    2017-07-28

    Ionizing radiation exposure from medical diagnostic imaging has greatly increased over the last few decades. Approximately 80% of patients who undergo medical imaging are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR). Although there is widespread consensus regarding the harmful effects of high doses of radiation, the biological effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) LDIR is not well understood. LDIR is known to promote oxidative stress, however, these levels may not be large enough to result in genomic mutations. There is emerging evidence that oxidative stress causes heritable modifications via epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNA regulation). These epigenetic modifications result in permanent cellular transformations without altering the underlying DNA nucleotide sequence. This review summarizes the major concepts in the field of epigenetics with a focus on the effects of low-LET LDIR (<100 mGy) and oxidative stress on epigenetic gene modification. In this review, we show evidence that suggests that LDIR-induced oxidative stress provides a mechanistic link between LDIR and epigenetic gene regulation. We also discuss the potential implication of LDIR exposure during pregnancy where intrauterine fetal development is highly susceptible to oxidative stress-induced epigenetic programing.

  17. Comparative toxicity of low dose tributyltin chloride on serum, liver, lung and kidney following subchronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sumonto; Gera, Ruchi; Singh, Vikas; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2014-02-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) pollution is rampant worldwide and is a growing threat due to its bio-accumulative property. Isolated studies of TBT toxicity on different organs are available but consolidated information is greatly lacking. We planned this study to delineate the effect of subchronic (1 month) exposure to low dose TBT-chloride (TBTC) (1 and 5 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. Total tin concentration was found to be significantly increased in liver, kidney and blood, and marginally in lungs. Organo-somatic indices were seen to be altered with little effect on serum biochemical markers (liver and kidney function, and general parameters). Reactive oxygen species but not lipid peroxidation content was observed to be significantly elevated both in the tissues and serum. TBTC was found to act as a hyperlipidemic agent and it also affected heme biosynthetic pathway. Hematological analysis showed that TBTC exposure resulted in minor alterations in RBC parameters. Histological studies demonstrated marked tissue damage in all the 3 organs. Calcium inhibitors (BAPTA-AM, EGTA) and antioxidants (NAC, C-PC) significantly restored TBTC induced loss in cell viability, under ex-vivo conditions. Antioxidants were evidently more efficient in comparison to the calcium inhibitors, implying major role of oxidative stress pathways in TBTC toxicity.

  18. Pulmonary Injury after Combined Exposures to Low-Dose Low-LET Radiation and Fungal Spores

    PubMed Central

    Marples, B.; Downing, L.; Sawarynski, K. E.; Finkelstein, J. N.; Williams, J. P.; Martinez, A. A.; Wilson, G. D.; Sims, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to infectious microbes is a likely confounder after a nuclear terrorism event. In combination with radiation, morbidity and mortality from an infection may increase significantly. Pulmonary damage after low-dose low-LET irradiation is characterized by an initial diffuse alveolar inflammation. By contrast, inhaled fungal spores produce localized damage around pulmonary bronchioles. In the present study, we assessed lung injury in C57BL/6 mice after combined exposures to whole-body X radiation and inhaled fungal spores. Either animals were exposed to Aspergillus spores and immediately irradiated with 2 Gy, or the inoculation and irradiation were separated by 8 weeks. Pulmonary injury was assessed at 24 and 48 h and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 weeks later using standard H&E-stained sections and compared with sham-treated age-matched controls. Immunohistochemistry for invasive inflammatory cells (macrophages, neutrophils and B and T lymphocytes) was performed. A semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary injury was made using three distinct parameters: local infiltration of inflammatory cells, diffuse inflammation, and thickening and distortion of alveolar architecture. Radiation-induced changes in lung architecture were most evident during the first 2 weeks postexposure. Fungal changes were seen over the first 4 weeks. Simultaneous combined exposures significantly increased the duration of acute pulmonary damage up to 24 weeks (P < 0.01). In contrast, administration of the fungus 8 weeks after irradiation did not produce enhanced levels of acute pulmonary damage. These data imply that the inhalation of fungal spores at the time of a radiation exposure alters the susceptibility of the lungs to radiation-induced injury. PMID:21275606

  19. [Effect of low dose of gamma-radiation on the cellular content in the center of chronic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Klymenko, M O; Onyshchenko, M I

    2004-01-01

    On the model of chronic aseptic carrageenan-induced inflammation in rats it is shown that low dose-rate y-radiation of small dose (0.1 Gy) leads to the increase of fibroblast and macrophage proliferation in the inflammatory focus, and produces considerable decrease of lymphocyte emigration at all investigated radiation doses. Obtained data on stimulation of proliferation in the inflammatory focus with possible accumulation of DNA errors at depressed immunological supervision by lymphocytes can indirectly point to probability of oncogenous potential increase in the chronic inflammatory focus at low dose-rate gamma-irradiation.

  20. Long-term health effects of persistent exposure to low-dose lr192 gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Zujun; Li, Li; Xiao, Zhifang; Liu, Zenghui; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Hui; Su, Lei; Xiao, Yang

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of persistent low-dose iridium-192 (Ir192) exposure on immunological function, chromosome aberration and the telomerase activity of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs), in order to increase clinical knowledge of the late effects of persistent low-dose Ir192 gamma-ray exposure. Patients (n=54) accidentally exposed to persistent low-dose Ir192 were included in this 10-year follow-up study. Clinical symptoms, peripheral blood, bone marrow, cellular and humoral immune status, chromosome aberrations and the telomerase activity of BMNCs were analyzed in this study. Exposure to low-dose Ir192 resulted in different degrees of clinical symptoms and significantly lowered complement C3 and C4 levels, CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell levels, the lymphocyte transformation rate and the percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. It also led to increases in peripheral blood and bone marrow abnormality rates, chromosome aberration rate and BMNC telomerase activity. Exposure to persistent low-dose Ir192 radiation resulted in different degrees of immune dysfunction, and abnormalities of blood cells and bone marrow, which recovered within 1-3 years. Chromosome aberrations were observed to take 5-10 years to recover. However, it would take >10 years for the telomerase activity of BMNCs to be reduced to normal levels. A prolonged follow-up time is required in order to monitor clonal proliferative diseases such as leukemia.

  1. Long-term health effects of persistent exposure to low-dose lr192 gamma-rays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongbo; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Zujun; Li, Li; Xiao, Zhifang; Liu, Zenghui; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Hui; Su, Lei; Xiao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of persistent low-dose iridium-192 (Ir192) exposure on immunological function, chromosome aberration and the telomerase activity of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs), in order to increase clinical knowledge of the late effects of persistent low-dose Ir192 gamma-ray exposure. Patients (n=54) accidentally exposed to persistent low-dose Ir192 were included in this 10-year follow-up study. Clinical symptoms, peripheral blood, bone marrow, cellular and humoral immune status, chromosome aberrations and the telomerase activity of BMNCs were analyzed in this study. Exposure to low-dose Ir192 resulted in different degrees of clinical symptoms and significantly lowered complement C3 and C4 levels, CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell levels, the lymphocyte transformation rate and the percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. It also led to increases in peripheral blood and bone marrow abnormality rates, chromosome aberration rate and BMNC telomerase activity. Exposure to persistent low-dose Ir192 radiation resulted in different degrees of immune dysfunction, and abnormalities of blood cells and bone marrow, which recovered within 1–3 years. Chromosome aberrations were observed to take 5–10 years to recover. However, it would take >10 years for the telomerase activity of BMNCs to be reduced to normal levels. A prolonged follow-up time is required in order to monitor clonal proliferative diseases such as leukemia. PMID:27698774

  2. Low doses of glyphosate change the response of soybean to later glyphosate exposures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The stimulatory effect of low doses of toxic substances is known as hormesis. Many herbicides that cause severe injury to plants at recommended rates, promote growth or have other stimulatory effects at very low doses. The objective of this study was to evaluate glyphosate-induced hormesis in soyb...

  3. Murine neocortical histogenesis is perturbed by prenatal exposure to low doses of Bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Sugimoto, Tohru; Fushiki, Shinji

    2006-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to disrupt thyroid hormone function. We therefore studied whether prenatal exposure to low-doses of BPA affects the morphology and the expression of some genes related to brain development in the murine fetal neocortex. Pregnant mice were injected subcutaneously with 20 microg/kg of BPA daily from embryonic day 0 (E0). Control animals received vehicle alone. For evaluating cell proliferation, neuronal differentiation and migration, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected intraperitoneally into pregnant mice with various regimens and the brains were processed for immunohistochemistry. The total RNA was extracted from the embryonic telencephalon at various embryonic stages. The BrdU-labeled cells examined 1 hour after BrdU injection showed no differences between the BPA-treated and control groups (n = 10, each), which indicated that the proliferation of precursor cells was not affected. The BrdU-labeled cells, analysed 2 days after BrdU injection, were decreased in the ventricular zone of BPA-treated mice at E14.5 and E16.5, whereas they were increased in the cortical plate at E14.5 as compared with those in control mice (n = 10, each). Furthermore, the expression of Math3, Ngn2, Hes1, LICAM, and THRalpha was significantly upregulated at E14.5 in the BPA-treated group. These results suggested that BPA might disrupt normal neocortical development by accelerating neuronal differentiation/migration. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Response of phytoplankton community to low-dose atrazine exposure combined with phosphorus fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Pannard, Alexandrine; Le Rouzic, Bertrand; Binet, Françoise

    2009-07-01

    The effects of atrazine on a controlled phytoplankton community derived from a natural freshwater wetland exposed to low doses of this photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicide were examined. The community was exposed for 7 weeks to doses of 0.1, 1, and 10 microg L(-1) atrazine, combined with changes in nutrient concentration, and the photosynthetic activity, biomass, and community structure were noted during the experiment. Responses of the phytoplankton community were examined in terms of photosynthetic activity, biomass, and community structure. Significant effects of atrazine on the phytoplankton assemblage, in terms of primary production and community structure, were highlighted, even at doses as low as 1 and 0.1 microg L(-1), when associated with phosphorus fluctuations. The most abundant Chlorophyceae decreased in concentration with increasing atrazine dose, whereas cyanobacteria were more tolerant to atrazine, particularly with increased nutrient supply. The subinhibitory doses of atrazine used in the present study confirmed the higher sensitivity of long-term exposure of multispecies assemblages under resource competition. Our study supports the emerging hypothesis that the increasing prevalence of cyanobacterial blooms in European aquatic systems may result from a combination of unbalanced nutrient enrichment and selective pressures from multiple toxicants.

  5. Comparison of a low dose polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution with lactulose for treatment of chronic constipation

    PubMed Central

    Attar, A; Lemann, M; Ferguson, A; Halphen, M; Boutron, M; Flourie, B; Alix, E; Salmeron, M; Guillemot, F; Chaussade, S; Menard, A; Moreau, J; Naudin, G; Barthet, M

    1999-01-01

    Background—Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 is a non-absorbable, non-metabolised osmotic agent used in lavage solutions for gut cleansing. 
Aims—To compare the efficacy of PEG and lactulose in chronic constipation. 
Methods—A total of 115 patients with chronic constipation entered a multicentre, randomised, comparative trial. They initially received two sachets containing either PEG (13 g/sachet) or lactulose (10 g/sachet) and were given an option to change the dose to one or three sachets/day, depending on response. 
Results—Ninety nine patients completed the trial. After four weeks, patients in the PEG group (n=50) had a higher number of stools and a lower median daily score for straining at stool than patients in the lactulose group (n=49). Overall improvement was greater in the PEG group. Clinical tolerance was similar in the two groups, but flatus was less frequently reported in the PEG group. The mean number of liquid stools was higher in the PEG group but the difference was significant only for the first two weeks. There were no serious adverse events and no significant change in laboratory tests in either group. At the end of the study, the number of sachets used by the patients was 1.6 (0.7)/day in the PEG group and 2.1 (0.7)/day in the lactulose group. Sixty one patients completed a further two months open study of one to three sachets PEG daily; there was no loss of efficacy and no serious toxicity. 
Conclusion—Low dose PEG 3350 was more effective than lactulose and better tolerated. 

 Keywords: constipation; polyethylene glycol; lactulose; cathartics; randomised trial PMID:9895382

  6. Influence of a pre-stimulation with chronic low-dose UVB on stress response mechanisms in human skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Drigeard Desgarnier, Marie-Catherine; Fournier, Frédéric; Droit, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet type B (UVB), through the induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), is the major risk factor for cutaneous cancer. Cells respond to UV-induced CPD by triggering the DNA damage response (DDR) responsible for signaling DNA repair, programmed cell death and cell cycle arrest. Underlying mechanisms implicated in the DDR have been extensively studied using single acute UVB irradiation. However, little is known concerning the consequences of chronic low-dose of UVB (CLUV) on the DDR. Thus, we have investigated the effect of a CLUV pre-stimulation on the different stress response pathways. We found that CLUV pre-stimulation enhances CPD repair capacity and leads to a cell cycle delay but leave residual unrepaired CPD. We further analyzed the consequence of the CLUV regimen on general gene and protein expression. We found that CLUV treatment influences biological processes related to the response to stress at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. This overview study represents the first demonstration that human cells respond to chronic UV irradiation by modulating their genotoxic stress response mechanisms. PMID:28301513

  7. Influence of a pre-stimulation with chronic low-dose UVB on stress response mechanisms in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drigeard Desgarnier, Marie-Catherine; Fournier, Frédéric; Droit, Arnaud; Rochette, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet type B (UVB), through the induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), is the major risk factor for cutaneous cancer. Cells respond to UV-induced CPD by triggering the DNA damage response (DDR) responsible for signaling DNA repair, programmed cell death and cell cycle arrest. Underlying mechanisms implicated in the DDR have been extensively studied using single acute UVB irradiation. However, little is known concerning the consequences of chronic low-dose of UVB (CLUV) on the DDR. Thus, we have investigated the effect of a CLUV pre-stimulation on the different stress response pathways. We found that CLUV pre-stimulation enhances CPD repair capacity and leads to a cell cycle delay but leave residual unrepaired CPD. We further analyzed the consequence of the CLUV regimen on general gene and protein expression. We found that CLUV treatment influences biological processes related to the response to stress at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels. This overview study represents the first demonstration that human cells respond to chronic UV irradiation by modulating their genotoxic stress response mechanisms.

  8. [Morphometric analysis of follicular structure of the thyroid gland after chronic low-dose gamma-irradiation].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, A V; Ermakova, O V; Korableva, T V; Raskosha, O V

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative study of follicle average cross-sectional diameter distribution was conducted in the thyroid gland (TG) of mouse like rodents (25 tundra voles, 24 CBA mice, 16 Wistar rats) after chronic exposure to low-level external y-radiation both in the environment and under the experimental condition (absorbed dose range 0.05-0.5 Gy). Spectrum analysis of TG follicle cross-sectional diameter distribution in the irradiated animals has demonstrated a universal regularity: in comparison with the unirradiated animals there was a significant (1.3-1.7-fold) increase in content of small follicles (with a cross-sectional diameter lower than 36-41 microm in the studied animal species). A similar phenomenon was reproduced in the model experiments (TG regeneration in rats after hemithyroidectomy). The observed activation of the folliculogenesis processes after chronic low-dose irradiation in small doses may be interpreted as a nonspecific adaptive reaction of TG to radiation induced damage of its parenchyma.

  9. Survey on low-dose medical radiation exposure in occupational workers: the effect on hematological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J. K.; Cho, S. M.; Cho, J. H.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Lee, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the changes in the hematological index caused by low-dose medical radiation exposure in workers in a medical radiation-exposed environment. The cumulative dose was obtained using thermoluminescent dosimeters over a 9-year period, and the changes in hematological index count (red blood cells (RBCs), hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cells (WBCs), monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, and eosinophils) were examined in both the occupational workers and controls. In total, 370 occupational workers and 335 controls were compared. The analysis led to the following observations: (1) The average cumulative dose in males and females was 9.65±15.2 and 4.82±5.55 mSv, respectively. (2) In both males and females, there was a very low correlation between the occupation period and the cumulative dose (r<±0.25). (3) When the occupation period was longer, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the male workers and the RBC counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the WBC counts both decreased and increased in the workers and the eosinophil counts were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.01). (4) When the cumulative dose was large, the lymphocyte counts decreased in male workers and the platelet count was lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). In females, the lymphocyte count and RBC count were lower in the workers than in the control group (p<0.05). Abnormal distributions of some blood indices were observed in the occupational radiation workers compared with the controls. Attempts were made to limit radiation exposure to personnel, but the employees did not always follow the preset rules. Actually, the adverse effects of low-level radiation were attributed to probability. Overall, workers should obey the radiation protection regulations provided by the government and a national system of radiation protection is needed.

  10. Tissue toxicokinetics of perfluoro compounds with single and chronic low doses in male rats.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Katsumi; Senzaki, Norimasa; Mazawa, Daichi; Sato, Itaru; Hara, Michihiro; Ueda, Fukiko; Liu, Wei; Tsuda, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    To examine the kinetics of low doses of perfluoro compounds (PFCs), we administered perfluorohexanoic acid (C6A), perfluorooctanoic acid (C8A), perfluorononanoic acid (C9A) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (C8S) with a single oral dose (50-100 μg/kg BW), and in drinking water at 1, 5, and 25 μg/L for one and three months to male rats; and examined the distribution in the brain, heart, liver, spleen, kidney, whole blood and serum. C6A was very rapidly absorbed, distributed and eliminated from the tissues with nearly the same tissue t1/2 of 2-3 hr. Considering serum Vd, and the tissue delivery, C6A was mainly in the serum with the lowest delivery to the brain; and no tissue accumulation was observed in the chronic studies as estimated from the single dose study. For the other PFCs, the body seemed to be an assortment of independent one-compartments with a longer elimination t1/2 for the liver than the serum. The concentration ratio of liver/serum increased gradually from C0 to a steady state. The high binding capacity of plasma protein may be the reason for the unusual kinetics, with only a very small fraction of free PFCs moving gradually to the liver. Although the tissue specific distribution was time dependent and different among the PFCs, the Vd and ke of each tissue were constant throughout the study. The possibility of extremely high C6A accumulation in the human brain and liver was suggested, by comparing the steady state tissue concentration of this study with the human data reported by Pérez et al. (2013).

  11. Increased mitochondrial DNA copy number in occupations associated with low-dose benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Carugno, Michele; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Bollati, Valentina; Albetti, Benedetta; Byun, Hyang-Min; Bonzini, Matteo; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cocco, Pierluigi; Satta, Giannina; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Cipolla, Massimo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Benzene is an established leukemogen at high exposure levels. Although low-level benzene exposure is widespread and may induce oxidative damage, no mechanistic biomarkers are available to detect biological dysfunction at low doses. Our goals were to determine in a large multicenter cross-sectional study whether low-level benzene is associated with increased blood mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn, a biological oxidative response to mitochondrial DNA damage and dysfunction) and to explore potential links between mtDNAcn and leukemia-related epigenetic markers. We measured blood relative mtDNAcn by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 341 individuals selected from various occupational groups with low-level benzene exposures (> 100 times lower than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration/European Union standards) and 178 referents from three Italian cities (Genoa, Milan, Cagliari). In each city, benzene-exposed participants showed higher mtDNAcn than referents: mtDNAcn was 0.90 relative units in Genoa bus drivers and 0.75 in referents (p = 0.019); 0.90 in Milan gas station attendants, 1.10 in police officers, and 0.75 in referents (p-trend = 0.008); 1.63 in Cagliari petrochemical plant workers, 1.25 in referents close to the plant, and 0.90 in referents farther from the plant (p-trend = 0.046). Using covariate-adjusted regression models, we estimated that an interquartile range increase in personal airborne benzene was associated with percent increases in mtDNAcn equal to 10.5% in Genoa (p = 0.014), 8.2% (p = 0.008) in Milan, 7.5% in Cagliari (p = 0.22), and 10.3% in all cities combined (p < 0.001). Using methylation data available for the Milan participants, we found that mtDNAcn was associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation (-2.41%; p = 0.007) and p15 hypermethylation (+15.95%, p = 0.008). Blood MtDNAcn was increased in persons exposed to low benzene levels, potentially reflecting mitochondrial DNA damage and dysfunction.

  12. Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Occupations Associated with Low-Dose Benzene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Bollati, Valentina; Albetti, Benedetta; Byun, Hyang-Min; Bonzini, Matteo; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cocco, Pierluigi; Satta, Giannina; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Cipolla, Massimo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background: Benzene is an established leukemogen at high exposure levels. Although low-level benzene exposure is widespread and may induce oxidative damage, no mechanistic biomarkers are available to detect biological dysfunction at low doses. Objectives: Our goals were to determine in a large multicenter cross-sectional study whether low-level benzene is associated with increased blood mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn, a biological oxidative response to mitochondrial DNA damage and dysfunction) and to explore potential links between mtDNAcn and leukemia-related epigenetic markers. Methods: We measured blood relative mtDNAcn by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 341 individuals selected from various occupational groups with low-level benzene exposures (> 100 times lower than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration/European Union standards) and 178 referents from three Italian cities (Genoa, Milan, Cagliari). Results: In each city, benzene-exposed participants showed higher mtDNAcn than referents: mtDNAcn was 0.90 relative units in Genoa bus drivers and 0.75 in referents (p = 0.019); 0.90 in Milan gas station attendants, 1.10 in police officers, and 0.75 in referents (p-trend = 0.008); 1.63 in Cagliari petrochemical plant workers, 1.25 in referents close to the plant, and 0.90 in referents farther from the plant (p-trend = 0.046). Using covariate-adjusted regression models, we estimated that an interquartile range increase in personal airborne benzene was associated with percent increases in mtDNAcn equal to 10.5% in Genoa (p = 0.014), 8.2% (p = 0.008) in Milan, 7.5% in Cagliari (p = 0.22), and 10.3% in all cities combined (p < 0.001). Using methylation data available for the Milan participants, we found that mtDNAcn was associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation (–2.41%; p = 0.007) and p15 hypermethylation (+15.95%, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Blood MtDNAcn was increased in persons exposed to low benzene levels, potentially reflecting mitochondrial

  13. Identification of molecular candidates and interaction networks via integrative toxicogenomic analysis in a human cell line following low-dose exposure to the carcinogenic metals cadmium and nickel.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jee Young; Weon, Jong-Il; Koedrith, Preeyaporn; Park, Kang-Sik; Kim, Im Soon; Seo, Young Rok

    2013-09-01

    Cadmium and nickel have been classified as carcinogenic to humans by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer. Given their prevalence in the environment, the fact that cadmium and nickel may cause diseases including cancer even at low doses is a cause for concern. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the toxicological effects induced by low-dose exposure to cadmium and nickel remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, it has recently been recognized that integrative analysis of DNA, mRNA and proteins is required to discover biomarkers and signaling networks relevant to human toxicant exposure. In the present study, we examined the deleterious effects of chronic low-dose exposure of either cadmium or nickel on global profiling of DNA copy number variation, mRNA and proteins. Array comparative genomic hybridization, gene expression microarray and functional proteomics were conducted, and a bioinformatics tool, which predicted signaling pathways, was applied to integrate data for each heavy metal separately and together. We found distinctive signaling networks associated with subchronic low-dose exposure to cadmium and nickel, and identified pathways common to both. ACTB, HSP90AA1, HSPA5 and HSPA8, which are key mediators of pathways related to apoptosis, proliferation and neoplastic processes, were key mediators of the same pathways in low-dose nickel and cadmium exposure in particular. CASP-associated signaling pathways involving CASP3, CASP7 and CASP9 were observed in cadmium-exposed cells. We found that HSP90AA1, one of the main modulators, interacted with HIF1A, AR and BCL2 in nickel-exposed cells. Interestingly, we found that HSP90AA1 was involved in the BCL2-associated apoptotic pathway in the nickel-only data, whereas this gene interacted with several genes functioning in CASP-associated apoptotic signaling in the cadmium-only data. Additionally, JUN and FASN were main modulators in nickel-responsive signaling pathways. Our

  14. Influence of chronic low-dose/dose-rate high-LET irradiation from radium-226 in a human colorectal carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nguyen T K; Sokeechand, Bibi S H; Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate potential damages of chronic environmentally relevant low-dose/dose-rate high-LET irradiation from a naturally occurring alpha-emitting radionuclide (radium-226, (226)Ra) on a human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 p53(+/+) cell line. Clonogenic survival assays and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) measurement with a sensitive fluorescent MMP probe JC-1 were performed in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells chronically exposure to low doses/dose rates of (226)Ra with high-LET. Comparisons were made with the human non-transformed keratinocyte HaCaT cell line and acute low-dose direct low-LET gamma radiation. The chronic low-dose/dose-rate alpha radiation (CLD/DRAR) did not reduce the clonogenic survival of HCT116 p53(+/+) cells over the period of 70 days of exposure. Only one significant reduction in the HCT116 p53(+/+) cells' clonogenic survival was when cells were grown with 10,000mBq/mL (226)Ra for 40 days and progeny cells were clonogenically assessed in the presence of 10,000mBq/mL (226)Ra. The cumulative doses that cells received during this period ranged from 0.05 to 46.2mGy. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dropped initially in both HCT116 p53(+/+) and HaCaT cells in response to CLD/DRAR. The MMP in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells recovered more quickly at all dose points than and that in HaCaT cells until the end of the exposure period. The highest dose rate of 0.66mGy/day depolarized the HaCaT's mitochondria more consistently during the exposure period. The faster recovery status of the MMP in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells than that in HaCaT cells was also observed after exposure to acute low-dose gamma rays. Overall, it was found that CLD/DRAR had little impact on the MMP of human colorectal cancer and keratinocyte cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic ingestion of a low dose of caffeine induces tolerance to the performance benefits of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Ross; Cordery, Philip; Funnell, Mark; Mears, Stephen; James, Lewis; Watson, Phillip

    2017-10-01

    This study examined effects of 4 weeks of caffeine supplementation on endurance performance. Eighteen low-habitual caffeine consumers (<75 mg · day(-1)) were randomly assigned to ingest caffeine (1.5-3.0 mg · kg(-1)day(-1); titrated) or placebo for 28 days. Groups were matched for age, body mass, V̇O2peak and Wmax (P > 0.05). Before supplementation, all participants completed one V̇O2peak test, one practice trial and 2 experimental trials (acute 3 mg · kg(-1) caffeine [precaf] and placebo [testpla]). During the supplementation period a second V̇O2peak test was completed on day 21 before a final, acute 3 mg · kg(-1) caffeine trial (postcaf) on day 29. Trials consisted of 60 min cycle exercise at 60% V̇O2peak followed by a 30 min performance task. All participants produced more external work during the precaf trial than testpla, with increases in the caffeine (383.3 ± 75 kJ vs. 344.9 ± 80.3 kJ; Cohen's d effect size [ES] = 0.49; P = 0.001) and placebo (354.5 ± 55.2 kJ vs. 333.1 ± 56.4 kJ; ES = 0.38; P = 0.004) supplementation group, respectively. This performance benefit was no longer apparent after 4 weeks of caffeine supplementation (precaf: 383.3 ± 75.0 kJ vs. postcaf: 358.0 ± 89.8 kJ; ES = 0.31; P = 0.025), but was retained in the placebo group (precaf: 354.5 ± 55.2 kJ vs. postcaf: 351.8 ± 49.4 kJ; ES = 0.05; P > 0.05). Circulating caffeine, hormonal concentrations and substrate oxidation did not differ between groups (all P > 0.05). Chronic ingestion of a low dose of caffeine develops tolerance in low-caffeine consumers. Therefore, individuals with low-habitual intakes should refrain from chronic caffeine supplementation to maximise performance benefits from acute caffeine ingestion.

  16. Corticosterone protects against memory impairments and reduced hippocampal BDNF levels induced by a chronic low dose of ethanol in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Latif, Liaque M; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie Christine

    2014-01-01

    Acute low doses of ethanol can produce reversible memory deficits, but it is unknown whether they persist upon chronic use. We investigated whether the chronic intake of a low dose of ethanol induces memory impairments in the ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J mouse strain. Because stress precipitates alcohol abuse and the stress hormone corticosterone contributes to memory processes, ethanol consumption and toxic effects, we also determined the impact of co-treatment with corticosterone on these effects. BDNF contributes to memory function and toxic effects of ethanol, therefore its levels were quantified in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Ethanol (1% in drinking water) and corticosterone (250 μg/mL) were administered using the two-bottle choice test to monitor their appetitive properties. Spatial and non-spatial memory performance was assessed using the spontaneous alternation, object recognition and object location tests. The chronic exposure to a low dose of ethanol caused spatial and non-spatial memory deficits after withdrawal associated with a reduction in hippocampal BDNF levels, which were prevented by co-treatment with corticosterone (~21 mg/kg/day). The protective effect of corticosterone on memory was no longer observed at higher doses (~41 mg/kg/day), but persisted for hippocampal BDNF levels. C57BL/6J mice did not develop an appetence for 1% ethanol, but the addition of corticosterone increased voluntary consumption of and preference for the ethanol+corticosterone solutions. Although acute low doses of corticosterone (1 mg/kg) were found to rescue established memory impairments, this is the first report of a protective effect of chronic doses of corticosterone in the range of 20-32 mg/kg, and particularly against memory deficits induced by alcohol.

  17. Obesity in the United States – Dysbiosis from Exposure to Low-Dose Antibiotics?

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Lee W.; Raphael, Eva; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in obesity prevalence in the United States in the last 20 years is unprecedented and not well explained. Here, we explore a hypothesis that the obesity epidemic may be driven by population-wide chronic exposures to low-residue antibiotics that have increasingly entered the American food chain over the same time period. We propose this hypothesis based on two recent bodies of published reports – (1) those that provide evidence for the spread of antibiotics into the American food chain, and (2) those that examine the relationship between the gut microbiota and body physiology. The livestock use of antimicrobial agents has sharply increased in the US over the same 20-year period of the obesity epidemic, especially with the expansion of intensified livestock production, such as the concentrated animal feeding operations. Observational and experimental studies support the idea that changes in the intestinal microbiota exert a profound effect on body physiology. We propose that chronic exposures to low-residue antimicrobial drugs in food could disrupt the equilibrium state of intestinal microbiota and cause dysbiosis that can contribute to changes in body physiology. The obesity epidemic in the United States may be partly driven by the mass exposure of Americans to food containing low-residue antimicrobial agents. While this hypothesis cannot discount the impact of diet and other factors associated with obesity, we believe studies are warranted to consider this possible driver of the epidemic. PMID:24392444

  18. Chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts after exposure to very low doses of high-LET radiation

    PubMed Central

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Chappell, Lori; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between biological effects and low doses of radiation is still uncertain, especially for high-LET radiation exposures. Estimates of risk from exposure to low doses and low dose rates are often extrapolated from the Japanese atomic bomb survivor data using either linear or linear-quadratic models fitted to dose–response data. In this study, we determined the dose–response for chromosome damage after exposure to very low doses of high-LET radiation and assessed the radiation qualities of Fe, Si and Oxygen ions. Materials and methods: Chromosomal aberrations (CA) were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts after exposure to very low doses (0.01–0.20 Gy) of 77-MeV/u oxygen (LET = 55 keV/µm), 170-MeV/u 28Si (LET = 99 keV/µm), or 56Fe ions with energies of 600- or 450-MeV/u (LET = 180 or 195 keV/µm). These exposures included doses that, on average, produce fewer than one in five direct ion traversals per cell nucleus. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and CA were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving more than two breaks in two or more chromosomes). The frequencies of CA in the painted chromosome(s) were evaluated as the ratio between aberrations scored and total cells analyzed. The dose–response for simple exchanges was assessed using a generalized linear model assuming binomial errors per number of chromosomes scored. The model coefficients were extrapolated to whole-genome equivalents. The linear dose–response denoted as the targete effects (TE) model considered the mean number of radiation tracks per cell. Two different non-targeted effect (NTE) models, P = P0 + αT + κ × I (NTE1), and P = P0 + αT (1 − e−T) + κe−T × I (NTE2), were compared with the simple linear model, P = P0 + αT. Akaike information

  19. Repeated low-dose organophosphate DFP exposure leads to the development of depression and cognitive impairment in a rat model of Gulf War Illness.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kristin F; Deshpande, Laxmikant S

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 175,000-250,000 of the returning veterans from the 1991 Persian Gulf War exhibit chronic multi-symptom illnesses that includes neurologic co-morbidities such as depression, anxiety and cognitive impairments. Amongst a host of causative factors, exposure to low levels of the nerve agent Sarin has been strongly implicated for expression of Gulf War Illness (GWI). Nerve agents similar to pesticides are organophosphate (OP) compounds. There is evidence from civilian population that exposure to OPs such as in agricultural workers and nerve agents such as the survivors and first-responders of the Tokyo subway Sarin gas attack suffer from chronic neurological problems similar to GWI symptoms. Given this unique chemical profile, OPs are ideal to study the effects of nerve agents and develop models of GWI in civilian laboratories. In this study, we used repeated low-dose exposure to OP agent diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) over a 5-day period to approximate the duration and level of Sarin exposure during the Persian Gulf War. We tested the rats at 3-months post DFP exposure. Using a battery of behavioral assays, we observed the presence of symptoms of chronic depression, anxiety and memory problems as characterized by increased immobility time in the Forced Swim Test, anhedonia in the Sucrose Preference Test, anxiety in the Elevated Plus Maze, and spatial memory impairments in the Object Location Test, respectively. Chronic low dose DFP exposure was also associated with hippocampal neuronal damage as characterized by the presence of Fluoro-Jade staining. Given that OP exposure is considered a leading cause of GWI related morbidities, this animal model will be ideally suited to study underlying molecular mechanisms for the expression of GWI neurological symptoms and identify drugs for the effective treatment of GWIs.

  20. Gestational and lactational exposure to low-dose bisphenol A increases Th17 cells in mice offspring.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shimeng; Li, Yun; Li, Yingpei; Zhu, Qixing; Jiang, Jianhua; Wu, Changhao; Shen, Tong

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) can cause immune disorders throughout the life span. However, the biological basis for these immune disorders is poorly understood and the effects of exposure to BPA on Th17 development are unknown. The present study sought to characterize alterations of Th17 cells in childhood and adulthood following gestational and lactational exposure to environmentally relevant low-dose of BPA and the underlying mechanisms. Pregnant dams were exposed to BPA (10, 100 or 1000nM) via drinking water from gestational day (GD) 0 to postnatal day (PND) 21. At PNDs 21 and 42, offspring mice were anesthetized, blood was obtained for cytokine assay and spleens were collected for Th17 cell frequency and RORγt mRNA expression analysis. Perinatal exposure to low-dose BPA resulted in a dose-dependent and gender-specific persistent rise in Th17 cells accompanied by an increase of RORγt mRNA expression in the offsprings. The contents of major Th17 cell-derived cytokines (IL-17 and IL-21) and those essential for Th17 cell differentiation (IL-6 and IL-23) were also increased compared to those in controls. These changes were more pronounced in female than in male offsprings. However, perinatal exposure to low-dose BPA had little effect on serum TGF-β, another key regulator for Th17 cell development. Our results suggest that gestational and lactational exposure to a low-dose of BPA can affect Th17 cell development via an action on its transcription factor and the regulatory cytokines. These findings provide novel insight into sustained immune disorders by BPA exposure during development.

  1. Low-dose spironolactone ameliorates insulin resistance and suppresses elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 during gestational testosterone exposure.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Lawrence A; Usman, Taofeek O; Akinade, Aminat I; Adeyanju, Oluwaseun A; Kim, InKyeom; Soladoye, Ayodele O

    2017-12-01

    Elevated gestational circulating testosterone has been associated with pathological pregnancies that increase the risk of development of cardiometabolic disorder in later life. We hypothesised that gestational testosterone exposure, in late pregnancy, causes glucose deregulation and atherogenic dyslipidaemia that would be accompanied by high plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The study also hypothesise that low-dose spironolactone treatment would ameliorate these effects. Pregnant Wistar rats received vehicle, testosterone (0.5 mg/kg; sc), spironolactone (0.5 mg/kg, po) or testosterone and spironolactone daily between gestational days 15 and 19. Gestational testosterone exposure led to increased HOMA-IR, circulating insulin, testosterone, 1-h post-load glucose, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, PLR, PAI-1 and MDA. However, all these effects, except that of circulating testosterone, were ameliorated by spironolactone. These results demonstrate that low-dose spironolactone ameliorates glucose deregulation and atherogenic dyslipidaemia during elevated gestational testosterone exposure, at least in part, by suppressing elevated PAI-1.

  2. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  3. Chronic low-dose γ-irradiation of Drosophila melanogaster larvae induces gene expression changes and enhances locomotive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cha Soon; Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Byung Sub; Lee, In Kyung; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Nam, Seon Young

    2015-01-01

    Although radiation effects have been extensively studied, the biological effects of low-dose radiation (LDR) are controversial. This study investigates LDR-induced alterations in locomotive behavior and gene expression profiles of Drosophila melanogaster. We measured locomotive behavior using larval pupation height and the rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay after exposure to 0.1 Gy γ-radiation (dose rate of 16.7 mGy/h). We also observed chronic LDR effects on development (pupation and eclosion rates) and longevity (life span). To identify chronic LDR effects on gene expression, we performed whole-genome expression analysis using gene-expression microarrays, and confirmed the results using quantitative real-time PCR. The pupation height of the LDR-treated group at the first larval instar was significantly higher (∼2-fold increase in PHI value, P < 0.05). The locomotive behavior of LDR-treated male flies (∼3 − 5 weeks of age) was significantly increased by 7.7%, 29% and 138%, respectively (P < 0.01), but pupation and eclosion rates and life spans were not significantly altered. Genome-wide expression analysis identified 344 genes that were differentially expressed in irradiated larvae compared with in control larvae. We identified several genes belonging to larval behavior functional groups such as locomotion (1.1%), oxidation reduction (8.0%), and genes involved in conventional functional groups modulated by irradiation such as defense response (4.9%), and sensory and perception (2.5%). Four candidate genes were confirmed as differentially expressed genes in irradiated larvae using qRT-PCR (>2-fold change). These data suggest that LDR stimulates locomotion-related genes, and these genes can be used as potential markers for LDR. PMID:25792464

  4. Low-dose exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) increases susceptibility to testicular autoimmunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Shuichi; Naito, Munekazu; Kuramasu, Miyuki; Ogawa, Yuki; Terayama, Hayato; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Shogo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) induces spermatogenic disturbance (SD) through oxidative stress, and affects the immune system by acting as an adjuvant. Recently, we reported that in mice, a low dose of DEHP, which did not affect spermatogenesis, was able to alter the testicular immune microenvironment. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) can be induced by repeated immunization with testicular antigens, and its pathology is characterized by production of autoantibodies and SD. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a low-dose DEHP on the susceptibility of mice to EAO. The exposure to DEHP-containing feed (0.01%) caused a modest functional damage to the blood-testis barrier (BTB) with an increase in testicular number of interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-positive cells and resulted in the production of autoantibodies targeting haploid cells, but did not affect spermatogenesis. While only single immunization with testicular antigens caused very mild EAO, the concurrent DEHP exposure induced severe EAO with significant increases in number of interferon gamma-positive cells and macrophages, as well as lymphocytic infiltration and serum autoantibody titer accompanied by severe SD. To summarize, the exposure of mice to the low-dose DEHP does not induce significant SD, but it may cause an increase in IFN-γ positive cells and modest functional damage to the BTB in the testis. These changes lead to an autoimmune response against haploid cell autoantigens, resulting in increased susceptibility to EAO.

  5. Low dose alpha interferon therapy can be effective in chronic active hepatitis C. Results of a multicentre, randomised trial.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tapias, J M; Forns, X; Ampurdanés, S; Titó, L; Planas, R; Viver, J M; Acero, D; Torres, M; Mas, P; Morillas, R; Forné, M; Espinós, J; Llovet, J M; Costa, J; Olmedo, E; López-Labrador, F X; Jiménez de Anta, M T; Rodés, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is some controversy concerning the efficacy of low dose alpha interferon therapy in chronic hepatitis C. AIMS--To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with low doses of alpha interferon in chronic hepatitis C. PATIENTS--One hundred and forty one patients with anti-HCV positive chronic active hepatitis C from six hospitals were enrolled in the study. METHODS--Patients were randomised to treatment with 5 MU (group A) or 1.5 MU (group B) injections. The dose was reduced in responders from group A or increased in non-responders from group B to maintain treatment with the minimal effective dose. Patients were treated for 48 weeks and followed up for 24 additional weeks with no treatment. Normalisation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was used to evaluate response. RESULTS--A sustained response was seen in eight patients from group A (12%) and in 15 (21%) from group B. This difference was not statistically significant. Increasing the dose of interferon led to sustained response in only five of 58 patients (9%) from group B who did not respond to 1.5 MU injections. In contrast, 15 of 21 patients (71%) in whom ALT remained normal with 1.5 MU injections developed a sustained response. By multivariate analysis sustained response seemed associated with young age and was more frequent in patients with genotype 3 HCV infection. Sustained response was preceded by a rapid normalisation of ALT and was inversely related to the amount of alpha interferon necessary to maintain ALT at low values during treatment. CONCLUSIONS--Some patients with chronic hepatitis C are very sensitive to alpha interferon and can be successfully treated with low doses. Treatment with higher doses may be effective in a minority of patients who do not respond to low doses. PMID:8707096

  6. Data Integration Reveals Key Homeostatic Mechanisms Following Low Dose Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J.; Morgan, William F.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time - with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24 – 72 hr). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress were measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 were experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation.

  7. Metabonomic analysis of urine from rats after low-dose exposure to 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol using UPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyan; He, Yujie; Lu, Huimin; Wang, Maoqing; Sun, Changhao; Na, Lixin; Li, Ying

    2013-05-15

    To study the toxic effect of chronic exposure to 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol (3-MCPD) at low doses, a metabonomics approach based on ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was performed. Two different doses of 3-MCPD (1.1 and 5.5mg/kg bw/d) were administered to Wistar rats for 120 days (1.1mg/kg bw/d: lowest observed adverse effect level [LOAEL]). The metabolite profiles and biochemical parameters were obtained at five time points after treatment. For the 3-MCPD-treated groups, a significant change in urinary N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase and β-d-galactosidase was detected on day 90, while some biomarkers based on the metabonomics, such as N-acetylneuraminic acid, N-acetyl-l-tyrosine, and gulonic acid, were detected on day 30. These results suggest that these biomarkers changed more sensitively and earlier than conventional biochemical parameters and were thus considered early and sensitive biomarkers of exposure to 3-MCPD; these biomarkers provide more information on toxicity than conventional biochemical parameters. These results might be helpful to investigate the toxic mechanisms of 3-MCPD and provide a scientific basis for assessing the effect of chronic exposure to low-dose 3-MCPD on human health.

  8. Low-dose interleukin-2 therapy restores regulatory T cell homeostasis in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Ken-ichi; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Bascug, O. Gregory; McDonough, Sean; Kawano, Yutaka; Murase, Kazuyuki; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Armand, Philippe; Blazar, Bruce R.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a central role in the maintenance of immune tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We recently reported that daily administration of low-dose IL-2 induces selective expansion of functional Treg and clinical improvement of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). To define the mechanisms of action of IL-2 therapy we examined the immunologic effects of this treatment on homeostasis of CD4 T cell subsets after transplant. We first demonstrate that chronic GVHD is characterized by constitutive phosphorylation of Stat5 in conventional CD4 T cells (Tcon) associated with elevated levels of IL-7 and IL-15 and relative functional deficiency of IL-2. IL-2 therapy resulted in the selective increase of Stat5 phosphorylation in Treg and decrease of pStat5 in Tcon. Over an eight-week period, IL-2 therapy induced a series of changes in Treg homeostasis, including increased proliferation, increased thymic export and enhanced resistance to apoptosis. Low-dose IL-2 had minimal effects on Tcon. These findings define the mechanisms whereby low-dose IL-2 therapy restores the homeostasis of CD4 T cell subsets and promotes the re-establishment of immune tolerance. PMID:23552371

  9. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Gola, Anna; Tzoulaki, Ioanna

    2009-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1) concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  10. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  11. Seizures associated with low-dose tramadol for chronic pain treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Sonbahar, Tuğba; Bayar, Fikret; Erdem, Ali Fuat

    2016-01-01

    The management of cancer pain still poses a major challenge for clinicians. Tramadol is a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic. Its well-known side effects include nausea, vomiting, and dizziness; seizures are a rare side effect. Some reports have found that tramadol triggers seizure activity at high doses, whereas a few preclinical studies have found that this seizure activity is not dose-related. We herein present a case involving a patient with laryngeal cancer who developed seizures while on low-dose oral tramadol. PMID:27212778

  12. [Adverse effects of low dose exposures to cadmium below renal damage level should be emphasized for human health effect studies].

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Wu, Y N

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the pollution of heavy metal, including lead, cadmium (Cd) and mercury, was one of the major environmental problems in China. Cd could cause adverse effects on kidney, bone, lung and reproductive system. Most of the past researches focused on renal damage effect, and some evidences suggestedadverse effects on bone, tumor, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and mineral elements, etc, which was occurred at low dose exposures to Cd below renal damage level. An important content of human health effect Studies on exposures to Cd is to follow up the development and consequences of adverse effects after long-term exposure to environmental Cd and then reduction or cessation of its exposure among this population. In this paper, the progress and development trend of long-term environmental exposure to Cd and its health damage effect were reviewed.

  13. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  14. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: the challenge ahead

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, William H.; Lowe, Leroy; Carpenter, David O.; Gilbertson, Michael; Manaf Ali, Abdul; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Lasfar, Ahmed; Carnero, Amancio; Azqueta, Amaya; Amedei, Amedeo; Charles, Amelia K.; Collins, Andrew R.; Ward, Andrew; Salzberg, Anna C.; Colacci, Anna Maria; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Berg, Arthur; Barclay, Barry J.; Zhou, Binhua P.; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Baglole, Carolyn J.; Dong, Chenfang; Mondello, Chiara; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Naus, Christian C.; Yedjou, Clement; Curran, Colleen S.; Laird, Dale W.; Koch, Daniel C.; Carlin, Danielle J.; Felsher, Dean W.; Roy, Debasish; Brown, Dustin G.; Ratovitski, Edward; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Corsini, Emanuela; Rojas, Emilio; Moon, Eun-Yi; Laconi, Ezio; Marongiu, Fabio; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Darroudi, Firouz; Martin, Francis L.; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Goldberg, Gary S.; Wagemaker, Gerard; Nangami, Gladys N.; Calaf, Gloria M.; Williams, Graeme P.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Koppen, Gudrun; Brunborg, Gunnar; Lyerly, H. Kim; Krishnan, Harini; Ab Hamid, Hasiah; Yasaei, Hemad; Sone, Hideko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Salem, Hosni K.; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Park, Hyun Ho; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Scovassi, A.Ivana; Klaunig, James E.; Vondráček, Jan; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Wise, John Pierce; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Woodrick, Jordan; Christopher, Joseph A.; Ochieng, Josiah; Martinez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Weisz, Judith; Kravchenko, Julia; Sun, Jun; Prudhomme, Kalan R.; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.; Moorwood, Kim; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Soucek, Laura; Jian, Le; D’Abronzo, Leandro S.; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Li, Lin; Gulliver, Linda; McCawley, Lisa J.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Vermeulen, Louis; Leyns, Luc; Zhang, Luoping; Valverde, Mahara; Khatami, Mahin; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Chapellier, Marion; Williams, Marc A.; Wade, Mark; Manjili, Masoud H.; Lleonart, Matilde E.; Xia, Menghang; Gonzalez Guzman, Michael J.; Karamouzis, Michalis V.; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Vaccari, Monica; Kuemmerle, Nancy B.; Singh, Neetu; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; van Larebeke, Nik; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Krishnakumar, P.K.; Vadgama, Pankaj; Marignani, Paola A.; Ghosh, Paramita M.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Thompson, Patricia A.; Dent, Paul; Heneberg, Petr; Darbre, Philippa; Leung, Po Sing; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Cheng, Qiang (Shawn); Robey, R.Brooks; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Roy, Rabindra; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Sinha, Ranjeet K.; Mehta, Rekha; Vento, Renza; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Nahta, Rita; Castellino, Robert C.; Palorini, Roberta; Hamid, Roslida A.; Langie, Sabine A.S.; Eltom, Sakina E.; Brooks, Samira A.; Ryeom, Sandra; Wise, Sandra S.; Bay, Sarah N.; Harris, Shelley A.; Papagerakis, Silvana; Romano, Simona; Pavanello, Sofia; Eriksson, Staffan; Forte, Stefano; Casey, Stephanie C.; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Lee, Tae-Jin; Otsuki, Takemi; Chen, Tao; Massfelder, Thierry; Sanderson, Thomas; Guarnieri, Tiziana; Hultman, Tove; Dormoy, Valérian; Odero-Marah, Valerie; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Rathmell, W.Kimryn; Engström, Wilhelm; Decker, William K.; Bisson, William H.; Rojanasakul, Yon; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Hu, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Lifestyle factors are responsible for a considerable portion of cancer incidence worldwide, but credible estimates from the World Health Organization and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) suggest that the fraction of cancers attributable to toxic environmental exposures is between 7% and 19%. To explore the hypothesis that low-dose exposures to mixtures of chemicals in the environment may be combining to contribute to environmental carcinogenesis, we reviewed 11 hallmark phenotypes of cancer, multiple priority target sites for disruption in each area and prototypical chemical disruptors for all targets, this included dose-response characterizations, evidence of low-dose effects and cross-hallmark effects for all targets and chemicals. In total, 85 examples of chemicals were reviewed for actions on key pathways/mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Only 15% (13/85) were found to have evidence of a dose-response threshold, whereas 59% (50/85) exerted low-dose effects. No dose-response information was found for the remaining 26% (22/85). Our analysis suggests that the cumulative effects of individual (non-carcinogenic) chemicals acting on different pathways, and a variety of related systems, organs, tissues and cells could plausibly conspire to produce carcinogenic synergies. Additional basic research on carcinogenesis and research focused on low-dose effects of chemical mixtures needs to be rigorously pursued before the merits of this hypothesis can be further advanced. However, the structure of the World Health Organization International Programme on Chemical Safety ‘Mode of Action’ framework should be revisited as it has inherent weaknesses that are not fully aligned with our current understanding of cancer biology. PMID:26106142

  15. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: the challenge ahead.

    PubMed

    Goodson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Carpenter, David O; Gilbertson, Michael; Manaf Ali, Abdul; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Lasfar, Ahmed; Carnero, Amancio; Azqueta, Amaya; Amedei, Amedeo; Charles, Amelia K; Collins, Andrew R; Ward, Andrew; Salzberg, Anna C; Colacci, Annamaria; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Berg, Arthur; Barclay, Barry J; Zhou, Binhua P; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Baglole, Carolyn J; Dong, Chenfang; Mondello, Chiara; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Naus, Christian C; Yedjou, Clement; Curran, Colleen S; Laird, Dale W; Koch, Daniel C; Carlin, Danielle J; Felsher, Dean W; Roy, Debasish; Brown, Dustin G; Ratovitski, Edward; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Corsini, Emanuela; Rojas, Emilio; Moon, Eun-Yi; Laconi, Ezio; Marongiu, Fabio; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Darroudi, Firouz; Martin, Francis L; Van Schooten, Frederik J; Goldberg, Gary S; Wagemaker, Gerard; Nangami, Gladys N; Calaf, Gloria M; Williams, Graeme; Wolf, Gregory T; Koppen, Gudrun; Brunborg, Gunnar; Lyerly, H Kim; Krishnan, Harini; Ab Hamid, Hasiah; Yasaei, Hemad; Sone, Hideko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Salem, Hosni K; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Park, Hyun Ho; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R; Scovassi, A Ivana; Klaunig, James E; Vondráček, Jan; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Wise, John Pierce; Whitfield, Jonathan R; Woodrick, Jordan; Christopher, Joseph A; Ochieng, Josiah; Martinez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Weisz, Judith; Kravchenko, Julia; Sun, Jun; Prudhomme, Kalan R; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Moorwood, Kim; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Soucek, Laura; Jian, Le; D'Abronzo, Leandro S; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Li, Lin; Gulliver, Linda; McCawley, Lisa J; Memeo, Lorenzo; Vermeulen, Louis; Leyns, Luc; Zhang, Luoping; Valverde, Mahara; Khatami, Mahin; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Chapellier, Marion; Williams, Marc A; Wade, Mark; Manjili, Masoud H; Lleonart, Matilde E; Xia, Menghang; Gonzalez, Michael J; Karamouzis, Michalis V; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Vaccari, Monica; Kuemmerle, Nancy B; Singh, Neetu; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; van Larebeke, Nik; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Krishnakumar, P K; Vadgama, Pankaj; Marignani, Paola A; Ghosh, Paramita M; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Thompson, Patricia A; Dent, Paul; Heneberg, Petr; Darbre, Philippa; Sing Leung, Po; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Cheng, Qiang Shawn; Robey, R Brooks; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Roy, Rabindra; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Sinha, Ranjeet K; Mehta, Rekha; Vento, Renza; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Dornetshuber-Fleiss, Rita; Nahta, Rita; Castellino, Robert C; Palorini, Roberta; Abd Hamid, Roslida; Langie, Sabine A S; Eltom, Sakina E; Brooks, Samira A; Ryeom, Sandra; Wise, Sandra S; Bay, Sarah N; Harris, Shelley A; Papagerakis, Silvana; Romano, Simona; Pavanello, Sofia; Eriksson, Staffan; Forte, Stefano; Casey, Stephanie C; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Lee, Tae-Jin; Otsuki, Takemi; Chen, Tao; Massfelder, Thierry; Sanderson, Thomas; Guarnieri, Tiziana; Hultman, Tove; Dormoy, Valérian; Odero-Marah, Valerie; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Engström, Wilhelm; Decker, William K; Bisson, William H; Rojanasakul, Yon; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Hu, Zhiwei

    2015-06-01

    Lifestyle factors are responsible for a considerable portion of cancer incidence worldwide, but credible estimates from the World Health Organization and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) suggest that the fraction of cancers attributable to toxic environmental exposures is between 7% and 19%. To explore the hypothesis that low-dose exposures to mixtures of chemicals in the environment may be combining to contribute to environmental carcinogenesis, we reviewed 11 hallmark phenotypes of cancer, multiple priority target sites for disruption in each area and prototypical chemical disruptors for all targets, this included dose-response characterizations, evidence of low-dose effects and cross-hallmark effects for all targets and chemicals. In total, 85 examples of chemicals were reviewed for actions on key pathways/mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Only 15% (13/85) were found to have evidence of a dose-response threshold, whereas 59% (50/85) exerted low-dose effects. No dose-response information was found for the remaining 26% (22/85). Our analysis suggests that the cumulative effects of individual (non-carcinogenic) chemicals acting on different pathways, and a variety of related systems, organs, tissues and cells could plausibly conspire to produce carcinogenic synergies. Additional basic research on carcinogenesis and research focused on low-dose effects of chemical mixtures needs to be rigorously pursued before the merits of this hypothesis can be further advanced. However, the structure of the World Health Organization International Programme on Chemical Safety 'Mode of Action' framework should be revisited as it has inherent weaknesses that are not fully aligned with our current understanding of cancer biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Changes in mammary histology and transcriptome profiles by low-dose exposure to environmental phenols at critical windows of development.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Kalpana; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Lambertini, Luca; Wetmur, James; Manservisi, Fabiana; Falcioni, Laura; Panzacchi, Simona; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals has been linked to altered mammary development and cancer risk at high doses using animal models. Effects at low doses comparable to human exposure remain poorly understood, especially during critical developmental windows. We investigated the effects of two environmental phenols commonly used in personal care products - methyl paraben (MPB) and triclosan (TCS) - on the histology and transcriptome of normal mammary glands at low doses mimicking human exposure during critical windows of development. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed during perinatal, prepubertal and pubertal windows, as well as from birth to lactation. Low-dose exposure to MPB and TCS induced measurable changes in both mammary histology (by Masson's Trichrome Stain) and transcriptome (by microarrays) in a window-specific fashion. Puberty represented a window of heightened sensitivity to MPB, with increased glandular tissue and changes of expression in 295 genes with significant enrichment in functions such as DNA replication and cell cycle regulation. Long-term exposure to TCS from birth to lactation was associated with increased adipose and reduced glandular and secretory tissue, with expression alterations in 993 genes enriched in pathways such as cholesterol synthesis and adipogenesis. Finally, enrichment analyses revealed that genes modified by MPB and TCS were over-represented in human breast cancer gene signatures, suggesting possible links with breast carcinogenesis. These findings highlight the issues of critical windows of susceptibility that may confer heightened sensitivity to environmental insults and implicate the potential health effects of these ubiquitous environmental chemicals in breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Hernandez, Alberto J; Loera, Miriam J; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined.

  18. Early Developmental Low-Dose Methylmercury Exposure Alters Learning and Memory in Periadolescent but Not Young Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Albores-Garcia, Damaris; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Loera, Miriam J.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the effects of developmental methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on learning and memory at different ages. The possibility of the amelioration or worsening of the effects has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to assess whether low-dose MeHg exposure in utero and during suckling induces differential disturbances in learning and memory of periadolescent and young adult rats. Four experimental groups of pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were orally exposed to MeHg or vehicle from gestational day 5 to weaning: (1) control (vehicle), (2) 250 μg/kg/day MeHg, (3) 500 μg/kg/day MeHg, and (4) vehicle, and treated on the test day with MK-801 (0.15 mg/kg i.p.), an antagonist of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor. The effects were evaluated in male offspring through the open field test, object recognition test, Morris water maze, and conditioned taste aversion. For each test and stage assessed, different groups of animals were used. MeHg exposure, in a dose-dependent manner, disrupted exploratory behaviour, recognition memory, spatial learning, and acquisition of aversive memories in periadolescent rats, but alterations were not observed in littermates tested in young adulthood. These results suggest that developmental low-dose exposure to MeHg induces age-dependent detrimental effects. The relevance of decreasing exposure to MeHg in humans remains to be determined. PMID:26885512

  19. [Rapid dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Repin, M V; Repina, L A

    2011-01-01

    The probability of losses of different chromosome aberrations during the dicentric chromosome assay of metaphase cells with incomplete sets of chromosome centromeres was estimated using a mathematical model for low doses of ionizing radiation. A dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes without determination of the total amount of chromosome centromeres in cells without chromosome aberrations (rapid dicentric assay) has been proposed. The rapid dicentric analysis allows to register chromosome aberrations in full compliance with the conventional classification. The experimental data have shown no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes detected by rapid and classical dicentric chromosome assays of human lymphocytes exposed to 0.5 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays. The rate of the rapid dicentric assay was almost twice as high as that of the classical dicentric assay.

  20. Effects of long-term low-dose cadmium exposure on genomic DNA methylation in human embryo lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Gaofeng; Xu, Lei; Song, Shizhen; Zhu, Changcai; Wu, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Lei

    2008-02-03

    Cadmium is a toxic transition metal of continuing occupational and environmental concern. As a well-recognized human carcinogen, its carcinogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. Cadmium has long been considered a non-genotoxic carcinogen and thought to act through epigenetic mechanisms. In the present study, we tested the effects of long-term low-dose cadmium exposure on DNA methylation in human embryo lung fibroblast (HLF) cells. After 2 months of exposure to 0-1.5 micromol/L cadmium, both the level of genomic DNA methylation and the enzyme activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) were increased in a concentration-related manner. Moreover, our results showed that cadmium exposure up-regulated the mRNA levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b at higher concentrations. We further tested the growth dynamics of HLF cells, and observed significantly elevated growth rates, decreased cell population of G0/G1-phase and increased cell population of S-phase at 0.9, 1.2, and 1.5 micromol/L concentrations. Our study indicated that long-term low-dose cadmium exposure could disrupt DNA methylation, which may be one of the possible underlying carcinogenic mechanisms of cadmium.

  1. Low-dose occupational exposure to benzene and signal transduction pathways involved in the regulation of cellular response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fenga, Concettina; Gangemi, Silvia; Giambò, Federica; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Golokhvast, Kirill; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Costa, Chiara

    2016-02-15

    Benzene metabolism seems to modulate NF-κB, p38-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling pathways via the production of reactive oxygen species. This study aims to evaluate the effects of low-dose, long-term exposure on NF-κB, STAT3, p38-MAPK and stress-activated protein kinase/Jun amino-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) signal transduction pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in gasoline station attendants. The influence of consumption of vegetables and fruits on these pathways has also been evaluated. A total of 91 men, employed in gasoline stations located in eastern Sicily, were enrolled for this study and compared with a control group of 63 male office workers with no history of exposure to benzene. The exposure was assessed by measuring urinary trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) concentration. Quantitative analyses were performed for proteins NF-κB p65, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-IκB-α, phospho-SAPK/JNK, phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-STAT3 using an immunoenzymatic assay. The results of this study indicate significantly higher t,t-MA levels in gasoline station attendants. With regard to NF-κB, phospho-IκB-α and phospho-STAT3 proteins, statistically significant differences were observed in workers exposed to benzene. However, no differences were observed in SAPK/JNK and p38-MAPK activation. These changes were positively correlated with t,t-MA levels, but only phospho-NF-κB p65 was associated with the intake of food rich in antioxidant active principles. Chronic exposure to low-dose benzene can modulate signal transduction pathways activated by oxidative stress and involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. This could represent a possible mechanism of carcinogenic action of chronic benzene exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low dose chronic treatment of human keratinocytes with inorganic arsenic causes hyperproliferation and altered protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.L.; Su, L.; Snow, E.T. |

    1997-10-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenate [As(V)] or arsenite [As(III)] causes hyperproliferation of normal and SV40-transformed human epidermal keratinocytes. Line 327 SV40-infected human keratinocytes were grown in the presence of either As(III) or As(V) (0.01 to 10 {mu}M) in complete medium for seven days prior to harvesting and counting. Both As(III) and As(V) were cytotoxic at micromolar concentrations, however submicromolar arsenic caused a significant increase in cell growth. Cell numbers in cultures exposed to As(V) were increased more than 186% relative to controls, and an even larger stimulation in cell growth was observed after treatment with 50 nM As(III). Normal non-SV40 T-antigen. Preliminary cell cycle analysis using unselected, log-phase cultures of arsenic-treated keratinocytes shows an increased proportion of cells in S- and G2/M-phase. Isoelectric focusing of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins from cells labeled with {sup 32}P-inorganic phosphate showed that the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes grown in low concentrations of arsenic is accompanied by altered tyrosine-specific protein phosphorylation. A number of phosphorylated proteins were observed in As-treated cells that were not observed in the controls; and minor bands at IEPs of 3.0, 4.2, 7.2, 7.5 and 8.2. These results, together with the lack of direct enzyme inhibition by arsenic shown by Su et al., this volume, suggest that arsenic-induced skin lesions and carcinogenesis may be the result of altered cell cycle control rather than DNA damage or reduced DNA repair.

  3. LOW-DOSE AIRBORNE ENDOTOXIN EXPOSURE ENHANCES BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS TO INHALED ALLERGEN IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endotoxin exposure has been associated with both protection against development of TH2-immune responses during childhood and exacerbation of asthma in persons who already have allergic airway inflammation.1 Occupational and experimental inhalation exposures to endotoxin have been...

  4. LOW-DOSE AIRBORNE ENDOTOXIN EXPOSURE ENHANCES BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS TO INHALED ALLERGEN IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endotoxin exposure has been associated with both protection against development of TH2-immune responses during childhood and exacerbation of asthma in persons who already have allergic airway inflammation.1 Occupational and experimental inhalation exposures to endotoxin have been...

  5. Over-exposure correction in knee cone-beam CT imaging with automatic exposure control using a partial low dose scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Muller, Kerstin; Hsieh, Scott; Maier, Andreas; Gold, Garry; Levenston, Marc; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    C-arm-based cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems with flat-panel detectors are suitable for diagnostic knee imaging due to their potentially flexible selection of CT trajectories and wide volumetric beam coverage. In knee CT imaging, over-exposure artifacts can occur because of limitations in the dynamic range of the flat panel detectors present on most CBCT systems. We developed a straightforward but effective method for correction and detection of over-exposure for an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC)-enabled standard knee scan incorporating a prior low dose scan. The radiation dose associated with the low dose scan was negligible (0.0042mSv, 2.8% increase) which was enabled by partially sampling the projection images considering the geometry of the knees and lowering the dose further to be able to just see the skin-air interface. We combined the line integrals from the AEC and low dose scans after detecting over-exposed regions by comparing the line profiles of the two scans detector row-wise. The combined line integrals were reconstructed into a volumetric image using filtered back projection. We evaluated our method using in vivo human subject knee data. The proposed method effectively corrected and detected over-exposure, and thus recovered the visibility of exterior tissues (e.g., the shape and density of the patella, and the patellar tendon), incorporating a prior low dose scan with a negligible increase in radiation exposure.

  6. Low dose exposure to Bisphenol A alters development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3 neurons and larval locomotor behavior in Japanese Medaka.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, T; Smith, N; Lee, E K; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that chronic low dose exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, may disrupt normal brain development and behavior mediated by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pathways. While it is known that GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus regulate reproductive physiology and behavior, functional roles of extra-hypothalamic GnRH neurons remain unclear. Furthermore, little is known whether BPA interacts with extra-hypothalamic GnRH3 neural systems in vulnerable developing brains. Here we examined the impact of low dose BPA exposure on the developing GnRH3 neural system, eye and brain growth, and locomotor activity in transgenic medaka embryos and larvae with GnRH3 neurons tagged with GFP. Fertilized eggs were collected daily and embryos/larvae were chronically exposed to 200ng/ml of BPA, starting at 1 day post fertilization (dpf). BPA significantly increased fluorescence intensity of the GnRH3-GFP neural population in the terminal nerve (TN) of the forebrain at 3dpf, but decreased the intensity at 5dpf, compared with controls. BPA advanced eye pigmentation without affecting eye and brain size development, and accelerated times to hatch. Following chronic BPA exposure, 20dpf larvae showed suppression of locomotion, both in distance covered and speed of movement (47% and 43% reduction, respectively). BPA-induced hypoactivity was accompanied by decreased cell body sizes of individual TN-GnRH3 neurons (14% smaller than those of controls), but not of non-GnRH3 neurons. These novel data demonstrate complex neurobehavioral effects of BPA on the development of extra-hypothalamic GnRH3 neurons in teleost fish.

  7. Chronic use of low-dose aspirin is not associated with lower bone mineral density in the general population.

    PubMed

    Bonten, T N; de Mutsert, R; Rosendaal, F R; Jukema, J W; van der Bom, J G; de Jongh, R T; den Heijer, M

    2017-10-01

    Low-dose aspirin is the cornerstone of secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Previous studies suggested that the use of aspirin is associated with an increased fracture risk. However, there is uncertainty whether this is due to an effect of aspirin on bone mineral density (BMD). Between 2008 and 2012, information on medication use and dual X-ray absorptiometry measured vertebral and femoral BMD of 916 participants was collected in the Netherland Epidemiology of Obesity study. The cross-sectional association between chronic low-dose aspirin use and BMD was estimated using linear regression, controlling for demography, body composition, comorbidity and other medication use which could affect BMD. A subgroup analysis in postmenopausal women (n=329) was conducted. After full adjustment, there was no difference between aspirin users and non-users for vertebral BMD (adjusted mean difference: 0.036 (95% CI -0.027 to 0.100) g/cm(2)) and femoral BMD (adjusted mean difference: 0.001 (-0.067 to 0.069) g/cm(2)). Also in the subgroup of postmenopausal women, aspirin use was not associated with lower vertebral (adjusted mean difference: 0.069 (-0.046 to 0.184) g/cm(2)) or femoral BMD (adjusted mean difference: -0.055 (-0.139;0.029) g/cm(2)). Chronic use of low-dose aspirin is not associated with lower BMD in the general population. The increased risk of fractures observed in aspirin users in previous studies is therefore more likely to be the result of common causes of aspirin use and fractures, but not of direct effects of aspirin on BMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exposure to low doses of formaldehyde during pregnancy suppresses the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Maiellaro, Marília; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Gimenes Júnior, João Antônio; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2014-08-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant, and its toxic effects on the immune system have been shown. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding the programming mechanisms after FA exposure and its repercussions for the immune systems of offspring. In this study, our objective was to investigate the effects of low-dose exposure of FA on pregnant rats and its repercussion for the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned in 3 groups: P (rats exposed to FA (0.75 ppm, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, for 21 days)), C (rats exposed to vehicle of FA (distillated water)) and B (rats non-manipulated). After 30 days of age, the offspring was sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 15 min, 3 days). After 24 h the OVA challenge the parameters were evaluated. Our data showed that low-dose exposure to FA during pregnancy induced low birth weight and suppressed the development of allergic lung inflammation and tracheal hyperresponsiveness in offspring by mechanisms mediated by reduced anaphylactic antibodies synthesis, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion. Elevated levels of IL-10 were found. Any systemic alteration was detected in the exposed pregnant rats, although oxidative stress in the uterine environment was evident at the moment of the delivery based on elevated COX-1 expression and reduced cNOS and SOD-2 in the uterus. Therefore, we show the putative programming mechanisms induced by FA on the immune system for the first time and the mechanisms involved may be related to oxidative stress in the foetal microenvironment. - Highlights: • Formaldehyde exposure does not cause lung inflammation in pregnant rats. • Formaldehyde exposure suppresses allergic lung inflammation in the offspring. • Formaldehyde exposure induces oxidative stress in uterine environment.

  9. [Evaluation of a low dose imaging protocol on radiation exposure reduction in pediatric supraventricular tachycardia ablation procedure].

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Lu, Y; Yuan, C; Bai, J R; Yang, H S; Wu, L

    2017-04-02

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and efficiency of a low dose imaging protocol on reducing X-ray dose level in pediatric supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) ablation procedure. Method: Data were collected from 103 patients who underwent catheter ablation for SVT in Children's Hospital of Fudan University from January 2014 to October 2016 in terms of body weight, body surface area (BSA), SVT types, accessory pathway location, fluoroscopy time and the radiation dose (including AIR KERMA and dose area product) in a case observational study.The fluoroscopy protocols were operated at 36 nGy/frame and 10 frames/s (Standard group, n=47) from January 2014 to September 2015, 36 nGy/frame and 10 frames/s with removal of the grid (Grid-out group, n=24) from October 2015 to April 2016, as well as 23 nGy/frame and 4.0-7.5 frames/s without the grid (Grid-out plus low dose group, n=32) from May 2016 to October 2016, respectively.Comparisons among groups were performed by independent-sample t-test or one-way analysis of variance for normally distributed continuous variables, and χ(2) test for categorical variables. Result: The average body weight, BSA, fluoroscopy time and AIR KERMA of the three groups was (34±14) kg, (1.14±0.33) m(2,) (11±8) minutes and (12.97±12.43) mGy, respectively.No significant differences in body weight (F=2.551), BSA (F=2.359), SVT types (χ(2)=6.15), and accessory pathway location (χ(2)=3.438) were observed among these three groups (P>0.05). Images acquired by low dose protocol could provide enough information for procedures, and no complication occurred.The acute success rates were 100% in all of these three groups, and there was no significant difference in mean fluoroscopy time (F=0.004, P>0.05) among them.However, the radiation dose (AIR KERMA) in the Grid-out plus low dose group was much lower than that in the Standard group ((7.54±7.31) mGy vs. (16.25±12.08) mGy, F=6.112, P<0.01)). Conclusion: The new strategy of combination of low dose

  10. Estimates of relative risks for cancers in a population after prolonged low-dose-rate radiation exposure: a follow-up assessment from 1983 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Su-Lun; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Yang, Yi-Ta; Hsieh, Wanhua A; Chang, Tien-Chun; Guo, How-Ran; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Tang, Jih-Luh; Lin, I-Feng; Chang, Wushou Peter

    2008-08-01

    Radiation effects on cancer risks in a cohort of Taiwanese residents who received protracted low-dose-rate gamma-radiation exposures from (60)Co-contaminated reinforcing steel used to build their apartments were studied, and risks were compared to those in other radiation-exposed cohorts. Analyses were based on a more extended follow-up of the cohort population in which 117 cancer cases diagnosed between 1983 and 2005 among 6,242 people with an average excess cumulative exposure estimate of about 48 mGy. Cases were identified from Taiwan's National Cancer Registry. Radiation effects on cancer risk were estimated using proportional hazards models and were summarized in terms of the hazard ratio associated with a 100-mGy increase in dose (HR(100mGy)). A significant radiation risk was observed for leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia (HR(100mGy) 1.19, 90% CI 1.01-1.31). Breast cancer exhibited a marginally significant dose response (HR(100mGy) 1.12, 90% CI 0.99-1.21). The results further strengthen the association between protracted low-dose radiation and cancer risks, especially for breast cancers and leukemia, in this unique cohort population.

  11. Long-term exposures to low doses of silver nanoparticles enhanced in vitro malignant cell transformation in non-tumorigenic BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Choo, Wun Hak; Park, Cho Hee; Jung, Shi Eun; Moon, Byeonghak; Ahn, Huiyeon; Ryu, Jung Seok; Kim, Keun-Soo; Lee, Yong Hwa; Yu, Il Je; Oh, Seung Min

    2016-12-01

    To predict carcinogenic potential of AgNPs on the respiratory system, BEAS-2B cells (human bronchial epithelial cells) were chronically exposed to low- and non-cytotoxic dose (0.13 and 1.33μg/ml) of AgNPs for 4months (#40 passages). To assess malignant cell transformation of chronic exposure to AgNPs, several bioassays including anchorage independent agar colony formation, cell migration/invasion assay, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were performed in BEAS-2B cells. Chronic exposure to AgNPs showed a significant increase of anchorage independent agar colony formation and cell migration/invasion. EMT, which is the loss of epithelial markers (E-Cadherin and Keratin) and the gain of mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin and Vimentin), was induced by chronic exposure to AgNPs. These responses indicated that chronic exposure to AgNPs could acquire characteristics of tumorigenic cells from normal BEAS-2B cells. In addition, caspase-3, p-p53, p-p38, and p-JNK were significantly decreased, while p-ERK1/2 was significantly increased. MMP-9 related to cell migration/invasion was upregulated, while a MMP-9 inhibitor, TIMP-1 was down-regulated. These results indicated that BEAS-2B cells exposed to AgNPs could induce anti-apoptotic response/anoikis resistance, and cell migration/invasion by complex regulation of MAPK kinase (p38, JNK, and ERK) and p53 signaling pathways. Therefore, we suggested that long-term exposure to low-dose of AgNPs could enhance malignant cell transformation in non-tumorigenic BEAS-2B cells. Our findings provide useful information needed to assess the carcinogenic potential of AgNPs.

  12. Oral exposure to low-dose of nonylphenol impairs memory performance in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Shinichiro; Kuwahara, Rika; Kohara, Yumi; Uchida, Yutaro; Oku, Yushi; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2015-02-01

    Nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPE) is a non-ionic surfactant, that is degraded to short-chain NPE and 4-nonylphenol (NP) by bacteria in the environment. NP, one of the most common environmental endocrine disruptors, exhibits weak estrogen-like activity. In this study, we investigated whether oral administration of NP (at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg doses) affects spatial learning and memory, general activity, emotionality, and fear-motivated learning and memory in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. SD rats of both sexes were evaluated using a battery of behavioral tests, including an appetite-motivated maze test (MAZE test) that was used to assess spatial learning and memory. In the MAZE test, the time required to reach the reward in male rats treated with 0.5 mg/kg NP group and female rats administered 5 mg/kg NP was significantly longer than that for control animals of the corresponding sex. In other behavioral tests, no significant differences were observed between the control group and either of the NP-treated groups of male rats. In female rats, inner and ambulation values for animals administered 0.5 mg/kg NP were significantly higher than those measured in control animals in open-field test, while the latency in the group treated with 5 mg/kg NP was significantly shorter compared to the control group in step-through passive avoidance test. This study indicates that oral administration of a low-dose of NP slightly impairs spatial learning and memory performance in male and female rats, and alters emotionality and fear-motivated learning and memory in female rats only.

  13. The use of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) as a novel anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Younger, Jarred; Parkitny, Luke; McLain, David

    2014-04-01

    Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) has been demonstrated to reduce symptom severity in conditions such as fibromyalgia, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and complex regional pain syndrome. We review the evidence that LDN may operate as a novel anti-inflammatory agent in the central nervous system, via action on microglial cells. These effects may be unique to low dosages of naltrexone and appear to be entirely independent from naltrexone's better-known activity on opioid receptors. As a daily oral therapy, LDN is inexpensive and well-tolerated. Despite initial promise of efficacy, the use of LDN for chronic disorders is still highly experimental. Published trials have low sample sizes, and few replications have been performed. We cover the typical usage of LDN in clinical trials, caveats to using the medication, and recommendations for future research and clinical work. LDN may represent one of the first glial cell modulators to be used for the management of chronic pain disorders.

  14. Repeated low-dose exposures to sarin, soman, or VX affect acoustic startle in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Smith, C D; Lee, R B; Moran, A V; Sipos, M L

    2016-01-01

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are known to cause behavioral abnormalities in cases of human exposures and in animal models. The behavioral consequences of single exposures to CWNAs that cause observable toxic signs are particularly well characterized in animals; however, less is known regarding repeated smaller exposures that may or may not cause observable toxic signs. In the current study, guinea pigs were exposed to fractions (0.1, 0.2, or 0.4) of a medial lethal dose (LD50) of sarin, soman, or VX for two weeks. On each exposure day, and for a post-exposure period, acoustic startle response (ASR) was measured in each animal. Although relatively few studies use guinea pigs to measure behavior, this species is ideal for CWNA-related experiments because their levels of carboxylesterases closely mimic those of humans, unlike rats or mice. Results showed that the 0.4 LD50 doses of soman and VX transiently increased peak startle amplitude by the second week of injections, with amplitude returning to baseline by the second week post-exposure. Sarin also increased peak startle amplitude independent of week. Latencies to peak startle and PPI were affected by agent exposure but not consistently among the three agents. Most of the changes in startle responses returned to baseline following the cessation of exposures. These data suggest that doses of CWNAs not known to produce observable toxic signs in guinea pigs can affect behavior in the ASR paradigm. Further, these deficits are transient and usually return to baseline shortly after the end of a two-week exposure period. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. An animal model to study health effects during continuous low-dose exposure to the nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Rocksén, David; Elfsmark, Daniel; Heldestad, Victoria; Wallgren, Karin; Cassel, Gudrun; Göransson Nyberg, Ann

    2008-08-19

    In the present study, we have developed an animal model to study long-term health effects of continuous exposure of toxic chemical agents, in awake, freely moving rats. The aim was to evaluate the effect of low-dose exposure of the nerve agent VX, and to find specific biomarkers for intoxication. To exclude the influence of stress, we used an implanted radio-telemetric device for online registration of physiological parameters, and an osmotic pump, implanted subcutaneously, for continuous exposure of the toxic agent. Our results showed that the lowest observable effect dose of VX in Wistar rats was 5 microg/kg/24 h, after continuous exposure by the osmotic pump. Although we observed significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in blood and a significant decrease in body weight gain at this dose, no change in blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory rate was registered. However, a significant decrease in the thyroid hormone, free T4, was measured in blood after 8 weeks, indicating that low doses of VX might affect the thyroid function. Rats given repeated daily injections were more sensitive to VX and needed only 1/10 of the concentration to reach a similar level of AChE inhibition, compared to animals exposed by the osmotic pump. Moreover, the results showed that exposure of VX in our experimental design, does not induce an increase in corticosterone blood levels. Thus, the model used in this investigation renders minimal stress and will not cause unnecessary pain to the animals, indicating that this model could be a useful tool to study long-term effects of various toxic substances in freely moving rats.

  16. DNA Damage Following Pulmonary Exposure by Instillation to Low Doses of Carbon Black (Printex 90) Nanoparticles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Saber, Anne T; Bengtson, Stefan; Jackson, Petra; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    We previously observed genotoxic effects of carbon black nanoparticles at low doses relative to the Danish Occupational Exposure Limit (3.5 mg/m3). Furthermore, DNA damage occurred in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in the absence of inflammation, indicating that inflammation is not required for the genotoxic effects of carbon black. In this study, we investigated inflammatory and acute phase response in addition to genotoxic effects occurring following exposure to nanoparticulate carbon black (NPCB) at even lower doses. C57BL/6JBomTac mice were examined 1, 3, and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.67, 2, 6, and 162 µg Printex 90 NPCB and vehicle. Cellular composition and protein concentration was evaluated in BAL fluid as markers of inflammatory response and cell damage. DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung, and liver tissue were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. The pulmonary acute phase response was analyzed by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Instillation of the low doses of NPCB induced a slight neutrophil influx one day after exposure. Pulmonary exposure to small doses of NPCB caused an increase in DNA strand breaks in BAL cells and lung tissue measured using the comet assay. We interpret the increased DNA strand breaks occurring following these low exposure doses of NPCB as DNA damage caused by primary genotoxicity in the absence of substantial inflammation, cell damage, and acute phase response. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:41–49, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society PMID:25042074

  17. Treatment with low dose fasudil for acute ischemic stroke in chronic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the effect of Rho kinase inhibition on changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), brain injury and vascular function after ischemic stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Changes in core MCA and collateral perfusion were measured by a validated laser Doppler method. Animals underwent 2 h tMCAO and 2 h reperfusion. Fasudil (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) or vehicle was given at 30 min ischemia (n = 9/group; mean (SD)). Brain injury was determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. To determine the effect of fasudil on vascular function, fasudil was given 10 min before reperfusion and parenchymal arterioles studied isolated (n = 6/group; mean(SD)). Collateral perfusion was low in vehicle-treated SHR (-8(32)%) that changed minimally with fasudil (6(24)%, p > 0.05, effect size: 0.47;95% CI-0.49-1.39). Reperfusion CBF was below baseline in vehicle (-27(26)%) and fasudil (-32(25)%, p > 0.05, effect size: 0.19; 95% CI-0.74-1.11) groups, suggesting incomplete reperfusion in both groups. Fasudil had little effect on brain injury volume (28(13)% vs. 36(7)% in vehicle, p > 0.05, effect size: 0.75; 95% CI-0.24-1.66). In isolated parenchymal arterioles, myogenic tone was similar between groups (37(6)% vs. 38(10)% in vehicle, p > 0.05, effect size: 0.09; 95% CI-1.05-1.21). There were no differences with fasudil treatment vs. vehicle in perfusion, brain injury and vascular function that may be related to the low dose that had minimal blood pressure lowering effect.

  18. [Alteration of thyroid hormone secretion after long-term exposure to low doses of endocrine disruptor DDT].

    PubMed

    Iaglova, N V; Iaglov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are exogenous substances that exhibit hormone-like action and consequently disrupt homeostatic action of endogenous hormones. DDT is the most common disruptor. The objective was to evaluate changes in thyroid hormone secretion after long-term exposure to low doses of DDT. The experiment was performed on male Wistar rats. The rats were given DDT at doses of 1.89±0.86 мg/kg/day and 7.77±0.17 мg/kg/day for 6 and 10 weeks. Dose dependent increase of serum total thyroxine, total triiodthyronine, and thyroid peroxidase was revealed after 6 weeks exposure. After 10 weeks free thyroxine secretion was reduced. Such alterations of the thyroid status are typical for iodine deficient goiter. The data obtained indicate that the main mechanism of DDT action includes disruption of thyroxine secretion by thyrocytes, but not inhibition of deiodinase activity and decrease of blood thyroid binding proteins.

  19. TU-C-18A-01: Models of Risk From Low-Dose Radiation Exposures: What Does the Evidence Say?

    SciTech Connect

    Bushberg, J; Boreham, D; Ulsh, B

    2014-06-15

    what dose level are risk vs. benefit discussions with patients appropriate, 3) at what dose level should we tell a pregnant woman that the baby’s health risk from a prenatal radiation exposure is “significant”, 4) is informed consent needed for patients undergoing medical imaging, and 5) at what dose level is evacuation appropriate after a radiological accident. Examples of the tremendous impact that choosing different risks models can have on the answers to these types of questions will be given.A moderated panel discussion will allow audience members to pose questions to the faculty members, each of whom is an established expert in his respective discipline. Learning Objectives: Understand the fundamental principles, strengths and limitations of radiation epidemiology and radiation biology for determining the risk from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation Become familiar with common models of risk used to describe the dose-response relationship at low dose levels Learn to identify strengths and weaknesses in studies designed to measure the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation Understand the implications of different risk models on public policy and health care decisions.

  20. Changes in the Metabolome in Response to Low-Dose Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Used in Personal Care Products during Different Windows of Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Houten, Sander M; Chen, Jia; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Manservisi, Fabiana; Sánchez-Guijo, Alberto; Wudy, Stefan A; Teitelbaum, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of ubiquitous exposure to environmental chemicals remain poorly defined. Non-targeted metabolomic profiling is an emerging method to identify biomarkers of the physiological response to such exposures. We investigated the effect of three commonly used ingredients in personal care products, diethyl phthalate (DEP), methylparaben (MPB) and triclosan (TCS), on the blood metabolome of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were treated with low levels of these chemicals comparable to human exposures during prepubertal and pubertal windows as well as chronically from birth to adulthood. Non-targeted metabolomic profiling revealed that most of the variation in the metabolites was associated with developmental stage. The low-dose exposure to DEP, MPB and TCS had a relatively small, but detectable impact on the metabolome. Multiple metabolites that were affected by chemical exposure belonged to the same biochemical pathways including phenol sulfonation and metabolism of pyruvate, lyso-plasmalogens, unsaturated fatty acids and serotonin. Changes in phenol sulfonation and pyruvate metabolism were most pronounced in rats exposed to DEP during the prepubertal period. Our metabolomics analysis demonstrates that human level exposure to personal care product ingredients has detectable effects on the rat metabolome. We highlight specific pathways such as sulfonation that warrant further study.

  1. Changes in the Metabolome in Response to Low-Dose Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Used in Personal Care Products during Different Windows of Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Manservisi, Fabiana; Sánchez-Guijo, Alberto; Wudy, Stefan A.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of ubiquitous exposure to environmental chemicals remain poorly defined. Non-targeted metabolomic profiling is an emerging method to identify biomarkers of the physiological response to such exposures. We investigated the effect of three commonly used ingredients in personal care products, diethyl phthalate (DEP), methylparaben (MPB) and triclosan (TCS), on the blood metabolome of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were treated with low levels of these chemicals comparable to human exposures during prepubertal and pubertal windows as well as chronically from birth to adulthood. Non-targeted metabolomic profiling revealed that most of the variation in the metabolites was associated with developmental stage. The low-dose exposure to DEP, MPB and TCS had a relatively small, but detectable impact on the metabolome. Multiple metabolites that were affected by chemical exposure belonged to the same biochemical pathways including phenol sulfonation and metabolism of pyruvate, lyso-plasmalogens, unsaturated fatty acids and serotonin. Changes in phenol sulfonation and pyruvate metabolism were most pronounced in rats exposed to DEP during the prepubertal period. Our metabolomics analysis demonstrates that human level exposure to personal care product ingredients has detectable effects on the rat metabolome. We highlight specific pathways such as sulfonation that warrant further study. PMID:27467775

  2. Comparative genomic analyses identify common molecular pathways modulated upon exposure to low doses of arsenic and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Benton, Margaret Ann; Rager, Julia E; Smeester, Lisa; Fry, Rebecca C

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to the toxic metals arsenic and cadmium is associated with detrimental health effects including cancers of various organs. While arsenic and cadmium are well known to cause adverse health effects at high doses, the molecular impact resulting from exposure to environmentally relevant doses of these metals remains largely unexplored. In this study, we examined the effects of in vitro exposure to either arsenic or cadmium in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells using genomics and systems level pathway mapping approaches. A total of 167 genes with differential expression were identified following exposure to either metal with surprisingly no overlap between the two. Real-time PCR was used to confirm target gene expression changes. The gene sets were overlaid onto protein-protein interaction maps to identify metal-induced transcriptional networks. Interestingly, both metal-induced networks were significantly enriched for proteins involved in common biological processes such as tumorigenesis, inflammation, and cell signaling. These findings were further supported by gene set enrichment analysis. This study is the first to compare the transcriptional responses induced by low dose exposure to cadmium and arsenic in human lymphoblastoid cells. These results highlight that even at low levels of exposure both metals can dramatically influence the expression of important cellular pathways.

  3. Chronic Low Dose Fructose infusion Does Not Reverse Glucagon-Mediated Decrease in Hepatic Glucose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Paulette M.; Chen, Sheng-Song; Santomango, Tammy S.; Williams, Phillip E; Lacy, D. Brooks; McGuinness, Owen P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective An adaptation to chronic total parenteral nutrition (TPN; 75% of non protein calories as glucose) is the liver becomes a major consumer of glucose with lactate release as a by-product. The liver is able to further increase liver glucose uptake when a small dose of fructose is acutely infused via the portal system. Glucagon, commonly elevated during inflammatory stress, is a potent inhibitor of glucose uptake by the liver during TPN. The aim was to determine if chronic fructose infusion could overcome the glucagon-mediated decrease in hepatic glucose uptake. Material/methods Studies were performed in conscious insulin-treated chronically catheterized pancreatectomized dogs that adapted to TPN for 33 h. They were then assigned to one of 4 groups: TPN (C), TPN + fructose (4.4 μmol·kg−1·min−1, F), TPN+ glucagon (0.2 pmol·kg−1·min−1, GGN), or a TPN + fructose and glucagon (F+GGN) for an additional 63h (33–96h). Insulin, fructose and glucagon were infused into the portal vein. During that period all animals received a fixed insulin infusion 0.4mU· kg−1·min−1 (33–96h) and the glucose infusion rates were adjusted to maintain euglycemia (6.6 mM). Results Chronic fructose infusion was unable to further enhance net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU; μmol·kg−1·min−1) (31.1±2.8 vs. 36.1±5.0; C vs. F) nor was it able to overcome glucagon-mediated decrease in NHGU (10.0±4.4 vs. 12.2±3.9; GGN vs. F+GGN). Conclusion In summary, chronic fructose infusion cannot augment liver glucose uptake during TPN nor can it overcome the inhibitory effects of glucagon. PMID:20940071

  4. Some Behavioral Effects of Exposure to Low Doses of Fe-56 Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Joseph, James A.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Future missions in space (such as a mission to Mars) will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth. As a result, astronauts will be exposed to radiation qualities and doses that differ from those experienced in low earth orbit, including exposure to heavy particles, such as Fe-56, which are a component of cosmic rays. Although the hazards of exposure to heavy particles are often minimized, they can affect neural functioning, and as a consequence, behavior. Unless the effects of exposure to cosmic rays can somehow be reduced, their effects on the brain throughout long duration flights could be disastrous. In the extreme case, it is possible that the effects of cosmic rays on space travelers could result in symptomatology resembling that of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases or of advancing age, including significant cognitive and/or motor impairments. Because successful operations in space depend in part on the performance capabilities of astronauts, such impairments could jeopardize their ability to satisfy mission requirements, as well as have long-term consequences on the health of astronauts. As such, understanding the nature and extent of this risk may be vital to the effective performance and possibly the survival of astronauts during future missions in space.

  5. Some Behavioral Effects of Exposure to Low Doses of Fe-56 Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Joseph, James A.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Future missions in space (such as a mission to Mars) will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth. As a result, astronauts will be exposed to radiation qualities and doses that differ from those experienced in low earth orbit, including exposure to heavy particles, such as Fe-56, which are a component of cosmic rays. Although the hazards of exposure to heavy particles are often minimized, they can affect neural functioning, and as a consequence, behavior. Unless the effects of exposure to cosmic rays can somehow be reduced, their effects on the brain throughout long duration flights could be disastrous. In the extreme case, it is possible that the effects of cosmic rays on space travelers could result in symptomatology resembling that of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases or of advancing age, including significant cognitive and/or motor impairments. Because successful operations in space depend in part on the performance capabilities of astronauts, such impairments could jeopardize their ability to satisfy mission requirements, as well as have long-term consequences on the health of astronauts. As such, understanding the nature and extent of this risk may be vital to the effective performance and possibly the survival of astronauts during future missions in space.

  6. Exposure to low doses of formaldehyde during pregnancy suppresses the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring.

    PubMed

    Maiellaro, Marília; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Gimenes Júnior, João Antônio; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2014-08-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant, and its toxic effects on the immune system have been shown. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding the programming mechanisms after FA exposure and its repercussions for the immune systems of offspring. In this study, our objective was to investigate the effects of low-dose exposure of FA on pregnant rats and its repercussion for the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned in 3 groups: P (rats exposed to FA (0.75 ppm, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, for 21 days)), C (rats exposed to vehicle of FA (distillated water)) and B (rats non-manipulated). After 30 days of age, the offspring was sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 15 min, 3 days). After 24 h the OVA challenge the parameters were evaluated. Our data showed that low-dose exposure to FA during pregnancy induced low birth weight and suppressed the development of allergic lung inflammation and tracheal hyperresponsiveness in offspring by mechanisms mediated by reduced anaphylactic antibodies synthesis, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion. Elevated levels of IL-10 were found. Any systemic alteration was detected in the exposed pregnant rats, although oxidative stress in the uterine environment was evident at the moment of the delivery based on elevated COX-1 expression and reduced cNOS and SOD-2 in the uterus. Therefore, we show the putative programming mechanisms induced by FA on the immune system for the first time and the mechanisms involved may be related to oxidative stress in the foetal microenvironment.

  7. [Teamwork for cardiac imaging: coronary computed tomography angiography and low-dose radiation exposure: a cardiology center experience].

    PubMed

    Magnacca, Massimo; Poddighe, Rosa; Del Meglio, Jacopo; Lilli, Alessio; Baratto, Marco Tullio; Canale, Maria Laura; Tessa, Carlo; Salvatori, Luca; Niespolo, Alessandra; Vignali, Claudio; Casolo, Giancarlo

    2017-04-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is increasingly used for noninvasive imaging of the coronary arteries. Radiation exposure, however, is a potential limitation to a more extensive use of this imaging modality. We aimed to demonstrate that a professional teamwork approach, including a cardiologist and a radiologist in performing CCTA, may allow to obtain best quality exams with very low radiation doses. A total of 998 consecutive patients underwent CCTA in accordance with the most recent guidelines. The following procedures were undertaken to reduce the radiation dose: (a) preliminary cardiological evaluation to check for CCTA eligibility; (b) optimized heart rate control with beta-blockers and/or ivabradine; and (c) the use of nonstandardized computed tomography protocols and algorithms for dose reduction. All the patients underwent a preliminary cardiological evaluation; 89% of them were pretreated with oral or intravenous beta-blockers and/or ivabradine; 806 patients (81%) were scanned by means of prospective gating, which allowed a radiation dose exposure of 161 ± 68.64 mGy; 192 patients (19%) underwent a retrospective gating protocol, with a radiation dose exposure of 1135.15 ± 485.87 mGy. In 13 patients (1%) CCTA was uninterpretable because of artifacts. Exam quality was not affected by the use of low-dose computed tomography scanning. Coronary calcium score and/or left ventricular functional analysis were never performed. The preliminary selection and preparation of patients and optimized scanner utilization allow a substantial reduction in radiation dose for most of the patients submitted to CCTA without affecting image quality. In our experience, a team approach was necessary to allow a "low-dose learning curve" and a progressive reduction in radiation doses administered to patients by means of the prospective gating protocol.

  8. The effects of high- and low-dose aspirin on thermoregulation during and after acute cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Murray, Leigh K; Otterstetter, Ronald; Muller, Matthew D; Glickman, Ellen L

    2011-12-01

    To explore the effect of aspirin on the thermoregulatory responses of men during exposure to 12°C air (acute cold exposure) for a period of 120 minutes and recovery in 25°C air (rewarming) for 120 minutes. Seven male subjects (26.1 ± 2.4 yr) underwent pre-experimental testing to determine peak VO(2) and body composition. Participants underwent 3 trials in which they ingested the following for 1 week prior to each experimental trial: a capsule filled with cellulose (placebo), 81 mg · day(-1) of aspirin (low-dose aspirin), or 650 mg · day(-1) of aspirin (high-dose aspirin). Each trial consisted of a 30-minute baseline period, 120 minutes of exposure to 12°C air, and 120 minutes of recovery in 25°C air. Mean skin temperature and rectal temperature (T(re)) were measured, and heat production was calculated. During both acute cold exposure and rewarming, analysis of variance revealed a main effect for time (P < .05) with respect to T(re), mean skin temperature, and heat production. However, there were no significant differences between the treatments or treatment by time interactions. These data demonstrate that aspirin had no significant effect on the thermal and metabolic responses during acute cold exposure and rewarming. Copyright © 2011 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Low dose chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection increases susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Elias, D; Akuffo, H; Thors, C; Pawlowski, A; Britton, S

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of mycobacterial diseases is high and the efficacy of Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) is low in most areas of the world where chronic worm infections are common. However, if and how concurrent worm infections could affect immunity to mycobacterial infections has not been elucidated. In this study we investigated whether infection of mice with Schistosoma mansoni could affect the ability of the animals to control Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection and the immune response to mycobacterial antigens. BALB/c mice subclinically infected with S. mansoni were challenged with M. bovis BCG via the intravenous route. The ability of the animals to contain the replication of M. bovis BCG in their organs, lung pathology as well as the in vitro mycobacterial and worm antigen induced immune responses were evaluated. The results showed that S. mansoni coinfected mice had significantly higher levels of BCG bacilli in their organs and sustained greater lung pathology compared to Schistosoma uninfected controls. Moreover, Schistosoma infected mice show depressed mycobacterial antigen specific Th1 type responses. This is an indication that chronic worm infection could affect resistance/susceptibility to mycobacterial infections by impairing mycobacteria antigen specific Th1 type responses. This finding is potentially important in the control of TB in helminth endemic parts of the world. PMID:15730384

  10. Chronic low-dose melatonin treatment maintains nigrostriatal integrity in an intrastriatal rotenone model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carriere, Candace H; Kang, Na Hyea; Niles, Lennard P

    2016-02-15

    Parkinson's disease is a major neurodegenerative disorder which primarily involves the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and related projections in the striatum. The pesticide/neurotoxin, rotenone, has been shown to cause systemic inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity in nigral dopaminergic neurons, with consequent degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway, as observed in Parkinson's disease. A novel intrastriatal rotenone model of Parkinson's disease was used to examine the neuroprotective effects of chronic low-dose treatment with the antioxidant indoleamine, melatonin, which can upregulate neurotrophic factors and other protective proteins in the brain. Sham or lesioned rats were treated with either vehicle (0.04% ethanol in drinking water) or melatonin at a dose of 4 µg/mL in drinking water. The right striatum was lesioned by stereotactic injection of rotenone at three sites (4 μg/site) along its rostrocaudal axis. Apomorphine administration to lesioned animals resulted in a significant (p<0.001) increase in ipsilateral rotations, which was suppressed by melatonin. Nine weeks post-surgery, animals were sacrificed by transcardial perfusion. Subsequent immunohistochemical examination revealed a decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity within the striatum and substantia nigra of rotenone-lesioned animals. Melatonin treatment attenuated the decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase in the striatum and abolished it in the substantia nigra. Stereological cell counts indicated a significant (p<0.05) decrease in dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra of rotenone-lesioned animals, which was confirmed by Nissl staining. Importantly, chronic melatonin treatment blocked the loss of dopamine neurons in rotenone-lesioned animals. These findings strongly support the therapeutic potential of long-term and low-dose melatonin treatment in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-Dose N,N-Dimethylformamide Exposure and Liver Injuries in a Cohort of Chinese Leather Industry Workers.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cong; Gu, Yiyang; Sun, Qing; Gu, Hongliang; Xu, Bo; Gu, Qing; Xiao, Jing; Lian, Yulong

    2017-05-01

    We assessed the risk of liver injuries following low doses of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) below threshold limit values (20 mg/m) among leather industry workers and comparison groups. A cohort of 429 workers from a leather factory and 466 non-exposed subjects in China were followed for 4 years. Poisson regression and piece-wise linear regression were used to examine the relationship between DMF and liver injury. Workers exposed to a cumulative dose of DMF were significantly more likely than non-exposed workers to develop liver injury. A nonlinear relationship between DMF and liver injury was observed, and a threshold of the cumulative DMF dose for liver injury was 7.30 (mg/m) year. The findings indicate the importance of taking action to reduce DMF occupational exposure limits for promoting worker health.

  12. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-06-06

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Negative Effects of Low Dose Atrazine Exposure on the Development of Effective Immunity to FV3 in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Sifkarovski, Jason; Grayfer, Leon; De Jesús Andino, Francisco; Lawrence, B. Paige; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    The recent dramatic increase of the prevalence and range of amphibian host species and populations infected by ranaviruses such as Frog Virus 3 (FV3) raises concerns about the efficacies of amphibian antiviral immunity. In this context, the potential negative effects of water contaminants such as the herbicide atrazine, at environmentally relevant levels, on host antiviral immunity remains unclear. Here we describe the use of the amphibian Xenopus laevis as an ecotoxiciology platform to elucidate the consequences of exposure to ecologically relevant doses of atrazine on amphibian antiviral immunity. X. laevis were exposed at tadpole and adult stages as well as during metamorphosis to atrazine (range from 0.1 to 10.0 ppb) prior to infection with FV3. Quantitative analysis of gene expression revealed significant changes in the pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α and the antiviral type I IFN gene in response to FV3 infection. This was most marked in tadpoles that were exposed to atrazine at doses as low 0.1 ppb. Furthermore, atrazine exposure significantly compromised tadpole survival following FV3 infections. In contrast, acute atrazine exposure of mature adult frogs did not induce detectable effects on anti-FV3 immunity, but adults that were exposed to atrazine during metamorphosis exhibited pronounced defects in FV3-induced TNF-α gene expression responses and slight diminution in type I IFN gene induction. Thus, even at low doses, atrazine exposure culminates in impaired development of amphibian antiviral defenses. PMID:24984115

  14. Negative effects of low dose atrazine exposure on the development of effective immunity to FV3 in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Sifkarovski, Jason; Grayfer, Leon; De Jesús Andino, Francisco; Lawrence, B Paige; Robert, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    The recent dramatic increase of the prevalence and range of amphibian host species and populations infected by ranaviruses such as Frog Virus 3 (FV3) raises concerns about the efficacies of amphibian antiviral immunity. In this context, the potential negative effects of water contaminants such as the herbicide atrazine, at environmentally relevant levels, on host antiviral immunity remains unclear. Here we describe the use of the amphibian Xenopus laevis as an ecotoxicology platform to elucidate the consequences of exposure to ecologically relevant doses of atrazine on amphibian antiviral immunity. X. laevis were exposed at tadpole and adult stages as well as during metamorphosis to atrazine (range from 0.1 to 10.0 ppb) prior to infection with FV3. Quantitative analysis of gene expression revealed significant changes in the pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α and the antiviral type I IFN gene in response to FV3 infection. This was most marked in tadpoles that were exposed to atrazine at doses as low 0.1 ppb. Furthermore, atrazine exposure significantly compromised tadpole survival following FV3 infections. In contrast, acute atrazine exposure of mature adult frogs did not induce detectable effects on anti-FV3 immunity, but adults that were exposed to atrazine during metamorphosis exhibited pronounced defects in FV3-induced TNF-α gene expression responses and slight diminution in type I IFN gene induction. Thus, even at low doses, atrazine exposure culminates in impaired development of amphibian antiviral defenses.

  15. Cross-generational effects of parental low dose BPA exposure on the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone3 system and larval behavior in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Inagaki, T; Smith, N L; Sherva, K M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates that chronic exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) may disrupt normal brain function and behavior mediated by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pathways. Previous studies have shown that low dose BPA (200ng/ml) exposure during embryogenesis altered development of extra-hypothalamic GnRH3 systems and non-reproductive locomotor behavior in medaka. Effects of parental low-dose BPA exposure on the development of GnRH3 systems and locomotor behavior of offspring are not well known. This study examines whether the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of BPA in parents (F0 generation) are carried over to their offspring (F1 generation) using stable transgenic medaka embryos/larvae with GnRH3 neurons tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Parental fish were exposed to BPA (200ng/ml) for either life-long or different developmental time windows. Fertilized F1 eggs were collected and raised in egg/fish water with no environmental exposure to BPA. All experiments were performed on F1 embryos/larvae, which were grouped based on the following parental (F0) BPA exposure conditions - (i) Group 1 (G1): through life; (ii) G2: during embryogenesis and early larval development [1-14days post fertilization (dpf)]; (iii) G3: during neurogenesis (1-5dpf); and (iv) G4: during sex differentiation (5-14dpf). Embryos from unexposed vehicle treated parents served as controls (G0). G1 embryos showed significantly reduced survival rates and delayed hatching time compared to other groups, while G4 embryos hatched significantly earlier than all other groups. At 3 dpf, the GnRH3-GFP intensity was increased by 47% in G3 embryos and decreased in G4 embryos by 59% compared to controls. At 4dpf, G1 fish showed 42% increased intensity, while GFP intensity was reduced by 44% in G3 subjects. In addition, the mean brain size of G1, G3 and G4 embryos were smaller than that of control at 4dpf. At 20dpf, all larvae from BPA-treated parents showed significantly decreased

  16. Subacute effects of low dose lead nitrate and mercury chloride exposure on kidney of rats.

    PubMed

    Apaydın, Fatma Gökçe; Baş, Hatice; Kalender, Suna; Kalender, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Lead nitrate and mercury chloride are the most common heavy metal pollutants. In the present study, the effects of lead and mercury induced nephrotoxicity were studied in Wistar rats. Lead nitrate (LN, 45 mg/kg b.w/day) and mercury chloride (MC, 0.02 mg/kg b.w/day) and their combination were administered orally for 28 days. Four groups of rats were used in the study: control, LN, MC and LN plus MC groups. Serum biochemical parameters, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes and histopathological changes in kidney tissues were investigated in all treatment groups. LN and MC caused severe histopathological changes. It was shown that LN, MC and also co-treatment with LN and MC exposure induced significant increase in serum urea, uric acid and creatinine levels. There were also statistically significant changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, CAT, GPx and GST) and lipid peroxidation (MDA) in all groups except control group. In this study, we showed that MC caused more harmful effects than LN in rats.

  17. Assessment of the Technologies for Molecular Biodosimetry for Human Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Symposium: Agenda and Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Matthew A.; Ramakrishnan, Narayani

    2009-11-16

    In the event of a radiological accident, the rapid evaluation of the individual absorbed dose is paramount to discriminate those individuals who must receive medical attention. New research with genomic- and proteomic-wide tools is showing that within minutes to hours after exposure to ionizing radiation the cellular machinery is modified. For example: large-scale changes occur in the gene expression profiles involving a broad variety of cellular pathways after a wide range of both low dose (<10 cGy) and high dose (>10 cGy) ionizing radiation exposures. Symposium 12 was organized to address a wide range of biological effects using the latest technologies. To address current models following ionizing radiation exposure, methods in biodosimetry and dose effects the symposia featured a general overview titled “Model Systems and Current Approaches in Biodosimetry” by Matthew A. Coleman, from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a talk entitled “Brief Overview of Biodosimetry Projects in the NIH Rad/Nuc Program” by Dr. Narayani Ramakrishnan, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. These two talk set the tone for issues in data and model integration as well as addressing the national need for robust technologies for biological dosimetry. The report continues with more description of the presentations, along with the agenda and abstracts of the papers presented.

  18. Subchronic exposure to low-doses of the nerve agent VX: physiological, behavioral, histopathological and neurochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia; Rabinovitz, Ishai; Egoz, Inbal; Raveh, Lily; Allon, Nahum; Grauer, Ettie; Gilat, Eran; Weissman, Ben Avi

    2008-08-15

    The highly toxic organophosphorous compound VX [O-ethyl-S-(isoporopylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate] undergoes an incomplete decontamination by conventional chemicals and thus evaporates from urban surfaces, e.g., pavement, long after the initial insult. As a consequence to these characteristics of VX, even the expected low levels should be examined for their potential to induce functional impairments including those associated with neuronal changes. In the present study, we developed an animal model for subchronic, low-dose VX exposure and evaluated its effects in rats. Animals were exposed to VX (2.25 microg/kg/day, 0.05 LD(50)) for three months via implanted mini osmotic pumps. The rapidly attained continuous and marked whole-blood cholinesterase inhibition (approximately 60%), fully recovered 96 h post pump removal. Under these conditions, body weight, blood count and chemistry, water maze acquisition task, sensitivity to the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine, peripheral benzodiazepine receptors density and brain morphology as demonstrated by routine histopathology, remained unchanged. However, animals treated with VX showed abnormal initial response in an Open Field test and a reduction (approximately 30%) in the expression of the exocytotic synaptobrevin/vesicle associate membrane protein (VAMP) in hippocampal neurons. These changes could not be detected one month following termination of exposure. Our findings indicate that following a subchronic, low-level exposure to the chemical warfare agent VX some important processes might be considerably impaired. Further research should be addressed towards better understanding of its potential health ramifications and in search of optimal countermeasures.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of epigenomic alterations in fetal mouse forebrain after exposure to low doses of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Takeshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Nakamura, Keiko; Ogi, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Fushiki, Shinji

    2008-11-21

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of endocrine disrupting chemicals, being distributed widely in the environment. We have been studying the low dose effects of BPA on murine forebrain development. Here, we have investigated the genome-wide effect of maternal exposure to BPA on the epigenome in mouse forebrain at E12.5 and at E14.5. We scanned CpG methylation status in 2500 NotI loci, representing 48 (de)methylated unique loci. Methylation status in most of them was primarily developmental stage-dependent. Each of almost all cloned NotI loci was located in a CpG island (CGI) adjacent to 5' end of the transcriptional unit. The mRNA expression of two functionally related genes changed with development as well as the exposure to BPA. In both genes, changes at the transcriptional level correlated well with the changes in NotI methylation status. Taken together, epigenetic alterations in promoter-associated CGIs after exposure to BPA may underlie some effects on brain development.

  20. Low-dose exposure to bisphenol A and replacement bisphenol S induces precocious hypothalamic neurogenesis in embryonic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kinch, Cassandra D.; Ibhazehiebo, Kingsley; Jeong, Joo-Hyun; Habibi, Hamid R.; Kurrasch, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous endocrine disruptor that is present in many household products, has been linked to obesity, cancer, and, most relevant here, childhood neurological disorders such as anxiety and hyperactivity. However, how BPA exposure translates into these neurodevelopmental disorders remains poorly understood. Here, we used zebrafish to link BPA mechanistically to disease etiology. Strikingly, treatment of embryonic zebrafish with very low-dose BPA (0.0068 μM, 1,000-fold lower than the accepted human daily exposure) and bisphenol S (BPS), a common analog used in BPA-free products, resulted in 180% and 240% increases, respectively, in neuronal birth (neurogenesis) within the hypothalamus, a highly conserved brain region involved in hyperactivity. Furthermore, restricted BPA/BPS exposure specifically during the neurogenic window caused later hyperactive behaviors in zebrafish larvae. Unexpectedly, we show that BPA-mediated precocious neurogenesis and the concomitant behavioral phenotype were not dependent on predicted estrogen receptors but relied on androgen receptor-mediated up-regulation of aromatase. Although human epidemiological results are still emerging, an association between high maternal urinary BPA during gestation and hyperactivity and other behavioral disturbances in the child has been suggested. Our studies here provide mechanistic support that the neurogenic period indeed may be a window of vulnerability and uncovers previously unexplored avenues of research into how endocrine disruptors might perturb early brain development. Furthermore, our results show that BPA-free products are not necessarily safer and support the removal of all bisphenols from consumer merchandise. PMID:25583509

  1. Absence of effects on the rat sperm quality after subacute exposure to low doses of fungicide prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Marciana; Pessin, Alessandra; Zanutto, Mirella Rossitto; Perobelli, Juliana Elaine; Guerra, Marina Trevizan; Banzato, Thais Petrochelli; Borges, Cibele dos Santos; Kempinas, Wilma De Grava

    2015-01-01

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is a fungicide and androgen-receptor antagonist used worldwide in horticulture and agriculture. Pre- and perinatal exposure to this pesticide during sexual differentiation is deleterious for male offspring. Since data on the effects of PCZ on epididymal functions are scarce, and because sperm maturation occurs in this organ, the present investigation aimed to determine whether low PCZ doses administered to rats during the phase of sperm transit through the epididymis might affect the morphophysiology of this organ and sperm quality. Adult male Wistar rats were assigned to 4 different groups: 0 (control, vehicle) or 10, 15, or 30 mg/kg bw/d PCZ diluted in corn oil administered orally for 4 consecutive days. Morphofunctional parameters of the male reproductive tract, hormone concentrations, sperm evaluations, and fertility and histopathologic analysis of testis and epididymis were assessed. There were no statistically significant differences between treated and control groups in relation to all evaluated parameters. Data demonstrated show that PCZ exposure for a brief 4-d exposure and low doses did not produce reproductive toxicity or compromise sperm quality in adult rats.

  2. Effects of low-dose exposure to pesticide mixture on physiological responses of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Geret, F; Burgeot, T; Haure, J; Gagnaire, B; Renault, T; Communal, P Y; Samain, J F

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effects on the physiology of Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, of a mixture of pesticides containing 0.8 μg L(-1) alachlor, 0.6 μg L(-1) metolachlor, 0.7 μg L(-1) atrazine, 0.6 μg L(-1) terbuthylazine, 0.5 μg L(-1) diuron, 0.6 μg L(-1) fosetyl aluminum, 0.05 μg L(-1) carbaryl, and 0.7 μg L(-1) glyphosate for a total concentration of 4.55 μg L(-1) . The total nominal concentration of pesticides mixture corresponds to the pesticide concentrations in the shellfish culture area of the Marennes-Oleron basin. Two varieties of C. gigas were selected on the foreshore, based on their characteristics in terms of resistance to summer mortality, to assess the effects of the pesticide mixture after 7 days of exposure under controlled conditions. The early effects of the mixture were assessed using enzyme biomarkers of nitrogen metabolism (GS, glutamine synthetase), detoxification metabolism (GST, glutathione S-transferase), and oxidative stress (CAT, catalase). Sublethal effects on hemocyte parameters (phagocytosis and esterase activity) and DNA damages (DNA adducts) were also measured. Changes in metabolic activities were characterized by increases in GS, GST, and CAT levels on the first day of exposure for the "resistant" oysters and after 3-7 days of exposure for the "susceptible" oysters. The formation of DNA adducts was detected after 7 days of exposure. The percentage of hemocyte esterase-positive cells was reduced in the resistant oysters, as was the hemocyte phagocytic capacity in both oyster varieties after 7 days of exposure to the pesticide mixture. This study highlights the need to consider the low doses and the mixture of pesticides to evaluate the effects of these molecules on organisms.

  3. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P R Vivek; Seshadri, M; Jaikrishan, G; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year(-1)), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N=43, range 1.07 mSv year(-1) to 5.55 mSv year(-1)) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year(-1) to 17.41 mSv year(-1)), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P=0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from our study suggest in vivo chronic low-level natural radiation provides an initial exposure that allows an adaptation to a subsequent higher radiation exposure, perhaps through improving DNA repair via an unknown mechanism. Therefore, further investigations would be necessary in this population to understand the biological and health effects of chronic low-level natural radiation exposures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sex-specific epigenetic disruption and behavioral changes following low-dose in utero bisphenol A exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kundakovic, Marija; Gudsnuk, Kathryn; Franks, Becca; Madrid, Jesus; Miller, Rachel L.; Perera, Frederica P.; Champagne, Frances A.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic endocrine disruptor widely used in the production of plastics. Increasing evidence indicates that in utero BPA exposure affects sexual differentiation and behavior; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. We hypothesized that BPA may disrupt epigenetic programming of gene expression in the brain. Here, we provide evidence that maternal exposure during pregnancy to environmentally relevant doses of BPA (2, 20, and 200 µg/kg/d) in mice induces sex-specific, dose-dependent (linear and curvilinear), and brain region-specific changes in expression of genes encoding estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ) and estrogen-related receptor-γ in juvenile offspring. Concomitantly, BPA altered mRNA levels of epigenetic regulators DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and DNMT3A in the juvenile cortex and hypothalamus, paralleling changes in estrogen-related receptors. Importantly, changes in ERα and DNMT expression in the cortex (males) and hypothalamus (females) were associated with DNA methylation changes in the ERα gene. BPA exposure induced persistent, largely sex-specific effects on social and anxiety-like behavior, leading to disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Although postnatal maternal care was altered in mothers treated with BPA during pregnancy, the effects of in utero BPA were not found to be mediated by maternal care. However, our data suggest that increased maternal care may partially attenuate the effects of in utero BPA on DNA methylation. Overall, we demonstrate that low-dose prenatal BPA exposure induces lasting epigenetic disruption in the brain that possibly underlie enduring effects of BPA on brain function and behavior, especially regarding sexually dimorphic phenotypes. PMID:23716699

  5. In Utero Exposure to Low-Dose Alcohol Induces Reprogramming of Mammary Development and Tumor Risk in MMTV-erbB-2 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhikun; Blackwelder, Amanda J.; Lee, Harry; Zhao, Ming; Yang, Xiaohe

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that prenatal exposure to environmental factors may modify breast cancer risk later in life. This study aimed to investigate the effects of in utero exposure to low-dose alcohol on mammary development and tumor risk. Pregnant MMTV-erbB-2 mice were exposed to alcohol (6 g/kg/day) between day 13 and day 19 of gestation, and the female offspring were examined for tumor risk. Whole mount analysis indicated that in utero exposure to low-dose alcohol induced significant increases in ductal extension at 10 weeks of age. Molecular analysis showed that in utero alcohol exposure induced upregulation of ERα signaling and activation of Akt and Erk1/2 in pubertal mammary glands. However, enhanced signaling in the EGFR/erbB-2 pathway appeared to be more prominent in 10-week-old glands than did signaling in the other pathways. Interestingly, tumor development in mice with in utero exposure to low-dose alcohol was slightly delayed compared to control mice, but tumor multiplicity was increased. The results indicate that in utero exposure to low-dose alcohol induces the reprogramming of mammary development by mechanisms that include altered signaling in the estrogen receptor (ER) and erbB-2 pathways. The intriguing tumor development pattern might be related to alcohol dose and exposure conditions, and warrants further investigation. PMID:25853264

  6. Reduction in average fluoroscopic exposure times for interventional spinal procedures through the use of pulsed and low-dose image settings.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Bradly S; Carnel, Charles T; Mallempati, Srinivas; Agarwal, Pooja

    2011-11-01

    A practice improvement project was completed with the goal of reducing radiation exposure times in a busy spinal intervention practice through the use of "pulsed" and "low-dose fluoroscopy." The goal was to quantify the reduction in fluoroscopy exposure times with these modes. Exposure times were recorded for 316 patients undergoing spinal interventional procedures before and after the implementation of this project. Before implementation, 158 consecutive patients received spinal interventions with nonpulsed fluoroscopy on an Orthopedic Equipment Company 9800 and exposure times were recorded. After implementation of the practice improvement project, 158 consecutive patients received spinal interventions with pulsed and low-dose modes. Exposure times were then compared between these groups. Pulsed and low-dose fluoroscopy modes reduced overall exposure times by 56.7% after implementation of the practice improvement project. The use of pulsed and low-dose fluoroscopy in addition to lead shielding; increasing distance from the radiation source; collimation; limited use of magnification, boost, or digital subtraction; and proficiency with interventional techniques should be used to reduce radiation exposure in concordance with the principle of "as low as reasonably achievable."

  7. Maternal low-dose estradiol-17β exposure during pregnancy impairs postnatal progeny weight development and body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Werner Fürst, Rainer; Pistek, Veronika Leopoldine; Kliem, Heike; Skurk, Thomas; Hauner, Hans; Meyer, Heinrich Herman Dietrich; Ulbrich, Susanne Ernestine

    2012-09-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals with estrogenic activity play an important role as obesogens. However, studies investigating the most potent natural estrogen, estradiol-17β (E2), at low dose are lacking. We examined endocrine and physiological parameters in gilts receiving distinct concentrations of E2 during pregnancy. We then investigated whether adverse effects prevail in progeny due to a potential endocrine disruption. E2 was orally applied to gilts during the entire period of pregnancy. The concentrations represented a daily consumption at the recommended ADI level (0.05 μg/kg body weight/day), at the NOEL (10 μg/kg body weight/day) and at a high dosage (1000 μg/kg body weight/day). Plasma hormone concentrations were determined using enzyme immuno assays. Offspring body fat was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. In treated gilts receiving 1000 μg E2/kg body weight/day we found significantly elevated plasma E2 levels during pregnancy, paralleled by an increased weight gain. While offspring showed similar weight at birth, piglets exhibited a significant reduction in weight at weaning even though their mothers had only received 0.05 μg E2/kg body weight/day. At 8 weeks of age, specifically males showed a significant increase in overall body fat percentage. In conclusion, prenatal exposure to low doses of E2 affected pig offspring development in terms of body weight and composition. In line with findings from other obesogens, our data suggest a programming effect during pregnancy for E2 causative for the depicted phenotypes. Therefore, E2 exposure may imply a possible contribution to childhood obesity. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the potential role of estradiol-17β (E2) as an obesogen. ► We orally apply E2 at the ADI, NOEL and a high dose to gilts during pregnancy. ► Offspring weight is similar at birth but reduced at weaning even after ADI treatment. ► Male offspring only exhibit an increase in overall body fat percentage

  8. Subchronic exposure to low-doses of the nerve agent VX: Physiological, behavioral, histopathological and neurochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia Rabinovitz, Ishai; Egoz, Inbal; Raveh, Lily; Allon, Nahum; Grauer, Ettie; Gilat, Eran; Weissman, Ben Avi

    2008-08-15

    The highly toxic organophosphorous compound VX [O-ethyl-S-(isoporopylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate] undergoes an incomplete decontamination by conventional chemicals and thus evaporates from urban surfaces, e.g., pavement, long after the initial insult. As a consequence to these characteristics of VX, even the expected low levels should be examined for their potential to induce functional impairments including those associated with neuronal changes. In the present study, we developed an animal model for subchronic, low-dose VX exposure and evaluated its effects in rats. Animals were exposed to VX (2.25 {mu}g/kg/day, 0.05 LD{sub 50}) for three months via implanted mini osmotic pumps. The rapidly attained continuous and marked whole-blood cholinesterase inhibition ({approx} 60%), fully recovered 96 h post pump removal. Under these conditions, body weight, blood count and chemistry, water maze acquisition task, sensitivity to the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine, peripheral benzodiazepine receptors density and brain morphology as demonstrated by routine histopathology, remained unchanged. However, animals treated with VX showed abnormal initial response in an Open Field test and a reduction ({approx} 30%) in the expression of the exocytotic synaptobrevin/vesicle associate membrane protein (VAMP) in hippocampal neurons. These changes could not be detected one month following termination of exposure. Our findings indicate that following a subchronic, low-level exposure to the chemical warfare agent VX some important processes might be considerably impaired. Further research should be addressed towards better understanding of its potential health ramifications and in search of optimal countermeasures.

  9. [The effect of long-term exposure to low doses of endocrine disruptor ddt on serum levels of thyroid protein autoantigenes and antithyroid autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yaglova, N V; Yaglov, V V

    2016-01-01

    Changes in secretion of thyroid autoantigenes and production of antithyroid autoantibodies after long-term exposure to low doses of DDT were studied. Changes in serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroid peroxidase, attributed to disruption of thyroxine production by DDT were found. Long-term exposure of rats to low doses of DDT revealed no specific impact on serum autoantibodies to all thyroid autoantigenes studied. The increase of the ratio of autoantibody/autoantigen for thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin was rather small and thus could not be considered as a significant symptom of thyroid autoimmunity.

  10. Chronic Systemic Therapy With Low-dose Morpholino Oligomers Ameliorates the Pathology and Normalizes Locomotor Behavior in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Alberto; Sharp, Paul S; Graham, Ian R; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Foster, Keith; Muntoni, Francesco; Wells, Dominic J; Dickson, George

    2011-01-01

    The administration of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) to skip one or more exons in mutated forms of the DMD gene and so restore the reading frame of the transcript is one of the most promising approaches to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). At present, preclinical studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of long-term AO administration have not been conducted. Furthermore, it is essential to determine the minimal effective dose and frequency of administration. In this study, two different low doses (LDs) of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) designed to skip the mutated exon 23 in the mdx dystrophic mouse were administered for up to 12 months. Mice treated for 50 weeks showed a substantial dose-related amelioration of the pathology, particularly in the diaphragm. Moreover, the generalized physical activity was profoundly enhanced compared to untreated mdx mice showing that widespread, albeit partial, dystrophin expression restores the normal activity in mdx mice. Our results show for the first time that a chronic long-term administration of LDs of unmodified PMO, equivalent to doses in use in DMD boys, is safe, significantly ameliorates the muscular dystrophic phenotype and improves the activity of dystrophin-deficient mice, thus encouraging the further clinical translation of this approach in humans. PMID:21102560

  11. No adaptive response is induced by chronic low-dose radiation from Ra-226 in the CHSE/F fish embryonic cell line and the HaCaT human epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaopei; Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether chronic low-dose α-particle radiation from Ra-226 over multiple cell generations can lead to an adaptive response in CHSE/F fish embryonic cells or HaCaT human epithelial cells receiving subsequent acute high-dose γ-ray radiation. CHSE/F and HaCaT cells were exposed to very low doses of Ra-226 in medium for multiple generations prior to being challenged by a higher dose γ-ray radiation. The clonogenic assay was used to test the clonogenic survival of cells with or without being pretreated by radiation from Ra-226. In general, pretreatment with chronic radiation has no significant influence on the reaction of cells to the subsequent challenge radiation. Compared to unprimed cells, the change in clonogenic survival of primed cells after receiving challenge radiation is mainly due to the influence of the chronic exposure, and there's little adaptive response induced. However at several dose points, pretreatment of CHSE/F fish cells with chronic radiation resulted in a radiosensitive response to a challenge dose of γ-ray radiation, and pretreatment of HaCaT cells resulted in no effect except for a slightly radioresistant response to the challenge radiation which was not significant. The results suggest that chronic low-dose radiation is not effective enough to induce adaptive response. There was a difference between human and fish cells and it may be important to consider results from multiple species before making conclusions about effects of chronic or low doses of radiation in the environment. The term "radiosensitive" or "adaptive" make no judgment about whether such responses are ultimately beneficial or harmful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acetaminophen protein adduct formation following low-dose acetaminophen exposure: comparison of immediate-release vs extended-release formulations.

    PubMed

    James, Laura P; Chiew, Angela; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Letzig, Lynda; Graudins, Andis; Day, Peter; Roberts, Dean

    2013-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) protein adducts are a biomarker of APAP metabolism, reflecting oxidation of APAP and generation of the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. High levels of adducts correspond to liver toxicity in patients with APAP-related acute liver failure. Adduct formation following low-dose exposure to APAP has not been well studied. APAP protein adducts were measured in blood samples collected from fasted individuals who participated in a crossover study of APAP (80 mg/kg) comparing extended release (ER) and immediate release (IR) formulations. Adducts were quantified in all postdose blood samples using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC) assay. Comparison of pharmacokinetic parameters for adducts did not reveal significant differences between ER and IR formulations, with one exception. Formation rates for adducts were faster for IR than the ER formulation (0.420 ± 0.157 vs. 0.203 ± 0.080 1/h), respectively. Maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of adducts for IR and ER were 0.108 (±0.020) and 0.100 (±0.028) nmol/ml serum, respectively, and were two orders of magnitude lower than adduct levels previously reported in adults with acute liver failure secondary to APAP. APAP protein adducts are rapidly formed following nontoxic ingestion of APAP at levels significantly lower than those associated with acute liver failure.

  13. Hepatic mitochondrial alteration in CD1 mice associated with prenatal exposures to low doses of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)

    PubMed Central

    Quist, Erin M.; Filgo, Adam J.; Cummings, Connie A.; Kissling, Grace E.; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Fenton, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid primarily used as an industrial surfactant. It persists in the environment and has been linked to potentially toxic and/or carcinogenic effects in animals and people. As a known activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), PFOA exposure can induce defects in fatty acid oxidation, lipid transport, and inflammation. Here, pregnant CD-1 mice were orally gavaged with 0, 0.01, 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg of PFOA from gestation days (GD) 1 through 17. On postnatal day (PND) 21, histopathologic changes in the livers of offspring included hepatocellular hypertrophy and periportal inflammation that increased in severity by PND 91 in an apparent dose-dependent response. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of selected liver sections from PND 91 mice revealed PFOA-induced cellular damage and mitochondrial abnormalities with no evidence of peroxisome proliferation. Within hypertrophied hepatocytes, mitochondria were not only increased in number, but also exhibited altered morphologies suggestive of increased and/or uncontrolled fission and fusion reactions. These findings suggest that peroxisome proliferation is not a component of PFOA-induced hepatic toxicity in animals that are prenatally exposed to low doses of PFOA. PMID:25326589

  14. Acetaminophen protein adduct formation following low dose acetaminophen exposure: comparison of immediate release vs. extended release formulations

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura P.; Chiew, Angela; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.; Letzig, Lynda; Graudins, Andis; Day, Peter; Roberts, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Acetaminophen (APAP) protein adducts are a biomarker of APAP metabolism, reflecting oxidation of APAP and generation of the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. High levels of adducts correspond to liver toxicity in patients with APAP related acute liver failure. Adduct formation following low dose exposure to APAP has not been well studied. APAP protein adducts were measured in blood samples collected from fasted subjects that participated in a cross-over study of APAP (80 mg/kg) comparing extended release (ER) and immediate release (IR) formulations. Methods Adducts were quantified in all post-dose blood samples using a validated HPLC-EC assay. Results Comparison of pharmacokinetic parameters for adducts did not reveal significant differences between the ER and IR formulations, with one exception. Formation rates for adducts were faster for the IR than the ER formulation (0.420 ± 0.157 vs. 0.203 ± 0.080 1/hr), respectively. The Cmax of adducts for IR and ER were 0.108 (±0.020) and 0.100 (±0.028) nmol/mL serum, respectively, and were two orders of magnitude lower than adduct levels previously reported in adults with acute liver failure secondary to APAP. Conclusions APAP protein adducts are rapidly formed following non-toxic ingestion of APAP at levels significantly lower than those associated with acute liver failure. PMID:23052410

  15. Evidence for Radiation Hormesis After In Vitro Exposure of Human Lymphocytes to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation§

    PubMed Central

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Scott, Bobby R.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that adding a very small gamma-ray dose to a small alpha radiation dose can completely suppress lung cancer induction by alpha radiation (a gamma-ray hormetic effect). Here we investigated the possibility of gamma-ray hormesis during low-dose neutron irradiation, since a small contribution to the total radiation dose from neutrons involves gamma rays. Using binucleated cells with micronuclei (micronucleated cells) among in vitro monoenergetic-neutron-irradiated human lymphocytes as a measure of residual damage, we investigated the influence of the small gamma-ray contribution to the dose on suppressing residual damage. We used residual damage data from previous experiments that involved neutrons with five different energies (0.22-, 0.44-, 1.5-, 5.9-, and 13.7-million electron volts [MeV]). Corresponding gamma-ray contributions to the dose were approximately 1%, 1%, 2%, 6%, and 6%, respectively. Total absorbed radiation doses were 0, 10, 50, and 100 mGy for each neutron source. We demonstrate for the first time a protective effect (reduced residual damage) of the small gamma-ray contribution to the neutron dose. Using similar data for exposure to gamma rays only, we also demonstrate a protective effect of 10 mGy (but not 50 or 100 mGy) related to reducing the frequency of micronucleated cells to below the spontaneous level. PMID:18846261

  16. Differential Response and Priming Dose Effect on the Proteome of Human Fibroblast and Stem Cells Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Monika; Haghdoost, Siamak; Gomolka, Maria; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Dietz, Anne; Kulka, Ulrike; Unger, Kristian; Babini, Gabriele; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Hornhardt, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that a mechanistic understanding of the cellular responses to low dose and dose rate may be valuable in reducing some of the uncertainties involved in current risk estimates for cancer- and non-cancer-related radiation effects that are inherited in the linear no-threshold hypothesis. In this study, the effects of low-dose radiation on the proteome in both human fibroblasts and stem cells were investigated. Particular emphasis was placed on examining: 1. the dose-response relationships for the differential expression of proteins in the low-dose range (40-140 mGy) of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation; and 2. the effect on differential expression of proteins of a priming dose given prior to a challenge dose (adaptive response effects). These studies were performed on cultured human fibroblasts (VH10) and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). The results from the VH10 cell experiments demonstrated that low-doses of low-LET radiation induced unique patterns of differentially expressed proteins for each dose investigated. In addition, a low priming radiation dose significantly changed the protein expression induced by the subsequent challenge exposure. In the ADSC the number of differentially expressed proteins was markedly less compared to VH10 cells, indicating that ADSC differ in their intrinsic response to low doses of radiation. The proteomic results are further discussed in terms of possible pathways influenced by low-dose irradiation.

  17. Impact of low dose prenatal ethanol exposure on glucose homeostasis in Sprague-Dawley rats aged up to eight months.

    PubMed

    Probyn, Megan E; Parsonson, Kylie R; Gårdebjer, Emelie M; Ward, Leigh C; Wlodek, Mary E; Anderson, Stephen T; Moritz, Karen M

    2013-01-01

    Excessive exposure to alcohol prenatally has a myriad of detrimental effects on the health and well-being of the offspring. It is unknown whether chronic low-moderate exposure of alcohol prenatally has similar and lasting effects on the adult offspring's health. Using our recently developed Sprague-Dawley rat model of 6% chronic prenatal ethanol exposure, this study aimed to determine if this modest level of exposure adversely affects glucose homeostasis in male and female offspring aged up to eight months. Plasma glucose concentrations were measured in late fetal and postnatal life. The pancreas of 30 day old offspring was analysed for β-cell mass. Glucose handling and insulin action was measured at four months using an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and insulin challenge, respectively. Body composition and metabolic gene expression were measured at eight months. Despite normoglycaemia in ethanol consuming dams, ethanol-exposed fetuses were hypoglycaemic at embryonic day 20. Ethanol-exposed offspring were normoglycaemic and normoinsulinaemic under basal fasting conditions and had normal pancreatic β-cell mass at postnatal day 30. However, during a glucose tolerance test, male ethanol-exposed offspring were hyperinsulinaemic with increased first phase insulin secretion. Female ethanol-exposed offspring displayed enhanced glucose clearance during an insulin challenge. Body composition and hepatic, muscle and adipose tissue metabolic gene expression levels at eight months were not altered by prenatal ethanol exposure. Low-moderate chronic prenatal ethanol exposure has subtle, sex specific effects on glucose homeostasis in the young adult rat. As aging is associated with glucose dysregulation, further studies will clarify the long lasting effects of prenatal ethanol exposure.

  18. Sex-specific effects of low-dose gestational estradiol-17β exposure on bone development in porcine offspring.

    PubMed

    Flöter, Veronika L; Galateanu, Gabriela; Fürst, Rainer W; Seidlová-Wuttke, Dana; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Möstl, Erich; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Ulbrich, Susanne E

    2016-07-29

    Estrogens are important for the bone development and health. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals during the early development has been shown to affect the bone phenotype later in life. Several studies have been performed in rodents, while in larger animals that are important to bridge the gap to humans there is a paucity of data. To this end, the pig as large animal model was used in the present study to assess the influence of gestational estradiol-17β (E2) exposure on the bone development of the prepubertal and adult offspring. Two low doses (0.05 and 10μg E2/kg body weight) referring to the 'acceptable daily intake' (ADI) and the 'no observed effect level' (NOEL) as stated for humans, and a high-dose (1000μg E2/kg body weight), respectively, were fed to the sows every day from insemination until delivery. In the male prepubertal offspring, the ADI dose group had a lower strength strain index (p=0.002) at the proximal tibia compared to controls, which was determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Prepubertal females were not significantly affected. However, there was a higher cortical cross-sectional area (CSA) (p=0.03) and total CSA (p=0.02) at the femur midpoint in the adult female offspring of the NOEL dose group as measured by computed tomography. These effects were independent from plasma hormone concentrations (leptin, IGF1, estrogens), which remained unaltered. Overall, sex-specific effects on bone development and non-monotonic dose responses were observed. These results substantiate the high sensitivity of developing organisms to exogenous estrogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term exposures to low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce cell transformation, but not genotoxic damage in BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Vales, Gerard; Rubio, Laura; Marcos, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    There is a great interest in a better knowledge of the health effects caused by nanomaterials exposures and, in particular to those induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) due to its high use and increasing presence in the environment. To add new information on its potential genotoxic/carcinogenic risk, we have carried out experiments using chronic exposures (up to 4 weeks), low doses, and the BEAS-2B cell line that, as a human bronchial epithelium cells, can be considered a good cell target. Cell uptake has been assessed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and flow cytometry (FC); genotoxicity was evaluated using the comet and the micronucleus (MN) assays; and cell-transforming ability was evaluated using the soft-agar assay to detect anchorage-independent cell growth. Results show an important cell uptake at all the tested doses and sampling times used (except for 1 µg/mL and 24-h exposure). Nevertheless, no genotoxic effects were observed in the comet and in the MN assays. This lack of genotoxic effect agrees with the FC results showing no induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), the data from the comet assay with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) enzyme showing no induction of oxidized bases, and the lack of induction of expression of heme-oxygenase (HO-1) gene both at the RNA and protein level. On the contrary, significant increases in the number of clones growing in an anchorage-independent way were observed. This study would indicate a potential carcinogenic risk associated to nano-TiO2 exposure, not mediated by a genotoxic mechanism.

  20. Managing chronic whiplash associated pain with a combination of low-dose opioid (remifentanil) and NMDA-antagonist (ketamine).

    PubMed

    Lemming, Dag; Sörensen, Jan; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Lauber, Rolf; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gerdle, Björn

    2007-10-01

    The aim was to investigate the efficacy of a combination of low-dose remifentanil (REMI) and ketamine (KET) compared to the single drugs and placebo (P) on whiplash associated pain (WAD) in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Twenty patients with chronic (>1 year) WAD were included. Four different drug combinations were tested in four sessions: placebo/placebo (P/P), placebo/remifentanil (P/REMI), ketamine/placebo (KET/P) and ketamine/remifentanil (KET/REMI). Target concentrations were 1 and 2ng/ml (stepwise) for remifentanil and 100ng/ml for ketamine. Habitual pain intensity was assessed on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Experimental pain was assessed with electrical stimulation (single and repeated) of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle, pressure pain algometry applied over infraspinatus (IS) and TA muscles and VAS scores after intramuscular hypertonic saline infusion in TA. KET/REMI significantly reduced habitual pain. KET/REMI infused at low REMI target concentration (1ng/ml) significantly elevated electrical intramuscular pain thresholds (single and repeated). Pain thresholds to electrical stimulation were similarly increased by both P/REMI and KET/REMI at 2ng/ml target concentration. Pressure pain thresholds were increased by both KET/REMI and P/REMI. VAS-scores after intramuscular saline were also similarly decreased by both REMI combinations. Seven out of 20 subjects were non-responders (<50% pain relief). No correlation was found between effects on spontaneous pain and experimental pain. KET/REMI showed an analgesic effect on habitual pain. Experimental pain was attenuated by both combinations containing the opioid, however, KET seemed to enhance the effect of REMI on electrical pain thresholds when a low REMI target concentration was used.

  1. Exposure to Low-Dose Bisphenol A Impairs Meiosis in the Rat Seminiferous Tubule Culture Model: A Physiotoxicogenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sazan; Steinmetz, Gérard; Montillet, Guillaume; Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Loundou, Anderson; Durand, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most widespread chemicals in the world and is suspected of being responsible for male reproductive impairments. Nevertheless, its molecular mode of action on spermatogenesis is unclear. This work combines physiology and toxicogenomics to identify mechanisms by which BPA affects the timing of meiosis and induces germ-cell abnormalities. Methods We used a rat seminiferous tubule culture model mimicking the in vivo adult rat situation. BPA (1 nM and 10 nM) was added to the culture medium. Transcriptomic and meiotic studies were performed on the same cultures at the same exposure times (days 8, 14, and 21). Transcriptomics was performed using pangenomic rat microarrays. Immunocytochemistry was conducted with an anti-SCP3 antibody. Results The gene expression analysis showed that the total number of differentially expressed transcripts was time but not dose dependent. We focused on 120 genes directly involved in the first meiotic prophase, sustaining immunocytochemistry. Sixty-two genes were directly involved in pairing and recombination, some of them with high fold changes. Immunocytochemistry indicated alteration of meiotic progression in the presence of BPA, with increased leptotene and decreased diplotene spermatocyte percentages and partial meiotic arrest at the pachytene checkpoint. Morphological abnormalities were observed at all stages of the meiotic prophase. The prevalent abnormalities were total asynapsis and apoptosis. Transcriptomic analysis sustained immunocytological observations. Conclusion We showed that low doses of BPA alter numerous genes expression, especially those involved in the reproductive system, and severely impair crucial events of the meiotic prophase leading to partial arrest of meiosis in rat seminiferous tubule cultures. PMID:25181051

  2. Low-dose BPA exposure alters the mesenchymal and epithelial transcriptomes of the mouse fetal mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wadia, Perinaaz R; Cabaton, Nicolas J; Borrero, Michael D; Rubin, Beverly S; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Shioda, Toshi; Soto, Ana M

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of rodent fetuses to low doses of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) causes subtle morphological changes in the prenatal mammary gland and results in pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions during adulthood. To examine whether the BPA-induced morphological alterations of the fetal mouse mammary glands are a) associated with changes in mRNA expression reflecting estrogenic actions and/or b) dependent on the estrogen receptor α (ERα), we compared the transcriptomal effects of BPA and the steroidal estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2) on fetal mammary tissues of wild type and ERα knock-out mice. Mammary glands from fetuses of dams exposed to vehicle, 250 ng BPA/kg BW/d or 10 ng EE2/kg BW/d from embryonic day (E) 8 were harvested at E19. Transcriptomal analyses on the ductal epithelium and periductal stroma revealed altered expression of genes involved in the focal adhesion and adipogenesis pathways in the BPA-exposed stroma while genes regulating the apoptosis pathway changed their expression in the BPA-exposed epithelium. These changes in gene expression correlated with previously reported histological changes in matrix organization, adipogenesis, and lumen formation resulting in enhanced maturation of the fat-pad and delayed lumen formation in the epithelium of BPA-exposed fetal mammary glands. Overall similarities in the transcriptomal effects of BPA and EE2 were more pronounced in the epithelium, than in the stroma. In addition, the effects of BPA and EE2 on the expression of various genes involved in mammary stromal-epithelial interactions were suppressed in the absence of ERα. These observations support a model whereby BPA and EE2 act directly on the stroma, which expresses ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in fetal mammary glands, and that the stroma, in turn, affects gene expression in the epithelium, where ERα and ERβ are below the level of detection at this stage of development.

  3. Investigation of an apparent protective effect of occupational exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzbaum, J.; Shy, C.

    1986-09-01

    To examine the effect of occupational exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on the length of survival after the start of employment, 8375 employees at a nuclear scientific research and development laboratory were followed from 1943 until 1977. Nine hundred sixty-six deaths from all causes were observed. The total cumulative dose of ionizing radiation in rems as measured by film badges was divided into four categories, 0, 0.01-0.99, 1-4.9, greater than or equal to5 rems. When adjusted for the year of first employment and the age at death (using the Cox proportional hazards regression model) the risks of death from all causes at each dose per unit time relative to the risk at the 0 dose level (the hazard ratios - from the lowest to the highest dose) were 1.00, 0.97 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82-1.14), 0.75 (95% CI, 0.73-0.89), and 0.46 (95% CI, 0.34-0.61). The hypothesis of a linear relationship between the log of the hazard rate and dose was not rejected (x/sub 2/ = 1.34, p > 0.05). The hazard ratios for deaths due to cancer were similar: 1.00, 1.19 (95% CI, 0.80-1.75, 1.01 (95% CI, 0.64-1.50), and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.31-1.10). This unexpected inverse association is being examined by 1) treating radiation dose as a time dependent covariate; 2) investigating the effect of adding several potentially confounding and effect modifying variables; and 3) determining the survival-dose association within subsets of causes of death.

  4. Exposure to low doses (20 cGy) of Hze results in spatial memory impairment in rats.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, Richard; Johnson, Angela; Davis, Leslie; Green-Mitchell, Shamina; Chabriol, Olivia; Sanford, Larry; Drake, Richard

    Escape hole over the 5 days of training. There was a suggestion that there may be some recovery in spatial memory performance by 6 months post exposure. Our preliminary data on Hze-induced exposure on sleep, suggests that within 4 weeks of Hze exposure there is a change in sleep latency, raising the possibility that some of the observed decline in neurocognitive performance may arise due to perturbed sleep patterns. We have used MALDI-IMS to determine the Hze-induced changes in the neuroproteome with a high degree of spatial resolution. Using this technique we have found that a peptide with a m/z of 14207 is differentially elevated in the Thalamus of irradiated rats that have good spatial memory. MALDI-MSI thus appears to be a powerful tool that can be used to identify radiation-induced changes in ancillary brain regions that correlate with neurocognitive impairment, and will ultimately be useful for identifying proteins whose expression changes in parallel with Hze-induced neurocognitive deficits. SUMMARY. We have found that mission-relevant Hze doses (20 cGy) lead to significant neu-rocognitive defects. Clearly such low doses of Hze are unlikely to lead to a significant loss of neuronal cells, and have not been reported to lead to gliosis etc. We take this as further evi-dence that neurocognitive impairment is not solely dependent upon radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis and neuronal cell death. FUNDING: The authors gratefully acknowledge grant support from NASA (NNJ06HD89D).

  5. Effects of low-dose clonidine on cardiovascular and autonomic variables in adolescents with chronic fatigue: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fagermoen, Even; Sulheim, Dag; Winger, Anette; Andersen, Anders M; Gjerstad, Johannes; Godang, Kristin; Rowe, Peter C; Saul, J Philip; Skovlund, Eva; Wyller, Vegard Bruun

    2015-09-10

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a common and disabling condition in adolescence with few treatment options. A central feature of CFS is orthostatic intolerance and abnormal autonomic cardiovascular control characterized by sympathetic predominance. We hypothesized that symptoms as well as the underlying pathophysiology might improve by treatment with the alpha2A-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. A total of 176 adolescent CFS patients (12-18 years) were assessed for eligibility at a single referral center recruiting nation-wide. Patients were randomized 1:1 by a computer system and started treatment with clonidine capsules (25 μg or 50 μg twice daily, respectively, for body weight below/above 35 kg) or placebo capsules for 9 weeks. Double-blinding was provided. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of The Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL). Effect of clonidine intervention was assessed by general linear models in intention-to-treat analyses, including baseline values as covariates in the model. A total of 120 patients (clonidine group n = 60, placebo group n = 60) were enrolled and started treatment. There were 14 drop-outs (5 in the clonidine group, 9 in the placebo group) during the intervention period. At 8 weeks, the clonidine group had lower plasma norepinephrine (difference = 205 pmol/L, p = 0.05) and urine norepinephrine/creatinine ratio (difference = 3.9 nmol/mmol, p = 0.002). During supine rest, the clonidine group had higher heart rate variability in the low-frequency range (LF-HRV, absolute units) (ratio = 1.4, p = 0.007) as well as higher standard deviation of all RR-intervals (SDNN) (difference = 12.0 ms, p = 0.05); during 20° head-up tilt there were no statistical differences in any cardiovascular variable. Symptoms of orthostatic intolerance did not change during the intervention period. Low-dose clonidine reduces catecholamine levels in adolescent

  6. Effects of six priority controlled phthalate esters with long-term low-dose integrated exposure on male reproductive toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hai-Tao; Xu, Run; Cao, Wei-Xin; Qian, Liang-Liang; Wang, Min; Lu, Lingeng; Xu, Qian; Yu, Shu-Qin

    2017-03-01

    Human beings are inevitably exposed to ubiquitous phthalate esters (PEs) surroundings. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to the mixture of six priority controlled phthalate esters (MIXPs): dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di(2-ethyhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP), on male rat reproductive system and further to explore the underlying mechanisms of the reproductive toxicity. The male rats were orally exposed to either sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as controls or MIXPs at three different low-doses by gavage for 15 weeks. Testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) in serum were analyzed, and pathological examinations were performed for toxicity evaluation. Steroidogenic proteins (StAR, P450scc, CYP17A1 and 17β-HSD), cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins (p53, Chk1, Cdc2, CDK6, Bcl-2 and Bax) were measured for mechanisms exploration. MIXPs with long-term low-dose exposure could cause male reproductive toxicity to the rats, including the decrease of both serum and testicular testosterone, and the constructional damage of testis. These effects were related to down-regulated steroidogenic proteins, arresting cell cycle progression and promoting apoptosis in rat testicular cells. The results indicate that MIXPs with long-term low-dose exposure may pose male reproductive toxicity in human. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical utility of ultra-low-dose pre-test exposure to avoid unnecessary patient exposure due to positioning errors: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Nose, Hideo; Shiraishi, Junji

    2017-09-11

    The use of digital radiographic systems has decreased the frequency of image retakes due to over/underexposure in general radiography. However, image retakes owing to patient positioning errors are likely to increase because of the convenience of a real-time image check on a console table. The purpose of the present study is to propose a novel radiographic examination procedure with an ultra-low-dose pre-test exposure that may be utilized to check patient positioning prior to taking an actual image, thereby reducing unnecessary patient exposure owing to image retakes. In this study, examination data from 714 knee joint radiographs, both submitted and retaken images, were included. Twelve radiological technologists (RTs) took all images. The actual total exposure dose for each patient was compared with simulated total doses utilized in the proposed procedure. The simulation assumed that each examination was completed following pre-test exposure. Therefore, this method did not involve retaking images although at least one pre-test exposure had been applied to all patients. Pre-test exposures at four dose levels corresponding to 25, 10, 5, and 2% of the actual exposure dose were evaluated to determine whether each dose level could be used to check patient positioning. The results indicated that when the pre-test exposure dose rate was 10% or lower, the total exposure dose reduction equaled or exceeded 8% for all patients. The use of the proposed procedure reduced the total exposure dose for all patients when compared to the exposure dose calculated from records.

  8. Perinatal exposure to low-dose DE-71 increases serum thyroid hormones and gonadal osteopontin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Charles A; McCoy, George L; Hui, Yvonne Y; LaVoie, Holly A

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that have been widely used in manufacturing. They are major household and environmental contaminants that bioaccumulate. Humans are exposed primarily through dust inhalation and dietary ingestion of animal products. In animal studies, high doses of penta-brominated diphenyl ethers (penta-BDEs) in the mg/kg body weight (BW) range negatively impact brain development, behavior, memory, circulating thyroid hormone concentrations, the reproductive system and bone development. We investigated the effects of ingestion of a relatively low dose of the penta-BDE mixture DE-71 by pregnant and lactating rats on reproductive and thyroid parameters of the F1 offspring. F0 mothers received 60 μg/kg BW of DE-71 or vehicle daily by gavage from Day 1.5 of pregnancy through lactation (except the day of parturition). F1 pups were sacrificed at 21 d of age or outbred at approximately 80 d of age. Bred F1 females were sacrificed at Day 14.5 of pregnancy or at five months of age. Bred F1 males were sacrificed at five months of age. DE-71 treatment of the mothers affected the F1 females as evidenced by lower body weights at 80 d and five months of age, elevated serum T3 and T4 concentrations at Day 14.5 of pregnancy and increased thyroid gland weight and ovarian osteopontin mRNA at five months of age. Perinatal DE-71 exposure also increased testicular osteopontin mRNA in 21-day-old F1 males. Utilizing a granulosa cell in vitro model, we demonstrated that DE-71 activated the rat osteopontin gene promoter. Our results are the first to demonstrate that PBDEs increase rodent circulating T3 and T4 concentrations and gonadal osteopontin mRNA, and activate the osteopontin gene promoter. These changes may have clinical implications as others have shown associations between human exposure to PBDEs and subclinical hyperthyroidism, and overexpression of ovarian osteopontin has been associated with ovarian cancer. PMID:21367881

  9. Non-Target Effect for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (.01 - 0.2 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28-ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 0.1 Gy were more than one ion traverses a cell showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, Si-28-ions showed no dose response, suggesting a non-targeted effect when less than one ion traversal occurs. Additional findings for Fe-56 will be discussed.

  10. Low-dose rotenone exposure induces early senescence leading to late apoptotic signaling cascade in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cell line: An in vitro glaucoma model.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Nancy; Agarwal, Nupur Rani; Ghosh, Ilora

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the prolonged exposure of the human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cell line to a low dose (1 nM) of rotenone could simulate a glaucomatous-like condition and serve as a cellular model for its etiological analysis. Under 1-nM rotenone exposure for 24-72 h, HTM cells showed a decrease in cell viability as assessed by an MTT assay and showed mitochondrial dysfunction as assessed by measuring H2 DCFDA fluorescence; a decrease in ATP level was also observed. Flow cytometric analysis showed an increase in cellular size and granularity. Elevated AF showed initial senescence. LF staining with SBB and its spectrofluorometric quantification confirmed growth arrest. An accumulation of cytoplasmic myocilin, IL-6, and MMP-9 at 72 h of exposure supported glaucomatous induction. TEM revealed morphological changes in mitochondria and nuclei of treated cells. Signaling cascades were assessed by immunoblotting and immunocytochemical analysis. This study showed a shift in status of the cells from initial senescence to induction of apoptosis in the HTM cell line due to continuous low-dose exposure to rotenone; however, at 72 h, both senescence and apoptotic features are apparent in these cells. This is the first report that reveals the potential of a prolonged low-dose exposure of rotenone to simulate senescence in the HTM cell line to cause a glaucomatous condition. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  11. Characterization of allergic response induced by repeated dermal exposure of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic mice to low dose formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Moon-Hwa; Kim, Ji-Eun; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun-Kyoung; Song, Sung-Hwa; Sung, Ji-Eun; Yang, Seung-Yun; An, Beum-Soo; Jung, Young-Jin; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lim, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Although formaldehyde (FA) is known to be a major allergen responsible for allergic contact dermatitis, there are conflicting reports regarding correlation between FA exposure and interleukin (IL-4) expression. To investigate whether allergic responses including IL-4 expression were induced by repeated dermal exposure to low dose FA, alterations in the luciferase signal and allergic phenotypes were measured in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic (Tg) mice containing luciferase cDNA under control of the IL-4 promoter after exposure to 4% FA for 2 weeks. High levels of luciferase were detected in the abdominal region of the whole body and submandibular lymph node (SLN) of FA treated mice. Additionally, the ear thickness and IgE concentration were significantly upregulated in the FA treated group when compared with the acetone olive oil (AOO) treated group. FA treated mice showed enhanced auricular lymph node (ALN) weight, epidermis and dermis thickness, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, the expression of IL-6 among T helper 2 cytokines was higher in the FA treated group than the AOO treated group, while vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels remained constant. Overall, the results presented herein provide additional evidence that various allergic responses may be successfully induced in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 Tg mice after exposure to low dose FA for 2 weeks. The luciferase signal under the IL-4 promoter may reflect general indicators of the allergic response induced by exposure to low dose FA. PMID:25324870

  12. Long-Term Effects of Low-Dose Spironolactone on Chronic Dialysis Patients: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, ChongTing; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, HuiFang; Lin, AiXia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this 2-year multicentric, randomized, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the long-term effects and adverse effects of spironolactone on chronic dialysis patients. A total of 253 non-heart failure dialysis patients with end-stage renal disease were randomly assigned to 2-year treatment with spironolactone (25 mg once daily, n=125) or a matching placebo (n=128) as add-on therapy. The primary outcome was a composite of death from cardiocerebrovascular (CCV) events, aborted cardiac arrest, and sudden cardiac death, and the secondary outcome was death from all causes. Other CCV-related indexes such as left ventricular mass index, left ventricular ejection fraction, heart rate variability, vascular endothelial function, and blood pressure-lowering effect were analyzed for patients who completed the whole 2-year follow-up study. Sociodemographic, clinical, and relevant laboratory data were also collected. During the 2-year follow-up, the primary outcome occurred less frequently in the spironolactone group vs the control group (7.2% vs 18.0%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.78). Death from CCV events occurred in 4.0% of patients in the spironolactone group and in 11.7% of patients in the control group. Neither aborted cardiac arrest nor sudden cardiac death was significantly reduced by spironolactone treatment. The secondary outcome occurred less frequently in the spironolactone group vs the control group (9.6% vs 19.5%; adjusted HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29-0.94). Other CCV-related indexes except for heart rate variability were significantly improved. This study demonstrates that use of low-dose spironolactone in non-heart failure dialysis patients can effectively reduce the risks of both CCV morbidity and mortality with few side effects. Moreover, the beneficial effect was mediated through improving the endothelial function or reducing left ventricular size independent of blood pressure changes, rather than mediation

  13. Distinct Sets of lncRNAs are Differentially Modulated after Exposure to High and Low Doses of X Rays.

    PubMed

    Terradas, Mariona; Martín, Marta; Repullès, Joan; Huarte, Maite; Genescà, Anna

    2016-12-01

    High- and low-dose X rays are used in medicine as therapeutic and diagnostic tools, respectively. While the cellular response to high-dose radiation is well known, studies on the effects of low-dose radiation and its ability to trigger a proper DNA damage response have had contradictory results. The functions of many signaling and effector proteins of the DNA damage response (DDR) have been described, and are attributed to well-known DDR pathways. However, there has been little known about the contribution of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to DDR, although there is recent evidence that lncRNAs may be associated with almost all biological functions, including DDR. In this work, we investigated the participation of lncRNAs in the response to different X-ray doses. By microarray analysis, we observed that in human breast epithelial cells, distinct sets of coding and noncoding transcripts are differentially regulated after moderate- and high-dose irradiation compared to those regulated after low-dose irradiation. While the modulated coding and noncoding genes at low doses relate to cell signaling pathways, those affected by moderate and high doses are mostly enriched for cell cycle regulation and apoptotic pathways. Quantification using qPCR of the lncRNAs identified by microarrays allowed the validation of 75% of those regulated at the higher doses. These results indicate that lncRNA expression is regulated by ionizing radiation and that this expression is dose dependent.

  14. Sex-specific enhanced behavioral toxicity induced by maternal exposure to a mixture of low dose endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, Marissa; Conrad, Katherine; Allen, Joshua L; Weston, Hiromi; Martin, Kyle; Lawrence, B Paige; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A

    2014-12-01

    Humans are increasingly and consistently exposed to a variety of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), chemicals that have been linked to neurobehavioral disorders such as ADHD and autism. Many of such EDCs have been shown to adversely influence brain mesocorticolimbic systems raising the potential for cumulative toxicity. As such, understanding the effects of developmental exposure to mixtures of EDCs is critical to public health protection. Consequently, this study compared the effects of a mixture of four EDCs to their effects alone to examine potential for enhanced toxicity, using behavioral domains and paradigms known to be mediated by mesocorticolimbic circuits (fixed interval (FI) schedule controlled behavior, novel object recognition memory and locomotor activity) in offspring of pregnant mice that had been exposed to vehicle or relatively low doses of four EDCs, atrazine (ATR - 10mg/kg), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA - 0.1mg/kg), bisphenol-A (BPA - 50 μg/kg), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD - 0.25 μg/kg) alone or combined in a mixture (MIX), from gestational day 7 until weaning. EDC-treated males maintained significantly higher horizontal activity levels across three testing sessions, indicative of delayed habituation, whereas no effects were found in females. Statistically significant effects of MIX were seen in males, but not females, in the form of increased FI response rates, in contrast to reductions in response rate with ATR, BPA and TCDD, and reduced short term memory in the novel object recognition paradigm. MIX also reversed the typically lower neophobia levels of males compared to females. With respect to individual EDCs, TCDD produced notable increases in FI response rates in females, and PFOA significantly increased ambulatory locomotor activity in males. Collectively, these findings show the potential for enhanced behavioral effects of EDC mixtures in males and underscore the need for animal studies to fully investigate mixtures

  15. Exposure to low doses of (137)cesium and nicotine during postnatal development modifies anxiety levels, learning, and spatial memory performance in mice.

    PubMed

    Bellés, Montserrat; Heredia, Luis; Serra, Noemí; Domingo, José L; Linares, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    Radiation therapy is a major cause of long-term complications observed in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. However, the effects of low-doses of ionizing radiation (IR) to the brain are less studied. On the other hand, tobacco is one of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Tobacco is not only a health concern for adults. It has also shown to exert deleterious effects on fetuses, newborns, children and adolescents. Exposure to nicotine (Nic) from smoking may potentiate the toxic effects induced by IR on brain development. In this study, we evaluated in mice the cognitive effects of concomitant exposure to low doses of internal radiation ((137)Cs) and Nic during neonatal brain development. On postnatal day 10 (PND10), two groups of C57BL/6J mice were subcutaneously exposed to 137-Cesium ((137)Cs) (4000 and 8000 Bq/kg) and/or Nic (100 μg/ml). At the age of two months, neurobehavior of mice was assessed. Results showed that exposure to IR-alone or in combination with Nic-increased the anxiety-like of the animals without changing the activity levels. Moreover, exposure to IR impaired learning and spatial memory. However, Nic administration was able to reverse this effect, but only at the low dose of (137)Cs.

  16. Low-dose penicillin exposure in early life decreases Th17 and the susceptibility to DSS colitis in mice through gut microbiota modification

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shuang; Zhao, Di; Cai, Chenwen; Song, Dongjuan; Shen, Jun; Xu, Antao; Qiao, Yuqi; Ran, Zhihua; Zheng, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic exposure in early life can lead to a significant change of the gut microbiota and may contribute to later onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the relationship between early-life antibiotic treatment and IBD is ambiguous, according to contradicting results of epidemiologic studies. In the present study, we demonstrated that low-dose penicillin pre-treatment had a unique protective effect against mouse colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Low-dose penicillin also suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 in various intestinal tissues, and decreased the amount of Th17 cells in small-intestine lamina propria. Neither metronidazole nor enrofloxacin had a similar effect. We further confirmed that low-dose penicillin could cause specific changes of the gut microbiota, especially the eradication of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB). Mice without SFB inoculation showed no disparity when treated with penicillin or water. Taken together, the results showed that low-dose penicillin can achieve a highly specific manipulation of sensitive bacteria and interfere with development of intestinal immune system in early life. The study may further indicate the possibility of achieving a favorable immune state among a certain group of patients with IBD, or other autoimmune diseases, by fine-tuning the gut microbiota. PMID:28272549

  17. Low-dose penicillin exposure in early life decreases Th17 and the susceptibility to DSS colitis in mice through gut microbiota modification.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shuang; Zhao, Di; Cai, Chenwen; Song, Dongjuan; Shen, Jun; Xu, Antao; Qiao, Yuqi; Ran, Zhihua; Zheng, Qing

    2017-03-08

    Antibiotic exposure in early life can lead to a significant change of the gut microbiota and may contribute to later onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the relationship between early-life antibiotic treatment and IBD is ambiguous, according to contradicting results of epidemiologic studies. In the present study, we demonstrated that low-dose penicillin pre-treatment had a unique protective effect against mouse colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Low-dose penicillin also suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 in various intestinal tissues, and decreased the amount of Th17 cells in small-intestine lamina propria. Neither metronidazole nor enrofloxacin had a similar effect. We further confirmed that low-dose penicillin could cause specific changes of the gut microbiota, especially the eradication of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB). Mice without SFB inoculation showed no disparity when treated with penicillin or water. Taken together, the results showed that low-dose penicillin can achieve a highly specific manipulation of sensitive bacteria and interfere with development of intestinal immune system in early life. The study may further indicate the possibility of achieving a favorable immune state among a certain group of patients with IBD, or other autoimmune diseases, by fine-tuning the gut microbiota.

  18. Detection of DNA damage by the alkaline comet assay after exposure to low-dose gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Malyapa, R S; Bi, C; Ahern, E W; Roti Roti, J L

    1998-04-01

    The alkaline comet assay as described by Olive et al. (Exp. Cell Res. 198, 259-267, 1992) was used to detect DNA damage in cells exposed to low doses (0-5 cGy) of gamma radiation. Experiments were performed using lymphocytes isolated from whole blood of rats. The comet parameters, normalized comet moment and comet length, described by Kent et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 67, 655-660, 1995), were used as measurements of DNA damage. It was observed that the alkaline comet assay can detect DNA damage at doses as low as 0.6 cGy. The results of the experiments using low-dose gamma radiation are comparable with published results obtained using the alkaline comet assay according to the method of Singh et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 66, 23-28, 1994). Based on this observation and analysis of results published previously, we conclude that the version of the alkaline comet assay described by Olive et al. is as sensitive as other modifications of the comet assay reported in literature for the detection of DNA damage in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation.

  19. Defence strategies and antibiotic resistance gene abundance in enterococci under stress by exposure to low doses of peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Turolla, Andrea; Sabatino, Raffaella; Fontaneto, Diego; Eckert, Ester M; Colinas, Noemi; Corno, Gianluca; Citterio, Barbara; Biavasco, Francesca; Antonelli, Manuela; Mauro, Alessandro; Mangiaterra, Gianmarco; Di Cesare, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is an organic compound used efficiently as disinfectant in wastewater treatments. Yet, at low doses it may cause selection; thus, the effect of low doses of PAA on Enterococcus faecium as a proxy of human-related microbial waste was evaluated. Bacteria were treated with increasing doses of PAA (from 0 to 25 mg L(-1) min) and incubated in regrowth experiments under non-growing, limiting conditions and under growing, favorable conditions. The changes in bacterial abundance, in bacterial phenotype (number and composition of small cell clusters), and in the abundance of an antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) was evaluated. The experiment demonstrated that the selected doses of PAA efficiently removed enterococci, and induced a long-lasting effect after PAA inactivation. The relative abundance of small clusters increased during the experiment when compared with that of the inoculum. Moreover, under growing favorable conditions the relative abundance of small clusters decreased and the number of cells per cluster increased with increasing PAA doses. A strong stability of the measured ARG was found, not showing any effect during the whole experiment. The results demonstrated the feasibility of low doses of PAA to inactivate bacteria. However, the stress induced by PAA disinfection promoted a bacterial adaptation, even if potentially without affecting the abundance of the ARG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Axon-reflex cutaneous vasodilatation is impaired in type 2 diabetic patients receiving chronic low-dose aspirin.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Pascal; Mahé, Guillaume; Fromy, Bérengère; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Saumet, Jean-Louis; Abraham, Pierre

    2009-09-01

    Low-dose aspirin is largely but non-homogeneously used in primary prevention of cardiovascular complication in type-2 diabetic patients. We hypothesised that low-dose aspirin could interfere with the cutaneous neurovascular responses in type-2 diabetic patients. Galvanic current-induced vasodilatation (CIV) is an original non-noxious integrative model of neurovascular interaction and is impaired under low-dose aspirin in healthy subjects. Twenty type-2 diabetic patients (ten not receiving aspirin: D(-NA) and ten regularly receiving low-dose aspirin, while other macrovascular, microvascular and clinical-sensitivity investigations show no significant difference. Potential clinical markers for the impairment of the neurovascular interaction are still required in diabetes. Correlation of the CIV response with the risk of cutaneous complications in diabetic patients remains to be tested.

  1. Elevated mu-opioid receptor expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract accompanies attenuated withdrawal signs after chronic low dose naltrexone in opiate-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, E J; Rudoy, C; Mannelli, P; Oropeza, V; Qian, Y

    2006-02-15

    We previously described a decrease in withdrawal behaviors in opiate-dependent rats that were chronically treated with very low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. Attenuated expression of withdrawal behaviors correlated with decreased c-Fos expression and intracellular signal transduction elements [protein kinase A regulatory subunit II (PKA) and phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB)] in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. In this study, to determine whether similar cellular changes occurred in forebrain nuclei associated with drug reward, expressions of PKA and pCREB were analyzed in the ventral tegmental area, frontal cortex, striatum, and amygdala of opiate-treated rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. No significant difference in PKA or pCREB was detected in these regions following drug treatment. To examine further the cellular mechanisms in noradrenergic nuclei that could underlie attenuated withdrawal behaviors following low dose naltrexone administration, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and locus coeruleus (LC) were examined for opioid receptor (OR) protein expression. Results showed a significant increase in muOR expression in the NTS of morphine-dependent rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water, and increases in muOR expression were also found to be dose dependent. Protein expression of muOR in the LC and deltaOR in either brain region remained unchanged. In conclusion, our previously reported decreases in c-Fos and PKA expression in the NTS following pretreatment with low doses of naltrexone may be partially explained by a greater inhibition of NTS neurons resulting from increased muOR expression in this region.

  2. Long-term low dose dietary resveratrol supplement reduces cardiovascular structural and functional deterioration in chronic heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmet, Ismayil; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Lakatta, Edward G; Talan, Mark

    2017-03-01

    A short-term exposure to resveratrol at high dosages exerts a remarkable cardioprotective effect. Whether a long-term exposure to resveratrol at low dosages that can be obtained through consumption of a resveratrol-rich diet is beneficial to heart diseases is unknown. We tested the effects of a resveratrol-enriched diet on cardiovascular remodeling of chronic heart failure (CHF) in rats resulting from permanent ligation of left coronary artery. Two weeks after surgery, rats were started on either a resveratrol-enriched (R; 5 mg/kg per day; n = 23) or normal (Control; n = 23) diet for next 10 months. Serial echocardiography in Control showed a significant decline in LV ejection fraction, increases in LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes, and expansion in myocardial infarct from pre-treatment values. In R, compared with Control, there were substantial improvements in those parameters. End-point LV pressure-volume loop analysis showed a significantly improved LV systolic function and AV-coupling, an index of energy transfer efficacy between the heart and aortic tree, in R compared with Control (p < 0.05). Aortic pulse wave velocity, a measure of arterial stiffness, was significantly lower in R (389 ± 15 cm/s; p < 0.05) compared with Control (489 ± 38 cm/s). These results demonstrated that long-term dietary resveratrol supplement reduces cardiovascular structural and functional deterioration in CHF.

  3. Modulation of DNA polymerase beta-dependent base excision repair in cultured human cells after low dose exposure to arsenite

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, Peter; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2008-05-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is crucial for development and for the repair of endogenous DNA damage. However, unlike nucleotide excision repair, the regulation of BER is not well understood. Arsenic, a well-established human carcinogen, is known to produce oxidative DNA damage, which is repaired primarily by BER, whilst high doses of arsenic can also inhibit DNA repair. However, the mechanism of repair inhibition by arsenic and the steps inhibited are not well defined. To address this question we have investigated the regulation of DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) and AP endonuclease (APE1), in response to low, physiologically relevant doses of arsenic. GM847 lung fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to sodium arsenite, As(III), and mRNA, protein levels and BER activity were assessed. Both Pol {beta} and APE1 mRNA exhibited significant dose-dependant down regulation at doses of As(III) above 1 {mu}M. However, at lower doses Pol {beta} mRNA and protein levels, and consequently, BER activity were significantly increased. In contrast, APE1 protein levels were only marginally increased by low doses of As(III) and there was no correlation between APE1 and overall BER activity. Enzyme supplementation of nuclear extracts confirmed that Pol {beta} was rate limiting. These changes in BER correlated with overall protection against sunlight UV-induced toxicity at low doses of As(III) and produced synergistic toxicity at high doses. The results provide evidence that changes in BER due to low doses of arsenic could contribute to a non-linear, threshold dose response for arsenic carcinogenesis.

  4. Low-dose azithromycin improves phagocytosis of bacteria by both alveolar and monocyte-derived macrophages in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Sandra; Reynolds, Paul N

    2012-07-01

    Chronic inflammation and reduced airways integrity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) potentially results from secondary necrosis as a result of impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic material by airway macrophages, and increased bacterial colonization. We have previously shown that administration of low-dose azithromycin to subjects with COPD improved macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic airway epithelial cells, reduced inflammation and increased expression of macrophage mannose receptor. We firstly investigated whether there were defects in the ability of both alveolar (AM) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) to phagocytose bacteria in COPD, as we have previously reported for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. We then assessed the effects of administration of low-dose azithromycin to COPD patients on the ability of AM and MDM to phagocytose bacteria. Azithromycin (250 mg orally daily for 5 days then 2× weekly (total 12 weeks)) was administered to 11 COPD subjects and phagocytosis of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled Escherichia coli assessed by flow cytometry. COPD subjects had a significant defect in the ability of both AM and MDM to phagocytose bacteria that was significantly improved by administration of low-dose azithromycin The data provide further support for the long-term use of low dose azithromycin as an attractive adjunct treatment option for COPD. Improved clearance of both apoptotic cells and bacteria in the airway may have a dual effect; reducing the risk of secondary necrosis and release of toxic cell contents that perpetuate inflammation as well as contributing to a reduction in the rate of exacerbations in COPD. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  5. Cytophysiological Changes in the Follicular Epithelium of the Thyroid Gland after Long-Term Exposure to Low Doses of Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT).

    PubMed

    Yaglova, N V; Yaglov, V V

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to endocrine disruptors is considered as a risk factor thyroid gland diseases. We analyzed cytophysiological changes in rat thyroid follicular epithelium after long-term exposure to low doses of the most widespread disruptor DDT. Analysis of thyroid hormone production and light and electron microscopy of thyroid gland samples revealed cytophysiological changes in thyroid epithelium related to impaired transport through the apical membrane, suppressed Golgi complex activity, and impaired thyrotrophic hormone regulation of the secretory functions of thyroid cells, which led to compensatory transition from merocrine to microapocrine secret release.

  6. Expression of genes involved in mouse lung cell differentiation/regulation after acute exposure to photons and protons with or without low-dose preirradiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Zhao, WeiLing; Tian, Sisi; Slater, James M; Deng, Zhiyong; Gridley, Daila S

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of acute 2 Gy irradiation with photons (0.8 Gy/min) or protons (0.9 Gy/min), both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays (0.01 Gy at 0.03 cGy/h), on 84 genes involved in stem cell differentiation or regulation in mouse lungs on days 21 and 56. Genes with a ≥1.5-fold difference in expression and P < 0.05 compared to 0 Gy controls are emphasized. Two proteins specific for lung stem cells/progenitors responsible for local tissue repair were also compared. Overall, striking differences were present between protons and photons in modulating the genes. More genes were affected by protons than by photons (22 compared to 2 and 6 compared to 2 on day 21 and day 56, respectively) compared to 0 Gy. Preirradiation with low-dose-rate γ rays enhanced the acute photon-induced gene modulation on day 21 (11 compared to 2), and all 11 genes were significantly downregulated on day 56. On day 21, seven genes (aldh2, bmp2, cdc2a, col1a1, dll1, foxa2 and notch1) were upregulated in response to most of the radiation regimens. Immunoreactivity of Clara cell secretory protein was enhanced by all radiation regimens. The number of alveolar type 2 cells positive for prosurfactant protein C in irradiated groups was higher on day 56 (12.4-14.6 cells/100) than on day 21 (8.5-11.2 cells/100) (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results showed that acute photons and protons induced different gene expression profiles in the lungs and that pre-exposure to low-dose-rate γ rays sometimes had modulatory effects. In addition, proteins associated with lung-specific stem cells/progenitors were highly sensitive to radiation.

  7. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: focus on the cancer hallmark of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiwei; Brooks, Samira A; Dormoy, Valérian; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Massfelder, Thierry; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Xia, Menghang; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Brown, Dustin G; Prudhomme, Kalan R; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K; Lowe, Leroy; Jensen, Lasse; Bisson, William H; Kleinstreuer, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    One of the important 'hallmarks' of cancer is angiogenesis, which is the process of formation of new blood vessels that are necessary for tumor expansion, invasion and metastasis. Under normal physiological conditions, angiogenesis is well balanced and controlled by endogenous proangiogenic factors and antiangiogenic factors. However, factors produced by cancer cells, cancer stem cells and other cell types in the tumor stroma can disrupt the balance so that the tumor microenvironment favors tumor angiogenesis. These factors include vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial tissue factor and other membrane bound receptors that mediate multiple intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Though environmental exposures to certain chemicals have been found to initiate and promote tumor development, the role of these exposures (particularly to low doses of multiple substances), is largely unknown in relation to tumor angiogenesis. This review summarizes the evidence of the role of environmental chemical bioactivity and exposure in tumor angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. We identify a number of ubiquitous (prototypical) chemicals with disruptive potential that may warrant further investigation given their selectivity for high-throughput screening assay targets associated with proangiogenic pathways. We also consider the cross-hallmark relationships of a number of important angiogenic pathway targets with other cancer hallmarks and we make recommendations for future research. Understanding of the role of low-dose exposure of chemicals with disruptive potential could help us refine our approach to cancer risk assessment, and may ultimately aid in preventing cancer by reducing or eliminating exposures to synergistic mixtures of chemicals with carcinogenic potential.

  8. Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2012-04-17

    The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

  9. p53-Dependent Senescence in Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Chronic Normoxia Is Potentiated by Low-Dose γ-Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Höfig, Ines; Ingawale, Yashodhara; Atkinson, Michael J; Hertlein, Heidi; Nelson, Peter J; Rosemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a source of adult multipotent cells important in tissue regeneration. Murine MSCs are known to proliferate poorly in vitro under normoxia. The aim of this study is to analyze the interaction of nonphysiological high oxygen and low-dose γ-irradiation onto growth, senescence, and DNA damage. Tri-potent bone marrow-derived MSCs from p53 wildtype and p53-/- mice were cultured under either 21% or 2% O2. Long-term observations revealed a decreasing ability of wildtype mMSCs to proliferate and form colonies under extended culture in normoxia. This was accompanied by increased senescence under normoxia but not associated with telomere shortening. After low-dose γ-irradiation, the normoxic wildtype cells further increased the level of senescence. The number of radiation-induced γH2AX DNA repair foci was higher in mMSCs kept under normoxia but not in p53-/- cells. P53-deficient MSCs additionally showed higher clonogeneity, lower senescence levels, and fewer γH2AX repair foci per cell as compared to their p53 wildtype counterparts irrespective of oxygen levels. These results reveal that oxygen levels together with γ-irradiation and p53 status are interconnected factors modulating growth capacity of BM MSCs in long-term culture. These efforts help to better understand and optimize handling of MSCs prior to their therapeutic use.

  10. p53-Dependent Senescence in Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Chronic Normoxia Is Potentiated by Low-Dose γ-Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ingawale, Yashodhara; Hertlein, Heidi; Nelson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a source of adult multipotent cells important in tissue regeneration. Murine MSCs are known to proliferate poorly in vitro under normoxia. The aim of this study is to analyze the interaction of nonphysiological high oxygen and low-dose γ-irradiation onto growth, senescence, and DNA damage. Tri-potent bone marrow-derived MSCs from p53 wildtype and p53−/− mice were cultured under either 21% or 2% O2. Long-term observations revealed a decreasing ability of wildtype mMSCs to proliferate and form colonies under extended culture in normoxia. This was accompanied by increased senescence under normoxia but not associated with telomere shortening. After low-dose γ-irradiation, the normoxic wildtype cells further increased the level of senescence. The number of radiation-induced γH2AX DNA repair foci was higher in mMSCs kept under normoxia but not in p53−/− cells. P53-deficient MSCs additionally showed higher clonogeneity, lower senescence levels, and fewer γH2AX repair foci per cell as compared to their p53 wildtype counterparts irrespective of oxygen levels. These results reveal that oxygen levels together with γ-irradiation and p53 status are interconnected factors modulating growth capacity of BM MSCs in long-term culture. These efforts help to better understand and optimize handling of MSCs prior to their therapeutic use. PMID:26788069

  11. Subcutaneous injections of low doses of humanized anti-CD20 veltuzumab: a phase I study in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kalaycio, Matt E; George Negrea, O; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Abbasi, Rashid M; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of subcutaneous (SC) injections with anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 21 patients received 80, 160, or 320 mg injections every 2 weeks × 4 doses (n = 11) or 160 or 320 mg twice-weekly × 16 doses (n = 10). Treatment was well tolerated with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions. Lymphocytosis decreased in all patients (maximum decrease, 5-91%), with 12 patients obtaining >50% decreases. Of 14 patients with lymphadenopathy on CT imaging, 5 (36%) achieved 14-61% reductions (sum of perpendicular diameters). By NCI-WG criteria, two patients achieved partial responses (10%). SC veltuzumab appeared active in all dose groups, with no obvious exposure-response relationship, despite cumulative doses ranging from 320-5120 mg. Overall median progression-free survival was 7.7 months; three patients remained progression-free >1 year (2 ongoing at 2-year study completion). These data suggest further studies of SC veltuzumab in CLL are warranted.

  12. [Genomic instability after exposure to radiation at low doses (in the 10-kilometer zone of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station and under laboratory conditions)].

    PubMed

    Pelevina, I I; Gotlib, V Ia; Kudriashova, O V; Serebrianyĭ, A M; Afanas'ev, G G

    1996-01-01

    The results of series investigations of late effects after Chernobyl accident are discussed. Genomic instability induced by chronic irradiation of cultural cells in Chernobyl zone and in laboratory conditions have been studied. It was shown that low level prolonged irradiation result in increase of frequency of cells with micronuclei, giant cells, enhancement of radiosensitivity in descendents of early irradiated cells. Chronic low doses irradiation doesn't induce the adaptive response. Comparative investigation of adaptive response in blood lymphocytes of people (adults and children) living in Moscow and in regions polluted with radionuclides (5-40 ci/km2) after Chernobyl disaster have been conducted. In population from contaminated areas the frequency of individuals with definite adaptive response is decreased and there are individuals with increasing radiosensitivity after irradiation in conditioned dose. Chronic irradiation during living on contaminated areas don't induce the adaptive response.

  13. Organ-specific effects of low-dose zinc pre-exposure on high-dose zinc induced mitochondrial dysfunction in large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Lang; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Shen, Bin; Wu, Chang-Wen

    2017-04-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the effects of low-dose zinc (Zn) pre-exposure on survival rate, new Zn accumulation, and mitochondrial bioenergetics in the liver and spleen of large yellow croaker exposed to high-dose Zn. To the end, fish were pre-exposed to 0 and 2 mg L(-1) Zn for 48 h and post-exposed to 0 and 12 mg L(-1) Zn for 48 h. Twelve milligrams Zn per liter exposure alone reduced survival rate, but the effect did not appear in the 2 mg L(-1) Zn pre-exposure groups. Two milligrams per liter Zn pre-exposure also ameliorated 12 mg Zn L(-1) induced new Zn accumulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and mitochondrial swelling in the liver. However, these effects did not appear in the spleen. In the liver, 2 mg L(-1) Zn pre-exposure apparently relieved 12 mg L(-1) Zn induced down-regulation of activities of ATP synthase (F-ATPase), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH). The mRNA levels of these genes remained relatively stable in fish exposed to 12 mg L(-1) Zn alone, but increased in fish exposed to 12 mg L(-1) Zn with 2 mg L(-1) Zn pre-treatment. In the spleen, 2 mg Zn L(-1) pre-exposure did not mitigate the down-regulation of mRNA levels of genes and activities of relative enzymes induced by 12 mg L(-1) Zn. In conclusion, our study demonstrated low-dose zinc pre-exposure ameliorated high-dose zinc induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver but not in the spleen of large yellow croaker, indicating an organ-specific effect.

  14. Sublinear response in lacZ mutant frequency of Muta™ Mouse spermatogonial stem cells after low dose subchronic exposure to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Walker, Mike; Sivathayalan, Ahalya; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The transgenic rodent mutation assay was used to compare the dose-response relationship of lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in spermatogonial stem cells exposed acutely or subchronically to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). Muta(™) Mouse males were exposed orally to 0, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg ENU for acute exposures and 0, 1, 2, or 5 mg/(kg day) for 28-day subchronic exposures. LacZ MF was measured in sperm collected 70 days post-exposure to target spermatogonial stem cells. Dose-response data were fit to linear, quadratic, exponential, or power models. Acute exposure resulted in a dose-dependent increase in MF that was significant (P < 0.05) at all doses tested and was best described by a quadratic dose-response model that was linear in the low dose range. In contrast, similar total doses fragmented over a 28-day subchronic exposure only resulted in a significant increase in lacZ MF at the highest dose tested. Therefore, the subchronic no observable genotoxic effect level (NOGEL) was 2 mg/(kg day) (or 56 mg/kg total dose). The subchronic dose-response was best described by the exponential and power models, which were sublinear in the low dose range. Benchmark dose lower confidence limits (BMDLs) for acute and subchronic exposure were 3.0 and 1.0 mg/(kg day) (or 27.4 mg/kg total dose), respectively. These findings are supportive of a saturable DNA repair mechanism as the mutagenic mode of action for ENU in spermatogonia and imply that sufficiently low exposures would not cause appreciable genotoxic effects over background. This may have important implications for the quantitative risk assessment of germ cell mutagens.

  15. Comparison between two FISH techniques in the in vitro study of cytogenetic markers for low-dose X-ray exposure in human primary fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nieri, D.; Berardinelli, F.; Antoccia, A.; Tanzarella, C.; Sgura, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    This work is about the setup of an in vitro system to report low-dose of X-rays as measured as cytogenetic damage. Q- and multicolor FISH (m-FISH), for telomere length and chromosome instability analysis, respectively, were compared to evaluate their sensitivity in the low-dose range in human primary fibroblasts. No telomere length modulation was observed up to 1 Gy in cycling fibroblasts, though reported for high doses, by that frustrating the purpose of using it as a low-exposure marker. To date the m-FISH is the best setup for the assessment of the chromosome structural damage: it allows stable and instable aberrations to be detected all over the karyotype. Stable ones such as balanced translocations, are not eliminated due to cell-cycle as unstable ones, so they are considered transmissible markers for retrospective dosimetry. The induction of chromosome damage showed a clear dependence on dose delivered; unstable aberrations were demonstrated after doses of 0.1 Gy, and stable aberrations after doses higher than 0.5 Gy. Summarizing, q-FISH is unfit to report low exposures while m-FISH provides better results: unstable aberrations are sensible short-term reporters, while stable ones long report exposures but with a higher induction threshold. PMID:23908663

  16. Deoxynivalenol Impairs Weight Gain and Affects Markers of Gut Health after Low-Dose, Short-Term Exposure of Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arash; Braber, Saskia; Akbari, Peyman; Garssen, Johan; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the major mycotoxins produced by Fusarium fungi, and exposure to this mycotoxin requires an assessment of the potential adverse effects, even at low toxin levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a short-term, low-dose DON exposure on various gut health parameters in pigs. Piglets received a commercial feed or the same feed contaminated with DON (0.9 mg/kg feed) for 10 days, and two hours after a DON bolus (0.28 mg/kg BW), weight gain was determined and samples of different segments of the intestine were collected. Even the selected low dose of DON in the diet negatively affected weight gain and induced histomorphological alterations in the duodenum and jejunum. The mRNA expression of different tight junction (TJ) proteins, especially occludin, of inflammatory markers, like interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-10 and the oxidative stress marker heme-oxigenase1, were affected along the intestine by low levels of DON in the diet. Taken together, our results indicate that even after low-level exposure to DON, which has been generally considered as acceptable in animal feeds, clinically-relevant changes are measurable in markers of gut health and integrity. PMID:26067367

  17. Short-term exposure to low doses of rotenone induces developmental, biochemical, behavioral, and histological changes in fish.

    PubMed

    Melo, Karina Motta; Oliveira, Rhaul; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe; Domingues, Inês; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; de Souza Filho, José; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko

    2015-09-01

    nontarget fish species, especially because rotenone and its metabolite rotenolone are frequently reported in the microgram range in natural environments for several days after field applications. Rotenone should be used with caution. Given the high toxicity and wide range of sublethal effects here reported, further studies in a chronic exposure scenario are recommended.

  18. Comparison between Calcitriol and Calcitriol Plus Low-Dose Cinacalcet for the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Chronic Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Ting; Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Kuo, Chien-Chun; Chen, Te-Chuan; Wu, Chien-Shing; Chiu, Terry Ting-Yu; Lee, Wen-Chin; Lee, Chien-Te

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Uremic hyperparathyroidism (UHPT) has been shown to contribute to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease—mineral bone disorder. UHPT is frequently observed in chronic dialysis patients, and patients with UHPT are associated with increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Cinacalcet is a novel agent that increases sensitivity to the calcium-sensing receptor and is approved for control of UHPT. Nevertheless, cinacalcet is costly and information regarding efficacy of low-dose cinacalcet on UHPT is limited. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate treatment with either low-dose calcitriol combined with low-dose cinacalcet (25 mg) (d-Cinacalcet) or calcitriol alone (VitD) in dialysis patients with moderate to severe UHPT. A total of 81 dialysis patients were enrolled (40 subjects in d-Cinacalcet group and 41 subjects in VitD group). Demographic data including age, gender, duration on dialysis and biochemical data were reviewed and recorded. Results: At the end of the study, the intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels of the d-Cinacalcet group declined significantly (from 1166.0 ± 469.3 pg/mL to 679.8 ± 421.6 pg/mL, p < 0.0001), while there was no significant change in the VitD group. Significant decrease of serum calcium (Ca: 9.9 ± 0.6 mg/dL vs. 9.6 ± 0.8 mg/dL, p = 0.002), phosphorus (P: 5.9 ± 1.3 mg/dL vs. 4.9 ± 0.9 mg/dL, p < 0.0001) and calcium phosphate product (Ca × P: 58.7 ± 15.0 mg2/dL2 vs. 46.9 ± 8.9 mg2/dL2, p < 0.0001) were observed in the d-Cinacalcet group. In addition, the subjects in the d-Cinacalcet group had a greater proportion to achieve Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI)-recommended biochemical targets than the subjects in the VitD group (Ca: 48% vs. 24%; P: 78% vs. 32%; Ca × P: 85% vs. 37%; iPTH: 15% vs. 0%). Conclusions: We conclude that combination therapy of low-dose cinacalcet and calcitriol is more effective than calcitriol alone as a treatment for moderate and

  19. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, James

    2002-09-14

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation.

  20. Comparison between low doses of TMT and cat odor exposure in anxiety- and fear-related behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Hacquemand, R; Choffat, N; Jacquot, L; Brand, G

    2013-02-01

    Few comparisons were made between cat odor and synthetic fox odor (TMT) to study fear and anxiety in rodents. TMT is frequently used are at high concentration while the stimulus should be as possible closer to natural conditions. The aim of this work was to compare behavioral responses of mice exposed to cat odor and low doses of TMT (i.e. 10 μl of a solution containing 1%, 0.1% or 0.01% TMT). Behavioral parameters were recorded in elevated plus-maze and in open field. Results showed that 1% TMT and 0.1% TMT induced similar responses to cat odor, contrary to water and 0.01% TMT which failed to elicit fear or anxiety-related behaviors. Additionally, behavioral changes were more marked in EPM - e.g. time spent in open arms - than in open field - e.g. freezing. These findings are discussed in terms of a possible continuum of mild anxiety-like behaviors to strong fear-like behaviors linked to predator odor intensity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of subcutaneous low-dose alemtuzumab and rituximab combination therapy for steroid-resistant chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Cesar Homero; Cantú-Rodríguez, Olga Graciela; Borjas-Almaguer, Omar David; González-Llano, Oscar; Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Solano-Genesta, Manuel; Gómez-Guijosa, Miguel; Mancias-Guerra, Consuelo; Tarin, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic graft-versus-host disease is a common late complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Corticosteroids are the standard initial treatment. Second-line treatment has not been well defined. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of low doses of alemtuzumab plus low doses of rituximab in the treatment of steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease. Design and Methods Ten men and 5 women were prospectively included in the study. All patients received one cycle of subcutaneous alemtuzumab 10 mg/day/3 days and intravenous rituximab 100 mg on Days +4, +11, +18 and +25. The therapeutic response was measured on Days +30, +90 and +365 of the protocol. Results Median age was 41 years. The main site involved was the oral mucosa (86.7%) followed by the eyes (66.7%), liver (60%), skin (53%), lungs (13.3%) and intestinal tract (6.7%). The overall response was 100% at Day +30 evaluation: 10 patients (67%) had partial remission, 5 (33%) had complete remission. At Day +90 evaluation, 7 (50%) patients had partial remission, 4 (28%) had complete remission; 3 (21%) had relapsed chronic graft-versus-host disease and one patient did not reach the evaluation time point. So far, 5 patients have reached the Day +365 follow-up evaluation; 2 (40%) had partial remission, 2 had complete remission and one experienced chronic graft-versus-host disease progression. Adverse effects were mainly infections in 67% of patients; these were all quickly solved, except for one patient who died from pneumonia. Conclusions This combination therapy appears to be an efficacious and safe treatment for steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease. Longer follow up to determine the durability of response and survival is required. PMID:22133770

  2. Investigation of sinonasal anatomy via low-dose multidetector CT examination in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with higher risk for perioperative complications.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Marcin; Guzinski, Maciej; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Krecicki, Tomasz

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare visualisation of the surgically relevant anatomical structures via low- and standard-dose multidetector CT protocol in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and higher risk for perioperative complications (i.e. presence of bronchial asthma, history of sinus surgery and advanced nasal polyposis). 135 adult CRS patients were divided randomly into standard-dose (120 kVp, 100 mAs) or low-dose CT groups (120 kVp, 45 mAs). The detectability of the vital anatomical structures (anterior ethmoid artery, optic nerve, cribriform plate and lamina papyracea) was scored using a five-point scale (from excellent to unacceptable) by a radiologist and sinus surgeon. Polyp sizes were quantified endoscopically according to the Lildholdt's scale (LS). Olfactory function was tested with the "Sniffin' Sticks" test. On the low-dose CT images, detectability ranged from 2.42 (better than poor) for cribriform plate among anosmic cases to 4.11 (better than good) for lamina papyracea in cases without nasal polyps. Identification of lamina papyracea on low-dose scans was significantly worse in each group and the same was the case with cribriform plates in patients with advanced polyposis and anosmia. Cribriform plates were the most poorly identified (between poor and average) among all the structures on low-dose images. Identification of anterior ethmoid artery (AEA) with reduced dose was insignificantly worse than with standard-dose examination. The AEA was scored as an average-defined structure and was the second weakest visualised. In conclusion, preoperatively, low-dose protocols may not sufficiently visualise the surgically relevant anatomical structures in patients with CRS and bronchial asthma, advanced nasal polyps (LS > 2) and history of sinus surgery. Low mAs value enables comparable detectability of sinonasal landmarks with standard-dose protocols in patients without analysed risk factors. In the context of planned surgery, the current

  3. Effect of high/low dose N-acetylcysteine on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanfei; Cai, Wanru; Lei, Shu; Zhang, Zhongheng

    2014-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, characterised by persistent airflow limitation, mucus hypersecretion, oxidative stress and airway inflammation. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been shown an uncertain benefit in COPD patients. Systematic searches were conducted in Cochrane, Medline and Embase electronic databases. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the different effect between high and low-dose NAC treatment on COPD exacerbation. This review yielded 11 studies. The methodological quality of included studies were scored using the Jadad score, with a scale of 1 to 5 (score of 5 being the highest). Data showed high-dose NAC can reduce both the total number of exacerbations (RR = 0.59, 0.47 to 0.74, 95%CI, p < 0.001) and the proportion of patients with at least one exacerbation (RR = 0.76, 0.59 to 0.98, 95%CI, p = 0.03). In the low-dose group, subgroup with jadad ≤ 3 showed a significant decrease (RR = 0.69, 0.61 to 0.77, 95%CI, p < 0.001) in the proportion of patients with exacerbation, the other subgroup with Jadad score > 3 showed no significant decrease (RR = 0.98, 0.90 to 1.06, 95%CI, p = 0.59). And low-dose NAC showed no benefit in the total number of exacerbations (RR = 0.97, 0.68 to 1.37, 95%CI, p = 0.85). Neither high nor low-dose NAC treatment showed benefit in forced expiratory volume in one second(FEV1)(WMD = 1.08, -9.97 to 12.13, 95%CI, p = 0.85). Long-term high-dose NAC treatment may lead to a lower rate of exacerbations. But the effect of low-dose NAC treatment remains uncertain. Further researches are needed to confirm this outcome and to clarify its mechanisms.

  4. Calmodulin mediates DNA repair pathways involving H2AX in response to low-dose radiation exposure of RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Heather S; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Eberlein, P Elis; Watson, David J; Squier, Thomas C

    2009-03-16

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that modulate macrophage radioresistance is necessary for the development of effective radiation therapies, as tumor-associated macrophages promote both angiogenesis and matrix remodeling that, in turn, enhance tumor metastasis. In this respect, we have identified a dose-dependent increase in the abundance (i.e., expression level) of the calcium regulatory protein calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages upon irradiation. At low doses of irradiation there are minimal changes in the abundance of other cellular proteins detected using mass spectrometry, indicating that increases in CaM levels are part of a specific radiation-dependent cellular response. CaM overexpression results in increased macrophage survival following radiation exposure, acting to diminish the sensitivity to low-dose radiation exposures. Following macrophage irradiation, increases in CaM abundance also result in an increase in the number of phosphorylated histone H2AX foci, associated with DNA repair, with no change in the extent of double-stranded DNA damage. In comparison, when nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB)-dependent pathways are inhibited, through the expression of a dominant-negative IkappaB construct, there is no significant increase in phosphorylated histone H2AX foci upon irradiation. These results indicate that the molecular basis for the up-regulation of histone H2AX-mediated DNA repair pathways is not the result of nonspecific NFkappaB-dependent pathways or a specific threshold of DNA damage. Rather, increases in CaM abundance act to minimize the low-dose hypersensitivity to radiation by enhancing macrophage radioresistance through processes that include the up-regulation of DNA repair pathways involving histone H2AX phosphorylation.

  5. Calmodulin Mediates DNA Repair Pathways Involving H2AX in Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure of RAW 264.7 Macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Lopez Ferrer, Daniel; Eberlein, P. Elis; Watson, David J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2009-02-05

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that modulate macrophage radioresistance is necessary for the development of effective radiation therapies, as tumor-associated macrophages promote both angiogenesis and matrix remodeling that, in turn, enhance metastasis. In this respect, we have identified a dose-dependent increase in the abundance of the calcium regulatory protein calmodulin (CaM) in RAW 264.7 macrophages upon irradiation. CaM overexpression results in increased macrophage survival following radiation exposure, acting to diminish the sensitivity to low-dose exposures. Increases in CaM abundance also result in an increase in the number of phosphorylated histone H2AX protein complexes associated with DNA repair following macrophage irradiation, with no change in the extent of double-stranded DNA damage. In comparison, when NFκB-dependent pathways are inhibited, through the expression of a dominant-negative IκB construct, there is no significant increase in phosphorylated H2AX upon irradiation. These results indicate that the molecular basis for the up-regulation of histone H2AX mediated DNA-repair pathways is not the result of nonspecific NFκB-dependent pathways or a specific threshold of DNA damage. Rather, increases in CaM abundance act to minimize the low-dose hypersensitivity to radiation to enhance macrophage radioresistance through processes that include the upregulation of DNA repair pathways involving histone protein H2AX phosphorylation.

  6. The association between urinary kidney injury molecule 1 and urinary cadmium in elderly during long-term, low-dose cadmium exposure: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pennemans, Valérie; De Winter, Liesbeth M; Munters, Elke; Nawrot, Tim S; Van Kerkhove, Emmy; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Reynders, Carmen; Dewitte, Harrie; Carleer, Robert; Penders, Joris; Swennen, Quirine

    2011-09-05

    Urinary kidney injury molecule 1 is a recently discovered early biomarker for renal damage that has been proven to be correlated to urinary cadmium in rats. However, so far the association between urinary cadmium and kidney injury molecule 1 in humans after long-term, low-dose cadmium exposure has not been studied. We collected urine and blood samples from 153 non-smoking men and women aged 60+, living in an area with moderate cadmium pollution from a non-ferrous metal plant for a significant period. Urinary cadmium and urinary kidney injury molecule 1 as well as other renal biomarkers (alpha1-microglobulin, beta2-microglobulin, blood urea nitrogen, urinary proteins and microalbumin) were assessed. Both before (r = 0.20; p = 0.01) and after (partial r = 0.32; p < 0.0001) adjustment for creatinine, age, sex, past smoking, socio-economic status and body mass index, urinary kidney injury molecule 1 correlated with urinary cadmium concentrations. No significant association was found between the other studied renal biomarkers and urinary cadmium. We showed that urinary kidney injury molecule 1 levels are positively correlated with urinary cadmium concentration in an elderly population after long-term, low-dose exposure to cadmium, while other classical markers do not show an association. Therefore, urinary kidney injury molecule 1 might be considered as a biomarker for early-stage metal-induced kidney injury by cadmium.

  7. Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: focus on the cancer hallmark of tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiwei; Brooks, Samira A.; Dormoy, Valérian; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Massfelder, Thierry; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Xia, Menghang; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Brown, Dustin G.; Prudhomme, Kalan R.; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A.; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K.; Lowe, Leroy; Jensen, Lasse; Bisson, William H.; Kleinstreuer, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    One of the important ‘hallmarks’ of cancer is angiogenesis, which is the process of formation of new blood vessels that are necessary for tumor expansion, invasion and metastasis. Under normal physiological conditions, angiogenesis is well balanced and controlled by endogenous proangiogenic factors and antiangiogenic factors. However, factors produced by cancer cells, cancer stem cells and other cell types in the tumor stroma can disrupt the balance so that the tumor microenvironment favors tumor angiogenesis. These factors include vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial tissue factor and other membrane bound receptors that mediate multiple intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Though environmental exposures to certain chemicals have been found to initiate and promote tumor development, the role of these exposures (particularly to low doses of multiple substances), is largely unknown in relation to tumor angiogenesis. This review summarizes the evidence of the role of environmental chemical bioactivity and exposure in tumor angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. We identify a number of ubiquitous (prototypical) chemicals with disruptive potential that may warrant further investigation given their selectivity for high-throughput screening assay targets associated with proangiogenic pathways. We also consider the cross-hallmark relationships of a number of important angiogenic pathway targets with other cancer hallmarks and we make recommendations for future research. Understanding of the role of low-dose exposure of chemicals with disruptive potential could help us refine our approach to cancer risk assessment, and may ultimately aid in preventing cancer by reducing or eliminating exposures to synergistic mixtures of chemicals with carcinogenic potential. PMID:26106137

  8. Perinatal Exposure to a Low Dose of Bisphenol A Impaired Systemic Cellular Immune Response and Predisposes Young Rats to Intestinal Parasitic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Sandrine; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Lencina, Corinne; Leveque, Mathilde; Naturel, Manon; Sekkal, Soraya; Harkat, Cherryl; Gaultier, Eric; Olier, Maïwenn; Garcia-Villar, Raphael; Theodorou, Vassilia; Houdeau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to the food contaminant bisphenol A (BPA) in rats induces long lasting adverse effects on intestinal immune homeostasis. This study was aimed at examining the immune response to dietary antigens and the clearance of parasites in young rats at the end of perinatal exposure to a low dose of BPA. Female rats were fed with BPA [5 µg/kg of body weight/day] or vehicle from gestational day 15 to pup weaning. Juvenile female offspring (day (D)25) were used to analyze immune cell populations, humoral and cellular responses after oral tolerance or immunization protocol to ovalbumin (OVA), and susceptibility to infection by the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (N. brasiliensis). Anti-OVA IgG titers following either oral tolerance or immunization were not affected after BPA perinatal exposure, while a sharp decrease in OVA-induced IFNγ secretion occurred in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of OVA-immunized rats. These results are consistent with a decreased number of helper T cells, regulatory T cells and dendritic cells in spleen and MLN of BPA-exposed rats. The lack of cellular response to antigens questioned the ability of BPA-exposed rats to clear intestinal infections. A 1.5-fold increase in N. brasiliensis living larvae was observed in the intestine of BPA-exposed rats compared to controls due to an inappropriate Th1/Th2 cytokine production in infected jejunal tissues. These results show that perinatal BPA exposure impairs cellular response to food antigens, and increases susceptibility to intestinal parasitic infection in the juveniles. This emphasized the maturing immune system during perinatal period highly sensitive to low dose exposure to BPA, altering innate and adaptative immune response capacities in early life. PMID:25415191

  9. What Have "Omics" Taught Us about the Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2011-04-27

    There is a plethora of data available on the DNA damages associated with exposures to ionizing radiation and the subsequent cellular responses. Indeed, much of radiation research has focused on these initial insults and induced responses, particularly DNA repair, cell signaling pathways, cell cycle checkpoint control, mutation induction, chromosomal rearrangements, transformation and apoptosis etc. While many of these endpoints correlate with exposure dose, few, if any, provide substantive information on human health risk(s) associated with radiation exposure. Here the contribution of recent advances in high throughput ‘omics technologies are evaluated to examine what they have taught us about health risk(s) to humans associated with exposure to ionizing radiation.

  10. [The status of the progeny of male rats subjected to low-dose external gamma irradiation exposure].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, E P; Kononenko, V V; Galian, S P; Vernidub, I V; Topchiĭ, I G

    1996-01-01

    In studies on 120 mature males of Wistar rats and 252 female rats of the same line, 20-day-old fetuses and 974 young rats of the first generation, anomalies of antenatal and postnatal development were found after exposure of spermatids and spermatozoa to gamma-radiation in doses 0.25-1.0 Gy. After exposure of male rats to radiation in dose 0.25 Gy, reliable delay of pelvic bone ossification was observed as compared to the control.

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone for chronic nononcological pain in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Fabio; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Marcassa, Claudio; Ricevuti, Giovanni; Rollone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults. Increasing evidence indicates strong opioids as a valid option for chronic pain management in geriatrics. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone–naloxone (OXN-PR) in patients aged ≥70 years. Methods This open-label prospective study assessed older patients naïve to strong opioids presenting with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Patients were prescribed OXN-PR at an initial dose of 10/5 mg/day for 28 days. In case of insufficient analgesia, the initial daily dose could be increased gradually. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline, assessed by a ten-point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at day 28 (T28). Changes in cognitive state, daily functioning, quality of life, constipation, and other adverse events were assessed. Results Of 53 patients enrolled (mean 81.7±6.2 years [range 70–92 years]), 52 (98.1%) completed the 28-day observation. At T28, the primary end point (≥30% reduction in mean pain from baseline in the absence of bowel function deterioration) was achieved in 38 patients (71.7%). OXN-PR significantly relieved pain (NRS score –3.26; P<0.0001), as well as daily need for rescue paracetamol (from 86.8% at baseline to 40.4% at T28; P<0.001), and reduced impact of pain on daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form from 6.2±1.5 to 3.4±2.1; P<0.0001). OXN-PR was also associated with significant improvement in daily functioning (Barthel Index from 53.3±14.1 to 61.3±14.3; P<0.01). No changes were observed in cognitive status and bowel function. OXN-PR was well tolerated; only one patient (1.9%) prematurely withdrew from treatment, due to drowsiness. Conclusion Findings from this open-label prospective study suggest that low-dose OXN-PR may be effective and well tolerated for treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in older patients. Besides its effectiveness, these data indicate that low-dose

  12. Arsenic exposure and bladder cancer: quantitative assessment of studies in human populations to detect risks at low doses.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Joyce S; Alexander, Dominik D; Perez, Vanessa; Mink, Pamela J

    2014-03-20

    While exposures to high levels of arsenic in drinking water are associated with excess cancer risk (e.g., skin, bladder, and lung), exposures at lower levels (e.g., <100-200 µg/L) generally are not. Lack of significant associations may result from methodological issues (e.g., inadequate statistical power, exposure misclassification), or a different dose-response relationship at low exposures, possibly associated with a toxicological mode of action that requires a sufficient dose for increased tumor formation. The extent to which bladder cancer risk for low-level arsenic exposure can be statistically measured by epidemiological studies was examined using an updated meta-analysis of bladder cancer risk with data from two new publications. The summary relative risk estimate (SRRE) for all nine studies was elevated slightly, but not significantly (1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-1.21, p-Heterogeneity [p-H]=0.543). The SRRE among never smokers was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.66-1.08, p-H=0.915), whereas the SRRE was positive and more heterogeneous among ever smokers (1.18; 95% CI: 0.97-1.44, p-H=0.034). The SRRE was statistically significantly lower than relative risks predicted for never smokers in the United States based on linear extrapolation of risks from higher doses in southwest Taiwan to arsenic water exposures >10 µg/L for more than one-third of a lifetime. By contrast, for all study subjects, relative risks predicted for one-half of lifetime exposure to 50 µg/L were just above the upper 95% CI on the SRRE. Thus, results from low-exposure studies, particularly for never smokers, were statistically inconsistent with predicted risk based on high-dose extrapolation. Additional studies that better characterize tobacco use and stratify analyses of arsenic and bladder cancer by smoking status are necessary to further examine risks of arsenic exposure for smokers.

  13. Immune potentiation after fractionated exposure to very low doses of ionizing radiation and/or caloric restriction in autoimmune-prone and normal C57Bl/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.J.; Enger, S.M.; Peterson, W.J.; Makinodan, T. )

    1990-06-01

    Very low doses of ionizing radiation can enhance immune responsiveness and extend life span in normal mice. Total lymphoid irradiation at relatively high doses of radiation can retard autoimmune disease in genetically susceptible mice, but may impair immune function. In order to determine whether fractionated low dose exposure would enhance immune response and retard lymphadenopathy in autoimmune-prone mice, groups of C57B1/6 lpr/lpr mice were sham irradiated, exposed 5 days/week for 4 weeks to 0.04 Gy/day, or to 0.1 Gy/day. After the radiation protocol, the mice were evaluated for splenic T cell proliferative capacity, T cell subset distribution, and total spleen cell numbers. The independent and additive effect of caloric restriction was additionally assessed since this intervention has been shown to increase immune responsiveness and retard disease progression in autoimmune-prone mice. The congenic C57B1/6 +/+ immunologically normal strain was evaluated in parallel as congenic control. The results indicated that mitogen-stimulated proliferation was up-regulated in both strains of mice after exposure to 0.04 Gy/day. The proliferative capacity was additively enhanced when radiation at this dose level was combined with caloric restriction. Exposure to 0.1 Gy/day resulted in further augmentation of proliferative response in the lpr/lpr mice, but was depressive in the +/+ mice. Although the proportions of the various T cell subpopulations were altered in both strains after exposure to LDR, the specific subset alterations were different within each strain. Additional experiments were subsequently performed to assess whether the thymus is required for LDR-induced immune potentiation. Thymectomy completely abrogated the LDR effect in the +/+ mice, suggesting that thymic processing and/or trafficking is adaptively altered with LDR in this strain.

  14. Nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 following long-term fractionated exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation in normal human diploid cells.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Sasatani, Megumi; Kamiya, Kenji; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a mitogenic sensor that responds to growth signals from the extracellular environment and regulates the G 1-to-S cell cycle transition. When cells are acutely irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy, cyclin D1 is degraded, causing cell cycle arrest at the G 1/S checkpoint. In contrast, cyclin D1 accumulates in human tumor cells that are exposed to long-term fractionated radiation (0.5 Gy/fraction of X-rays). In this study we investigated the effect of fractionated low-dose radiation exposure on cyclin D1 localization in 3 strains of normal human fibroblasts. To specifically examine the nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1, cells were treated with a hypotonic buffer containing detergent to remove cytoplasmic cyclin D1. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunofluorescence was used to identify cells in S phase. With this approach, we observed S-phase nuclear retention of cyclin D1 following low-dose fractionated exposures, and found that cyclin D1 nuclear retention increased with exposure time. Cells that retained nuclear cyclin D1 were more likely to have micronuclei than non-retaining cells, indicating that the accumulation of nuclear cyclin D1 was associated with genomic instability. Moreover, inhibition of the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) pathway facilitated cyclin D1 degradation and eliminated cyclin D1 nuclear retention in cells exposed to fractionated radiation. Thus, cyclin D1 may represent a useful marker for monitoring long-term effects associated with exposure to low levels of radiation.

  15. [Methodological aspects in environmental and biological monitoring of exposure to low doses of benzene: problems and possible solutions].

    PubMed

    Tranfo, Giovanna; Paci, Enrico; Fustinoni, Silvia; Barbieri, Anna; Carrieri, Mariella

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine some methods to measure human exposure to benzene, both in life and occupational environments, through environmental and biological monitoring, examining the critical issues and optimal conditions of use. The overall performance of environmental monitoring, from the analytical point of view, strongly depend on the choice of an appropriate method of sampling and analysis. Urinary SPMA and t, t-MA are the biomarkers listed by ACGIH to evaluate occupational exposure: most of the recent studies use HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry, but since t, t-MA is present in the urine in larger quantities it is also determinable with UV detectors. The urinary benzene is an index not officially included in the list of the ACGIH BEIs, but it is useful to assess exposure and benzene at low concentrations, that most frequently are found today in the occupational and life environments.

  16. New developed urological protocols for the Uro Dyna-CT reduce radiation exposure of endourological patients below the levels of the low dose standard CT scans.

    PubMed

    Rassweiler, M-C; Banckwitz, R; Koehler, C; Mueller-Allissat, B; Michel, M-S; Häcker, A; Ritter, M

    2014-10-01

    Cross-sectional imaging by computed tomography (CT) is associated with higher radiation dose compared to plain X-ray. The Uro Dyna-CT provides CT-like images in the endourological operating room. Our aim was to reduce the radiation exposure of endourological patients with the Uro Dyna-CT and optimize the cross-sectional image quality. For the hard contrast protocol, two artificial stones were placed in a Rando-Alderson phantom's left kidney region. Relevant parameters of the standard abdomen protocol were changed. After each modification, two urologists subjectively evaluated the image quality. We developed two customized protocols (standard, low-dose) for hard contrast imaging. To optimize the examination protocol for soft tissue imaging a standardized cone beam phantom was used. Parameters of the preset high-resolution protocol were changed to develop a protocol with similar objective image quality but lower radiation dose. To evaluate the effective radiation dose we embedded 129 thermoluminescence dosimeters in the kidney and ureter region of the Rando-Alderson phantom and performed each protocol five times (stone, soft tissue) and ten times (low-dose protocol). Mean effective dose values per 3D-examination were calculated. We detected a dose area product (DAP) 776.2 (standard) and 163.5 μGym(2) (low-dose) for the stone protocols with an effective dose of 1.96 and 0.33 mSv, respectively. The soft tissue protocol produced a DAP of 5,070 μGym(2) and an effective dose of 7.76 mSv. Our newly developed examination protocols for the Uro Dyna-CT provide CT-like image quality during urological interventions with low radiation dose.

  17. Prostaglandin production in human endometrium following continuous exposure to low-dose levonorgestrel released from a vaginal ring.

    PubMed

    White, J O; Sullivan, M H; Patel, L; Croxtall, J D; d'Arcangues, C; Belsey, E M; Elder, M G

    1991-04-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolites produced by primary cultures of human endometrial cells derived from biopsies obtained before and after exposure to 20 micrograms/day levonorgestrel for 84 +/- 1 days were analysed by reverse phase HPLC. This revealed a significant increase in PGF1 alpha and an epoxide metabolite upon levonorgestrel stimulation. The proportion of epoxide metabolite, PGF1 alpha and PGE2 were positively correlated with serum levonorgestrel levels while HETES, PGE2 and epoxide were similarly correlated with serum oestradiol. The extent of intermenstrual bleeding during exposure to levonorgestrel was correlated with the proportion of epoxide and HETES products in vitro which is discussed in relation to their physiological function.

  18. Use of low-dose oral theophylline as an adjunct to inhaled corticosteroids in preventing exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Graham; Cotton, Seonaidh; Barnes, Peter; Briggs, Andrew; Burns, Graham; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Chrystyn, Henry; Davies, Lisa; De Soyza, Anthony; Fielding, Shona; Gompertz, Simon; Haughney, John; Lee, Amanda J; McCormack, Kirsty; McPherson, Gladys; Morice, Alyn; Norrie, John; Sullivan, Anita; Wilson, Andrew; Price, David

    2015-06-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. An incomplete response to the anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled corticosteroids is present in COPD. Preclinical work indicates that 'low dose' theophylline improves steroid responsiveness. The Theophylline With Inhaled Corticosteroids (TWICS) trial investigates whether the addition of 'low dose' theophylline to inhaled corticosteroids has clinical and cost-effective benefits in COPD. TWICS is a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial conducted in primary and secondary care sites in the UK. The inclusion criteria are the following: an established predominant respiratory diagnosis of COPD (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in first second/forced vital capacity [FEV1/FVC] of less than 0.7), age of at least 40 years, smoking history of at least 10 pack-years, current inhaled corticosteroid use, and history of at least two exacerbations requiring treatment with antibiotics or oral corticosteroids in the previous year. A computerised randomisation system will stratify 1424 participants by region and recruitment setting (primary and secondary) and then randomly assign with equal probability to intervention or control arms. Participants will receive either 'low dose' theophylline (Uniphyllin MR 200 mg tablets) or placebo for 52 weeks. Dosing is based on pharmacokinetic modelling to achieve a steady-state serum theophylline of 1-5 mg/l. A dose of theophylline MR 200 mg once daily (or placebo once daily) will be taken by participants who do not smoke or participants who smoke but have an ideal body weight (IBW) of not more than 60 kg. A dose of theophylline MR 200 mg twice daily (or placebo twice daily) will be taken by participants who smoke and have an IBW of more than 60 kg. Participants will be reviewed at recruitment and after 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome is the total number of participant-reported COPD exacerbations requiring

  19. Peripubertal exposure to low doses of tributyltin chloride affects the homeostasis of serum T, E2, LH, and body weight of male mice.

    PubMed

    Si, Jiliang; Wu, Xuesen; Wan, Chengen; Zeng, Tao; Zhang, Miao; Xie, Keqin; Li, Jie

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that tributyltin could act as an endocrine disruptor in mammals. However, the data on the low-dose effect of tributyltin in animals are still lacking. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the endocrine disruption induced by low levels of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) in male KM mice. The animals were treated with 0.05 or 0.5 mg TBTCl/kg body weight/3 days from postnatal days (PNDs) 24 to 45, and killed on PNDs 49 and 84, respectively. Mice treated with 0.5 mg TBTCl/kg exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone (T) levels on PND 49 and then followed by an obvious recovery on PND 84. Furthermore, mice treated with 0.05 mg TBTCl/kg showed reduced serum 17β-estradiol (E2) levels on PND 49. However, treatments with TBTCl resulted in a dose-dependent increase in serum E2 concentration of the mice on PND 84. Administration of TBTCl also decreased levels of serum luteinizing hormone and intratesticular E2 on PND 84. In addition, mice exposed to 0.05 mg/kg TBTCl exhibited an increase in body weight in the late stage of the experiment. These results indicate that treatment with low doses of TBTCl could disturb hormone homeostasis and body weight gain in rodents, and exposure to different levels of TBTCl might have different effects on changing some physiologic parameters.

  20. Induction of potent local cellular immunity with low dose X4 SHIV{sub SF33A} vaginal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tasca, Silvana; Tsai, Lily; Trunova, Nataliya; Gettie, Agegnehu; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Bohm, Rudolf; Chakrabarti, Lisa; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2007-10-10

    Intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques with varying doses of the CXCR4 (X4)-tropic SHIV{sub SF33A} isolate revealed a threshold inoculum for establishment of systemic virus infection and a dose dependency in overall viral burden and CD4+ T cell depletion. While exposure to inoculum size of 1000 or greater 50% tissue infectious dose (TCID{sub 50}) resulted in high viremia and precipitous CD4+ T cell loss, occult infection was observed in seven of eight macaques exposed to 500 TCID{sub 50} of the same virus. The latter was characterized by intermittent detection of low level virus with no evidence of seroconversion or CD4+ T cell decline, but with signs of an ongoing antiviral T cell immune response. Upon vaginal re-challenge with the same limiting dose 11-12 weeks after the first, classic pathogenic X4 SHIV{sub SF33A} infection was established in four of the seven previously exposed seronegative macaques, implying enhanced susceptibility to systemic infection with prior exposure. Pre-existing peripheral SIV gag-specific CD4+ T cells were more readily demonstrable in macaques that became systemically infected following re-exposure than those that were not. In contrast, early presence of circulating polyfunctional cytokine secreting CD8+ T cells or strong virus-specific proliferative responses in draining lymph nodes and in the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) following the first exposure was associated with protection from systemic re-infection. These studies identify the gut and lymphoid tissues proximal to the genital tract as sites of robust CD8 T lymphocyte responses that contribute to containment of virus spread following vaginal transmission.

  1. Exposure to a low dose of bisphenol A during fetal life or in adulthood alters maternal behavior in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Palanza, Paola L; Howdeshell, Kembra L; Parmigiani, Stefano; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2002-01-01

    Maternal behavior in mammals is the result of a complex interaction between the lactating dam and her developing offspring. Slight perturbations of any of the components of the mother-infant interaction may result in alterations of the behavior of the mother and/or of the offspring. We studied the effects of exposure of female CD-1 mice to the estrogenic chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during fetal life and/or in adulthood during the last part of pregnancy on subsequent maternal behavior. Pregnant females were fed daily doses of corn oil (controls) or 10 microg/kg body weight BPA during gestation days 14-18. As adults, the prenatally treated female offspring were time-mated and again fed either corn oil (controls) or the same doses of BPA on gestation days 14-18, resulting in four treatment groups: controls, prenatal BPA exposure, adult BPA exposure, and both prenatal and adult BPA exposure. Maternal behavior was then observed on postnatal days 2-15 and reflex responses were examined in the offspring. Dams exposed to BPA either as fetuses or in adulthood spent less time nursing their pups and more time out of the nest compared with the control group. Females exposed to BPA both as fetuses and in adulthood did not significantly differ from controls. No alterations in postnatal reflex development were observed in the offspring of the females exposed to BPA. The changes seen in maternal behavior may be the result of a direct effect of BPA on the neuroendocrine substrates underlying the initiation of maternal behavior. PMID:12060838

  2. Repetitive exposure to low-dose X-irradiation attenuates testicular apoptosis in type 2 diabetic rats, likely via Akt-mediated Nrf2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Kong, Chuipeng; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Zhenyu; Wan, Zhiqiang; Jia, Lin; Liu, Qiuju; Wang, Yuehui; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei; Han, Fujun; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether repetitive exposure to low-dose radiation (LDR) attenuates type 2 diabetes (T2DM)-induced testicular apoptotic cell death in a T2DM rat model, we examined the effects of LDR exposure on diabetic and age-matched control rats. We found that testicular apoptosis and oxidative stress levels were significantly higher in T2DM rats than in control rats. In addition, glucose metabolism-related Akt and GSK-3β function was downregulated and Akt negative regulators PTP1B and TRB3 were upregulated in the T2DM group. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catalase content were also found to be decreased in T2DM rats. These effects were partially prevented or reversed by repetitive LDR exposure. Nrf2 and its downstream genes NQO1, SOD, and catalase were significantly upregulated by repetitive exposure to LDR, suggesting that the reduction of T2DM-induced testicular apoptosis due to repetitive LDR exposure likely involves enhancement of testicular Akt-mediated glucose metabolism and anti-oxidative defense mechanisms. PMID:26704079

  3. In utero and lactational exposures to low doses of polybrominated diphenyl ether-47 alter the reproductive system and thyroid gland of female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Talsness, Chris E; Kuriyama, Sergio N; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Schnitker, Petra; Grande, Simone Wichert; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Andrade, Anderson; Grote, Konstanze; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2008-03-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are capable of disrupting thyroid hormone homeostasis. PBDE-47 (2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) is one of the most abundant congeners found in human breast adipose tissue and maternal milk samples. We evaluated the effects of developmental exposure to low doses of PBDE-47 on the female reproductive system. Pregnant Wistar rats were administered vehicle (peanut oil) or PBDE-47 [140 or 700 microg/kg body weight (bw)] on gestation day (GD) 6, or 5 mg 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU)/L in the drinking water from GD7 through postnatal day (PND) 21. In female offspring sacrificed on PND38, there was a significant decrease in ovarian weight after exposure to PTU or 140 microg/kg PBDE-47. Alterations in folliculogenesis were apparent: we observed a decrease in tertiary follicles and serum estradiol concentrations in the offspring exposed to either PTU or 700 microg/kg PBDE-47. PTU exposure also resulted in a decrease in primordial follicles. On PND100, persistent effects on the thyroid glands included histologic and morphometric changes after exposure to either PTU or PBDE-47. No relevant changes in reproductive indices were observed after mating the exposed F1 females with nontreated males. Administration of PBDE-47 at doses relevant to human exposure led to changes in the rat female reproductive system and thyroid gland.

  4. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures.

    PubMed

    Ali, Haytham; Galal, Omima; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan; Abdelrahim, Eman; Ono, Yusuke; Mostafa, Emtethal; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2014-09-26

    Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30min before exposure to 50mGy γ-ray daily for 30days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5Gy). Mice were victimized 24h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit(+) stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60-90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit(+) stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancement of regulatory T cell-like suppressive function in MT-2 by long-term and low-dose exposure to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chen; Maeda, Megumi; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Yoshitome, Kei; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-12-02

    Asbestos exposure causes lung fibrosis and various malignant tumors such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. The effects of asbestos on immune cells have not been thoroughly investigated, although our previous reports showed that asbestos exposure reduced anti-tumor immunity. The effects of continuous exposure of regulatory T cells (Treg) to asbestos were examined using the HTLV-1 immortalized human T cell line MT-2, which possesses a suppressive function and expresses the Treg marker protein, Foxp3. Sublines were generated by the continuous exposure to low doses of asbestos fibers for more than one year. The sublines exposed to asbestos showed enhanced suppressive Treg function via cell-cell contact, and increased production of soluble factors such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. These results also indicated that asbestos exposure induced the reduction of anti-tumor immunity, and efforts to develop substances to reverse this reduction may be helpful in preventing the occurrence of asbestos-induced tumors.

  6. Examination of Chronic Smoking Behavior and Eligibility for Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening Among Older Chinese Male Smokers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Ching; Matthews, Alicia K; Dong, XinQi

    2017-07-01

    Low-dose computed tomography lung cancer (LDCT) screening is an effective way to decrease lung cancer mortality. Both Medicare and private insurers offer coverage of LDCT screening to beneficiaries who are at high risk of developing lung cancer. In this study, we examined rates and predictors of chronic smoking behavior and eligibility for coverage of LDCT screening among older Chinese men living in the greater Chicago area. Data were obtained from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago, a population-based survey of community-dwelling, older Chinese adults in the Chicago metropolitan area. Eligibility criteria according to Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) for LDCT screening were used. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to determine predictors of chronic smoking behavior which was operationalized as meeting criteria for LDCT screening. A quarter of the sample were current smokers and 42.5% reported a prior history of smoking. Eighteen percent and 22% of older Chinese men met the eligibility criteria for appropriateness for CMS and USPSTF LDCT screening, respectively. Furthermore, education, marital status, and number of children were significantly associated with chronic smoking behavior. Older Chinese men with chronic smoking behavior are at high risk of developing lung cancer and nearly one in five meet eligibility for LDCT screening. Increased outreach and education regarding early detection of lung cancer and smoking cessation are needed for this vulnerable and high-risk population.

  7. γ-H2AX responds to DNA damage induced by long-term exposure to combined low-dose-rate neutron and γ-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junlin; He, Ying; Shen, Xianrong; Jiang, Dingwen; Wang, Qingrong; Liu, Qiong; Fang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Risk estimates for low-dose radiation (LDR) remain controversial. The possible involvement of DNA repair-related genes in long-term low-dose-rate neutron-gamma radiation exposure is poorly understood. In this study, 60 rats were divided into control groups and irradiated groups, which were exposed to low-dose-rate n-γ combined radiation (LDCR) for 15, 30, or 60 days. The effects of different cumulative radiation doses on peripheral blood cell (PBC), subsets of T cells of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and DNA damage repair were investigated. Real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to detect expression of DNA DSB-repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway, such as Ku70 and Ku80, in PBL. The mRNA level of H2AX and the expression level of γ-H2AX were detected by real-time PCR, immunoblot, and flow cytometry. White blood cells (WBC) and platelets (PLT) of all ionizing radiation (IR) groups decreased significantly, while no difference was seen between the 30 day and 60 day exposure groups. The numbers of CD3(+), CD4(+) T cells and CD4(+)/CD8(+) in the PBL of IR groups were lower than in the control group. In the 30 day and 60 day exposure groups, CD8(+) T cells decreased significantly. Real-time PCR and immunoblot results showed no significant difference in the mRNA and protein expression of Ku70 and Ku80 between the control groups and IR groups. However, the mRNA of H2AX increased significantly, and there was a positive correlation with dose. There was no difference in the protein expression of γ-H2AX between 30 day and 60 day groups, which may help to explain the damage to PBL. In conclusion, PBL damage increased with cumulative dose, suggesting that γ-H2AX, but neither Ku70 nor Ku80, plays an important role in PBL impairment induced by LDCR. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reducing Radiation Exposure During CRT Implant Procedures: Single-Center Experience With Low-Dose Fluoroscopy Settings and a Sensor-Based Navigation System (MediGuide).

    PubMed

    Thibault, Bernard; Mondésert, Blandine; Macle, Laurent; Dubuc, Marc; Dyrda, Katia; Talajic, Mario; Roy, Denis; Rivard, Léna; Guerra, Peter G; Andrade, Jason G; Khairy, Paul

    2016-07-26

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) implant procedures are often complex and prolonged, resulting in substantial ionizing radiation (IR) exposure to the patient and operator. We assessed the impact of lower-dose fluoroscopy settings and a sensor-based electromagnetic tracking system (MediGuide™, MDG) on reducing IR exposure during CRT implantation. A single-center 2-group cohort study was conducted on 348 consecutive patients, age 66.4 ± 11.0 years, 80.4% male, with CRT implant procedures from 2013 to 2015. Patients were arbitrarily assigned to MDG (N = 239) versus no MDG (N = 109) guidance. Lower-dose fluoroscopy settings were adopted in January 2015 (3 instead of 6 fps; 23 instead of 40 nGy/pulse; N = 101). Overall, MDG was associated with an 82.1% reduction in IR exposure (393 μGray·m(2) vs. 2191 μGray·m(2) , P < 0.001). Lower-dose fluoroscopy resulted in a 59.5% reduction in IR-exposure without MDG (1055 μGray·m(2) vs. 2608 μGray·m(2) , P < 0.001) and 81.8% reduction with MDG (108 μGray·m(2) vs. 595 μGray·m(2) , P < 0.001). Low-dose fluoroscopy combined with MDG was associated with a 95.9% lower exposure to IR when compared to standard fluoroscopy without MDG (108 μGray·m(2) vs. 2608 μGray·m(2) , P < 0.001). Procedures with MDG were shorter (96 minutes vs. 123 minutes, P < 0.001) and associated with a trend towards a higher success rate (94.6% vs. 89.0%, P = 0.062), with fewer coronary sinus cannulation failures (2.1% vs. 6.4%, P = 0.040). Low-dose fluoroscopy settings are highly effective (>50%) in reducing IR exposure during CRT implant procedures. When combined with MDG, >95% reduction in IR exposure is achieved. Moreover, MDG shortens procedural duration and may improve acute procedural outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Long-term effects of perinatal exposure to low doses of cadmium on the prostate of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Santana, Viviane P; Salles, Évila S; Correa, Deborah E; Gonçalves, Bianca F; Campos, Silvana G; Justulin, Luiz A; Godinho, Antonio F; Scarano, Wellerson R

    2016-08-01

    Developmental toxicity caused by environmental exposure to heavy metals during the perinatal period has raised questions about offspring health. Cadmium (Cd) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical with the potential to interfere with morphogenesis and susceptibility to diseases in reproductive organs. Taking into account that in the rat prostate morphogenesis occurs during the perinatal period, and that pregnant females absorb and retain more dietary Cd than their non-pregnant counterparts, it is important to understand the effects of perinatal Cd exposure on the adult rat prostate. Therefore this study investigated the effects of gestational and lactational Cd exposure on adult offspring rat prostate histopathology. Pregnant rats (n = 20) were divided into two groups: Control (treated with aqueous solution of sodium acetate 10 mg/l) and treated (treated with aqueous solution of cadmium acetate 10 mg/l) administered in the drinking water. After weaning, male offspring from different litters (n = 10) received food and water 'ad libitum'. The animals were euthanized at postnatal day 90 (PND90), the ventral prostates (VPs) were removed, weighed and examined histopathologically. Blood was collected for the measurement of testosterone (T) levels. Immunohistochemistry for androgen receptor (AR) and Ki67, and a TUNEL assay were performed. There were no differences in T levels, cell proliferation and apoptosis indexes, or AR immunostaining between the experimental groups. Stromal inflammatory foci and multifocal inflammation increased significantly in the treated group. These changes were associated with inflammatory reactive epithelial atypia and stromal fibrillar rearrangement. In conclusion, VP was permanently affected by perinatal Cd exposition, with increased incidence of inflammatory disorders with ageing. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2016 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  10. Electrocardiographic and blood pressure changes in apparently healthy male subjects following oral, chronic, low-dose vitamin C supplementation and/or change in posture.

    PubMed

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S I; Kehinde, M O

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that oral, chronic, low dose vitamin C reduces blood pressure and forearm blood flow in normal young adults or hypertensive patients. It is not clear how vitamin C affects cardiac function or autonomic control of blood pressure in young apparently healthy adults. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of a chronic, low dose (300 mg/day for 6 weeks) vitamin C supplementation on the electrocardiogram and autonomic control of blood pressure in apparently healthy male subjects. Electrocardiographic (ECG) and arterial blood pressure (BP) changes were assessed following change in posture with or without oral, chronic low dose vitamin C supplementation in twenty (20) apparently healthy male subjects (mean age 28.2 +/- 2.0 yrs). Blood pressure (BP, mm Hg) and ECG measurements (amplitude, mV; duration or interval, ms) were recorded in the supine position and immediately on assumption of the upright position. Heart rate (HR; beats/min) was calculated from the ECG while rate pressure product (RPP; arbitrary units) was calculated and used as a measure of myocardial oxygen demand. Each subject was then placed on oral vitamin C at a dose of 300 mg/day for 6 weeks. Measurements were made again after the period. Change in posture caused significant reductions in P-wave amplitude, QRS amplitude and duration, T-wave amplitude and systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) (p < 0.01 respectively). PR and RR intervals also fell (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively) while HR and RPP increased (p < 0.001) Vitamin C decreased T-wave amplitude (p < 0.01) and QRS duration (p < 0.01). Also, SBP, DBP, MABP and RPP fell (p < 0.01 in each case). After vitamin C supplement ation, change in posture decreased P-wave amplitude, T-wave duration, P-wave duration, QT interval and RR interval (p < 0.05 respectively). BP and HR responses to postural change were attenuated by vitamin C supplementation. SBP fell by 7

  11. Maintenance of remission with low-dose olopatadine hydrochloride for itch in well-controlled chronic urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Teruhiko; Takegami, Yoshiaki; Rehman, Mati Ur; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Ishida, Waka; Toyomoto, Takashi; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The long-term follow-up of chronic urticaria (CU) is important to ensure the adequate treatment of patients. Olopatadine hydrochloride is one of the second-generation nonsedating antihistamines. Methods: This study was designed to assess the optimal dose of olopatadine to suppress symptoms of chronic urticarial itch in well-controlled patients. After CU patients were treated with 10 mg olopatadine, patients having a visual analog scale (VAS) itch score of less than 20 were randomly allocated into one of three groups: 10 mg/day (n = 35), 5 mg/day (n = 30), or no medication (n = 32). Results: The suppressive effects of both the 5 mg and 10 mg olopatadine treatments on the VAS itch score were more significant and longer lasting over a period of 4 weeks than the no-medication treatment. Both the 5-mg group and the 10-mg group showed improved urticarial symptoms and maintained their VAS itch score within normal limits compared to the no-medication group. The differences between the 5-mg and 10-mg groups were not significant. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that treatment with olopatadine at a dose of 5 mg once daily is effective and safe for the management and prevention of CU symptoms for itch in well-controlled patients. PMID:23055763

  12. Maintenance of remission with low-dose olopatadine hydrochloride for itch in well-controlled chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Makino, Teruhiko; Takegami, Yoshiaki; Rehman, Mati Ur; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Ishida, Waka; Toyomoto, Takashi; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2012-01-01

    The long-term follow-up of chronic urticaria (CU) is important to ensure the adequate treatment of patients. Olopatadine hydrochloride is one of the second-generation nonsedating antihistamines. This study was designed to assess the optimal dose of olopatadine to suppress symptoms of chronic urticarial itch in well-controlled patients. After CU patients were treated with 10 mg olopatadine, patients having a visual analog scale (VAS) itch score of less than 20 were randomly allocated into one of three groups: 10 mg/day (n = 35), 5 mg/day (n = 30), or no medication (n = 32). The suppressive effects of both the 5 mg and 10 mg olopatadine treatments on the VAS itch score were more significant and longer lasting over a period of 4 weeks than the no-medication treatment. Both the 5-mg group and the 10-mg group showed improved urticarial symptoms and maintained their VAS itch score within normal limits compared to the no-medication group. The differences between the 5-mg and 10-mg groups were not significant. These results demonstrate that treatment with olopatadine at a dose of 5 mg once daily is effective and safe for the management and prevention of CU symptoms for itch in well-controlled patients.

  13. Effects of low dose endosulfan exposure on brain neurotransmitter levels in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Preud'homme, Valérie; Milla, Sylvain; Gillardin, Virginie; De Pauw, Edwin; Denoël, Mathieu; Kestemont, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the impact of pesticides in amphibians is of growing concern to assess the causes of their decline. Among pesticides, endosulfan belongs to one of the potential sources of danger because of its wide use and known effects, particularly neurotoxic, on a variety of organisms. However, the effect of endosulfan was not yet evaluated on amphibians at levels encompassing simultaneously brain neurotransmitters and behavioural endpoints. In this context, tadpoles of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis were submitted to four treatments during 27 d: one control, one ethanol control, and two low environmental concentrations of endosulfan (0.1 and 1 μg L(-1)). Endosulfan induced a significant increase of brain serotonin level at both concentrations and a significant increase of brain dopamine and GABA levels at the lower exposure but acetylcholinesterase activity was not modified by the treatment. The gene coding for the GABA transporter 1 was up-regulated in endosulfan contaminated tadpoles while the expression of other genes coding for the neurotransmitter receptors or for the enzymes involved in their metabolic pathways was not significantly modified by endosulfan exposure. Endosulfan also affected foraging, and locomotion in links with the results of the physiological assays, but no effects were seen on growth. These results show that low environmental concentrations of endosulfan can induce adverse responses in X. laevis tadpoles. At a broader perspective, this suggests that more research using and linking multiple markers should be used to understand the complex mode of action of pollutants.

  14. Low Dose Computed Tomography for 3D Planning of Total Hip Arthroplasty: Evaluation of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, Alexander; Lembcke, Alexander; Sariali, El-Hadi; Durmus, Tahir; Schwenke, Carsten; Hamm, Bernd; Sparmann, Martin; Baur, Alexander D J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare radiation exposure and image quality between dedicated computed tomography (CT) protocols for preoperative total hip arthroplasty (THA) planning. Three protocols with automated tube current modulation using 64-slice (n = 177) and 128-slice CT scanners without (n = 129) and with automated tube voltage preselection (n = 84) were compared. All 390 CTs were of sufficient quality for THA planning. Mean DLP was 235.0 mGy*cm (effective dose 2.8 mSv). Lowest radiation exposure (2.5 mSv) was seen with automated voltage preselection and the algorithm's selection was 100 kV (90.5% of patients) and 120 kV. Lowest image noise was seen in the highest dose group (3.1 mSv, 128-slice CT fixed tube voltage). A significant difference in cortical bone radiodensity was seen between 100 kV and 120 kV (P < 0.0001). Preoperative pelvic CT for THA planning is possible with very low radiation dose and reliable quality. Automated voltage preselection further decreases the effective dose by 18.2%.

  15. Acute and chronic administration of a low-dose combination of topiramate and ondansetron reduces ethanol's reinforcing effects in male alcohol preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine F; Lycas, Matthew D; Bond, Colin W; Johnson, Bankole A; Lynch, Wendy J

    2014-02-01

    Topiramate (a GABA/glutamate modulator) and ondansetron (a serotonin-3 antagonist) have shown promise as treatments for alcohol use disorders (AUDs), although efficacy is modest/variable for both medications. We recently showed in animal models of consumption and relapse that acute treatment with a combination of these medications was more efficacious than either alone. To determine whether the mechanism for its beneficial effects is through modulation of ethanol's reinforcing effects, we measured the effect of this combination in male alcohol preferring (P) rats (N = 22) responding for ethanol under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule. Low doses, which either do not affect (ondansetron; 0.001 mg/kg) or only modestly affect (topiramate; 10 mg/kg) alcohol-related behaviors on their own, were selected in an attempt to maximize their combined efficacy while minimizing potential side effects. In addition to acute treatment (1 day), the effects of chronic administration (10 days) were examined in an attempt to model human treatment approaches. The effects of the combination were compared with the low dose of topiramate alone hypothesizing that the combination would be more efficacious than topiramate alone. Although both topiramate and the combination similarly reduced PR responding for ethanol following acute treatment and during the initial phase of chronic treatment (Days 1-5), after repeated administration (Days 6-10), only the combination produced a sustained reduction in ethanol-maintained responding. These results suggest an advantage of the combination over topiramate alone at producing a sustained reduction in ethanol's reinforcing effects following prolonged treatment, and lend further support for its use as a potential treatment for AUDs.

  16. Association of Chromosome Translocation Rate with Low Dose Occupational Radiation Exposures in U.S. Radiologic Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Little, Mark P.; Kwon, Deukwoo; Doi, Kazataka; Simon, Steven L.; Preston, Dale L.; Doody, Michele M.; Lee, Terrence; Miller, Jeremy S.; Kampa, Diane M.; Bhatti, Parveen; Tucker, James D.; Linet, Martha S.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are a well-recognized biological marker of radiation exposure and cancer risk. However, there is uncertainty about the lowest dose at which excess translocations can be detected, and whether there is temporal decay of induced translocations in radiation-exposed populations. Dosimetric uncertainties can substantially alter the shape of dose-response relationships; although regression-calibration methods have been used in some datasets, these have not been applied in radio-occupational studies, where there are also complex patterns of shared and unshared errors that these methods do not account for. In this article we evaluated the relationship between estimated occupational ionizing radiation doses and chromosome translocation rates using fluorescent in situ hybridization in 238 U.S. radiologic technologists selected from a large cohort. Estimated cumulative red bone marrow doses (mean 29.3 mGy, range 0–135.7 mGy) were based on available badge–dose measurement data and on questionnaire-reported work history factors. Dosimetric assessment uncertainties were evaluated using regression calibration, Bayesian and Monte Carlo maximum likelihood methods, taking account of shared and unshared error and adjusted for overdispersion. There was a significant dose response for estimated occupational radiation exposure, adjusted for questionnaire-based personal diagnostic radiation, age, sex and study group (5.7 translocations per 100 whole genome cell equivalents per Gy, 95% CI 0.2, 11.3, P = 0.0440). A significant increasing trend with dose continued to be observed for individuals with estimated doses <100 mGy. For combined estimated occupational and personal-diagnostic-medical radiation exposures, there was a borderline-significant modifying effect of age (P 0.0704), but little evidence (P > 0.5) of temporal decay of induced translocations. The three methods of analysis to adjust for dose uncertainty gave similar results. In summary, chromosome

  17. Association of chromosome translocation rate with low dose occupational radiation exposures in U.S. radiologic technologists.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Kwon, Deukwoo; Doi, Kazataka; Simon, Steven L; Preston, Dale L; Doody, Michele M; Lee, Terrence; Miller, Jeremy S; Kampa, Diane M; Bhatti, Parveen; Tucker, James D; Linet, Martha S; Sigurdson, Alice J

    2014-07-01

    Chromosome translocations are a well-recognized biological marker of radiation exposure and cancer risk. However, there is uncertainty about the lowest dose at which excess translocations can be detected, and whether there is temporal decay of induced translocations in radiation-exposed populations. Dosimetric uncertainties can substantially alter the shape of dose-response relationships; although regression-calibration methods have been used in some datasets, these have not been applied in radio-occupational studies, where there are also complex patterns of shared and unshared errors that these methods do not account for. In this article we evaluated the relationship between estimated occupational ionizing radiation doses and chromosome translocation rates using fluorescent in situ hybridization in 238 U.S. radiologic technologists selected from a large cohort. Estimated cumulative red bone marrow doses (mean 29.3 mGy, range 0-135.7 mGy) were based on available badge-dose measurement data and on questionnaire-reported work history factors. Dosimetric assessment uncertainties were evaluated using regression calibration, Bayesian and Monte Carlo maximum likelihood methods, taking account of shared and unshared error and adjusted for overdispersion. There was a significant dose response for estimated occupational radiation exposure, adjusted for questionnaire-based personal diagnostic radiation, age, sex and study group (5.7 translocations per 100 whole genome cell equivalents per Gy, 95% CI 0.2, 11.3, P = 0.0440). A significant increasing trend with dose continued to be observed for individuals with estimated doses <100 mGy. For combined estimated occupational and personal-diagnostic-medical radiation exposures, there was a borderline-significant modifying effect of age (P = 0.0704), but little evidence (P > 0.5) of temporal decay of induced translocations. The three methods of analysis to adjust for dose uncertainty gave similar results. In summary, chromosome

  18. Effects of repeated low-dose exposure of the nerve agent VX on monoamine levels in different brain structures in mice.

    PubMed

    Graziani, S; Christin, D; Daulon, S; Breton, P; Perrier, N; Taysse, L

    2014-05-01

    In a previous report, alterations of the serotonin metabolism were previously reported in mice intoxicated with repeated low doses of soman. In order to better understand the effects induced by repeated low-dose exposure to organophosphorus compounds on physiological and behavioural functions, the levels of endogenous monoamines (serotonin and dopamine) in different brain areas in mice intoxicated with sublethal dose of (O-ethyl-S-[2(di-isopropylamino) ethyl] methyl phosphonothioate) (VX) were analysed by HPLC method with electrochemical detection. Animals were injected once a day for three consecutive days with 0.10 LD50 of VX (5 μg/kg, i.p). Neither severe signs of cholinergic toxicity nor pathological changes in brain tissue of exposed animals were observed. Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was only inhibited in plasma (a maximum of 30% inhibition 24 h after the last injection of VX), but remained unchanged in the brain. Serotonin and dopamine (DA) metabolism appeared significantly modified. During the entire period of investigation, at least one of the three parameters investigated (i.e. DA and DOPAC levels and DOPAC/DA ratio) was modified. During the toxic challenge, an increase of the serotonin metabolism was noted in hippocampus (HPC), hypothalamus/thalamus, pons medulla and cerebellum (CER). This increase was maintained 4 weeks after exposure in HPC, pons medulla and CER whereas a decrease in cortex 3 weeks after the toxic challenge was observed. The lack of correlation between brain ChE activity and neurochemical outcomes points out to independent mechanisms. The involvement in possibly long-lasting behavioural disorders is discussed.

  19. Low-dose exposure to bisphenol A in combination with fructose increases expression of genes regulating angiogenesis and vascular tone in juvenile Fischer 344 rat cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Klint, Helén; Karimullina, Elina; Rönn, Monika; Lind, Lars; Lind, P. Monica

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Epidemiological studies report associations between exposure to the high-volume chemical and endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) and cardiovascular disorders, but there is a lack of experimental studies addressing the mechanisms of action of BPA on the cardiovascular system. In the present study, effects on markers for cardiovascular function of exposure to BPA and fructose in vivo in rat cardiac tissues, and of BPA exposure in human cardiomyocytes in vitro, were investigated. Materials Juvenile female Fischer 344 rats were exposed to 5, 50, and 500 μg BPA/kg bodyweight/day in their drinking water from 5 to 15 weeks of age, in combination with 5% fructose. Further, cultured human cardiomyocytes were exposed to 10 nM BPA to 1 × 104 nM BPA for six hours. Expression of markers for cardiovascular function and BPA target receptors was investigated using qRT-PCR. Results Exposure to 5 μg BPA/kg bodyweight/day plus fructose increased mRNA expression of Vegf, Vegfr2, eNos, and Ace1 in rat heart. Exposure of human cardiomyocytes to 1 × 104 nM BPA increased mRNA expression of eNOS and ACE1, as well as IL-8 and NFκβ known to regulate inflammatory response. Conclusions:. Low-dose exposure of juvenile rats to BPA and fructose induced up-regulation of expression of genes controlling angiogenesis and vascular tone in cardiac tissues. The observed effects of BPA in rat heart were in line with our present and previous studies of BPA in human endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. These findings may aid in understanding the mechanisms of the association between BPA exposure and cardiovascular disorders reported in epidemiological studies. PMID:27622962

  20. Induction of hepatic cytochromes P450 in dogs exposed to a chronic low dose of polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Korytko, P J; Casey, A C; Bush, B; Quimby, F W

    1999-01-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 isoforms, specifically CYP1A1, and their catalytic activities are potential biomarkers of environmental contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, dogs were exposed to 25 ppm or 5 ppm Aroclor 1248 (PCB mixture) daily in their diet for 10 or 20 weeks, respectively. Relative to controls, hepatic microsomes from dogs dosed with PCBs had higher levels of CYP1A1 detected in immunoblots and higher levels of EROD activity, but low levels of induction for CYP2B and PROD activity. Concentrations of 96 PCB congeners in serum and liver were evaluated using capillary chromatography. Results showed that all dogs exposed to PCB mixtures had higher levels of PCB in serum and liver. Dogs preferentially sequestered highly chlorinated PCB congeners in liver relative to serum. With these experiments, we demonstrated that EROD activity was a potentially sensitive marker of PCB exposure at 5 and 25 ppm. Furthermore, CYP1A1 and EROD activity were maximally induced in dogs consuming dietary concentrations only 2.5 times the maximal permissible level for human food (FDA). The value of CYP1A1 induction as a biomarker of PCB exposure was tenuous because neither CYP1A1 levels nor EROD activity correlated with total PCB body burden. However, a small subset of congeners were identified in liver that may strongly influence EROD and PROD induction. Finally, two dogs in the 25 ppm dose group were fasted for 48 h. After 24 h of fasting, several new congeners appeared in the serum and remained in the serum for the remainder of the fast. The fast caused a 293% increase in PCB concentration in serum. This increase has strong implications regarding mobilization of toxic PCBs in wildlife during fasting (e.g., migration, hibernation).

  1. Low-dose calcium versus pentagastrin for stimulation of calcitonin in chronic hemodialysis patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Thiem, Ursula; Marculescu, Rodrig; Cejka, Daniel; Gessl, Alois; Borchhardt, Kyra

    2014-12-01

    Elevated calcitonin levels occur in up to 46% of patients with chronic hemodialysis (CHD) and frequently reflect benign C-cell hyperplasia rather than medullary thyroid carcinoma. For the differential diagnosis of hypercalcitoninemia, the pentagastrin-stimulated calcitonin test was used until its availability became restricted. This study sought to compare calcium and pentagastrin in terms of their ability to stimulate calcitonin secretion and their side effects in patients with CHD. This prospective pilot study was conducted at the chronic hemodialysis unit of the Medical University of Vienna between December 2012 and September 2013. We studied six male patients with CHD with elevated basal calcitonin levels. The stimulation test was performed first with 0.5 μg/kg pentagastrin and then with 1 mg/kg calcium after a median washout period of 7 (6-9) months. We measured calcitonin, serum ionized calcium, intact PTH (iPTH), and C-terminal fibroblast growth factor 23 levels before and 2, 5, and 10 minutes after iv infusion of the stimulant and assessed the tolerability of the two substances by a questionnaire. Both pentagastrin and calcium significantly stimulated calcitonin secretion at 2 and 5 minutes. Partial correlation analysis revealed a strong association between calcium- and pentagastrin-stimulated calcitonin levels (r=0.875, P < .0001). Only after calcium infusion serum ionized calcium levels increased from 1.09 (0.91-1.16) mmol/l to 1.4 (1.14-1.65) mmol/l at 2 minutes (P < .01) but returned to baseline levels at 5 minutes. Moreover, calcium infusion led to a significant decrease in iPTH levels from 315 (203-723) pg/ml to 182 (121-415) pg/ml at 5 minutes (P < .05) and 171 (91-346) pg/ml at 10 minutes (P < .001). In general, calcium caused fewer and less severe side effects than pentagastrin. In patients with CHD, the response of calcitonin to calcium and pentagastrin was comparable, making calcium a potential substitute for pentagastrin in these patients.

  2. Nanoscale-Barrier Formation Induced by Low-Dose Electron-Beam Exposure in Ultrathin MoS2 Transistors.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Higuchi, Ayaka; He, Guanchen; Yamada, Tetsushi; Krüger, Peter; Ochiai, Yuichi; Gong, Yongji; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Bird, Jonathan P; Aoki, Nobuyuki

    2016-10-05

    Utilizing an innovative combination of scanning-probe and spectroscopic techniques, supported by first-principles calculations, we demonstrate how electron-beam exposure of field-effect transistors, implemented from ultrathin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), may cause nanoscale structural modifications that in turn significantly modify the electrical operation of these devices. Quite surprisingly, these modifications are induced by even the relatively low electron doses used in conventional electron-beam lithography, which are found to induce compressive strain in the atomically thin MoS2. Likely arising from sulfur-vacancy formation in the exposed regions, the strain gives rise to a local widening of the MoS2 bandgap, an idea that is supported both by our experiment and by the results of first-principles calculations. A nanoscale potential barrier develops at the boundary between exposed and unexposed regions and may cause extrinsic variations in the resulting electrical characteristics exhibited by the transistor. The widespread use of electron-beam lithography in nanofabrication implies that the presence of such strain must be carefully considered when seeking to harness the potential of atomically thin transistors. At the same time, this work also promises the possibility of exploiting the strain as a means to achieve "bandstructure engineering" in such devices.

  3. Low-dose and short-term cyclosporine treatment in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria: a clinical and immunological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Serhat Inaloz, H; Ozturk, Savas; Akcali, Cenk; Kirtak, Necmettin; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet

    2008-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of 2.5 mg/kg/day cyclosporin (CsA) treatment in patients with severe chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and the impact of CsA treatment on several cytokines involved in the etiopathogenesis of CIU. Twenty-seven CIU patients and 24 healthy control subjects were included in the study. The autologous serum skin test (ASST) for autoantibodies and urticaria activity scoring (UAS) were measured for the evaluation of the clinical severity and the response to therapy, and the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-2 receptor, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-5 were measured. The mean UAS score was 32.07 +/- 7.05 and 6.22 +/- 3.84 before and after CsA treatment, respectively. The serum IL-2 receptor, TNF-alpha and IL-5 levels of patients before CsA treatment were statistically higher than those of the control group (P = 0.001), and after 4 weeks of CsA therapy the mean IL-2R, TNF-alpha and IL-5 levels were significantly decreased. The data from this study demonstrate that CsA therapy is efficient and safe for CIU patients. Increase in clinical efficacy and marked decreases in serum cytokine levels suggest that inhibition of cytokine generation is involved in the action of the drug in this clinical setting.

  4. Enhancing acupuncture by low dose naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Hesselink, Jan M Keppel; Kopsky, David J

    2011-06-01

    To find appropriate and effective treatment options for chronic pain syndromes is a challenging task. Multimodal treatment approach has been gaining acceptance for chronic pain. However, combining treatments, such as acupuncture, with rational pharmacology is still in its infancy. Acupuncture influences the opioid and cannabinoid system through releasing endogenous receptor ligands. Low dose naltrexone also acts on both these systems, and upregulates the opioid and cannabinoid receptors. The authors hypothesise that low dose naltrexone could enhance the pain-relieving effect of acupuncture.

  5. [Functional and morphological characterization of rat thyroid gland at remote periods following single high and low dose radiation exposure].

    PubMed

    Nadol'nik, L I; Netsetskaia, Z V; Kardash, N A; Martynchik, D I; Kravchuk, R I; Basinskiĭ, V A; Vinogradov, V V

    2004-01-01

    A study of the morphological structure and functional activity of the rat thyroid gland was carried out after 22 months following a single exposure to external radiation. The 3-month-old animals were irradiated with doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 Gy. Blood was assayed for thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels, while liver tissue--for NADP-MDH activity and thyroid tissue--for thyroperoxidase activity. The thyroid was studied histologically, morphometrically and by electron microscope. The decreased T4 concentrations 2.59-fold in the 5.0 Gy group, the increased T3/T4 in the 2.0 and 0.25 Gy groups, the reduced diameter of cellular nuclei and follicles, the flat follicular epithelium and diminished number of thyrocyte ultrastructures indicate thyroid hypofunction in the irradiated animals. The morphological changes are characterized by enhanced diffuse and focal sclerotic changes in thyroid, most pronounced at high irradiation doses (1.0-5.0 Gy), whereas the hemosiderosis foci suggest that the structural changes are consequences of radiation-induced destructive injuries in the gland parenchyma. Two of the thyroids (0.5 Gy) demonstrate foci with pronounced lymphoid infiltration, while follicular carcinomas were detected in 4 thyroids (2.0 Gy), and in one thyroid (0.5 Gy) in one thyroid (5.0 Gy). The remote effects of radiation were dose-dependent destructive, sclerotic and atrophic processes, decreased functional activity, stimulation of development of autoimmune aggression and carcinogenesis in thyroid.

  6. Life-Span Exposure to Low Doses of Aspartame Beginning during Prenatal Life Increases Cancer Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soffritti, Morando; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Tibaldi, Eva; Esposti, Davide Degli; Lauriola, Michelina

    2007-01-01

    Background In a previous study conducted at the Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center of the European Ramazzini Foundation (CMCRC/ERF), we demonstrated for the first time that aspartame (APM) is a multipotent carcinogenic agent when various doses are administered with feed to Sprague-Dawley rats from 8 weeks of age throughout the life span. Objective The aim of this second study is to better quantify the carcinogenic risk of APM, beginning treatment during fetal life. Methods We studied groups of 70–95 male and female Sprague-Dawley rats administered APM (2,000, 400, or 0 ppm) with feed from the 12th day of fetal life until natural death. Results Our results show a) a significant dose-related increase of malignant tumor–bearing animals in males (p < 0.01), particularly in the group treated with 2,000 ppm APM (p < 0.01); b) a significant increase in incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in males treated with 2,000 ppm (p < 0.05) and a significant dose-related increase in incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in females (p < 0.01), particularly in the 2,000-ppm group (p < 0.01); and c) a significant dose-related increase in incidence of mammary cancer in females (p < 0.05), particularly in the 2,000-ppm group (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results of this carcinogenicity bioassay confirm and reinforce the first experimental demonstration of APM’s multipotential carcinogenicity at a dose level close to the acceptable daily intake for humans. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that when life-span exposure to APM begins during fetal life, its carcinogenic effects are increased. PMID:17805418

  7. Dietary exposure to a low dose of pesticides alone or as a mixture: the biological metabolic fingerprint and impact on hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Demur, C; Métais, B; Canlet, C; Tremblay-Franco, M; Gautier, R; Blas-Y-Estrada, F; Sommer, C; Gamet-Payrastre, L

    2013-06-07

    Consumers are exposed to a mixture of pesticides through their food intake. These compounds are considered risk factors for human health, and the impact of dietary exposure to low doses of pesticide mixtures remains poorly understood. For this study we developed a mouse model to mimic consumer exposure in order to compare the effect of pesticides both alone or combined at doses corresponding to their Acceptable Daily Intake value. Female mice were exposed to pesticides throughout gestation and lactation. After weaning pups were fed the same pesticide-enriched diet their mothers had received for an additional 11 weeks. A metabonomic approach using (1)H NMR-based analysis of plasma showed that exposure to each pesticide produced a specific metabolic fingerprint in adult offspring. Discriminant metabolites between groups were glucose or lactate, choline, glycerophosphocholine and phosphocholine. Interestingly, metabolite differences were observed as early as weaned animals that had not yet been directly exposed themselves. Studies of the hematopoietic system revealed that dietary exposure to one particular pesticide, endosulfan, produced a significant decrease in red blood cell and hemoglobin levels, consistent with hemolytic anemia. Moreover, cell signaling profiles of bone marrow progenitors were also clearly affected. Expression of cell signaling proteins such as P35, CDC27, FAK, P38 MAP kinase, calcineurin and caspase as well as proteins involved in the stability or structure of the cytoskeleton (vinculin, MAP2) was changed upon dietary exposure to pesticides. Finally, we found that dietary exposure to a mixture of pesticides had effects that differed and were often lesser or equal to that of the most efficient pesticide (endosulfan), suggesting that the effect of pesticide mixtures cannot always be predicted from the combined effects of their constituent compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C.; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-11-01

    Our goal here was to identify dose and temporal dependent radiation responses in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. Direct sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts following exposure to 0.1, 2 and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation at 3 and 8 hours. These doses include a low dose in the range of some medical diagnostic procedures (0.1 Gy), a dose typically received during radiotherapy (2.0 Gy) and a lethal dose (10 Gy). These doses could be received after an intentional or accidental radiation exposure and biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage exposed individuals. A total of 1701 genes were deemed to be significantly affected by high dose radiation exposure with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. A group of 29 genes including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA, and AEN were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at multiple time points. A much larger group of up regulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after a 10 Gy exposure. At high doses, down regulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a handful of genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy exposure using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to the high dose exposures. Differential regulation of PLK1 signaling at low and high doses was confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results indicate that some alterations in gene expression are qualitatively different at low and high doses of radiation in this model system.

  9. Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Prostate Organoids In Vitro and its Perturbation by Low-Dose Bisphenol A Exposure.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Gierszal, Esther L; Prins, Gail S

    2015-01-01

    Studies using rodent and adult human prostate stem-progenitor cell models suggest that developmental exposure to the endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A (BPA) can predispose to prostate carcinogenesis with aging. Unknown at present is whether the embryonic human prostate is equally susceptible to BPA during its natural developmental window. To address this unmet need, we herein report the construction of a pioneer in vitro human prostate developmental model to study the effects of BPA. The directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into prostatic organoids in a spatial system was accomplished with precise temporal control of growth factors and steroids. Activin-induced definitive endoderm was driven to prostate specification by combined exposure to WNT10B and FGF10. Matrigel culture for 20-30 days in medium containing R-Spondin-1, Noggin, EGF, retinoic acid and testosterone was sufficient for mature prostate organoid development. Immunofluorescence and gene expression analysis confirmed that organoids exhibited cytodifferentiation and functional properties of the human prostate. Exposure to 1 nM or 10 nM BPA throughout differentiation culture disturbed early morphogenesis in a dose-dependent manner with 1 nM BPA increasing and 10 nM BPA reducing the number of branched structures formed. While differentiation of branched structures to mature organoids seemed largely unaffected by BPA exposure, the stem-like cell population increased, appearing as focal stem cell nests that have not properly entered lineage commitment rather than the rare isolated stem cells found in normally differentiated structures. These findings provide the first direct evidence that low-dose BPA exposure targets hESC and perturbs morphogenesis as the embryonic cells differentiate towards human prostate organoids, suggesting that the developing human prostate may be susceptible to disruption by in utero BPA exposures.

  10. Prenatal Exposure to Low Doses of Bisphenol A Increases Pituitary Proliferation and Gonadotroph Number in Female Mice Offspring at Birth1

    PubMed Central

    Brannick, Katherine E.; Craig, Zelieann R.; Himes, Ashley D.; Peretz, Jackye R.; Wang, Wei; Flaws, Jodi A.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pituitary gland is composed of hormone-producing cells essential for homeostasis and reproduction. Pituitary cells are sensitive to endocrine feedback in the adult and can have altered hormonal secretion from exposure to the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA). BPA is a prevalent plasticizer used in food and beverage containers, leading to widespread human exposure. Although prenatal exposure to BPA can impact reproductive function in the adult, the effects of BPA on the developing pituitary are unknown. We hypothesized that prenatal exposure to low doses of BPA impacts gonadotroph cell number or parameters of hormone synthesis. To test this, pregnant mice were administered 0.5 μg/kg/day of BPA, 50 μg/kg/day of BPA, or vehicle beginning on Embryonic Day 10.5. At parturition, pituitaries from female offspring exposed in utero to either dose of BPA had increased proliferation, as assessed by mKi67 mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry. Coincidently, gonadotroph number also increased in treated females. However, we observed a dichotomy between mRNA levels of Lhb and Fshb. Female mice exposed to 0.5 μg/kg/day BPA had increased mRNA levels of gonadotropins and the gonadotropin-receptor hormone (GNRH) receptor (Gnrhr), which mediates GNRH regulation of gonadotropin production and release. In contrast, mice treated with 50 μg/kg/day of BPA had decreased gonadotropin mRNA levels, Gnrhr and Nr5a1, a transcription factor required for gonadotroph differentiation. No other pituitary hormones were altered on the day of birth in response to in utero BPA exposure, and male pituitaries showed no change in the parameters tested. Collectively, these results show that prenatal exposure to BPA affects pituitary gonadotroph development in females. PMID:22875908

  11. The Fukushima nuclear accident and the pale grass blue butterfly: evaluating biological effects of long-term low-dose exposures.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Atsuki; Nohara, Chiyo; Taira, Wataru; Kinjo, Seira; Iwata, Masaki; Otaki, Joji M

    2013-08-12

    On August 9th 2012, we published an original research article in Scientific Reports, concluding that artificial radionuclides released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant exerted genetically and physiologically adverse effects on the pale grass blue butterfly Zizeeria maha in the Fukushima area. Immediately following publication, many questions and comments were generated from all over the world. Here, we have clarified points made in the original paper and answered questions posed by the readers. The following points were clarified. (1) There are many advantages to using the pale grass blue butterfly as an indicator species. (2) The forewings of the individuals collected in Fukushima were significantly smaller than in the northern and southern localities. (3) We observed growth retardation in the butterflies from the Fukushima area. (4) The aberrant colour patterns in the butterflies obtained in the Fukushima area were different from the colour patterns induced by temperature and sibling crosses but similar to those induced by external and internal exposures to the artificial radionuclides and by a chemical mutagen, suggesting that genetic mutations caused the aberrations. (5) This species of butterfly has been plentiful in Fukushima area for at least half a century. We here present specimens collected from Fukushima Prefecture before the accident. (6) Mutation accumulation was detected by the increase in the abnormality rates from May 2011 to September 2011. (7) The abnormal traits were heritable. (8) Our sampling localities were not affected by the tsunami. (9) We used a high enough number of samples to obtain statistically significant results. (10) The standard rearing method was followed, producing normal adults in the control groups. (11) The exposure experiments successfully reproduced the results of the field work. This species of butterfly is vulnerable to long-term low-dose internal and external exposures; however, insect cells are known to be

  12. The Fukushima nuclear accident and the pale grass blue butterfly: evaluating biological effects of long-term low-dose exposures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background On August 9th 2012, we published an original research article in Scientific Reports, concluding that artificial radionuclides released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant exerted genetically and physiologically adverse effects on the pale grass blue butterfly Zizeeria maha in the Fukushima area. Immediately following publication, many questions and comments were generated from all over the world. Here, we have clarified points made in the original paper and answered questions posed by the readers. Results The following points were clarified. (1) There are many advantages to using the pale grass blue butterfly as an indicator species. (2) The forewings of the individuals collected in Fukushima were significantly smaller than in the northern and southern localities. (3) We observed growth retardation in the butterflies from the Fukushima area. (4) The aberrant colour patterns in the butterflies obtained in the Fukushima area were different from the colour patterns induced by temperature and sibling crosses but similar to those induced by external and internal exposures to the artificial radionuclides and by a chemical mutagen, suggesting that genetic mutations caused the aberrations. (5) This species of butterfly has been plentiful in Fukushima area for at least half a century. We here present specimens collected from Fukushima Prefecture before the accident. (6) Mutation accumulation was detected by the increase in the abnormality rates from May 2011 to September 2011. (7) The abnormal traits were heritable. (8) Our sampling localities were not affected by the tsunami. (9) We used a high enough number of samples to obtain statistically significant results. (10) The standard rearing method was followed, producing normal adults in the control groups. (11) The exposure experiments successfully reproduced the results of the field work. This species of butterfly is vulnerable to long-term low-dose internal and external exposures; however, insect

  13. SU-F-I-31: Reproducibility of An Automatic Exposure Control Technique in the Low-Dose CT Scan of Cardiac PET/CT Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Rosica, D; Agarwal, V; Di Carli, M; Dorbala, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Two separate low-dose CT scans are usually performed for attenuation correction of rest and stress N-13 ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (PET/CT). We utilize an automatic exposure control (AEC) technique to reduce CT radiation dose while maintaining perfusion image quality. Our goal is to assess the reproducibility of displayed CT dose index (CTDI) on same-day repeat CT scans (CT1 and CT2). Methods: Retrospectively, we reviewed CT images of PET/CT studies performed on the same day. Low-dose CT utilized AEC technique based on tube current modulation called Smart-mA. The scan parameters were 64 × 0.625mm collimation, 5mm slice thickness, 0.984 pitch, 1-sec rotation time, 120 kVp, and noise index 50 with a range of 10–200 mA. The scan length matched with PET field of view (FOV) with the heart near the middle of axial FOV. We identified the reference slice number (RS) for an anatomical landmark (carina) and used it to estimate axial shift between two CTs. For patient size, we measured an effective diameter on the reference slice. The effect of patient positioning to CTDI was evaluated using the table height. We calculated the absolute percent difference of the CTDI (%diff) for estimation of the reproducibility. Results: The study included 168 adults with an average body-mass index of 31.72 ± 9.10 (kg/m{sup 2}) and effective diameter was 32.72 ± 4.60 cm. The average CTDI was 1.95 ± 1.40 mGy for CT1 and 1.97 ± 1.42mGy for CT2. The mean %diff was 7.8 ± 6.8%. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the table height and %diff CTDI. (r=0.82, p<0.001) Conclusion: We have shown for the first time in human subjects, using two same-day CT images, that the AEC technique in low-dose CT is reproducible within 10% and significantly depends on the patient centering.

  14. Low-dose alemtuzumab in refractory/relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia: Genetic profile and long-term outcome from a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Sciumè, Mariarita; Vincenti, Daniele; Reda, Gianluigi; Orofino, Nicola; Cassin, Ramona; Giannarelli, Diana; Gaidano, Gianluca; Rossi, Davide; Cortelezzi, Agostino

    2015-11-01

    Relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) represents a clinical challenge, in particular when high risk gene mutations occur. In this setting, alemtuzumab was recognized to be effective. This retrospective study evaluates long-term efficacy and tolerability of low-dose alemtuzumab in relapsed/refractory CLL and correlates clinical outcome with biological feature. Sixty-two consecutive patients (median age 68 years) were evaluated; alemtuzumab was administered 30 mg weekly for up to 18 weeks. Among the patients included in the analysis, 37% were fludarabine-refractory, 33.3% carried a TP53 disruption, 14.8% a NOTCH1 mutation and 9% a SF3B1 mutation. Overall response rate (ORR) was 61.3% (complete remission 25.8%). After a median follow-up of 43 months, overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were 43.1 and 15 months, respectively; while ORR was 77.8% for patients carrying TP53 disruptions (OS 33.8 months) and 43.5% for fludarabine-refractory patients (OS 30 months). Noteworthy, long-term survivors (OS ≥ 36 months) were 54.8%. None of the biological poor risk factors negatively impacted on ORR, PFS and OS. Grade ≥3 cytopenia occurred in 24.2% patients, 6.5% experienced a grade ≥3 non-CMV infection and no grade ≥3 CMV-event occurred. In conclusion, low dose-alemtuzumab is safe and effective in relapsed/refractory CLL, also in a long-term follow-up and high-risk genetic subgroups. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Phenotypic dichotomy following developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in female CD-1 mice: Low doses induce elevated serum leptin and insulin, and overweight in mid-life.

    PubMed

    Hines, Erin P; White, Sally S; Stanko, Jason P; Gibbs-Flournoy, Eugene A; Lau, Christopher; Fenton, Suzanne E

    2009-05-25

    The synthetic surfactant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a proven developmental toxicant in mice, causing pregnancy loss, increased neonatal mortality, delayed eye opening, and abnormal mammary gland growth in animals exposed during fetal life. PFOA is found in the sera and tissues of wildlife and humans throughout the world, but is especially high in the sera of children compared to adults. These studies in CD-1 mice aim to determine the latent health effects of PFOA following: (1) an in utero exposure, (2) an in utero exposure followed by ovariectomy (ovx), or (3) exposure as an adult. Mice were exposed to 0, 0.01, 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, or 5mg PFOA/kg BW for 17 days of pregnancy or as young adults. Body weight was reduced in the highest doses on postnatal day (PND) 1 and at weaning. However, the lowest exposures (0.01-0.3mg/kg) significantly increased body weight, and serum insulin and leptin (0.01-0.1mg/kg) in mid-life after developmental exposure. PFOA exposure combined with ovx caused no additional increase in mid-life body weight. At 18 months of age, the effects of in utero PFOA exposure on body weight were no longer detected. White adipose tissue and spleen weights were decreased at high doses of PFOA in intact developmentally exposed mice, and spleen weight was reduced in PFOA-exposed ovx mice. Brown adipose tissue weight was significantly increased in both ovx and intact mice at high PFOA doses. Liver weight was unaffected in late life by these exposure paradigms. Finally, there was no effect of adult exposure to PFOA on body weight. These studies demonstrate an important window of exposure for low-dose effects of PFOA on body weight gain, as well as leptin and insulin concentrations in mid-life, at a lowest observed effect level of 0.01mg PFOA/kg BW. The mode of action of these effects and its relevance to human health remain to be explored.

  16. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Haytham; Galal, Omima; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan; Abdelrahim, Eman; Ono, Yusuke; Mostafa, Emtethal; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit{sup +} stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms.

  17. Low-dose combined exposure of nanoparticles and heavy metal compared with PM2.5 in human myocardial AC16 cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lin; Yang, Xiaozhe; Asweto, Collins Otieno; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Yannan; Hu, Hejing; Shi, Yanfeng; Duan, Junchao; Sun, Zhiwei

    2017-10-05

    The co-exposure toxicity mechanism of ultrafine particles and pollutants on human cardiovascular system are still unclear. In this study, the combined effects of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) and/or carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) with Pb(AC)2 compared with particulate matter (PM)2.5 were investigated in human myocardial cells (AC16). Our study detected three different combinations of SiNPs and Pb(AC)2, CBNPs and Pb(AC)2, and SiNPs and CBNPs compared with PM2.5 at low-dose exposure. Using PM2.5 as positive control, our results suggested that the combination of SiNPs and Pb(AC)2/CBNPs could increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase leakage (LDH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) and decrease the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH); induce inflammation by the upregulation of protein CRP and TNF-α, and apoptosis by the upregulation of protein caspase-3, caspase-9, and Bax while the downregulation of protein Bcl-2; and trigger G2/M phase arrest by the upregulation of protein Chk2 and downregulation of protein Cdc2 and cyclin B1. In addition, the combination of CBNPs and Pb(AC)2 induced a significant increase in MDA and reduced the activities of ROS, LDH, SOD, and GSH, with G1/S phase arrest via upregulation of Chk1 and downregulation of CDK6 and cyclin D1. Our data suggested that the additive interaction and synergistic interaction are the major interaction in co-exposure system, and PM2.5 could trigger more severe oxidative stress, G2/M arrest, and apoptosis than either co-exposure or single exposure.

  18. The effect of adjunctive low-dose doxycycline and licorice therapy on gingival crevicular fluid matrix metalloproteinase-8 levels in chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Aminzadeh, Atousa; Mafi, Morvarid; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Naghney, Mohammad; Ghafari, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study compared the effect of adjunctive low dose doxycycline and licorice on gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) levels in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: In this in vivo, experimental study 39 patients with mild to moderate chronic periodontitis were selected. Samples of GCF were collected from three deepest pockets and MMP-8 concentration was measured. Patients were divided into three groups (n = 13). Groups were treated with doxycycline, licorice and placebo. Sampling and measurement of MMP-8 was repeated after 6 weeks. Data was analyzed by t-paired and ANOVA test. P > 0.001 was considered significant. Results: The decrease in mean of MMP-8 concentration was higher in doxycycline and licorice group in comparison with the placebo group and the difference was statistically significant (P value > 0.001). The decrease in mean of MMP-8 concentration was higher in licorice group than doxycycline group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study showed that licorice extract can prevent the production of MMPs by host cells and can be as useful as antibiotics like doxycycline to cure periodontal and other inflammatory diseases. It must be added that no side-effects were observed in usage of licorice extract. PMID:24348620

  19. Stress and combined exposure to low doses of pyridostigmine bromide, DEET, and permethrin produce neurochemical and neuropathological alterations in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, A; Abou-Donia, Suzanne; El-Masry, Eman; Shetty, Ashok; Abou-Donia, Mohamed

    2004-01-23

    Exposure to a combination of stress and low doses of the chemicals pyridostigmine bromide (PB), DEET, and permethrin in adult rats, a model of Gulf War exposure, produces blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and neuronal cell death in the cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus, thalamus, and hypothalamus. In this study, neuropathological alterations in other areas of the brain where no apparent BBB disruption was observed was studied following such exposure. Animals exposed to both stress and chemical exhibited decreased brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellum and decreased m2 muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor ligand binding in the midbrain and cerebellum. These alterations were associated with significant neuronal cell death, reduced microtubule-associated protein (MAP-2) expression, and increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3. In the cerebellum, the neurochemical alterations were associated with Purkinje cell loss and increased GFAP immunoreactivity in the white matter. However, animals subjected to either stress or chemicals alone did not show any of these changes in comparison to vehicle-treated controls. Collectively, these results suggest that prolonged exposure to a combination of stress and the chemicals PB, DEET, and permethrin can produce significant damage to the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, even in the absence of apparent BBB damage. As these areas of the brain are respectively important for the maintenance of motor and sensory functions, learning and memory, and gait and coordination of movements, such alterations could lead to many physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral abnormalities, particularly motor deficits and learning and memory dysfunction.

  20. Exposure to low-dose (56)Fe-ion radiation induces long-term epigenetic alterations in mouse bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Shao, Lijian; Chang, Jianhui; Feng, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Allen, Antiño R; Turner, Jennifer; Stewart, Blair; Raber, Jacob; Zhou, Daohong; Koturbash, Igor

    2014-07-01

    There is an increasing need to better understand the long-term health effects of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation due to exposure during space missions, as well as its increasing use in clinical treatments. Previous studies have indicated that exposure to (56)Fe heavy ions increases the incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Epigenetic alterations play a role in radiation-induced genomic instability and the initiation and progression of AML. In this study, we assessed the effects of low-dose (56)Fe-ion irradiation on epigenetic alterations in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells (HPSCs). Exposure to (56)Fe ions (600 MeV, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 Gy) resulted in significant epigenetic alterations involving methylation of DNA, the DNA methylation machinery and expression of repetitive elements. Four weeks after irradiation, these changes were primarily confined to HPSCs and were exhibited as dose-dependent hypermethylation of LINE1 and SINE B1 repetitive elements [4.2-fold increase in LINE1 (P < 0.001) and 7.6-fold increase in SINE B1 (P < 0.01) after exposure to 0.4 Gy; n = 5]. Epigenetic alterations were persistent and detectable for at least 22 weeks after exposure, when significant loss of global DNA hypomethylation (1.9-fold, P < 0.05), decreased expression of Dnmt1 (1.9-fold, P < 0.01), and increased expression of LINE1 and SINE B1 repetitive elements (2.8-fold, P < 0.001 for LINE1 and 1.9-fold, P < 0.05 for SINE B1; n = 5) were observed after exposure to 0.4 Gy. In contrast, exposure to (56)Fe ions did not result in accumulation of increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage, exhibited as DNA strand breaks. Furthermore, no significant alterations in cellular senescence and apoptosis were detected in HPSCs after exposure to (56)Fe-ion radiation. These findings suggest that epigenetic reprogramming is possibly involved in

  1. Low-dose, non-supervised, health insurance initiated exercise for the treatment and prevention of chronic low back pain in employees. Results from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Haufe, Sven; Wiechmann, Klaus; Stein, Lothar; Kück, Momme; Smith, Andrea; Meineke, Stefan; Zirkelbach, Yvonne; Rodriguez Duarte, Samuel; Drupp, Michael; Tegtbur, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Objective Back pain is a major problem requiring pragmatic interventions, low in costs for health care providers and feasible for individuals to perform. Our objective was to test the effectiveness of a low-dose 5-month exercise intervention with small personnel investment on low back strength and self-perceived pain. Methods Two hundred twenty-six employees (age: 42.7±10.2 years) from three mid-size companies were randomized to 5-month non-supervised training at home (3 times/week for 20 minutes) or wait-list-control. Health insurance professionals instructed the participants on trunk exercises at the start and then supervised participants once a month. Results Muscle strength for back extension increased after the 5-month intervention with a significant between-group difference (mean 27.4 Newton [95%CI 2.2; 60.3]) favoring the exercise group (p = 0.035). Low back pain was reduced more in subjects after exercise than control (mean difference –0.74 cm [95%CI –1.17; –0.27], p = 0.002). No between-group differences were observed for back pain related disability and work ability. After stratified analysis only subjects with preexisting chronic low back pain showed a between-group difference (exercise versus controls) after the intervention in their strength for back extension (mean 55.7 Newton [95%CI 2.8; 108.5], p = 0.039), self-perceived pain (mean –1.42 cm [95%CI –2.32; –0.51], p = 0.003) and work ability (mean 2.1 points [95%CI 0.2; 4.0], p = 0.032). Significant between-group differences were not observed in subjects without low back pain: strength for back extension (mean 23.4 Newton [95%CI –11.2; 58.1], p = 0.184), self-perceived pain (mean –0.48 cm [95%CI –0.99; 0.04], p = 0.067) and work ability (mean –0.1 points [95%CI –0.9; 0.9], p = 0.999). An interaction between low back pain subgroups and the study intervention (exercise versus control) was exclusively observed for the work ability index (p = 0.016). Conclusion In middle

  2. Low-dose, non-supervised, health insurance initiated exercise for the treatment and prevention of chronic low back pain in employees. Results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Haufe, Sven; Wiechmann, Klaus; Stein, Lothar; Kück, Momme; Smith, Andrea; Meineke, Stefan; Zirkelbach, Yvonne; Rodriguez Duarte, Samuel; Drupp, Michael; Tegtbur, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Back pain is a major problem requiring pragmatic interventions, low in costs for health care providers and feasible for individuals to perform. Our objective was to test the effectiveness of a low-dose 5-month exercise intervention with small personnel investment on low back strength and self-perceived pain. Two hundred twenty-six employees (age: 42.7±10.2 years) from three mid-size companies were randomized to 5-month non-supervised training at home (3 times/week for 20 minutes) or wait-list-control. Health insurance professionals instructed the participants on trunk exercises at the start and then supervised participants once a month. Muscle strength for back extension increased after the 5-month intervention with a significant between-group difference (mean 27.4 Newton [95%CI 2.2; 60.3]) favoring the exercise group (p = 0.035). Low back pain was reduced more in subjects after exercise than control (mean difference -0.74 cm [95%CI -1.17; -0.27], p = 0.002). No between-group differences were observed for back pain related disability and work ability. After stratified analysis only subjects with preexisting chronic low back pain showed a between-group difference (exercise versus controls) after the intervention in their strength for back extension (mean 55.7 Newton [95%CI 2.8; 108.5], p = 0.039), self-perceived pain (mean -1.42 cm [95%CI -2.32; -0.51], p = 0.003) and work ability (mean 2.1 points [95%CI 0.2; 4.0], p = 0.032). Significant between-group differences were not observed in subjects without low back pain: strength for back extension (mean 23.4 Newton [95%CI -11.2; 58.1], p = 0.184), self-perceived pain (mean -0.48 cm [95%CI -0.99; 0.04], p = 0.067) and work ability (mean -0.1 points [95%CI -0.9; 0.9], p = 0.999). An interaction between low back pain subgroups and the study intervention (exercise versus control) was exclusively observed for the work ability index (p = 0.016). In middle-aged employees a low-dose, non-supervised exercise program implemented

  3. Low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation–induced bioeffects in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Weng Keong; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Animal experimental studies indicate that acute or chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) (≤100 mSv) or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation (LDRIR) (<6 mSv/h) exposures may be harmful. It induces genetic and epigenetic changes and is associated with a range of physiological disturbances that includes altered immune system, abnormal brain development with resultant cognitive impairment, cataractogenesis, abnormal embryonic development, circulatory diseases, weight gain, premature menopause in female animals, tumorigenesis and shortened lifespan. Paternal or prenatal LDIR/LDRIR exposure is associated with reduced fertility and number of live fetuses, and transgenerational genomic aberrations. On the other hand, in some experimental studies, LDIR/LDRIR exposure has also been reported to bring about beneficial effects such as reduction in tumorigenesis, prolonged lifespan and enhanced fertility. The differences in reported effects of LDIR/LDRIR exposure are dependent on animal genetic background (susceptibility), age (prenatal or postnatal days), sex, nature of radiation exposure (i.e. acute, fractionated or chronic radiation exposure), type of radiation, combination of radiation with other toxic agents (such as smoking, pesticides or other chemical toxins) or animal experimental designs. In this review paper, we aimed to update radiation researchers and radiologists on the current progress achieved in understanding the LDIR/LDRIR-induced bionegative and biopositive effects reported in the various animal models. The roles played by a variety of molecules that are implicated in LDIR/LDRIR-induced health effects will be elaborated. The review will help in future investigations of LDIR/LDRIR-induced health effects by providing clues for designing improved animal research models in order to clarify the current controversial/contradictory findings from existing studies. PMID:28077626

  4. Low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation-induced bioeffects in animal models.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-03-01

    Animal experimental studies indicate that acute or chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) (≤100 mSv) or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation (LDRIR) (<6 mSv/h) exposures may be harmful. It induces genetic and epigenetic changes and is associated with a range of physiological disturbances that includes altered immune system, abnormal brain development with resultant cognitive impairment, cataractogenesis, abnormal embryonic development, circulatory diseases, weight gain, premature menopause in female animals, tumorigenesis and shortened lifespan. Paternal or prenatal LDIR/LDRIR exposure is associated with reduced fertility and number of live fetuses, and transgenerational genomic aberrations. On the other hand, in some experimental studies, LDIR/LDRIR exposure has also been reported to bring about beneficial effects such as reduction in tumorigenesis, prolonged lifespan and enhanced fertility. The differences in reported effects of LDIR/LDRIR exposure are dependent on animal genetic background (susceptibility), age (prenatal or postnatal days), sex, nature of radiation exposure (i.e. acute, fractionated or chronic radiation exposure), type of radiation, combination of radiation with other toxic agents (such as smoking, pesticides or other chemical toxins) or animal experimental designs. In this review paper, we aimed to update radiation researchers and radiologists on the current progress achieved in understanding the LDIR/LDRIR-induced bionegative and biopositive effects reported in the various animal models. The roles played by a variety of molecules that are implicated in LDIR/LDRIR-induced health effects will be elaborated. The review will help in future investigations of LDIR/LDRIR-induced health effects by providing clues for designing improved animal research models in order to clarify the current controversial/contradictory findings from existing studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research

  5. Induction of reciprocal translocations in rhesus monkey stem-cell spermatogonia: effects of low doses and low dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    van Buul, P.P.; Richardson, J.F. Jr.; Goudzwaard, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of reciprocal translocation in rhesus monkey spermatogonial stem cells was studied following exposure to low doses of acute X rays (0.25 Gy, 300 mGy/min) or to low-dose-rate X rays (1 Gy, 2 mGy/min) and gamma rays (1 Gy, 0.2 mGy/min). The results obtained at 0.25 Gy of X rays fitted exactly the linear extrapolation down from the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy points obtained earlier. Extension of X-ray exposure reduced the yield of translocations similar to that in the mouse by about 50%. The reduction to 40% of translocation rate after chronic gamma exposure was clearly less than the value of about 80% reported for the mouse over the same range of dose rates. Differential cell killing with ensuing differential elimination of aberration-carrying cells is the most likely explanation for the differences between mouse and monkey.

  6. Altered gene expression by low-dose arsenic exposure in humans and cultured cardiomyocytes: Assessment by real-time PCR array

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has become a great public health concern worldwide. Chronic arsenic exposure results in higher risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer, as well as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects o...

  7. Altered gene expression by low-dose arsenic exposure in humans and cultured cardiomyocytes: Assessment by real-time PCR array

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has become a great public health concern worldwide. Chronic arsenic exposure results in higher risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer, as well as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects o...

  8. Low Dose Effects in Psychopharmacology: Ontogenetic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Linda Patia; Varlinskaya, Elena I.

    2005-01-01

    Low doses of psychoactive drugs often elicit a behavioral profile opposite to that observed following administration of more substantial doses. Our laboratory has observed that these effects are often age-specific in rats. For instance, whereas moderate to high doses of the dopamine agonist apomorphine increase locomotion, suppressed locomotor activity is seen following low dose exposure, with this low dose effect not emerging consistently until adolescence. A somewhat earlier emergence of a low dose “paradoxical” effect is seen with the 5HT1a receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, with late preweanling, but not neonatal, rats showing increases in ingestive behavior at low doses but suppression at higher doses. In contrast to these ontogenetic increases in expression of low dose drug effects, low dose facilitation of social behavior is seen following ethanol only in adolescent rats and not their mature counterparts, although suppression of social interactions at higher doses is seen at both ages. This hormesis-like low dose stimulation appears related in part to overcompensation, with brief social suppression preceding the subsequent stimulation response, and also bears a number of ontogenetic similarities to acute tolerance, a well characterized, rapidly emerging adaptation to ethanol. Implications of these and other ontogenetic findings for studies of hormesis are discussed. PMID:19330157

  9. Low-Dose Carcinogenicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major deficiencies of cancer risk assessments is the lack of low-dose carcinogenicity data. Most assessments require extrapolation from high to low doses, which is subject to various uncertainties. Only 4 low-dose carcinogenicity studies and 5 low-dose biomarker/pre-n...

  10. Low-Dose Carcinogenicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major deficiencies of cancer risk assessments is the lack of low-dose carcinogenicity data. Most assessments require extrapolation from high to low doses, which is subject to various uncertainties. Only 4 low-dose carcinogenicity studies and 5 low-dose biomarker/pre-n...

  11. Adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) 3D in low dose CT abdomen-pelvis: Effects on image quality and radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, W. C.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Salehhon, N.; Musa, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The widespread use of computed tomography (CT) has increased the medical radiation exposure and cancer risk. We aimed to evaluate the impact of AIDR 3D in CT abdomen-pelvic examinations based on image quality and radiation dose in low dose (LD) setting compared to standard dose (STD) with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the images of 40 patients who underwent CT abdomen-pelvic using a 80 slice CT scanner. Group 1 patients (n=20, mean age 41 ± 17 years) were performed at LD with AIDR 3D reconstruction and Group 2 patients (n=20, mean age 52 ± 21 years) were scanned with STD using FBP reconstruction. Objective image noise was assessed by region of interest (ROI) measurements in the liver and aorta as standard deviation (SD) of the attenuation value (Hounsfield Unit, HU) while subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists. Statistical analysis was used to compare the scan length, CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and image quality of both patient groups. Although both groups have similar mean scan length, the CTDIvol significantly decreased by 38% in LD CT compared to STD CT (p<0.05). Objective and subjective image quality were statistically improved with AIDR 3D (p<0.05). In conclusion, AIDR 3D enables significant dose reduction of 38% with superior image quality in LD CT abdomen-pelvis.

  12. High susceptibility to repeated, low-dose, vaginal SHIV exposure late in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle of pigtail macaques.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Guenthner, Patricia C; Lin, Carol Y; Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Adams, Debra R; Otten, Ron A; Heneine, Walid; Hendry, R Michael; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuations in susceptibility to HIV or SHIV during the menstrual cycle are currently not fully documented. To address this, the time point of infection was determined in 19 adult female pigtail macaques vaginally challenged during their undisturbed menstrual cycles with repeated, low-dose SHIV(SF162P3) exposures. Eighteen macaques (95%) first displayed viremia in the follicular phase, as compared with 1 macaque (5%) in the luteal phase (P < 0.0001). Due to a viral eclipse phase, we estimated a window of most frequent virus transmission between days 24 and 31 of the menstrual cycle, in the late luteal phase. Thus, susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection is significantly elevated in the second half of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are high and when local immunity may be low. Such susceptibility windows have been postulated before but not definitively documented. Our data support the findings of higher susceptibility to HIV in women during progesterone-dominated periods including pregnancy and contraceptive use.

  13. Low-dose computed tomography scans with automatic exposure control for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Shu-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of automatic exposure control (AEC) in order to optimize low-dose computed tomography (CT) protocols for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). One PET/CT and one SPECT/CT were used to acquire CT images for four anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-year-old, 5-year-old and 10-year-old children and an adult. For the hybrid systems investigated in this study, the radiation dose and image quality of cardiac CT scans performed with AEC activated depend mainly on the selection of a predefined image quality index. Multiple linear regression methods were used to analyse image data from anthropomorphic phantom studies to investigate the effects of body size and predefined image quality index on CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT scans. The regression relationships have a coefficient of determination larger than 0.9, indicating a good fit to the data. According to the regression models, low-dose protocols using the AEC technique were optimized for patients of different ages. In comparison with the standard protocol with AEC activated for adult cardiac examinations used in our clinical routine practice, the optimized paediatric protocols in PET/CT allow 32.2, 63.7 and 79.2% CT dose reductions for anthropomorphic phantoms simulating 10-year-old, 5-year-old and 1-year-old children, respectively. The corresponding results for cardiac SPECT/CT are 8.4, 51.5 and 72.7%. AEC is a practical way to reduce CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT, but the AEC settings should be determined properly for optimal effect. Our results show that AEC does not eliminate the need for paediatric protocols and CT examinations using the AEC technique should be optimized for paediatric patients to reduce the radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  14. Chronic oral administration of low-dose combination of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin protects the rat heart against experimentally induced acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Garg, Monika; Khanna, Deepa; Kalra, Sanjeev; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2016-10-01

    Fenofibrate and rosuvastatin at low doses might have experimental pleiotropic benefits. This study investigated the combined effect of low doses of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin in isoproterenol-induced experimental myocardial infarction. Rats administered isoproterenol (85 mg/kg/day, s.c.) for 2 days (day 29 and day 30) of 30 days experimental protocol developed significant myocardial infarction that was accompanied with high myocardial oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, elevated serum markers of cardiac injury, lipid abnormalities, and elevated circulatory levels of C-reactive protein. Pretreatment with low doses of fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 30 days) and rosuvastatin (2 mg/kg/day p.o., 30 days) both alone or in combination markedly prevented isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction and associated abnormalities while the low-dose combination of fenofibrate and rosuvastatin was more effective. Histopathological study in isoproterenol control rat heart showed necrosis with edema and acute inflammation at the margins of necrotic area. The rat heart from low-dose fenofibrate and rosuvastatin pretreated group showed scanty inflammation and no ischemia. In conclusion, fenofibrate and rosuvastatin pretreatment in low doses might have a therapeutic potential to prevent the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction. Moreover, their combined treatment option might offer superior therapeutic benefits via a marked reduction in myocardial infarct size and oxidative stress, suggesting a possibility of their pleiotropic cardioprotective action at low doses.

  15. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  16. In Vivo Comparison of Radiation Exposure of Dual-Energy CT Versus Low-Dose CT Versus Standard CT for Imaging Urinary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Jepperson, Maria A.; Cernigliaro, Joseph G.; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H.; Morin, Richard L.; Haley, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is an emerging imaging modality with the unique capability of determining urinary stone composition. This study compares radiation exposure of DECT, standard single-energy CT (SECT), and low-dose renal stone protocol single-energy CT (LDSECT) for the evaluation of nephrolithiasis in a single in vivo patient cohort. Materials and Methods: Following institutional review board (IRB) approval, we retrospectively reviewed 200 consecutive DECT examinations performed on patients with suspected urolithiasis over a 6-month period. Of these, 35 patients had undergone examination with our LDSECT protocol, and 30 patients had undergone examination of the abdomen and pelvis with our SECT imaging protocol within 2 years of the DECT examination. The CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) was used to compare radiation exposure between scans. Image quality was objectively evaluated by comparing image noise. Statistical evaluation was performed using a Student's t-test. Results: DECT performed at 80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp did not produce a significant difference in radiation exposure compared with LDSECT (p=0.09 and 0.18, respectively). DECT performed at 80/140 kVp and 100/140 kVp produced an average 40% and 31%, respectively, reduction in radiation exposure compared with SECT (p<0.001). For patients imaged with the 100/140 kVp protocol, average values for images noise were higher in the LDSECT images compared with DECT images (p<0.001) and there was no significant difference in image noise between DECT and SECT images in the same patient (p=0.88). Patients imaged with the 80/140 kVp protocol had equivocal image noise compared with LDSECT images (p=0.44), however, DECT images had greater noise compared with SECT images in the same patient (p<0.001). Of the 75 patients included in the study, stone material was available for 16; DECT analysis correctly predicted stone composition in 15/16 patients (93%). Conclusion: DECT

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of adding low dose ribavirin to peginterferon alfa-2a for treatment of chronic hepatitis C infected thalassemia major patients in iran.

    PubMed

    Mehrazmay, Alireza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Mokhtari Payam, Mahdi; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Behnava, Bita; Miri, Seyyed Mohammad; Karimi Elizee, Pegah; Tabatabaee, Seyed Vahid; Keshvari, Maryam; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis C in Iran is 1% and 18% in general population and thalassemia patients respectively. The cost effectiveness analysis of adding Ribavirin to Peginterferon alfa-2a (PEG IFN alfa-2a) as a combination treatment strategy of chronic hepatitis C in thalassemia patients in comparison with monotherapy could help clinicians and policy makers to provide the best treatment for the patients. In this study we aimed to assess whether adding Ribavirin to PEG IFN alfa-2a is a cost effective strategy in different genotypes and different subgroups of 280 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection from the perspective of society in Iranian setting. A cost effectiveness analysis including all costs and outcomes of treatments for chronic hepatitis C infected thalassemia major patients was conducted. We constructed a decision tree of treatment course in which a hypothetical cohort of 100 patients received "PEG IFN alfa-2a" or "Peg IFN alfa-2a plus Ribavirin." The cost analysis was based on cost data for 2008 and we used 9300 Iranian Rials (IR Rial) as exchange rate declared by the Iranian Central Bank on that time to calculating costs by US Dollar (USD). To evaluate whether a strategy is cost effective, one time and three times of GDP per capita were used as threshold based on recommendation of the World Health Organization. The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) for combination therapy in genotype-1 and genotypes non-1 subgroups was 2,673 and 19,211 US dollars (USD) per one Sustain Virological Response (SVR), respectively. In low viral load and high viral load subgroups, the ICER was 5,233 and 14,976 USD per SVR, respectively. The calculated ICER for combination therapy in subgroup of patients with previously resistant to monotherapy was 13,006 USD per SVR. Combination therapy in previously resistant patients to combination therapy was a dominant strategy. Adding low dose of Ribavirin to PEG IFN alfa-2a for treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients

  18. IL6-174 G>C Polymorphism (rs1800795) Association with Late Effects of Low Dose Radiation Exposure in the Portuguese Tinea Capitis Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Adélia; Costa, Natália Rios; Chora, Inês; Ferreira, Sara; Araújo, Emanuel; Lopes, Pedro; Rosa, Gilberto; Marques, Pedro; Bettencourt, Paulo; Oliveira, Inês; Costa, Francisco; Ramos, Isabel; Teles, Maria José; Guimarães, João Tiago; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, and cardiovascular disease have been described as late effects of low dose radiation (LDR) exposure, namely in tinea capitis cohorts. In addition to radiation dose, gender and younger age at exposure, the genetic background might be involved in the susceptibility to LDR late effects. The -174 G>C (rs1800795) SNP in IL6 has been associated with cancer and cardiovascular disease, nevertheless this association is still controversial. We assessed the association of the IL6-174 G>C SNP with LDR effects such as thyroid carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and carotid atherosclerosis in the Portuguese tinea capitis cohort. The IL6-174 G>C SNP was genotyped in 1269 individuals formerly irradiated for tinea capitis. This sampling group included thyroid cancer (n = 36), basal cell carcinoma (n = 113) and cases without thyroid or basal cell carcinoma (1120). A subgroup was assessed for atherosclerosis by ultrasonography (n = 379) and included matched controls (n = 222). Genotypes were discriminated by real-time PCR using a TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. In the irradiated group, we observed that the CC genotype was significantly associated with carotid plaque risk, both in the genotypic (OR = 3.57, CI = 1.60–7.95, p-value = 0.002) and in the recessive (OR = 3.02, CI = 1.42–6.42, p-value = 0.004) models. Irradiation alone was not a risk factor for carotid atherosclerosis. We did not find a significant association of the IL6-174 C allele with thyroid carcinoma or basal cell carcinoma risk. The IL6-174 CC genotype confers a three-fold risk for carotid atherosclerotic disease suggesting it may represent a genetic susceptibility factor in the LDR context. PMID:27662210

  19. IL6-174 G>C Polymorphism (rs1800795) Association with Late Effects of Low Dose Radiation Exposure in the Portuguese Tinea Capitis Cohort.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Paula; Durães, Cecília; Mendes, Adélia; Costa, Natália Rios; Chora, Inês; Ferreira, Sara; Araújo, Emanuel; Lopes, Pedro; Rosa, Gilberto; Marques, Pedro; Bettencourt, Paulo; Oliveira, Inês; Costa, Francisco; Ramos, Isabel; Teles, Maria José; Guimarães, João Tiago; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    Head and neck cancers, and cardiovascular disease have been described as late effects of low dose radiation (LDR) exposure, namely in tinea capitis cohorts. In addition to radiation dose, gender and younger age at exposure, the genetic background might be involved in the susceptibility to LDR late effects. The -174 G>C (rs1800795) SNP in IL6 has been associated with cancer and cardiovascular disease, nevertheless this association is still controversial. We assessed the association of the IL6-174 G>C SNP with LDR effects such as thyroid carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and carotid atherosclerosis in the Portuguese tinea capitis cohort. The IL6-174 G>C SNP was genotyped in 1269 individuals formerly irradiated for tinea capitis. This sampling group included thyroid cancer (n = 36), basal cell carcinoma (n = 113) and cases without thyroid or basal cell carcinoma (1120). A subgroup was assessed for atherosclerosis by ultrasonography (n = 379) and included matched controls (n = 222). Genotypes were discriminated by real-time PCR using a TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. In the irradiated group, we observed that the CC genotype was significantly associated with carotid plaque risk, both in the genotypic (OR = 3.57, CI = 1.60-7.95, p-value = 0.002) and in the recessive (OR = 3.02, CI = 1.42-6.42, p-value = 0.004) models. Irradiation alone was not a risk factor for carotid atherosclerosis. We did not find a significant association of the IL6-174 C allele with thyroid carcinoma or basal cell carcinoma risk. The IL6-174 CC genotype confers a three-fold risk for carotid atherosclerotic disease suggesting it may represent a genetic susceptibility factor in the LDR context.

  20. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AS A SENSITIVE END-POINT FOLLOWING ACUTE PERNATAL EXPOSURE TO A LOW DOSE ATRAZINE METABOLITE MIXTURE IN FEMALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to characterize the potential developmental effects of atrazine (ATR) metabolites at low doses, an environmentally-based mixture (EBM) of ATR and its metabolites hydroxyatrazine, diaminochlorotriazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine was formulated based on surv...

  1. MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT AS A SENSITIVE END-POINT FOLLOWING ACUTE PERNATAL EXPOSURE TO A LOW DOSE ATRAZINE METABOLITE MIXTURE IN FEMALE LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to characterize the potential developmental effects of atrazine (ATR) metabolites at low doses, an environmentally-based mixture (EBM) of ATR and its metabolites hydroxyatrazine, diaminochlorotriazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine was formulated based on surv...

  2. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, David M.

    2013-09-09

    During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  3. State of the art in research into the risk of low dose radiation exposure--findings of the fourth MELODI workshop.

    PubMed

    Salomaa, Sisko; Prise, Kevin M; Atkinson, Michael J; Wojcik, Andrzej; Auvinen, Anssi; Grosche, Bernd; Sabatier, Laure; Jourdain, Jean-René; Salminen, Eeva; Baatout, Sarah; Kulka, Ulrike; Rabus, Hans; Blanchardon, Eric; Averbeck, Dietrich; Weiss, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    The fourth workshop of the Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) was organised by STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland. It took place from 12 to 14 September 2012 in Helsinki, Finland. The meeting was attended by 179 scientists and professionals engaged in radiation research and radiation protection. We summarise the major scientific findings of the workshop and the recommendations for updating the MELODI Strategic Research Agenda and Road Map for future low dose research activities.

  4. Very Low Dose Fetal Exposure to Chernobyl Contamination Resulted in Increases in Infant Leukemia in Europe and Raises Questions about Current Radiation Risk Models

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    Following contamination from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 excess infant leukemia (0–1 y) was reported from five different countries, Scotland, Greece, Germany, Belarus and Wales and Scotland combined. The cumulative absorbed doses to the fetus, as conventionally assessed, varied from 0.02 mSv in the UK through 0.06 mSv in Germany, 0.2 mSv in Greece and 2 mSv in Belarus, where it was highest. Nevertheless, the effect was real and given the specificity of the cohort raised questions about the safety of applying the current radiation risk model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to these internal exposures, a matter which was discussed in 2000 by Busby and Cato [7,8] and also in the reports of the UK Committee examining Radiation Risk from Internal Emitters. Data on infant leukemia in the United Kingdom, chosen on the basis of the cohorts defined by the study of Greece were supplied by the UK Childhood Cancer Research Group. This has enabled a study of leukemia in the combined infant population of 15,466,845 born in the UK, Greece, and Germany between 1980 and 1990. Results show a statistically significant excess risk RR = 1.43 (95% CI 1.13 < RR < 1.80 (2-tailed); p = 0.0025) in those born during the defined peak exposure period of 01/07/86 to 31/12/87 compared with those born between 01/01/80 and 31/12/85 and 01/01/88 and 31/12/90. The excess risks in individual countries do not increase monotonically with the conventionally calculated doses, the relation being biphasic, increasing sharply at low doses and falling at high doses. This result is discussed in relation to fetal/cell death at higher doses and also to induction of DNA repair. Since the cohort is chosen specifically on the basis of exposure to internal radionuclides, the result can be expressed as evidence for a significant error in the conventional modeling for such internal fetal exposures. PMID:20049249

  5. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Susan C; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C; Stenoien, David L

    2016-11-01

    In this study we utilized a systems biology approach to identify dose- (0.1, 2.0 and 10 Gy) and time- (3 and 8 h) dependent responses to acute ionizing radiation exposure in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. The low dose used here (0.1 Gy) falls within the range of certain medical diagnostic procedures. Of the two higher doses used, 2.0 Gy is typically administered for radiotherapy, while 10 Gy is lethal. Because exposure to any of these doses is possible after an intentional or accidental radiation events, biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage potentially exposed individuals. Here, tissue samples were acutely exposed to X-ray-generated low-linear-energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation, and direct RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts. The time points used for this study aid in assessing early responses to exposure, when key signaling pathways and biomarkers can be identified, which precede and regulate later phenotypic alterations that occur at high doses, including cell death. We determined that a total of 1,701 genes expressed were significantly affected by high-dose radiation, with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. Expression levels of a group of 29 genes, including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA and AEN, were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at both time points. A much larger group of upregulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after 10 Gy irradiation. At high doses, downregulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a few genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy irradiation, using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to high

  6. Treating concurrent chronic low back pain and depression with low-dose venlafaxine: an initial identification of "easy-to-use" clinical predictors of early response.

    PubMed

    Rej, Soham; Dew, Mary Amanda; Karp, Jordan F

    2014-07-01

    Depression and chronic low back pain (CLBP) are both frequent and commonly comorbid in older adults seeking primary care. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) such as venlafaxine may be effective in treating comorbid depression and CLBP. For patients with comorbid depression and CLBP, our goal was to identify "easy-to-use" early clinical variables associated with response to 6 weeks of low-dose venlafaxine pharmacotherapy that could be used to construct a clinically useful predictive model in future studies. We report data from the first 140 patients completing phase 1 of the Addressing Depression and Pain Together clinical trial. Patients aged ≥60 with concurrent depression and CLBP received 6 weeks of open-label venlafaxine 150 mg/day and supportive management. Using univariate and multivariate methods, we examined a variety of clinical predictors and their association with response to both depression and CLBP; change in depression; and change in pain scores at 6 weeks. About 26.4% of patients responded for both depression and pain with venlafaxine. Early improvement in pain at 2 weeks predicted improved response rates (P = 0.027). Similarly, positive changes in depression and pain at 2 weeks independently predicted continued improvement at 6 weeks in depression and pain, respectively (P < 0.001). An important minority of patients benefitted from 6 weeks of venlafaxine 150 mg/day. Early improvement in depression and pain at 2 weeks may predict continued improvement at week 6. Future studies must examine whether patients who have a poor initial response may benefit from increasing the SNRI dose, switching, or augmenting with other treatments after 2 weeks of pharmacotherapy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Treating Concurrent Chronic Low Back Pain and Depression with Low-Dose Venlafaxine: An Initial Identification of “Easy-to-Use” Clinical Predictors of Early Response

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Soham; Dew, Mary Amanda; Karp, Jordan F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Depression and Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) are both frequent and commonly comorbid in older adults seeking primary care. Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) such as venlafaxine may be effective in treating comorbid depression and CLBP. For patients with comorbid depression and CLBP, our goal was to identify “easy-to-use” early clinical variables associated with response to 6 weeks of low-dose venlafaxine pharmacotherapy that could be used to construct a clinically-useful predictive model in future studies. Methods We report data from the first 140 patients completing phase 1 of the ADAPT clinical trial. Patients aged ≥60 with concurrent depression and CLBP received 6-weeks of open-label venlafaxine 150mg/day and supportive management. Using univariate and multivariate methods, we examined a variety of clinical predictors and their association with response to both depression and CLBP; change in depression; and change in pain scores at 6 weeks. Results 26.4% of patients responded for both depression and pain with venlafaxine. Early improvement in pain at 2 weeks predicted improved response rates (p=0.027). Similarly, positive changes in depression and pain at 2 weeks independently predicted continued improvement at 6 weeks in depression and pain, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusions An important minority of patients benefitted from 6 weeks of venlafaxine 150mg/day. Early improvement in depression and pain at 2 weeks may predict continued improvement at week 6. Future studies must examine whether patients who have a poor initial response may benefit from increasing the SNRI dose, switching, or augmenting with other treatments after 2 weeks of pharmacotherapy. PMID:25040462

  8. Low-dose triple-rule-out using 320-row-detector volume MDCT--less contrast medium and lower radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Tahir; Rogalla, Patrik; Lembcke, Alexander; Mühler, Matthias R; Hamm, Bernd; Hein, Patrick A

    2011-07-01

    To investigate image quality of triple-rule-out (TRO) computed tomography (CT) using a 320-row-detector CT system with substantially reduced contrast medium volume at 100 kV. Forty-six consecutive patients with noncritical, acute chest pain underwent 320-row-detector CT using a two-step TRO protocol consisting of a non-spiral, non-gated chest CT acquisition (150 mA) followed by a non-spiral, electrocardiography-gated cardiac acquisition (200-500 mA based on body mass index (BMI)). Data were acquired using a biphasic injection protocol with a total iodinated contrast medium volume of 60 ml (370 mg/ml). Vessel attenuation and effective doses were recorded. Image quality was scored independently by two readers. Mean attenuation was 584 ± 114 Hounsfield units (HU) in the ascending aorta, 335 ± 63HU in the aortic arch, 658 ± 136HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 521 ± 97HU and 549 ± 102HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. In all but one patient, attenuation and image quality allowed accurate visualization of the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta, and coronary arteries in a single examination. Ninety-six percent of all coronary artery segments were rated diagnostic. Radiation exposure ranged between 2.0 and 3.3 mSv. Using 320-row-detector CT the investigated low-dose TRO protocol resulted in excellent opacification and image quality with substantial reduction of contrast medium volume compared to recently published TRO protocols.

  9. Low-Dose Treatment with Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents and Cardiovascular Geometry in Chronic Kidney Disease: Is Darbepoetin-α More Effective than Expected?

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; Granata, Antonio; Malaguti, Moreno

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a widespread invalidating condition, leading to erythropoietin deficiency and decreased cardiovascular performance. Darbepoetin-α and epoetin-α are extensively used to correct renal anemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiological outcomes in two groups of CKD patients treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA: 20 μg darbepoetin-α weekly vs. 2,000 IU epoetin-α thrice weekly) with an unconventional 1:300 conversion ratio. METHODS: The study was designed as a single center, retrospective, observational study. One hundred stage IV CKD patients were selected. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit, C-reactive protein, pro-brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and basal echocardiograms were monitored every 3 months. RESULTS: Darbepoetin-α was significantly more effective in increasing Hb levels after 3 (p < 0.0001), 6 (p < 0.0001), 9 (p < 0.01) and 12 months (p < 0.01) compared to epoetin-α. The optimal Hb target level (11 g/dl < Hb < 12 g/dl) was completely reached after 1 year of treatment with darbepoetin-α and in 70% of the patients treated with epoetin-α (p < 0.01). Cardiovascular performance (left ventricular end-diastolic volume, ejection fraction and pro-BNP) was significantly improved after darbepoetin-α treatment at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups compared to epoetin-α. Discussion: Despite the limitations of a retrospective observational study, these results encourage nephrologists to test the 1:300 darbepoetin/epoetin conversion ratio in 'easy' patients, and aggressive protocols for the treatment of anemia in CKD patients are avoided. Darbepoetin-α appeared effective in anemia correction, improving cardiovascular performance in a significantly higher proportion than epoetin. At low doses, on the other hand, it has to be borne in mind that a treatment regimen with only one submaximal administration per week may increase patient compliance and adherence to therapy, explaining in part the observed

  10. Low-Dose Treatment with Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents and Cardiovascular Geometry in Chronic Kidney Disease: Is Darbepoetin-α More Effective than Expected?

    PubMed Central

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; Granata, Antonio; Malaguti, Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a widespread invalidating condition, leading to erythropoietin deficiency and decreased cardiovascular performance. Darbepoetin-α and epoetin-α are extensively used to correct renal anemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiological outcomes in two groups of CKD patients treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA: 20 μg darbepoetin-α weekly vs. 2,000 IU epoetin-α thrice weekly) with an unconventional 1:300 conversion ratio. Methods The study was designed as a single center, retrospective, observational study. One hundred stage IV CKD patients were selected. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit, C-reactive protein, pro-brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and basal echocardiograms were monitored every 3 months. Results Darbepoetin-α was significantly more effective in increasing Hb levels after 3 (p < 0.0001), 6 (p < 0.0001), 9 (p < 0.01) and 12 months (p < 0.01) compared to epoetin-α. The optimal Hb target level (11 g/dl < Hb < 12 g/dl) was completely reached after 1 year of treatment with darbepoetin-α and in 70% of the patients treated with epoetin-α (p < 0.01). Cardiovascular performance (left ventricular end-diastolic volume, ejection fraction and pro-BNP) was significantly improved after darbepoetin-α treatment at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups compared to epoetin-α. Discussion: Despite the limitations of a retrospective observational study, these results encourage nephrologists to test the 1:300 darbepoetin/epoetin conversion ratio in ‘easy’ patients, and aggressive protocols for the treatment of anemia in CKD patients are avoided. Darbepoetin-α appeared effective in anemia correction, improving cardiovascular performance in a significantly higher proportion than epoetin. At low doses, on the other hand, it has to be borne in mind that a treatment regimen with only one submaximal administration per week may increase patient compliance and adherence to therapy, explaining in part the observed

  11. Altered Gene Expression by Low-Dose Arsenic Exposure in Humans and Cultured Cardiomyocytes: Assessment by Real-Time PCR Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jinyao; Xia, Yajuan; Wade, Timothy J.; DeMarini, David M.; Davidson, Mercy; Mumford, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure results in higher risk of skin, lung, and bladder cancer, as well as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on expression of selected genes in the blood lymphocytes from 159 people exposed chronically to arsenic in their drinking water using a novel RT-PCR TaqMan low-density array (TLDA). We found that expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which activates both inflammation and NF-κB-dependent survival pathways, was strongly associated with water and urinary arsenic levels. Expression of KCNA5, which encodes a potassium ion channel protein, was positively associated with water and toe nail arsenic levels. Expression of 2 and 11 genes were positively associated with nail and urinary arsenic, respectively. Because arsenic exposure has been reported to be associated with long QT intervals and vascular disease in humans, we also used this TLDA for analysis of gene expression in human cardiomyocytes exposed to arsenic in vitro. Expression of the ion-channel genes CACNA1, KCNH2, KCNQ1 and KCNE1 were down-regulated by 1-μM arsenic. Alteration of some common pathways, including those involved in oxidative stress, inflammatory signaling, and ion-channel function, may underlay the seemingly disparate array of arsenic-associated diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. PMID:21776218

  12. Aberrant cell divisions in root meristeme of maize following exposure to X-rays low doses compared to similar effects of 50 Hz electromagnetic exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Capraru, G.; Racuciu, M.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-04-01

    The response of maize to radiation exposure was investigated by two cytogenetic methods considering the importance of the geno-toxic effect for environmental and agricultural purposes. Uniform genophond seeds, freshly germinated, were exposed to relatively low radiation doses using a radiotherapy X-ray applicator from a hospital irradiation device and to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field with about 10 mT magnetic induction (generated within laboratory assembled electromagnetic coils). Radicular meristeme tissue aliquots were prevailed for cytogenetic investigation based on microscopic observations and cell counting. Microscope slides were prepared following a specific procedure (squash technique and Feulgen method based on modified Carr reactive coloration). Mitotic index as well as chromosomal aberration percentage were calculated for more than 30,000 cells taken into account. From a qualitative viewpoint, chromosomal aberrations such as interchromatidian bridges, lagging and expelled chromosomes and multipolar divisions were evidenced - no distinct situation for either ionizing radiation or electromagnetic field being identified. The main quantitative difference consisted in the increased mitotic index for electromagnetic exposure increased times compared with the diminished mitotic index in the case of low X-ray doses.

  13. Maternofetal pharmacokinetics and fetal lung responses in chronically catheterized sheep receiving constant, low-dose infusions of betamethasone phosphate.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Matthew W; Saito, Masatoshi; Usuda, Haruo; Molloy, Timothy J; Miura, Yuichiro; Sato, Shinichi; Watanabe, Shimpei; Clarke, Michael; Fossler, Michael; Scmidt, Augusto; Kallapur, Suhas G; Kramer, Boris W; Newnham, John P; Jobe, Alan H

    2016-12-01

    Antenatal steroids are standard of care for cases of anticipated preterm labor to improve neonatal outcomes. However, steroids are potent drugs, and their use in pregnancy remains largely unoptimized. The objective of the study was to measure the maternofetal pharmacokinetics of constant, low-dose intravenous betamethasone phosphate infusions and correlate these data with the transcriptional effect exerted by subclinical betamethasone exposures on the ovine fetal lung. Thirty-two ewes carrying a single fetus had surgery to catheterize fetal and maternal jugular veins at 116 days of gestation (term, 150 days). Animals were recovered for 2 days and then were randomized to receive 2 sequential maternal intravenous infusions of either (n = 4/group) of the following: 1) saline, 0.125, 0.04, or 0.0125 mg/kg betamethasone phosphate over 3 hours; or 2) saline, 0.25, 0.08, or 0.025 mg/kg betamethasone phosphate over 12 hours. Each infusion was separated by 2 days. Fetal lung tissue was collected for analysis using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and an ovine-specific microarray. Plasma betamethasone levels from time-course catheter samples were determined by mass spectrometry. Data were assessed for distribution, variance, and tested by an analysis of variance. Betamethasone was detectable (>1 ng/mL) in fetal plasma only in animals randomized to 0.125 mg/kg 3 hour or 0.250 mg/kg 12 hour infusions. Fetal betamethasone half-lives were 1.7-2.8 times greater than maternal values. At maximum concentration, fetal plasma betamethasone levels were approximately 10% of maternal levels. Compared with saline control, all animals, other than those receiving 0.0125 mg/kg 3 hour betamethasone phosphate infusions, had evidence of dose-dependent glucocorticoid transcriptional responses in the fetal lung. Constant maternal betamethasone infusions delivering substantially lower fetal and maternal betamethasone maximal concentrations than those achieved with current clinical treatment

  14. An innovative in vitro device providing continuous low doses of gamma-rays and altered gravity mimicking spatial exposure: dosimetry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Laetitia; Courtade-Saidi, Monique; Pereda Loth, Veronica; Franceries, Xavier; Afonso, Anne Sophie; Ayala, Alicia; Bardies, Manuel

    Astronauts are exposed to microgravity and chronic irradiation. Experimental conditions combining these two factors are difficult to reproduce on earth. The aim of our study was to create an experimental device able to combine chronic irradiation and altered gravity that may be used for cell cultures or plant models. Irradiation was provided with Thorium nitrate powder, conditioned in several bags in order to obtain a sealed source. This source was placed in an incubator. Lead leafs covered the internal walls of the incubator in order to protect people outside from radiations. Cell plates or plants seeds could be placed on direct contact with the source or at different distances above the source. Moreover, a random positioning machine (RPM) was placed inside the incubator and positioned on the source. The dosimetry was performed for different experimental conditions. The activity of the source was established considering all the decay chain of thorium. The spectrum of the source calculated according to the natural decrease of radioactivity was compared with gamma spectrometry (InterceptorTM) and showed a very good adequacy. The fluence evaluated with a gamma detector was closed to the theoretical fluence evaluated with our model, attesting that the source was uniformly distributed. Dosimetry was performed with radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPL) placed for one month exposition in different locations (x and y axis) inside cell culture dishes. When the dishes were placed directly on the source, we obtained a dose rate from 660 to 983 mSv/year, while it was between 80 to 127 mSv/year at a distance of 14.5 cm above the source. Using the RPM placed on the source we reached median dose rate levels of 140 mSv/year. In conclusion, we have elaborated a new device allowing the combination of chronic radiation exposure and altered gravity. This device can be used by researchers interested in the field of space biology.

  15. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture on pubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Stanko, Jason P; Enoch, Rolondo R; Rayner, Jennifer L; Davis, Christine C; Wolf, Douglas C; Malarkey, David E; Fenton, Suzanne E

    2010-12-01

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were treated by gavage with 0.09, 0.87, or 8.73mg AMM/kg body weight (BW), vehicle, or 100mg ATR/kg BW positive control, on gestation days 15-19. Preputial separation was significantly delayed in 0.87 mg and 8.73mg AMM-exposed males. AMM-exposed males demonstrated a significant treatment-related increase in incidence and severity of inflammation in the prostate on postnatal day (PND) 120. A dose-dependent increase in epididymal fat masses and prostate foci were grossly visible in AMM-exposed offspring. These results indicate that a short, late prenatal exposure to mixture of chlorotriazine metabolites can cause chronic prostatitis in male LE rats. The mode of action for these effects is presently unclear.

  16. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture on pubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Stanko, Jason; Enoch, Rolondo; Rayner, Jennifer L; Davis, Christine; Wolf, Douglas; Malarkey, David; Fenton, Suzanne

    2010-12-01

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were treated by gavage with 0.09, 0.87, or 8.73 mg AMM/kg body weight (BW), vehicle, or 100 mg ATR/kg BW positive control, on gestation days 15 19. Preputial separation was significantly delayed in 0.87 mg and 8.73 mg AMM-exposed males. AMM-exposed males demonstrated a significant treatment-related increase in incidence and severity of inflammation in the prostate on postnatal day (PND) 120. A dose-dependent increase in epididymal fat masses and prostate foci were grossly visible in AMM-exposed offspring. These results indicate that a short, late prenatal exposure to mixture of chlorotriazine metabolites can cause chronic prostatitis in male LE rats. The mode of action for these effects is presently unclear.

  17. Health benefits from low-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Whole-body exposures of mice and humans show no harm from low doses of ionizing radiation. Forty reports show statistically significant, p < 0.01, beneficial effects when cancer and total mortality rates were examined in mice. In vitro experiments indicate that radiogenic metabolism, adaptive repair mechanisms, such as DNA repair enzymes, and the essential nature of ionizing radiation are responsible for part of this activity. However, overwhelming evidence shows that low-dose irradiation increases immune competence. Such data negate the linear concept, which has no reliable whole-animal data to support it in the low-dose range. Cell culture data are not pertinent; such cells do not have a complete immune system.

  18. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  19. Repeated exposure of male mice to low doses of lipopolysaccharide: dose and time dependent development of behavioral sensitization and tolerance in an automated light-dark anxiety test.

    PubMed

    Banasikowski, Tomek J; Cloutier, Caylen J; Ossenkopp, Klaus-Peter; Kavaliers, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is widely used to examine immune behavior relationships there has been little consideration of the effects of low doses and the roles of sensitization and, or tolerance. Here low doses of LPS (1.0, 5.0 and 25.0 μg/kg) were peripherally administered to male mice on Days 1, 4, 28 and 32 after a baseline recording of anxiety-like behaviors in an automated light-dark apparatus (total time in the light chamber, number of light-dark transitions, nose pokes into the light chamber). LPS at 1.0 μg/kg, while having no significant effects on anxiety-like behaviors in the light-dark test on Days 1 and 4, displayed sensitization with the mice exhibiting significantly enhanced anxiety-like responses on Days 28 and 32. LPS at 5.0 μg/kg had no consistent significant effects on anxiety-like behavior on Days 1 and 4, with sensitization and enhanced anxiety-like behaviors on Day 28 followed by tolerance on Day 32. LPS at 25 μg/kg significantly enhanced anxiety-like behaviors on Day 1, followed by tolerance on Day 4, which was not evident by Day 28 and re-emerged on Day 32. There was a similar overall pattern of sensitization and tolerance for LPS-induced decreases in locomotor activity in the safe dark chamber, without, however, any significant effects on activity in the riskier light chamber. This shows that low doses of LPS induce anxiety-like behavior and these effects are subject to sensitization and tolerance in a dose, context, and time related manner.

  20. Short communication: Survival of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in tissues of cows following low-dose exposure to electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bode, John F; Thoen, Charles O

    2016-08-01

    This investigation was designed to determine the effects of low-dose electron beam irradiation on the survival of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in tissue samples collected at necropsy from clinically affected cows. Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis was isolated from the ileum and ileocecal valve of one cow and from the ileum of another cow irradiated at 4.0 kGy, but was not isolated from the ileum, ileocecal valve, or mesenteric lymph node of 11 other cows irradiated at 4 kGy.

  1. Low-dose exposure to bisphenols A, F and S of human primary adipocyte impacts coding and non-coding RNA profiles

    PubMed Central

    Leloire, Audrey; Dhennin, Véronique; Coumoul, Xavier; Yengo, Loïc; Froguel, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been suspected to be associated with deleterious effects on health including obesity and metabolically-linked diseases. Although bisphenols F (BPF) and S (BPS) are BPA structural analogs commonly used in many marketed products as a replacement for BPA, only sparse toxicological data are available yet. Our objective was to comprehensively characterize bisphenols gene targets in a human primary adipocyte model, in order to determine whether they may induce cellular dysfunction, using chronic exposure at two concentrations: a “low-dose” similar to the dose usually encountered in human biological fluids and a higher dose. Therefore, BPA, BPF and BPS have been added at 10 nM or 10 μM during the differentiation of human primary adipocytes from subcutaneous fat of three non-diabetic Caucasian female patients. Gene expression (mRNA/lncRNA) arrays and microRNA arrays, have been used to assess coding and non-coding RNA changes. We detected significantly deregulated mRNA/lncRNA and miRNA at low and high doses. Enrichment in “cancer” and “organismal injury and abnormalities” related pathways was found in response to the three products. Some long intergenic non-coding RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs were differentially expressed suggesting that bisphenols may also activate multiple cellular processes and epigenetic modifications. The analysis of upstream regulators of deregulated genes highlighted hormones or hormone-like chemicals suggesting that BPS and BPF can be suspected to interfere, just like BPA, with hormonal regulation and have to be considered as endocrine disruptors. All these results suggest that as BPA, its substitutes BPS and BPF should be used with the same restrictions. PMID:28628672

  2. LINE-1 gene hypomethylation and p16 gene hypermethylation in HepG2 cells induced by low-dose and long-term triclosan exposure: The role of hydroxyl group.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liudan; Ma, Huimin; Pan, Shangxia; You, Jing; Zhang, Gan; Yu, Zhiqing; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2016-08-01

    Triclosan (TCS), a frequently used antimicrobial agent in pharmaceuticals and personal care products, exerts liver tumor promoter activities in mice. Previous work showed high-dose TCS (1.25-10μM) induced global DNA hypomethylation in HepG2 cells. However, whether or how tumor suppressor gene methylation changed in HepG2 cells after low-dose and long-term TCS exposure is still unknown. We investigate here the effects and mechanisms of DNA methylation of global DNA(GDM), repetitive genes, and liver tumor suppressor gene (p16) after exposing HepG2 cells to low-dose TCS (0.625-5nM)for two weeks using HPLC-MS/MS, Methylight, Q-MSP, Pyrosequencing, and Massarray methods. We found that low-dose TCS exposure decreased repetitive elements LINE-1 methylation levels, but not global DNA methylation, through down-regulating DNMT1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) and MeCP2 (methylated DNA binding domain) expression, and up-regulating 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels. Interestingly, low-dose TCS elevated p16 gene methylation and inhibited p16 expression, which were not observed in high-dose (10μM) group. Meanwhile, methyl-triclosan could not induce these two types of DNA methylation changes, suggesting the involvement of hydroxyl in TCS-mediated DNA methylation changes. Collectively, our results suggested low concentrations of TCS adversely affected HepG2 cells through DNA methylation dysregulation, and hydroxyl group in TCS played an important role in the effects. This study provided a better understanding on hepatotoxicity of TCS at environmentally relevant concentrations through epigenetic pathway.

  3. Changes in fibrinopeptide A peptides in the sera of rats chronically exposed to low doses of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Ma, Shi-wei; Ma, Xiao-ming; Xu, Yuan-jing; Tang, Nai-jun

    2012-03-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a ubiquitously distributed endocrine disruptors. To investigate peptide changes in the sera of rats chronically exposed to TCDD and to explore the association of these changes with liver morphology, TCDD was administrated to male rats at doses of 140, 350, and 875 ng/kg/week for 29 weeks. Serum was collected and proteomic analysis was performed using automated Bruker Daltonics ClinProt with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer. One peptide at 1740.89 was found to be significantly decreased and further identified with nano LC-MS/MS system. The MS BLAST homology search engine reported the peptide to be a partial sequence of fibrinopeptide A. Liver fatty degeneration and necrosis were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Liver fatty degeneration and necrosis were both found to be significantly increased after TCDD exposure. Levels of fibrinopeptide A were significantly correlated with liver fatty degeneration and necrosis.

  4. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Michael N.

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  5. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response.

    PubMed

    Chang, Polly Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Bjornstad, Kathleen A; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A

    2016-05-01

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ∼70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ∼100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  6. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Polly Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J.; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G.; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2016-04-19

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ~70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ~100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  7. Inter-individual variation in DNA double-strand break repair in human fibroblasts before and after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Paul F; Nham, Peter B; Urbin, Salustra S; Hinz, John M; Jones, Irene M; Thompson, Larry H

    2010-01-05

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are generally considered the most critical lesion induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and may initiate carcinogenesis and other disease. Using an immunofluorescence assay to simultaneously detect nuclear foci of the phosphorylated forms of histone H2AX and ATM kinase at sites of DSBs, we examined the response of 25 apparently normal and 10 DNA repair-deficient (ATM, ATR, NBN, LIG1, LIG4, and FANCG) primary fibroblast strains irradiated with low doses of (137)Cs gamma-rays. Quiescent G(0)/G(1)-phase cultures were exposed to 5, 10, and 25 cGy and allowed to repair for 24h. The maximum level of IR-induced foci (0.15 foci per cGy, at 10 or 30 min) in the normal strains showed much less inter-individual variation (CV approximately 0.2) than the level of spontaneous foci, which ranged from 0.2-2.6 foci/cell (CV approximately 0.6; mean+/-SD of 1.00+/-0.57). Significantly slower focus formation post-irradiation was observed in seven normal strains, similar to most mutant strains examined. There was variation in repair efficiency measured by the fraction of IR-induced foci remaining 24h post-irradiation, curiously with the strains having slower focus formation showing more efficient repair after 25 cGy. Interestingly, the ranges of spontaneous and residual induced foci levels at 24h in the normal strains were as least as large as those observed for the repair-defective mutant strains. The inter-individual variation in DSB foci parameters observed in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in this small survey of apparently normal people suggests that hypomorphic genetic variants in genomic maintenance and/or DNA damage signaling and repair genes may contribute to differential susceptibility to cancer induced by environmental mutagens.

  8. Adaptive hormetic response of pre-exposure of mouse brain with low-dose 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray on growth hormone (GH) and body weight induced by subsequent high-dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Zhou, Qingming; Liu, Bing; Li, Wenjian; Li, Xiaoda; Duan, Xin; Yuan, Zhigang; Zhou, Guangming; Min, Fengling

    2006-01-01

    The brain of the Kun-Ming strain mice were irradiated with 0.05 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray as the pre-exposure dose, and were then irradiated with 2 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray as challenging irradiation dose at 4 h after per-exposure. Body weight and serum growth hormone (GH) concentration were measured at 35th day after irradiation. The results showed that irradiation of mouse brain with 2 Gy of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray significantly diminished mouse body weight and level of serum GH. The relative biological effectiveness values of a 2 Gy dose of 12C 6+ ion calculated with respect to 60Co γ-ray were 1.47 and 1.34 for body weight and serum GH concentration, respectively. Pre-exposure with a low-dose (0.05 Gy) of 12C 6+ ion or 60Co γ-ray significantly alleviated reductions of mouse body weight and level of serum GH induced by a subsequent high-dose (2 Gy) irradiation. The data suggested that low-dose ionizing irradiation can induce adaptive hormetic responses to the harmful effects of pituitary by subsequent high-dose exposure.

  9. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Truta-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-07

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival.To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  10. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TruÅ£ǎ-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-01

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival. To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  11. Neonatal exposure to low dose corticosterone persistently modulates hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor expression and improves locomotor/exploratory behaviour in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily affecting girls. RTT causes a wide variety of debilitating symptoms and no cure currently exists. Mouse models bearing mutations in the Mecp2 gene recapitulate most physiological and behavioural RTT-related abnormalities. Stimulating neonatal environments (e.g. brief maternal separations or maternal low-dose corticosterone supplementation) reduce stress and fear responses at adulthood. The present study investigated whether impacting early in development the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, by exposing Mecp2-308 mutant pups to a low dose of corticosterone (50 µg/ml, during the 1st week of life) may contrast RTT-related abnormalities in neuroendocrine regulation and behavioural adaptation at adulthood. In line with previous reports, when fully symptomatic, MeCP2-308 mice showed a reduction in the regular nocturnal hyperactivity in the home-cage and increased anxiety-like behaviours and plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels in response to restraint stress. An abnormal elevation in mRNA levels of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and BDNF gene was also evident in the hippocampus of fully symptomatic mutant mice. Neonatal CORT modulated MR gene expression and behavioural reactivity towards a novel object, also restoring wt-like levels of locomotor/exploratory behaviour in mutant mice. Enhanced sensitivity to the neonatal treatment (in terms of increase in GR and MR mRNA levels), was also evident in the hippocampus of MeCP2-308 mice compared to wt littermates. Present results corroborate the hypothesis that targeting the glucocorticoid system may prove valid in contrasting at least some of the RTT-related symptoms and provide evidence that pharmacological interventions during critical early time windows can persistently improve the behavioural phenotype of RTT mice. Current data also support the emerging role played by Mecp2 in mediating the epigenetic programming induced by early life events

  12. A High-Fat Diet Decreases Bone Mass in Growing Mice with Systemic Chronic Inflammation Induced by Low-Dose, Slow-Release Lipopolysaccharide Pellets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic inflammation is linked to osteopenia or low bone mass, observed in a variety of physiological conditions such as aging and post-menopause with estrogen deficiency. Evidence suggests that obesity is also associated with low-grade chronic up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. This study inv...

  13. [The efficacy and safety of low-dose tiotropium bromide inhaled via Respimat® in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinfang; Zhou, Zhimin; Tang, Yan; Zhong, Nanshan

    2014-12-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of long-term treatment (48 weeks) with tiotropium bromide (5 µg) via Respimat(®) with placebo in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A total of 338 patients were randomized in this double-blind, placebo controlled, parallel study. All patients received either tiotropium bromide or placebo. Tiotropium bromide solution 5 µg (2×2.5 µg/puff) or matching placebo was delivered via Respimat(®) at a dosage of once daily for 48 weeks. Co-primary endpoints were trough forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) and the time to first exacerbation. Statistically significant improvements of both trough FEV(1) and trough forced vital capacity (FVC) in the tiotropium group were achieved at weeks 4, 24, and 48 compared with those in the placebo group (P < 0.000 1). Tiotropium treatment delayed the time to first exacerbation. The time was 157 days in the tiotropium group and 85 days in the placebo group. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.002 7) in favor of tiotropium was also observed. The total numbers of exacerbation during treatment were 90 and 128 in the tiotropium and placebo groups, respectively. The Poisson regression analysis gave a mean exacerbation rate per patient year exposure of 0.67 in the tiotropium group compared to 0.98 in the placebo group with a rate ratio of 0.69 (95%CI 0.50-0.93, P = 0.016 4). A much larger improvement from baseline in St. George's respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ) total score was observed for the tiotropium group than in the placebo group (P = 0.036 7), SGRQ symptom and activity scores of patients in the tiotropium group were also superior to those of patients receiving placebo. The drugs-related adverse events in the tiotropium and placebo groups were 12 cases and 11 cases, respectively. Tiotropium significantly improved lung function and quality of life, delayed the time to first exacerbation, reduced the number of exacerbation. Overall, tiotropium was well

  14. Low-dose paroxetine exposure causes lifetime declines in male mouse body weight, reproduction and competitive ability as measured by the novel organismal performance assay

    PubMed Central

    Gaukler, Shannon M.; Ruff, James S.; Galland, Tessa; Kandaris, Kirstie A.; Underwood, Tristan K.; Liu, Nicole M.; Young, Elizabeth L.; Morrison, Linda C.; Yost, Garold S.; Potts, Wayne K.

    2014-01-01

    Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that is currently available on the market and is suspected of causing congenital malformations in babies born to mothers who take the drug during the first trimester of pregnancy. We utilized organismal performance assays (OPAs), a novel toxicity assessment method, to assess the safety of paroxetine during pregnancy in a rodent model. OPAs utilize genetically diverse wild mice (Mus musculus) to evaluate competitive performance between experimental and control animals as they compete amongst each other for limited resources in semi-natural enclosures. Performance measures included reproductive success, male competitive ability and survivorship. Paroxetine-exposed males weighed 13% less, had 44% fewer offspring, dominated 53% fewer territories and experienced a 2.5-fold increased trend in mortality, when compared with controls. Paroxetine-exposed females had 65% fewer offspring early in the study, but rebounded at later time points. In cages, paroxetine-exposed breeders took 2.3 times longer to produce their first litter and pups of both sexes experienced reduced weight when compared with controls. Low-dose paroxetine-induced health declines detected in this study were undetected in preclinical trials with dose 2.5-8 times higher than human therapeutic doses. These data indicate that OPAs detect phenotypic adversity and provide unique information that could useful towards safety testing during pharmaceutical development. PMID:25446017

  15. Low-dose paroxetine exposure causes lifetime declines in male mouse body weight, reproduction and competitive ability as measured by the novel organismal performance assay.

    PubMed

    Gaukler, Shannon M; Ruff, James S; Galland, Tessa; Kandaris, Kirstie A; Underwood, Tristan K; Liu, Nicole M; Young, Elizabeth L; Morrison, Linda C; Yost, Garold S; Potts, Wayne K

    2015-01-01

    Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that is currently available on the market and is suspected of causing congenital malformations in babies born to mothers who take the drug during the first trimester of pregnancy. We utilized organismal performance assays (OPAs), a novel toxicity assessment method, to assess the safety of paroxetine during pregnancy in a rodent model. OPAs utilize genetically diverse wild mice (Mus musculus) to evaluate competitive performance between experimental and control animals as they compete among each other for limited resources in semi-natural enclosures. Performance measures included reproductive success, male competitive ability and survivorship. Paroxetine-exposed males weighed 13% less, had 44% fewer offspring, dominated 53% fewer territories and experienced a 2.5-fold increased trend in mortality, when compared with controls. Paroxetine-exposed females had 65% fewer offspring early in the study, but rebounded at later time points, presumably, because they were no longer exposed to paroxetine. In cages, paroxetine-exposed breeders took 2.3 times longer to produce their first litter and pups of both sexes experienced reduced weight when compared with controls. Low-dose paroxetine-induced health declines detected in this study that were undetected in preclinical trials with doses 2.5-8 times higher than human therapeutic doses. These data indicate that OPAs detect phenotypic adversity and provide unique information that could be useful towards safety testing during pharmaceutical development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The stage-specific testicular germ cell apoptotic response to low-dose radiation and 2,5-hexanedione combined exposure. II: qRT-PCR array analysis reveals dose dependent adaptive alterations in the apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Natasha R; Huse, Susan M; Boekelheide, Kim

    2014-12-01

    Testicular effects of chemical mixtures may differ from those of the individual chemical constituents. This study assessed the co-exposure effects of the model germ cell- and Sertoli cell-specific toxicants, X-irradiation (x-ray), and 2,5-hexanedione (HD), respectively. In high-dose studies, HD has been shown to attenuate x-ray-induced germ cell apoptosis. Adult rats were exposed to different levels of x-ray (0.5 Gy, 1 Gy, and 2 Gy) or HD (0.33%), either alone or in combination. To assess cell type-specific attenuation of x-ray effects with HD co-exposure, we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) to enrich the targeted cell population and examine a panel of apoptosis-related transcripts using PCR arrays. The apoptosis PCR arrays identified significant dose-dependent treatment effects on several genes, with downregulation of death receptor 5 (DR5), Naip2, Sphk2, Casp7, Aven, Birc3, and upregulation of Fas. The greatest difference in transcript response to exposure was seen with 0.5 Gy x-ray exposure, and the attenuation effect seen with the combined high-dose x-ray and HD did not persist into the low-dose range. Examination of protein levels in staged tubules revealed a significant upregulation in DR5, following high-dose co-exposure. These results provide insight into the testis cell-specific apoptotic response to low-dose co-exposures of model testicular toxicants. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  17. EARLY INDICATORS OF NITRATE STRESS; EFFECTS TO ECOSYSTEMS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO LOW DOSES OF BIOAVAILABE NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the eastern United States, from the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean, bioavailable nitrogen has been falling in the rain since the industrial revolution. Bioavailable nitrogen is a limiting nutrient throughout this region. While long-term rese...

  18. EARLY INDICATORS OF NITRATE STRESS; EFFECTS TO ECOSYSTEMS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO LOW DOSES OF BIOAVAILABLE NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the eastern United States, from the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean, bioavailable nitrogen has been falling in the rain since the industrial revolution. Bioavailable nitrogen is a limiting nutrient throughout this region. While long-term rese...

  19. EARLY INDICATORS OF NITRATE STRESS; EFFECTS TO ECOSYSTEMS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO LOW DOSES OF BIOAVAILABLE NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the eastern United States, from the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean, bioavailable nitrogen has been falling in the rain since the industrial revolution. Bioavailable nitrogen is a limiting nutrient throughout this region. While long-term rese...

  20. EARLY INDICATORS OF NITRATE STRESS; EFFECTS TO ECOSYSTEMS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO LOW DOSES OF BIOAVAILABE NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the eastern United States, from the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean, bioavailable nitrogen has been falling in the rain since the industrial revolution. Bioavailable nitrogen is a limiting nutrient throughout this region. While long-term rese...

  1. Digital Tomosynthesis of the Chest: Comparison of Patient Exposure Dose and Image Quality between Standard Default Setting and Low Dose Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the optimum low dose (LD) digital tomosynthesis (DT) setting, and to compared the image quality of the LD DT with that of the standard default (SD) DT. Materials and Methods Nine DT settings, by changing tube voltage, copper filter, and dose ratio, were performed for determining the LD setting. Among combinations of DT setting, a condition providing the lowest radiation dose was determined. Eighty artificial nodules less than 1 cm in diameter (subcentimeter nodules: 40, micronodules less than 4 mm: 40) were attached to a Styrofoam and a diaphragm of the phantom. Among these, 38 nodules were located at the periphery of the lung (thin area) and 42 nodules were located at the paravertebral or sub-diaphragmatic area (thick area). Four observers counted the number of nodules detected in the thick and thin areas. The detection sensitivity in SD and LD settings were calculated separately. Data were analyzed statistically. Results The lowest LD setting was a combination of 100 kVp, 0.3 mm additional copper filter, and a 1 : 5 dose ratio. The effective dose for the LD and SD settings were 62 µSv and 140 µSv, separately. A 56.7% dose reduction was achieved in the LD setting compared with the SD setting. Detection sensitivities were not different between the SD and the LD settings except between observers 1 and 2 for the detection of micronodules in the thick area. Conclusion LD DT can be effective in nodule detection bigger than 4 mm without a significant decrease in image quality compared with SD DT. PMID:23690724

  2. The effect of low-dose exposure on germline microsatellite mutation rates in humans accidentally exposed to caesium-137 in Goiânia.

    PubMed

    Costa, Emília Oliveira Alves; de Melo e Silva, Daniela; de Melo, Aldaires Vieira; Godoy, Fernanda Ribeiro; Nunes, Hugo Freire; Pedrosa, Eduardo Rocha; Flores, Braúlio Cançado; Rodovalho, Ricardo Goulart; da Silva, Cláudio Carlos; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino

    2011-09-01

    A serious radiological accident occurred in 1987 in Goiânia, Brazil, which lead to extensive human and environmental contamination as a result of ionising radiation (IR) from caesium-137. Among the exposed were those in direct contact with caesium-137, their relatives, neighbours, liquidators and health personnel involved in the handling of the radioactive material and the clean-up of the radioactive sites. The exposed group consisted of 10 two-generation families, totalling 34 people. For each exposed family, at least one of the progenitors was directly exposed to very low doses of γ-IR. The control group consisted of 215 non-irradiated families, composed of a father, mother and child, all of them from Goiânia, Brazil. Genomic DNA was purified using 100 μl of whole blood. The amplification reactions were prepared according to PowerPlex® 16, following the manufacturer's instructions. Genetic profiles were obtained from a single polymerase chain reaction amplification. The exposed group had only one germline mutation of a paternal origin in the 'locus' D8S1179 and the observed mutation presented a gain of only one repeat unit. In the control group, 11 mutations were observed and the mutational events were distributed in five loci D16S539, D3S1358, FGA, Penta E and D21S11. The mutation rates for the exposed and control groups were 0.006 and 0.002, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference (P = 0.09) between the mutation rate of the exposed and control groups. In conclusion, the quantification of mutational events in short tandem repeats can provide a useful system for detecting induced mutations in a relatively small population.

  3. Drinking-water exposure to a mixture of nitrate and low-dose atrazine metabolites and small-for-gestational age (SGA) babies: a historic cohort study.

    PubMed

    Migeot, V; Albouy-Llaty, M; Carles, C; Limousi, F; Strezlec, S; Dupuis, A; Rabouan, S

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater, surface water and drinking water are contaminated by nitrates and atrazine, an herbicide. They are present as a mixture in drinking water and with their endocrine-disrupting activity, they may alter fetal growth. To study an association between drinking-water atrazine metabolites/nitrate mixture exposure and small-for-gestational-age(SGA). A historic cohort study based on birth records and drinking-water nitrate and pesticide measurements in Deux-Sèvres (France) between 2005 and 2009 was carried out. Exposure to drinking-water atrazine metabolites/nitrate mixture was divided into 6 classes according to the presence or absence of atrazine metabolites and to terciles of nitrate concentrations in each trimester of pregnancy. Regression analysis of SGA by mixture exposure at second trimester was subsequently conducted. We included 11,446 woman-neonate couples of whom 37.0% were exposed to pesticides, while 99.9% of the women were exposed to nitrates. Average nitrate concentration was from 0 to 63.30 mg/L. In the second trimester of pregnancy, the risk of SGA was different with mixture exposure when drinking-water atrazine metabolites, mainly 2 hydroxyatrazine and desethylatrazine, were present and nitrate dose exposure increased: compared to single first tercile of nitrate concentration exposure, single second tercile exposure OR was 1.74 CI 95% [1.10; 2.75] and atrazine metabolites presence in the third tercile of nitrate concentration exposure OR was 0.87 CI 95% [0.45;1.67]. It is possible that the association found at the second trimester of exposure with regard to birth weight may likewise be observed before birth, with regard to the estimated fetal weight, and that it might change in the event that the atrazine metabolites dose were higher or the nitrate dose lower. It would appear necessary to further explore the variability of effects. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of DNA methylation in the adaptive responses induced in a human B lymphoblast cell line by long-term low-dose exposures to γ-rays and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuang; Yuan, Dexiao; Xie, Yuexia; Pan, Yan; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-10-01

    The possible involvement of epigenetic factors in health risks due to exposures to environmental toxicants and ionizing radiation is poorly understood. We have tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation contributes to the adaptive response (AR) to ionizing radiation or Cd. Human B lymphoblast cells HMy2.CIR were irradiated (0.032 Gy γ-rays) three times per week for 4 weeks or exposed to CdCl2 (0.005, 0.01, or 0.1 μM) for 3 months, and then challenged with a high dose of Cd (50 or 100 μM) or γ-rays (2 Gy). Long-term low-dose radiation (LDR) or long-term low-dose Cd exposure induced AR against challenging doses of Cd and irradiation, respectively. When the primed cells were treated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, the ARs were eliminated. These results indicate that DNA methylation is involved in the induction of AR in HMy2.CIR cells.

  5. Effects of Prenatal Exposure to a Low Dose Atrazine Metabolite Mixture on pubertal timing and prostrate Development of Male Long Evans Rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and d...

  6. Breast cancer risk from low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation: results of parallel analysis of three exposed populations of women

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Shore, R.E.; Norman, J.E.; Tokunaga, M.

    1980-08-01

    Breast cancer incidence data were analyzed from three populations of women exposed to ionizing radiation: survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, patients in Massachusetts tuberculosis sanitoria who were exposed to multiple chest fluoroscopies, and patients treated by X-rays for acute postpartum mastitis in Rochester, New York. Parallel analyses by radiation dose, age at exposure, and time after exposure suggested that risk of radiation-induced cancer increased approximately linearly with increasing dose and was heavily dependent on age at exposure; however, the risk was otherwise remarkably similar among the three populations, at least for ages 10 to 40 years at exposure, and followed the same temporal pattern of occurrence as did breast cancer incidence in nonexposed women of similar ages.

  7. Effects of Prenatal Exposure to a Low Dose Atrazine Metabolite Mixture on pubertal timing and prostrate Development of Male Long Evans Rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and d...

  8. Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Helen H. Sedwick, David W. Veigl, Martina L.

    2006-07-15

    The goal of this project was to determine if genomic instability could be initiated by poorly repaired DNA damage induced by low doses of ionizing radiation leading to a mutator phenotype. Human cells were irradiated, then transfected with an unirradiated reporter gene at various times AFTER exposure. The vector carried an inactive GFP gene that fluoresced when the gene was activated by a delayed mutation. Fluorescent cells were measured in the interval of 50 hours to four days after transfection. The results showed that delayed mutations occurred in these cells after exposure to relatively low doses (0.3-1.0 Gy) of low or high ionizing radiation, as well as after treatment with hyrodgen peroxide (30-100 micromolar). The occurrence was both dose and time dependent, often decreasing at higher doses and