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Sample records for chronic spinal epidural

  1. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    Intraspinal anesthesia; Subarachnoid anesthesia; Epidural; Peridural anesthesia ... Spinal and epidural anesthesia have fewer side effects and risks than general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free). Patients usually recover their senses ...

  2. Spinal epidural neurostimulation for treatment of acute and chronic intractable pain: initial and long term results.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R R; Siqueira, E B; Cerullo, L J

    1979-09-01

    Spinal epidural neurostimulation, which evolved from dorsal column stimulation, has been found to be effective in the treatment of acute and chronic intractable pain. Urban and Hashold have shown that it is a safe, simplified alternative to dorsal column stimulation, especially because laminectomy is not required if the electrodes are inserted percutaneously. Percutaneous epidural neurostimulation is also advantageous because there can be a diagnostic trial period before permanent internalization and implantation. This diagnostic and therapeutic modality has been used in 36 patients during the past 3 years at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Eleven of these patients had acute intractable pain, which was defined as pain of less than 1 year in duration. Initial postimplantation results from the 36 patients indicate that spinal epidural neurostimulation is most effective in treating the intractable pain of diabetes, arachnoiditis, and post-traumatic and postamputation neuroma. Long term follow-up, varying from 1 year to 3 years postimplantation in the 20 initially responding patients, indicates that the neurostimulation continues to provide significant pain relief (50% or greater) in a majority of the patients who experienced initial significant pain relief.

  3. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  4. Lumbar spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Nanassis, Kimon; Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion; Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Mintelis, Apostolos; Tsitsopoulos, Philippos

    2008-04-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare benign tumours most commonly found in the thoracic spine. A case of an extradural lumbar angiolipoma in a 47-year-old female is described. She had a recent history of lower back pain accompanied by sciatica. Lumbar MRI revealed a dorsal epidural mass at the L2-L3 level. The patient underwent a bilateral laminectomy, in which the tumour was totally excised. The pathological examination indicated haemangiolipoma. Post-operatively, the patient's neurological signs and symptoms improved remarkably quickly. MRI at 6 and 18 months after surgery revealed no evidence of tumour recurrence.

  5. Effects of Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Epidural Stimulation for Standing after Chronic Complete Paralysis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rejc, Enrico; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Sensory and motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered functionally complete resulting in permanent paralysis with no recovery of voluntary movement, standing or walking. Previous findings demonstrated that lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation can activate the spinal neural networks in one individual with motor complete, but sensory incomplete SCI, who achieved full body weight-bearing standing with independent knee extension, minimal self-assistance for balance and minimal external assistance for facilitating hip extension. In this study, we showed that two clinically sensory and motor complete participants were able to stand over-ground bearing full body-weight without any external assistance, using their hands to assist balance. The two clinically motor complete, but sensory incomplete participants also used minimal external assistance for hip extension. Standing with the least amount of assistance was achieved with individual-specific stimulation parameters, which promoted overall continuous EMG patterns in the lower limbs’ muscles. Stimulation parameters optimized for one individual resulted in poor standing and additional need of external assistance for hip and knee extension in the other participants. During sitting, little or negligible EMG activity of lower limb muscles was induced by epidural stimulation, showing that the weight-bearing related sensory information was needed to generate sufficient EMG patterns to effectively support full weight-bearing standing. In general, electrode configurations with cathodes selected in the caudal region of the array at relatively higher frequencies (25–60 Hz) resulted in the more effective EMG patterns for standing. These results show that human spinal circuitry can generate motor patterns effective for standing in the absence of functional supraspinal connections; however the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters is critical. PMID:26207623

  6. Whole Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Song, Jae Gyok; Ryu, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male who had no underlying disease, including coagulopathy, underwent thoracotomy and bleeding control due to hemothorax. On the fifth postoperative day, paralysis of both lower limbs occurred. Urgent spine magnetic resonance imaging showed a massive anterior spinal epidural hematoma from C2 to L1 level with different signal intensities, which was suspected to be staged hemorrhage. Hematoma evacuation with decompressive laminectomy was performed. The patient's neurologic deterioration was recovered immediately, and he was discharged without neurological deficits. A drug history of naftazone, which could induce a drug-induced platelet dysfunction, was revealed retrospectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of whole spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a young patient, with a history of hemorrhoid medication. PMID:24967052

  7. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Report.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma in a 12-year-old female, who presented with significant upper and lower extremities weakness preceded by pain around the neck and shoulder girdle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed epidural hematoma extending from C6-T2 with characteristic heterogeneously hyperintensity on T2 and homogenously isointensity on T1. Emergent spinal decompression was performed. However, the patient remained substantially weak in her lower extremities and was wheelchair bound at 3 months postoperatively. We have discussed clinical features, predisposing events, pathogenesis and treatment guidelines described in the literature. We also aim to reinforce the notion of keeping a high degree of clinical suspicion to identify and intervene at the earliest stage to prevent the physically and socially challenging consequences of SSEH. PMID:27598898

  8. Spinal epidural angiolipoma: A rare cause of spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Rajesh K; Koti, Kalyan; Dandamudi, Srinivas

    2012-09-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare, benign tumors composed of mature lipocytes admixed with abnormal blood vessels. Only 128 cases of spinal epidural angiolipomas have been reported in literature till now. Spinal angiolipomas are predominantly located in the mid-thoracic region. We report a case of dorsal epidural angiolipoma in a 56-year-old male who presented with paraparesis and was diagnosed to have D4-5 epidural angiolipoma. Total surgical excision of the epidural angiolipoma was done and his paraparesis gradually improved.

  9. Functional and metabolic changes in the brain in neuropathic pain syndrome against the background of chronic epidural electrostimulation of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Sufianov, A A; Shapkin, A G; Sufianova, G Z; Elishev, V G; Barashin, D A; Berdichevskii, V B; Churkin, S V

    2014-08-01

    Changes in functional and metabolic activities of the brain were evaluated by EEG and positron-emission/computer tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with neuropathic pain syndrome previous to and 3 months after implantation of a system for chronic epidural spinal cord stimulation. In most cases, the use of a nerve stimulator was followed by alleviation of neuropathic pain and partial normalization of functional and metabolic activities of brain structures responsible for pain perception, emotiogenic, behavioral, and autonomic responses.

  10. Epidural spinal cord stimulation in chronic non-reconstructible limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser; Greiner; Kofler; Perkmann

    2004-04-01

    For patients with chronic non-reconstructible limb ischemia (chronic CLI), spinal-cord stimulation (SCS) has been advocated for the treatment of ischemic pain and prevention of amputation. The present clinical report was performed to evaluate the long-term effects of SCS on limb survival. A retrospective review was performed of 21 patients who had undergone SCS between December 1997 and July 2002 due to chronic CLI. The impulse generator used was the Itrel device (Medtronic, Inc). All conventional methods for revascularization and improvement of microcirculatory blood flow had been performed prior to SCS treatment. Patient selection was performed by clinical examination, pulse volume records, Doppler ankle/brachial measurements, angiography, and thoracic spine and lumbar spine x-ray. Since July 2000, additional TcpO2 measurements at the dorsum of the foot have been performed. SCS implantation was performed as a one-stage procedure in all cases. Patients are followed up to 57 months. Of 21 patients with chronic CLI, 20 (95%) were available for follow-up investigations. Four patients died one to fifteen months after implantation due to acute renal failure or myocardial infarction (19%). Major amputation could be avoided in 15 (71%) of 21 patients. Two electrode dislocation, one pulse-generator dislocation, and one wire disconnection occurred; no other complications were observed. SCS represents a safe and effective therapy for patients with chronic non-reconstructible critical limb ischemia.

  11. Epidural spinal myelolipoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Miyake, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Yamada, Kazutaka; Uzuka, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    Epidural spinal myelolipoma was diagnosed in a 13-year-old, male Siberian husky that was referred for evaluation of progressive pelvic limb paresis and urinary incontinence. An epidural mass was detected by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The mass was removed and identified histopathologically as an epidural myelolipoma. Pelvic limb paresis improved after surgery, but urinary retention associated with neurological bladder dysfunction persisted.

  12. Four cases of spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kenneth; Tsui, Alpha; Paldor, Iddo; Kaye, Andrew H; Gaillard, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumours composed of mature fatty tissue and abnormal vascular elements, most commonly found within the posterior spinal epidural space. Most tumours are located within the mid-thoracic spine; in contrast thoracolumbar junction and purely lumbar angiolipomas are rare. We report a case series of four spinal angiolipomas, including a thoracolumbar junction and a purely lumbar tumour.

  13. Functional and metabolic changes in the brain in neuropathic pain syndrome against the background of chronic epidural electrostimulation of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Sufianov, A A; Shapkin, A G; Sufianova, G Z; Elishev, V G; Barashin, D A; Berdichevskii, V B; Churkin, S V

    2014-08-01

    Changes in functional and metabolic activities of the brain were evaluated by EEG and positron-emission/computer tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with neuropathic pain syndrome previous to and 3 months after implantation of a system for chronic epidural spinal cord stimulation. In most cases, the use of a nerve stimulator was followed by alleviation of neuropathic pain and partial normalization of functional and metabolic activities of brain structures responsible for pain perception, emotiogenic, behavioral, and autonomic responses. PMID:25113605

  14. Epidural injections with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hai; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Yang, Yong; Li, Dong; Li, Jinjun; Su, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural injections of anesthetic with or without steroids are widely used for treating lumbar spinal stenosis, a common cause of chronic low back pain, but there is a lack of rigorous data comparing the effectiveness of epidural injections of anesthetic with and without steroids. This meta-analysis presents a current, comprehensive picture of how epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids compare with those using local anesthetic alone. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception through February 5, 2015. Weight mean difference, risk ratio, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A random effects model or fixed effects model was used to pool the estimates, according to the heterogeneity between the included studies. Results We included 13 randomized controlled trials, involving 1,465 patients. Significant pain relief (≥50%) was demonstrated in 53.7% of patients administered with epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids (group 1) and in 56.4% of those administered with local anesthetic alone (group 2). Patients showed a reduction in numeric rating scale pain score of 3.7 and 3.6 in the two groups, respectively. Significant functional improvement was achieved in 65.2% of patients in group 1 and 63.1% of patients in group 2, with Oswestry Disability Index reductions of 13.8 and 14.5 points, respectively. The overall number of injections per year was 3.2±1.3 and 3.4±1.2 with average total relief per year of 29.3±19.7 and 33.8±19.3 weeks, respectively. The opioid intakes decreased from baseline by 12.4 and 7.8 mg, respectively. Among the outcomes listed, only total relief time differed significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Both epidural injections with steroids or with local anesthetic alone provide significant pain relief and functional improvement in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis, and the inclusion of steroids confers no

  15. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... located outside the dural membrane. Steroids, anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications are typically delivered in an epidural injection. ... create different effects for patients. Corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents, reducing swelling and nerve irritation to allow ...

  16. [Spinal epidural angiolipoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Dufrenot, Leïla; Pelé, Eric; Cursolle, Jean-Christophe; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2010-02-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipoma is a rare tumor revealed by a slowly progressive paraplegia. We reported a case of a 44-year-old female and point out the peculiar pattern of this lesion characterized by the prominence of the vascular component over the lipomatous component. Recognition of this entity is important because this is a benign and curable cause of paraplegia.

  17. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Taisei; Iida, Yasuaki; Yokoyama, Yuichirou; Tsuge, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Keiji; Wada, Akihito; Mikami, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered. PMID:27703825

  18. Management of infiltrating spinal epidural angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Nadi, Mustafa M; Nadi, Arwa M; Zabara, Mohammad Y; Ahmad, Tahani M

    2015-04-01

    Angiolipomas of the spine are rare benign tumors commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. The present report describes a case of spinal angiolipoma with thoracic mediastinal extension in a 50-year-old woman. She presented with a long-standing history of mid-back pain with progressive lower extremities weakness. An MRI showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass located in the posterior epidural space of the thoracic spine with mediastinal extension. Histopathological examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the diagnosis and therapeutic management options of infiltrating spinal angiolipomas.

  19. Management of infiltrating spinal epidural angiolipoma

    PubMed Central

    Nadi, Mustafa M.; Nadi, Arwa M.; Zabara, Mohammad Y.; Ahmad, Tahani M.

    2015-01-01

    Angiolipomas of the spine are rare benign tumors commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. The present report describes a case of spinal angiolipoma with thoracic mediastinal extension in a 50-year-old woman. She presented with a long-standing history of mid-back pain with progressive lower extremities weakness. An MRI showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass located in the posterior epidural space of the thoracic spine with mediastinal extension. Histopathological examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the diagnosis and therapeutic management options of infiltrating spinal angiolipomas. PMID:25864069

  20. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  1. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail; Arslan, Harun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  2. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation.

  3. [Clinical use of spinal or epidural steroids].

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, F; Ciccozzi, A; Donatelli, F; Paladini, A; Varrassi, G

    2002-01-01

    Steroids, drugs with potent antiinflammatory properties on the damaged nervous roots, have been especially used as adjuvants of local anesthetics, by spinal route, in the treatments of low-back pain. Spinal route was chosen to obtain a higher local concentration of drug, with few systemic side effects and to improve drug's action mechanism. Steroids seem to interact with GABA receptors and thus control neural excitability through a stabilising effect on membranes, modification of nervous conduction and membrane hyperpolarization, in supraspinal and spinal site. Epidural steroids are especially used in the treatment of low back pain due to irritation of nervous roots. They have been administered alone or in association with local anesthetics and/or saline solution. Slow release formulations have been generally used (methylprednisolone acetate, and triamcinolone diacetate). Other indications of epidural steroids are: postoperative hemilaminectomy pain, prevention of post herpetic neuralgia, degenerative ostheoartrithis. Intra-thecal steroids have been frequently used in the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to discopathy, as an alternative treatment when epidural administration is ineffective. Positive results have been obtained with methylprednisolone acetate, alone or in association with local anesthetics. Complications related to intraspinal steroids injections are due to execution of the block and side effects of drugs. Complications associated with intrathecal steroids are more frequent and severe than epidural injections and include: adhesive arachnoiditis, aseptic meningitis, cauda equina syndrome. Steroidal toxicity seems to be related to the polyethylenic glycole vehicle. Anyway, slow release formulations contain less concentrated polyethylenic glycole. The epidural administration, a correct dilution of steroid with local anesthetics solution and/or saline solution, and a limited number of injections (no more than three) allows a significant reduction of

  4. Spinal epidural empyema in a cat.

    PubMed

    Maeta, Noritaka; Kanda, Teppei; Sasaki, Takanori; Morita, Takehito; Furukawa, Toshinori

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis and surgical treatment of spinal epidural empyema (SEE) in a 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthaired cat is described. SEE was diagnosed by computed tomographic myelography (CT myelography) and surgical exploration. The lesion was missed on both non-enhanced CT and conventional myelography. SEE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive myelopathy in cats, and CT myelography should be undertaken when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cannot be performed. PMID:20226705

  5. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  6. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

    PubMed Central

    Velickovic, Mirko; Ballhause, Tobias M

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention. PMID:27803810

  7. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  8. Skin pulse wave monitoring during lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J; de Lange, J J; Ros, H H

    1988-04-01

    The effectiveness of pulse wave monitoring of the big toes was compared with loss of cold discrimination to determine the onset of nerve blockade during lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia. Forty-seven patients scheduled for elective urologic or lower extremity operations were assigned to one of three groups. Group 1 (15 patients) received epidural mepivacaine 1.5% with epinephrine; group 2 (12 patients), epidural bupivacaine 0.5%, and group 3 (20 patients), spinal bupivacaine 0.5%. In the epidural groups, the mean time to onset of increases in pulse wave amplitude was less than half the mean time to onset of decrease in cold discrimination (P less than 0.05). In patients given spinal anesthesia, there was no significant difference. The pulse wave monitor seems to be a sensitive and objective detector of early anesthetic effect during spinal and epidural anesthesia.

  9. Evaluation of optimal electrode configurations for epidural spinal cord stimulation in cervical spinal cord injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Monzurul; Garcia-Alias, Guillermo; Shah, Prithvi K.; Gerasimenko, Yury; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural spinal cord stimulation is a promising technique for modulating the level of excitability and reactivation of dormant spinal neuronal circuits after spinal cord injury (SCI). We examined the ability of chronically implanted epidural stimulation electrodes within the cervical spinal cord to (1) directly elicit spinal motor evoked potentials (sMEPs) in forelimb muscles and (2) determine whether these sMEPs can serve as a biomarker of forelimb motor function after SCI. New method We implanted EMG electrodes in forelimb muscles and epidural stimulation electrodes at C6 and C8 in adult rats. After recovering from a dorsal funiculi crush (C4), rats were tested with different stimulation configurations and current intensities to elicit sMEPs and determined forelimb grip strength. Results: sMEPs were evoked in all muscles tested and their characteristics were dependent on electrode configurations and current intensities. C6(−) stimulation elicited more robust sMEPs than stimulation at C8(−). Stimulating C6 and C8 simultaneously produced better muscle recruitment and higher grip strengths than stimulation at one site. Comparison with existing method(s) Classical method to select the most optimal stimulation configuration is to empirically test each combination individually for every subject and relate to functional improvements. This approach is impractical, requiring extensively long experimental time to determine the more effective stimulation parameters. Our proposed method is fast and physiologically sound. Conclusions Results suggest that sMEPs from forelimb muscles can be useful biomarkers for identifying optimal parameters for epidural stimulation of the cervical spinal cord after SCI. PMID:25791014

  10. Percutaneous Adhesiolysis Versus Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Chronic Radicular Pain Caused by Lumbar Foraminal Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongbum; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Jae Ki; Nam, Hee-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of percutaneous adhesiolysis (PA) compared to fluoroscopy (FL)-guided transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) in patients with radicular pain caused by lumbar foraminal spinal stenosis (LFSS) by assessing pain relief and functional improvement at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. Methods This retrospective study included 45 patients who underwent PA or FL-guided TFSEI for radicular pain caused by LFSS of at least 3 months' duration. Outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Verbal Numeric Pain Scale (VNS) before the procedure and at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. A successful outcome was defined by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI score. Results ODI and VNS scores improved 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure in both groups. Statistically significant differences between groups were observed in ODI and VNS at 12 weeks (p<0.05). The proportion of patients with successful outcomes was significantly different between the two groups only at the 12-week time point. Conclusion Our study suggests that PA is effective for pain reduction and functional improvement in patients with chronic radicular pain caused by LFSS. Therefore, PA can be considered for patients with previous ineffective responses to conservative treatment. Although PA seems to be more effective than TFEFI according to the results of our study, in order to fully elucidate the difference in effectiveness, a prospective study with a larger sample size is necessary. PMID:26798608

  11. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  12. Epidural volume extension in combined spinal epidural anaesthesia for elective caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Loubert, C; O'Brien, P J; Fernando, R; Walton, N; Philip, S; Addei, T; Columb, M O; Hallworth, S

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the effect of epidural volume extension on spinal blockade in pregnant women undergoing elective caesarean section with a combined spinal-epidural technique. We randomly allocated 90 healthy subjects to three groups to receive spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg (group B7.5), spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg immediately followed by epidural volume extension with saline 5 ml (group B7.5-EVE) or spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg without epidural volume extension (group B10). We evaluated the height of the block every 5 min for 15 min following the spinal injection. The overall sensory block level increased with time (p < 0.001), regardless of the group studied, and there were significantly fewer failures of block in the group B10 compared with both B7.5 and B7.5-EVE groups (p = 0.001). In conclusion, we could not demonstrate a benefit in using epidural volume extension with 5 ml saline as part of a combined spinal epidural technique in term parturients undergoing elective caesarean section.

  13. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-11-16

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis.

  14. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis. PMID:26610278

  15. Unusual presentation of a spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Forgnone, Sara; Fontanella, Marco; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2009-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma (SSEH) is a rare clinical entity that generally requires an urgent surgical evacuation. The combination of Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and Horner's syndrome (HS) as the presenting symptoms of a traumatic spinal epidural haematoma is very unusual, but it has never been observed in cases of spontaneous haematoma. We herein describe a case of SSEH presenting with simultaneous BSS and HS. The possibility of a conservative management in similar cases is discussed.

  16. Spinal cord injury following an attempted thoracic epidural.

    PubMed

    Mayall, M F; Calder, I

    1999-10-01

    Unsuccessful attempts were made to insert a thoracic epidural in an anaesthetised patient. Signs of spinal cord damage were observed the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a haematoma anterior to the spinal cord. Surgical exploration revealed an intradural haematoma and a needle puncture of the cord. The patient suffered a permanent paraparesis.

  17. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery.

  18. Obstetrical epidural and spinal anesthesia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ellen; Zhao, Yinshan; Dahlgren, Leanne; Preston, Roanne; van der Kop, Mia; Synnes, Anne; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony; Tremlett, Helen

    2013-10-01

    To examine obstetrical epidural and spinal anesthesia use in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) and the relationship with MS clinical factors. This was a retrospective cohort study, linking clinical data from women with MS in the British Columbia (BC) MS database to obstetrical data (1998-2009) from the BC Perinatal Database Registry. We compared epidural use in 431 deliveries to women with MS and 2,959 deliveries from the general population, as well as spinal use in cesarean deliveries (128 to women with MS and 846 in the general population), considering parity and using multivariate models. We also examined the association between epidural or spinal anesthesia and MS clinical factors-disease duration and disability [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score]. Of 431 deliveries to women with MS, 116 were exposed to epidural anesthesia and of 128 cesarean deliveries, 82 were exposed to spinal anesthesia. The use of epidural anesthesia was similar in nullipara (adjusted OR = 0.86, 95 % CI = 0.63-1.18, p = 0.36), but more likely in multipara with MS (adjusted OR = 1.75, 95 % CI = 1.20-2.54, p = 0.004). Spinal anesthesia use in cesarean deliveries was comparable between the MS and general population cohorts (adjusted OR = 0.84, 95 % CI = 0.55-1.31, p = 0.45). Women who delivered 5 to <10 years after MS onset were less likely to have an epidural (adjusted OR = 0.57, 95 % CI = 0.34-0.95, p = 0.03) vs. those delivering within 5 years. EDSS was not associated with use of either type of anesthesia (adjusted p > 0.1). Contrary to previous studies, epidural anesthesia use differed between women with MS and the general population and was influenced by parity and MS disease duration; these findings warrant further investigation.

  19. Spinal epidural abscess: the importance of early diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, A; Laing, R; Smith, C; Kaar, G; Smith, F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To remind clinicians of the dangers of delayed diagnosis and the importance of early treatment of spinal epidural abscess.
METHODS—A review of the literature on spinal epidural abscess and a comparison of the published literature with local experience.
RESULTS—Imaging with MRI or CT enables early diagnosis of spinal epidural abcess and optimal therapy is surgical evacuation combined with 6-12 weeks (median 8 weeks) of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinical features are fever, pain, and focal neurological signs and may be associated with preceding and pre-existing bone or joint disease. The commonest aetiological organism is S aureus.
CONCLUSION—Early diagnosis and appropriate early antimicrobial chemotherapy with surgery is associated with an excellent prognosis.

 PMID:9703173

  20. Spinal epidural angiolipomas: Clinical characteristics, management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouali, Sofiene; Maatar, Nidhal; Bouhoula, Asma; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Said, Imed Ben; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare expansive processes made of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. They often have a benign character. Their etiology, pathogenesis remains uncertain, and it is a cause of spinal cord compression. The magnetic resonance imaging is the most important neuroradiological examination. Histological examination is the only examination to confirm the diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Methods: A retrospective study of all patients operated on for a spinal epidural angiolipoma at the Department of Neurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology of Tunis between January 2000 and December 2014 (15 years) was performed. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, radiological, histological characteristics and the treatment of this tumor. Results: A total of nine patients were operated from January 01, 2000 to November 30, 2014. The average age of our patients was 51 years with ages that ranged from 29 to 65 with a male predominance. The period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis ranged from 24 months with an average 12 months. Posterior localization of the tumor was seen in all patients. Surgical resection was performed for all cases. The postoperative course has been satisfactory, with a complete recovery of neurological functions in all patients. Conclusions: The spinal epidural angiolipomas is rare expansive process causing spinal cord compression. Treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The functional outcome of spinal epidural angiolipomas is particularly favorable with a complete neurological recovery is if the patient was quickly operated. PMID:27695535

  1. Spinal epidural angiolipomas: Clinical characteristics, management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouali, Sofiene; Maatar, Nidhal; Bouhoula, Asma; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Said, Imed Ben; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare expansive processes made of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. They often have a benign character. Their etiology, pathogenesis remains uncertain, and it is a cause of spinal cord compression. The magnetic resonance imaging is the most important neuroradiological examination. Histological examination is the only examination to confirm the diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Methods: A retrospective study of all patients operated on for a spinal epidural angiolipoma at the Department of Neurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology of Tunis between January 2000 and December 2014 (15 years) was performed. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, radiological, histological characteristics and the treatment of this tumor. Results: A total of nine patients were operated from January 01, 2000 to November 30, 2014. The average age of our patients was 51 years with ages that ranged from 29 to 65 with a male predominance. The period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis ranged from 24 months with an average 12 months. Posterior localization of the tumor was seen in all patients. Surgical resection was performed for all cases. The postoperative course has been satisfactory, with a complete recovery of neurological functions in all patients. Conclusions: The spinal epidural angiolipomas is rare expansive process causing spinal cord compression. Treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The functional outcome of spinal epidural angiolipomas is particularly favorable with a complete neurological recovery is if the patient was quickly operated.

  2. Spinal epidural angiolipoma complicated by an intratumoral abscess. Case report.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Gianpaolo; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Lauriola, Libero; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2005-08-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare, benign lesions representing 0.14 to 1.2% of all spinal axis tumors. They most commonly involve the midthoracic spine and are located in the posterior epidural space. Up to now, six pediatric cases have been reported in the literature; two of them involved an acute clinical onset that was related to a venous infarction of a tumor. The authors report the case of a 16-year-old boy with a midthoracic epidural angiolipoma who was admitted with a clinical history of an acute paraparesis. In contrast to previous descriptions, the acute onset in this case was related to a spontaneous intratumoral abscess within the tumor.

  3. Continuous Cervical Epidural Analgesia in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Mahesh; Taha, Nafisa; Purohit, Navita; Kothari, Vatsal; Singh, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is a devastating complication of cancer. Patients may often require high doses of opioids that may cause side effects, myoclonus being one such. A 63-year-old male suffering from malignant spinal cord compression was admitted to our institution. The primary team managed him conservatively with pharmacotherapy with no relief of pain, and he experienced myoclonus and sedation as adverse effects. A continuous cervical epidural catheter with local anesthetic infusion was inserted for 5 days to control his pain. This relieved his pain, which was sustained even after we removed the epidural catheter on day 5, for up to 64 days until the time of his death. Continuous cervical epidural local anesthetic infusions may help with refractory pain by deafferentation of noxious stimuli. Central neuraxial blocks may be a valuable rescue in selected patients. PMID:27803576

  4. [Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Cademartori, M S; Mamani, R S; Beltrame, C M; Cademartori, C G

    1984-03-01

    A case of spontaneous dorso- lumbar spinal epidural hematoma during pregnancy is reported. The hematoma was removed 8 hours after the onset of paraplegia, and there was no evidence of vascular malformation. The motor deficit remained unchanged post-operatively. The etiology, clinical findings and the value of early laminectomy are discussed.

  5. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation. PMID:24418452

  6. Spontaneous spinal epidural hemorrhage from intense piano playing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Ju; Su, Fang Jy; Huang, Ying C; Chen, Shih-Han

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare but real neurosurgical emergency. It is caused by atraumatic rupture of the vertebral epidural vein that results in nerve root or spinal cord compression. Most cases of SSEH have a multifactorial etiology, including congenital and acquired coagulopathies; platelet dysfunction; vascular malformation; tumors; uncontrolled hypertension; pregnancy; and, very rarely, activities requiring Valsalva. Herein we reported the case of a young pianist who was attacked by SSEH during piano practice. Playing the piano is a joyful, relaxing entertainment; however, this musical activity can be a highly demanding physical and mental exercise for pianists. Emotional and expressive performance, especially in professional performing, has been reported to result in significant increase of sympathetic and decrease of parasympathetic activities and thus influence the cardiorespiratory variables. The increased biomechanical stress from fluctuating hemodynamics was thought to trigger the rupture of her spinal arteriovenous malformation.

  7. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Prostatic Small Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Solitary, spinal epidural metastasis (SEM) that is not related to vertebral metastasis is very rare. And solitary SEM from prostatic cancer is rarely found in previously published reports. However, it is clinically significant due to the possibility of neurologic dysfunction, and it can be assessed by MRI. In this report, we show a case of solitary SEM arising from prostatic small cell carcinoma detected by MRI. PMID:27413569

  8. Spinal epidural abscess in a young girl without risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Birbilis, Theodosios; Michailidis, Lambros; Souftas, Vasileios; Chatzimichael, Athanassios

    2011-07-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection associated with well-established risk factors mainly in adults. We describe an 11-year-old girl without any known risk factors who presented with fever and localized spinal tenderness in the lumbar area and was diagnosed with spinal MRI as suffering from a posterior SEA extending between T11 and L4. She was successfully managed with sequential intravenous and oral antibiotics along with minimally invasive surgery without laminectomy. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was the responsible pathogen isolated at surgery. Immediate institution of antibiotics, spinal MRI, and well-timed neurosurgical consultation are mandatory for a favorable outcome in cases of SEA in children. PMID:21360025

  9. Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection for Painful Spasticity in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun; Chun, Seong Min; Park, Hee Won; Bang, Moon Suk

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old male with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). He could not maintain a standing position because of painful spasticity in his lower limbs. A magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography indicated chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy, explaining his chronic low back pain before the injury. For diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI) to the right L5 root was performed. After the intervention, the spasticity decreased and his ambulatory function improved. This case illustrates that lumbar radiculopathy concomitant with a cervical SCI can produce severe spasticity and it can be dramatically improved by ESI. PMID:26361605

  10. Transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with epidural steroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cöcelli, L. Pirbudak; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Karakurum, Gunhan; Avci, Neslihan; Gül, Rauf; Öner, Ünsal

    2009-01-01

    Background: Transient neurologic syndrome (TNS) is a rare complication of spinal and epidural anesthesia. It is defined as paradoxic postoperative back pain radiating to the lower extremities with no neurologic deficits. Because it is a self-limited disease, the treatment is usually symptomatic and consists of NSAIDs and injections of a neuromuscular-blocking drug at the trigger points. The syndrome may be resistant to this treatment regimen and may last for several months, resulting in a long convalescence. Case summary: A 63-year-old Turkish woman (height, 165 cm; weight, 71 kg) underwent hemorrhoidectomy in the jackknife position using spinal anesthesia. No adverse events occurred during puncture or surgery or in the immediate postoperative recovery period. Recovery from the sensory and motor block was normal. Twenty-four hours after surgery, lower limb and plantar pain developed with no sensory or motor deficit. Neurologic examination revealed normal motor and sensory function. Electroneuromyography showed partial denervation potential of muscles innervated by the left sciatic nerve. The symptoms were suggestive of TNS. Combination oral NSAID treatment with amitriptyline (25 mg/d) and gabapentin (1200 mg/d) was initiated. Because the pain still persisted 6 weeks after surgery, epidural steroid injection with triamcinolone acetate (80 mg) with isotonic saline was administered, resulting in definite pain relief (visual analog scale score = 0). Conclusions: Epidural steroid treatment was effective in this patient with TNS resistant to treatment with NSAIDs, amitriptyline, and gabapentin. Future studies are needed to evaluate this treatment. PMID:24683240

  11. [Technical difficulties in epidural blocks and spinal bleeding complications].

    PubMed

    Nava, S; Rossignoli, L; Tagariello, V; Bertini, L

    2001-12-01

    The clinical cases of two patients with neurological complications following neuroaxial blocks are reported. The events took place in different institutions where thousands of central blocks were yearly performed. In both instances the blocking procedures presented technical difficulties needing repeated lumbar punctures. The first case concerns a patient receiving anticoagulant and fibrinolytic therapy for vascular pathology. This 89 year-old female experienced severe cord compression requiring surgical decompression and laminectomy. The second case regards a patient with previous minor surgical procedure requiring postoperative antiinflammatory treatment. This 74 year-old male experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal/epidural hematoma as shown by NMR. The symptoms regressed with steroid therapy. The authors emphasise the risks of mechanical trauma of epidural or spinal anesthesia both during positioning or removal of an epidural catheter. The problem related to the compatibility between central blocks and antithrombotic/anticoagulant prophylaxis/therapy is now of primary concern and has led to publications about guide lines on this topic. If central block is carried out in patients with bleeding diathesis it is mandatory to co-ordinate multidisciplinary assistance for early detection of significant symptoms of the above described complications and subsequent treatment.

  12. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  13. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease. PMID:26275629

  14. Spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma mimicking acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Noor; Shahid, Muhammad; Haque, Munirul; Qureshi, Masood

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is an acute neurological emergency which carries significant morbidity unless diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Some cases of SSEH are idiopathic but there is a well-recognised association with deranged coagulation and abnormalities of clotting. In recent years there has been increasing availability of novel anti-platelet agents, often prescribed in the setting of suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and following percutaneous coronary interventions and these agents also present an increased risk of SSEH. We present a case of SSEH following an acute presentation with chest pain and treatment with dual anti-platelet therapy. PMID:26807374

  15. Low dose combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pirlet, M; Baird, M; Pryn, S; Jones-Ritson, M; Kinsella, S M

    2000-07-01

    A patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy was scheduled for elective caesarean section after stabilization on medical therapy. Wer performed a combined spinal epidural using one ml 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5 mg) with 0.3 mg diamorphine for the spinal. The epidural was topped up with 10 mL bupivacaine 0.5%. Significant haemodynamic changes consisted of reduction in heart rate and hypotension after the spinal, and tachycardia after delivery. The benefits and risks of this approach are discussed.

  16. Low-dose spinal neostigmine further enhances the analgesic effect of spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, following orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha; Veloso, Fabricio S.; Kitayama, Antonio T; Mattos, Anita Leocadia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Opioids are considered mainstream for combined spinal-epidural anesthesia, but frequently limited by adverse effects. The aim of this study was to examine whether low-dose spinal neostigmine, epidural dexamethasone or their combination enhances analgesia from spinal bupivacaine without adverse effects. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery were randomized to one of four groups and evaluated for 24-h after surgery for analgesia (time to first rescue analgesic) and rescue analgesic consumption. Patients received 15 mg bupivacaine plus the test drug intrathecally (saline or 1 microgram (μg) neostigmine). The epidural test drug was either saline or 10 mg dexamethasone. The Control group (CG) received spinal and epidural saline. The Neostigmine group (NG), spinal neostigmine and epidural saline; the Dexamethasone group (DG), spinal saline and epidural dexamethasone; and the Neostigmine-dexamethasone group (NDG), spinal neostigmine and epidural dexamethasone. Results: The CG (282 ± 163 min) and NG (524 ± 142 min) were similar in their times to first rescue analgesic and analgesic consumption. The time to first rescue analgesic was longer for the DG (966 ± 397 min) compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0002), and the DG had less ketoprofen consumption and lower overall visual analogue scale-pain sores compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0005). Addition of 1 mg-neostigmine (NDG) resulted in longer time to rescue analgesic (1205 ± 303 min; P < 0.02) and lower ketoprofen consumption (P < 0.05) compared to DG. Sporadic cases of vesical catheterization and emesis were observed, however adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusion: Spinal 1 microgram (μg) neostigmine further enhanced analgesia from spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, without increasing the incidence of adverse effects. PMID:25535491

  17. The pathogenesis of spinal epidural abscess: microangiographic studies in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Feldenzer, J A; McKeever, P E; Schaberg, D R; Campbell, J A; Hoff, J T

    1988-07-01

    An experimental model of spinal epidural abscess was developed in rabbits by injecting Staphylococcus aureus into the posterior thoracolumbar epidural space. This model has been shown to reproduce the neurological, bacteriological, and radiological aspects of the human disease. In this study, the effect of the infectious epidural mass on the vasculature of the spinal cord in paraplegic rabbits was studied using microangiographic techniques. The normal vascular anatomy of the rabbit spinal cord was defined in control experiments. Vascular proliferation was demonstrated in the epidural space surrounding the abscesses. Anterior and paired posterior spinal arteries remained patent in paraplegic rabbits with mild or moderate spinal cord compression and in some cases of severe compression. In animals with severe compression, the anterior epidural venous plexus remained patent, but the dorsal spinal vein was occluded. Occlusion of perforating arteries occurred only with extreme spinal cord compression. These data indicate that the initial neurological deficit associated with experimental spinal epidural abscess is not due to vascular thrombosis. PMID:2454302

  18. Epidural anesthesia for permanent spinal cord stimulation with a cylindrical type lead: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Choi, Rak Min; Kee, Rim; Lee, Kang Hun; Jeon, Sangyoon; Jung, Jae-Wook; Kim, Woo-Jin; Yoon, Jin Sun

    2015-04-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in trials involving external stimulation are easily conducted under local anesthesia. However, implantation of a permanent SCS system is painful, and can be intolerable in some patients. Epidural anesthesia can be used to perform the SCS implantation without discomfort if the patient can localize the area of paresthesia. However, little is known about epidural anesthesia for SCS. This paper reports 23 cases of permanent SCS with a cylindrical type lead implanted under the epidural anesthesia. Epidural anesthesia was sufficient in 22 patients without discomfort and significant complications. The remaining patient experienced incomplete epidural anesthesia and required additional analgesics to blunt the pain. All the leads were placed consistent with the patient's report of paresthesia area under epidural anesthesia. Thus, epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe method for the optimal placement of SCS to minimize the discomfort for patients without impairing patients' response to the intraoperative stimulation test.

  19. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient’s history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection. PMID:27382529

  20. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  1. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bustoros, Mark; Thomas, Cheddhi; Frenster, Joshua; Modrek, Aram S; Bayin, N Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Rosen, Gerald; Schiff, Peter B; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  2. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes.

  3. Thoracic epidural spinal angiolipoma with coexisting lumbar spinal stenosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal angiolipomas (SALs) are uncommon benign lesions that may present insidiously with back pain or acutely with weakness due to tumor bleeding/thrombosis. Given their rarity, these lesions are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of epidural masses. The purpose of this article is to report the case of an epidural SAL and to conduct a literature review on the topic. Methods A case report and review of the literature using the PubMed/Medline databases. All case reports and case series were reviewed up to June 2015. Results A 65-year old female presented with neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar spinal stenosis. Following decompressive surgery, she experienced symptom resolution, but three months postoperatively she presented to the emergency department with acute paraparesis. A thoracic MRI revealed a lesion located between T8 and T10 causing severe spinal cord compression. Following emergent laminectomy and en bloc resection, the patient regained function and the lesion was diagnosed as SAL. Our literature review revealed 178 reported cases, with a female and thoracic predominance. The majority of patients underwent surgical treatment, achieving a gross total resection in most cases. Similarly, complete symptom resolution was the most common outcome. Conclusion Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon spinal tumors. However, they may be treated as any other space-occupying lesion, and surgical resection allows for complete symptom recovery in most patients. PMID:26767159

  4. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain. PMID:27056873

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Reirradiation for Recurrent Epidural Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Floyd, Scott; Wong, Eric; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Groff, Michael; Kasper, Ekkehard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: When patients show progression after conventional fractionated radiation for spine metastasis, further radiation and surgery may not be options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been successfully used in treatment of the spine and may be applicable in these cases. We report the use of SBRT for 60 consecutive patients (81 lesions) who had radiological progressive spine metastasis with epidural involvement after previous radiation for spine metastasis. Methods and Materials: SBRT was used with fiducial and vertebral anatomy-based targeting. The radiation dose was prescribed based on the extent of spinal canal involvement; the dose was 8 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 = 24 Gy when the tumor did not touch the spinal cord and 5 to 6 Gy x 5 = 25 to 30 Gy when the tumor abutted the cord. The cord surface received up to the prescription dose with no hot spots in the cord. Results: The median overall survival was 11 months, and the median progression-free survival was 9 months. Overall, 93% of patients had stable or improved disease while 7% of patients showed disease progression; 65% of patients had pain relief. There was no significant toxicity other than fatigue. Conclusions: SBRT is feasible and appears to be an effective treatment modality for reirradiation after conventional palliative radiation fails for spine metastasis patients.

  6. Effect of preloading epidural space with normal saline on the incidence of complications of epidural catheter placement and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Geng, Guiqi; Sun, Xingfeng; Huang, Shaoqiang

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of preloading the epidural space with normal saline (NS) on the incidence of complications of epidural catheter placement and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. Two hundred and ninety parturients at full term, who were scheduled for cesarean section under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups: group control (I) and group NS (II). The epidural puncture was performed at the estimated L3-4 interspace with a Tuohy needle attached to a 5 ml syringe. Loss of resistance to air was used to identify the epidural space. In group I no fluid was injected into the epidural space before insertion of the catheter; while in group II NS 5 ml was injected into the epidural space before catheter insertion. The incidence of blood vessel trauma and paraesthesia were evaluated. The effect of spinal anesthesia was evaluated. Blood vessel trauma in group II was significantly lower than in group I, P < 0.05. However, the incidence of paraesthesia was similar between the two groups, P > 0.05. Preloading the epidural space with NS can decrease the incidence of clinically apparent injury to blood vessels during epidural catheter placement, and can improve the effects of spinal analgesia, but does not reduce the incidence of paraesthesia.

  7. Therapeutic Effect of Epidurally Administered Lipo-Prostaglandin E1 Agonist in a Rat Spinal Stenosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyun; Choe, Ghee Young; Moon, Jee Yeon; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Kim, Yong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background A lipo-prostaglandin E1 agonist is effective for the treatment of neurological symptoms of spinal stenosis when administered by an oral or intravenous route. we would like to reveal the therapeutic effect of an epidural injection of lipo-prostaglandin E1 on hyperalgesia in foraminal stenosis. Methods A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were included. A small stainless steel rod was inserted into the L5/L6 intervertebral foramen to produce intervertebral foraminal stenosis and chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The rats were divided into three groups: epidural PGE1 (EP) (n = 15), saline (n = 15), and control (n = 10). In the EP group, 0.15 µg.kg-1 of a lipo-PGE1 agonist was injected daily via an epidural catheter for 10 days from postoperative day 3. In the saline group, saline was injected. Behavioral tests for mechanical hyperalgesia were performed for 3 weeks. Then, the target DRG was analyzed for the degree of chromatolysis, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis in light microscopic images. Results From the fifth day after lipo-PGE1 agonist injection, the EP group showed significant recovery from mechanical hyperalgesia, which was maintained for 3 weeks (P < 0.05). Microscopic analysis showed much less chromatolysis in the EP group than in the saline or control groups. Conclusions An epidurally administered lipo-PGE1 agonist relieved neuropathic pain, such as mechanical hyperalgesia, in a rat foraminal stenosis model, with decreasing chromatolysis in target DRG. We suggest that epidurally administered lipo-PGE1 may be a useful therapeutic candidate for patients with spinal stenosis. PMID:25031807

  8. Low dose combined spinal-epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pirlet, M; Baird, M; Pryn, S; Jones-Ritson, M; Kinsella, S M

    2000-07-01

    A patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy was scheduled for elective caesarean section after stabilization on medical therapy. Wer performed a combined spinal epidural using one ml 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5 mg) with 0.3 mg diamorphine for the spinal. The epidural was topped up with 10 mL bupivacaine 0.5%. Significant haemodynamic changes consisted of reduction in heart rate and hypotension after the spinal, and tachycardia after delivery. The benefits and risks of this approach are discussed. PMID:15321091

  9. Spinal subdural hematoma with cauda equina syndrome: A complication of combined spinal epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Sethi, Priyanka; Jain, Jitesh Kumar; Agarwal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSE) is considered safe in lower limb surgeries. We report a case of sudden neurological deterioration in a stable postoperative patient who was given CSE for total knee replacement and low molecular weight heparin in postoperative period. On the 4th postoperative day, she developed sudden onset weakness in left lower limb along with bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging spine revealed a subdural hematoma at L2-L3 level. Immediate laminectomy along with cord decompression was done and patient recovered well except for a persistent foot drop on left side. PMID:25948911

  10. Spinal epidural lipomatosis: An unusual cause of relapsing and remitting paraparesis

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Dinesh; Srivastava, Arun K.; Kumar, Raj

    2010-01-01

    Epidural lipomatosis is a rare entity to cause spinal cord compression and neurological deficits. This is usually associated with excess of steroids in the body either because of endogenous source as in Cushings disease or exogenous intake as in some diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus, in some endocrinopathies or in morbid obesity. But in some cases no cause has been found. Such idiopathic cases of spinal epidural lipomatosis have also been reported. Here, we report a case of idiopathic spinal epidural lipomatosis with relapsing and remitting paraparesis which is quite unusual. Treatment depends upon neurological status of the patient. We operated the patient as he had significant neurological compromise and he improved significantly. PMID:21559166

  11. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Naoum, Joseph J.; Arbid, Elias J.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of chronic limb ischemia involves the restoration of pulsatile blood flow to the distal extremity. Some patients cannot be treated with endovascular means or with open surgery; some may have medical comorbidities that render them unfit for surgery, while others may have persistent ischemia or pain even in the face of previous attempts at reperfusion. In spinal cord stimulation (SCS), a device with electrodes is implanted in the epidural space to stimulate sensory fibers. This activates cell-signaling molecules that in turn cause the release of vasodilatory molecules, a decrease in vascular resistance, and relaxation of smooth muscle cells. SCS also suppresses sympathetic vasoconstriction and pain transmission. When patient selection is based on microcirculatory parameters, SCS therapy can significantly improve pain relief, halt the progression of ulcers, and potentially achieve limb salvage. PMID:23805343

  12. Sudden onset of paraplegia caused by hemorrhagic spinal epidural angiolipoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, Ali; Albouzidi, Abderrahmane; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohamed

    2008-09-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipoma is a rare benign tumor containing vascular and mature adipose elements. A slow progressive clinical course was mostly presented and rarely a fluctuating course during pregnancy. The authors report the original case of spontaneous spinal epidural bleeding resulting from thoracic epidural angiolipoma who presented with hyperacute onset of paraplegia, simulating an extradural hematoma. The patient was admitted with sudden non-traumatic hyperacute paraplegia during a prolonged walk. Neurologic examination showed sensory loss below T6 and bladder disturbances. Spinal MRI revealed a non-enhanced heterogeneous thoracic epidural lesion, extending from T2 to T3. A bilateral T2-T4 laminectomy was performed to achieve resection of a lipomatous tumor containing area of spontaneous hemorrhage. The postoperative course was uneventful with complete neurologic recovery. Histologic examination revealed the tumor as an angiolipoma. Because the prognosis after rapid surgical management of this lesion is favorable, the diagnosis of spinal angiolipoma with bleeding should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperacute spinal cord compression.

  13. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  14. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report. PMID:26844816

  15. [Cesarean Section Under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia for a Pregnant Woman with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Hyoda, Akira; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Matsunami, Sayuri; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-12-01

    We report the successful anesthetic management of a pregnant woman with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune hepatitis who underwent cesarean section. A 35 year-old pregnant woman with PBC was diagnosed with preterm rupture of membranes (PROM). Emergent cesarean section was scheduled. AST and ALT were elevated and she complained of itching due to PBC. Hydrocortisone 50 mg was intravenously administered. Spinal anesthesia was initiated with 2.4 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride and 10 µg fentanyl at L3-4; sensory loss (T2) was confirmed. Morphine was not included in spinal anesthesia to avoid worsening of the itching. Epidural anesthesia at T12-L1 was performed for postoperative pain control. Surgery proceeded uneventfully and postoperative pain control was satisfactory. Combined spinal and epidural anesthesia was beneficial for the perioperative management of a pregnant woman with PBC and autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:26790326

  16. Successful treatment of cervical spinal epidural empyema secondary to grass awn migration in a cat.

    PubMed

    Granger, Nicolas; Hidalgo, Antoine; Leperlier, Dimitri; Gnirs, Kirsten; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Delisle, Françoise; Blot, Stéphane

    2007-08-01

    Spinal epidural empyema (SEE) represents a severe pyogenic infection of the epidural space. Clinical signs of the disease are non-specific--increased body temperature, intense neck pain, neurological signs of a transverse myelopathy--and can lead to severe and permanent neurological deficits. This report describes the diagnosis and successful surgical treatment of cervical SEE secondary to grass awn migration in a cat. Although it is uncommon, this disease should be suspected in cats with progressive myelopathy. Early diagnosis and emergency surgery combined with antibiotic therapy are required to allow a complete recovery. PMID:17449314

  17. Spinal intraosseous epidural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary drainage obliterated with Onyx embolization: case report.

    PubMed

    Ou, Chang-Hsien; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Yang, Tzu-Hsien; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Wong, Ho-Fai

    2015-08-01

    The authors report an extremely rare case of spinal intraosseous epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with perimedullary vein reflux causing symptoms of myelopathy. The intraosseous fistula tracts were completely obliterated with Onyx embolic agent, resulting in a total resolution of symptoms. The unique features of this case include the rare location of the fistula in the vertebral body and the association of the fistula with a compressive fracture. Imaging studies confirmed these hemodynamic findings and provided clarity and direct evidence regarding the association of epidural AVF formation with the vertebral compressive fracture. The authors also propose a possible disease evolution based on the previously adduced reflux-impending mechanism.

  18. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI.

  19. Neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia after spinal cord lesion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Marcello Oliveira; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; Ferreira, Ricardo; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord lesion. METHODS: Wistar rats (n = 30) weighing 320-360 g were randomized to two groups (hypothermia and control) of 15 rats per group. A spinal cord lesion was induced by the standardized drop of a 10-g weight from a height of 2.5 cm, using the New York University Impactor, after laminectomy at the T9-10 level. Rats in the hypothermia group underwent epidural hypothermia for 20 minutes immediately after spinal cord injury. Motor function was assessed for six weeks using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan motor scores and the inclined plane test. At the end of the final week, the rats' neurological status was monitored by the motor evoked potential test and the results for the two groups were compared. RESULTS: Analysis of the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores obtained during the six-week period indicated that there were no significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in the inclined plane test scores during the six-week period. Furthermore, at the end of the study, the latency and amplitude values of the motor evoked potential test were not significantly different between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Hypothermia did not produce a neuroprotective effect when applied at the injury level and in the epidural space immediately after induction of a spinal cord contusion in Wistar rats. PMID:25141116

  20. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  1. Development of a multi-electrode array for spinal cord epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping and standing after a complete spinal cord injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stimulation of the spinal cord has been shown to have great potential for improving function after motor deficits caused by injury or pathological conditions. Using a wide range of animal models, many studies have shown that stimulation applied to the neural networks intrinsic to the spinal cord can result in a dramatic improvement of motor ability, even allowing an animal to step and stand after a complete spinal cord transection. Clinical use of this technology, however, has been slow to develop due to the invasive nature of the implantation procedures, the lack of versatility in conventional stimulation technology, and the difficulty of ascertaining specific sites of stimulation that would provide optimal amelioration of the motor deficits. Moreover, the development of tools available to control precise stimulation chronically via biocompatible electrodes has been limited. In this paper, we outline the development of this technology and its use in the spinal rat model, demonstrating the ability to identify and stimulate specific sites of the spinal cord to produce discrete motor behaviors in spinal rats using this array. Methods We have designed a chronically implantable, rapidly switchable, high-density platinum based multi-electrode array that can be used to stimulate at 1–100 Hz and 1–10 V in both monopolar and bipolar configurations to examine the electrophysiological and behavioral effects of spinal cord epidural stimulation in complete spinal cord transected rats. Results In this paper, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of using high-resolution stimulation parameters in the context of improving motor recovery after a spinal cord injury. We observed that rats whose hindlimbs were paralyzed can stand and step when specific sets of electrodes of the array are stimulated tonically (40 Hz). Distinct patterns of stepping and standing were produced by stimulation of different combinations of electrodes on the array located at specific

  2. Spinal neuronal activation during locomotor-like activity enabled by epidural stimulation and 5-HT agonists in spinal rats

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Paul O.; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J.K.; Kim, Jung A.; Zhong, Hui; Stauber, Stacey M.; Pham, Trinh T.; Xiao, Mei S.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Roy, Roland R.

    2015-01-01

    The neural networks that generate stepping in complete spinal adult rats remain poorly defined. To address this problem we used c-fos (an activity-dependent marker) to identify active interneurons and motoneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of adult spinal rats during a 30-minute bout of bipedal stepping. Spinal rats were either step trained (30 min/day, 3 days/week for 7.5 weeks) or not step-trained. Stepping was enabled by epidural stimulation and the administration of the serotonergic agonists quipazine and 8-OHDPAT. A third group of spinal rats served as untreated (no stimulation, drugs, or stepping) controls. The number of activated cholinergic central canal cluster cells and partition neurons was higher in both step-trained and non-trained than untreated rats, and higher in non-trained than step-trained rats. The latter finding suggests that daily treatment with epidural stimulation plus serotonergic agonist treatment without step training enhanced the excitability of a broader cholinergic interneuronal population than step training. The number of activated interneurons in laminae II-VI of lumbar cross sections was higher in both step-trained and non-trained than untreated rats, and highest in step-trained rats. This finding suggests that this population of interneurons was responsive to epidural stimulation plus serotonergic treatment and that load-bearing induced when stepping had an additive effect. The number of activated motoneurons of all size categories was higher in the step-trained than the other two groups, reflecting a strong effect of loading on motoneuron recruitment. In general, these results indicate that the spinal networks for locomotion are similar with and without brain input. PMID:25789848

  3. Cervical Epidural Hematoma after Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation Therapy in a Patient with an Undiagnosed Cervical Spinal Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meng; Barber, Sean M; Moisi, Marc; Powell, Suzanne; Rivera, Andreana; Rose, James

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) occurring after chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy (CSMT) is a rare clinical phenomenon. Our case is unique because the patient had an undiagnosed cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) discovered on pathological analysis of the evacuated hematoma. Although the spinal manipulation likely contributed to the rupture of the AVM, there was no radiographic evidence of the use of excessive force, which was seen in another reported case. As such, patients with a known AVM who have not undergone surgical intervention should be cautioned against symptomatic treatment with CSMT, even if performed properly. Regardless of etiology, SEH is a surgical emergency and its favorable neurological recovery correlates inversely with time to surgical evacuation. PMID:26430581

  4. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  5. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary. PMID:26409007

  6. Spinal Epidural Hematoma After Thrombolysis for Deep Vein Thrombosis with Subsequent Pulmonary Thromboembolism: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Young-Min Kwak, Ho-Sung; Jin, Gong-Young; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Song, Kyung-Jin

    2006-06-15

    A 38-year-old male was initially admitted for left leg swelling. He was diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left leg and a pulmonary thromboembolism by contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) with delayed lower extremity CT. The DVT was treated by thrombolysis and a venous stent. Four hours later, he complained of severe back pain and a sensation of separation of his body and lower extremities; he experienced paraplegia early in the morning of the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a spinal epidural hematoma between T11 and L2, which decompressed following surgery. We, therefore, report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma after thrombolysis in a case of DVT with a pulmonary thromboembolism.

  7. Gallium-67 scintigraphy as an aid in the detection of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Klein, M; Ahn, C S; Drum, D E; Tow, D E

    1994-09-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is considered the study of choice for diagnosing spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Most of such cases, however, are not suspected initially, and thus do not benefit from the procedure. A case of SEA is described in which positive Ga-67 scintigraphy shortly before onset of lower extremity dysfunction was instrumental in obtaining an emergency gadolinium-enhanced MRI and establishing the diagnosis.

  8. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Orthopedic Surgery under Combined Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Vilhena, Ditza; Pereira, Luís; Duarte, Delfim; Oliveira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative hearing loss following nonotologic surgery is rare. For patients undergoing subarachnoid anesthesia, the loss of cerebral spinal fluid and hence the drop in intracranial pressure can result in hearing loss and cranial nerve palsy. We report a case in which a patient sustained orthopedic surgery under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia complicated by severe and persistent sensorineural hearing loss. This report is a reminder that postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a poorly understood complication. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of this complication, although prompt treatment does not guarantee a good outcome. PMID:26904339

  9. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS. PMID:27800000

  10. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  11. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Abigail N; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2–5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function. PMID:24654267

  12. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman presenting with acute epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Nonaka, Yasuomi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    A 26-year-old woman in week 31 of pregnancy presented to the emergency room with acute onset of paraplegia. Her medical history was unremarkable. Neurological examination revealed complete paraplegia, total sensory loss below the T7 dermatome, and significant vesicorectal dysfunction. MRI revealed an intraspinal mass from T3 to T4, which was hyperintense on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Blood examination found no abnormality. She underwent emergent hemilaminectomy and removal of the hematoma. Intraoperatively, unusually ectatic venous vessels were found adhered to the lower surface of the epidural clot. No concurrent vascular malformations were identified and the dura mater was intact. The histological diagnosis was angiolipoma. Postoperatively her neurological deficits showed remarkable improvement, and she gave birth to a healthy baby. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman may be complicated with acute epidural hemorrhage. Emergent surgical evacuation can be performed safely with a good functional prognosis.

  13. Rupture of the retrocorporeal artery: a rare cause of spontaneous spinal epidural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Alexis; Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Sourour, Nader; Gabrieli, Joseph; Rojas, Patricia; Chiras, Jacques; Peyre, Matthieu; Di Maria, Federico

    2016-06-01

    A 22-year-old man presented with a sudden backache and paraplegia (ASIA = B). Magnetic resonance imaging showed an anterior pan-spinal epidural haematoma. Digital subtraction angiography was performed and ruled out an underlying vascular malformation but showed an active contrast media leakage into the T-4 ventral epidural space with a pattern of pseudo-aneurysm. A rupture of a T-4 retrocorporeal artery was considered as the aetiology, possibly caused by a haemorrhagic sub-adventitial dissection. Treatment consisted in the embolisation of both the pseudo-aneurysm and the parent artery with liquid acrylic glue, followed by neurosurgical decompression in emergency. The patient had totally recovered (ASIA = E) by the 10-month clinical follow-up.

  14. Fentanyl versus tramadol with levobupivacaine for combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Sharma, Sujata; Kumari, Pratibha; Sudha; Bali, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia using new local anesthetics such as levobupivacaine has become very popular by virtue of the safety and lesser motor blockade caused by these agents. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) has become the preferred method for labor analgesia as it combines benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of the epidural catheter. Adding opioids to local anesthetic drugs provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesia but may be associated with several maternal and fetal adverse effects. The purpose of this study is to compare fentanyl and tramadol used in CSEA in terms of duration of analgesia and frequency of the adverse fetomaternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor were given CSEA after randomly allocating them in two groups of 30 each. Group I received intrathecal 2.5 mg levobupivacaine + 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top ups of 20 ml 0.125% solution of the same combination. Group II received 25 mg tramadol instead of fentanyl. Epidural top ups were given when parturient complained of two painful contractions (visual analogue scale ≥ 4). Data collected were demographic profile of the patients, analgesic qualities, side- effects and the fetomaternal outcome. Results: Patients in Group II had significantly prolonged analgesia (145 ± 9 minutes) than in Group I (95 ± 7 minutes). Patients receiving fentanyl showed rapid onset of analgesia, but there were more incidence of side-effects like shivering, pruritus, transient fetal bradycardia, hypotension, nausea and vomiting. Only side-effect in the tramadol group was nausea and vomiting. During labor, maternal satisfaction was excellent. Conclusions: Adding tramadol to local anesthetic provides prolonged analgesia with minimal side effects. Fentanyl, when used as adjuvant to local anesthetic, has a rapid onset of analgesia but has certain fetomaternal side-effects. PMID:26240543

  15. A fully implantable stimulator with wireless power and data transmission for experimental use in epidural spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Li, Jun; Han, Wenjuan; Zhou, Houlun

    2011-01-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) combined with partial weight bearing therapy (PWBT) has been reported to facilitate recovery of functional walking for individuals after chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. This paper describes a low cost, fully implantable, advanced ESCS stimulator that can be manufactured in a research laboratory for use in small animals. The system is composed of four main parts: an external personal digital assistant (PDA), an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), lead extension and electrode. The PDA allows the experimenter to program the stimulation parameters through a user-friendly graphical interface. The external controller placed on the rat back communicates with PDA via RF telemetry. The IPG generates the biphasic charge-balanced voltage-regulated pulses, which are delivered to the bipolar electrode by the lead extension to achieve chronic ESCS in freely moving rats. A RF carrier from the Class-E amplifier in the external controller provides both data and power for the implanted circuitry through a closely coupled inductive link. The IPG is hermetically packaged using a silicon elastomer and measures 22 mm × 23 mm × 7 mm with a mass of ~3.78 g.

  16. A fully implantable stimulator with wireless power and data transmission for experimental use in epidural spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Li, Jun; Han, Wenjuan; Zhou, Houlun

    2011-01-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) combined with partial weight bearing therapy (PWBT) has been reported to facilitate recovery of functional walking for individuals after chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. This paper describes a low cost, fully implantable, advanced ESCS stimulator that can be manufactured in a research laboratory for use in small animals. The system is composed of four main parts: an external personal digital assistant (PDA), an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), lead extension and electrode. The PDA allows the experimenter to program the stimulation parameters through a user-friendly graphical interface. The external controller placed on the rat back communicates with PDA via RF telemetry. The IPG generates the biphasic charge-balanced voltage-regulated pulses, which are delivered to the bipolar electrode by the lead extension to achieve chronic ESCS in freely moving rats. A RF carrier from the Class-E amplifier in the external controller provides both data and power for the implanted circuitry through a closely coupled inductive link. The IPG is hermetically packaged using a silicon elastomer and measures 22 mm × 23 mm × 7 mm with a mass of ~3.78 g. PMID:22256007

  17. Surgical Management of Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucella Melitensis : Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Özbek, Zühtü; Gökoğlu, Abdülkerim; Menkü, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess, if especially caused by Brucellosis is a very rare disease which is usually a consequence of spondylodiscitis. The spinal column can be affected at any joint; however, the lumbar spine is the most common region, especially at the level of the L4-5 and L5-S1. The frequency of spinal involvement usually seen at the lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine respectively. As an occupational disease in farmers, veterinaries, butchers, laboratory staff and shepherds, brucellosis can also occur by direct contact to animals and infected materials or ingestion of raw cheese, milk or unpasteurized milk products. In this study, we presented two cases with cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by brucella melitensis, which was successfully treated by surgical approach. Initial treatment was combined with antibiotic therapy after the surgery for 3 months. PMID:22949972

  18. A Fully Implantable Stimulator With Wireless Power and Data Transmission for Experimental Investigation of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Hu, Dingyin; Duan, Bingyu; He, Jiping

    2015-07-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) combined with partial weight-bearing therapy (PWBT) has been shown to facilitate recovery of functional walking for individuals after spinal cord injury (SCI). The investigation of neural mechanisms of recovery from SCI under this treatment has been conducted broadly in rodent models, yet a suitable ESCS system is still unavailable. This paper describes a practical, programmable, and fully implantable stimulator for laboratory research on rats to explore fundamental neurophysiological principles for functional recovery after SCI. The ESCS system is composed of a personal digital assistant (PDA), an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), lead extension, and stimulating electrodes. The stimulation parameters can be programmed and adjusted through a graphical user interface on the PDA. The external controller is placed on the rat back and communicates with the PDA via radio-frequency (RF) telemetry. An RF carrier from the class-E power amplifier in the external controller provides both data and power for the IPG through an inductive link. The IPG is built around a microcontroller unit to generate voltage-regulated pulses delivered to the bipolar electrode for ESCS in rats. The encapsulated IPG measures 22 mm × 23 mm × 7 mm with a mass of  ∼  3.78 g. This fully implantable batteryless stimulator provided a simplified and efficient method to carry out chronic experiments in untethered animals for medical electro-neurological research. PMID:25680207

  19. Multimodal Approach to the Management of Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (MESCC) Due to Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tancioni, Flavio; Navarria, Pierina; Lorenzetti, Martin A.; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Masci, Giovanna; Mancosu, Pietro; Alloisio, Marco; Morenghi, Emanuela; Santoro, Armando; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a multidisciplinary approach for treatment of patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression in terms of feasibility, local control, and survival. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine consecutive patients treated between January 2004 and December 2007 were included. The most common primary cancers were lung, breast, and kidney cancers. Ninety-eight surgical procedures were performed. Radiotherapy was performed within the first month postoperatively. Clinical outcome was evaluated by modified visual analog scale for pain, Frankel scale for neurologic deficit, and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. Nearly all patients (93%) had back pain before treatment, whereas major or minor preoperative neurologic deficit was present in 62 cases (63%). Results: Clinical remission of pain was obtained in the vast majority of patients (91%). Improvement of neurologic deficit was observed in 45 cases (72.5%). Local relapse occurred in 10%. Median survival was 11 months (range, 0-46 months). Overall survival at 1 year was 43.6%. Type of primary tumor significantly affected survival. Conclusions: In patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression, the combination of surgery plus radiotherapy is feasible and provides clinical benefit in most patients. The discussion of each single case within a multidisciplinary team has been of pivotal importance in implementing the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  20. Primary spinal epidural lymphoma: Patients' profile, outcome, and prognostic factors: A multicenter Rare Cancer Network study

    SciTech Connect

    Monnard, Virginie; Sun, Alex; Epelbaum, Ron; Poortmans, Philip; Miller, Robert C.; Verschueren, Tom; Scandolaro, Luciano; Villa, Salvador; Majno, Sabine Balmer; Ostermann, Sandrine; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier . E-mail: rene-olivier.mirimanoff@chuv.ch

    2006-07-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical profile, treatment outcome, and prognostic factors in primary spinal epidural lymphoma (PSEL). Methods and Materials Between 1982 and 2002, 52 consecutive patients with PSEL were treated in nine institutions of the Rare Cancer Network. Forty-eight patients had an Ann Arbor stage IE and four had a stage IIE. Forty-eight patients underwent decompressive laminectomy, all received radiotherapy (RT) with (n = 32) or without chemotherapy (n = 20). Median RT dose was 36 Gy (range, 6-50 Gy). Results Six (11%) patients progressed locally and 22 (42%) had a systemic relapse. At last follow-up, 28 patients were alive and 24 had died. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were 69%, 57%, and 88%, respectively. In univariate analyses, favorable prognostic factors were younger age and complete neurologic response. Multivariate analysis showed that combined modality treatment, RT volume, total dose more than 36 Gy, tumor resection, and complete neurologic response were favorable prognostic factors. Conclusions Primary spinal epidural lymphoma has distinct clinical features and outcome, with a relatively good prognosis. After therapy, local control is excellent and systemic relapse occurs in less than half the cases. Combined modality treatment appears to be superior to RT alone.

  1. Paraesthesia during the needle-through-needle and the double segment technique for combined spinal epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ahn, H J; Choi, D H; Kim, C S

    2006-07-01

    Paraesthesia during regional anaesthesia is an unpleasant sensation for patients and, more importantly, in some cases it is related to neurological injury. Relatively few studies have been conducted on the frequency of paraesthesia during combined spinal epidural anaesthesia. We compared two combined spinal epidural anaesthesia techniques: the needle-through-needle technique and the double segment technique in this respect. We randomly allocated 116 parturients undergoing elective Caesarean section to receive anaesthesia using one of these techniques. Both techniques were performed using a 27G pencil point needle, an 18G Tuohy needle, and a 20G multiport epidural catheter from the same manufacturer. The overall frequency of paraesthesia was higher in the needle-through-needle technique group (56.9% vs. 31.6%, p = 0.011). The frequency of paraesthesia at spinal needle insertion was 20.7% in the needle-through-needle technique group and 8.8% in the double segment technique group; whereas the frequency of paraesthesia at epidural catheter insertion was 46.6% in the needle-through-needle technique group and 24.6% in the double segment technique group.

  2. Cervical spinal cord injection of epidural corticosteroids; comprehensive longitudinal study including multiparametric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Buchbinder, Bradley; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread use, the efficacy of epidural corticosteroid injections (ESI) for osteoarthritis-associated neck or radicular pain remains uncertain, so even rare serious complications enter into discussions about use. However various factors impede investigation and publication of serious adverse events. To that end, we developed new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for spinal cord white-matter quantification and employed best-available physiological tests to characterize a cervical spinal cord lesion caused by inadvertent intramedullary injection of Depo-Medrol. A 29-year-old woman with mild cervical osteoarthritis had 2 years of headache and neck pain (concussion and whiplash) after two minor motor-vehicle accidents. During C5–6 ESI, she developed new left-sided motor and sensory symptoms and MRI demonstrated a new left dorsal spinal cord cavity. Mild left-sided motor and sensory symptoms have persisted for more than 2 years, during which time we performed serial neurological examinations, standard electrodiagnostics, somatosensory evoked potentials, and transcranial measurement of corticospinal central motor conduction time (CMCT). We used 3 tesla MRI with a 32-channel coil developed for high-resolution cervical spinal cord structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetization transfer (MT). T2*-weighted signal, DTI and MT metrics showed delayed spread of the lesion across four vertebral levels rostrally, consistent with Wallerian degeneration within the ascending left dorsal columns. However only CMCT metrics detected objective correlates of her left hemiparesis and bilateral hyperreflexia. DTI and MT metrics may better distinguish between post-traumatic demyelination and axonal degeneration than conventional MRI. These tests should be considered to better characterize similar spinal cord injuries. PMID:22964435

  3. Use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1990-08-01

    The use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids is described. The risks of infection and mechanical catheter complications, the need for escalating doses, reservoir volume, drug stability, and cost are practical considerations associated with use of both external and internal infusion systems. Use of patient criteria to identify suitable candidates for intraspinal administration of pain medication helps ensure successful management. The criteria for intraspinal delivery pumps are safety, accuracy, reliability, ease of management by the patient and the health-care professional, and compatibility of the drug with the pump components. The primary factors to consider when comparing pumps to be used for intraspinal delivery of pain medication are the volume and flow rate requirements of the devices. External portable infusion devices are classified according to the mechanism of operation into three primary groups: syringe pumps, peristaltic mechanisms, and elastomeric reservoir pumps. Portable patient-controlled analgesia pumps that have syringes, flexible reservoir bags, and elastomeric reservoirs have been developed. Implanted systems with flow rates that are preset at the factory make pain management more difficult when the patient requires changes or escalations in doses over time. A programmable implanted pump is available. Two advantages of continuous epidural or intrathecal infusion are (1) the peaks and valleys of pain relief with bolus injections are eliminated and (2) the need for multiple injections is reduced. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps enhance the efficacy of continuous infusions by allowing the patient to administer bolus doses to control acute pain. PMID:2202209

  4. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma management with minimally invasive surgery through tubular retractors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chao-Feng; Zhuang, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Chun-Mei; Cai, Gang-Feng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhao, Wei; Ahmada, Said Idrissa; Devi, Ramparsad Doorga; Kibria, Md Golam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To report a minimally invasive paraspinal approach in the treatment of a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). We additionally aim to review the relevant literature to enhance our knowledge of this disease. SSEH is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic disease. Currently, most appropriate management is emergence decompression laminectomy and hematoma evacuation. An 81-year-old woman was admitted to the neurology department with a chief complaint of bilateral numbness and weakness of the lower limbs and difficulty walking for 4 days with progressive weakness developed over the following 3 days accompanied with pain in the lower limbs and lower back. No history of trauma was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar spine demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from T-12 to L-5 with thecal sac and cauda equina displacement anterior. The patient was treated in our department with a minimally invasive approach. This operation method had been approved by Chinese Independent Ethics Committee. Three months following the operation, the patient had regained the ability to walk with the aid of a cane and myodynamia tests revealed normal results for the left lower limb and a 4/5 grade for the right limb. Importantly, no complications were exhibited from the surgical operation. The minimally invasive paraspinal approach through tubular retractors is demonstrated here as an effective alternative method for the treatment of SSEH. PMID:27367986

  5. Comparative evaluation of general, epidural and spinal anaesthesia for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Rickford, J K; Speedy, H M; Tytler, J A; Lim, M

    1988-03-01

    The results of a prospective randomised evaluation of general anaesthesia (GA), epidural anaesthesia (EA) and spinal anaesthesia (SA) for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy are presented. GA provided speed and reliability but resulted in a high incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting and sore throat. Both regional techniques conferred the advantages of an awake, cooperative patient, but EA required a longer preparation time than SA and more supplementary treatment with fentanyl or midazolam. A major drawback associated with the use of SA was a 42% incidence of postspinal headache. All three techniques were associated with hypotension on placement in the hoisl; bath immersion resulted in significant rises in blood pressure in the EA and SA groups and a more variable (overall non-significant) response in the GA group.

  6. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: A case series of seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Nosseir, Mohamed; Fayed, Zeiad Y; Seoud, Khaled; El Bahy, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas (PSECHs) are rare vascular lesions with about 100 cases reported. Herein, we present a case series of 7 PSECHs discussing their clinical presentation, radiological characteristics, surgical technique and intraoperative findings, pathological features, and functional outcome. Materials and Methods: We retrieved from the retrolective databases of the senior authors, patients with pathologically confirmed PSECH operated between January 2002 and November 2015. From their medical records, the patients’ sociodemographic, clinical, radiological, surgical, and histopathological data were retrieved and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the seven cases was 50.3 years. Four were females. All the five cases (71.4%) in the thoracic spine had myelopathy and the 2 (28.6%) lumbar cases had sciatica. Local pain was present in all the cases. All the lesions were isointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and in five cases there was strong homogeneous enhancement. In six cases (85.7%), classical laminectomy was done; lesions resected in one piece in five cases. Total excision was achieved in all the cases. Lesions were thin-walled dilated blood vessels, lined with endothelium, and engorged with blood and with scanty loose fibrous stroma. The median follow-up was 12 months (range: 1–144 months). All patients gradually improved neurologically and achieved a good outcome with no recurrence at the last follow-up. Conclusion: PSECH although rare is increasing reported and ought to be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. Early surgical treatment with total resection is recommended as would result in a good prognosis.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of surgery plus radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Nosyk, Bohdan; Fisher, Charles G.; Dvorak, Marcel; Patchell, Roy A.; Regine, William F.; Loblaw, Andrew; Bansback, Nick; Guh, Daphne; Sun, Huiying; Anis, Aslam . E-mail: aslam.anis@ubc.ca

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: A recent randomized clinical trial has demonstrated that direct decompressive surgery plus radiotherapy was superior to radiotherapy alone for the treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. The current study compared the cost-effectiveness of the two approaches. Methods and Materials: In the original clinical trial, clinical effectiveness was measured by ambulation and survival time until death. In this study, an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective. Costs related to treatment and posttreatment care were estimated and extended to the lifetime of the cohort. Weibull regression was applied to extrapolate outcomes in the presence of censored clinical effectiveness data. Results: From a societal perspective, the baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was found to be $60 per additional day of ambulation (all costs in 2003 Canadian dollars). Using probabilistic sensitivity analysis, 50% of all generated ICERs were lower than $57, and 95% were lower than $242 per additional day of ambulation. This analysis had a 95% CI of -$72.74 to 309.44, meaning that this intervention ranged from a financial savings of $72.74 to a cost of $309.44 per additional day of ambulation. Using survival as the measure of effectiveness resulted in an ICER of $30,940 per life-year gained. Conclusions: We found strong evidence that treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression with surgery in addition to radiotherapy is cost-effective both in terms of cost per additional day of ambulation, and cost per life-year gained.

  8. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: A case series of seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Nosseir, Mohamed; Fayed, Zeiad Y; Seoud, Khaled; El Bahy, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas (PSECHs) are rare vascular lesions with about 100 cases reported. Herein, we present a case series of 7 PSECHs discussing their clinical presentation, radiological characteristics, surgical technique and intraoperative findings, pathological features, and functional outcome. Materials and Methods: We retrieved from the retrolective databases of the senior authors, patients with pathologically confirmed PSECH operated between January 2002 and November 2015. From their medical records, the patients’ sociodemographic, clinical, radiological, surgical, and histopathological data were retrieved and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the seven cases was 50.3 years. Four were females. All the five cases (71.4%) in the thoracic spine had myelopathy and the 2 (28.6%) lumbar cases had sciatica. Local pain was present in all the cases. All the lesions were isointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and in five cases there was strong homogeneous enhancement. In six cases (85.7%), classical laminectomy was done; lesions resected in one piece in five cases. Total excision was achieved in all the cases. Lesions were thin-walled dilated blood vessels, lined with endothelium, and engorged with blood and with scanty loose fibrous stroma. The median follow-up was 12 months (range: 1–144 months). All patients gradually improved neurologically and achieved a good outcome with no recurrence at the last follow-up. Conclusion: PSECH although rare is increasing reported and ought to be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. Early surgical treatment with total resection is recommended as would result in a good prognosis. PMID:27630480

  9. [Morpho-functional characteristic of the lateral vaults of the epidural space of the spinal cord and their clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A A; Gaĭvoronskiĭ, I V; Gaĭvoronskiĭ, A I

    2014-01-01

    The study of the epidural space was performed on 362 samples of the vertebral column obtained from the fetuses aged from 16 weeks, newborns, children and adult persons aged up to 90 years, using anatomical and histological methods. Within the lateral parts of the epidural space, the lateral vaults were distinguished. A new anatomical interpretation of these structures is proposed, considering them as a complex of anatomical structures including the periosteum of the intervertebral foramen, the sleeve of dura mater, intervertebral veins, spinal arteries, adipose tissue, the system of the connective-tissue trabeculae, recurrent nerves controlling the blood flow in the vascular system of the vertebral channel and promoting the communication of the epidural space with the paravertebral areas. PMID:25552083

  10. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic visceral pain secondary to chronic non-alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kapural, Leonardo; Rakic, Mladen

    2008-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) suppresses visceral response to colon distension in an animal model. In humans, it may be an effective therapy for chronic pain of pelvic origin, irritable bowel syndrome, and persistent unspecified abdominal pain. Described here is the case of SCS for 38-year-old woman with visceral pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis. Previous therapies included numerous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies, multiple pancreatic duct stenting, chemical and surgical sympathectomies with short-lasting pain relief. After the initial evaluation, the patient underwent retrograde epidural differential block to determine possible source of pain. Delay in pain recurrence after block suggested that the origin of her pain was visceral. After the psychologic evaluation, the patient underwent SCS trial over 14 days. She had 2 trial leads placed epidurally via T9-T10 paramedian entry with the tips of both leads positioned at T6 vertebral body. During the trial, visual analog scale pain score decreased from 8 to 1 cm, Pain Disability Index from 62 to 14, and opioid use from 150 to 0 mg of morphine sulfate equivalent a day. After the completion of successful SCS trial, she was implanted with dual octrode leads and rechargeable pulse generator. Median pain scores decreased from 8 to 1 at 3 months after the implant. Pain Disability Index changed from 62 to 15. Opiate use decreased to none. It seems that SCS may have a significant therapeutic potential for the treatment of visceral pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis. PMID:18496389

  11. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Nandita; Gupta, Sunana; Sharma, Atul; Dar, Mohd Reidwan

    2015-01-01

    Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency.

  12. Thoracic combined spinal epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease and renal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nandita; Gupta, Sunana; Sharma, Atul; Dar, Mohd Reidwan

    2015-01-01

    Older people undergoing any surgery have a higher incidence of morbidity and mortality, resulting from a decline in physiological reserves, associated comorbidities, polypharmacy, cognitive dysfunction, and frailty. Most of the clinical trials comparing regional versus general anesthesia in elderly have failed to establish superiority of any single technique. However, the ideal approach in elderly is to be least invasive, thus minimizing alterations in homeostasis. The goal of anesthetic management in laparoscopic procedures includes management of pneumoperitoneum, achieving an adequate level of sensory blockade without any respiratory compromise, management of shoulder tip pain, provision of adequate postoperative pain relief, and early ambulation. Regional anesthesia fulfills all the aforementioned criteria and aids in quick recovery and thus has been suggested to be a suitable alternative to general anesthesia for laparoscopic surgeries, particularly in patients who are at high risk while under general anesthesia or for patients unwilling to undergo general anesthesia. In conclusion, we report results of successful management with thoracic combined spinal epidural for laparoscopic cholecystectomy of a geriatric patient with ischemic heart disease with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and renal insufficiency. PMID:26664202

  13. A fully implanted programmable stimulator based on wireless communication for epidural spinal cord stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Xu, Qi; He, Jiping; Ren, Hangkong; Zhou, Houlun; Zheng, Kejia

    2012-03-15

    Clinical research indicates that the epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) has shown potential in promoting locomotor recovery in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI). This paper presents the development of a fully implantable voltage-regulated stimulator with bi-directional wireless communication for investigating underlying neural mechanisms of ESCS facilitating motor function improvement. The stimulation system consists of a computer, an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), a magnet, the extension leads and a stimulation electrode. The telemetry transmission between the IPG and the external controller is achieved by a commercially available transceiver chip with 2.4GHz carrier band. The magnet is used to activate the IPG only when necessary to minimize the power consumption. The encapsulated IPG measures 33mm×24mm×8mm, with a total mass of ∼12.6g. Feasibility experiments are conducted in three Sprague-Dawley rats to validate the function of the stimulator, and to investigate the relationship between lumbar-sacral ESCS and hindlimb electromyography (EMG) responses. The results show that the stimulation system provides an effective tool for investigation of ESCS application in motor function recovery in small animals. PMID:22085835

  14. The effect of chronic toxicity of pethidine on the spinal cord: an experimental model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Peştean, C; Taulescu, M; Ober, C; Cătoi, C; Miclăuş, V; Oana, L; Bodolea, C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of chronic spinal analgesia with pethidine in a rabbit model. We introduced epidural catheters in twenty New Zealand white rabbits, divided into two groups, and we administered 0.5 mg/kg pethidine or the same volume of normal saline through the catheters, for three consecutive days. Throughout the experiment, the animals were evaluated in terms of neurological status using the Tarlov score. After the rabbit's euthanasia, 4 μm sections of spinal cord stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin were analyzed by a pathologist blinded to the study for neurohistopathological changes. The results were statistically analyzed with Prism 5 software for Windows. No significant differences were noticed between the two groups in as far as body temperature (p=0.295) and weight (p=0.139) were concerned. In the group of animals, which received epidural pethidine, nine rabbits showed histological changes suggestive for neurotoxicity at the lumbar level of the spinal cord. These findings were significantly different compared with the control group which received only saline (no microscopic lesions revealed; p=0.0006). When combining the data from both groups or using the pethidine group alone, there was a significant correlation between the presence of neurological injury (Tarlov score) and the presence of the histopathological lesions in the spinal cord (r=-0.709, p=0.0002 and r=-0.635, p=0.013, respectively). Based on our findings, the chronic epidural administration of pethidine in rabbits induces moderate to severe histological changes on the spinal cord, but further investigations are needed to make a definitive statement about the histological effect of pethidine on the neurological tissue. PMID:24068413

  15. A comparison of the effects of epidural and spinal anesthesia with ischemia-reperfusion injury on the rat transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Acar, Yusuf; Bozkurt, Mehmet; Firat, Ugur; Selcuk, Caferi Tayyar; Kapi, Emin; Isik, Fatma Birgul; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Celik, Feyzi; Bozarslan, Beri Hocaoglu

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of spinal and epidural anesthesia on a rat transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flap ischemia-reperfusion injury model.Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 experimental groups: group I (n = 10), sham group; group II (n = 10), control group; group III (n = 10), epidural group; and group IV (n = 10), spinal group. After the elevation of the transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flaps, all groups except for the sham group were subjected to normothermic no-flow ischemia for 4 hours, followed by a reperfusion period of 2 hours. At the end of the reperfusion period, biochemical and histopathological evaluations were performed on tissue samples.Although there was no significant difference concerning the malonyldialdehyde, nitric oxide, and paraoxonase levels in the spinal and epidural groups, the total antioxidant state levels were significantly increased, and the total oxidative stress levels were significantly decreased in the epidural group in comparison to the spinal group. The pathological evaluation showed that findings related to inflammation, nuclear change rates and hyalinization were significantly higher in the spinal group compared with the epidural group.Epidural anesthesia can be considered as a more suitable method that enables a decrease in ischemia-reperfusion injuries in the muscle flaps.

  16. [Experience of application of multimodal combined spinal-epidural anesthesia during operative interventions for abdominal cavity tumors in children].

    PubMed

    Dmutriiev, D V

    2014-10-01

    The investigations were conducted in 44 children, operated on for abdominal cavity tumors and tumors of ovaries. In patients of the first group a combined spinal-epidural analgesia and a continuous intravenous phentanyl infusion were applied; while in the second group--the intravenous continuous infusion of phentanyl. Conduction of a multimodal analgesia have had reduced significantly a negative outcomes of insufficient analgesia in children and secured an effective analgesia after traumatic operations.

  17. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  18. Fictive motor patterns in chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Pearson, K G; Rossignol, S

    1991-12-01

    1. Fictive motor patterns were recorded in hind leg nerves of 10 adult chronic spinal cats (spinalized at T13). Four of these animals had been trained to step with their hind legs on a treadmill (late-spinal animals), whereas the remainder received no training and were examined a short time after spinalization (early-spinal animals). 2. A fictive pattern resembling the locomotor pattern for stepping was evoked in all animals in response to stimulation of the skin of the perineal region. (2-[2,6-Dichloroaniline]-2-imidazoline) hydrochloride (Clonidine) at doses ranging from 100 to 500 micrograms/kg iv facilitated the production of this pattern, particularly in early-spinal animals. 3. The fictive locomotor pattern in late-spinal animals was more complex than that occurring in early-spinal animals. In the latter the pattern consisted of an alternation of activity in flexor and extensor nerves, and changing leg position did not qualitatively alter the pattern, whereas in late-spinal animals the relative durations of the bursts in different flexors were usually not the same, and the pattern of flexor activity was dependent on leg position. 4. Moving the legs from extension to flexion progressively decreased the duration of flexor bursts, increased the cycle period, and decreased the ease with which the pattern could be evoked in both early- and late-spinal animals. 5. 1-beta-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA)/Isonocotinic acid 2-[(2-benzylcarbamoyl)ethyl]hydrazide (Nialamide) treatment following Clonidine in early-spinal animals increased the complexity of flexor burst activity. This, and other observations, indicates that DOPA and Clonidine do not have strictly identical actions on the locomotor pattern generator. 6. Stimulation of the paws in late-spinal animals produced two patterns of activity distinctly different from the locomotor pattern. of activity distinctly different from the locomotor pattern. One was a short sequence of high-frequency rhythmic activity (at

  19. Severity of presentation is associated with time to recovery in spinal epidural lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Praver, Moshe; Kennedy, Benjamin C; Ellis, Jason A; D'Amico, Randy; Mandigo, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    We present a patient with prednisone-induced spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) and relatively acute neurologic deterioration followed by rapid recovery after surgical decompression. SEL is a rare disease characterized by hypertrophy of epidural fat, most commonly associated with exogenous steroid use. To our knowledge, an analysis of the dynamics of steroid dose related to time to onset has never been performed, or of patient presentation features with respect to patient outcome. We retrospectively reviewed the literature for English language series and case reports of SEL associated with prednisone use from 1975-2013. Data were compiled for 41 patients regarding the prescribed dose of prednisone and length of treatment, as well as the severity of symptoms on the Ranawat scale, time to onset, time to recovery, and degree of recovery of neurological symptoms. Fisher's exact test and analysis of variance were used for comparing proportions, and p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. We found that the mean cumulative dose of prednisone trended towards an association with a lack of recovery (p=0.06) and may be related to rate of recovery. Prescribed prednisone dose varied inversely with the time before onset of neurological symptoms, but failed to reach statistical significance. Higher severity of presenting symptoms on the Ranawat scale were found to be associated with a higher likelihood of delayed recovery (p=0.035). Patients with symptoms lower on the Ranawat scale more frequently experienced complete neurologic recovery, though this did not reach significance. The acuity of neurological deterioration was not related to the time to recovery or ultimate degree of recovery. Severity of presentation on the Ranawat scale is associated with rate of recovery and may be related to degree of recovery in SEL patients. Cumulative dose of prednisone may be related to degree and rate of recovery. Prescribed dose of prednisone may be related to time to onset

  20. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling for lumbar spinal stenosis using a specially designed needle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This report describes the methodological approach and clinical application of a minimally invasive intervention to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Methods Thirty-four patients with LSS underwent fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling using a specially designed flexed Round Needle. The needle was inserted 8-12 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the stenosis and advanced to a position between the anterior side of the facet joint and pedicle up to the outer-third of the pedicle. The needle was advanced medially and backed laterally within a few millimetres along the canal side of the inferior articular process between the facet joint and pedicle. The procedure was completed when a marked reduction in resistance was felt at the tip of the needle. The procedure was performed bilaterally at the level of the stenosis. Results The average follow-up period was 12.9 ± 1.1 months. The visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was reduced from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 4.6 ± 2.5 points, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score decreased from 41.4 ± 17.2 to 25.5 ± 12.6% and the average self-rated improvement was 52.6 ± 33.1%. The VAS scores indicated that 14 (41.2%) patients reported a "good" to "excellent" treatment response, while 11 (32.4%) had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the ODI and 22 (64.7%) had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the self-rated improvement scale. Conclusions These results suggest that fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling is effective for managing LSS. PMID:20698999

  1. A comparative study-efficacy and safety of combined spinal epidural anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric patients for surgeries around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Vengamamba; Rao, Lella Nageswara; Vallury, Manoj Kumar; Sanapala, Anitha

    2015-01-01

    Context: Combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) has a significant advantage by enabling the use of low dose intrathecal local anesthetic, with knowledge that the epidural catheter may be used to extend the block as necessary. CSEA is useful in high-risk geriatric patients by providing greater hemodynamic stability. Aim: This study is designed to compare the clinical effects of CSEA versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients aged >65 years, American Society of Anaesthesiology III and IV were randomly allocated into two equal groups. Group A (n = 30) received CSEA with 1 ml (5 mg) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl through spinal route, and the expected incompleteness of spinal block was managed with small incremental dose of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine through epidural catheter, 1–1.5 ml for every unblocked segment to achieve T10 sensory level. Group B (n = 30) received spinal anesthesia with 2.5 ml (12.5 mg) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 25 μg fentanyl. Result: Both the groups showed rapid onset, excellent analgesia and good quality motor block. Group A showed a significantly less incidence of hypotension (P < 0.01) along with the provision of prolonging analgesia as compared to Group B. Conclusion: CSEA is a safe, effective, reliable technique with better hemodynamic stability along with the provision of prolonging analgesia compared to spinal anesthesia for high-risk geriatric patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. PMID:26417125

  2. Randomized trial of epidural injections for spinal stenosis published in the New England Journal of Medicine: further confusion without clarification.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Kaye, Alan D; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Gharibo, Christopher G; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials are considered the hallmark of evidence-based medicine. This conveys the idea that up-to-date evidence applied consistently in clinical practice, in combination with clinicians' individual expertise and patients own preference/expectations are enjoined to achieve the best possible outcome. Since its inception in 1990s, evidence-based medicine has evolved in conjunction with numerous changes in the healthcare environment. However, the benefits of evidence-based medicine have not materialized for spinal pain including surgical interventions. Consequently, the debate continues on the efficacy and medical necessity of multiple interventions provided in managing spinal pain. Friedly et al published a randomized controlled trial of epidural glucocorticoid injections for spinal stenosis in the July 2014 edition of the highly prestigious New England Journal of Medicine. This was accompanied by an editorial from Andersson. This manuscript provided significant sensationalism for the media and confusion for the spine community. This randomized trial of epidural glucocorticoid injections for spinal stenosis and accompanying editorial concluded that epidural injections of glucocorticoids plus lidocaine offered minimal or no short-term benefit as compared with epidural injections of lidocaine alone, with the editorial emphasizing proceeding directly to surgical intervention. In addition media statements by the authors also emphasized the idea that exercise or surgery might be better options for patients suffereing from narrowing of the spinal canal. The interventional pain management community believes that there are severe limitations to this study, manuscript, and accompanying editorial. The design, inclusion criteria, outcomes assessment, analysis of data and interpretation, and conclusions of this trial point to the fact that this highly sophisticated and much publicized randomized trial may not be appropriate and lead to misinformation. The

  3. Effect of epidural clonidine on characteristics of spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing gynaecological surgeries: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rachna; Rao, RS Raghavendra; Turai, Ashwini; Prabha, P; Shreyavathi, R; Harsoor, Karuna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Combined spinal–epidural (CSE) anaesthesia is being increasingly used for effective post-operative analgesia. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of epidural clonidine on characteristics of spinal anaesthesia for gynaecological surgeries. Methods: This was a prospective randomised, double-blind, controlled study involving sixty patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II who underwent gynaecological surgeries were randomly divided into clonidine (C) group and saline (S) group of thirty each. All patients received CSE anaesthesia. Ten minutes before subarachnoid block (SAB), Group C received clonidine 150 μg diluted to 5 ml in normal saline (NS) and Group S received NS epidurally. Hyperbaric bupivacaine (15 mg) was administered intrathecally for both groups after epidural injection. Sensory and motor block characteristics, analgesia, sedation and haemodynamics were observed. Statistical analysis was performed using appropriate tests. Results: Epidural clonidine produced faster onset (37.83 ± 8.58 s in Group C compared to 50.33 ± 8.80 s in Group S, P = 0.001) and prolonged duration of sensory block (241.17±18.65 minutes in group C compared to 150.33±19.16 minutes in group S, P = 0.001). Time for two segment regression of sensory block was193.67 ± 19.82 min in Group C and 109.33 ± 18.56 min Group S (P < 0.001). The duration of analgesia was 299.00 ± 43.38 min in Group C and 152.50 ± 21.04 min in Group S (P < 0.001). Haemodynamics and sedation scores were comparable between two groups. Conclusion: Administration of clonidine epidurally, 10 min before SAB, caused early onset and prolonged duration of motor blockade and analgesia, without any significant post-operative complication. PMID:27330201

  4. [A case of acute intracranial epidural hematoma caused by chronic nasal sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Kihara, Kazunori; Sato, Motoki; Kado, Ken; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial acute epidural hematoma(EDH)is rare. It is mostly caused by coagulation disorders, dural metastasis, or vascular malformations of the dura. We report a case of non-traumatic acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis and review the literature comprising 10 cases of acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis. A 16-year-old boy visited our outpatient clinic with a 2-day history of severe headache. He did not have fever or neurological abnormalities and showed no evidence of head trauma. Cranial computed tomography(CT)revealed sphenoid sinusitis and a small amount of epidural air in the middle fossa, but no other intracranial abnormalities. After eight days with no subsequent history of trauma, radiological exams showed a massive acute epidural hematoma in the left middle fossa and temporal convexity without any vascular lesion or skull fracture. The patient underwent a hematoma evacuation that revealed neither a skull fracture nor a vascular abnormality. In this adolescent, chronic nasal sinusitis caused fragility of the meningeal artery wall, an air collection in the epidural space, and the detachment of the dura mater from the inner surface of the skull, thereby resulting in a non-traumatic acute EDH.

  5. Stance control in the chronic spinal cat.

    PubMed

    Pratt, C A; Fung, J; Macpherson, J M

    1994-05-01

    1. A longitudinal study of the control of quiet and perturbed stance was conducted before and for 1 yr after complete spinal transection (T12) in a cat trained to stand on a moveable force platform. 2. With daily training, the spinal cat recovered full weight support and some intermittent control of lateral stability within 1 mo. Within the second month postspinalization, the spinal cat achieved the ability to maintain independent, unassisted stance (no external support or stimulation) for up to 45 s during quiet stance, as well as for 62-97% of the trials of horizontal translations of the support surface. 3. Control of lateral stability in the spinal cat was severely compromised, however, as eventually the spinal cat always lost its balance. Head movements and the tendency for the hindlimbs to initiate stepping movements were more destabilizing than platform translations. 4. Our preliminary results indicate that the recovery of partial lateral stability of the hindquarters in the spinal cat is the product of passive muscle properties and segmental reflexes, which, in isolation can provide only limited balance control in the chronic spinal cat.

  6. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A.; McManus, Carla D.; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted delivery. The literature on the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing central spinal stenosis after failure of epidural injections has not been widely studied. Study Design: A prospective evaluation. Setting: An interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center, a private practice setting in the United States. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain with lumbar central spinal stenosis. Methods: Seventy patients were recruited. The initial phase of the study was randomized, double-blind with a comparison of percutaneous adhesiolysis with caudal epidural injections. The 25 patients from the adhesiolysis group continued with follow-up, along with 45 additional patients, leading to a total of 70 patients. All patients received percutaneous adhesiolysis and appropriate placement of the Racz catheter, followed by an injection of 5 mL of 2% preservative-free lidocaine with subsequent monitoring in the recovery room. In the recovery room, each patient also received 6 mL of 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and 6 mg of non-particulate betamethasone, followed by an injection of 1 mL of sodium chloride solution and removal of the catheter. Outcomes Assessment: Multiple outcome measures were utilized including the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI), employment status, and opioid intake with assessment at 3, 6, and 12, 18

  7. Timing and prognosis of surgery for spinal epidural abscess: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nonsurgical versus surgical management of spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs) remains controversial. Even with the best preoperative screening for multiple risk factors, high nonoperative failure rates are attended by considerable morbidity (e.g., irreversible paralysis) and mortality. Therefore, the focus remains on early surgery. Methods: Most papers promote early recognition of the clinical triad (e.g., fever [50%], spinal pain [92–100%], and neurological deficits [47%]) for SEA. They also identify SEA-related risk factors for choosing nonsurgical versus surgical approaches; advanced age (>65 or 80), diabetes (15–30%), cancer, intravenous drug abuse (25%), smoking (23%), elevated white blood cell count (>12.5), high C-reactive protein >115, positive blood cultures, magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomographic documented cord compression, and significant neurological deficits (e.g., 19–45%). Results: Surgical options include: decompressions, open versus minimally invasive biopsy/culture/irrigation, or fusions. Up to 75% of SEA involve the thoracolumbar spine, and 50% are located ventrally. Wound cultures are positive in up to 78.8% of cases and are often (60%) correlated with positive blood cultures. The most typical offending organism is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, followed by methicillin sensitive S. aureus. Unfortunately, the failure rates for nonoperative treatment of SEA remain high (e.g., 41–42.5%), contributing to significant morbidity (22% risk of permanent paralysis), and mortality (3–25%). Conclusion: The vast majority of studies advocated early surgery to achieve better outcomes for treating SEA; this avoids high failure rates (41–42.5%) for nonoperative therapy, and limits morbidity/mortality rates. PMID:26605109

  8. Spinal epidural abscess with a rapid course in young healthy infantry recruits with multiple skin lacerations.

    PubMed

    Honig, Asaf; Or, Omer; Barzilay, Yair; Fraifeld, Shifra; Pikkel, Yoav Y; Eliahou, Ruth; Cohen, José E; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been high prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection among soldiers in the Israeli military, with devastating sequelae in several cases. Emergency department physicians have developed a high level of suspicion for spinal epidural abscess (SEA) in patients presenting known risk factors; however, SEA is a particularly elusive diagnosis in young healthy adults with no history of drug abuse. We review three cases of SEA secondary to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infection in young healthy soldiers without known risk factors. We retrospectively reviewed clinical files of soldiers treated at our Medical Center from 2004-2015 to identify patients diagnosed with SEA. Those aged less than 30years with no history of intravenous drug use, spine surgery or spine trauma were included in the study. Three young army recruits met the inclusion criteria. These young men developed SEA through extension of MSSA infection to proximal skin and soft tissue from impetigo secondary to skin scratches sustained during "basic" training. All presented with mild nuchal rigidity and severe persistent unremitting lancinating radicular pain. Although healthy at baseline, they had a severe, rapidly progressive course. Following urgent surgery, two patients recovered after rehabilitation; one remained with paraparesis at late follow-up. Neurological deficits and systemic evidence of S. aureus infection progressed rapidly in these young healthy SEA patients with no history of drug abuse, emphasizing the critical role of timely MRI, diagnosis, and surgery. PMID:27364320

  9. Plasma concentrations of bupivacaine after combined spinal epidural anaesthesia in infants and neonates.

    PubMed

    Frawley, G; Ragg, P; Hack, H

    2000-01-01

    The unbound and bound plasma concentration of bupivacaine in 50 infants less than 55 weeks postconceptual age was determined following combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia (csea). Plasma concentrations were determined at 15-min intervals up to 60 min postspinal anaesthesia. Maximum plasma bupivacaine levels were recorded between 45 and 60 min post CseA. Total plasma concentrations above a toxic threshold level of 4 microg.ml(-1) were recorded in 4% of patients and above 2.5 microg.ml(-1) in 10% of patients. Unbound bupivacaine levels were greater than a presumed toxic level of 0.25 microg.ml(-1) in 16% of cases and above 0.3 microg. ml(-1) in 14% of cases. A wide range of protein binding was measured (varying from 53.8-98.2%) and could not be correlated with standard indicators of local anaesthetic binding. Two neonates had brief apnoeas in the immediate perioperative phase but no adverse cardiac or central nervous system events attributable to the performance of Csea were demonstrated.

  10. Design and fabrication of a multi-electrode array for spinal cord epidural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Lo, Yi-Kai; Gad, Parag; Edgerton, Reggie; Liu, Wentai

    2014-01-01

    A detailed design, fabrication, characterization and test of a flexible multi-site platinum/polyimide based electrode array for electrical epidural stimulation in spinal cord prosthesis is described in this paper. Carefully designed 8.4 μm-thick structure fabrication flow achieves an electrode surface modification with 3.8 times enhanced effective surface area without extra process needed. Measured impedance and phase of two type of electrodes are 2.35±0.21 KΩ and 2.10±0.11 KΩ, -34.25±8.07° and -27.71±8.27° at 1K Hz, respectively. The fabricated arrays were then in-vitro tested by a multichannel neural stimulation system in physiological saline to validate the capability for electrical stimulation. The measured channel isolation on adjacent electrode is about -34dB. Randles cell model was used to investigate the charging waveforms, the model parameters were then extracted by various methods. The measured charge transfer resistance, double layer capacitance, and solution resistance are 1.9 KΩ, 220 nF and 15 KΩ, respectively. The results show that the fabricated array is applicable for electrical stimulation with well characterized parameters. Combined with a multichannel stimulator, this system provides a full solution for versatile neural stimulation applications. PMID:25571566

  11. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542

  12. A double-blind comparison between epidural morphine and epidural clonidine in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Glynn, C; Dawson, D; Sanders, R

    1988-08-01

    In a randomised double-blind study of 20 patients with chronic pain, epidural morphine 5 mg in 5 ml of saline was compared with epidural clonidine 150 micrograms in 5 ml of saline. Thirteen patients had a clinical and radiological diagnosis of arachnoiditis, 6 had low back pain and 1 had post-operative scar pain. There were 18 females and 2 males with an average age of 52 years, range 22-76 years. There was no difference found between the 2 solutions in the resultant analgesia measured by the visual analogue scale for pain, pain relief or the pain word score during the 3 h period of the study. No difference was found in the patient's mood which was also measured with the visual analogue scale. Two patients had no analgesia from either injection, 2 patients did not obtain any relief from clonidine and another 2 obtained no relief from morphine. Six patients reported that clonidine was better than morphine, 5 reported that morphine and clonidine were the same and 3 reported that morphine was better than clonidine. The duration of analgesia from the clonidine varied from 6 h to 1 month; the duration of analgesia from morphine varied from 6 to 24 h. Clonidine was associated with sedation and a fall in blood pressure of greater than 20 mm Hg in all patients, 1 patient required ephedrine to treat hypotension. Twelve patients had pruritus, 7 nausea and 2 vomiting following the morphine. Statistically there was no difference found between morphine and clonidine for short-term (3 h) analgesia in these patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Chronic prostatitis in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Wyndaele, J J

    1985-06-01

    Six spinal cord injury patients with chronic prostatitis were reviewed, all of whom had been treated with an indwelling Foley catheter during the phase of spinal shock. The 3 glass urine specimen test, the bladder wash-out test, a study of antibody coated bacteria and urethrography had limited diagnostic value. A specific diagnostic 5 glass specimen test proved to be useful and reliable. Longterm antibiotic treatment was successful in only one patient. Injection of antibiotics into the prostate gland was ineffective in the five patients in whom it was carried out. During a follow up from 1 to 5 years urological complications were rare in all five patients who remained infected.

  14. [Determination of spinal or epidural anesthetic level in patients who cannot communicate well--finger or magnifying glass].

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, H; Mizoguchi, K; Gotoh, Y

    1990-07-01

    Difficulty to determine level of spinal or epidural anesthesia troubles us in the patients who can not communicate well, for example in patients with hearing loss, depressed CNS with or without depressants and in slowly replying patients with various reasons. We know that one can determine spinal or epidural anesthetic level with stroking the skin with finger with which we can detect different touch sensation, feeling as anesthetized smooth and unanesthetized rough. We thought that different touch sensation is due to perspiration at unblocked skin area. If cause of difference of touch sensation was due to perspiration at unanesthetized area as we thought, perspiration may be visible on unblocked area. We found no perspiration but texture change on the anesthetized skin. We photographed the texture of the blocked skin, before and after spinal anesthesia. The skin texture after the block became shallow and widened. These texture changes give us different touch sensation, rough and scratched before and smooth after the block. We can easily differentiate the blocked from the unblocked skin area with finger or by magnifying glass by which the skin texture change is visible. PMID:2214129

  15. Prevention of postdural puncture headache after spinal anaesthesia for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. An assessment of prophylactic epidural blood patching.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, P; Bagley, G; Lim, M

    1989-01-01

    The prevention of postdural puncture headache after spinal anaesthesia for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was investigated by a controlled clinical trial which compared epidural injection of 10 ml of autologous blood with 10 ml of normal saline immediately after intrathecal injection of local anaesthetic. The incidence of postdural puncture headache was 8.3% in the group that received blood compared with 45% in the group that received saline, a significant reduction (p less than 0.01). The incidences of backache and lower limb paraesthesiae were similar in both groups. No serious complications were reported.

  16. Decoding of motor intentions from epidural ECoG recordings in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spüler, M.; Walter, A.; Ramos-Murguialday, A.; Naros, G.; Birbaumer, N.; Gharabaghi, A.; Rosenstiel, W.; Bogdan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recently, there have been several approaches to utilize a brain-computer interface (BCI) for rehabilitation with stroke patients or as an assistive device for the paralyzed. In this study we investigated whether up to seven different hand movement intentions can be decoded from epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) in chronic stroke patients. Approach. In a screening session we recorded epidural ECoG data over the ipsilesional motor cortex from four chronic stroke patients who had no residual hand movement. Data was analyzed offline using a support vector machine (SVM) to decode different movement intentions. Main results. We showed that up to seven hand movement intentions can be decoded with an average accuracy of 61% (chance level 15.6%). When reducing the number of classes, average accuracies up to 88% can be achieved for decoding three different movement intentions. Significance. The findings suggest that ipsilesional epidural ECoG can be used as a viable control signal for BCI-driven neuroprosthesis. Although patients showed no sign of residual hand movement, brain activity at the ipsilesional motor cortex still shows enough intention-related activity to decode different movement intentions with sufficient accuracy.

  17. How Effective Is a Virtual Consultation Process in Facilitating Multidisciplinary Decision-Making for Malignant Epidural Spinal Cord Compression?

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Wang, Lisa; Bezjak, Andrea; Fehlings, Michael G.; Fosker, Christopher; Rampersaud, Raja; Wong, Rebecca K.S.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a virtual consultation (VC) process in determining treatment strategy for patients with malignant epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods and Materials: A prospective clinical database was maintained for patients with MESCC. A virtual consultation process (involving exchange of key predetermined clinical information and diagnostic imaging) facilitated rapid decision-making between oncologists and spinal surgeons. Diagnostic imaging was reviewed retrospectively (by R.R.) for surgical opinions in all patients. The primary outcome was the accuracy of virtual consultation opinion in predicting the final treatment recommendation. Results: After excluding 20 patients who were referred directly to the spinal surgeon, 125 patients were eligible for virtual consultation. Of the 46 patients who had a VC, surgery was recommended in 28 patients and actually given to 23. A retrospective review revealed that 5/79 patients who did not have a VC would have been considered surgical candidates. The overall accuracy of the virtual consultation process was estimated at 92%. Conclusion: The VC process for MESCC patients provides a reliable means of arriving at a multidisciplinary opinion while minimizing patient transfer. This can potentially shorten treatment decision time and enhance clinical outcomes.

  18. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma management with minimally invasive surgery through tubular retractors: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chao-Feng; Zhuang, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Chun-Mei; Cai, Gang-Feng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhao, Wei; Ahmada, Said Idrissa; Devi, Ramparsad Doorga; Kibria, Md Golam

    2016-06-01

    To report a minimally invasive paraspinal approach in the treatment of a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). We additionally aim to review the relevant literature to enhance our knowledge of this disease. SSEH is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic disease. Currently, most appropriate management is emergence decompression laminectomy and hematoma evacuation. An 81-year-old woman was admitted to the neurology department with a chief complaint of bilateral numbness and weakness of the lower limbs and difficulty walking for 4 days with progressive weakness developed over the following 3 days accompanied with pain in the lower limbs and lower back. No history of trauma was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar spine demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from T-12 to L-5 with thecal sac and cauda equina displacement anterior. The patient was treated in our department with a minimally invasive approach. This operation method had been approved by Chinese Independent Ethics Committee. Three months following the operation, the patient had regained the ability to walk with the aid of a cane and myodynamia tests revealed normal results for the left lower limb and a 4/5 grade for the right limb. Importantly, no complications were exhibited from the surgical operation. The minimally invasive paraspinal approach through tubular retractors is demonstrated here as an effective alternative method for the treatment of SSEH. PMID:27367986

  19. [Prevention of headache from spinal anesthesia with the use of epidural cortisone].

    PubMed

    De Matteis, C; Pisana, G

    1991-04-01

    The Authors have analysed the etiopathogenetic factors of the post-dural puncture headache. To prevent this complication they have experimented an original method: in 74 patients they have injected 1.5 mg of betamethasone (diluted in physiological solution) into the epidural space after the anaesthetic infusion. They conclude supporting the validity of this method of prevention and its safety.

  20. Reduction of postoperative mortality and morbidity with epidural or spinal anaesthesia: results from overview of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Anthony; Walker, Natalie; Schug, S; McKee, A; Kehlet, H; van Zundert, A; Sage, D; Futter, M; Saville, G; Clark, T; MacMahon, S

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To obtain reliable estimates of the effects of neuraxial blockade with epidural or spinal anaesthesia on postoperative morbidity and mortality. Design Systematic review of all trials with randomisation to intraoperative neuraxial blockade or not. Studies 141 trials including 9559 patients for which data were available before 1 January 1997. Trials were eligible irrespective of their primary aims, concomitant use of general anaesthesia, publication status, or language. Trials were identified by extensive search methods, and substantial amounts of data were obtained or confirmed by correspondence with trialists. Main outcome measures All cause mortality, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, transfusion requirements, pneumonia, other infections, respiratory depression, and renal failure. Results Overall mortality was reduced by about a third in patients allocated to neuraxial blockade (103 deaths/4871 patients versus 144/4688 patients, odds ratio=0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.90, P=0.006). Neuraxial blockade reduced the odds of deep vein thrombosis by 44%, pulmonary embolism by 55%, transfusion requirements by 50%, pneumonia by 39%, and respiratory depression by 59% (all P<0.001). There were also reductions in myocardial infarction and renal failure. Although there was limited power to assess subgroup effects, the proportional reductions in mortality did not clearly differ by surgical group, type of blockade (epidural or spinal), or in those trials in which neuraxial blockade was combined with general anaesthesia compared with trials in which neuraxial blockade was used alone. Conclusions Neuraxial blockade reduces postoperative mortality and other serious complications. The size of some of these benefits remains uncertain, and further research is required to determine whether these effects are due solely to benefits of neuraxial blockade or partly to avoidance of general anaesthesia. Nevertheless, these findings

  1. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  2. Successful Spinal Cord Stimulator Trial and Permanent Implant in Patient with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy on Chronic Dual Antiplatelet Therapy.

    PubMed

    Covert, Brian P; Nobles, Ryan H

    2015-01-01

    The safety of neuraxial anesthetic techniques in the setting of oral and parenteral anticoagulation is an area of growing interest and clinical inquiry as the multitude of anticoagulant medications rapidly increases. Additionally, the indications for spinal cord stimulation therapy are evolving as both technique and technology in the field continue to advance. The estimated incidence of spinal hematoma following epidural injection has been estimated to be 1 in 150,000-200,000. However, there is very little data on the risk of indwelling spinal cord simulation leads and chronic use of anticoagulant medications. We would like to report a recent case for consideration in which a spinal cord stimulator trial was successful and led to permanent spinal cord stimulator implantation in a patient with diabetic peripheral neuropathy taking life-long aspirin and clopidogrel therapy secondary to extensive coronary and carotid atherosclerosis. The report serves as a novel case to encourage exploration into the topic of anticoagulation therapy with indwelling spinal cord stimulator leads. The case brings up a number of critical questions that cannot clearly be answered with the current literature and some interesting topics for discussion including the need for acute systemic anticoagulation in the future for vascular interventions and risk stratification for those patients selected for spinal cord stimulation. PMID:26431144

  3. Epidural analgesia in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Tan, T K

    1998-03-01

    An ideal analgesic for labour would preferably be non-invasive, as effective as spinals and epidurals without their attendant complications and is safe to mother and child and should not complicate the labour process. Analgesia for labouring women ranges from the use of opioid injections to invasive methods, chiefly epidural injections. Each has its advantages and drawbacks. This article provides a review of analgesic methods and techniques for labouring women. It focuses mainly on the role of epidurals, how it is utilised by anaesthetists and the differing methods of drug delivery through the epidural route. It discusses various concoctions of local anaesthetics and adjuvants used. The epidural route is probably the most effective and most commonly used invasive route for achieving analgesia during labour. Local anaesthetics of varying concentrations are administered as intermittent boluses or as a continuous infusion. Adjuvant drugs are able to enhance the quality and duration of the analgesia. Opioids including fentanyl and sufentanil, and clonidine are discussed. The use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia and combined spinal-epidural analgesia are reviewed. Ambulatory or mobile epidurals are increasingly popular. They are known to improve maternal satisfaction because of preservation of motor power. Ambulation may help with cervical dilatation and engagement, and abolition of backpain, among other advantages. This article describes the methods of establishing mobile epidurals and offers guidelines on safe ambulation and contraindications to its use. PMID:9663317

  4. Efficacy of Platelet Rich Plasma via Lumbar Epidural Route in Chronic Prolapsed Intervertebral Disc Patients-A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar radiculopathy is a major health problem often treated by surgery or guided lumbar epidural steroids for pain relief. We have used Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) a novel therapeutic tool of autologous nature that has emerged strongly in recent years to treat patients of prolapsed intervertebral disc. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of PRP via interlaminar epidural route in treatment of pain in patients with prolapsed inter vertebral disc. Materials and Methods Ten patients were injected with five ml of autologous platelet rich plasma under fluoroscopic guidance via interlaminar lumbar epidural injection into area of affected nerve root. They were followed using VAS (Visual Analogue Scale), SLRT (Straight Leg Raising Test) and MODQ (Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire) for clinical improvement. Results Patients who had received epidural injections of autologous PRP showed improvements in their scores of evaluation tools. Improvement was sustained during the 3 month study period and was not associated with any complications. Conclusion Autologous PRP can be considered as a good alternative to epidural steroids and surgery in management of patients with chronic prolapsed intervertebral disc. PMID:27790553

  5. Novel use of epidural catheter: Air injection for neuroprotection during radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, JR; Solanki, SL; Patil, VP; Divatia, JV

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign bone tumor, with a male-female ratio of approximately 2:1 and mainly affecting long bones. Ten percent of the lesions occur in the spine, mostly within the posterior elements. Treatment options for OO include surgical excision and percutaneous imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Lesions within the spine have an inherent risk of thermal damage to the vital structure because of proximity to the neural elements. We report a novel use of the epidural catheter for air injection for the neuroprotection of nerves close to the OO of the spine. A 12-year-old and 30 kg male child with an OO of the L3 vertebra was taken up for RFA. His preoperative examinations were within normal limits. The OO was very close to the L3 nerve root. Under general anesthesia, lumbar epidural catheter was placed in the L3-L4 space under imaging guidance. Ten ml of aliquots of air was injected under imaging guidance to avoid injury to the neural structures due to RFA. The air created a gap between neural elements and the tumor and served as an insulating material thereby protecting the neural elements from damage due to the RFA. Postoperatively, the patient did not develop any neurological deficit. PMID:27375396

  6. Can low dose spinal anesthesia combined with ultrasound guided bilateral ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve blocks avoid use of additional epidural catheter in high risk obstetric cases? Our experience from two cases.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, P; Sharma, P K; Date, R R; Mohammad, A K

    2013-01-01

    Critical obstetric cases associated with cardiac pathology may pose real challenge for anaesthesiologist during Caesarean section. Meticulous perioperative care and suitable selection of anaesthesia technique are the key to successful outcome. Single shot spinal anaesthesia is not used any more because of serious haemodynamic consequence. Progressive and controlled epidural local anaesthetic injection is mostly used in such cases. But recently combined spinal epidural anaesthesia and continuous spinal anaesthesia are suggested due to better precise control of haemodynamics and quicker onset. However, institution of such complex technique may require time which may not be feasible in emergency situations. Use of bilateral ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block along with low dose spinal anaesthesia may obviate the need of additional epidural catheter in such complicated cases. We hereby present our experience from two cases.

  7. Potential associations between chronic whiplash and incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew C.; Parrish, Todd B.; Hoggarth, Mark A.; McPherson, Jacob G.; Tysseling, Vicki M.; Wasielewski, Marie; Kim, Hyosub E.; Hornby, T. George; Elliott, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This research utilized a cross-sectional design with control group inclusion. Objectives Preliminary evidence suggests that a portion of the patient population with chronic whiplash may have sustained spinal cord damage. Our hypothesis is that in some cases of chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD), observed muscle weakness in the legs will be associated with local signs of a partial spinal cord injury of the cervical spine. Setting University based laboratory in Chicago, IL, USA. Methods Five participants with chronic WAD were compared with five gender/age/height/weight/body mass index (BMI) control participants. For a secondary investigation, the chronic WAD group was compared with five unmatched participants with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Spinal cord motor tract integrity was assessed using magnetization transfer imaging. Muscle fat infiltration (MFI) was quantified using fat/water separation magnetic resonance imaging. Central volitional muscle activation of the plantarflexors was assessed using a burst superimposition technique. Results We found reduced spinal cord motor tract integrity, increased MFI of the neck and lower extremity muscles and significantly impaired voluntary plantarflexor muscle activation in five participants with chronic WAD. The lower extremity structural changes and volitional weakness in chronic WAD were comparable to participants with iSCI. Conclusion The results support the position that a subset of the chronic whiplash population may have sustained partial damage to the spinal cord. Sponsorship NIH R01HD079076-01A1, NIH T32 HD057845 and the Foundation for Physical Therapy Promotion of Doctoral Studies program.

  8. Potential associations between chronic whiplash and incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew C.; Parrish, Todd B.; Hoggarth, Mark A.; McPherson, Jacob G.; Tysseling, Vicki M.; Wasielewski, Marie; Kim, Hyosub E.; Hornby, T. George; Elliott, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This research utilized a cross-sectional design with control group inclusion. Objectives Preliminary evidence suggests that a portion of the patient population with chronic whiplash may have sustained spinal cord damage. Our hypothesis is that in some cases of chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD), observed muscle weakness in the legs will be associated with local signs of a partial spinal cord injury of the cervical spine. Setting University based laboratory in Chicago, IL, USA. Methods Five participants with chronic WAD were compared with five gender/age/height/weight/body mass index (BMI) control participants. For a secondary investigation, the chronic WAD group was compared with five unmatched participants with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Spinal cord motor tract integrity was assessed using magnetization transfer imaging. Muscle fat infiltration (MFI) was quantified using fat/water separation magnetic resonance imaging. Central volitional muscle activation of the plantarflexors was assessed using a burst superimposition technique. Results We found reduced spinal cord motor tract integrity, increased MFI of the neck and lower extremity muscles and significantly impaired voluntary plantarflexor muscle activation in five participants with chronic WAD. The lower extremity structural changes and volitional weakness in chronic WAD were comparable to participants with iSCI. Conclusion The results support the position that a subset of the chronic whiplash population may have sustained partial damage to the spinal cord. Sponsorship NIH R01HD079076-01A1, NIH T32 HD057845 and the Foundation for Physical Therapy Promotion of Doctoral Studies program. PMID:27630770

  9. Prevention of hypotension induced by combined spinal epidural anesthesia using continuous infusion of vasopressin: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Shamshery, Chetna; Kannaujia, Ashish; Madabushi, Rajashree; Singh, Dinesh; Srivastava, Divya; Jafa, Shobhana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Central neuraxial blockade (CNB) is an established technique of providing anesthesia for surgeries of the lower limb and abdomen. Hypotension is the most common side effect of CNB. It was hypothesized that by supplementing the initial burst of vasopressin following hypovolemia, hypotension following combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) could be avoided. Materials and Methods: A total of 122 patients undergoing lower limb and abdomen surgeries were included in the study, with 61 patients randomized into two groups - I and II. Patients in Group I received infusion of normal saline as soon as CSEA was applied. When systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased to <90 mmHg, they received a 6 mg bolus of mephentermine to counteract hypotension. Patients in Group II received a continuous infusion of vasopressin as soon as CSEA was applied. If despite maximum dose of vasopressin, SBP dropped to < 90 mmHg, then intravenous mephentermine was administered to counteract hypotension. Hemodynamic parameters and side effects were noted. Results: Level of block attained in both groups was comparable in terms of dermatomal height. The mean SBP and mean arterial pressure values of Group I were significantly lower than in Group II in the initial 14 min. Diastolic BP was also significantly lower in Group I. Heart rate was found to be lower in Group II, especially after 30 min (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Maintaining plasma levels of the physiological burst of vasopressin helps to avoid hypotension following neuraxial blockade. Continuous infusion of vasopressin at 1–3 U/h can prevent hypotension following neuraxial blockade. PMID:27746553

  10. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  11. Recovery from Chronic Spinal Cord Contusion after Nogo Receptor Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Duffy, Philip; McGee, Aaron W.; Hasan, Omar; Gould, Grahame; Tu, Nathan; Harel, Noam Y.; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; Weinzimmer, David; Ropchan, Jim; Benowitz, Larry I.; Cafferty, William B. J.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Several interventions promote axonal growth and functional recovery when initiated shortly after CNS injury, including blockade of myelin-derived inhibitors with soluble Nogo Receptor (NgR1, RTN4R) ‘decoy’ protein. We examined the efficacy of this intervention in the much more prevalent and refractory condition of chronic spinal cord injury. Methods We eliminated the NgR1 pathway genetically in mice by conditional gene targeting starting 8 weeks after spinal hemisection injury and monitored locomotion in the open field and by video kinematics over the ensuing 4 months. In a separate pharmacological experiment, intrathecal NgR1 decoy protein administration was initiated 3 months after spinal cord contusion injury. Locomotion and raphespinal axon growth were assessed during 3 months of treatment between 4 and 6 months after contusion injury. Results Conditional deletion of NgR1 in the chronic state results in gradual improvement of motor function accompanied by increased density of raphespinal axons in the caudal spinal cord. In chronic rat spinal contusion, NgR1 decoy treatment from 4–6 months after injury results in 29% (10 of 35) of rats recovering weight-bearing status compared to 0% (0 of 29) of control rats (P<0.05). Open field BBB locomotor scores showed a significant improvement in the NgR-treated group relative to the control group (P<0.005, repeated measures ANOVA). An increase in raphespinal axon density caudal to the injury is detected in NgR1-decoy-treated animals by immunohistology and by positron emission tomography using a serotonin reuptake ligand. Interpretation Antagonizing myelin-derived inhibitors signaling with NgR1 decoy augments recovery from chronic spinal cord injury. PMID:22162062

  12. Comparison of the efficacy of saline, local anesthetics, and steroids in epidural and facet joint injections for the management of spinal pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Nampiaparampil, Devi E.; Manchikanti, Kavita N.; Falco, Frank J.E.; Singh, Vijay; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Kaye, Alan D.; Sehgal, Nalini; Soin, Amol; Simopoulos, Thomas T.; Bakshi, Sanjay; Gharibo, Christopher G.; Gilligan, Christopher J.; Hirsch, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of epidural and facet joint injections has been assessed utilizing multiple solutions including saline, local anesthetic, steroids, and others. The responses to these various solutions have been variable and have not been systematically assessed with long-term follow-ups. Methods: Randomized trials utilizing a true active control design were included. The primary outcome measure was pain relief and the secondary outcome measure was functional improvement. The quality of each individual article was assessed by Cochrane review criteria, as well as the criteria developed by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) for assessing interventional techniques. An evidence analysis was conducted based on the qualitative level of evidence (Level I to IV). Results: A total of 31 trials met the inclusion criteria. There was Level I evidence that local anesthetic with steroids was effective in managing chronic spinal pain based on multiple high-quality randomized controlled trials. The evidence also showed that local anesthetic with steroids and local anesthetic alone were equally effective except in disc herniation, where the superiority of local anesthetic with steroids was demonstrated over local anesthetic alone. Conclusion: This systematic review showed equal efficacy for local anesthetic with steroids and local anesthetic alone in multiple spinal conditions except for disc herniation where the superiority of local anesthetic with steroids was seen over local anesthetic alone. PMID:26005584

  13. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka; Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore; Sturdza, Alina; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful factors

  14. Chronic generalized spinal muscular atrophy of infancy and childhood

    PubMed Central

    Pearn, J. H.; Wilson, J.

    1973-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the acute fatal form of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease or spinal muscular atrophy Type I) is a distinct genetic and clinical entity. This has prompted clinical re-examination of the disease known as `arrested Werdnig-Hoffmann disease' which hitherto was thought to be a spectrum variant of the acute fatal form. A total of 18 such patients with the chronic generalized form of spinal muscular atrophy has been known to The Hospital for Sick Children over the past 10 years. Patients with this characteristic clinical syndrome comprise approximately one-fifth of children with chronic spinal muscular atrophy. Clinically, no patient was even able to crawl normally or progress further with motor milestones. Median age of clinical onset is 6 months of age, and life expectancy ranges from 2 years to the third decade. Inevitable spinal and joint deformities occur by the second decade of life. Management should be based on vigorous antibiotic therapy, orthopaedic and neurological surveillance, and a carefully planned educational programme aimed at realistic employment in late adolescence. ImagesFIG. 4p772-b PMID:4749680

  15. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans. PMID:3953294

  16. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans.

  17. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  18. [Spinal cord stimulation for the management of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Perruchoud, Christophe; Mariotti, Nicolas

    2016-06-22

    Neuromodulation techniques modify the activity of the central or peripheral nervous system. Spinal cord stimulation is a reversible and minimally invasive treatment whose efficacy and cost effectiveness are recognized for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain or ischemic pain. Spinal cord stimulation is not the option of last resort and should be considered among other options before prescribing long-term opioids or considering reoperation. The selection and regular follow-up of patients are crucial to the success of the therapy. PMID:27506068

  19. [ENMG-assessment of efficiency of temporal epidural electroneurostimulation in combined with robotic kinesotherapy in the treatment of patients with spinal cord injury consequences].

    PubMed

    Shein, A P; Krivoruchko, G A; Prudnikova, O G

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to ENMG-assess effectiveness of the short combined neurorehabilitation course (temporal epidural stimulation of the spinal cord combined with a robotic kinesotherapy) in the restorative treatment of patients with traumatic spinal cord disease. Before and after completion of the combined instrumental neurorehabilitation (course duration--2-3 weeks) were tested 75 patients with spinal cord injury consequences. The authors used global and stimulation (H-reflex, M-response) electromyography methods. On the ENMG-data basis were calculated indices of sensorimotor deficit (ISD) and their postrehabilitation trends. ENMG-signs of sensorimotor deficit regression in the lower extremities were observed in 46.6% of events, in the upper extremities (if damaged cervical spine)--in 78.6% of events. The stabilizing effect of the used neurorehabilitation technology was identified an average of 24.0% of events. In 18.8% of events, the using of the combined neurorehabilitation technology has been ineffective. As indications for the use of combined neurorehabilitation courses series may be employed ENMG-signs of the partial corticospinal tracts conduction safety and a positive ISD trend after the each course completion.

  20. Neurocontrol of Movement in Humans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, Milan R; Danner, Simon M; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    In this review of neurocontrol of movement after spinal cord injury, we discuss neurophysiological evidences of conducting and processing mechanisms of the spinal cord. We illustrate that external afferent inputs to the spinal cord below the level of the lesion can modify, initiate, and maintain execution of movement in absence or partial presence of brain motor control after chronic spinal cord injury. We review significant differences between spinal reflex activity elicited by single and repetitive stimulation. The spinal cord can respond with sensitization, habituation, and dis-habituation to regular repetitive stimulation. Therefore, repetitive spinal cord reflex activity can contribute to the functional configuration of the spinal network. Moreover, testing spinal reflex activity in individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury provided evidences for subclinical residual brain influence, suggesting the existence of axons traversing the injury site and influencing the activities below the level of lesion. Thus, there are two motor control models of chronic spinal cord injury in humans: "discomplete" and "reduced and altered volitional motor control." We outline accomplishments in modification and initiation of altered neurocontrol in chronic spinal cord injury people with epidural and functional electrical stimulation. By nonpatterned electrical stimulation of lumbar posterior roots, it is possible to evoke bilateral extension as well as rhythmic motor outputs. Epidural stimulation during treadmill stepping shows increased and/or modified motor activity. Finally, volitional efforts can alter epidurally induced rhythmic activities in incomplete spinal cord injury. Overall, we highlight that upper motor neuron paralysis does not entail complete absence of connectivity between cortex, brain stem, and spinal motor cells, but there can be altered anatomy and corresponding neurophysiological characteristics. With specific input to the spinal cord below the level

  1. [Treatment of Non-Traumatic Spinal Epidural Hematoma:A Report of Five Cases and a Systematic Review of the Literature].

    PubMed

    Terada, Yukinori; Toda, Hiroki; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Yamamoto, Yu; Nagai, Yasunori; Yoshimoto, Naoya; Goto, Masanori; Nishida, Namiko; Iwasaki, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    Objective:Non-traumatic spinal epidural hematoma(SEH)is relatively rare. We report five cases of SEH, review the relevant literature, and discuss the current treatment strategies for non-traumatic SEH in Japan. Methods:Clinical data of cases with non-traumatic SEH treated at our institute from 2008 to 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, we identified the relevant literature using the Japan Medical Abstracts Society databases for peer-reviewed articles published from Jan 1, 1995 to Aug 31, 2015. The search terms "spinal", "epidural hematoma", and "non-traumatic OR spontaneous" were used. Treatment strategies were summarized according to the treatment criteria. Results:Five patients(1 man and 4 women;age, 59-86 years;mean age, 74 years)were treated for SEH. Hematomas were located in the cervical(n=1), cervicothoracic(n=2), thoracic(n=1), and thoracolumbar(n=1)regions. All patients suffered sudden neck and/or back pain followed by subsequent neurological deterioration. Four patients were under antithrombotic treatment, and underwent laminectomy and drainage of the hematoma due to severe and progressive neurological deficits. All patients demonstrated significant neurological recovery. Seventy-seven articles from domestic institutes and hospitals were identified. Their criteria for conservative and surgical treatments differed based on the time from the onset and severity. Conclusion:Five cases of non-traumatic SEH were treated successfully. Patients with moderate to severe neurological deficit need timely surgical management, while non-surgical treatment may be indicated in mild deficits. To standardize the optimal treatment for non-traumatic SEH, an appropriate assessment system incorporating the time from onset and severity of neurological impairment should be established. PMID:27506844

  2. Altering spinal cord excitability enables voluntary movements after chronic complete paralysis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Claudia A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that one individual who had a motor complete, but sensory incomplete spinal cord injury regained voluntary movement after 7 months of epidural stimulation and stand training. We presumed that the residual sensory pathways were critical in this recovery. However, we now report in three more individuals voluntary movement occurred with epidural stimulation immediately after implant even in two who were diagnosed with a motor and sensory complete lesion. We demonstrate that neuromodulating the spinal circuitry with epidural stimulation, enables completely paralysed individuals to process conceptual, auditory and visual input to regain relatively fine voluntary control of paralysed muscles. We show that neuromodulation of the sub-threshold motor state of excitability of the lumbosacral spinal networks was the key to recovery of intentional movement in four of four individuals diagnosed as having complete paralysis of the legs. We have uncovered a fundamentally new intervention strategy that can dramatically affect recovery of voluntary movement in individuals with complete paralysis even years after injury. PMID:24713270

  3. Epidural angiomatous meningioma of the thoracic spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, TAO; WU, LIANG; YANG, CHENLONG; XU, YULUN

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural angiomatous meningiomas (AMs) are extremely rare lesions. Here, we report on a case of an epidural AM of the thoracic spine with chronic but severe cord compression. The patient underwent a T6-T8 laminectomy through the posterior approach. En bloc resection was achieved, and histopathological examination demonstrated an AM. Delayed paraplegia occurred 4 h postoperatively. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone, hyperbaric oxygen and rehabilitation. Gradually, over the next six months, the bilateral leg strength was improved compared with the preoperative status, and no tumor recurrence was noted. Although epidural AM is extremely rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. A definitive diagnosis is difficult based on magnetic resonance imaging alone due to the nonspecific characteristics of the tumor. Since AM is a histologically benign and highly vascularized tumor, timely gross total resection (GTR) is the most effective treatment. A good clinical outcome may be expected following GTR (Simpson grade I and II resection). PMID:26870233

  4. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  5. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression, autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Jan M; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G

    2014-08-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the "immune privileged/specialized" milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of "SCI disease" and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because inflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, "compartimentalized" investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS are influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is 'hardwired' into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the context of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and "neurogenic" spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired "host-defense" and trauma-induced autoimmunity. PMID:25017893

  6. A thin film polyimide mesh microelectrode for chronic epidural electrocorticography recording with enhanced contactability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Jeyeon; Byeon, Hang jin; Choi, Hoseok; Kim, In Young; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Jungho Pak, James; Jang, Dong Pyo; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) activity may be more reliable and stable than single-unit-activity or local field potential. Invasive brain computer interface (BCI) devices are limited by mechanical mismatching and cellular reactive responses due to differences in the elastic modulus and the motion of stiff electrodes. We propose a mesh-shaped electrode to enhance the contactability between surface of dura and electrode. Approach. We designed a polyimide (PI) electrode with a mesh pattern for more conformal contact with a curved surface. We compared the contact capability of mesh PI electrodes with conventionally used sheet PI electrode. The electrical properties of the mesh PI electrode were evaluated for four weeks. We recorded the epidural ECoG (eECoG) activity on the surface of rhesus monkey brains while they performed a saccadic task for four months. Main results. The mesh PI electrode showed good contact with the agarose brain surface, as evaluated by visual inspection and signal measurement. It was about 87% accurate in predicting the direction of saccade eye movement. Significance. Our results indicate that the mesh PI electrode was flexible and good contact on the curved surface and can record eECoG activity maintaining close contact to dura, which was proved by in vivo and in vitro test.

  7. Thoracic epidural analgesia for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Sharma, Munish; Arora, Reetesh; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are well documented. However, the literature available on the role of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery is scarce. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to establish whether HTEA is beneficial in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing elective OPCAB surgery. After institutional ethics board approval and informed consent, 62 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing elective OPCAB were randomly grouped into two (n = 31 each). Both groups received general anesthesia (GA), but in the HTEA group patients, TEA was also administered. Standardized surgical and anesthetic techniques were used for both the groups. Pulmonary function tests were performed pre-operatively, 6 h and 24 h post-extubation and on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 along with arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) analysis. Time for extubation (h) and time for oxygen withdrawal (h) were recorded. Pain score was assessed by the 10-cm visual analogue scale. All hemodynamic/oxygenation parameters were noted. Any complications related to the TEA were also recorded. Patients in the HTEA group were extubated earlier (10.8 h vs. 13.5 h, P < 0.01) and their oxygen withdrawal time was also significantly lower (26.26 h vs. 29.87 h, P < 0.01). The VAS score, both at rest and on coughing, was significantly lower in the HTEA group at all times, post-operatively (P < 0.01). The forced vital capacity improved significantly at 6 h post-operatively in the HTEA group (P = 0.026) and remained significantly higher thereafter. A similar trend was observed in forced expiratory volume in the first second on day 2 in the HTEA group (P = 0.024). We did not observe any significant side-effects/mortality in either group. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing

  8. Thoracic epidural analgesia for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Sharma, Munish; Arora, Reetesh; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are well documented. However, the literature available on the role of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery is scarce. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to establish whether HTEA is beneficial in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing elective OPCAB surgery. After institutional ethics board approval and informed consent, 62 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing elective OPCAB were randomly grouped into two (n = 31 each). Both groups received general anesthesia (GA), but in the HTEA group patients, TEA was also administered. Standardized surgical and anesthetic techniques were used for both the groups. Pulmonary function tests were performed pre-operatively, 6 h and 24 h post-extubation and on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 along with arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) analysis. Time for extubation (h) and time for oxygen withdrawal (h) were recorded. Pain score was assessed by the 10-cm visual analogue scale. All hemodynamic/oxygenation parameters were noted. Any complications related to the TEA were also recorded. Patients in the HTEA group were extubated earlier (10.8 h vs. 13.5 h, P < 0.01) and their oxygen withdrawal time was also significantly lower (26.26 h vs. 29.87 h, P < 0.01). The VAS score, both at rest and on coughing, was significantly lower in the HTEA group at all times, post-operatively (P < 0.01). The forced vital capacity improved significantly at 6 h post-operatively in the HTEA group (P = 0.026) and remained significantly higher thereafter. A similar trend was observed in forced expiratory volume in the first second on day 2 in the HTEA group (P = 0.024). We did not observe any significant side-effects/mortality in either group. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing

  9. Myoclonus-like involuntary movements following cesarean delivery epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Yong; Lee, Sang Wook; Hong, Eun Pyo; Sim, Yeo Hae; Lee, Su-Mi; Park, Sung Wook; Kang, Jong-Man

    2016-11-01

    Spinal myoclonus following neuraxial anesthesia is rare. This report describes a case of myoclonus-like involuntary movement that occurred during the recovery from epidural anesthesia for a cesarean delivery. The patient's symptom improved with the administration of benzodiazepine, and the patient recovered with no neurological sequelae. In conclusion, epidural anesthesia can cause spinal myoclonus, which can be treated with a benzodiazepine. PMID:27687419

  10. Development and characteristics of airstepping in chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, C A; Smith, J L

    1985-05-01

    Airstepping, walking-like movements of the hindlimbs, is a commonly observed behavior in chronic spinal animals when they are held vertically. The purpose of this study was to: describe the development of airstepping after spinalization and compare it to the onset of segmental reflexes, characterize the EMG pattern of muscle activity during spontaneous airstepping, and examine the effects of sensory perturbation on the characteristic pattern. Airstepping was analyzed during three conditions of tonic sensory perturbation which included: tail pinching, tape applied to one hindpaw, and immobilization of the ankle and knee in a plaster cast. Seven adult cats were spinalized at T-12, and bipolar electrode wires were surgically implanted in selected hindlimb muscles at the hip, knee, and ankle. Testing began within 48 hr of transection. Segmental reflexes and paw-shake responses were present in the first week; however, the earliest observed airstepping occurred during tail pinching at 2 weeks after surgery, and the average onset of spontaneous airstepping (without exteroceptive stimuli) was at 33 days. The average cycle period of spontaneous airstepping (691 msec) was comparable to the shortest periods reported for fictive rhythms and to treadmill walking between 1 and 2 m/sec. Intralimb coordination was characterized by flexor and extensor synergies typical of locomotion, while interlimb coordination was characterized by alternating cycles similar to that reported for treadmill walking and fictive locomotion. Neither intralimb nor interlimb patterns of coordination were altered by conditions of sensory perturbation, although cycle period and EMG recruitment level were variable. Many characteristics of airstepping are similar to those of treadmill and fictive locomotion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Gene expression in term placentas is regulated more by spinal or epidural anesthesia than by late-onset preeclampsia or gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lekva, Tove; Lyle, Robert; Roland, Marie Cecilie Paasche; Friis, Camilla; Bianchi, Diana W.; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Norwitz, Errol R.; Bollerslev, Jens; Henriksen, Tore; Ueland, Thor

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are common complications of pregnancy, but the mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unclear. The aim was to identify the extent of altered gene expression in term placentas from pregnant women with late-onset PE and GDM compared to controls. RNAseq identified few significantly differentially regulated genes in placental biopsies between PE, GDM, or uncomplicated pregnancy (n = 10 each group). Five genes were altered in placentas from PE including 4 non-coding genes and Angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2). No genes were significantly regulated by GDM. In contrast, many genes were significantly regulated by fetal, maternal and delivery-specific variables, particularly spinal and epidural anesthesia. We selected ANGPT2 and Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 14 (CXCL14) to test with qPCR in a larger set of placentas (n = 475) and found no differences between the groups. However, regression analysis revealed a stronger association between placental ANGPT2 and CXCL14 mRNA expression and fetal, maternal and delivery-specific variables than diagnostic group. To conclude, the gene expression in term placentas are highly affected by fetal, maternal and delivery specific variables. Few regulated genes were found in late-onset PE and GDM placentas, which may suggest that these conditions could be more affected by maternal factors. PMID:27405415

  12. Effects of ozone applied by spinal endoscopy in patients with chronic pain related to failed back surgery syndrome: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    de Nêuton, Francisco; Magalhães, Oliveira; Soares, Sandra Correia; Torres, Jaqueline Melo; Ungaretti, Arthur; Cacciacarro, Mariana Fillipi; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last two decades, ozone has emerged as a treatment for low back pain, applied by means of minimally invasive techniques. Objective The aim of this study is to assess the effect and safety of ozone therapy applied in the epidural space for chronic pain related to failed back surgery syndrome. Methods The investigators studied 13 sequential patients of both sexes, between 18 and 70 years old, with persistent chronic pain (more than six months) in the lumbar region and in the lower limbs related to failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Pain was classified as neuropathic and non-neuropathic regarding the topography (lumbar and lower limb), based on the DN4 (Douleur Neuropathique 4) questionnaire. The patients received the ozone gas in the lumbar epidural space via spinal-sacral endoscopy. Clinical evaluation was performed before, immediately after (24 hours), and 1, 3, and 6 months after intervention with visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results Overall, the patients had 43.7% reduction of lumbar pain, 60.9% reduction in leg pain in six months followed by 44.0% of improvement in ODI. The reduction of pain and in the disability index was markedly greater in patients with non-neuropathic predominant pain, 95.2%, 80.6%, and 75.3% improvement in lumbar, leg pain, and ODI respectively, while neuropathic predominant pain patients experienced only 12.5%, 42.4%, and 20.9% improvement, also respectively. No neurological or infectious complications were observed acutely or during the follow-up. The present data suggests that epidural ozone might be a therapeutic option for persistent low back pain, especially in non-neuropathic predominant pain patients, but double-blind controlled studies are still required to prove its efficacy. PMID:24259984

  13. Targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) through a single catheter access site for treatment of a cerebral spinal fluid leak causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S; Chaudhary, Neeraj

    2015-06-02

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) usually occurs in the setting of a spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak. We report the first description of a case of SIH caused by a CSF leak which improved after a targeted epidural patch with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA) at the right T1-T2 level. An 81-year-old woman presented with an orthostatic headache for 6 days. MRI of the brain with contrast demonstrated low lying cerebellar tonsils, an engorged transverse sinus flow void, bifrontal small subdural fluid collections, and diffuse dural enhancement. CT myelography showed extravasation of intrathecal contrast at the right T1-T2 level. A targeted epidural patch was performed by injection of n-BCA through a catheter at the right T1-T2 level. After treatment, the patient's symptoms immediately improved and she was without a headache at 1-year follow-up.

  14. Analysis of Efficacy Differences between Caudal and Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in Chronic Lumbar Axial Discogenic Pain: Local Anesthetic Alone vs. Local Combined with Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Boswell, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Comparative assessment of randomized controlled trials of caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in chronic lumbar discogenic pain. Objective: To assess the comparative efficacy of caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches of epidural injections in managing axial or discogenic low back pain. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections are commonly performed utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach to treat chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain, which is pain exclusive of that associated with a herniated intervertebral disc, or that is due to degeneration of the zygapophyseal joints, or due to dysfunction of the sacroiliac joints, respectively. The literature on the efficacy of epidural injections in managing chronic axial lumbar pain of presumed discogenic origin is limited. Methods: The present analysis is based on 2 randomized controlled trials of chronic axial low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain, utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach, with a total of 240 patients studied, and a 24-month follow-up. Patients were assigned to receive either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic with a steroid in each 60 patient group. Results: The primary outcome measure was significant improvement, defined as pain relief and functional status improvement of at least 50% from baseline, which was reported at 24-month follow-ups in 72% who received local anesthetic only with a lumbar interlaminar approach and 54% who received local anesthetic only with a caudal approach. In patients receiving local anesthetic with a steroid, the response rate was 67% for those who had a lumbar interlaminar approach and 68% for those who had a caudal approach at 12 months. The response was significantly better in the lumbar interlaminar group who received local anesthetic only, 77% versus 56% at 12 months and 72% versus 54% at 24 months. Conclusion: This assessment shows that in patients

  15. Transplantation of neural progenitor cells in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y; Bouyer, J; Shumsky, J S; Haas, C; Fischer, I

    2016-04-21

    Previous studies demonstrated that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) transplanted into a subacute contusion injury improve motor, sensory, and bladder function. In this study we tested whether transplanted NPCs can also improve functional recovery after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) alone or in combination with the reduction of glial scar and neurotrophic support. Adult rats received a T10 moderate contusion. Thirteen weeks after the injury they were divided into four groups and received either: 1. Medium (control), 2. NPC transplants, 3. NPC+lentivirus vector expressing chondroitinase, or 4. NPC+lentivirus vectors expressing chondroitinase and neurotrophic factors. During the 8 weeks post-transplantation the animals were tested for functional recovery and eventually analyzed by anatomical and immunohistochemical assays. The behavioral tests for motor and sensory function were performed before and after injury, and weekly after transplantation, with some animals also tested for bladder function at the end of the experiment. Transplant survival in the chronic injury model was variable and showed NPCs at the injury site in 60% of the animals in all transplantation groups. The NPC transplants comprised less than 40% of the injury site, without significant anatomical or histological differences among the groups. All groups also showed similar patterns of functional deficits and recovery in the 12 weeks after injury and in the 8 weeks after transplantation using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating score, the grid test, and the Von Frey test for mechanical allodynia. A notable exception was group 4 (NPC together with chondroitinase and neurotrophins), which showed a significant improvement in bladder function. This study underscores the therapeutic challenges facing transplantation strategies in a chronic SCI in which even the inclusion of treatments designed to reduce scarring and increase neurotrophic support produce only modest functional improvements. Further

  16. Contralateral acute epidural haematoma following evacuation of a chronic subdural haematoma with burr-hole craniostomy and continuous closed system drainage: a rare complication.

    PubMed

    Panourias, Ioannis G; Skandalakis, Panajiotis N

    2006-06-01

    Chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is one of the most frequent causes for neurosurgical intervention. Although the prognosis is generally good and treatment modalities are well established, some devastating intracranial haematomas can complicate its evacuation. The authors report here a case of an acute epidural haematoma occurring after evacuation of a contralateral chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) with burr-hole craniostomy and continuous closed system drainage without irrigation. Since this is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication, clinicians should suspect its occurrence when an unexpected postoperative course is demonstrated.

  17. A review of spinal cord stimulation systems for chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Verrills, Paul; Sinclair, Chantelle; Barnard, Adele

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applications and technologies are fast advancing. New SCS technologies are being used increasingly in the clinical environment, but often there is a lag period between the clinical application and the publishing of high-quality evidence on safety and efficacy. Recent developments will undoubtedly expand the applicability of SCS, allowing more effective and individualized treatment for patients, and may have the potential to salvage patients who have previously failed neuromodulation. Already, high-level evidence exists for the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness (Level I–II) of traditional SCS therapies in the treatment of chronic refractory low back with predominant limb pain (regardless of surgical history). More than half of all patients with chronic painful conditions experience sustained and significant levels of pain reduction following SCS treatment. Although only limited evidence exists for burst stimulation, there is now Level I evidence for both dorsal root ganglion SCS and high-frequency SCS that demonstrates compelling results compared with traditional therapies. The body of evidence built on traditional SCS research may be redundant, with newer iterations of SCS therapies such as dorsal root ganglion SCS, high-frequency SCS, and burst SCS. A number of variables have been identified that can affect SCS efficacy: implanter experience, appropriate patient selection, etiologies of patient pain, existence of comorbidities, including psychiatric illness, smoking status, and delay to SCS implant following pain onset. Overall, scientific literature demonstrates SCS to be a safe, effective, and drug-free treatment option for many chronic pain etiologies. PMID:27445503

  18. Role of Epidural Injections to Prevent Surgical Intervention in Patients with Chronic Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the different types of epidural injections (EI) to prevent surgical intervention in patients suffering from chronic sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Material and Methods: Studies were identified by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to retrieve all available relevant articles. Lists of references of several systematic reviews were also used for scanning further references. Publications from the past ten years (2006-2016) were considered, and all studies selected were in the English language only. The studies employed specified the use of EI to treat sciatica caused by LDH. A total of 19 papers meeting the eligibility criteria (mentioned below) were included in this study. The pain scores, functional disability scores, and surgical rates from these studies were considered, and meta-analysis was performed. Outcome measures: Pain scores, functional disability scores, and surgical rates were assessed from the included studies. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) have been the most commonly used baseline scales for pain evaluation followed by the Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS) and Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA). The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) scales were used for the functional disability scoring system in the literature. Results: Significant improvement in the pain scores and functional disability scores were observed. Additionally, greater than 80% of the patients suffering from chronic sciatica caused by LDH could successfully prevent surgical intervention after EI treatment with or without steroids. Conclusion: The management of sciatica with EI treatment results in significant improvements in the pain score, functional disability score, and surgical rate. We concluded that EI provides new hope to prevent surgical intervention in patients suffering from sciatica caused by LDH.

  19. Role of Epidural Injections to Prevent Surgical Intervention in Patients with Chronic Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the different types of epidural injections (EI) to prevent surgical intervention in patients suffering from chronic sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Material and Methods: Studies were identified by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to retrieve all available relevant articles. Lists of references of several systematic reviews were also used for scanning further references. Publications from the past ten years (2006-2016) were considered, and all studies selected were in the English language only. The studies employed specified the use of EI to treat sciatica caused by LDH. A total of 19 papers meeting the eligibility criteria (mentioned below) were included in this study. The pain scores, functional disability scores, and surgical rates from these studies were considered, and meta-analysis was performed. Outcome measures: Pain scores, functional disability scores, and surgical rates were assessed from the included studies. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) have been the most commonly used baseline scales for pain evaluation followed by the Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS) and Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA). The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) scales were used for the functional disability scoring system in the literature. Results: Significant improvement in the pain scores and functional disability scores were observed. Additionally, greater than 80% of the patients suffering from chronic sciatica caused by LDH could successfully prevent surgical intervention after EI treatment with or without steroids. Conclusion: The management of sciatica with EI treatment results in significant improvements in the pain score, functional disability score, and surgical rate. We concluded that EI provides new hope to prevent surgical intervention in patients suffering from sciatica caused by LDH. PMID

  20. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  1. The relationship between the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of spinal opioids. Minireview based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, S

    1988-01-01

    Spinal opioids have been used clinically since the late seventies to treat acute, traumatic, obstetric and chronic pain. In this article the influence of the pharmacokinetics on the dynamics of intrathecal and epidural opioid administration are discussed with reference to current knowledge. PMID:2905092

  2. Ultrasound versus fluoroscopy-guided caudal epidural steroid injection for the treatment of chronic low back pain with radiculopathy: A randomised, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Arindam Kumar; Bhattacharya, Dipasri; Mukherjee, Sayantan; Ghosh, Santanu; Mitra, Manasij; Mandal, Mohanchandra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural steroid administration is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain (LBP). Fluoroscopy guidance is the gold standard for pain procedures. Ultrasound guidance is recently being used in pain clinic procedures. We compared the fluoroscopy guidance and ultrasound guidance for caudal epidural steroid injection with respect to the time needed for correct placement of the needle and clinical effectiveness in patients with chronic LBP. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic LBP with radiculopathy, not responding to conventional medical management, were randomly allocated to receive injection depot methyl prednisolone (40 mg) through caudal route either using ultrasound guidance (Group U, n = 25) or fluoroscopy guidance (Group F, n = 25). Pre-procedural visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were noted. During the procedure, the time needed for correct placement of needle was observed. Adverse events, if any, were also noted. All patients were followed up for next 2 months to evaluate Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and ODI at the 2nd week and again at the end of 1st and 2nd month. Results: The needle-placement time was less using ultrasound guidance as compared to fluoroscopy guidance (119 ± 7.66 vs. 222.28 ± 29.65 s, respectively, P < 0.001). Significant reduction in VAS score and ODI (clinical improvement) was noted in the follow-up time points and comparable between the groups at all time points. Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance can be a safe alternative tool for achieving faster needle placement in caudal epidural space. Clinical effectiveness (reduction of VAS and ODI scores) remains comparable between both the techniques. PMID:27330199

  3. Long-term potentiation in spinal nociceptive systems--how acute pain may become chronic.

    PubMed

    Rygh, Lars Jørgen; Svendsen, Frode; Fiskå, Atle; Haugan, Frøydis; Hole, Kjell; Tjølsen, Arne

    2005-11-01

    Chronic pain is a major problem since it is difficult to treat and the understanding of the underlying neurobiology is sparse. The mechanisms underpinning the transition of acute into chronic pain remain unclear. However, long-term potentiation (LTP) in spinal nociceptive systems may be one such mechanism. Here, we briefly review the literature regarding LTP in spinal nociceptive systems including our own data on LTP in deep convergent nociceptive neurons. Furthermore, we discuss the role of this phenomenon in understanding the neurobiology of chronic pain and the possible therapeutic implications.

  4. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  5. Are there a guidelines for implantable spinal cord stimulator therapy in patients using chronic anticoagulation therapy? - A review of decision-making in the high-risk patient

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-01-01

    evidence of SCS therapy among patients with chronic anticoagulation. This case illustrated a complicated clinical case scenario wherein a percutaneous SCS implantation would normally be contraindicated due to severe thoracic spinal stenosis and chronic anticoagulation which could lead to possible paralysis or even a lethal consequences associated with the possible formation of a thoracic epidural hematoma. PMID:27127698

  6. Neuromodulation of the lumbar spinal locomotor circuit.

    PubMed

    AuYong, Nicholas; Lu, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    The lumbar spinal cord contains the necessary circuitry to independently drive locomotor behaviors. This function is retained following spinal cord injury (SCI) and is amenable to rehabilitation. Although the effectiveness of task-specific training and pharmacologic modulation has been repeatedly demonstrated in animal studies, results from human studies are less striking. Recently, lumbar epidural stimulation (EDS) along with locomotor training was shown to restore weight-bearing function and lower-extremity voluntary control in a chronic, motor-complete human SCI subject. Related animal studies incorporating EDS as part of the therapeutic regiment are also encouraging. EDS is emerging as a promising neuromodulatory tool for SCI. PMID:24262896

  7. Correlation between Epidurographic Contrast Flow Patterns and Clinical Effectiveness in Chronic Lumbar Discogenic Radicular Pain Treated with Epidural Steroid Injections Via Different Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saru; Kaur, Sukhdeep; Singh, Kulvinder; Aujla, Kuljeet

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural steroid injections are an accepted procedure for the conservative management of chronic backache caused by lumbar disc pathology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the epidurographic findings for the midline, transforaminal and parasagittal approaches in lumbar epidural steroid injections, and correlating them with the clinical improvement. Methods Sixty chronic lower back pain patients with unilateral radiculitis from a herniated/degenerated disc were enrolled. After screening the patients according to the exclusion criteria and randomly allocating them to 3 groups of 20 patients, fluoroscopic contrast enhanced epidural steroids were injected via midline (group 1), transforaminal (group 2) and parasagittal interlaminar (group 3) approaches at the level of the pathology. The fluoroscopic patterns of the three groups were studied and correlated with the clinical improvement measured by the VAS over the next 3 months; any incidences of complications were recorded. Results The transforaminal group presented better results in terms of VAS reduction than the midline and parasagittal approach groups (P < 0.05). The epidurography showed a better ventral spread for both the transforaminal (P < 0.001) and the paramedian approaches (P < 0.05), as compared to the midline approach. The nerve root filling was greater in the transforaminal group (P < 0.001) than in the other two groups. The ventral spread of the contrast agent was associated with improvement in the VAS score and this difference was statistically significant in group 1 (P < 0.05), and highly significant in groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001). In all the groups, any complications observed were transient and minor. Conclusions The midline and paramedian approaches are technically easier and statistically comparable, but clinically less efficacious than the transforaminal approach. The incidence of ventral spread and nerve root delineation show a definite correlation with clinical improvement

  8. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  9. Single-Fraction Versus 5-Fraction Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Limited Survival Prognoses: Results of a Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Šegedin, Barbara; Perpar, Ana; Conde, Antonio J.; Garcia, Raquel; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Cacicedo, Jon; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: This study compared single-fraction to multi-fraction short-course radiation therapy (RT) for symptomatic metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) in patients with limited survival prognosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients who received 8 Gy × 1 fraction were matched (1:1) to 121 patients treated with 4 Gy × 5 fractions for 10 factors including age, sex, performance status, primary tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval between tumor diagnosis and MESCC, pre-RT ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits prior to RT. Endpoints included in-field repeated RT (reRT) for MESCC, overall survival (OS), and impact of RT on motor function. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test for in-field reRT for MESCC and OS and with the ordered-logit model for effect of RT on motor function. Results: Doses of 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 4 Gy × 5 fractions were not significantly different with respect to the need for in-field reRT for MESCC (P=.11) at 6 months (18% vs 9%, respectively) and 12 months (30% vs 22%, respectively). The RT regimen also had no significant impact on OS (P=.65) and post-RT motor function (P=.21). OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 24% and 9%, respectively, after 8 Gy × 1 fraction versus 25% and 13%, respectively, after 4 Gy × 5 fractions. Improvement of motor function was observed in 17% of patients after 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 23% after 4 Gy × 5 fractions, respectively. Conclusions: There were no significant differences with respect to need for in-field reRT for MESCC, OS, and motor function by dose fractionation regimen. Thus, 8 Gy × 1 fraction may be a reasonable option for patients with survival prognosis of a few months.

  10. [Non-invasive transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation facilitates locomotor activity in decerebrated and spinal cats].

    PubMed

    Musienko, P E; Bogacheva, I N; Savochin, A A; Kilimnik, V A; Gorskiĭ, O V; Nikitin, O A; Gerasimenko, Ia P

    2013-08-01

    It is known that spinal neuronal networks activated by epidural electrical stimulation (EES) can produce the stepping EMG pattern and control the locomotor behavior. At present study we showed that non-invasive transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation (tESCS) applied to the lumbar-sacral enlargement can facilitate the locomotor activity in decerebrated and spinal animals. The comparison of the motor responses evoked by EES vs tESCS showed that both methods produce the locomotor patterns with close properties and similar reflex mechanisms. The data obtained suggest that tESCS is an efficient approach for investigation of the locomotor control in acute and chronic experiments as well as facilitates of the locomotor abilities after spinal cord injury. Taking to account the non-invasivity and easement of tESCS, this approach could be further implemented in clinical practice for rehabilitation of the patient with spinal cord injury.

  11. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritation (inflammation) and the collection of infected material (pus) in or around the spinal cord. ... occurs as a complication of an epidural abscess . Pus forms as a collection of: Destroyed tissue cells ...

  12. Sponge-mediated Lentivirus Delivery to Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Aline M.; Palma, Jaime L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    The environment within the spinal cord after injury, which changes in the progression from the acute to chronic stages, limits the extent of regeneration. The delivery of inductive factors to promote regeneration following spinal cord injury has been promising, yet, few strategies are have are versatile to allow delivery during acute or chronic injury that would facilitate screening of candidate therapies. This report investigates the intrathecal delivery of lentiviruses for long-term expression of regenerative factors. Lentivirus-filled sponges were inserted into the intrathecal space surrounding the spinal cord, with transgene expression observed within multiple cell types that persists for 12 weeks for both intact and injured spinal cord, without any apparent damage to the spinal cord tissue. Sponges loaded with lentivirus encoding for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated for acute (delivered at 0 weeks) and chronic (at 4 weeks) injuries, and for multiple locations relative to the injury. In an acute model, sponges placed directly above the injury increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Sponges placed caudal to the injury had reduced impact on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the injury. In a chronic model, sponges increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Furthermore, the effect of Shh was shown to be mediated in part by reduction of Bmp signaling, monitored with an Msx2-sensitive reporter vector. The implantation of lentivirus-loaded biomaterials intrathecally provides the opportunity to induce the expression of a factor at a specified time without entering the spinal cord, and has the potential to promote gene delivery within the spinal cord, which can influence the extent of regeneration. PMID:25724274

  13. Sponge-mediated lentivirus delivery to acute and chronic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Aline M; Palma, Jaime L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-04-28

    The environment within the spinal cord after injury, which changes in the progression from the acute to chronic stages, limits the extent of regeneration. The delivery of inductive factors to promote regeneration following spinal cord injury has been promising, yet, few strategies are versatile to allow delivery during acute or chronic injury that would facilitate screening of candidate therapies. This report investigates the intrathecal delivery of lentiviruses for long-term expression of regenerative factors. Lentivirus-filled sponges were inserted into the intrathecal space surrounding the spinal cord, with transgene expression observed within multiple cell types that persists for 12 weeks for both intact and injured spinal cord, without any apparent damage to the spinal cord tissue. Sponges loaded with lentivirus encoding for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated for acute (delivered at 0 weeks) and chronic (at 4 weeks) injuries, and for multiple locations relative to the injury. In an acute model, sponges placed directly above the injury increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Sponges placed caudal to the injury had reduced impact on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the injury. In a chronic model, sponges increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Furthermore, the effect of Shh was shown to be mediated in part by reduction of Bmp signaling, monitored with an Msx2-sensitive reporter vector. The implantation of lentivirus-loaded biomaterials intrathecally provides the opportunity to induce the expression of a factor at a specified time without entering the spinal cord, and has the potential to promote gene delivery within the spinal cord, which can influence the extent of regeneration.

  14. Spinal distribution of c-Fos activated neurons expressing enkephalin in acute and chronic pain models.

    PubMed

    Hossaini, Mehdi; Duraku, Liron S; Kohli, Somesh K; Jongen, Joost L M; Holstege, Jan C

    2014-01-16

    The endogenous opioid enkephalin is known to inhibit spinal nociceptive transmission. Here we investigated activation of spinal enkephalinergic neurons by determining the proportions of c-Fos expressing (activated) spinal neurons that were enkephalinergic after different acute and chronic peripheral nociceptive stimuli. The number of c-Fos-activated neurons in the dorsal horn was increased after hind paw injection of capsaicin, formalin or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 1.5 hrs - 4 days). The numbers of these neurons that were enkephalinergic increased after paraformaldehyde, and at 20 hrs, but not 1.5 hrs or 4 days post-CFA as compared to saline. In the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain, c-Fos expression was increased acutely (2 hrs) and chronically (2 weeks), and a greater number of these were enkephalinergic in the nerve-injured animals acutely compared to controls (sham-SNI). Combining all acute (=2 hrs) versus chronic (≥20 hrs) treatment groups, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of activated neurons that were enkephalinergic in superficial layers, but a significant increase in the deeper layers of the dorsal horn in the chronic treatment group. It is concluded that the overall percentage of c-Fos activated neurons that contained enkephalin was not significantly different between acute and chronic pain phases. However, the shift in localization of these neurons within the spinal dorsal horn indicates a noxious stimulus directed activation pattern.

  15. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  16. Contributions of spinal D-amino acid oxidase to chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuai; Li, Xin-Yan; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    Spinal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is an FAD-dependent peroxisomal flavoenzyme which mediates the conversion of neutral and polar D-amino acids (including D-serine) to the corresponding α-keto acids, and simultaneously produces hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. This study has aimed to explore the potential contributions of spinal DAAO and its mediated hydrogen peroxide/D-serine metabolism to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia. Bi-daily subcutaneous injections of morphine to mice over 7 days induced thermal hyperalgesia as measured by both the hot-plate and tail-immersion tests, and spinal astroglial activation with increased spinal gene expression of DAAO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Subcutaneous injections of the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[D]isoxazol-3-ol) prevented and reversed the chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. CBIO also inhibited both astrocyte activation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intrathecal injection of the hydrogen peroxide scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) and of catalase completely reversed established morphine hyperalgesia, whereas subcutaneous injections of exogenous D-serine failed to alter chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. These results provided evidence that spinal DAAO and its subsequent production of hydrogen peroxide rather than the D-serine metabolism contributed to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

  17. Spinal cord involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a clinical and MRI study.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Parissis, Dimitris; Karapanayiotides, Theodoros; Maiovis, Pantelis; Karacostas, Dimitris; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2015-06-01

    Concomitant central nervous system (CNS) involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is rare. Although the spinal nerve roots may present MRI abnormalities in CIDP, hitherto, the spinal cord has been investigated in a single study. We retrospectively investigated clinically and with MRI a cohort of patients with definite CIDP diagnosis (EFNS/PNS criteria) for evidence of brain and spinal cord involvement, who were initially admitted in our department during the last 4 years. Among 12 patients with CIDP (men: 8, mean age: 59.3 years, mean disease duration: 3.8 years), nine patients had their MRI scan during a clinical relapse and three during remission. Brain MRI did not document typical multiple sclerosis lesions in any patient. We did not identify any MRI abnormalities in ten patients without clinical evidence of spinal cord involvement. Conversely, MRI disclosed extensive lesions of the thoracic cord in two patients with an overt spinal cord syndrome, whom we describe. This represents the biggest MRI study of CIDP patients who have been investigated for spinal cord involvement. Our data support earlier observations that a minority of CIDP patients may additionally develop CNS involvement of variable degree.

  18. Pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Müller, Monika; Ashraf, Aroosiah; Neziri, Alban Y; Streitberger, Konrad; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of pain pathways is considered a relevant determinant of symptoms in chronic pain patients, but data on its prevalence are very limited. To our knowledge, no data on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity are available. We studied the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in 961 consecutive patients with various chronic pain conditions. Pain threshold and nociceptive withdrawal reflex threshold to electrical stimulation were used to assess pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity, respectively. Using 10th percentile cutoff of previously determined reference values, the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity (95% confidence interval) was 71.2 (68.3-74.0) and 80.0 (77.0-82.6), respectively. As a secondary aim, we analyzed demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics as factors potentially associated with pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity using logistic regression models. Both hypersensitivity parameters were unaffected by most factors analyzed. Depression, catastrophizing, pain-related sleep interference, and average pain intensity were significantly associated with hypersensitivity. However, none of them was significant for both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Furthermore, the odds ratios were very low, indicating modest quantitative impact. To our knowledge, this is the largest prevalence study on central hypersensitivity and the first one on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain patients. The results revealed an impressively high prevalence, supporting a high clinical relevance of this phenomenon. Electrical pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex explore aspects of pain processing that are mostly independent of sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical pain-related characteristics.

  19. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  20. Insidious Onset of Tetraparesis due to Cervical Epidural Abscess from Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Soultanis, Konstantinos Chr; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Starantzis, Konstantinos A; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of cervical epidural abscess from Enterococcus faecalis, which caused an insidious onset of tetraparesis. This 53-year-old female with a history of diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure under hemodialysis presented with pain and progressive weakness of upper and lower extremities without fever. Although a recent MRI she did at the beginning of symptoms showed no significant pathologies, except for a cervical disc herniation and adjacent spinal degeneration, and stenosis that confused the diagnostic procedure, newer imaging with CT and MRI, which was performed due to progression of tetraparesis, revealed the formation of a cervical epidural abscess. Surgical drainage was done after a complete infection workup. The patient showed immediate neurological improvement after surgery. She received antibiotics intravenously for 3 weeks and orally for another 6 weeks. The patient was free from complications 24 months after surgery. A high index of suspicion is most important in making a rapid and correct diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess. The classic clinical triad (fever, local pain, and neurologic deficits) is not sensitive enough for early detection. Continuous clinical, laboratory, and imaging monitoring are of paramount importance. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention could optimize the final functional outcome. PMID:23573096

  1. Thoracic Extraosseous Epidural Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Asil, Kiyasettin; Ceylan, Davut; Erdem, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas were first reported in 1929 by Globus and Doshay, and are defined as benign vascular structures developed between the neural tissues occurring in the central nervous system, consisting of a dilated vascular bed. Cavernous hemangiomas comprise nearly 5-12% of all spinal vascular malformations; however, existence in the epidural space without bone involvement is rare. Only 4% of all cavernous hemangiomas (0.22/1.000.000) are purely epidural cavernous hemangiomas. In this case report, we removed a hemorrhagic thoracic mass presenting with progressive neurological deficits in a 55-year-old male patient. We found this case to be appropriate for presentation due to the rare occurrence of this type of cavernous hemangioma. PMID:25674348

  2. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  3. [History and Technique of Epidural Anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Waurick, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2015-07-01

    In 1901, the first Epidural anesthesia via a caudal approach was independently described by two FrenchmanJean-Anthanase Sicard and Fernand Cathelin.. The Spanish military surgeon, Fidel Pagés Miravé, completed the lumbar approach successfully in 1921. The two possibilities for identification of the epidural space the "loss of resistance" technique and the technique of the "hanging drop" were developed by Achille Mario Dogliotti, an Italian, and Alberto Gutierrez, an Argentinean physician, at the same time. In 1956 John J. Bonica published the paramedian approach to the epidural space. As early as 1931 Eugene Aburel, a Romanian obstetrician, injected local anaesthetics via a silk catheter to perform lumbar obstetric Epidural analgesia. In 1949 the first successful continuous lumbar Epidural anaesthesia was reported by Manuel Martinez Curbelo, a Cuban. Epidural anaesthesia can be performed in sitting or lateral position in all segments of the spinal column via the median or paramedian approach. Different off-axis angles pose the challenge in learning the technique.

  4. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    IWATSUKI, Koichi; TAJIMA, Fumihiro; OHNISHI, Yu-ichiro; NAKAMURA, Takeshi; ISHIHARA, Masahiro; HOSOMI, Koichi; NINOMIYA, Koshi; MORIWAKI, Takashi; YOSHIMINE, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury. PMID:27053327

  5. Therapeutic activities of engrafted neural stem/precursor cells are not dormant in the chronically injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kumamaru, Hiromi; Saiwai, Hirokazu; Kubota, Kensuke; Kobayakawa, Kazu; Yokota, Kazuya; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Shiba, Keiichiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Okada, Seiji

    2013-08-01

    The transplantation of neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for many neurodegenerative disorders including spinal cord injury (SCI) because it provides for neural replacement or trophic support. This strategy is now being extended to the treatment of chronic SCI patients. However, understanding of biological properties of chronically transplanted NSPCs and their surrounding environments is limited. Here, we performed temporal analysis of injured spinal cords and demonstrated their multiphasic cellular and molecular responses. In particular, chronically injured spinal cords were growth factor-enriched environments, whereas acutely injured spinal cords were enriched by neurotrophic and inflammatory factors. To determine how these environmental differences affect engrafted cells, NSPCs transplanted into acutely, subacutely, and chronically injured spinal cords were selectively isolated by flow cytometry, and their whole transcriptomes were compared by RNA sequencing. This analysis revealed that NSPCs produced many regenerative/neurotrophic molecules irrespective of transplantation timing, and these activities were prominent in chronically transplanted NSPCs. Furthermore, chronically injured spinal cords permitted engrafted NSPCs to differentiate into neurons/oligodendrocytes and provided more neurogenic environment for NSPCs than other environments. Despite these results demonstrate that transplanted NSPCs have adequate capacity in generating neurons/oligodendrocytes and producing therapeutic molecules in chronic SCI microenvironments, they did not improve locomotor function. Our results indicate that failure in chronic transplantation is not due to the lack of therapeutic activities of engrafted NSPCs but the refractory state of chronically injured spinal cords. Environmental modulation, rather modification of transplanting cells, will be significant for successful translation of stem cell-based therapies into chronic SCI patients.

  6. Spinal and Paraspinal Fungal Infections Associated With Contaminated Methylprednisolone Injections

    PubMed Central

    Moudgal, Varsha; Singal, Bonita; Kauffman, Carol A.; Brodkey, Jason A.; Malani, Anurag N.; Olmsted, Russell N.; Kasotakis, Michael J.; Koch, Spencer R.; Kaakaji, Rami; Nyaku, Mawuli; Neelakanta, Anupama; Valenstein, Paul; Winter, Suzanne; Otto, Michael; Jagarlamudi, Rajasekhar; Kerr, Lisa; Czerwinski, Jennifer; Vandenberg, David; Sutton, Suzanne R.; Murphy, Holly; Halasyamani, Lakshmi K.

    2014-01-01

    Background.  A nationwide outbreak of fungal infections was traced to injection of Exserohilum-contaminated methylprednisolone. We describe our experience with patients who developed spinal or paraspinal infection after injection of contaminated methylprednisolone. Methods.  Data were assembled from the Michigan Department of Community Health, electronic medical records, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports. Results.  Of 544 patients who received an epidural injection from a contaminated lot of methylprednisolone at a pain clinic in southeastern Michigan, 153 (28%) were diagnosed at our institution with probable or confirmed spinal or paraspinal fungal infection at the injection site. Forty-one patients had both meningitis and spinal or paraspinal infection, and 112 had only spinal or paraspinal infection. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities included abscess, phlegmon, arachnoiditis, and osteomyelitis. Surgical debridement in 116 patients revealed epidural phlegmon and epidural abscess most often. Among 26 patients with an abnormal MRI but with no increase or change in chronic pain, 19 (73%) had infection identified at surgery. Fungal infection was confirmed in 78 patients (51%) by finding hyphae in tissues, positive polymerase chain reaction, or culture. Initial therapy was voriconazole plus liposomal amphotericin B in 115 patients (75%) and voriconazole alone in 38 patients (25%). As of January 31, 2014, 20 patients remained on an azole agent. Five patients died of infection. Conclusions.  We report on 153 patients who had spinal or paraspinal fungal infection at the site of epidural injection of contaminated methylprednisolone. One hundred sixteen (76%) underwent operative debridement in addition to treatment with antifungal agents. PMID:25734095

  7. Intractable Pruritus After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Background: This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Method: Case report. Findings: Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Conclusions: Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective. PMID:19777867

  8. Scoliosis associated with idiopathic lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There are very few reports of spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) in association with scoliosis. A 49-year-old man presented with persistent back pain and right hip lump. The lumbar spine X-rays showed scoliosis (Lenke classification 5BN). Lumbar MRI demonstrated circumferential epidural fat deposit from L1 to lower S2 level. There was no obvious etiology of SEL except mild increased body mass index (BMI). The patient was managed with conservative treatment. After 6 months medication (limaprost and ginkgo), his symptoms were relieved.

  9. Scoliosis associated with idiopathic lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Rok

    2016-03-01

    There are very few reports of spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) in association with scoliosis. A 49-year-old man presented with persistent back pain and right hip lump. The lumbar spine X-rays showed scoliosis (Lenke classification 5BN). Lumbar MRI demonstrated circumferential epidural fat deposit from L1 to lower S2 level. There was no obvious etiology of SEL except mild increased body mass index (BMI). The patient was managed with conservative treatment. After 6 months medication (limaprost and ginkgo), his symptoms were relieved. PMID:27683700

  10. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  11. [Complications related to epidural catheter in caesarean delivery].

    PubMed

    Leykin, Y; Lucca, M

    2001-09-01

    A review of complications related to epidural catheters in caesarean delivery is presented. Catheters for prolongation of nerve blocks were first used in 1940s. Thereafter, there has been steady development in the design and plastic material technology of the different catheters. In the last decade the regional anaesthesia for caesarean section became very popular, as well as continuous increase in the use of epidural catheters. The anatomical changes of pregnancy like marked distension of the epidural veins resulted in increased risk of the complications due to the epidural catheter placement. It is likely that permanent neurologic sequelae due to regional anaesthesia in obstetrics almost never occur, while minor self-limiting complications do occur. The possible complications of epidural catheter techniques are: trauma, malposition and migration of the catheter, knotting and breaking, radiculopathy, dural puncture, subdural injection, abscess and infection, haematoma and wrong solution injection. Most of the malpositions of the epidural catheter can be avoided by a careful technique, advancing the catheter with no forceful movement and not more than 3 to 4 cm into epidural space. Broken parts of the catheters should be left as a rule within the spinal space. Test dose should be always done for continuous epidural anaesthesia. Early diagnosis and prompt appropriate treatment will usually lead to complete resolution of the neurological deficit even in cases of epidural haematoma or abscess.

  12. [A case of chronic toluene intoxication presenting stimulus-sensitive segmental spinal myoclonus].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama-Oishi, A; Arakawa, K; Araki, E; Yamada, T; Tobimatsu, S; Kira, J

    2000-05-01

    We reported a 48-year-old male who showed stimulus-sensitive spinal myoclonus due to chronic toluene intoxication. He has been exposed to thinner for more than 30 years as a painter, and occasionally experienced an episode of headache, nausea and dizziness because of acute thinner intoxication. He noted tremor of his hands 10 years ago. He also noticed memory disturbance since the end of 1997. Neurological examination revealed postural tremor of his fingers on the bilateral sides and the left arm. In addition, rhythmic myoclonic jerks were induced in the right upper limb muscles by a tendon tap given on the right brachioradialis muscles. Surface EMG revealed repetitive grouping discharges in those two muscles approximately 100 msec after the tendon tap which continued for about 30-50 msec. A long loop reflex (C-reflex) and giant SEPs were not observed in his right upper limb, and EEG showed no spike. Urinary excretion of N-benzoylglycine, which was a metabolite of toluene was increased (1.17 g/l). Therefore, he was diagnosed as a case of chronic toluene intoxication. His myoclonic jerks were considered to be stimulus-sensitive spinal myoclonus, because they were induced segmentally and because cortical hyperexcitability was not seen. This is the first report to describe the occurrence of stimulus-sensitive spinal myoclonus in the case of chronic toluene intoxication.

  13. Chronic Spinal Compression Model in Minipigs: A Systematic Behavioral, Qualitative, and Quantitative Neuropathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Roman; Juhas, Stefan; Keshavarzi, Sassan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Johe, Karl; Marsala, Silvia; Scadeng, Miriam; Lazar, Peter; Tomori, Zoltan; Schulteis, Gery; Beattie, Michael; Ciacci, Joseph D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The goal of the present study was to develop a porcine spinal cord injury (SCI) model, and to describe the neurological outcome and characterize the corresponding quantitative and qualitative histological changes at 4–9 months after injury. Adult Gottingen-Minnesota minipigs were anesthetized and placed in a spine immobilization frame. The exposed T12 spinal segment was compressed in a dorso-ventral direction using a 5-mm-diameter circular bar with a progressively increasing peak force (1.5, 2.0, or 2.5 kg) at a velocity of 3 cm/sec. During recovery, motor and sensory function were periodically monitored. After survival, the animals were perfusion fixed and the extent of local SCI was analyzed by (1) post-mortem MRI analysis of dissected spinal cords, (2) qualitative and quantitative analysis of axonal survival at the epicenter of injury, and (3) defining the presence of local inflammatory changes, astrocytosis, and schwannosis. Following 2.5-kg spinal cord compression the animals demonstrated a near complete loss of motor and sensory function with no recovery over the next 4–9 months. Those that underwent spinal cord compression with 2 kg force developed an incomplete injury with progressive partial neurological recovery characterized by a restricted ability to stand and walk. Animals injured with a spinal compression force of 1.5 kg showed near normal ambulation 10 days after injury. In fully paralyzed animals (2.5 kg), MRI analysis demonstrated a loss of spinal white matter integrity and extensive septal cavitations. A significant correlation between the magnitude of loss of small and medium-sized myelinated axons in the ventral funiculus and neurological deficits was identified. These data, demonstrating stable neurological deficits in severely injured animals, similarities of spinal pathology to humans, and relatively good post-injury tolerance of this strain of minipigs to spinal trauma, suggest that this model can successfully be used

  14. Technique of spinal cord compression induced by inflation of epidural balloon catheter in rabbits (Oryctologus cuniculus): efficient and easy to use model.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Antonio F B DA; Scheffer, Jussara P; Coelho, Barbara P; Aiello, Graciane; Guimarães, Arthur G; Gama, Carlos R B; Vescovini, Victor; Cabral, Paula G A; Oliveira, André L A

    2016-09-01

    The most common cause of spinal cord injury are high impact trauma, which often result in some motor impairment, sensory or autonomic a greater or lesser extent in the distal areas the level of trauma. In terms of survival and complications due to sequelae, veterinary patients have a poor prognosis unfavorable. Therefore justified the study of experimental models of spinal cord injury production that could provide more support to research potential treatments for spinal cord injuries in medicine and veterinary medicine. Preclinical studies of acute spinal cord injury require an experimental animal model easily reproducible. The most common experimental animal model is the rat, and several techniques for producing a spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to describe and evaluate the effectiveness of acute spinal cord injury production technique through inflation of Fogarty(r) catheter using rabbits as an experimental model because it is a species that has fewer conclusive publications and contemplating. The main requirements of a model as low cost, handling convenience, reproducibility and uniformity. The technique was adequate for performing preclinical studies in neuro-traumatology area, effectively leading to degeneration and necrosis of the nervous tissue fostering the emergence of acute paraplegia.

  15. Characterization of chronic pain and somatosensory function in spinal cord injury subjects.

    PubMed

    Defrin, R; Ohry, A; Blumen, N; Urca, G

    2001-01-01

    The pathophysiology of the chronic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI) is unclear. In order to study it's underlying mechanism we characterized the neurological profile of SCI subjects with (SCIP) and without (SCINP) chronic pain. Characterization comprised of thermal threshold testing for warmth, cold and heat pain and tactile sensibility testing of touch, graphesthesia and identification of speed of movement of touch stimuli on the skin. In addition, spontaneously painful areas were mapped in SCIP and evoked pathological pain--allodynia, hyperpathia and wind-up pain evaluated for both groups. Both SCIP and SCINP showed similar reductions in both thermal and tactile sensations. In both groups thermal sensations were significantly more impaired than tactile sensations. Chronic pain was present only in skin areas below the lesion with impaired or absent temperature and heat-pain sensibilities. Conversely, all the thermally impaired skin areas in SCIP were painful while painfree areas in the same subjects were normal. In contrast, chronic pain could be found in skin areas without any impairment in tactile sensibilities. Allodynia could only be elicited in SCIP and a significantly higher incidence of pathologically evoked pain (i.e. hyperpathia and wind-up pain) was seen in the chronic pain areas compared to SCINP. We conclude that damage to the spinothalamic tract (STT) is a necessary condition for the occurrence of chronic pain following SCI. However, STT lesion is not a sufficient condition since it could also be found in SCINP. The abnormal evoked pain seen in SCIP is probably due to neuronal hyperexcitability in these subjects. The fact that apparently identical sensory impairments manifest as chronic pain and hyperexcitability in one subject but not in another implies that either genetic predisposition or subtle differences in the nature of spinal injury determine the emergence of chronic pain following SCI.

  16. Quality of Life Among Veterans With Chronic Spinal Cord Injury and Related Variables

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Soltani-Moghaddas, Seyed Hosein; Birjandinejad, Ali; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Bozorgnia, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Background: In recent decades, the incidence of spinal cord injuries has increased. In a systemic review on epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in developing countries reported 25.5/million cases per year. Objectives: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of the veterans among Iran-Iraq war with chronic spinal cord injuries (SCI) and to evaluate long-term impressions of SCI on their quality of life. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two veterans, all male, with chronic spinal cord injury from Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) were interviewed and examined. The mean age of veterans at the time of interview was 49.3 years (38 to 80 years). Veterans were assessed by using a 36-item short-form (SF-36), hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) and the Barthel index. The presence or absence of pressure sores and spasticity were documented as well. Results: The mean age of veterans at the time of study was 49.3 years. Pearson's correlation test showed that depression and anxiety have a reverse association with mental component summary (MCS) scale and physical component summary (PCS) scale scores, respectively. Regression analysis showed a negative effect of depression and pressure sore on PCS. Moreover, no association was found between the duration of injury and age with quality of life. Conclusions: Lower QOL was found among veterans with chronic SCI. More researches on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are needed to give us a better understanding of changes in life of patients with SCI and the ways to improve them. PMID:25147777

  17. A technological platform to optimize combinatorial treatment design and discovery for chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Pierre A

    2008-11-01

    Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with the development of serious medical concerns. In fact, it is increasingly well documented that most SCI patients who survive the first 24 hr will rapidly develop, within a few months to a few years, cardiovascular problems, type II diabetes, muscle wasting, osteoporosis, immune deficiencies, and other life-threatening problems. The cellular mechanisms underlying these so-called secondary health complications remain unclear, and no drug or standard approach has been developed to specifically treat these complications. To investigate the cellular and metabolic changes associated with chronic SCI and functional recovery, work mainly from our laboratory recently has led to the characterization of a mouse model of chronic paraplegia. This review reports cellular, systemic, and metabolic changes (associated mainly with secondary health complications) occurring within a few days to a few weeks after SCI in low-thoracic spinal cord-transected mice. We also describe our research platform developed to ease technological transfer and to accelerate drug-screening studies in animals. A global understanding of the many chronic changes occurring after SCI together with efficient tools and approaches for testing new or existing drug candidates is likely to yield the design of innovative treatments against secondary complications that combine cellular plasticity-modulating agents, locomotor network-activating drugs, hormonal therapy, and exercise training.

  18. Chronic Spinal Cord Electrical Stimulation Protects Against 6-hydroxydopamine Lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amol P.; Fuentes, Romulo; Zhang, Hao; Vinholo, Thais; Wang, Chi-Han; Freire, Marco Aurelio M.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Although L-dopa continues to be the gold standard for treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), it presents long-term complications. Deep brain stimulation is effective, but only a small percentage of idiopathic PD patients are eligible. Based on results in animal models and a handful of patients, dorsal column stimulation (DCS) has been proposed as a potential therapy for PD. To date, the long-term effects of DCS in animal models have not been quantified. Here, we report that DCS applied twice a week in rats treated with bilateral 6-OHDA striatal infusions led to a significant improvement in symptoms. DCS-treated rats exhibited a higher density of dopaminergic innervation in the striatum and higher neuronal cell count in the substantia nigra pars compacta compared to a control group. These results suggest that DCS has a chronic therapeutical and neuroprotective effect, increasing its potential as a new clinical option for treating PD patients.

  19. No evidence for chronic demyelination in spared axons after spinal cord injury in a mouse.

    PubMed

    Lasiene, Jurate; Shupe, Larry; Perlmutter, Steve; Horner, Philip

    2008-04-01

    The pattern of remyelination after traumatic spinal cord injury remains elusive, with animal and human studies reporting partial to complete demyelination followed by incomplete remyelination. In the present study, we found that spared rubrospinal tract (RST) axons of passage traced with actively transported dextrans and examined caudally to the lesion 12 weeks after mouse spinal cord contusion injury were fully remyelinated. Spared axons exhibited a marginally reduced myelin thickness and significantly shorter internodes. CASPR (contactin-associated protein) and K(v)1.2 channels were used to identify internodes and paranodal protein distribution properties were used as an index of myelin integrity. This is the first time the CNS myelin internode length was measured in a mouse. To better understand the significance of shortened internodes and thinner myelin in spared axons, we modeled conduction properties using McIntyre's et al. model of myelinated axons. Mathematical modeling predicted a 21% decrease in the conduction velocity of remyelinated RST axons attributable to shortened internodes. To determine whether demyelination could be present on axons exhibiting a pathological transport system, we used the retroviral reporter system. Virally delivered green fluorescent protein unveiled a small population of dystrophic RST axons that persist chronically with evident demyelination or abnormal remyelination. Collectively, these data show that lasting demyelination in spared axons is rare and that remyelination of axons of passage occurs in the chronically injured mouse spinal cord. PMID:18400887

  20. Management of chronic symphysis pubis pain following child birth with spinal cord stimulator.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Ahsan

    2012-01-01

    The case of a 39 year old woman who had diastasis of pubic symphysis following childbirth and later developed severe chronic neuropathic pain and disability is presented. She received extensive surgical and medical treatment for 6 years with no improvement of symptoms. The VNRS (Visual Numerical Rating Scale) pain score was 7/10 or more most of the time. This was quite disabling in terms of her quality of life. A spinal cord stimulator was inserted after failure of other modalities of pain management which resulted in dramatic improvement in the quality of life measured with SF-36 questionnaire. Her pain score became 0/10 VNRS and she was free from opioids and psychotropic medications within 3 months post insertion. Spinal cord stimulator can be considered for the management of pain due to diastasis of pubic symphysis, not amenable to other therapies. PMID:22352111

  1. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video. PMID:27194987

  2. Unusual case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anaesthesia and caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shubhra; Burkat, Cat Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    This is a rare case of persistent Horner's syndrome following epidural anesthesia and Caesarean section. A 33-year-old female presented with persistent ptosis and miosis following epidural anesthesia and Caesarian section several months prior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of head, neck, and chest were unremarkable. Medline search using terms Horner's, epidural, spinal anesthesia, delivery, childbirth, Caesarian, and pregnancy identified 31 articles describing Horner's syndrome in obstetric epidural anesthesia, of which 11 were following Caesarean section. The increased incidence of Horner's syndrome in the setting of epidural anesthesia in pregnancy may be related to epidural venous engorgement and cephalic spread of the local anaesthetic, with disruption in the oculosympathetic pathway. It is important to include recent epidural anesthesia within the differential diagnosis of acute Horner's syndrome in a postpartum female. Rarely, the ptosis may be permanent and require surgical intervention.

  3. Chronic Tissue Response to Untethered Microelectrode Implants in the Rat Brain and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    ERSEN, Ali; ELKABES, Stella; FREEDMAN, David S.; SAHIN, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main Results The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant. PMID:25605679

  4. Chronic tissue response to untethered microelectrode implants in the rat brain and spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersen, Ali; Elkabes, Stella; Freedman, David S.; Sahin, Mesut

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach. One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main results. The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance. These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant.

  5. Combining Peripheral Nerve Grafts and Chondroitinase Promotes Functional Axonal Regeneration in the Chronically Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Veronica J.; Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R.; Miller, Kassi; Santi, Lauren; Connors, Theresa; Lemay, Michel A.; Houlé, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Because there currently is no treatment for spinal cord injury, most patients are living with long-standing injuries. Therefore, strategies aimed at promoting restoration of function to the chronically injured spinal cord have high therapeutic value. For successful regeneration, long-injured axons must overcome their poor intrinsic growth potential as well as the inhibitory environment of the glial scar established around the lesion site. Acutely injured axons that regenerate into growth-permissive peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) reenter host tissue to mediate functional recovery if the distal graft– host interface is treated with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to cleave inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the scar matrix. To determine whether a similar strategy is effective for a chronic injury, we combined grafting of a peripheral nerve into a highly relevant, chronic, cervical contusion site with ChABC treatment of the glial scar and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) stimulation of long-injured axons. We tested this combination in two grafting paradigms: (1) a peripheral nerve that was grafted to span a chronic injury site or (2) a PNG that bridged a chronic contusion site with a second, more distal injury site. Unlike GDNF–PBS treatment, GDNF–ChABC treatment facilitated axons to exit the PNG into host tissue and promoted some functional recovery. Electrical stimulation of axons in the peripheral nerve bridge induced c-Fos expression in host neurons, indicative of synaptic contact by regenerating fibers. Thus, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that administering ChABC to a distal graft interface allows for functional axonal regeneration by chronically injured neurons. PMID:19940184

  6. Combining peripheral nerve grafts and chondroitinase promotes functional axonal regeneration in the chronically injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tom, Veronica J; Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R; Miller, Kassi; Santi, Lauren; Connors, Theresa; Lemay, Michel A; Houlé, John D

    2009-11-25

    Because there currently is no treatment for spinal cord injury, most patients are living with long-standing injuries. Therefore, strategies aimed at promoting restoration of function to the chronically injured spinal cord have high therapeutic value. For successful regeneration, long-injured axons must overcome their poor intrinsic growth potential as well as the inhibitory environment of the glial scar established around the lesion site. Acutely injured axons that regenerate into growth-permissive peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) reenter host tissue to mediate functional recovery if the distal graft-host interface is treated with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) to cleave inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the scar matrix. To determine whether a similar strategy is effective for a chronic injury, we combined grafting of a peripheral nerve into a highly relevant, chronic, cervical contusion site with ChABC treatment of the glial scar and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) stimulation of long-injured axons. We tested this combination in two grafting paradigms: (1) a peripheral nerve that was grafted to span a chronic injury site or (2) a PNG that bridged a chronic contusion site with a second, more distal injury site. Unlike GDNF-PBS treatment, GDNF-ChABC treatment facilitated axons to exit the PNG into host tissue and promoted some functional recovery. Electrical stimulation of axons in the peripheral nerve bridge induced c-Fos expression in host neurons, indicative of synaptic contact by regenerating fibers. Thus, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that administering ChABC to a distal graft interface allows for functional axonal regeneration by chronically injured neurons.

  7. Comparative effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis for different sacrum types in patients with chronic pain due to lumbar disc herniation: A propensity score matching analysis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sang Ho; Park, Jun Young; Cho, Seong-Sik; Cho, Hyun-Seok; Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Yeon Ju; Choi, Seong-Soo

    2016-09-01

    For percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis (PEA) in patients with chronic low back and/or leg pain, comparative efficacy of lumbar PEA between the sacral types has not yet been investigated. This study aimed to determine the comparative efficacy of lumbar PEA between the sacral types in chronic pain with lumbosacral herniated intervertebral disc (L-HIVD).A total of 1158 chronic low back and/or leg pain patients who diagnosed with L-HIVD and underwent PEA between February 2011 and March 2015 were retrospectively examined. All enrolled patients were divided into 2 types: dome-sacral type and flat type. To avoid confounding bias, propensity score analysis was used. Numeric rating scales (NRS) and Patients' Global Impression of Change (PGIC) were compared between the 2 types at baseline and at 3 months post-PEA.After conducting a propensity score matching analysis, 114 patients were included in each type. The mean sacral angle significantly differed between the flat-sacral and dome-sacral types (P < 0.001). A linear mixed effect model analysis showed that the adjusted NRS score at baseline was 7.58 [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.40-7.76] for the flat-sacral type and 7.47 (95% CI: 7.29-7.64) for the dome-sacral type. The adjusted NRS score after 3 months post-PEA was 4.27 (95% CI: 3.77-4.77) for the flat-sacral type and 3.71 (95% CI: 3.21-4.21) for the dome-sacral type. We detected no significant differences in NRS at baseline (P = 0.371) and after 3 months (P = 0.121) between the 2 groups. No significant differences were observed in terms of the NRS score between the 2 groups during the 3 months follow-up (omnibus P = 0.223). There were no significant differences in PGIC between flat-sacral and dome-sacral types at 3 months after the follow-up period (4.40 ± 2.17 and 4.67 ± 1.88, respectively, P = 0.431).PEA provides sufficient pain relief for chronic pain due to L-HIVD at 3 months postprocedure. The sacral type might not affect the outcome

  8. Postoperative epidural opioid analgesia: what are the choices?

    PubMed

    de Leon-Casasola, O A; Lema, M J

    1996-10-01

    The administration of hydrophilic opioids via a continuous infusion results in selective spinal analgesia with a low incidence of side effects. Lipophilic opioids may also be associated with spinal effects. However, the doses required to produce postoperative analgesia also produce plasma concentrations within the MEAC. Thus, in clinical practice it may not be possible to limit epidural doses of lipophilic opioids to those associated with spinal analgesia. Regardless of the mechanism of action, epidural administration of lipophilic opioids may offer no clinical advantages over the IV route. Notwithstanding, epidural administration of small doses of lipophilic opioids in combination with local anesthetics may offer significant clinical advantages over systemic administration of opioids alone. Dose-ranging studies will be necessary to determine the ideal concentrations of opioids and local anesthetics, as well as the ratios of the two drugs to obtain optimal analgesia with minimal incidence of side effects.

  9. BDNF regulates atypical PKC at spinal synapses to initiate and maintain a centralized chronic pain state

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is an important medical problem affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Mechanisms underlying the maintenance of chronic pain states are poorly understood but the elucidation of such mechanisms have the potential to reveal novel therapeutics capable of reversing a chronic pain state. We have recently shown that the maintenance of a chronic pain state is dependent on an atypical PKC, PKMζ, but the mechanisms involved in controlling PKMζ in chronic pain are completely unknown. Here we have tested the hypothesis that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates PKMζ, and possibly other aPKCs, to maintain a centralized chronic pain state. Results We first demonstrate that although other kinases play a role in the initiation of persistent nociceptive sensitization, they are not involved in the maintenance of this chronic pain state indicating that a ZIP-reversible process is responsible for the maintenance of persistent sensitization. We further show that BDNF plays a critical role in initiating and maintaining persistent nociceptive sensitization and that this occurs via a ZIP-reversible process. Moreover, at spinal synapses, BDNF controls PKMζ and PKCλ nascent synthesis via mTORC1 and BDNF enhances PKMζ phosphorylaton. Finally, we show that BDNF signaling to PKMζ and PKCλ is conserved across CNS synapses demonstrating molecular links between pain and memory mechanisms. Conclusions Hence, BDNF is a key regulator of aPKC synthesis and phosphorylation and an essential mediator of the maintenance of a centralized chronic pain state. These findings point to BDNF regulation of aPKC as a potential therapeutic target for the permanent reversal of a chronic pain state. PMID:23510079

  10. Regenerating motor bridge axons refine connections and synapse on lumbar motoneurons to bypass chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Campos, Lucas W; Chakrabarty, Samit; Haque, Raqeeb; Martin, John H

    2008-02-10

    To restore motor control after spinal cord injury requires reconnecting the brain with spinal motor circuits below the lesion. A bridge around the injury is an important alternative to promoting axon regeneration through the injury. Previously, we reported a novel motor bridge in rats. The thirteenth thoracic nerve was detached from the muscle it innervates and the cut end implanted caudally into the lumbar gray matter where motor bridge axons regenerate. In this study, we first determined that regenerating bridge axons project to spinal motor circuits. Stable projections were present in ventral motor laminae of the cord, including putative synapses directly on motoneurons, 2 months after insertion in the intact cord. At this time, earlier-forming dorsal horn projections were mostly eliminated. Regenerating axons were effective in evoking leg motor activity as early as 2 weeks. We next determined that bridge axons could regenerate caudal to a chronic injury. We hemisected the spinal cord at L2 and inserted the bridge nerve 1 month later at L5 and found ventral laminae projections similar to those in intact animals, including onto motoneurons directly. Finally, we determined that the bridge circuit could be activated by neural pathways rostral to its origin. For spinally hemisected animals, we electrically stimulated the rostral spinal cord and recorded evoked potentials from the bridge and, in turn, motor responses in the sciatic nerve. Our findings suggests that bridge motoneurons could be used by descending motor pathways as premotor interneurons to transmit neural signals to bypass a chronic spinal injury.

  11. Acute and Chronic Deficits in the Urinary Bladder after Spinal Contusion Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Juan J.; Haywood-Watson, Ricky J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) permanently alters bladder function in humans. Hematuria and cystitis occur in both human SCI as well as in rodent models of SCI. Others have reported early SCI-dependent disruption to bladder uroepithelial integrity that results in increased permeability to urine and urine-borne substances. This can result in cystitis, or inflammation of the bladder, an ongoing pathological condition present throughout the chronic phase of SCI in humans. The goals of our study were twofold: (1) to begin to examine the inflammatory and molecular changes that occur within the bladder uroepithelium using a clinically-relevant spinal contusion model of injury, and (2) to assess whether these alterations continue into the chronic phase of SCI. Rats received either moderate SCI or sham surgery. Urine was collected from SCI and sham subjects over 7 days or at 7 months to assess levels of excreted proteins. Inflammation in the bladder wall was assessed via biochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Bladder tight junction proteins, mediators of uroepithelial integrity, were also measured in both the acute and chronic phases of SCI. Urine protein and hemoglobin levels rapidly increase following SCI. An SCI-dependent elevation in numbers of neutrophils within the bladder wall peaked at 48 h. Bladder tight junction proteins demonstrate a rapid but transient decrease as early as 2 h post-SCI. Surprisingly, elevated levels of urine proteins and significant deficits in bladder tight junction proteins could be detected in chronic SCI, suggesting that early pathological changes to the bladder may continue throughout the chronic phase of injury. PMID:19891526

  12. Epidural myelolipoma in a Husky-cross: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marina Verena; Ludwig, Davina Claudia; Lempp, Charlotte; Haist, Verena; Stein, Veronika Maria

    2013-04-04

    Epidural spinal myelolipoma was diagnosed in an 11.5-year-old castrated male Husky-cross that was evaluated at the veterinary teaching hospital due to progressive thoracolumbar spinal hyperaesthesia and mild proprioceptive pelvic limb ataxia. A focal, ill-defined mildly inhomogenous extradural mass lesion was detected by MRI. The dog was euthanized. At necropsy an extradurally located reddish mass of about 2.5 cm in diameter was present in the vertebral canal. The mass was identified histopathologically as an epidural myelolipoma.

  13. Unilateral microinjection of acrolein into thoracic spinal cord produces acute and chronic injury and functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Gianaris, Alexander; Liu, Nai-Kui; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Oakes, Eddie; Brenia, John; Gianaris, Thomas; Ruan, Yiwen; Deng, Ling-Xiao; Goetz, Maria; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Lu, Qing-Bo; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-21

    Although lipid peroxidation has long been associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), the specific role of lipid peroxidation-derived byproducts such as acrolein in mediating damage remains to be fully understood. Acrolein, an α-β unsaturated aldehyde, is highly reactive with proteins, DNA, and phospholipids and is considered as a second toxic messenger that disseminates and augments initial free radical events. Previously, we showed that acrolein increased following traumatic SCI and injection of acrolein induced tissue damage. Here, we demonstrate that microinjection of acrolein into the thoracic spinal cord of adult rats resulted in dose-dependent tissue damage and functional deficits. At 24h (acute) after the microinjection, tissue damage, motoneuron loss, and spinal cord swelling were observed on sections stained with Cresyl Violet. Luxol fast blue staining further showed that acrolein injection resulted in dose-dependent demyelination. At 8weeks (chronic) after the microinjection, cord shrinkage, astrocyte activation, and macrophage infiltration were observed along with tissue damage, neuron loss, and demyelination. These pathological changes resulted in behavioral impairments as measured by both the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and grid walking analysis. Electron microscopy further demonstrated that acrolein induced axonal degeneration, demyelination, and macrophage infiltration. These results, combined with our previous reports, strongly suggest that acrolein may play a critical causal role in the pathogenesis of SCI and that targeting acrolein could be an attractive strategy for repair after SCI. PMID:27058147

  14. Assessment of oxidative parameters in rat spinal cord after chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Goecks, Cristina S B; Horst, Andréa; Moraes, Maira S; Scheid, Taína; Kolberg, Carolina; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Partata, Wania A

    2012-09-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in neuropathic pain, the direct relationship between these species and chronic constriction of sciatic nerve (CCI) has not been studied in spinal cord. Thus, this study induced CCI in rats and these animals were sacrificed 3 and 10 days after the surgical procedure to determine the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, as well as ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and lipid hydroperoxide levels in lumbosacral spinal cord. Von Frey Hair and hot plate tests were performed to assess the degree of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia at days 0, 3 and 10. The results showed that CCI significantly induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia at days 3 and 10. Parallel there was increase in spinal cord lipid hydroperoxide at days 3 and 10 in rats submitted to CCI. In Sham rats a significant increase in this parameter occurred at day 10. H(2)O(2) decreased at day 10 only in CCI group. SOD activity was decreased in Sham and CCI groups at day 3, while catalase activity was increased in CCI rats at days 3 and 10. Ascorbic acid levels were reduced only in CCI rats at day 3. Although the role of such changes is unclear, many were not specific to neuropathic pain and the differences could be related to different degrees of central sensitization in Sham and CCI rats. PMID:22674084

  15. Chondroitinase combined with rehabilitation promotes recovery of forelimb function in rats with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Difei; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M; Zhao, Rongrong; Andrews, Melissa R; Fawcett, James W

    2011-06-22

    Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) in combination with rehabilitation has been shown to promote functional recovery in acute spinal cord injury. For clinical use, the optimal treatment window is concurrent with the beginning of rehabilitation, usually 2-4 weeks after injury. We show that ChABC is effective when given 4 weeks after injury combined with rehabilitation. After C4 dorsal spinal cord injury, rats received no treatment for 4 weeks. They then received either ChABC or penicillinase control treatment followed by hour-long daily rehabilitation specific for skilled paw reaching. Animals that received both ChABC and task-specific rehabilitation showed the greatest recovery in skilled paw reaching, approaching similar levels to animals that were treated at the time of injury. There was also a modest increase in skilled paw reaching ability in animals receiving task-specific rehabilitation alone. Animals treated with ChABC and task-specific rehabilitation also showed improvement in ladder and beam walking. ChABC increased sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and these sprouts had more vGlut1(+ve) presynaptic boutons than controls. Animals that received rehabilitation showed an increase in perineuronal net number and staining intensity. Our results indicate that ChABC treatment opens a window of opportunity in chronic spinal cord lesions, allowing rehabilitation to improve functional recovery. PMID:21697383

  16. Chronic spinal cord stimulation modifies intrinsic cardiac synaptic efficacy in the suppression of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Cardinal, René; Beaumont, Eric; Vermeulen, Michel; Smith, Frank M.; Armour, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy, when applied chronically to canines, imparts long-lasting cardio-protective effects on neurogenic atrial tachyarrhythmia induction and, if so, whether its effects can be attributable to i) changes in intrinsic cardiac (IC) neuronal transmembrane properties vs ii) modification of their interneuronal stochastic interactivity that initiates such pathology. Data derived from canines subjected to long-term SCS [(group 1 studied after 3–4 weeks SCS; n=5) (group 2: studied 5 weeks SCS; n=11)] were compared to data derived from 10 control animals (including 4 sham SCS electrode implantations). During terminal studies conducted under anesthesia, chronotropic and inotropic responses to vagal nerve or stellate ganglion stimulation were similar in all 3 groups. Chronic SCS suppressed atrial tachyarrhythmia induction evoked by mediastinal nerve stimulation. When induced, arrhythmia durations were shortened (controls: median of 27s; SCS 3–4 weeks: median of 16s; SCS 5 weeks: median of 7s). Phasic and accommodating right atrial neuronal somata displayed similar passive and active membrane properties in vitro, whether derived from sham or either chronic SCS groups. Synaptic efficacy was differentially enhanced in accommodating (not phasic) IC neurons by chronic SCS. Taken together these data indicate that chronic SCS therapy modifies IC neuronal stochastic inter-connectivity in atrial fibrillation suppression by altering synaptic function without directly targeting the transmembrane properties of individual IC neuronal somata. PMID:25301713

  17. Chronic Spinal Injury Repair by Olfactory Bulb Ensheathing Glia and Feasibility for Autologous Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Quiles, Cintia; Santos-Benito, Fernando F.; Llamusí, M. Beatriz; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory bulb ensheathing glia (OB-OEG) promote repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats after transplantation at acute or subacute (up to 45 days) stages. The most relevant clinical scenario in humans, however, is chronic SCI, in which no more major cellular or molecular changes occur at the injury site; this occurs after the third month in rodents. Whether adult OB-OEG grafts promote repair of severe chronic SCI has not been previously addressed. Rats with complete SCI that were transplanted with OB-OEG 4 months after injury exhibited progressive improvement in motor function and axonal regeneration from different brainstem nuclei across and beyond the SCI site. A positive correlation between motor outcome and axonal regeneration suggested a role for brainstem neurons in the recovery. Functional and histological outcomes did not differ at subacute or chronic stages. Thus, autologous transplantation is a feasible approach as there is time for patient stabilization and OEG preparation in human chronic SCI; the healing effects of OB-OEG on established injuries may offer new therapeutic opportunities for chronic SCI patients. PMID:19915486

  18. Inducing Chronic Excitotoxicity in the Mouse Spinal Cord to Investigate Lower Motor Neuron Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Blizzard, Catherine A.; Lee, K. M.; Dickson, Tracey C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the methodology for the chronic delivery of an excitotoxin to the mouse spinal cord via surgically implanted osmotic mini-pumps. Previous studies have investigated the effect of chronic application of excitotoxins in the rat, however there has been little translation of this model to the mouse. Using mice that express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), motor neuron and neuromuscular junction alterations can be investigate following targeted, long-term (28 days) exposure to the α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor excitotoxin, kainic acid. By targeting the L3-4 region of the lumbar spinal cord, with insertion of an intrathecal catheter into the subarachnoid space at L5, chronic application of the kainic acid results in slow excitotoxic death in the anterior ventral horn, with a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in the number of SMI-32 immunopositive neurons present after 28 days infusion. Use of the Thy1-YFP mice provides unrivaled visualization of the neuromuscular junction and enables the resultant distal degeneration in skeletal muscle to be observed. Both neuromuscular junction retraction at the gastrocnemius muscle and axonal fragmentation in the sciatic nerve were observed after chronic infusion of kainic acid for 28 days. Lower motor neuron, and distal neuromuscular junction, degeneration are pathological hallmarks of the devastating neurodegenerative disease Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). This mouse model will be advantageous for increasing our understanding of how the pathophysiological phenomena associated with this disease can lead to lower motor neuron loss and distal pathology, as well as providing a robust in vivo platform to test therapeutic interventions directed at excitotoxic mechanisms. PMID:26973454

  19. The stress regulator FKBP51 drives chronic pain by modulating spinal glucocorticoid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Maiarù, Maria; Tochiki, Keri K.; Cox, Marc B.; Annan, Leonette V.; Bell, Christopher G.; Feng, Xixi; Hausch, Felix; Géranton, Sandrine M.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in FKBP51 are associated with stress-related psychiatric disorders and influence the severity of pain symptoms experienced after trauma. Here, we report that FKBP51 (FK506 binding protein 51) is crucial for the full development and maintenance of long-term pain states and that this is independent from its effect on mood. Indeed, FKBP51 knock out mice but also mice with silencing of FKBP51 restricted to the spinal cord showed reduced hypersensitivity in a number of persistent pain models. FKBP51 deletion did not compromise the detection of acute painful stimuli, a critical protective mechanism. Moreover, the specific FKBP51 inhibitor SAFit2 intrathecally administered reduced the severity of an established pain state, confirming the crucial role of spinal FKBP51 in nociceptive processing. Finally, glucocorticoid signaling, which is known to modulate persistent pain states in rodents, was impaired in FKBP51 knock out mice. This suggested that FKBP51 regulates chronic pain by modulation of glucocorticoid signaling. In conclusion, FKBP51 is a central mediator of chronic pain, likely in humans as well as rodents, and is a new pharmacologically tractable target for the treatment of long term pain states. PMID:26865567

  20. Immunomodulatory and angiogenic responses induced by graphene oxide scaffolds in chronic spinal hemisected rats.

    PubMed

    López-Dolado, Elisa; González-Mayorga, Ankor; Gutiérrez, María Concepción; Serrano, María Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Attractive physic-chemical features of graphene oxide (GO) and promising results in vitro with neural cells encourage its exploration for biomedical applications including neural regeneration. Fueled by previous findings at the subacute state, we herein investigate for the first time chronic tissue responses (at 30 days) to 3D scaffolds composed of partially reduced GO (rGO) when implanted in the injured rat spinal cord. These studies aim to define fibrotic, inflammatory and angiogenic changes at the lesion site induced by the chronic implantation of these porous structures. Injured animals receiving no scaffolds show badly structured lesion zones and more cavities than those carrying rGO materials, thus pointing out a significant role of the scaffolds in injury stabilization and sealing. Notably, GFAP(+) cells and pro-regenerative macrophages are evident at their interface. Moreover, rGO scaffolds support angiogenesis around and, more importantly, inside their structure, with abundant and functional new blood vessels in whose proximities inside the scaffolds some regenerated neuronal axons are found. On the contrary, lesion areas without rGO scaffolds show a diminished quantity of blood vessels and no axons at all. These findings provide a foundation for the usefulness of graphene-based materials in the design of novel biomaterials for spinal cord repair and encourage further investigation for the understanding of neural tissue responses to this kind of materials in vivo.

  1. Epidural analgesia for childbirth: effects of newer techniques on neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Capogna, Giorgio; Camorcia, Michela

    2004-01-01

    New low-dose, local anesthetic-opioid combinations, combined spinal epidural analgesia, and new anesthetic drugs, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine, have modified the anesthetic practice in obstetric labor analgesia. These new analgesic techniques have less or no neonatal effects when compared with traditional epidural labor analgesia. They also have less effect on mode of delivery, which may in turn affect neonatal outcome. The use of very diluted or low concentrations of local anesthetic solutions may reduce their placental passage and thus the possible subtle neonatal effects. Small doses of epidural or spinal opioids alone or combined with low doses of local anesthetics does not affect the well-being of the neonate at birth. When considering the neonatal outcome, combined spinal epidural analgesia is as well tolerated as low-dose epidural analgesia. Transient fetal heart rate changes have been described immediately after the administration of intrathecal or epidural opioids. Maternal hypotension may also occur at the onset of epidural analgesia. Whether the occurrence of transient fetal heart rate changes or maternal hypotension immediately after the epidural block may influence the neonatal outcome at birth needs verification.

  2. 1H-MRS in spinal cord injury: acute and chronic metabolite alterations in rat brain and lumbar spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Erschbamer, Matthias; Öberg, Johanna; Westman, Eric; Sitnikov, Rouslan; Olson, Lars; Spenger, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A variety of tests of sensorimotor function are used to characterize outcome after experimental spinal cord injury (SCI). These tests typically do not provide information about chemical and metabolic processes in the injured CNS. Here, we used 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to monitor long-term and short-term chemical changes in the CNS in vivo following SCI. The investigated areas were cortex, thalamus/striatum and the spinal cord distal to injury. In cortex, glutamate (Glu) decreased 1 day after SCI and slowly returned towards normal levels. The combined glutamine (Gln) and Glu signal was similarly decreased in cortex, but increased in the distal spinal cord, suggesting opposite changes of the Glu/Gln metabolites in cortex and distal spinal cord. In lumbar spinal cord, a marked increase of myo-inositol was found 3 days, 14 days and 4 months after SCI. Changes in metabolite concentrations in the spinal cord were also found for choline and N-acetylaspartate. No significant changes in metabolite concentrations were found in thalamus/striatum. Multivariate data analysis allowed separation between rats with SCI and controls for spectra acquired in cortex and spinal cord, but not in thalamus/striatum. Our findings suggest MRS could become a helpful tool to monitor spatial and temporal alterations of metabolic conditions in vivo in the brain and spinal cord after SCI. We provide evidence for dynamic temporal changes at both ends of the neuraxis, cortex cerebri and distal spinal cord, while deep brain areas appear less affected. PMID:21251091

  3. Cervical epidural abscess: rare complication of bacterial endocarditis with streptococcus viridans: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Doh, Jae-Won

    2015-03-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  4. Plasticity of interneuronal networks of the functionally isolated human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The loss of walking after human spinal cord injury has been attributed to the dominance of supraspinal over spinal mechanisms. The evidence for central pattern generation in humans is limited due to the inability to conclusively isolate the circuitry from descending and afferent input. However, studying individuals following spinal cord injury with no detectable influence on spinal networks from supraspinal centers can provide insight to their interaction with afferent input. The focus of this article is on the interaction of sensory input with human spinal networks in the generation of locomotor patterns. The functionally isolated human spinal cord has the capacity to generate locomotor patterns with appropriate afferent input. Locomotor Training is a rehabilitative strategy that has evolved from animal and humans studies focused on the neural plasticity of the spinal cord and has been successful for many people with acute and chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. However, even those individuals with clinically complete spinal cord injury that generate appropriate locomotor patterns during stepping with assistance on a treadmill with body weight support cannot sustain overground walking. This suggests that although a significant control of locomotion can occur at the level of spinal interneuronal networks the level of sustainable excitability of these circuits is still compromised. Future studies should focus on approaches to increase the central state of excitability and may include neural repair strategies, pharmacological interventions or epidural stimulation in combination with Locomotor Training. PMID:18042493

  5. [Meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mouchrif, Issam; Berdaii, Adnane; Labib, Ismail; Harrandou, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is a rare but serious complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. Bacterial meningitis is mainly caused by Gram-positive cocci, implying an exogenous contamination which suggests a lack of asepsis. The evolution is usually favorable after treatment, but at the expense of increased health care costs and, sometimes, of significant neurological sequelae. We report a case of bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section. PMID:27642477

  6. Spinal cord stimulation for patients with inoperable chronic critical leg ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-pei; Fu, Wei-min; Gu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because of the prevalence of diabetes, the treatment of diabetic foot is still challenging. Even an exactly proved effective and practical method can’t be listed except vascular surgery which is not a long-term way for it. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a very promising option in the treatment algorithm of inoperable chronic critical leg ischemia (CLI). DATA SOURCES: We searched Pubmed database with key words or terms such as “spinal cord stimulation”, “ischemic pain” and “limb ischemia” appeared in the last five years. RESULTS: The mechanism of SCS is unclear. Two theories have emerged to interpret the benefits of SCS. Pain relief from SCS can be confirmed by a majority of the studies, while limb salvage and other more ambitious improvements have not come to an agreement. The complications of SCS are not fatal, but most of them are lead migration, lead connection failure, and local infection. CONCLUSIONS: SCS is a safe, promising treatment for patients with inoperable CLI. It is effective in pain reduction compared with traditional medical treatment. PMID:25215020

  7. Lower-extremity muscle atrophy and fat infiltration after chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C.D.; Craven, B.C.; Thabane, L.; Laing, A.C.; Frank-Wilson, A.W.; Kontulainen, S.A.; Papaioannou, A.; Adachi, J. D.; Giangregorio, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrophy and fatty-infiltration of lower-extremity muscle after spinal cord injury (SCI) predisposes individuals to metabolic disease and related mortality. Objectives To determine the magnitude of atrophy and fatty-infiltration of lower-extremity muscles and related factors in a group of individuals with chronic SCI and diverse impairment. Methods Muscle cross-sectional area and density were calculated from peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of the 66% site of the calf of 70 participants with chronic SCI [50 male, mean age 49 (standard deviation 12) years, C2-T12, AIS A-D] and matched controls. Regression models for muscle area and density were formed using 16 potential correlates selected a priori. Results Participants with motor-complete SCI had ≈32% lower muscle area, and ≈43% lower muscle density values relative to controls. Participants with motor-incomplete SCI had muscle area and density values that were both ≈14% lower than controls. Body mass (+), tetraplegia (+), motor function (+), spasticity (+), vigorous physical activity (+), wheelchair use (−), age (−), and waist circumference (−) were associated with muscle size and/or density in best-fit regression models. Conclusions There are modifiable factors related to muscle size, body composition, and activity level that may offer therapeutic targets for preserving metabolic health after chronic SCI. PMID:25730650

  8. Rewiring of Developing Spinal Nociceptive Circuits by Neonatal Injury and Its Implications for Pediatric Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Baccei, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Significant evidence now suggests that neonatal tissue damage can evoke long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of how injuries during a critical period of early life modulate the functional organization of synaptic networks in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of the spinal cord in a manner that favors the excessive amplification of ascending nociceptive signaling to the brain, which likely contributes to the generation and/or maintenance of pediatric chronic pain. These persistent alterations in synaptic function within the SDH may also contribute to the well-documented "priming" of developing pain pathways by neonatal tissue injury. PMID:27657152

  9. Rewiring of Developing Spinal Nociceptive Circuits by Neonatal Injury and Its Implications for Pediatric Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Baccei, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Significant evidence now suggests that neonatal tissue damage can evoke long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of how injuries during a critical period of early life modulate the functional organization of synaptic networks in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of the spinal cord in a manner that favors the excessive amplification of ascending nociceptive signaling to the brain, which likely contributes to the generation and/or maintenance of pediatric chronic pain. These persistent alterations in synaptic function within the SDH may also contribute to the well-documented “priming” of developing pain pathways by neonatal tissue injury. PMID:27657152

  10. Targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation produces long-lasting motor recovery in chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Jacob G.; Miller, Robert R.; Perlmutter, Steve I.

    2015-01-01

    Use-dependent movement therapies can lead to partial recovery of motor function after neurological injury. We attempted to improve recovery by developing a neuroprosthetic intervention that enhances movement therapy by directing spike timing-dependent plasticity in spared motor pathways. Using a recurrent neural–computer interface in rats with a cervical contusion of the spinal cord, we synchronized intraspinal microstimulation below the injury with the arrival of functionally related volitional motor commands signaled by muscle activity in the impaired forelimb. Stimulation was delivered during physical retraining of a forelimb behavior and throughout the day for 3 mo. Rats receiving this targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation (TADSS) exhibited markedly enhanced recovery compared with animals receiving targeted but open-loop spinal stimulation and rats receiving physical retraining alone. On a forelimb reach and grasp task, TADSS animals recovered 63% of their preinjury ability, more than two times the performance level achieved by the other therapy groups. Therapeutic gains were maintained for 3 additional wk without stimulation. The results suggest that activity-dependent spinal stimulation can induce neural plasticity that improves behavioral recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:26371306

  11. Targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation produces long-lasting motor recovery in chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Jacob G; Miller, Robert R; Perlmutter, Steve I

    2015-09-29

    Use-dependent movement therapies can lead to partial recovery of motor function after neurological injury. We attempted to improve recovery by developing a neuroprosthetic intervention that enhances movement therapy by directing spike timing-dependent plasticity in spared motor pathways. Using a recurrent neural-computer interface in rats with a cervical contusion of the spinal cord, we synchronized intraspinal microstimulation below the injury with the arrival of functionally related volitional motor commands signaled by muscle activity in the impaired forelimb. Stimulation was delivered during physical retraining of a forelimb behavior and throughout the day for 3 mo. Rats receiving this targeted, activity-dependent spinal stimulation (TADSS) exhibited markedly enhanced recovery compared with animals receiving targeted but open-loop spinal stimulation and rats receiving physical retraining alone. On a forelimb reach and grasp task, TADSS animals recovered 63% of their preinjury ability, more than two times the performance level achieved by the other therapy groups. Therapeutic gains were maintained for 3 additional wk without stimulation. The results suggest that activity-dependent spinal stimulation can induce neural plasticity that improves behavioral recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:26371306

  12. A modern neuroscience approach to chronic spinal pain: combining pain neuroscience education with cognition-targeted motor control training.

    PubMed

    Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Cagnie, Barbara; Roussel, Nathalie A; Dolphens, Mieke; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Danneels, Lieven

    2014-05-01

    Chronic spinal pain (CSP) is a severely disabling disorder, including nontraumatic chronic low back and neck pain, failed back surgery, and chronic whiplash-associated disorders. Much of the current therapy is focused on input mechanisms (treating peripheral elements such as muscles and joints) and output mechanisms (addressing motor control), while there is less attention to processing (central) mechanisms. In addition to the compelling evidence for impaired motor control of spinal muscles in patients with CSP, there is increasing evidence that central mechanisms (ie, hyperexcitability of the central nervous system and brain abnormalities) play a role in CSP. Hence, treatments for CSP should address not only peripheral dysfunctions but also the brain. Therefore, a modern neuroscience approach, comprising therapeutic pain neuroscience education followed by cognition-targeted motor control training, is proposed. This perspective article explains why and how such an approach to CSP can be applied in physical therapist practice.

  13. The chaperone protein clusterin may serve as a cerebrospinal fluid biomarker for chronic spinal cord disorders in the dog.

    PubMed

    Shafie, Intan N F; McLaughlin, Mark; Burchmore, Richard; Lim, Mary Ann A; Montague, Paul; Johnston, Pamela E J; Penderis, Jacques; Anderson, Thomas J

    2014-05-01

    Chronic spinal cord dysfunction occurs in dogs as a consequence of diverse aetiologies, including long-standing spinal cord compression and insidious neurodegenerative conditions. One such neurodegenerative condition is canine degenerative myelopathy (DM), which clinically is a challenge to differentiate from other chronic spinal cord conditions. Although the clinical diagnosis of DM can be strengthened by the identification of the Sod1 mutations that are observed in affected dogs, genetic analysis alone is insufficient to provide a definitive diagnosis. There is a requirement to identify biomarkers that can differentiate conditions with a similar clinical presentation, thus facilitating patient diagnostic and management strategies. A comparison of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein gel electrophoresis profile between idiopathic epilepsy (IE) and DM identified a protein band that was more prominent in DM. This band was subsequently found to contain a multifunctional protein clusterin (apolipoprotein J) that is protective against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis, oxidative stress, and also serves as an extracellular chaperone influencing protein aggregation. Western blot analysis of CSF clusterin confirmed elevated levels in DM compared to IE (p < 0.05). Analysis of spinal cord tissue from DM and control material found that clusterin expression was evident in neurons and that the clusterin mRNA levels from tissue extracts were elevated in DM compared to the control. The plasma clusterin levels was comparable between these groups. However, a comparison of clusterin CSF levels in a number of neurological conditions found that clusterin was elevated in both DM and chronic intervertebral disc disease (cIVDD) but not in meningoencephalitis and IE. These findings indicate that clusterin may potentially serve as a marker for chronic spinal cord disease in the dog; however, additional markers are required to differentiate DM from a concurrent

  14. Intensity dependent effects of tDCS on corticospinal excitability in chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Lynda M; Edwards, Dylan J; Ruffini, Giulio; Labar, Douglas; Stampas, Argyrios; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Cortes, Mar

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) intensity on corticospinal excitability and affected muscle activation in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Single blind, randomized, sham-controlled, crossover study. Setting Medical Research Institute and Rehabilitation Hospital. Participants Nine volunteers with chronic SCI and motor dysfunction in wrist extensor muscles. Intervention Three single session exposures to 20 minutes of a-tDCS (anode over the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle representation on the left primary motor cortex, cathode over the right supraorbital area), using 1 mA, 2 mA or sham stimulation, delivered at rest, with at least one week between sessions. Outcome Measures Corticospinal excitability was assessed with motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the ECR muscle using surface electromyography (EMG) following transcranial magnetic stimulation. Changes in spinal excitability, sensory threshold and muscle strength were also investigated. Results Mean MEP amplitude significantly increased by ~40% immediately following 2 mA a-tDCS (Pre 0.36±0.1 mV; Post 0.47±0.11 mV; p=0.001), but not with 1 mA or sham. Maximal voluntary EMG measures remained unaltered across all conditions. Sensory threshold significantly decreased over time following 1 mA (p=0.002) and 2 mA (p=0.039) a-tDCS, and did not change with sham. F-wave persistence showed a non-significant trend for increase (Pre: 32±12%; Post: 41±10%; Follow-up: 46±12%) following 2 mA stimulation. No adverse effects were reported with any of the experimental conditions. Conclusion Anodal-tDCS can transiently raise corticospinal excitability to affected muscles in chronic SCI patients following 2 mA stimulation. Sensory perception can improve with both 1 and 2 mA stimulation. This study gives support to the safe and effective use of a-tDCS using small electrodes in SCI patients, and highlights the importance of stimulation

  15. [Postoperative epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Donato, S; Malisano, A M; Dogareschi, T; Chiarandini, P; Spasiano, A; Pasetto, A

    1995-01-01

    Epidural analgesia with local anesthetics and opioids is one of the most effective methods for postoperative pain control. In critical patients it seems to improve outcome as well as pain control. This technique works better when started in the intraoperative time. Epidural analgesia is safe on surgical wards if nursing staff is trained in managing epidural catheters and in early detection and treatment of major and minor side effects. Nursing staff cooperates with the Acute Pain Service doctors and nurses who are on call on a 24 hour basis. Many perspective and retrospective studies showed a very low incidence of major side effects with epidurals. So we can consider it safe and effective even if we consider its invasiveness.

  16. Spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tali, E Turgut; Koc, A Murat; Oner, A Yusuf

    2015-05-01

    Spinal involvement in human brucellosis is a common condition and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas, because it is often associated with therapeutic failure. Most chronic brucellosis cases are the result of inadequate treatment of the initial episode. Recognition of spinal brucellosis is challenging. Early diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment and decrease morbidity and mortality. Radiologic evaluation has gained importance in diagnosis and treatment planning, including interventional procedures and monitoring of all spinal infections.

  17. Cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula with radiculopathy mimicking cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masahito; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Asano, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2009-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a rare case of cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) manifesting as radiculopathy of the right upper extremity that mimicked cervical spondylosis. She had a 2-month history of gradually progressive right-hand motor weakness and sensory disturbance. The initial diagnosis was cervical disk herniation. However, computed tomography with contrast medium showed abnormal enhancement at the right C5-6 and C6-7 intervertebral foramina. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium disclosed an enhanced abnormal epidural mass at the dorsal surface of the dural tube between the C5 and C6 vertebrae. T(2)-weighted MR imaging showed a slight flow void on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the spinal cord between C3 and T4. Digital subtraction angiography disclosed cervical epidural and dural AVFs fed by the C5 and C6 radicular arteries. The diagnosis was concomitant epidural and dural AVFs. The dilated internal vertebral venous plexus attributable to epidural AVF was considered to be responsible for the radiculopathy. Transarterial embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate achieved complete occlusion of the lesions. Her symptoms improved immediately and MR imaging and angiography performed 10 days postembolization showed reduction of both the epidural and dural AVFs.

  18. Precise Delivery Into Chronic Spinal Cord Injury Syringomyelic Cysts with Magnetic Nanoparticles MRI Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Morozova, Anna Y.; Abakumov, Maxim A.; Gubsky, Ilya L.; Douglas, Patricia; Feng, Shiqing; Bryukhovetskiy, Andrey S.; Chekhonin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in the deficiency of glia and neurons in cystic cavities. These syringomyelic cysts can prevent axonal regeneration and sprouting. Details of the mechanism of syringomyelic cyst formation are unknown and an effective treatment for overcoming syringomyelic cysts is not available. Material/Methods Ten adult female Wistar rats underwent contusion SCI modeling resulting in syringomyelic cyst formation. A novel method for locating the cysts was developed and employed. MRI safe silver needles were inserted through the erector spinae of anesthetized rats to create a stable reference point. MRI images of the rodent spine were taken with the needles in situ. This information was used to accurately locate the cyst and determine the 3-dimensional entry point coordinates for nanoparticle delivery. Nanoparticles were injected into the cyst during a primary injection of 8 ul and a secondary injection of 8 ul, to prove the procedure can be accurately repeated. Results None of the rats died intra- or post-operatively. The syringomyelic cysts were accurately located with the 3-dimensional entry point coordinates. After nanoparticle delivery twice into each rat, the visualized syringomyelic cyst volume significantly decreased from 5.71±0.21 mm3 to 3.23±0.364 mm3 and to 1.48±0.722 mm3. Conclusions The present study describes a novel strategy for precise nanoparticle delivery into a syringomyelic cyst, using measurements obtained from MRI images. This strategy may aid in developing a new method for studying chronic spinal cord injury and a novel treatment for syringomyelic cysts. PMID:26486048

  19. Cervical Epidural Abscess in Haemodialysis Patients by Catheter Related Infection: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gezici, Ali Riza

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment modalities, spinal epidural abscess remains a challenging problem. Early diagnosis is often difficult and treatment is always delayed. Spinal epidural abscess usually develops in patients with predisposing factors such as IV drug abuse, senillity, diabetes mellitus, spinal attempts, alcoholism, immunosuppression, liver diseases and catheterizations. It is rarely seen in cervical region. A successful treatment is only possible with early diagnosis and accurate surgical and medical treatment. Optimal management is unclear and morbidity and mortality are significant. We present two adult haemodialysis patients with end-stage renal insufficiency who developed cervical epidural abscess following central venous catheter placement. Early surgical intervention is mandatory in cases those have progressive neurological deficit and spinal deformity, and this is also increases the success rate of medical therapy. PMID:20052368

  20. Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Alterations in Subacute and Chronic Stages of a Rat Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Haller, Edward; Tajiri, Naoki; Thomson, Avery; Barretta, Jennifer; Williams, Stephanie N; Haim, Eithan D; Qin, Hua; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Abraham, Jerry V; Sanberg, Paul R; Van Loveren, Harry; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-07-01

    We previously demonstrated blood-brain barrier impairment in remote contralateral brain areas in rats at 7 and 30 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), indicating ischemic diaschisis. Here, we focused on effects of subacute and chronic focal cerebral ischemia on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We observed BSCB damage on both sides of the cervical spinal cord in rats at 7 and 30 days post-tMCAO. Major BSCB ultrastructural changes in spinal cord gray and white matter included vacuolated endothelial cells containing autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration with enlarged mitochondria, astrocyte end-feet degeneration and perivascular edema; damaged motor neurons, swollen axons with unraveled myelin in ascending and descending tracts and astrogliosis were also observed. Evans Blue dye extravasation was maximal at 7 days. There was immunofluorescence evidence of reduction of microvascular expression of tight junction occludin, upregulation of Beclin-1 and LC3B immunoreactivities at 7 days and a reduction of the latter at 30 days post-ischemia. These novel pathological alterations on the cervical spinal cord microvasculature in rats after tMCAO suggest pervasive and long-lasting BSCB damage after focal cerebral ischemia, and that spinal cord ischemic diaschisis should be considered in the pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches in patients with ischemic cerebral infarction. PMID:27283328

  1. Idiopathic Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis with an Osteolytic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Tae Keun; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (IHSP) is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disorder characterized by marked fibrosis of the spinal dura mater with unknown etiology. According to the location of the lesion, it might induce neurologic deficits by compression of spinal cord and nerve root. A 58-year old female with a 3-year history of progressive weakness in both lower extremities was referred to our institute. Spinal computed tomography (CT) scan showed an osteolytic lesion involving base of the C6 spinous process with adjacent epidural mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an epidural mass involving dorsal aspect of cervical spinal canal from C5 to C7 level, with low signal intensity on T1 and T2 weighted images and non-enhancement on T1 weighted-enhanced images. We decided to undertake surgical exploration. At the operation field, there was yellow colored, thickened fibrous tissue over the dura mater. The lesion was removed totally, and decompression of spinal cord was achieved. Symptoms improved partially after the operation. Histopathologically, fibrotic pachymeninges with scanty inflammatory cells was revealed, which was compatible with diagnosis of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Six months after operation, motor power grade of both lower extremities was normal on physical examination. However, the patient still complained of mild weakness in the right lower extremity. Although the nature of IHSP is generally indolent, decompressive surgery should be considered for the patient with definite or progressive neurologic symptoms in order to prevent further deterioration. In addition, IHSP can present as an osteolytic lesion. Differential diagnosis with neoplastic disease, including giant cell tumor, is important. PMID:25328657

  2. Idiopathic hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis with an osteolytic lesion.

    PubMed

    Jee, Tae Keun; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (IHSP) is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disorder characterized by marked fibrosis of the spinal dura mater with unknown etiology. According to the location of the lesion, it might induce neurologic deficits by compression of spinal cord and nerve root. A 58-year old female with a 3-year history of progressive weakness in both lower extremities was referred to our institute. Spinal computed tomography (CT) scan showed an osteolytic lesion involving base of the C6 spinous process with adjacent epidural mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an epidural mass involving dorsal aspect of cervical spinal canal from C5 to C7 level, with low signal intensity on T1 and T2 weighted images and non-enhancement on T1 weighted-enhanced images. We decided to undertake surgical exploration. At the operation field, there was yellow colored, thickened fibrous tissue over the dura mater. The lesion was removed totally, and decompression of spinal cord was achieved. Symptoms improved partially after the operation. Histopathologically, fibrotic pachymeninges with scanty inflammatory cells was revealed, which was compatible with diagnosis of idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis. Six months after operation, motor power grade of both lower extremities was normal on physical examination. However, the patient still complained of mild weakness in the right lower extremity. Although the nature of IHSP is generally indolent, decompressive surgery should be considered for the patient with definite or progressive neurologic symptoms in order to prevent further deterioration. In addition, IHSP can present as an osteolytic lesion. Differential diagnosis with neoplastic disease, including giant cell tumor, is important. PMID:25328657

  3. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance.

  4. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  5. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  6. Histopathological Alterations after Single Epidural Injection of Ropivacaine, Methylprednizolone Acetate, or Contrast Material in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Demetrios; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Kelekis, Alexis

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The consequences from the injection of different types of drugs in the epidural space remains unknown. Increasing evidence suggests that localized inflammation, fibrosis, and arachnoiditis can complicate sequential epidural blockades, or even epidural contrast injection. We investigate the in vivo effect of epidural injections in the epidural space in an animal model. Materials and Methods: A group of ten male adult pigs, five punctures to each at distinct vertebral interspaces under general anesthesia, were examined, testing different drugs, used regularly in the epidural space (iopamidol, methylprednisolone acetate, ropivacaine). Each site was marked with a percutaneous hook wire marker. Histological analysis of the epidural space, the meninges, and the underlying spinal cord of the punctured sites along with staining for caspase-3 followed 20 days later. Results: The epidural space did not manifest adhesions or any other pathology, and the outer surface of the dura was not impaired in any specimen. The group that had the contrast media injection showed a higher inflammation response compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). Positive staining for caspase-3 was limited to <5% of neurons with all substances used. Conclusion: No proof of arachnoiditis and/or fibrosis was noted in the epidural space with the use of the above-described drugs. A higher inflammation rate was noted with the use of contrast media.

  7. Infiltrating spinal angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Yen, Han-Lin; Tsai, Shih-Chung; Liu, Shian-Min

    2008-10-01

    Infiltrating angiolipomas are rarely encountered in the spine. We present a case involving a 71-year-old man with a dorsal epidural angiolipoma at the T5-T7 level. The tumor involved the T5-T6 vertebral bodies and left pedicle. The patient presented with acute paraparesis and MRI showed a homogeneously hyphointense lesion on T1-weighted images. The epidural component of the tumor was removed via laminectomy to achieve adequate cord decompression. The patient was symptom-free at a 2-year follow-up. This report emphasizes the unusual clinical presentation and MRI features of an infiltrating spinal angiolipoma and discusses therapeutic management options.

  8. Motor Alterations Induced by Chronic 4-Aminopyridine Infusion in the Spinal Cord In vivo: Role of Glutamate and GABA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Gómez, Rafael; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motor neuron (MN) degeneration is the pathological hallmark of MN diseases, a group of neurodegenerative disorders clinically manifested as muscle fasciculations and hyperreflexia, followed by paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. Ample evidence supports a role of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in motor death. In previous work we showed that stimulation of glutamate release from nerve endings by perfusion of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in the rat hippocampus induces seizures and neurodegeneration, and that AMPA infusion in the spinal cord produces paralysis and MN death. On these bases, in this work we have tested the effect of the chronic infusion of 4-AP in the spinal cord, using implanted osmotic minipumps, on motor activity and on MN survival, and the mechanisms underlying this effect. 4-AP produced muscle fasciculations and motor deficits assessed in two motor tests, which start 2–3 h after the implant, which ameliorated spontaneously within 6–7 days, but no neurodegeneration. These effects were prevented by both AMPA and NMDA receptors blockers. The role of GABAA receptors was also explored, and we found that chronic infusion of bicuculline induced moderate MN degeneration and enhanced the hyperexcitation produced by 4-AP. Unexpectedly, the GABAAR agonist muscimol also induced motor deficits and failed to prevent the MN death induced by AMPA. We conclude that motor alterations induced by chronic 4-AP infusion in the spinal cord in vivo is due to ionotropic glutamate receptor overactivation and that blockade of GABAergic neurotransmission induces MN death under chronic conditions. These results shed light on the role of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the regulation of MN excitability in the spinal cord. PMID:27242406

  9. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  10. Alterations in Mouse Hypothalamic Adipokine Gene Expression and Leptin Signaling following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury and with Advanced Age

    PubMed Central

    Bigford, Gregory E.; Bracchi-Ricard, Valerie C.; Nash, Mark S.; Bethea, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an accelerated trajectory of several cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and related aging characteristics, however the molecular mechanisms that are activated have not been explored. Adipokines and leptin signaling are known to play a critical role in neuro-endocrine regulation of energy metabolism, and are now implicated in central inflammatory processes associated with CVD. Here, we examine hypothalamic adipokine gene expression and leptin signaling in response to chronic spinal cord injury and with advanced age. We demonstrate significant changes in fasting-induced adipose factor (FIAF), resistin (Rstn), long-form leptin receptor (LepRb) and suppressor of cytokine-3 (SOCS3) gene expression following chronic SCI and with advanced age. LepRb and Jak2/stat3 signaling is significantly decreased and the leptin signaling inhibitor SOCS3 is significantly elevated with chronic SCI and advanced age. In addition, we investigate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the uncoupled protein response (UPR) as a biological hallmark of leptin resistance. We observe the activation of the ER stress/UPR proteins IRE1, PERK, and eIF2alpha, demonstrating leptin resistance in chronic SCI and with advanced age. These findings provide evidence for adipokine-mediated inflammatory responses and leptin resistance as contributing to neuro-endocrine dysfunction and CVD risk following SCI and with advanced age. Understanding the underlying mechanisms contributing to SCI and age related CVD may provide insight that will help direct specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:22815920

  11. Chronic At- and Below-Level Pain after Moderate Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Rodel E.; Houlé, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Chronic neuropathic pain is a significant consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that is associated with evoked pain, including allodynia and/or hyperalgesia. Allodynia is defined as a painful response to normally innocuous stimuli, and hyperalgesia occurs when there is an amplified pain response to normally noxious stimuli. We describe a model of a unilateral cervical level (C5) contusion injury where sensory recovery was assessed weekly for 6 weeks in 32 adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia are detectable in the fore- and hindpaws as early as 7 days post-injury (dpi) and persist for at least 42 days. Paw withdrawal latency in response to a noxious thermal stimulus significantly intra-animal pre-operative values. Change in paw withdrawal latency plateaued at 21 dpi. Interestingly, bilateral forepaw allodynia develops in fewer than 40% of rats as measured by von Frey monofilament testing. Similar results occur in the hindpaws, where bilateral allodynia occurs in 46% of rats with SCI. The contralesional forepaw and both hindpaws of rats showed a slight increase in paw withdrawal threshold to tactile stimuli acutely after SCI, corresponding to ipsilesional forelimb motor deficits that resolve over time. That there is no difference among allodynic and non-allodynic groups in overall spared tissue or specifically of the dorsal column or ventrolateral white matter where ascending sensory tracts reside suggests that SCI-induced pain does not depend solely on the size or extent of the lesion, but that other mechanisms are in play. These observations provide a valid model system for future testing of therapeutic interventions to prevent the onset or to reduce the debilitating effects of chronic neuropathic pain after SCI. PMID:23216008

  12. Correlates of low testosterone in men with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Barbonetti, A; Vassallo, M R C; Pacca, F; Cavallo, F; Costanzo, M; Felzani, G; Francavilla, S; Francavilla, F

    2014-09-01

    Although high rates of serum testosterone deficiency have been reported in men with spinal cord injury (SCI), its determinants and attributes are not yet established. The aim of this study was to recognize, among putative determinants and attributes of androgen deficiency, those significantly associated to low testosterone after adjustment for confounders recognizable in men with chronic SCI. A biochemical androgen deficiency (total testosterone <300 ng/dL) was exhibited by 18 of 51 patients (35.3%). Significant correlates of testosterone levels were as follows: weekly leisure time physical activity (LTPA) explored by the LTPA Questionnaire for people with SCI, body mass index (BMI), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), triglycerides and sexual symptoms, explored by the aging males' symptom (AMS) questionnaire. At the multiple linear regression analysis, among putative determinants of low testosterone, only weekly LTPA and BMI exhibited a significant association with testosterone levels, explaining 54.2 and 9.0% of testosterone variability respectively. At the linear regression models, among various putative attributes of androgen deficiency, only lower sexual desire and, at a lesser extent, higher HOMA-IR, exhibited significant associations with lower testosterone levels, after adjustment for BMI, age, comorbidities and weekly LTPA. In conclusion, poor LTPA, high BMI and low sexual desire are independent predictors of low testosterone in men with chronic SCI. This is relevant to clinical practice, as all these features are routinely assessed in rehabilitation settings for SCI. As poor LTPA and high BMI are modifiable life-style related risk factors, prospective studies could clarify whether life-style modification could increase the level of testosterone and improve the low sexual desire, relevant clinical attribute of low testosterone in men with SCI. PMID:24925765

  13. A missed Behçet’s case presenting with spontaneous epidural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Levent; Mengi, Gönen; Özyemişçi-Taşkıran, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Spinal vascular events related to Behçet’s disease are relatively uncommon. Deep vein thrombosis is the most frequent vascular involvement. Anticoagulant therapy is a debated issue in Behçet’s disease. In this case report, we present a patient with a delayed diagnosis of Behçet’s disease after development of cervical epidural hematoma following anticoagulant therapy due to deep venous thrombosis. Anticoagulant therapy without immunosuppressive therapy leading to uncontrolled systemic inflammation may be the cause of spinal epidural hematoma. On the other hand, epidural vascular involvement as a vasculitic manifestation of Behçet’s disease in conjunction with anticoagulant therapy may have predisposed to spontaneous bleeding via increased fragility or microaneurysms in epidural arteries. In this case report, the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to Behçet’s disease is emphasized.

  14. Chronic unilateral locked facet joint with spinal cord injury in a 26-month-old child: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Luo, Peng; Xu, Hua-Zi; Chi, Yong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the successful posterior surgical reduction and fusion on a 26-month-old child with chronic unilateral locked facet joint and spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods A 26-month-old child with chronic unilateral locked facet joint and SCI treated by posterior surgical reduction and fusion. Plaster external fixation was applied and rehabilitation exercise was trained post-operatively. Results Chronic unilateral locked facet joint was reduced successfully and bone fusion of C4/5 was achieved 3 months after surgery. The function of both lower limbs was improved 1 year after surgery, aided with physical rehabilitation. Conclusion Unilateral locked facet joint in pediatric population is rare. Few clinical experiences were found in the literature. Non-surgical treatment has advantages of not being invasive and is preferred for acute patients; however, it may not be suitable for chronic unilateral locked facet joint with SCI, in which surgical intervention is needed. PMID:24673578

  15. Acupuncture for Chronic Urinary Retention due to Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Zhai, Yanbing; Wu, Jiani; Zhao, Shitong; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    No systematic review has been published on the use of acupuncture for the treatment of chronic urinary retention (CUR) due to spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for CUR due to SCI. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including 334 patients with CUR due to SCI were included. Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture plus rehabilitation training was much better than rehabilitation training alone in decreasing postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume (MD −109.44, 95% CI −156.53 to −62.35). Likewise, a combination of acupuncture and aseptic intermittent catheterization was better than aseptic intermittent catheterization alone in improving response rates (RR 1.23, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.38). No severe adverse events were reported. In conclusion, acupuncture as a complementary therapy may have a potential effect in CUR due to SCI in decreasing PVR and improving bladder voiding. Additionally, acupuncture may be safe in treating CUR caused by SCI. However, due to the lack of high quality RCTs, we could not draw any definitive conclusions. More well-designed RCTs are needed to provide strong evidence. PMID:27190542

  16. Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Chronic Lower Back Pain in Older Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Karuza, Jurgis; Dunn, Andrew S.; Savino, Dorian; Katz, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic lower back pain (CLBP) is problematic in older veterans. Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is commonly utilized for CLBP in older adults, yet there are few randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating SMT. Methods: The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of SMT to a sham intervention on pain (Visual Analogue Scale, SF-36 pain subscale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index), and physical function (SF-36 subscale, Timed Up and Go) by performing a randomized placebo-controlled trial at 2 Veteran Affairs Clinics. Results: Older veterans (≥ 65 years of age) who were naive to chiropractic were recruited. A total of 136 were included in the study with 69 being randomly assigned to SMT and 67 to sham intervention. Patients were treated 2 times per week for 4 weeks assessing outcomes at baseline, 5, and 12 weeks postbaseline. Both groups demonstrated significant decrease in pain and disability at 5 and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, there was no significant difference in pain and a statistically significant decline in disability scores in the SMT group when compared to the sham intervention group. There were no significant differences in adverse events between the groups. Conclusions: The SMT did not result in greater improvement in pain when compared to our sham intervention; however, SMT did demonstrate a slightly greater improvement in disability at 12 weeks. The fact that patients in both groups showed improvements suggests the presence of a nonspecific therapeutic effect. PMID:26246937

  17. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h. PMID:24071567

  18. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h.

  19. Chronic Ingestion of Advanced Glycation End Products Induces Degenerative Spinal Changes and Hypertrophy in Aging Pre-Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Illien-Jünger, Svenja; Lu, Young; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Cai, Weijing; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E.; Iatridis, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and pathological spinal changes are major causes of back pain, which is the top cause of global disability. Obese and diabetic individuals are at increased risk for back pain and musculoskeletal complications. Modern diets contain high levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), cyto-toxic components which are known contributors to obesity, diabetes and accelerated aging pathologies. There is little information about potential effects of AGE rich diet on spinal pathology, which may be a contributing cause for back pain which is common in obese and diabetic individuals. This study investigated the role of specific AGE precursors (e.g. methylglyoxal-derivatives (MG)) on IVD and vertebral pathologies in aging C57BL6 mice that were fed isocaloric diets with standard (dMG+) or reduced amounts of MG derivatives (dMG-; containing 60-70% less dMG). dMG+ mice exhibited a pre-diabetic phenotype, as they were insulin resistant but not hyperglycemic. Vertebrae of dMG+ mice displayed increased cortical-thickness and cortical-area, greater MG-AGE accumulation and ectopic calcification in vertebral endplates. IVD morphology of dMG+ mice exhibited ectopic calcification, hypertrophic differentiation and glycosaminoglycan loss relative to dMG- mice. Overall, chronic exposure to dietary AGEs promoted age-accelerated IVD degeneration and vertebral alterations involving ectopic calcification which occurred in parallel with insulin resistance, and which were prevented with dMG- diet. This study described a new mouse model for diet-induced spinal degeneration, and results were in support of the hypothesis that chronic AGE ingestion could be a factor contributing to a pre-diabetic state, ectopic calcifications in spinal tissues, and musculoskeletal complications that are more generally known to occur with chronic diabetic conditions. PMID:25668621

  20. Warming Moxibustion Relieves Chronic Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rats: Relations to Spinal Dynorphin and Orphanin-FQ System

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Liu, Hui-Rong; Yi, Tao; Wu, Lu-Yi; Liu, Xi-Ru; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Yin; Ma, Xiao-Peng; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2013-01-01

    As a twin therapy of acupuncture in traditional Chinese medicine, moxibustion has shown its effects in relieving abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and IBS rat models, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. In this paper, we determined the role of spinal dynorphin and orphanin-FQ system in analgesic effect of warming moxibustion (WM) on chronic visceral hyperalgesia (CVH) in IBS-like rat model. Here, we show that (1) repeated WM at bilateral ST25 and ST37 acupoints markedly attenuated the abdominal withdrawal reflex scores in CVH rats; (2) intrathecal administration of κ receptor antagonist prior to WM significantly attenuated the WM analgesia and dynorphinA (1-17) enhanced the WM analgesia. WM significantly reinforced the upregulation of spinal dynorphin mRNA/protein and κ receptor mRNA levels in CVH rats; (3) intrathecal administration of orphanin-FQ receptor antagonist prior to WM significantly attenuated the WM analgesia and orphanin-FQ enhanced the WM analgesia. WM reinforced the upregulation of spinal orphanin-FQ mRNA/protein and orphanin-FQ receptor mRNA levels in CVH rats. These results suggest that moxibustion may relieve CVH at least in part by activating spinal dynorphin and orphanin-FQ system. PMID:23573158

  1. Preclinical evidence supporting the clinical development of central pattern generator-modulating therapies for chronic spinal cord-injured patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ambulation or walking is one of the main gaits of locomotion. In terrestrial animals, it may be defined as a series of rhythmic and bilaterally coordinated movement of the limbs which creates a forward movement of the body. This applies regardless of the number of limbs—from arthropods with six or more limbs to bipedal primates. These fundamental similarities among species may explain why comparable neural systems and cellular properties have been found, thus far, to control in similar ways locomotor rhythm generation in most animal models. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the known structural and functional features associated with central nervous system (CNS) networks that are involved in the control of ambulation and other stereotyped motor patterns—specifically Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) that produce basic rhythmic patterned outputs for locomotion, micturition, ejaculation, and defecation. Although there is compelling evidence of their existence in humans, CPGs have been most studied in reduced models including in vitro isolated preparations, genetically-engineered mice and spinal cord-transected animals. Compared with other structures of the CNS, the spinal cord is generally considered as being well-preserved phylogenetically. As such, most animal models of spinal cord-injured (SCI) should be considered as valuable tools for the development of novel pharmacological strategies aimed at modulating spinal activity and restoring corresponding functions in chronic SCI patients. PMID:24910602

  2. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension following epidural anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    An, X; Wu, S; He, F; Li, C; Fang, X

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) following epidural anesthesia. In this case, typical clinical symptoms and concomitant use of regional anesthesia led to the misdiagnosis of SIH as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). A 56-year-old man received a successful appendectomy under epidural anesthesia performed at a T11-T12 intravertebral space. About 20 h later, the patient started complaining about orthostatic headache when getting up from his lying position, then a PDPH was diagnosed. However, the patient did not respond well to conservative treatment. Three months later, the first epidural blood patch was performed at the L3-L4 level, however, the patient still had an orthostatic headache. Five days later, spine magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple meningeal diverticulum in the cervicothoracic junction, and computerized tomography myelography demonstrated a C5-C6 spinal dural tear suggesting cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Finally, the patient was diagnosed as SIH and received a second epidural blood patch at the T2-T3 level and responded with improvements in symptomatology. The patient was then discharged, and at a 2-year follow-up, he had fully recovered except for some remaining neck stiffness. This case illustrates that SIH was misdiagnosed as PDPH because of the common clinical symptoms and potentially confounding events (epidural/spinal anesthesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. For a successful treatment of SIH, a timely epidural blood patch should be considered as soon as the diagnosis is established. PMID:26939569

  3. Preliminary Results of Spinal Cord Compression Recurrence Evaluation (Score-1) Study Comparing Short-Course Versus Long-Course Radiotherapy for Local Control of Malignant Epidural Spinal Cord Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Lange, Marisa; Veninga, Theo; Rudat, Volker; Bajrovic, Amira; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Dunst, Juergen; Schild, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the results of short-course vs. long-course radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression. Methods and Materials: A total of 231 patients who underwent RT between January 2006 and August 2007 were included in this two-arm prospective nonrandomized study. Patients received short-course (n = 114) or long-course (n = 117) RT. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints were local control (LC), functional outcome, and overall survival (OS). An additional 10 potential prognostic factors were investigated for outcomes. PFS and LC were judged according to motor function, not pain control. Results: The PFS rate at 12 months was 72% after long-course and 55% after short-course RT (p = 0.034). These results were confirmed in a multivariate analysis (relative risk, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.79; p = 0.046). The 12-month LC rate was 77% and 61% after long-course and short-course RT, respectively (p = 0.032). These results were also confirmed in a multivariate analysis (relative risk, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.24; p = 0.035). The corresponding 12-month OS rates were 32% and 25% (p = 0.37). Improvement in motor function was observed in 30% and 28% of patients undergoing long-course vs. short-course RT, respectively (p = 0.61). In addition to radiation schedule, PFS was associated with the interval to developing motor deficits before RT (relative risk, 1.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.55; p = 0.024). LC was associated only with the radiation schedule. Post-RT motor function was associated with performance status (p = 0.031), tumor type (p = 0.013), interval to developing motor deficits (p = 0.001), and bisphosphonate administration (p = 0.006). OS was associated with performance status (p < 0.001), number of involved vertebrae (p = 0.007), visceral metastases (p < 0.001), ambulatory status (p < 0.001), and bisphosphonate administration (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Short-course and long

  4. Mid-lumbar segments are needed for the expression of locomotion in chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Langlet, C; Leblond, H; Rossignol, S

    2005-05-01

    In acute experiments performed in decerebrated and spinalized (T13) cats, an intraspinal injection of clonidine, a noradrenergic agonist, restricted to mid-lumbar segments L3-L4, can induce hindlimb locomotion, whereas yohimbine, a noradrenergic antagonist, can block spinal locomotion, and a second spinal lesion at L4 can abolish all locomotor activity. In the present study, we investigated whether the abolition of locomotion after this second spinal lesion was due to an acute spinal shock or to the functional disconnection of the rostral and caudal lumbar segments. In seven cats, first spinalized at T13 and having recovered treadmill locomotion, a second transection was performed at lower lumbar levels. Video and electromyographic recordings were used to evaluate locomotor performance. Results show that after a second transection at L2 or rostral L3 levels, spinal locomotion was maintained; when the second lesion was performed at caudal L3 or L4, all locomotor activity was abolished even after several weeks of attempted locomotor training; vigorous fast paw shakes (FPS) were observed in all cases; and after an intraperitoneal injection of clonidine in cats with a second transection below L4, perineal stimulation induced hyperextension of the hindlimbs but no locomotion. Considering that the main motoneuron pools of the hindlimbs are caudal to L4 and are still functional after the second spinal transection, as evidenced by the presence of FPS, we conclude that the mid-lumbar spinal segments are essential for the specific expression of spinal locomotion but not necessarily for other rhythmic motor patterns. PMID:15647400

  5. The epidural and intrathecal administration of somatotrophin-release inhibiting factor: native and synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Beltrutti, D P; Moessinger, S; Varrassi, G

    2000-01-01

    It is well-known that morphine is the king of analgesics. It is widely used, and administered in various ways for the control of acute and chronic pain states. There are, however, certain types of pain and certain clinical conditions in which morphine cannot be used due to the risk of possible complications. These are usually pain states associated with intracranial hypertension, the presence of serious respiratory problems, the onset of major opioid tolerance, persistent vomiting, and so on. The search for "alternative analgesics" has been in progress for a decade, alternatives that could be used alone or in combination for spinal administration in the treatment of complex chronic pain states and with a low incidence of secondary effects. Today, research is carefully assessing the clinical effectiveness and the side effects of a series of drugs for spinal administration, that is, epidural or intrathecal, such as the new narcotics, alpha-2 agonists, central muscle relaxants, calcitonin, and local anesthetics. In this alternative analgesic category we have to mention the somatotrophin-release inhibiting factor (SRIF), which is an ubiquitous native hormone with widespread, predominantly inhibitory actions, and octreotide, its synthetic analogue. In this article we review the literature on the natural drug and its synthetic analogue, paying particular attention to the problems connected with intraspinal administration and analgesic properties.

  6. Transient bladder and fecal incontinence following epidural blood patch

    PubMed Central

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Palacio-Abinzada, Francisco J.; Campollo, Sara Chacón; Laporta-Báez, Yolanda; Mendez Cendón, Jose Carlos; López-García, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the currently accepted treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache because of its high initial success rates and infrequent complications. Many authors recommended a small volume (10-20 mL) of blood to be delivered for an effective EBP. Here, we report an obstetric patient who developed a transient bladder and fecal incontinence after 19 mL of blood EBP at L1 -L2 level. Since the magnetic resonance image did not demonstrate any definitive spinal cord lesion, the exact mechanism remains unclear. We suggest that accumulation of blood performed at L1 to L2 level in a closed relationship with the sacral cord, may have trigger a significant pressure elevation of the epidural space at this level, resulting in a temporal spinal cord-related injury in the sacral cord. PMID:26543470

  7. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-11-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  8. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  9. Functional Recovery from Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation Combined with Treadmill Training in Mice with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Syoichi; Nishimura, Soraya; Iwai, Hiroki; Sugai, Keiko; Zhang, Liang; Shinozaki, Munehisa; Iwanami, Akio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Liu, Meigen; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Most studies targeting chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) have concluded that neural stem/progenitor cell (NS/PC) transplantation exerts only a subclinical recovery; this in contrast to its remarkable effect on acute and subacute SCI. To determine whether the addition of rehabilitative intervention enhances the effect of NS/PC transplantation for chronic SCI, we used thoracic SCI mouse models to compare manifestations secondary to both transplantation and treadmill training, and the two therapies combined, with a control group. Significant locomotor recovery in comparison with the control group was only achieved in the combined therapy group. Further investigation revealed that NS/PC transplantation improved spinal conductivity and central pattern generator activity, and that treadmill training promoted the appropriate inhibitory motor control. The combined therapy enhanced these independent effects of each single therapy, and facilitated neuronal differentiation of transplanted cells and maturation of central pattern generator activity synergistically. Our data suggest that rehabilitative treatment represents a therapeutic option for locomotor recovery after NS/PC transplantation, even in chronic SCI. PMID:27485458

  10. Functional Recovery from Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation Combined with Treadmill Training in Mice with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Syoichi; Nishimura, Soraya; Iwai, Hiroki; Sugai, Keiko; Zhang, Liang; Shinozaki, Munehisa; Iwanami, Akio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Liu, Meigen; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Most studies targeting chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) have concluded that neural stem/progenitor cell (NS/PC) transplantation exerts only a subclinical recovery; this in contrast to its remarkable effect on acute and subacute SCI. To determine whether the addition of rehabilitative intervention enhances the effect of NS/PC transplantation for chronic SCI, we used thoracic SCI mouse models to compare manifestations secondary to both transplantation and treadmill training, and the two therapies combined, with a control group. Significant locomotor recovery in comparison with the control group was only achieved in the combined therapy group. Further investigation revealed that NS/PC transplantation improved spinal conductivity and central pattern generator activity, and that treadmill training promoted the appropriate inhibitory motor control. The combined therapy enhanced these independent effects of each single therapy, and facilitated neuronal differentiation of transplanted cells and maturation of central pattern generator activity synergistically. Our data suggest that rehabilitative treatment represents a therapeutic option for locomotor recovery after NS/PC transplantation, even in chronic SCI. PMID:27485458

  11. Modularity of endpoint force patterns evoked using intraspinal microstimulation in treadmill trained and/or neurotrophin-treated chronic spinal cats.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Vanessa S; Lemay, Michel A

    2009-03-01

    Chronic spinal cats with neurotrophin-secreting fibroblasts (NTF) transplants recover locomotor function. To ascertain possible mechanisms, intraspinal microstimulation was used to examine the lumbar spinal cord motor output of four groups of chronic spinal cats: untrained cats with unmodified-fibroblasts graft (Op-control) or NTF graft and locomotor-trained cats with unmodified-fibroblasts graft (Trained) or NTF graft (Combination). Forces generated via intraspinal microstimulation at different hindlimb positions were recorded and interpolated, generating representations of force patterns at the paw. Electromyographs (EMGs) of hindlimb muscles, medial gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris posterior, were also collected to examine relationships between activated muscles and force pattern types. The same four force pattern types obtained in spinal-intact cats were found in chronic spinal cats. Proportions of force patterns in spinal cats differed significantly from those in intact cats, but no significant differences in proportions were observed among individual spinal groups (Op-control, NTF, Trained, and Combination). However, the proportions of force patterns differed significantly between trained (Trained and Combination) and untrained groups (Op-control and NTF). Thus the frequency of expression of some response types was modified by injury and to a lesser extent by training. Force pattern laminar distribution differed in spinal cats compared with intact, with more responses obtained dorsally (0-1,000 microm) and fewer ventrally (3,200-5,200 microm). EMG analysis demonstrated that muscle activity highly predicted some force pattern types and was independent of hindlimb position. We conclude that spinal motor output modularity is preserved after injury.

  12. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  13. Adverse events after endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Annovazzi, P; Amato, M P; Capello, E; Cavalla, P; Cocco, E; Falcini, M; Gallo, A; Patti, F; Perini, P; Rodegher, M E; Rovaris, M; Rottoli, M R; Comi, G

    2013-06-01

    Although it is debated whether chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) plays a role in multiple sclerosis (MS) development, many patients undergo endovascular treatment (ET) of CCSVI. A study is ongoing in Italy to evaluate the clinical outcome of ET. Severe adverse events (AEs) occurred in 15/462 subjects at a variable interval after ET: jugular thrombosis in seven patients, tetraventricular hydrocephalus, stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, status epilepticus, aspiration pneumonia, hypertension with tachicardia, or bleeding of bedsore in the remaining seven cases. One patient died because of myocardial infarction 10 weeks after ET. The risk of severe AEs related to ET for CCSVI must be carefully considered.

  14. Decorin blocks scarring and cystic cavitation in acute and induces scar dissolution in chronic spinal cord wounds.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zubair; Bansal, Daljeet; Tizzard, Katie; Surey, Sarina; Esmaeili, Maryam; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann

    2014-04-01

    In the injured central nervous system (CNS), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/2-induced scarring and wound cavitation impede axon regeneration implying that a combination of both scar suppression and axogenic treatments is required to achieve functional recovery. After treating acute and chronic dorsal funicular spinal cord lesions (DFL) in adult rats with the pan-TGF-β1/2 antagonist Decorin, we report that in: (1), acute DFL, the development of all injury parameters was significantly retarded e.g., wound cavity area by 68%, encapsulation of the wound by a glia limitans accessoria (GLA) by 65%, GLA basal lamina thickness by 94%, fibronectin, NG2 and Sema-3A deposition by 87%, 48% and 48%, respectively, and both macrophage and reactive microglia accumulations by 60%; and (2), chronic DFL, all the above parameters were attenuated to a lesser extent e.g., wound cavity area by 11%, GLA encapsulation by 25%, GLA basal lamina thickness by 31%, extracellular fibronectin, NG2 and Sema-3A deposition by 58%, 22% and 29%, respectively, and macrophage and reactive microglia accumulations by 44%. Moreover, in acute and chronic DFL, levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were raised (by 236% and 482%, respectively), as were active-MMP-2 (by 64% and 91%, respectively) and active-MMP-9 (by 122% and 18%, respectively), while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was suppressed (by 56% and 23%, respectively) and active-TIMP-1 and active TIMP-2 were both lower but only significantly suppressed in acute DFL (by 56 and 21%, respectively). These findings demonstrate that both scar tissue mass and cavitation are attenuated in acute and chronic spinal cord wounds by Decorin treatment and suggest that the dominant effect of Decorin during acute scarring is anti-fibrogenic through suppression of inflammatory fibrosis by neutralisation of TGF-β1/2 whereas, in chronic lesions, Decorin-induction of tPA and MMP (concomitant with reduced complimentary levels of TIMP and PAI-1

  15. Intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells promotes functional recovery in a model of chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomonori; Sasaki, Masanori; Kataoka-Sasaki, Yuko; Nakazaki, Masahito; Nagahama, Hiroshi; Oka, Shinichi; Oshigiri, Tsutomu; Takebayashi, Tsuneo; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Kocsis, Jeffery D; Honmou, Osamu

    2016-10-29

    Intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adult bone marrow improves behavioral function in rat models of spinal cord injury (SCI). However, most studies have focused on the acute or subacute phase of SCI. In the present study, MSCs derived from bone marrow of rats were intravenously infused 10weeks after the induction of a severe contusive SCI. Open field locomotor function was assessed weekly until 20weeks post-SCI. Motor recovery was greater in the MSC-treated group with rapid improvement beginning in earlier post-infusion times than in the vehicle-treated group. Blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) integrity was assessed by the intravenous infusion of Evans Blue (EvB) with spectrophotometric quantitation of its leakage into the parenchyma. In MSC-treated rats, BSCB leakage was reduced. Immunohistochemical staining for RECA-1 and PDGFR-β showed increased microvasculature/repair-neovascularization in MSC-treated rats. There was extensive remyelination around the lesion center and increased sprouting of the corticospinal tract and serotonergic fibers after MSC infusion. These results indicate that the systemic infusion of MSCs results in functional improvement that is associated with structural changes in the chronically injured spinal cord including stabilization of the BSCB, axonal sprouting/regeneration and remyelination. PMID:27586052

  16. Primary lumbar epidural abscess without spondylodiscitis caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum diagnosed by 16S rRNA PCR.

    PubMed

    Sanmillán, Jose Luis; Pelegrín, Iván; Rodríguez, David; Ardanuy, Carmen; Cabellos, Carmen

    2013-10-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old woman who presented a primary spinal epidural abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This is the second report in the medical literature to associate this organism with a primary spinal epidural abscess without spondylodiscitis. After treatment with emergency laminectomy followed by 8 weeks of antibiotic treatment the patient was cured. Oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 h) was the definitive choice of treatment. F. necrophorum spinal epidural abscess is rare, although samples for anaerobic culture should be collected in order to improve detection of anaerobic spinal infections. PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA permits early diagnosis in anaerobic infections.

  17. Traumatic epidural hematoma in children.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Giovanni; Caroli, Emanuela; Raco, Antonino; Salvati, Maurizio; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of childhood acute epidural hematoma and to report our experience in recent years. A series of 35 patients below the age of 15 years treated for acute epidural hematoma at our institution between June 1991 and December 2000 was analyzed in detail. Pediatric epidural hematoma presents both age-related and atypical features when compared with epidural hematoma in adults. In selected cases, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma results in an excellent outcome. Outcomes seem to be directly related to the patient's preoperative neurologic status and the presence of associated intracranial lesions.

  18. Chronic Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Impairs Ejaculatory Reflexes in Male Rats: Partial Recovery by Systemic Infusions of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist 7OHDPAT.

    PubMed

    Kozyrev, Natalie; Staudt, Michael D; Brown, Arthur; Coolen, Lique M

    2016-05-15

    Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes major disruption of ejaculatory function in men. Ejaculation is a reflex and the spinal generator for ejaculatory reflexes in the rat has been located in the lumbosacral spinal cord. The effects of SCI on the rat spinal ejaculation generator and ejaculatory reflexes remain understudied. The first goal of the current study was to establish the effects of chronic SCI on the function of the spinal ejaculation generator. Male rats received a contusion injury of the spinal cord at spinal level T6-T7. Ejaculatory reflexes elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) were evaluated in injured and control rats at 4-6 weeks following SCI. SCI males demonstrated significant reductions in bursting of the bulbocavernosus muscle (BCM), an indicator for expulsion phase of ejaculation, and in seminal vesicle pressure (SVP) increases, an indicator for the emission phase of ejaculation, following DPN stimulation. Thus, contusion SCI resulted in long-term impairment of ejaculatory reflexes. The D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (7OHDPAT) facilitates ejaculation in spinal cord intact rats, thus the second goal of the current study was to test whether subcutaneous infusions of 7OHDPAT can facilitate ejaculatory reflexes in rats with chronic SCI. Male rats received a contusion injury at T6-T7 and effects of systemic administration of 7OHDPAT (1 mg/kg) were tested 4-5 weeks following injury. Results showed that 7OHDPAT administration facilitated ejaculatory reflexes in SCI males with or without DPN stimulation, provided that supraspinal inputs to the lumbar cord were severed by transection just prior to evaluating the reflex. Thus, 7OHDPAT administration in SCI males was able to overcome the detrimental effects of SCI on ejaculatory reflexes.

  19. Recurrent autonomic dysreflexia due to chronic aortic dissection in an adult male with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Hughes, Peter L; Oo, Tun; Soni, Bakul M

    2008-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a hypertensive clinical emergency for persons with spinal cord injury at T-6 level or above. Recurrent autonomic dysreflexia is uncommon in spinal cord injury patients and is usually caused by noxious stimuli that cannot be removed promptly, e.g., somatic pain, abdominal distension. A 61-year-old man, who sustained tetraplegia at C-5 (ASIA-A) 38 years ago, was admitted with chest infection. Computerised tomography (CT) of the chest showed the ascending aorta to measure 4 cm in anteroposterior diameter; descending thoracic aorta measured 3.5 cm. No dissection was seen. Normal appearances of abdominal aorta were seen. He was treated with noninvasive ventilation, antibiotics, and diuretics. Nineteen days later, when there was sudden deterioration in his clinical condition, CT of the pulmonary angiogram was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. This showed no pulmonary embolus, but the upper abdominal aorta showed some dissection with thrombosis of the false lumen. Blood pressure was controlled with perindopril 2 mg, once a day, doxazosin 4 mg, twice a day, and furosemide 20 mg, twice a day. Since this patient did not show clinical features of mesenteric or lower limb ischaemia, the vascular surgeon did not recommend subdiaphragmatic aortic replacement. This patient subsequently developed recurrent episodes of autonomic dysreflexia. Each acute episode of dysreflexia was controlled by nifedipine given sublingually in doses varying from 5 to 20 mg. No inciting cause for autonomic dysreflexia could be found other than chronic aortic dissection. This patient's medication was then changed to doxazosin 8 mg, twice a day, and sustained-release nifedipine 10 mg, twice a day, which helped to prevent recurrent autonomic dysreflexia. Chronic aortic dissection is a very rare cause for recurrent autonomic dysreflexia in ageing spinal cord injury patients. When the inciting cause for dysreflexia is not amenable for treatment, recurrent dysreflexic

  20. Effect of Overground Training Augmented By Mental Practice On Gait Velocity in Chronic, Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kelli G.; Gramer, Robert; Butler, Laine; Cramer, Steven C.; Hade, Erinn; Page, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare efficacy of a regimen combining mental practice (MP) with overground training with the efficacy of a regimen comprised of overground training only on gait velocity and lower extremity motor outcomes in individuals with chronic (> 12 months post injury), incomplete, spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Randomized controlled, single blinded, study Setting Outpatient rehabilitation laboratories located in the Midwestern and Western United States Participants 18 subjects with chronic, incomplete SCI Interventions Subjects were randomly assigned to receive: (a) Overground Training only (OT), occurring 3 days/week for 8 weeks; or (b) OT augmented by MP (MP + OT), during which randomly assigned subjects listened to a mental practice audio recording directly following OT sessions. Main Outcome Measures Subjects were administered a test of gait velocity as well as the Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA), Spinal Cord Injury Independence Measure (SCIM), and Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) on 2 occasions before intervention, 1 week after intervention, and 12 weeks after intervention. Results A significant increase in gait velocity was exhibited across subjects at both 1 week post-therapy (p=0.0046) and at 12 weeks post-therapy (p=0.0056). However, no differences were seen in intervention response at either 1 or 12 weeks post intervention among subjects in the MP + OT versus the OT groups. Conclusion Overground training was associated with significant gains in gait velocity, and that these gains were not augmented by further addition of mental practice. PMID:24342552

  1. Quantification of 10 elements in human cerebrospinal fluid from chronic pain patients with and without spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Korvela, Marcus; Lind, Anne-Li; Wetterhall, Magnus; Gordh, Torsten; Andersson, Marit; Pettersson, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Neuropathic pain affects 1-10% of the general population and is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS), a method where implanted electrodes stimulate the spinal cord, has been successfully used to treat drug-resistant neuropathic pain, but the mechanism of action is largely unknown. Studies show that SCS changes the protein levels in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) of pain patients. Several neurological conditions have been shown to alter the elemental composition of CSF. Therefore changes in the levels of ions and trace elements in the CSF may correspond to SCS use. This study used ICP-MS (Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy) to quantify 10 elements in CSF from chronic neuropathic pain patients using SCS. The element concentrations in CSF from patients with SCS treatment on/off, were measured. No effect on the element concentrations in CSF from treatment with SCS could be detected. Also, the elemental concentrations in pooled CSF from patients without chronic neuropathic pain was determined and compared to the patients using SCS. The concentration of the elements Ca, Sr, Na, K, P, Mg and Ti were, significantly higher in patients compared to the CSF-control. PMID:27473826

  2. Radical excision combined with instrumented fixation in the management of thoracic epidural angiolipoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Spinal angiolipoma is a benign uncommon neoplasm composed of mature lipocytes admixed with abnormal blood vessels. They account for only 0.04% to 1.2% of all spinal tumors. We present a case of thoracic epidural angiolipoma treated by combining radical resection with instrumented spinal fixation, without any surgical complication. Case presentation A 32-year-old Asian woman presented with dorsal epidural angiolipoma at the upper-thoracic level. She had a seven-month history of gradually worsening weakness and numbness in her lower extremities. Imaging studies of her thoracic spine demonstrated a heterogeneously well-enhancing mass, located in her posterior epidural space without surrounding bone erosion at the upper thoracic level. We also observed compression of her thoracic cord. During surgery, a reddish-gray, highly vascularized mass was excised. Her facet joints had to be resected to expose the part migrating into the intervertebral foramen. Because there was concern regarding the stability of her thoracic spine, we performed spinal fixation using pedicle screws. Histopathological study of the surgical specimen showed a typical angiolipoma. Conclusion Angiolipomas can be radically excised with good prognosis. Surgical removal is the preferred treatment for spinal angiolipoma, and the prognosis after surgical management is very good. Although outcomes remained favorable despite incomplete resections in a number of spinal angiolipoma, complete removal is preferred. We successfully achieved total resection without any surgical complication by combining radical resection with instrumented spinal fixation. PMID:25412677

  3. Sex differences in the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ system in rat spinal cord following chronic morphine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Donica, Courtney L.; Standifer, Kelly M.

    2016-01-01

    Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) appears to contribute to the development of morphine tolerance, as blockade of its actions will block or reverse the process. To better understand the contribution of N/OFQ to the development of morphine tolerance, this study examined the effect of chronic morphine treatment on levels of N/OFQ and levels and activity of the N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptor in spinal cord (SC) from male and female rats. Both male and female Wistar rats showed less responsiveness to morphine after subcutaneous injection of escalating doses of morphine (10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mg/kg, respectively) twice daily for five consecutive days. Male rats were more tolerant to the antinociceptive actions of morphine than females. The N/OFQ content of SC extracts was higher in females than in males, regardless of treatment; following chronic morphine treatment the difference in N/OFQ levels between males and females was more pronounced. N/OFQ content in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was reduced 40% in male and 16% in female rats with chronic morphine exposure, but increased in periaqueductal grey of both sexes. Chronic morphine treatment increased NOP receptor levels 173% in males and 137% in females, while decreasing affinity in both. Chronic morphine increased the efficacy of N/OFQ-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding to SC membranes from male rats, consistent with increased receptor levels. Taken together, these findings demonstrate sex differences in N/OFQ–NOP receptor expression and NOP receptor activity following chronic morphine treatment. They also suggest interplay between endogenous N/OFQ and chronic morphine treatment that results in nociceptive modulation. PMID:22575074

  4. [Spinal sonography of a newborn infant with postpartal paraplegia].

    PubMed

    Sauter, R; Klemm, T

    1988-01-01

    Cranial ultrasonography is a well established diagnostic procedure. In contrast ultrasonography of the spine and the spinal cord is less frequently used. It is indicated in infants with spinal dysraphism and may help to diagnose patients with meningomyelocele, spinal lipoma or cord tethering. We present a newborn with parplectic symptoms as a result of an epidural hematoma, which could be demonstrated exclusively by ultrasonography. We want to stress that spinal ultrasonography is a method of high clinical value.

  5. Neuropathological characterization of spinal motor neuron degeneration processes induced by acute and chronic excitotoxic stimulus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri Nimrod; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Motor neuron (MN) diseases are characterized by progressive cell degeneration, and excitotoxicity has been postulated as a causal factor. Using two experimental procedures for inducing excitotoxic spinal MN degeneration in vivo, by acute and chronic overactivation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMPA) receptors, we characterized the time course of the neuropathological changes. Electron transmission microscopy showed that acute AMPA perfusion by microdialysis caused MN swelling 1.5h after surgery and lysis with membrane rupture as early as 3h; no cleaved caspase 3 was detected by immunochemistry. Chronic AMPA infusion by osmotic minipumps induced a slow degeneration process along 5days, characterized by progressive changes: endoplasmic reticulum swelling, vacuolization of cytoplasm, vacuole fusion and cell membrane rupture. Quantification of these ultrastructural alterations showed that the increase of vacuolated area was at the expense of the nuclear area. Caspase 3 cleavage was observed since the first day of AMPA infusion. We conclude that acute AMPA-induced excitotoxicity induces MN loss by necrosis, while the progress of degeneration induced by chronic infusion is slow, starting with an early apoptotic process followed by necrosis. In both the acute and chronic procedures a correlation could be established between the loss of MN by necrosis, but not by caspase 3-linked apoptosis, and severe motor deficits and hindlimb paralysis. Our findings are relevant for understanding the mechanisms of neuron death in degenerative diseases and thus for the design of pharmacological therapeutic strategies. PMID:27320208

  6. Longitudinal study of bone loss in chronic spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Karapolat, Inanc; Karapolat, Hale Uzumcugil; Kirazli, Yesim; Capaci, Kazim; Akkoc, Yesim; Kumanlioglu, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This prospective longitudinal study evaluated the changes in bone metabolism markers and bone mineral density of spinal cord injury patients over 3 years. We also assessed the relationships among the bone mineral density, bone metabolism, and clinical data of spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] We assessed the clinical data (i.e., immobilization due to surgery, neurological status, neurological level, and extent of lesion) in 20 spinal cord injury patients. Bone mineral density, and hormonal and biochemical markers of the patients were measured at 0, 6, 12, and 36 months. [Results] Femoral neck T score decreased significantly at 36 months (p < 0.05). Among the hormonal markers, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D were significantly elevated, while bone turnover markers (i.e., deoxypyridinoline and osteocalcin) were significantly decreased at 12 and 36 months (p < 0.05). [Conclusion] Bone mineral density of the femoral neck decreases significantly during the long-term follow-up of patients with spinal cord injury due to osteoporosis. This could be due to changes in hormonal and bone turnover markers. PMID:26157234

  7. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2007-12-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S2 level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S1 level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation.

  8. Effects of Therapy in Patients Suffering from Chronic Back Pain Treated with Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mosiewicz, Anna; Rutkowska, Elżbieta; Matacz, Monika; Mosiewicz, Barbara; Kaczmarczyk, Robert; Trojanowski, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Pain in the lumbosacral part of the spine in the course of degenerative disease is the most common cause of physical activity limitation in adults. Treatment includes pharmacotherapy, physiotherapy, psychotherapy, health promotion, and sometimes surgery. Surgical treatment is not always successful, and the various clinical and psychosomatic symptoms that result from surgical treatment failure are known as failed back surgery syndrome. For some patients with this condition, spinal cord stimulation can provide relief. The aim of the work was to define subjective and objective spinal cord stimulation effects by assessing chosen disability and physical activity limitation ratios. Pain intensity, level of disability, and presence of neurological symptoms were assessed. The examination was performed twice: before the stimulator implantation and at least 6 months postimplantation. The study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery and Paediatric Neurosurgery in Lublin. Thirty-six patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were recruited for this study. The Visual Analog Scale, modified Laitinen's pain questionnaire, and Oswestry Disability Index were used in this work. The study showed that spinal cord stimulation was effective in treating spinal and lower limb pain in 64% of patients, similar to results obtained in other departments. Although back pain and neuropathic pain radiating to the lower limbs decreased, moderate physical activity impairment was still observed according to the Oswestry Disability Index scale. The decrease in neuropathic pain radiating to the lower limbs had the most significant influence on reducing physical activity impairment. PMID:26187548

  9. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure.

  10. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  11. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and management of such cases. Case Description: An 18-year-old male presented with bilateral lower limb paresis. He was a known case of homozygous beta thalassemia major. He had undergone surgery for spinal cord compression due to EMH 4 months prior to presentation. Symptom resolution was followed by deterioration 5 days later. He was operated again at our hospital with complete resection of the mass. He underwent local radiotherapy to prevent recurrence. At 2 years follow-up, he showed complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up imaging demonstrated no residual mass. Conclusion: The possibility of EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis as a cause of spinal cord compression. Treatment of such cases is usually done with blood transfusions, which can reduce the hematopoietic drive for EMH. Other options include surgery, hydroxyurea, radiotherapy, or a combination of these on a case to case basis. PMID:27069747

  12. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Desautels, Thomas A; Choe, Jaehoon; Gad, Parag; Nandra, Mandheerej S; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Burdick, Joel W

    2015-10-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained autonomous operations (ten-session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions' results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy.

  13. The Health Impact of Symptomatic Adult Spinal Deformity: Comparison of Deformity Types to United States Population Norms and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bess, Shay; Line, Breton; Fu, Kai-Ming; McCarthy, Ian; Lafage, Virgine; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher; Ames, Christopher; Akbarnia, Behrooz; Jo, Han; Kelly, Michael; Burton, Douglas; Hart, Robert; Klineberg, Eric; Kebaish, Khaled; Hostin, Richard; Mundis, Gregory; Mummaneni, Praveen; Smith, Justin S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. A retrospective analysis of a prospective, multicenter database. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the health impact of symptomatic adult spinal deformity (SASD) by comparing Standard Form Version 2 (SF-36) scores for SASD with United States normative and chronic disease values. Summary of Background Data. Recent data have identified radiographic parameters correlating with poor health-related quality of life for SASD. Disability comparisons between SASD patients and patients with chronic diseases may provide further insight to the disease burden caused by SASD. Methods. Consecutive SASD patients, with no history of spine surgery, were enrolled into a multicenter database and evaluated for type and severity of spinal deformity. Baseline SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) values for SASD patients were compared with reported U.S. normative and chronic disease SF-36 scores. SF-36 scores were reported as normative-based scores (NBS) and evaluated for minimally clinical important difference (MCID). Results. Between 2008 and 2011, 497 SASD patients were prospectively enrolled and evaluated. Mean PCS for all SASD was lower than U.S. total population (ASD = 40.9; US = 50; P < 0.05). Generational decline in PCS for SASD patients with no other reported comorbidities was more rapid than U.S. norms (P < 0.05). PCS worsened with lumbar scoliosis and increasing sagittal vertical axis (SVA). PCS scores for patients with isolated thoracic scoliosis were similar to values reported by individuals with chronic back pain (45.5 vs 45.7, respectively; P > 0.05), whereas patients with lumbar scoliosis combined with severe sagittal malalignment (SVA >10 cm) demonstrated worse PCS scores than values reported by patients with limited use of arms and legs (24.7 vs 29.1, respectively; P < 0.05). Conclusions. SASD is a heterogeneous condition that, depending upon the type and severity of the deformity

  14. Chronic prenatal stress epigenetically modifies spinal cord BDNF expression to induce sex specific visceral hypersensitivity in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Winston, John H.; Li, Qingjie; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous disorder with abdomen pain as one of the primary symptoms. The etiology of IBS remains unknown. Epidemiological studies found that a subset of these patients have a history of adverse early-life events. We tested the hypothesis that chronic prenatal stress (CPS) epigenetically enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in spinal cord to aggravate colon sensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD) differentially in male and female offspring. Methods We used heterotypic intermittent chronic stress (HeICS) protocols in pregnant dams from E11 until delivery. Results CPS induced significant visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) to CRD in male and female offspring. A second exposure to HeICS in adult offspring exacerbated VHS greater in female offspring that persisted longer than in male offspring. CPS upregulated BDNF expression in the lumbar-sacral dorsal horn that correlated with the exacerbation of VHS in female, but not in male offspring. The upregulation of BDNF was due to a significant increase in RNA Pol II binding, histone H3 acetylation and significant decrease in histone deacetylase 1 association with the core promoter of BDNF in female offspring. Other chronic prenatal and neonatal stress protocols were less effective than HeICS. Conclusion & Inferences The development of visceral hypersensitivity, which contributes to the symptom of intermittent abdominal pain, is a two-step process, chronic in utero stress followed by chronic stress in adult-life. This two-step process induces aggravated and persistent colon hypersensitivity in female than in male offspring. Our preclinical model explains several clinical features in IBS patients. PMID:24588943

  15. Persistent At-Level Thermal Hyperalgesia and Tactile Allodynia Accompany Chronic Neuronal and Astrocyte Activation in Superficial Dorsal Horn following Mouse Cervical Contusion Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jaime L.; Hala, Tamara J.; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  16. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  17. Synergistic effects of transplanted adult neural stem/progenitor cells, chondroitinase, and growth factors promote functional repair and plasticity of the chronically injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Wang, Jian; Schut, Desiree; Fehlings, Michael G

    2010-02-01

    The transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury (SCI). However, to date NPC transplantation has exhibited only limited success in the treatment of chronic SCI. Here, we show that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the glial scar around the site of chronic SCI negatively influence the long-term survival and integration of transplanted NPCs and their therapeutic potential for promoting functional repair and plasticity. We targeted CSPGs in the chronically injured spinal cord by sustained infusion of chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). One week later, the same rats were treated with transplants of NPCs and transient infusion of growth factors, EGF, bFGF, and PDGF-AA. We demonstrate that perturbing CSPGs dramatically optimizes NPC transplantation in chronic SCI. Engrafted NPCs successfully integrate and extensively migrate within the host spinal cord and principally differentiate into oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, this combined strategy promoted the axonal integrity and plasticity of the corticospinal tract and enhanced the plasticity of descending serotonergic pathways. These neuroanatomical changes were also associated with significantly improved neurobehavioral recovery after chronic SCI. Importantly, this strategy did not enhance the aberrant synaptic connectivity of pain afferents, nor did it exacerbate posttraumatic neuropathic pain. For the first time, we demonstrate key biological and functional benefits for the combined use of ChABC, growth factors, and NPCs to repair the chronically injured spinal cord. These findings could potentially bring us closer to the application of NPCs for patients suffering from chronic SCI or other conditions characterized by the formation of a glial scar.

  18. Treatment of chronic low back pain in patients with spinal deformities using a sagittal re-alignment brace

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Werkmann, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background For adult scoliosis patients with chronic low back pain bracing is initially indicated before spinal surgery is considered. Until recently there has been a lack of research into the effect upon pain reductions in the mid and long-term. Promising results have been documented in short-term studies for the application of a sagittal re-alignment brace in patients with spinal deformities and along with pain; however mid-term and long-term results are not yet available. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mid-term effects of this brace with respect to pain control. Materials and methods 67 patients (58 females and 9 males) with chronic low back pain (> 24 months) and the diagnosis of scoliosis or hyperkyphosis were treated with a sagittal re-alignment brace (physio-logic brace™) between January 2006 and July 2007. The indication for this kind of brace treatment was derived from a positive sagittal re-alignment test (SRT) and the exclusion of successful conservative treatment during the last 24 months. The aim of this type of conservative intervention was to avoid surgery for chronic low back pain. Results The average pain intensity was measured on the Roland and Morris VRS (5 steps) before treatment. This was 3.3 (t1), at the time of brace adjustment it was 2.7 (t2) and after at an average observation time of 18 months it was 2.0 (t3). The differences were highly significant in the Wilcoxon test. Discussion Short-term measurements showed that a significant pain reduction is possible in chronic postural low back pain using a sagittal re-alignment brace inducing lumbar re-lordosation. In a preliminary report at adjustment (t2), highly significant improvements of pain intensity have also been demonstrated. At 6 months of treatment however, no improvement was measured. The improvement of the mid-term effects (18 months) found in this study compared to the preliminary report may be due to the changed approach to compliance: whilst the bracing standard

  19. Human spinal locomotor control is based on flexibly organized burst generators.

    PubMed

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Constant drive provided to the human lumbar spinal cord by epidural electrical stimulation can cause local neural circuits to generate rhythmic motor outputs to lower limb muscles in people paralysed by spinal cord injury. Epidural spinal cord stimulation thus allows the study of spinal rhythm and pattern generating circuits without their configuration by volitional motor tasks or task-specific peripheral feedback. To reveal spinal locomotor control principles, we studied the repertoire of rhythmic patterns that can be generated by the functionally isolated human lumbar spinal cord, detected as electromyographic activity from the legs, and investigated basic temporal components shared across these patterns. Ten subjects with chronic, motor-complete spinal cord injury were studied. Surface electromyographic responses to lumbar spinal cord stimulation were collected from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae in the supine position. From these data, 10-s segments of rhythmic activity present in the four muscle groups of one limb were extracted. Such samples were found in seven subjects. Physiologically adequate cycle durations and relative extension- and flexion-phase durations similar to those needed for locomotion were generated. The multi-muscle activation patterns exhibited a variety of coactivation, mixed-synergy and locomotor-like configurations. Statistical decomposition of the electromyographic data across subjects, muscles and samples of rhythmic patterns identified three common temporal components, i.e. basic or shared activation patterns. Two of these basic patterns controlled muscles to contract either synchronously or alternatingly during extension- and flexion-like phases. The third basic pattern contributed to the observed muscle activities independently from these extensor- and flexor-related basic patterns. Each bifunctional muscle group was able to express both extensor- and flexor-patterns, with variable ratios across the

  20. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  1. Cauda Equina Syndrome Caused by Idiopathic Epidural Lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Seong; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is a rare condition that presents as a back pain with progressive neurologic symptoms. Most affected patients are obese and receiving steroid therapy, or have an endocrinopathies. We report a rare case of cauda equina syndrome caused by SEL in a non-obese healthy young man without any evident traumatic episode. A healthy 19-year-old man, who had experienced lower back pain for two months, visited our emergency room because of the sudden development of motor weakness and voiding difficulty. Lumbar magnetic resonance image revealed extradural fat compressing the cauda equina. Urgent decompression via posterior laminectomy and excision of excess epidural fat resulted in an immediate symptom improvement. PMID:26834816

  2. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    PubMed

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. PMID:27263067

  3. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    PubMed

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection.

  4. Mechanisms underlying spinal cord damage in decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, J M; Bove, A A; Elliott, D H

    1975-04-01

    Decompression sickness, which damaged the spinal cord, was produced in anesthetized dogs using a compression chamber. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure and several intravascular and intracardiac pressures were monitored during the course of the simulated dives. Manometric responses to forcible lung inflation and abdominal compression were measured both predive and postdive after signs of spinal cord damage were evident. Cinevenography of the epidural vertebral venous system was performed both predive and postdive. Histopathologic studies of the brains and cords of both predive and postdive. Histopathologic studies of the brains and cords of paretic animals were carried out. The results indicate that the epidural vertebral venous system becomes obstructed during spinal cord damaging decompression sickness and strongly suggests that spinal cord infarction in decompression sickness is caused by obstruction of cord venous drainage at the level of the epidural vertebral venous system. PMID:1168317

  5. Spinal cord compression due to ethmoid adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Johns, D R; Sweriduk, S T

    1987-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus is a rare tumor which has been epidemiologically linked to woodworking in the furniture industry. It has a low propensity to metastasize and has not been previously reported to cause spinal cord compression. A symptomatic epidural spinal cord compression was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in a former furniture worker with widely disseminated metastases. The clinical features of ethmoid sinus adenocarcinoma and neoplastic spinal cord compression, and the comparative value of MRI scanning in the neuroradiologic diagnosis of spinal cord compression are reviewed.

  6. Common questions about chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Christopher M; Zoberi, Kimberly Schiel; Gardner, Bruce J

    2015-05-15

    More than 30% of U.S. adults report having experienced low back pain within the preceding three months. Although most low back pain is nonspecific and self-limiting, a subset of patients develop chronic low back pain, defined as persistent symptoms for longer than three months. Low back pain is categorized as nonspecific low back pain without radiculopathy, low back pain with radicular symptoms, or secondary low back pain with a spinal cause. Imaging should be reserved for patients with red flags for cauda equina syndrome, recent trauma, risk of infection, or when warranted before treatment (e.g., surgical, interventional). Prompt recognition of cauda equina syndrome is critical. Patient education should be combined with evidence-guided pharmacologic therapy. Goals of therapy include reducing the severity of pain symptoms, pain interference, and disability, as well as maximizing activity. Validated tools such as the Oswestry Disability Index can help assess symptom severity and functional change in patients with chronic low back pain. Epidural steroid injections do not improve pain or disability in patients with spinal stenosis. Spinal manipulation therapy produces small benefits for up to six months. Because long-term data are lacking for spinal surgery, patient education about realistic outcome expectations is essential. PMID:25978200

  7. Common questions about chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Christopher M; Zoberi, Kimberly Schiel; Gardner, Bruce J

    2015-05-15

    More than 30% of U.S. adults report having experienced low back pain within the preceding three months. Although most low back pain is nonspecific and self-limiting, a subset of patients develop chronic low back pain, defined as persistent symptoms for longer than three months. Low back pain is categorized as nonspecific low back pain without radiculopathy, low back pain with radicular symptoms, or secondary low back pain with a spinal cause. Imaging should be reserved for patients with red flags for cauda equina syndrome, recent trauma, risk of infection, or when warranted before treatment (e.g., surgical, interventional). Prompt recognition of cauda equina syndrome is critical. Patient education should be combined with evidence-guided pharmacologic therapy. Goals of therapy include reducing the severity of pain symptoms, pain interference, and disability, as well as maximizing activity. Validated tools such as the Oswestry Disability Index can help assess symptom severity and functional change in patients with chronic low back pain. Epidural steroid injections do not improve pain or disability in patients with spinal stenosis. Spinal manipulation therapy produces small benefits for up to six months. Because long-term data are lacking for spinal surgery, patient education about realistic outcome expectations is essential.

  8. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine.

  9. Adiponectin is a candidate biomarker of lower extremity bone density in men with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Ashley L; Battaglino, Ricardo A; Donovan, Jayne; Gagnon, David; Lazzari, Antonio A; Garshick, Eric; Zafonte, Ross; Morse, Leslie R

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a major regulator of bone metabolism and in the general population obesity is associated with greater bone mineral density (BMD). However, bone-fat interactions are multifactorial, and may involve pathways that influence both bone formation and resorption with competing effects on the skeleton. One such pathway involves adipocyte production of adipokines that regulate bone metabolism. In this study we determined the association between BMD, walking status, and circulating adipokines (adiponectin and leptin) in 149 men with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Although adipokine levels did not vary significantly based on walking status, there was a significant inverse association between adiponectin and BMD in wheelchair users independent of body composition. We found no association between adiponectin and BMD in the walkers and no association between leptin and BMD in either group. These findings suggest that for subjects with chronic SCI, walking may mitigate the effect of adiponectin mediated bone loss. For wheelchair users, adipose-derived adiponectin may contribute to SCI-induced osteoporosis because the osteoprotective benefits of obesity appear to require mechanical loading during ambulation.

  10. Mediastinal paraganglioma causing spinal cord compression.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, M G; Fresco, R; Bruetman, M E

    1977-01-01

    An invasive paraganglioma of the posterior mediastinum caused spinal cord compression in a 31 year old women. Electron microscopic examination of the paraganglioma invading the epidural space revealed numerous dense-cored granules in the cytoplasm of the tumour cells. We are reporting this case to present the ultrastructure of mediastinal paraganglioma, and to call attention to an unusual cause of spinal cord compression. Images PMID:886352

  11. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  12. Compound action potentials recorded in the human spinal cord during neurostimulation for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Parker, John L; Karantonis, Dean M; Single, Peter S; Obradovic, Milan; Cousins, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord provides effective pain relief to hundreds of thousands of chronic neuropathic pain sufferers. The therapy involves implantation of an electrode array into the epidural space of the subject and then stimulation of the dorsal column with electrical pulses. The stimulation depolarises axons and generates propagating action potentials that interfere with the perception of pain. Despite the long-term clinical experience with spinal cord stimulation, the mechanism of action is not understood, and no direct evidence of the properties of neurons being stimulated has been presented. Here we report novel measurements of evoked compound action potentials from the spinal cords of patients undergoing stimulation for pain relief. The results reveal that Aβ sensory nerve fibres are recruited at therapeutic stimulation levels and the Aβ potential amplitude correlates with the degree of coverage of the painful area. Aβ-evoked responses are not measurable below a threshold stimulation level, and their amplitude increases with increasing stimulation current. At high currents, additional late responses are observed. Our results contribute towards efforts to define the mechanism of spinal cord stimulation. The minimally invasive recording technique we have developed provides data previously obtained only through microelectrode techniques in spinal cords of animals. Our observations also allow the development of systems that use neuronal recording in a feedback loop to control neurostimulation on a continuous basis and deliver more effective pain relief. This is one of numerous benefits that in vivo electrophysiological recording can bring to a broad range of neuromodulation therapies. PMID:22188868

  13. Combination of acupuncture and spinal manipulative therapy: management of a 32-year-old patient with chronic tension-type headache and migraine

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsen, Bahia A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment using acupuncture and spinal manipulation for a patient with a chronic tension-type headache and episodic migraines. Clinical Features A 32-year-old woman presented with headaches of 5 months' duration. She had a history of episodic migraine that began in her teens and had been controlled with medication. She had stopped taking the prescription medications because of gastrointestinal symptoms. A neurologist diagnosed her with mixed headaches, some migrainous and some tension type. Her headaches were chronic, were daily, and fit the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria of a chronic tension-type headache superimposed with migraine. Intervention and Outcome After 5 treatments over a 2-week period (the first using acupuncture only, the next 3 using acupuncture and chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy), her headaches resolved. The patient had no recurrences of headaches in her 1-year follow-up. Conclusion The combination of acupuncture with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy was a reasonable alternative in treating this patient's chronic tension-type headaches superimposed with migraine. PMID:23449932

  14. Analgesia after Epidural Dexamethasone is Further Enhanced by IV Dipyrone, but Not IV Parecoxibe Following Minor Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Righeti, Claudia CF; Kitayama, Antonio T

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural administration of dexamethasone has been suggested for pain control after minor orthopedic surgery. This study was conducted to assess its efficacy after such surgery, combined or not to IV dipyrone, IV parecoxibe or their combination. Methods 91 patients were randomly assigned to seven groups. Patients were submitted to spinal bupivacaine anesthesia combined to epidural administration of either 10 ml saline or 10 mg dexamethasone diluted to 10-ml volume. Patients also received 10 ml IV saline or 1 gr dipyrone and/or 40 mg parecoxibe diluted to 10 ml with saline. Control group (CG) received epidural and IV saline. Dexamethasone group (DexG) received epidural dexamethasone and IV saline. Dipyrone group (DipG) received epidural saline and IV dipyrone. Dex-Dip G received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone. Parecoxibe group (ParG) received epidural saline and IV parecoxibe. Dex-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV parecoxibe. Finally, Dex-Dip-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone plus IV parecoxibe. Results The CG expressed 4h of analgesia and sooner requested pain killer. DexG was similar to DipG or ParG or Dex-ParG (7-hours), and they requested less ketoprofen compared to the CG (P < 0.05). However, the Dex-DipG and the Dex-Dip-ParG resulted in longer time to demand pain killer (17-hours) and less ketoprofen consumption in 24-hours (P < 0.002). Adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusions The analgesia secondary to epidural dexamethasone was enhanced by IV dipyrone, while no effects were observed by the addition of IV parecoxibe. PMID:25317284

  15. Incidence of intravascular penetration in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Furman, Michael B; Giovanniello, Michael T; O'Brien, Erin M

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN A prospective, observational, human, study was conducted. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of vascular penetration during fluoroscopically guided, contrast-enhanced transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, and to determine whether the observation of blood in the needle hub can be used to predict a vascular injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Incorrectly placed intravascular cervical spinal injections result in medication flow systemically and not to the desired target. A recently published study demonstrates a high incidence of intravascular injections in transforaminal lumbosacral epidural injections. No studies so far have evaluated the incidence of vascular injections in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, nor have they calculated the ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict a vascular injection in the cervical spine.METHODS The incidence of fluoroscopically confirmed intravascular uptake of contrast was prospectively observed in 337 patients treated with cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. The ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict intravascular injection was also investigated. For each subject, the injection level was chosen on the basis of the clinical scenario including history, physical examination, and review of imaging studies. Some patients had multilevel injections. Using fluoroscopic guidance, the authors placed a 25-gauge needle into the epidural space using a transforaminal approach according to accepted standard technique. Needle tip location was confirmed with biplanar imaging. The presence or absence of blood in the needle hub spontaneously ("flash") and after attempted aspiration by pulling back on the syringe's plunger was documented. Contrast then was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to determine whether the location of the needle tip was intravascular. The results were recorded in a prospective manner indicating the presence or absence of blood

  16. Differences in Supraspinal and Spinal Excitability during Various Force Outputs of the Biceps Brachii in Chronic- and Non-Resistance Trained Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Power, Kevin E.; Button, Duane C.

    2014-01-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEP) and cervicomedullary evoked potentials (CMEP) may help determine the corticospinal adaptations underlying chronic resistance training-induced increases in voluntary force production. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of chronic resistance training on corticospinal excitability (CE) of the biceps brachii during elbow flexion contractions at various intensities and the CNS site (i.e. supraspinal or spinal) predominantly responsible for any training-induced differences in CE. Fifteen male subjects were divided into two groups: 1) chronic resistance-trained (RT), (n = 8) and 2) non-RT, (n = 7). Each group performed four sets of ∼5 s elbow flexion contractions of the dominant arm at 10 target forces (from 10%–100% MVC). During each contraction, subjects received 1) transcranial magnetic stimulation, 2) transmastoid electrical stimulation and 3) brachial plexus electrical stimulation, to determine MEP, CMEP and compound muscle action potential (Mmax) amplitudes, respectively, of the biceps brachii. All MEP and CMEP amplitudes were normalized to Mmax. MEP amplitudes were similar in both groups up to 50% MVC, however, beyond 50% MVC, MEP amplitudes were lower in the chronic RT group (p<0.05). CMEP amplitudes recorded from 10–100% MVC were similar for both groups. The ratio of MEP amplitude/absolute force and CMEP amplitude/absolute force were reduced (p<0.012) at all contraction intensities from 10–100% MVC in the chronic-RT compared to the non-RT group. In conclusion, chronic resistance training alters supraspinal and spinal excitability. However, adaptations in the spinal cord (i.e. motoneurone) seem to have a greater influence on the altered CE. PMID:24875495

  17. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders.

  18. Alterations in the expression of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox factor-1 (APE/ref-1) and DNA damage in the caudal region of acute and chronic spinal cord injured rats treated by embryonic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    DAGCI, T; ARMAGAN, G; KONYALIOGLU, S; YALCIN, A

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative mechanisms of injury-induced damage of neurons within the spinal cord are not very well understood. We used a model of T8-T9 spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat to induce neuronal degeneration. In this spinal cord injury model, unilateral avulsion of the spinal cord causes oxidative stress of neurons. We tested the hypothesis that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (or redox effector factor-1, APE/Ref-1) regulates this neuronal oxidation mechanism in the spinal cord region caudal to the lesion, and that DNA damage is an early upstream signal. The embryonic neural stem cell therapy significantly decreased DNA-damage levels in both study groups - acutely (followed up to 7 days after SCI), and chronically (followed up to 28 days after SCI) injured animals. Meanwhile, mRNA levels of APE/Ref-1 significantly increased after embryonic neural stem cell therapy in acutely and chronically injured animals when compared to acute and chronic sham groups. Our data has demonstrated that an increase of APE/Ref-1 mRNA levels in the caudal region of spinal cord strongly correlated with DNA damage after traumatic spinal cord injury. We suggest that DNA damage can be observed both in lesional and caudal regions of the acutely and chronically injured groups, but DNA damage is reduced with embryonic neural stem cell therapy.

  19. Nociceptors as chronic drivers of pain and hyperreflexia after spinal cord injury: an adaptive-maladaptive hyperfunctional state hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Edgar T.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes chronic peripheral sensitization of nociceptors and persistent generation of spontaneous action potentials (SA) in peripheral branches and the somata of hyperexcitable nociceptors within dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Here it is proposed that SCI triggers in numerous nociceptors a persistent hyperfunctional state (peripheral, synaptic, and somal) that originally evolved as an adaptive response to compensate for loss of sensory terminals after severe but survivable peripheral injury. In this hypothesis, nociceptor somata monitor the status of their own receptive field and the rest of the body by integrating signals received by their peripheral and central branches and the soma itself. A nociceptor switches into a potentially permanent hyperfunctional state when central neural, glial, and inflammatory signal combinations are detected that indicate extensive peripheral injury. Similar signal combinations are produced by SCI and disseminated widely to uninjured as well as injured nociceptors. This paper focuses on the uninjured nociceptors that are altered by SCI. Enhanced activity generated in below-level nociceptors promotes below-level central sensitization, somatic and autonomic hyperreflexia, and visceral dysfunction. If sufficient ascending fibers survive, enhanced activity in below-level nociceptors contributes to below-level pain. Nociceptor activity generated above the injury level contributes to at- and above-level sensitization and pain (evoked and spontaneous). Thus, SCI triggers a potent nociceptor state that may have been adaptive (from an evolutionary perspective) after severe peripheral injury but is maladaptive after SCI. Evidence that hyperfunctional nociceptors make large contributions to behavioral hypersensitivity after SCI suggests that nociceptor-specific ion channels required for nociceptor SA and hypersensitivity offer promising targets for treating chronic pain and hyperreflexia after SCI. PMID:22934060

  20. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training on Fitness and Walking Related Outcomes in Ambulatory Individuals with Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    DiPiro, Nicole D.; Embry, Aaron E.; Fritz, Stacy L.; Middleton, Addie; Krause, James S.; Gregory, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single group, pretest-posttest study. Objectives To determine the effects of a non-task-specific, voluntary, progressive aerobic exercise training (AET) intervention on fitness and walking-related outcomes in ambulatory adults with chronic motor-incomplete SCI. Setting Rehabilitation research center. Methods Ten ambulatory individuals (50% female; 57.94 ± 9.33 years old; 11.11 ± 9.66 years post injury) completed voluntary, progressive moderate-to-vigorous intensity AET on a recumbent stepper three days per week for six weeks. The primary outcome measures were aerobic capacity (VO2peak) and self-selected overground walking speed (OGWS). Secondary outcome measures included: walking economy, six-minute walk test (6MWT), daily step counts, Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI-II), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Results Nine participants completed all testing and training. Significant improvements in aerobic capacity (P=0.011), OGWS (P=0.023), the percentage of VO2peak utilized while walking at self-selected speed (P=0.03), and daily step counts (P=0.025) resulted following training. Conclusions The results indicate that total-body, voluntary, progressive AET is safe, feasible, and effective for improving aerobic capacity, walking speed, and select walking-related outcomes in an exclusively ambulatory SCI sample. This study suggests the potential for non-task-specific aerobic exercise to improve walking following incomplete SCI and builds a foundation for further investigation aimed at the development of exercise based rehabilitation strategies to target functionally limiting impairments in ambulatory individuals with chronic SCI. PMID:26666508

  1. Classification of Chronic Back Muscle Degeneration after Spinal Surgery and Its Relationship with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To classify back muscle degeneration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and investigate its relationship with back pain after surgery. Overview of Literature Back muscle injury and degeneration often occurs after posterior lumbar surgery, and the degeneration may be a cause of back pain. However, the relationship between back muscle degeneration and back pain remains controversial. Methods A total of 84 patients (average age, 65.1 years; 38 men, 46 women) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent posterior decompression surgery alone. MRI (1.5 tesla) was evaluated before and more than a year after surgery in all patients. Muscle on MRI was classified into three categories: low intensity in T1-weighted imaging, high intensity in T2-weighted imaging (type 1), high intensity in both T1- and T2-weighted images (type 2), and low intensity in both T1- and T2-weighted imaging (type 3). The prevalence of the types and their relationship with back pain (determined on a visual analog scale) were evaluated. Results MRI revealed muscle degeneration in all patients after surgery (type 1, 6%; type 2, 82%; and type 3, 12%). Type 2 was significantly more frequent compared with types 1 and 3 (p<0.01). Low back pain was significantly improved after surgery (p<0.01). Low back pain was not associated with any MRI type of muscle degeneration after surgery (p>0.05). Conclusions Various pathologies of back muscle degeneration after posterior lumbar surgery were revealed. Type 2 (fatty) change was most frequent, and other patients had type 3 (scar) or type 1 (inflammation or water-like) changes. According to the Modic classification of bone marrow changes, Modic type 1 change is associated with inflammation and back pain. However, no particular type of back muscle degeneration was correlated with back pain after surgery. PMID:27340532

  2. Complications of intraoperative epidural steroid use in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Miller, Brandon A; Haussen, Diogo C; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors' aim in this paper was to review the intraoperative use of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy surgery with a focus on surgical complications. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was done using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Relevant papers were retrieved and analyzed. The authors performed a meta-analysis of all available data. Search terms included epidural, steroids, discectomy, lumbar disc surgery, herniated lumbar disc, methylprednisolone, and perioperative.The primary outcome was surgical complications such as wound infection or need for reoperation. Secondary outcomes were pain and postoperative narcotic usage. RESULTS Sixteen trials and 1 retrospective study (a total of 1933 patients) were eligible for inclusion in this study. In all studies, steroids were added epidurally over the nerve root before closure in cases, and control patients underwent discectomy alone. The mean age (42.7 years vs 42.4 years; RR 0.30 [95% CI -0.30 to 0.90], p = 0.32), overall complication rates (2.69% vs 1.18%; RR 1.94 [95% CI 0.72-5.26], p = 0.19), and infectious complication rates (0.94% vs 0.08%; RR 4.58 [95% CI 0.75-27.95], p = 0.10) were similar between the steroid group and control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS There is good evidence that epidural steroids can decrease pain in the short term and decrease the usage of postoperative narcotics after lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. The authors' results demonstrate a trend toward increased infection with epidural steroid use, but there was not a statistically significant difference. More studies are needed to validate the long-term risk/benefit ratio of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy. PMID:26424336

  3. Complications of intraoperative epidural steroid use in lumbar discectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Miller, Brandon A; Haussen, Diogo C; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors' aim in this paper was to review the intraoperative use of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy surgery with a focus on surgical complications. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was done using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Relevant papers were retrieved and analyzed. The authors performed a meta-analysis of all available data. Search terms included epidural, steroids, discectomy, lumbar disc surgery, herniated lumbar disc, methylprednisolone, and perioperative.The primary outcome was surgical complications such as wound infection or need for reoperation. Secondary outcomes were pain and postoperative narcotic usage. RESULTS Sixteen trials and 1 retrospective study (a total of 1933 patients) were eligible for inclusion in this study. In all studies, steroids were added epidurally over the nerve root before closure in cases, and control patients underwent discectomy alone. The mean age (42.7 years vs 42.4 years; RR 0.30 [95% CI -0.30 to 0.90], p = 0.32), overall complication rates (2.69% vs 1.18%; RR 1.94 [95% CI 0.72-5.26], p = 0.19), and infectious complication rates (0.94% vs 0.08%; RR 4.58 [95% CI 0.75-27.95], p = 0.10) were similar between the steroid group and control group, respectively. CONCLUSIONS There is good evidence that epidural steroids can decrease pain in the short term and decrease the usage of postoperative narcotics after lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative spinal disease. The authors' results demonstrate a trend toward increased infection with epidural steroid use, but there was not a statistically significant difference. More studies are needed to validate the long-term risk/benefit ratio of epidural steroids in lumbar discectomy.

  4. Body composition modifications in people with chronic spinal cord injury after supervised physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Frederico Ribeiro; Lopes, Guilherme Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantification of body composition variables is important for planning of better activities in relation to individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objectives (1) To evaluate changes in body composition in patients with SCI after a supervised physical activity process; (2) To correlate total body fat with time since injury. Design Pre-post intervention. Setting Sarah Rehabilitation Hospital Network, Brazil. Participants Fifty-three men with SCI aged 18–52 years with duration of injury >3 years. Interventions The subjects were divided into three groups: tetraplegia (TT) (C5–C8), high paraplegia (HP) (T1–T6), and low paraplegia (LP) (T7–L2). Body composition was estimated in the first and last weeks of hospitalization. Outcome measures Body weight (kg), skinfolds sum (mm), absolute (kg), and relative (%) fat and lean body mass. Results Body weight increased in TT and decreased in HP (0.8 kg, 95%CI 0.1–1.5; and −1.0 kg, 95%CI −2.0 to 0.0, respectively; P < 0.05). Skinfolds sum decreased only in HP (−13.1 mm, 95%CI −20.7 to −5.5; P < 0.05). Absolute and relative body fat decreased significantly in the paraplegia groups. Lean body mass (LBM) percentage increased significantly in the paraplegia groups. Absolute LBM increased in TT and LP (0.8 kg, 95%CI 0.3–1.3; and 1.3 kg, 95%CI 0.8 to 1.8, respectively; P < 0.05). There was no correlation between time since injury and skinfolds sum for the three groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion TT, HP, and LP demonstrated favorable changes in body composition after 29 days of supervised physical activity. However, these changes were different in direction and magnitude. PMID:22330114

  5. Bionic epidural stimulation restores arterial pressure regulation during orthostasis.

    PubMed

    Yanagiya, Yusuke; Sato, Takayuki; Kawada, Toru; Inagaki, Masashi; Tatewaki, Teiji; Zheng, Can; Kamiya, Atsunori; Takaki, Hiroshi; Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2004-09-01

    A bionic baroreflex system (BBS) is a computer-assisted intelligent feedback system to control arterial pressure (AP) for the treatment of baroreflex failure. To apply this system clinically, an appropriate efferent neural (sympathetic vasomotor) interface has to be explored. We examined whether the spinal cord is a candidate site for such interface. In six anesthetized and baroreflex-deafferentiated cats, a multielectrode catheter was inserted into the epidural space to deliver epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS). Stepwise changes in ESCS rate revealed a linear correlation between ESCS rate and AP for ESCS rates of 2 pulses/s and above (r2, 0.876-0.979; slope, 14.3 +/- 5.8 mmHg.pulses(-1).s; pressure axis intercept, 35.7 +/- 25.9 mmHg). Random changes in ESCS rate with a white noise sequence revealed dynamic transfer function of peripheral effectors. The transfer function resembled a second-order, low-pass filter with a lag time (gain, 16.7 +/- 8.3 mmHg.pulses(-1).s; natural frequency, 0.022 +/- 0.007 Hz; damping coefficient, 2.40 +/- 1.07; lag time, 1.06 +/- 0.41 s). On the basis of the transfer function, we designed an artificial vasomotor center to attenuate hypotension. We evaluated the performance of the BBS against hypotension induced by 60 degrees head-up tilt. In the cats with baroreflex failure, head-up tilt dropped AP by 37 +/- 5 mmHg in 5 s and 59 +/- 11 mmHg in 30 s. BBS with optimized feedback parameters attenuated hypotension to 21 +/- 2 mmHg in 5 s (P < 0.05) and 8 +/- 4 mmHg in 30 s (P < 0.05). These results indicate that ESCS-mediated BBS prevents orthostatic hypotension. Because epidural stimulation is a clinically feasible procedure, this BBS can be applied clinically to combat hypotension associated with various pathophysiologies.

  6. Acupuncture's Effects in Treating the Sequelae of Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries: A Review of Allopathic and Traditional Chinese Medicine Literature.

    PubMed

    Dorsher, Peter T; McIntosh, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    Each year, there are an estimated 12 000 individuals who sustain a spinal cord injury (SCI) in the United States. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of SCI and its sequelae has over the past 50 years led to the development of medical treatments (especially urologic) that have enhanced short- and long-term survival from these injuries. The prevalence of individuals with SCI in this country is ~250 000 individuals; and beyond the incalculable personal consequences of these devastating neurologic injuries, substantial direct and indirect societal costs result from the sequelae of SCI including paralysis, sensory loss, chronic pain, decubiti and bladder and/or bowel incontinence. The purpose of this treatise is to review the allopathic and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) literature available through MEDLINE, PubMed and eCAM search engines that discuss the potential uses of acupuncture to treat acute and chronic spinal cord injuries and their sequelae, and present the neurophysiologic mechanisms for acupuncture's beneficial effects. There is evidence that use of electroacupuncture in acute SCI may significantly improve long-term neurologic recovery from these injuries both in terms of motor, sensory and bowel/bladder function with essentially no risk. Acupuncture may even improve neurourologic function in individuals with chronic SCI, and help with management with chronic pain associated with these injuries.

  7. Acute Motor Weakness of Opposite Lower Extremity after Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yong Seok; Park, Cheon Hee; Wee, Sang Woo; Sin, Sung Sik; Kim, Joon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, percutaneous epidural neuroplasty has become widely used to treat radicular pain caused by spinal stenosis or a herniated intervertebral disc. A 19-year-old female patient suffering from left radicular pain caused by an L4-L5 intervertebral disc herniation underwent percutaneous epidural neuroplasty of the left L5 nerve root using a Racz catheter. After the procedure, the patient complained of acute motor weakness in the right lower leg, on the opposite site to where the neuroplasty was conducted. Emergency surgery was performed, and swelling of the right L5 nerve root was discovered. The patient recovered her motor and sensory functions immediately after the surgery. Theoretically, the injection of a large volume of fluid in a patient with severe spinal stenosis during epidural neuroplasty can increase the pressure on the opposite side of the epidural space, which may cause injury of the opposite nerve by barotrauma from a closed compartment. Practitioners should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:25852837

  8. [Subcutaneous stimulation as additional therapy to spinal cord stimulation in a post-laminectomy syndrome patient].

    PubMed

    Akbaş, Mert; Yeğin, Mehmet Arif; Özdemir, İrem; Göksu, Ethem; Akyüz, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation as treatment of chronic low back pain via neuromodulation has been frequently performed in recent years. The dorsal column is stimulated by an electrode placed at the epidural region. In the case presently described, subcutaneous lead was implanted in a patient with failed back syndrome after spinal cord stimulation was inadequate to treat back and gluteal pain. A 65-year-old male had undergone surgery to treat lumbar disc herniation, after which he received physical therapy and multiple steroid injections due to unrelieved pain. He was admitted to the pain clinic with pain radiating to right gluteal muscle and leg. Spinal cord stimulation was performed and, as pain was not relieved, subcutaneous lead was applied to the right cluneal nerve distribution. Following treatment, the patient scored 1-2 on visual analog scale. Pain had been reduced by over 80%. Octad electrode was placed between T8 and T10 vertebrae after Tuohy needle was introduced to intervertebral area between L1 and L2. Paresthesia occurred in the right extremity. Boundaries were determined by area of right gluteal region in which paresthesia did not occur. Octad electrode was placed subcutaneously after vertical line was drawn from center point. Paresthesia occurred throughout the region. Pulse wave was 390-450 msec; frequency was 10-30 Hz. Subcutaneous electrode replacement is effective additional therapy when pain is not relieved by spinal cord stimulation. PMID:27225614

  9. Sciatica and epidural corticosteroid injections.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    According to trials conducted in hundreds of patients with sciatica, epidural corticosteroid injections have no demonstrated efficacy beyond the placebo effect, either in the short-term or the long-term. However, they expose patients to a risk of sometimes serious neurological adverse effects.

  10. Granulocytic sarcoma with compressive myelopathy: a rare presentation of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ganapule, Abhijeet P; Viswabandya, Auro; Jasper, Anita; Patel, Palak; Kokil, Gautami

    2014-07-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma occurs most commonly in acute myelogenous leukemia. The appearance of granulocytic sarcoma in chronic myelogenous leukemia signals accelerated phase/ blast transformation. This is a rare case of undiagnosed chronic myelogenous leukemia with granulocytic sarcoma causing cord compression, which went into tumour lysis syndrome requiring dialysis after starting of steroids and radiotherapy. A 43-year-old male presented in emergency department with acute onset of flaccid paralysis. On clinical examination, there was hepatosplenomegaly and lower motor neuron paralysis in the lower limbs. The peripheral smear was consistent with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase. The MRI spine revealed para-spinal and epidural masses causing cord compression and the biopsy from the paraspinal mass was consistent with granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:25177619

  11. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  12. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  13. Effect of chronic activity-based therapy on bone mineral density and bone turnover in persons with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Harness, Eric T.; Witzke, Kara A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporosis is a severe complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Many exercise modalities are used to slow bone loss, yet their efficacy is equivocal. This study examined the effect of activity-based therapy (ABT) targeting the lower extremities on bone health in individuals with SCI. Methods Thirteen men and women with SCI (age and injury duration = 29.7 ± 7.8 and 1.9 ± 2.7 years) underwent 6 months of ABT. At baseline and after 3 and 6 months of training, blood samples were obtained to assess bone formation (serum procollagen type 1 N propeptide (PINP) and bone resorption (serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), and participants underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans to obtain total body and regional estimates of bone mineral density (BMD). Results Results demonstrated significant increases (p < 0.05) in spine BMD (+4.8 %; 1.27 ± 0.22–1.33 ± 0.24 g/cm2) and decreases (p < 0.01) in total hip BMD (−6.1 %; 0.98 ± 0.18–0.91 ± 0.16 g/cm2) from 0 to 6 months of training. BMD at the bilateral distal femur (−7.5 to −11.0 %) and proximal tibia (− 8.0 to −11.2 %) declined but was not different (p > 0.05) versus baseline. Neither PINP nor CTX was altered (p> 0.05) with training. Conclusions Chronic activity-based therapy did not reverse bone loss typically observed soon after injury, yet reductions in BMD were less than the expected magnitude of decline in lower extremity BMD in persons with recent SCI. PMID:24097172

  14. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Methods: Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Results: Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Conclusion: Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity. PMID:26364281

  15. A combination therapy of neural and glial restricted precursor cells and chronic quipazine treatment paired with passive cycling promotes quipazine-induced stepping in adult spinalized rats

    PubMed Central

    Shumsky, Jed S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In order to develop optimal treatments to promote recovery from complete spinal cord injury (SCI), we examined the combination of: (1) a cellular graft of neural and glial restricted precursor (NRP/GRP) cells, (2) passive exercise, and (3) chronic quipazine treatment on behavioral outcomes and compared them with the individual treatment elements. NRP/GRP cells were transplanted at the time of spinalization. Methods Daily passive exercise began 1 week after injury to give sufficient time for the animals to recover. Chronic quipazine administration began 2 weeks after spinalization to allow for sufficient receptor upregulation permitting the expression of its behavioral effects. Behavioral measures consisted of the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor score and percent of weight-supported steps and hops on a treadmill. Results Rats displayed an increased response to quipazine (BBB ≥ 9) beginning at 8 weeks post-injury in all the animals that received the combination therapy. This increase in BBB score was persistent through the end of the study (12 weeks post-injury). Conclusion Unlike the individual treatment groups which never achieved weight support, the combination therapy animals were able to perform uncoordinated weight-supported stepping without a body weight support system while on a moving treadmill (6.5 m per minute) and were capable of supporting their own weight in stance during open field locomotion testing. No regeneration of descending serotonergic projections into and through the lesion cavity was observed. Furthermore, these results are a testament to the capacity of the lumbar spinal cord, when properly stimulated, to sustain functioning locomotor circuitry following complete SCI. PMID:25329574

  16. High-volume FES-cycling partially reverses bone loss in people with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frotzler, Angela; Coupaud, Sylvie; Perret, Claudio; Kakebeeke, Tanja H; Hunt, Kenneth J; Donaldson, Nick de N; Eser, Prisca

    2008-07-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to severe bone loss in the paralysed limbs and to a resulting increased fracture risk thereof. Since long bone fractures can lead to comorbidities and a reduction in quality of life, it is important to improve bone strength in people with chronic SCI. In this prospective longitudinal cohort study, we investigated whether functional electrical stimulation (FES) induced high-volume cycle training can partially reverse the loss of bone substance in the legs after chronic complete SCI. Eleven participants with motor-sensory complete SCI (mean age 41.9+/-7.5 years; 11.0+/-7.1 years post injury) were recruited. After an initial phase of 14+/-7 weeks of FES muscle conditioning, participants performed on average 3.7+/-0.6 FES-cycling sessions per week, of 58+/-5 min each, over 12 months at each individual's highest power output. Bone and muscle parameters were investigated in the legs by means of peripheral quantitative computed tomography before the muscle conditioning (t1), and after six (t2) and 12 months (t3) of high-volume FES-cycle training. After 12 months of FES-cycling, trabecular and total bone mineral density (BMD) as well as total cross-sectional area in the distal femoral epiphysis increased significantly by 14.4+/-21.1%, 7.0+/-10.8% and 1.2+/-1.5%, respectively. Bone parameters in the femoral shaft showed small but significant decreases, with a reduction of 0.4+/-0.4% in cortical BMD, 1.8+/-3.0% in bone mineral content, and 1.5+/-2.1% in cortical thickness. These decreases mainly occurred between t1 and t2. No significant changes were found in any of the measured bone parameters in the tibia. Muscle CSA at the thigh increased significantly by 35.5+/-18.3%, while fat CSA at the shank decreased by 16.7+/-12.3%. Our results indicate that high-volume FES-cycle training leads to site-specific skeletal changes in the paralysed limbs, with an increase in bone parameters at the actively loaded distal femur but not the passively loaded

  17. Somatosensory inputs by application of KinesioTaping: effects on spasticity, balance, and gait in chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Tamburella, Federica; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Leg paralysis, spasticity, reduced interlimb coordination, and impaired balance are the chief limitations to overground ambulation in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). In recent years, the application of KinesioTaping (KT) has been proposed to enhance sensory inputs, decreasing spasticity by proprioception feedback and relieving abnormal muscle tension. Because no studies have examined KT-based techniques in SCI subjects, our goal was to analyze the effects of ankle joint KT on spasticity, balance, and gait. Materials and Methods: A randomized crossover case control design was used to compare the effects of KT and conventional nonelastic silk tape (ST) in 11 chronic SCI subjects, AIS level D, with soleus/gastrocnemius (S/G) muscle spasticity and balance and gait impairments. Treatment: 48 h of treatment with KT or ST was followed by 48 h with the other technique after 1 week. A single Y-strip of Cure© tape (KT) and ST was to the S and G muscles with 0% stretch. Before and 48 h after of application of KT and ST, clinical data on the range of motion (ROM), spasticity, clonus, pain, balance, and gait were collected. Stabilometric platform assessment of center of pressure (COP) movements; bidimensional gait analysis; and recording of electromyographic (EMG) activity of the S, G, and tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis lungus muscles were also performed. Results: Only KT had significant effects on spasticity (p < 0.05), clonus (p < 0.001) and COP movements (p < 0.05), kinematic gait parameters (p < 0.001), and EMG activity (p < 0.001). Comparison between ST and KT improvements pointed out significant differences as concerns ROM (p < 0.001), spasticity (p < 0.001), clonus (p < 0.001), pain (p < 0.001), COP parameters (p < 0.05), and most kinematic gait data (p < 0.05). Discussion: Short-term application of KT reduces spasticity and pain and improves balance and gait in chronic SCI subjects. Although these data are promising, they

  18. Continuous spinal anaesthesia: what's new and what's not.

    PubMed

    Bevacqua, Brian K

    2003-09-01

    Continuous spinal anaesthesia combines the advantages of single-dose spinal anaesthesia, rapid onset and a high degree of success, with those of a continuous technique. The introduction of micro-catheters invigorated interest in the technique and allowed its expansion to additional populations and surgical procedures. However, multiple cases of cauda equina syndrome associated with micro-catheters and (primarily) hyperbaric lidocaine solution led to withdrawal of micro-catheters from the US market, casting doubt over the safety of continuous spinal anaesthesia as a whole. A decade after these events it is possible to look back at the experience with continuous spinal anaesthesia for operative anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia and to compare it with the available alternatives. From this perspective, continuous spinal anaesthesia remains a useful and safe technique. Future research should focus on the comparison of continuous spinal anaesthesia with the combined spinal/epidural technique and the use of newer spinal agents.

  19. [Interest of cervical epidural anesthesia in perioperative management of thyroidectomy with the high-risk anesthetic patient].

    PubMed

    Mahoungou Guimbi, K C; Itiere Odzili, F A; Soussa, G R

    2014-03-01

    Cervical epidural anesthesia is an anesthetic technique that can be useful in patients with high perioperative risk undergoing to cervical surgery. We report the case of a patient of 49 years old with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, left hemiparesis sequelae of stroke and congestive left ventricular failure. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy under cervical epidural anesthesia. No difficulty breathing or decompensation of chronic underlying diseases were noted in the postoperative.

  20. Spinal cord stimulation for treatment of failed back surgery syndrome--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, R; Ahmad, T S

    1999-12-01

    Severe, persistent back pain following back surgery is often referred to as Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (FBSS). Conservative measures such as physiotherapy, back strengthening exercises, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and epidural steroids may be inadequate to alleviate pain. Spinal Cord Stimulators were implanted into two patients suffering from FBSS. Both patients responded successfully to spinal cord stimulation with reduction of pain and disability.

  1. Infiltrating spinal angiolipoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Doron; Hon, B A; Pelz, David M; Ang, Lee Cyn; Lee, Donald H; Duggal, Neil

    2004-10-01

    Angiolipomas are rarely encountered in the spine. We report the case of a 47-year-old man with a thoracic angiolipoma involving the T9 vertebral body. A preoperative spinal angiogram confirmed a highly vascular neoplasm. The lesion was treated with endovascular embolization prior to a T9 corpectomy and resection of the epidural component of the tumor. At time of surgery, minimal blood loss occurred during resection of the vertebral body and the epidural mass. Pathologic examination demonstrated features consistent with spinal angiolipoma. This report emphasizes the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of infiltrating spinal angiolipoma and discusses therapeutic management options.

  2. Administration of low dose estrogen attenuates persistent inflammation, promotes angiogenesis, and improves locomotor function following chronic spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Matzelle, Denise C; Yu, Shan P; Wei, Ling; Varma, Abhay; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2016-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes loss of neurological function and, depending upon the severity of injury, may lead to paralysis. Currently, no FDA-approved pharmacotherapy is available for SCI. High-dose methylprednisolone is widely used, but this treatment is controversial. We have previously shown that low doses of estrogen reduces inflammation, attenuates cell death, and protects axon and myelin in SCI rats, but its effectiveness in recovery of function is not known. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate whether low doses of estrogen in post-SCI would reduce inflammation, protect cells and axons, and improve locomotor function during the chronic phase of injury. Injury (40 g.cm force) was induced at thoracic 10 in young adult male rats. Rats were treated with 10 or 100 μg 17β-estradiol (estrogen) for 7 days following SCI and compared with vehicle-treated injury and laminectomy (sham) controls. Histology (H&E staining), immunohistofluorescence, Doppler laser technique, and Western blotting were used to monitor tissue integrity, gliosis, blood flow, angiogenesis, the expression of angiogenic factors, axonal degeneration, and locomotor function (Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating) following injury. To assess the progression of recovery, rats were sacrificed at 7, 14, or 42 days post injury. A reduction in glial reactivity, attenuation of axonal and myelin damage, protection of cells, increased expression of angiogenic factors and microvessel growth, and improved locomotor function were found following estrogen treatment compared with vehicle-treated SCI rats. These results suggest that treatment with a very low dose of estrogen has significant therapeutic implications for the improvement of locomotor function in chronic SCI. Experimental studies with low dose estrogen therapy in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrated the potential for multi-active beneficial outcomes that could ameliorate the degenerative pathways in chronic SCI as

  3. [Anesthetic Management of Three Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Naoko; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Inamori, Noriko; Nishimura, Shinya; Mori, Takahiko

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronically progressing or relapsing disease caused by immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy. We report the anesthetic management of three CIDP patients who underwent elective orthopedic surgeries. Owing to the risk of neuraxial anesthetics triggering demyelination, general anesthesia was selected to avoid epidural or spinal anesthesia or other neuraxial blockade. It was also judged prudent to avoid prolonged perioperative immobilization, which might compress vulnerable peripheral nerves. For Patient 1, general anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil, and sevoflurane, and was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. For Patients 2 and 3, general anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. For tracheal intubation, under careful monitoring with peripheral nerve stimulators, minimal doses of rocuronium (0.6-0.7 mg x kg(-1)) were administered. When sugammadex was administered to reverse the effect of rocuronium, all patients rapidly regained muscular strength. Postoperative courses were satisfactory without sequelae.

  4. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection.

    PubMed

    Buzoianu-Anguiano, Vinnitsa; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; García-Vences, Elisa; Caballero-Chacón, Sara; Guizar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Chavez-Sanchez, Luis; Grijalva, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN) and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC) transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG), TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model. PMID:26634157

  5. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Buzoianu-Anguiano, Vinnitsa; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; García-Vences, Elisa; Caballero-Chacón, Sara; Guizar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Chavez-Sanchez, Luis; Grijalva, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN) and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC) transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG), TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model. PMID:26634157

  6. A Clinical Perspective and Definition of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) can be complete or incomplete. The level of injury in SCI is defined as the most caudal segment with motor function rated at greater than or equal to 3/5, with pain and temperature preserved. The standard neurological classification of SCI provided by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) assigns grades from ASIA A (complete SCI) through ASIA E (normal sensory/motor), with B, C, and D representing varying degrees of injury between these extremes. The most common causes of SCI include trauma (motor vehicle accidents, sports, violence, falls), degenerative spinal disease, vascular injury (anterior spinal artery syndrome, epidural hematoma), tumor, infection (epidural abscess), and demyelinating processes (). (SDC Figure 1, http://links.lww.com/BRS/B91)(Figure is included in full-text article.).

  7. Spinal angiolipoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Samdani, A F; Garonzik, I M; Jallo, G; Eberhart, C G; Zahos, P

    2004-03-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare lesions usually found in the epidural space of the thoracic spine. This report presents a case of and reviews the literature on this rare entity. The etiology, clinical presentation, imaging, and treatment are discussed. In 92 reported cases of spinal angiolipoma 56 occurred in women (61%), and 36 in men (39%). Mean age of occurrence is 42.9 years (range 10 days-85 years) with most patients presenting with slowly progressive symptoms of spinal cord compression. Most cases occur in the extradural compartment, and are of the non-invasive subtype. This rare clinical entity must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. In most cases complete removal is possible, however, prognosis is good even for infiltrating lesions. Thus, one must not risk neurological damage to attain complete resection.

  8. Lumbar spinal angiolipoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Konya, Deniz; Ozgen, Serdar; Kurtkaya, Ozlem; Pamir, Necmettin M

    2006-06-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are extremely rare benign tumors composed of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. Most are symptomatic due to progressive spinal cord or root compression. This article describes the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with a 6-month history of low back pain radiating to her right leg. The pain was multisegmental. The condition had worsened with time. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dorsal epidural mass at L5 and erosion of the lamina of the L5 vertebra. Laminectomy was performed, and an extradural tumor was totally excised. Neuropathologic examination identified it as a lumbar spinal angiolipoma. There was no evidence of recurrence in follow-up 12 months later. This rare clinical entity must be considered in the differential diagnosis for any spinal epidural lesion.

  9. The efficacy and safety of low dose epidural butorphanol on postoperative analgesia following cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, K; Rahman, T R; Singh, S N; Bhattarai, B; Basnet, N; Khaniya, S

    2008-01-01

    Butorphanol is considered an effective and safe analgesic after cesarean delivery but is associated with profound dose-dependent sedation. Somnolence may cause hindrance in early mother-baby interaction. This study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and to monitor side-effects of low doses (0.5 mg and 0.75 mg) of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine compared to bupivacaine alone in parturients following cesarean delivery. One hundred and twenty parturients (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2) undergoing cesarean delivery were allocated into three groups: group 1 received epidural 0.125% bupivacaine while group 2 and 3 received an additional 0.5 mg and 0.75 mg butorphanol respectively. A combined spinal, epidural technique was used. Spinal anaesthesia was used for surgery. The epidural route was used for postoperative analgesia with the study drug. Onset, duration and quality of analgesia, lowest visual analogue scales (VAS) score, and side effects were noted. The onset and duration of analgesia in group 2 (4.1+/-2.6 min and 202.4+/-62.8 min) and group 3 (4.0+/-2.5 min and 192.3+/-69.1 min) were significantly different (P<0.01) from group 1 (6.6+/-2.7 min and 145.7+/-89.6 min). The quality of analgesia in terms of time to first independent movement and satisfactory VAS were statistically better (P<0.01) in group 2 (3.9+/-0.3 hour and 8.1+/-0.1 mm) and group 3 (3.8+/-0.4 hour and 8.1+/-0.9 mm) than in group 1 (5.2+/-0.4 hour and 6.3+/-1.3 mm). The incidence of sedation was 5% in all the three groups. A lower dose of epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine produces a significantly earlier onset, longer duration and better quality of analgesia than bupivacaine does. PMID:18709032

  10. Safety assessment of encapsulated morphine delivered epidurally in a sustained-release multivesicular liposome preparation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yaksh, T L; Provencher, J C; Rathbun, M L; Myers, R R; Powell, H; Richter, P; Kohn, F R

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that the epidural (EPI) delivery of morphine encapsulated in multivesicular liposomes (DepoFoam drug delivery system) produces a sustained clearance of morphine and a prolonged analgesia. We have sought to subsequently determine the likelihood of deleterious effects on local tissue of repetitive epidural injections of this encapsulated morphine preparation (C0401). Beagle dogs were prepared according to protocol approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee under volatile general anesthesia with chronic lumbar EPI catheters and subcutaneous injection ports. Male and female dogs (three groups) received a total of 4 EPI injections at 8-day intervals of 3 mL of C0401 (10 mg/mL morphine) (N = 6), DepoFoam vehicle (N = 6), or 0.9% sodium chloride (N = 6). Following EPI-C0401, but not saline or DepoFoam vehicle, there were transient (< 72 hr) decreases in food consumption, arousal, hindlimb muscle tone, and body temperature. Heart rate was unaltered, but there were modest decreases in blood pressure and respiratory rate, which persisted for 24-72 hr after C0401. No persistent changes in sensory/motor function, body weight, or stool/urine production were observed. Cerebrospinal fluid, blood chemistry, and urinalysis performed at surgery and on the day of sacrifice (24 hr after the last dose) were within normal ranges. Gross pathology at necropsy was unremarkable. Spinal histopathology findings were judged to be minimal (e.g., modest pericatheter inflammation and fibrosis) and present in all dogs. However, a statistical trend in the rank order of pathology scores was noted (Saline < DepoFoam vehicle < C0401). Repeated EPI injection of C0401 at the maximum dose that could be administered (30 mg) resulted in moderate, transient behavioral and physiological effects after each injection, consistent with morphine administration, and a modest effect on cord histopathology. This level of pathology is reflected in the lack of change observed in

  11. Effect of yogic colon cleansing (Laghu Sankhaprakshalana Kriya) on pain, spinal flexibility, disability and state anxiety in chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Haldavnekar, Richa Vivek; Tekur, Padmini; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that Integrated Yoga reduces pain, disability, anxiety and depression and increases spinal flexibility and quality-of-life in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the effect of two yoga practices namely laghu shankha prakshalana (LSP) kriya, a yogic colon cleansing technique and back pain specific asanas (Back pain special technique [BST]) on pain, disability, spinal flexibility and state anxiety in patients with CLBP. Materials and Methods: In this randomized control (self as control) study, 40 in-patients (25 were males, 15 were females) between 25 and 70 years (44.05 ± 13.27) with CLBP were randomly assigned to receive LSP or BST sessions. The measurements were taken immediately before and after each session of either of the practices (30 min) in the same participant. Randomization was used to decide the day of the session (3rd or 5th day after admission) to ensure random distribution of the hang over effect of the two practices. Statistical analysis was performed using the repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: Significant group * time interaction (P < 0.001) was observed in 11 point numerical rating scale, spinal flexibility (on Leighton type Goniometer) and (straight leg raise test in both legs), Oswestry Disability Index, State Anxiety (XI component of Spieldberger's state and trait anxiety inventory. There was significantly (P < 0.001, between groups) better reduction in LSP than BST group on all variables. No adverse effects were reported by any participant. Conclusion: Clearing the bowel by yoga based colon cleansing technique (LSP) is safe and offers immediate analgesic effect with reduced disability, anxiety and improved spinal flexibility in patients with CLBP. PMID:25035620

  12. Comparison of epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia for post-thoracotomy pain control.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hui; Feng, Yi; Yang, Ba-Xian; Wang, Jun

    2008-04-01

    Epidural analgesia is regarded as the gold method for controlling post-thoracotomy pain. Intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia can also produce satisfactory analgesic effects, but is suspected to increase the incidence of chronic pain. However, randomized controlled trials comparing these two methods for post-thoracotomy acute pain analgesic effects and chronic pain incidents have not been conducted previously. We studied 107 adult patients, allocated randomly to thoracic epidural bupivacaine and morphine or intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia. Acute pain scores and opioid-related side effects were evaluated for three postoperative days. Chronic pain information, including the incidence, severity, and allodynia-like pain, was acquired on the first, third, sixth and twelfth months postoperatively. There was no significant difference on numeral rating scales (NRS) at rest or on motion between the two groups during the three postoperative days. The patient satisfaction results were also similar between the groups. The side effects, especially mild pruritus, were reported more often in the epidural group. Both groups showed high incidence of chronic pain (42.1-72.1%), and no significance between the groups. The incidence of allodynia-like pain reported in cryo group was higher than that in Epidural group on any postoperative month, with significance on the sixth and the twelfth months postoperatively (P<0.05). More patients rated their chronic pain intensity on moderate and severe in cryo group and interfered with daily life (P<0.05). Both thoracic epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia showed satisfactory analgesia for post-thoracotomy acute pain. The incidence of post-thoracotomy chronic pain is high. Cryoanalgesia may be a factor that increases the incidence of neuropathic pain. PMID:17870625

  13. Chronic spontaneous activity generated in the somata of primary nociceptors is associated with pain-related behavior following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Supinder S.; Yang, Qing; Crook, Robyn J.; Du, Junhui; Wu, Zizhen; Fishman, Harvey M.; Grill, Raymond J.; Carlton, Susan M.; Walters, Edgar T.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying chronic pain that develops after spinal cord injury (SCI) are incompletely understood. Most research on SCI pain mechanisms has focused on neuronal alterations within pain pathways at spinal and supraspinal levels associated with inflammation and glial activation. These events might also impact central processes of primary sensory neurons, triggering in nociceptors a hyperexcitable state and spontaneous activity (SA) that drive behavioral hypersensitivity and pain. SCI can sensitize peripheral fibers of nociceptors and promote peripheral SA, but whether these effects are driven by extrinsic alterations in surrounding tissue or are intrinsic to the nociceptor, and whether similar SA occurs in nociceptors in vivo are unknown. We show that small DRG neurons from rats (Rattus norvegicus) receiving thoracic spinal injury 3 d – 8 mo earlier and recorded 1 d after dissociation exhibit an elevated incidence of SA coupled with soma hyperexcitability compared to untreated and sham-treated groups. SA incidence was greatest in lumbar DRG neurons (57%) and least in cervical neurons (28%), and failed to decline over 8 mo. Many sampled SA neurons were capsaicin sensitive and/or bound the nociceptive marker, isolectin B4. This intrinsic SA state was correlated with increased behavioral responsiveness to mechanical and thermal stimulation of sites below and above the injury level. Recordings from C and Aδ fibers revealed SCI-induced SA generated in or near the neurons’ somata in vivo. SCI promotes the entry of primary nociceptors into a chronic hyperexcitable-SA state that may provide a useful therapeutic target in some forms of persistent pain. PMID:21048146

  14. Self-Sustained Motor Activity Triggered by Interlimb Reflexes in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury, Evidence of Functional Ascending Propriospinal Pathways

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Penelope A.; Burke, David

    2013-01-01

    The loss or reduction of supraspinal inputs after spinal cord injury provides a unique opportunity to examine the plasticity of neural pathways within the spinal cord. In a series of nine experiments on a patient, quadriplegic due to spinal cord injury, we investigated interlimb reflexes and self-sustained activity in completely paralyzed and paretic muscles due to a disinhibited propriospinal pathway. Electrical stimuli were delivered over the left common peroneal nerve at the fibular head as single stimuli or in trains at 2–100 Hz lasting 1 s. Single stimuli produced a robust interlimb reflex twitch in the contralateral thumb at a mean latency 69 ms, but no activity in other muscles. With stimulus trains the thumb twitch occurred at variable subharmonics of the stimulus rate, and strong self-sustained activity developed in the contralateral wrist extensors, outlasting both the stimuli and the thumb reflex by up to 20 s. Similar behavior was recorded in the ipsilateral wrist extensors and quadriceps femoris of both legs, but not in the contralateral thenar or peroneal muscles. The patient could not terminate the self-sustained activity voluntarily, but it was abolished on the left by attempted contractions of the paralyzed thumb muscles of the right hand. These responses depend on the functional integrity of an ascending propriospinal pathway, and highlight the plasticity of spinal circuitry following spinal cord injury. They emphasize the potential for pathways below the level of injury to generate movement, and the role of self-sustained reflex activity in the sequelae of spinal cord injury. PMID:23936543

  15. Self-sustained motor activity triggered by interlimb reflexes in chronic spinal cord injury, evidence of functional ascending propriospinal pathways.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Penelope A; Burke, David

    2013-01-01

    The loss or reduction of supraspinal inputs after spinal cord injury provides a unique opportunity to examine the plasticity of neural pathways within the spinal cord. In a series of nine experiments on a patient, quadriplegic due to spinal cord injury, we investigated interlimb reflexes and self-sustained activity in completely paralyzed and paretic muscles due to a disinhibited propriospinal pathway. Electrical stimuli were delivered over the left common peroneal nerve at the fibular head as single stimuli or in trains at 2-100 Hz lasting 1 s. Single stimuli produced a robust interlimb reflex twitch in the contralateral thumb at a mean latency 69 ms, but no activity in other muscles. With stimulus trains the thumb twitch occurred at variable subharmonics of the stimulus rate, and strong self-sustained activity developed in the contralateral wrist extensors, outlasting both the stimuli and the thumb reflex by up to 20 s. Similar behavior was recorded in the ipsilateral wrist extensors and quadriceps femoris of both legs, but not in the contralateral thenar or peroneal muscles. The patient could not terminate the self-sustained activity voluntarily, but it was abolished on the left by attempted contractions of the paralyzed thumb muscles of the right hand. These responses depend on the functional integrity of an ascending propriospinal pathway, and highlight the plasticity of spinal circuitry following spinal cord injury. They emphasize the potential for pathways below the level of injury to generate movement, and the role of self-sustained reflex activity in the sequelae of spinal cord injury.

  16. Comparison of Transforaminal and Parasagittal Epidural Steroid Injections in Patients With Radicular Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Aryani, Mohamad Reza; Momenzadeh, Sirus; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Esmilijah, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESI), including transforaminal (TF) epidural injections and interlaminar (IL) epidural steroid injections are commonly performed procedures for the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. Parasagittal interlaminar (PIL) approach could enable higher ventral epidural spread, with fewer complications than TF. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effectiveness of PIL and TF ESI in relieving the pain and disability of patients with lumbosacral pain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 64 patients, aged between 18 to 75 years, with a diagnosis of low back pain and unilateral lumbosacral radicular pain. The patients were randomized to receive fluoroscopically guided epidural injection, through either the PIL or TF approach. Patients were evaluated for effective pain relief [numerical rating scale (NRS) < 3] by 0 - 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) and functional improvement by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Effective pain relief [numeric rating scale (NRS) < 3] was observed in 77.3% (95% CI: 67‒90.5%) of patients in PIL group and 74.2% (95% CI: 62.4 - 89.4%) of patients in the TF group (P = 0.34), at 4 weeks. Mean NRS score was not significantly different between the PIL group compared to the TF group, at 4 weeks (P = 0.19). Number of patients with improved disability (measured by ODI < 20%) was not significantly different in PIL group (78% of cases) compared to the TF group (76% of cases), at 4 weeks (P = 0.21). There were no adverse effects observed in any of our patients. Conclusions: The PIL epidural injection is as effective as TF epidural injection in improving pain and functional status, in patients with chronic lumbosacral low back pain, due to disc degeneration. PMID:26587400

  17. Epidural Tube: A Useful Device in Sialendoscopy Operations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Fang, Wei; Chen, Ju-feng; Long, Xing

    2016-03-01

    Salivary endoscopy, which was first described in 1991, is a safe technique with few complications. The sialendoscopy operation has been developed and successfully offered as a minimally invasive and gland-preserving approach for the treatment of chronic obstructive sialadenitis. For many surgeons, entering the duct lumen of the salivary gland is the most difficult and time-consuming step of the sialendoscopy operation. This report introduces a timesaving and straightforward method for entering the duct lumen using an epidural tube, which is a plastic tube with a blunt tip. PMID:26433042

  18. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  19. Identification of Spinal Cord MicroRNA and Gene Signatures in a Model of Chronic Stress-Induced Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bradesi, Sylvie; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Joshi, Swapna Mahurkar; Koukos, Georgios; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Animal studies have shown that stress could induce epigenetic and transcriptomic alterations essential in determining the balance between adaptive or maladaptive responses to stress. We tested the hypothesis that chronic stress in rats deregulates coding and non-coding gene expression in the spinal cord, which may underline neuroinflammation and nociceptive changes previously observed in this model. Methods Male Wistar rats were exposed to daily stress or handled, for 10 days. At day 11, lumbar spinal segments were collected and processed for mRNA/miRNA isolation followed by expression profiling using Agilent SurePrint Rat Exon and Rat miRNA Microarray platforms. Differentially expressed gene lists were generated using the dChip program. Microarrays were analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) tool from Ingenuity Systems. Multiple methods were used for the analysis of miRNA-mRNA functional modules. Quantitative real time RT-PCR for Interleukin 6 signal transducer (gp130), the Signal Transducer And Activator Of Transcription 3 (STAT3), glial fibrillary acidic protein and mir-17-5p were performed to confirm levels of expression. Results Gene network analysis revealed that stress deregulated different inflammatory (IL-6, JAK/STAT, TNF) and metabolic (PI3K/AKT) signaling pathways. MicroRNA array analysis revealed a signature of 39 deregulated microRNAs in stressed rats. MicroRNA-gene network analysis showed that microRNAs are regulators of two gene networks relevant to inflammatory processes. Specifically, our analysis of miRNA-mRNA functional modules identified miR-17-5p as an important regulator in our model. We verified miR-17-5p increased expression in stress using qPCR and in situ hybridization. In addition, we observed changes in the expression of gp130 and STAT3 (involved in intracellular signaling cascades in response to gp130 activation), both predicted targets for miR-17-5p. A modulatory role of spinal mir17-5p in the modulation of

  20. Chronic Electrical Stimulation of the Intact Corticospinal System After Unilateral Injury Restores Skilled Locomotor Control and Promotes Spinal Axon Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, Jason B.; Berrol, Lauren J.; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Martin, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Injury to the brain or spinal cord usually preserves some corticospinal (CS) connections. These residual circuits sprout spontaneously and in response to activity-based treatments. We hypothesized that augmenting activity in spared CS circuits would restore the skilled motor control lost after injury and augment outgrowth of CS terminations in the spinal cord. After selective injury of one half of the CS tract (CST) in the rat, we applied 10 days of electrical stimulation to the forelimb area of motor cortex of the spared half and tested motor performance for 30 days. Rats with injury and CST stimulation showed substantial improvements in skilled paw placement while walking over a horizontal ladder. By the end of the testing period, the walking errors of the previously impaired forelimb in rats with injury and stimulation returned to baseline, while the errors remained elevated in rats with injury only. Whereas the time to perform the task returned to normal in all animals, the pattern of errors returned to normal only in the stimulated group. Electrical stimulation also caused robust outgrowth of CST axon terminations in the ipsilateral spinal cord, the side of impairment, compared with rats with injury only. The outgrowth was directed to the normal gray matter territory of ipsilateral CST axon terminations. Thus, stimulation of spared CS circuits induced substantial axon outgrowth to the largely denervated side of the spinal cord and restored normal motor control in the previously impaired limbs. PMID:20702720

  1. Chronic electrical stimulation of the intact corticospinal system after unilateral injury restores skilled locomotor control and promotes spinal axon outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Jason B; Berrol, Lauren J; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Martin, John H

    2010-08-11

    Injury to the brain or spinal cord usually preserves some corticospinal (CS) connections. These residual circuits sprout spontaneously and in response to activity-based treatments. We hypothesized that augmenting activity in spared CS circuits would restore the skilled motor control lost after injury and augment outgrowth of CS terminations in the spinal cord. After selective injury of one half of the CS tract (CST) in the rat, we applied 10 d of electrical stimulation to the forelimb area of motor cortex of the spared half and tested motor performance for 30 d. Rats with injury and CST stimulation showed substantial improvements in skilled paw placement while walking over a horizontal ladder. By the end of the testing period, the walking errors of the previously impaired forelimb in rats with injury and stimulation returned to baseline, while the errors remained elevated in rats with injury only. Whereas the time to perform the task returned to normal in all animals, the pattern of errors returned to normal only in the stimulated group. Electrical stimulation also caused robust outgrowth of CST axon terminations in the ipsilateral spinal cord, the side of impairment, compared with rats with injury only. The outgrowth was directed to the normal gray matter territory of ipsilateral CST axon terminations. Thus, stimulation of spared CS circuits induced substantial axon outgrowth to the largely denervated side of the spinal cord and restored normal motor control in the previously impaired limbs. PMID:20702720

  2. Lumbar spinal extradural angiolipomas. Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Seref; Arslan, Erhan; Sahin, Soner; Aksoy, Kaya; Aker, Sibel

    2006-03-01

    Spinal extradural angiolipomas are benign tumors mostly localized in the thoracic region. A 50-year-old woman and a 36-year-old man presented with rare lumbar spinal angiolipoma manifesting as low back pain but without neurological signs. Magnetic resonance imaging showed lumbar extradural tumors at the L4-5 and L1-2 levels, respectively. Each patient underwent complete surgical resection of the epidural tumors. Histological examination revealed characteristics of angiolipomas in both tumors. The symptoms of both patients improved postoperatively and no recurrence of the tumors was found 1 year after surgery.

  3. Systemic effects of epidural methylprednisolone injection on glucose tolerance in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that in diabetic patients, the glycemic profile was disturbed after intra-articular injection of corticosteroids. Little is known about the impact of epidural injection in such patients. The goal of this study was double, at first comparing the glycaemic profile in diabetic patients after a unique injection of 80 mg of acetate methylprednisolone either intra-articular or epidural and secondly to compare the amount of systemic diffusion of the drug after both procedures. Methods Seventeen patients were included. Glycemic changes were compared in 9 diabetic patients following intra-articular (4 patients) and epidural injections (5 patients). Epidural injections were performed using the sacral route under fluoroscopic control in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes control had to stable for more than 10 days and the renal function to be preserved. Blood glucose was monitored using a validated continuous measuring device (GMS, Medtronic) the day before and for two days following the injection. Results were expressed in the form of daily glycemic profiles and as by mean, peak and minimal values +/- SD. The urinary excretion of methylprednisolone after the 2 routes of injection was analyzed in 8 patients (4 in each group). Urine samples were cropped one hour before the injections, then 4 times during the first day and 3 times a week for 2 weeks. The measurements included the free and conjugated fraction Results The glycaemic profile remains unchanged with no significant changes in the group of the 5 diabetic patients receiving epidural injections. On the other end, the average peak and and mean values were enhanced up to 3 mmol/l above baseline two days after the infiltration in the groups of the 4 diabetic patients infiltrated intra-articular. The mean urinary excretion of the steroid was about ten times higher in the intra-articular versus epidural group: 7000 ng/ml versus 700 ng/ml. Looking at each individual there were

  4. Spontaneously Resolved Recurrent Cervical Epidural Hematoma in a 37-Week Primigravida.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Deguchi, Masao; Hirata, Hitoshi; Kanamono, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To describe a patient with a recurrent spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) during pregnancy that had spontaneous remission. Methods A 27-year-old primigravida at 37 weeks' gestation suddenly felt a strong left shoulder pain without any trauma. She had a history of fenestration for a spontaneous cervical hematoma when she was 18 years old. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a recurrence of the cervical epidural hematoma at the C4-T1 level, but she had no paralysis. Results The patient subsequently underwent a cesarean section and delivered a healthy male infant. Her spinal epidural hematoma disappeared. Multislice computed tomography showed no evidence for a vascular malformation or tumor. Three years after the initial cesarean section, she underwent a second one and delivered another male infant. Conclusions We report on a rare case of recurrent SSEH during pregnancy with no neurologic deficits that was treated nonoperatively with close observation and resulted in spontaneous resolution. In such patients with no neurologic deficits, nonoperative management with close observation may be a reasonable alternative. PMID:26430600

  5. Spinal Cord Stimulation and Augmentative Control Strategies for Leg Movement after Spinal Paralysis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Severe spinal cord injury is a devastating condition, tearing apart long white matter tracts and causing paralysis and disability of body functions below the lesion. But caudal to most injuries, the majority of neurons forming the distributed propriospinal system, the localized gray matter spinal interneuronal circuitry, and spinal motoneuron populations are spared. Epidural spinal cord stimulation can gain access to this neural circuitry. This review focuses on the capability of the human lumbar spinal cord to generate stereotyped motor output underlying standing and stepping, as well as full weight-bearing standing and rhythmic muscle activation during assisted treadmill stepping in paralyzed individuals in response to spinal cord stimulation. By enhancing the excitability state of the spinal circuitry, the stimulation can have an enabling effect upon otherwise "silent" translesional volitional motor control. Strategies for achieving functional movement in patients with severe injuries based on minimal translesional intentional control, task-specific proprioceptive feedback, and next-generation spinal cord stimulation systems will be reviewed. The role of spinal cord stimulation can go well beyond the immediate generation of motor output. With recently developed training paradigms, it can become a major rehabilitation approach in spinal cord injury for augmenting and steering trans- and sublesional plasticity for lasting therapeutic benefits.

  6. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion. A follow-up study in 136 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel; Bünger, Cody

    2006-01-01

    Although cost-effectiveness is becoming the foremost evaluative criterion within health service management of spine surgery, scientific knowledge about cost-patterns and cost-effectiveness is limited. The aims of this study were (1) to establish an activity-based method for costing at the patient-level, (2) to investigate the correlation between costs and effects, (3) to investigate the influence of selected patient characteristics on cost-effectiveness and, (4) to investigate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of (a) posterior instrumentation and (b) intervertebral anterior support in lumbar spinal fusion. We hypothesized a positive correlation between costs and effects, that determinants of effects would also determine cost-effectiveness, and that posterolateral instrumentation and anterior intervertebral support are cost-effective adjuncts in posterolateral lumbar fusion. A cohort of 136 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator’s perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted analysis (for non-random allocation of patients) was performed in order to reveal the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of (a) posterior instrumentation and

  7. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion. A follow-up study in 136 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel; Bünger, Cody

    2007-05-01

    Although cost-effectiveness is becoming the foremost evaluative criterion within health service management of spine surgery, scientific knowledge about cost-patterns and cost-effectiveness is limited. The aims of this study were (1) to establish an activity-based method for costing at the patient-level, (2) to investigate the correlation between costs and effects, (3) to investigate the influence of selected patient characteristics on cost-effectiveness and, (4) to investigate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of (a) posterior instrumentation and (b) intervertebral anterior support in lumbar spinal fusion. We hypothesized a positive correlation between costs and effects, that determinants of effects would also determine cost-effectiveness, and that posterolateral instrumentation and anterior intervertebral support are cost-effective adjuncts in posterolateral lumbar fusion. A cohort of 136 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted analysis (for non-random allocation of patients) was performed in order to reveal the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of (a) posterior instrumentation and (b

  8. Lumbar vertebral hemangioma mimicking lateral spinal canal stenosis: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Syrimpeis, Vasileios; Vitsas, Vasileios; Korovessis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Context Hemangiomas are the commonest benign tumors of the spine. Most occur in the thoracolumbar spine and the majority are asymptomatic. Rarely, hemangiomas cause symptoms through epidural expansion of the involved vertebra, resulting in spinal canal stenosis, spontaneous epidural hemorrhage, and pathological burst fracture. Findings We report a rare case of a 73-year-old woman, who had been treated for two months for degenerative neurogenic claudication. On admission, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic scans revealed a hemangioma of the third lumbar vertebra protruding to the epidural space producing lateral spinal stenosis and ipsilateral nerve root compression. The patient underwent successful right hemilaminectomy for decompression of the nerve root, balloon kyphoplasty with poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and pedicle screw segmental stabilization. Postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion In the elderly, this rare presentation of spinal stenosis due to hemangiomas may be encountered. Decompression and vertebral augmentation by means balloon kyphoplasty with PMMA plus segmental pedicle screw fixation is recommended. PMID:24090267

  9. Endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro spinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis modifies circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Bruno, Aldo; Mastrangelo, Diego; De Vizia, Marcella; Bernardo, Benedetto; Rosa, Buonagura; De Lucia, Domenico

    2014-10-01

    We performed a monocentric observational prospective study to evaluate coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis undergoing endovascular treatment for cerebro-spinal-venous insufficiency. Between February 2011 and July 2012, 144 endovascular procedures in 110 patients with multiple sclerosis and chronical cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency were performed and they were prospectively analyzed. Each patient was included in the study according to previously published criteria, assessed by the investigators before enrollment. Endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation parameters were determined before the procedure and during follow-up at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months after treatment, respectively. After the endovascular procedure, patients were treated with standard therapies, with the addition of mesoglycan. Fifty-five percent of patients experienced a favorable outcome of multiple sclerosis within 1 month after treatment, 25% regressed in the following 3 months, 24.9% did not experience any benefit. In only 0.1% patients, acute recurrence was observed and it was treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy. No major complications were observed. Coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters were shown to be reduced at 1 month and stable up to 12-month follow-up, and they were furthermore associated with a good clinical outcome. Endovascular procedures performed by a qualified staff are well tolerated; they can be associated with other currently adopted treatments. Correlations between inflammation, coagulation activation and neurodegenerative disorders are here supported by the observed variations in plasma levels of markers of coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction.

  10. One-year clinical study of NeuroRegen scaffold implantation following scar resection in complete chronic spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhifeng; Tang, Fengwu; Tang, Jiaguang; Yang, Huilin; Zhao, Yannan; Chen, Bing; Han, Sufang; Wang, Nuo; Li, Xing; Cheng, Shixiang; Han, Guang; Zhao, Changyu; Yang, Xiaoxiong; Chen, Yumei; Shi, Qin; Hou, Shuxun; Zhang, Sai; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this clinical study was to assess the safety and feasibility of the collagen scaffold, NeuroRegen scaffold, one year after scar tissue resection and implantation. Scar tissue is a physical and chemical barrier that prevents neural regeneration. However, identification of scar tissue is still a major challenge. In this study, the nerve electrophysiology method was used to distinguish scar tissue from normal neural tissue, and then different lengths of scars ranging from 0.5-4.5 cm were surgically resected in five complete chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The NeuroRegen scaffold along with autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs), which have been proven to promote neural regeneration and SCI recovery in animal models, were transplanted into the gap in the spinal cord following scar tissue resection. No obvious adverse effects related to scar resection or NeuroRegen scaffold transplantation were observed immediately after surgery or at the 12-month follow-up. In addition, patients showed partially autonomic nervous function improvement, and the recovery of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) from the lower limbs was also detected. The results indicate that scar resection and NeuroRegen scaffold transplantation could be a promising clinical approach to treating SCI.

  11. Effects of Self-Hypnosis Training and Emg Biofeedback Relaxation Training on Chronic Pain in Persons with Spinal-Cord Injury1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M.; Hanley, Marisol A.; Raichle, Katherine A.; Molton, Ivan R.; Engel, Joyce M.; Osborne, Travis L.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Cardenas, Diana D.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-seven adults with spinal-cord injury and chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of self-hypnosis (HYP) or EMG biofeedback relaxation (BIO) training for pain management. Participants in both treatment conditions reported sub-stantial, but similar, decreases in pain intensity from before to after the treatment sessions. However, participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, reported statistically significant decreases in daily average pain pre- to posttreatment. These pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain reported by the HYP participants were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, also reported significant pre- to posttreatment increases in perceived control over pain, but this change was not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. PMID:19459087

  12. Effects of self-hypnosis training and EMG biofeedback relaxation training on chronic pain in persons with spinal-cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M; Hanley, Marisol A; Raichle, Katherine A; Molton, Ivan R; Engel, Joyce M; Osborne, Travis L; Stoelb, Brenda L; Cardenas, Diana D; Patterson, David R

    2009-07-01

    Thirty-seven adults with spinal-cord injury and chronic pain were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of self-hypnosis (HYP) or EMG biofeedback relaxation (BIO) training for pain management. Participants in both treatment conditions reported substantial, but similar, decreases in pain intensity from before to after the treatment sessions. However, participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, reported statistically significant decreases in daily average pain pre- to posttreatment. These pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain reported by the HYP participants were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Participants in the HYP condition, but not the BIO condition, also reported significant pre- to posttreatment increases in perceived control over pain, but this change was not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. PMID:19459087

  13. Spinal computed tomography and computed tomographic metrizamide myelography in the early diagnosis of metastatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, T.; George, C.B.; Redmond, J. 3d.; Davidson, H.; Cornett, P.; Fill, W.L.; Spring, D.B.; Sobel, D.; Dabe, I.B.; Karl, R.D. Jr.

    1986-04-01

    New lesions were shown by Tc99m bone scans to have developed in sixty patients with known metastatic cancer or high-risk primary cancer and normal neurologic examinations; they were further evaluated with plain radiographs, spinal computed tomography (CT), and CT myelography (CT-M) according to an algorithm. Three groups were identified based on plain radiographs: group 1 (normal radiograph), group 2 (compression fracture as indicated by radiograph), group 3 (evidence of metastasis as indicated by radiograph). In group 1 (n = 18), spinal CT revealed that 33% of the patients had benign disease and 67%, metastases; epidural compression was seen in 25% of the patients with metastasis as indicated by CT-M. In group 2 (n = 26), CT-M disclosed that 38% had a benign compression fracture and 62% had metastases and that 63% of the patients with metastases had an epidural compression. In group 3 (n = 16), spinal CT revealed that 15 patients had metastases (one patient had benign disease). Epidural cord compression was seen in 47% of the patients with metastatic disease. In all groups, the presence of cortical bone discontinuity around the neural canal (seen in 31 patients) was highly associated with epidural compression (seen in 20 patients). Our approach allowed the early and accurate diagnosis of spinal metastasis and epidural tumor as well as the diagnosis of benign disease and was useful in planning optimal local therapy.

  14. Toll-like receptor 4-mediated nuclear factor-κB activation in spinal cord contributes to chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Zhai, Caihong; Han, Kun; Li, Zhisong; Qian, Junliang; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the spinal cord is involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation. However, the role of NF-κB activation in chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we found that the level of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) was increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar 4-6 segments after intrathecal administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days, and the p-p65 was co-localized with neurons and astrocytes. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was also increased in the same area. In addition, pretreatment with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) or SN50, inhibitors of NF-κB, prevented the development of morphine analgesic tolerance and alleviated morphine withdrawal-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. The increase in TNF-α and IL-1β expression induced by chronic morphine exposure was also partially blocked by PDTC pretreatment. In another experiment, rats receiving PDTC or SN50 beginning on day 7 of morphine injection showed partial recovery of the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine and attenuation of the withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an antagonist of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), blocked the activation of NF-κB, and prevented the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. These data indicated that TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation in the spinal cord is involved in the development and maintenance of morphine analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain hypersensitivity.

  15. Toll-like receptor 4-mediated nuclear factor-κB activation in spinal cord contributes to chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Zhai, Caihong; Han, Kun; Li, Zhisong; Qian, Junliang; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the spinal cord is involved in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation. However, the role of NF-κB activation in chronic morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we found that the level of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) was increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar 4-6 segments after intrathecal administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days, and the p-p65 was co-localized with neurons and astrocytes. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β was also increased in the same area. In addition, pretreatment with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) or SN50, inhibitors of NF-κB, prevented the development of morphine analgesic tolerance and alleviated morphine withdrawal-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. The increase in TNF-α and IL-1β expression induced by chronic morphine exposure was also partially blocked by PDTC pretreatment. In another experiment, rats receiving PDTC or SN50 beginning on day 7 of morphine injection showed partial recovery of the anti-nociceptive effects of morphine and attenuation of the withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an antagonist of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), blocked the activation of NF-κB, and prevented the development of morphine tolerance and withdrawal-induced abnormal pain. These data indicated that TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation in the spinal cord is involved in the development and maintenance of morphine analgesic tolerance and withdrawal-induced pain hypersensitivity. PMID:25446875

  16. The Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview Short Form (ZBI-12) in spouses of Veterans with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury, Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi-Mashhadi, Mohammad T; Mashhadinejad, Hosein; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Golhasani-Keshtan, Farideh; Ebrahimi, Hanieh; Zarei, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: To test the psychometric properties of the Persian version of Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-12) in the Iranian population. Methods: After translating and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire into Persian, 100 caregiver spouses of Iran- Iraq war (1980-88) veterans with chronic spinal cord injury who live in the city of Mashhad, Iran, invited to participate in the study. The Persian version of ZBI-12 accompanied with the Persian SF-36 was completed by the caregivers to test validity of the Persian ZBI-12.A Pearson`s correlation coefficient was calculated for validity testing. In order to assess reliability of the Persian ZBI-12, we administered the ZBI-12 randomly in 48 caregiver spouses again 3 days later. Results: Generally, the internal consistency of the questionnaire was found to be strong (Cronbach's alpha 0.77). Intercorrelation matrix between the different domains of ZBI-12 at test-retest was 0.78. The results revealed that majority of questions the Persian ZBI_12 have a significant correlation to each other. In terms of validity, our results showed that there is significant correlations between some domains of the Persian version the Short Form Health Survey -36 with the Persian Zarit Burden Interview such as Q1 with Role Physical (P=0.03),General Health (P=0.034),Social Functional (0.037), Mental Health (0.023) and Q3 with Physical Function (P=0.001),Viltality (0.002), Socil Function (0.001). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the Zarit Burden Interview Persian version is both a valid and reliable instrument for measuring the burden of caregivers of individuals with chronic spinal cord injury. PMID:25692171

  17. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  18. Anesthetic considerations in the patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing laparoscopic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Bali, Kusum; Chatrath, Veena; Bansal, Divya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the various anesthetic options which can be considered for laparoscopic surgeries in the patients with the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The literature search was performed in the Google, PubMed, and Medscape using key words “analgesia, anesthesia, general, laparoscopy, lung diseases, obstructive.” More than thirty-five free full articles and books published from the year 1994 to 2014 were retrieved and studied. Retrospective data observed from various studies and case reports showed regional anesthesia (RA) to be valid and safer option in the patients who are not good candidates of general anesthesia like patients having obstructive pulmonary diseases. It showed better postoperative patient outcome with respect to safety, efficacy, postoperative pulmonary complications, and analgesia. So depending upon disease severity RA in various forms such as spinal anesthesia, paravertebral block, continuous epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA), and CSEA with bi-level positive airway pressure should be considered. PMID:26957682

  19. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection.

    PubMed

    Tzimas, P; Prout, J; Papadopoulos, G; Mallett, S V

    2013-06-01

    Although epidural analgesia is routinely used in many institutions for patients undergoing hepatic resection, there are unresolved issues regarding its safety and efficacy in this setting. We performed a review of papers published in the area of anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection surgery and selected four areas of current controversy for the focus of this review: the safety of epidural catheters with respect to postoperative coagulopathy, a common feature of this type of surgery; analgesic efficacy; associated peri-operative fluid administration; and the role of epidural analgesia in enhanced recovery protocols. In all four areas, issues are raised that question whether epidural anaesthesia is always the best choice for these patients. Unfortunately, the evidence available is insufficient to provide definitive answers, and it is clear that there are a number of areas of controversy that would benefit from high-quality clinical trials.

  20. [Epidural analgesia in combination with general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Antje; Poepping, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Epidural anaesthesia is a widely used and accepted technique for perioperative analgesia in different kinds of surgery. Apart from analgetic effect and due to wide positve effects on patients outcome epidural analgesia is often used with general anaesthesia. It represents a reliable and reversible neural deafferentation technique that effectively contributes to a reduction of the surgical stress response with subsequent positive effects on cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, and immune function. Animal studies suggest that the use of epidural anaesthesia may be beneficial for cancer surgery because of less tumour recurrence. Further, a benefit is expected in patient's mortality. This article summarizes and critically discusses the current knowledge on the effects of epidural anaesthesia on pain management, cardiopulmonary as well as gastrointestinal functions and patient's outcome.

  1. A Systematic Review of Experimental Strategies Aimed at Improving Motor Function after Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Osman, Joyce; Cortes, Mar; Guest, James; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-03-01

    While various approaches have been proposed in clinical trials aimed at improving motor function after spinal cord injury in humans, there is still limited information regarding the scope, methodological quality, and evidence associated with single-intervention and multi-intervention approaches. A systematic review performed using the PubMed search engine and the key words "spinal cord injury motor recovery" identified 1973 records, of which 39 were selected (18 from the search records and 21 from reference list inspection). Study phase ( clinicaltrials.org criteria) and methodological quality (Cochrane criteria) were assessed. Studies included proposed a broad range of single-intervention (encompassing cell therapies, pharmacology, electrical stimulation, rehabilitation) (encompassing cell therapies, pharmacology, electrical stimulation, rehabilitation) and multi-intervention approaches (that combined more than one strategy). The highest evidence level was for Phase III studies supporting the role of multi-intervention approaches that contained a rehabilitation component. Quality appraisal revealed that the percentage of selected studies classified with high risk of bias by Cochrane criteria was as follows: random sequence generation = 64%; allocation concealment = 77%; blinding of participants and personnel = 69%; blinding of outcome assessment = 64%; attrition = 44%; selective reporting = 44%. The current literature contains a high proportion of studies with a limited ability to measure efficacy in a valid manner because of low methodological strength in all items of the Cochrane risk of bias assessment. Recommendations to decrease bias are discussed and include increased methodological rigor in the study design and recruitment of study participants, and the use of electrophysiological and imaging measures that can assess functional integrity of the spinal cord (and may be sufficiently sensitive to detect changes that occur in response to therapeutic

  2. [Techniques for identifying the epidural space].

    PubMed

    Figueredo, E

    2005-01-01

    A large part of the success of epidural anesthesia rests on correct identification of the epidural space. The last hundred years have seen the description of numerous techniques for locating the space in the most straightforward, effective, safe, and reliable manner. To evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and the complications associated with each, we carried out a MEDLINE search using the following key words: "epidural analgesia," "epidural anesthesia," "epidural space," "identification," and "loss of resistance" (LOR). Traditional, complementary, and instrument-guided techniques used to identify the epidural space were analyzed. The results of clinical trials comparing different LOR techniques were evaluated. LOR with air, with isotonic saline, or a combination of both were the techniques shown to be simplest and safest. With respect to safety, LOR with air led to the greatest number of complications (pneumocephalus, air embolism, insufficient analgesia, higher incidence of dural puncture, nerve root compression, subcutaneous emphysema). When a small air bubble is created inside the syringe, LOR with saline solution is reliable and teachable, as well as safe and effective.

  3. Combined nonlinear metrics to evaluate spontaneous EEG recordings from chronic spinal cord injury in a rat model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiangbo; Xu, Hanhui; Wang, Yazhou; Cui, Hongyan; Hu, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a high-cost disability and may cause permanent loss of movement and sensation below the injury location. The chance of cure in human after SCI is extremely limited. Instead, neural regeneration could have been seen in animals after SCI, and such regeneration could be retarded by blocking neural plasticity pathways, showing the importance of neural plasticity in functional recovery. As an indicator of nonlinear dynamics in the brain, sample entropy was used here in combination with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and Kolmogorov complexity to quantify functional plasticity changes in spontaneous EEG recordings of rats before and after SCI. The results showed that the sample entropy values were decreased at the first day following injury then gradually increased during recovery. DFA and Kolmogorov complexity results were in consistent with sample entropy, showing the complexity of the EEG time series was lost after injury and partially regained in 1 week. The tendency to regain complexity is in line with the observation of behavioral rehabilitation. A critical time point was found during the recovery process after SCI. Our preliminary results suggested that the combined use of these nonlinear dynamical metrics could provide a quantitative and predictive way to assess the change of neural plasticity in a spinal cord injury rat model. PMID:27668016

  4. Combined nonlinear metrics to evaluate spontaneous EEG recordings from chronic spinal cord injury in a rat model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiangbo; Xu, Hanhui; Wang, Yazhou; Cui, Hongyan; Hu, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a high-cost disability and may cause permanent loss of movement and sensation below the injury location. The chance of cure in human after SCI is extremely limited. Instead, neural regeneration could have been seen in animals after SCI, and such regeneration could be retarded by blocking neural plasticity pathways, showing the importance of neural plasticity in functional recovery. As an indicator of nonlinear dynamics in the brain, sample entropy was used here in combination with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and Kolmogorov complexity to quantify functional plasticity changes in spontaneous EEG recordings of rats before and after SCI. The results showed that the sample entropy values were decreased at the first day following injury then gradually increased during recovery. DFA and Kolmogorov complexity results were in consistent with sample entropy, showing the complexity of the EEG time series was lost after injury and partially regained in 1 week. The tendency to regain complexity is in line with the observation of behavioral rehabilitation. A critical time point was found during the recovery process after SCI. Our preliminary results suggested that the combined use of these nonlinear dynamical metrics could provide a quantitative and predictive way to assess the change of neural plasticity in a spinal cord injury rat model.

  5. Skiing and spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Frymoyer, J W; Pope, M H; Kristiansen, T

    1982-07-01

    Spinal injury in skiers can either be acute or chronic. Acute spinal injury accounts for 3 to 3.6 per cent of all injuries occurring in Alpine skiing. Fewer acute injuries occur in cross-country skiing, and those that do usually are the result of a sudden, compressive force from a seated fall. The prevalence of chronic spinal trauma in skiing is unknown. Both cross-country and Alpine skiers appear to have greater complaints of mild to moderate low back pain as compared with their nonskiing counterparts. These differences may be the result of a complex interaction between recreational and occupational activities. Theoretical analyses suggest a risk for low-grade torsional injury to the Alpine skier's spine, whereas in cross-country skiing significant shear forces are applied to lumbar discs during the kick but not the double-poling phase.

  6. Go-sha-jinki-Gan (GJG) ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of TNF-α expression in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Miho; Nakae, Aya; Kishida, Yuki; Baba, Kousuke; Sakashita, Noriko; Shibata, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Background Alternative medicine is noted for its clinical effect and minimal invasiveness in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Go-sha-jinki-Gan, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, has been used for meralgia and numbness in elderly patients. However, the exact mechanism of GJG is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of the analgesic effect of GJG in a chronic constriction injury model. Results GJG significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia from the early phase (von Frey test, p < 0.0001; cold-plate test, p < 0.0001; hot-plate test p = 0.011; two-way repeated measures ANOVA). Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that GJG decreased the expression of Iba1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord. Double staining immunohistochemistry showed that most of the tumor necrosis factor-α was co-expressed in Iba1-positive cells at day 3 post-operation. GJG decreased the phosphorylation of p38 in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. Moreover, intrathecal injection of tumor necrosis factor-α opposed the anti-allodynic effect of GJG in the cold-plate test. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJG ameliorates allodynia in chronic constriction injury model mice via suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α expression derived from activated microglia. GJG is a promising drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain induced by neuro-inflammation. PMID:27296622

  7. Impact of a limited trial of walking training using body weight support and a treadmill on the gait characteristics of an individual with chronic, incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Theresa E

    2010-10-01

    Studies showing improvement in locomotor ability for individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) use training times that may be prohibitive for clinics. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a limited period of training on the gait characteristics of a man with chronic, incomplete SCI. The participant was a minimally ambulatory 59-year-old man almost 3 years post C(3) central cord injury with an ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) classification of C. The participant received 11 training sessions using body weight support and a treadmill (BWST) over a 6-week period. The Six Minute Walk Test (6 MWT), and gait characteristics measured with motion analysis were obtained pretraining and posttraining. The participant made improvements on all measured gait characteristics. The participant's walking speed and comfort level on the treadmill improved enough for him to use community resources. This participant was able to make improvements in his gait with a much shorter training time period than those reported in previous locomotor training studies. Although this man did not obtain community ambulation status, his decreased dependence on his power chair at home and his new ability to use an available treadmill allow for continued walking practice outside the clinic.

  8. An epidural analgesia program: balancing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Rosen, H F; Calio, M M

    1990-09-01

    An alternative to parenteral narcotic management is the administration of analgesics into the epidural space. The recognition and prevention of complications or side effects of epidural analgesia are prime concerns in planning nursing care for these patients.

  9. Retroperitoneoscopic unroofing of a renal cyst under epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, T; Ito, F; Shimizu, T; Toma, H; Yamagata, K; Ikeda, M

    2001-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has routinely been performed under general anesthesia. Our first case of a large renal cyst treated successfully with retroperitoneoscopic unroofing under epidural anesthesia is presented here. Epidural anesthesia can be used for retroperitoneoscopic surgery if necessary.

  10. Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess Complicated with Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Oki, Masayuki; Ueda, Akihiro; Tsuda, Ayumi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Takagi, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella often results in a self-limited acute gastroenteritis. Extra-intestinal Salmonella infection is relatively rare and occurs predominantly in infants and adults with significant underlying conditions. We describe a 54-year-old Japanese man with a history of heavy alcohol consumption and daily contact with a dog, who developed bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, and meningitis, due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. This case suggests that Salmonella should be considered as an etiologic pathogen in adult patients with perivertebral infection or meningitis. PMID:27628612

  11. Unique Spatiotemporal Neuromodulation of the Lumbosacral Circuitry Shapes Locomotor Success after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prithvi K; Sureddi, Shakthi; Alam, Monzurul; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2016-09-15

    Spinal cord epidural stimulation has resulted in the initiation of voluntary leg movements and improvement in postural, bladder, and sexual function. However, one of the limitations in reaching the full potential of epidural stimulation for therapeutic purposes in humans has been the identification of optimal stimulation configurations that can neuromodulate the spinal cord for stepping. In the present work, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the specificity of interaction between the rostral and caudal spinal cord circuitries in enabling locomotion in spinal rats (n = 10) by epidural spinal cord stimulation. By using unique spatiotemporal epidural stimulation parameters of the lumbar and sacral spinal cords, a robust stepping pattern in spinal rats was observed with only six training sessions and as early as 3 weeks post-injury. Electrophysiological evidence reveals that in addition to frequency of stimulation pulses at the stimulation sites, the relative timing between stimulation pulses applied at the lumbar (L2) and sacral (S1) segments of the spinal cord heavily impacted stepping performance. Best stepping was established at a higher stimulation frequency (40 Hz vs. 5, 10, 15, and 20Hz) and at specific relative time-intervals between the stimulation pulses (L2 pulse applied at 18-25 msec after the onset of the S1 pulse; S1 pulse applied 0-7 msec after the L2 pulse). Our data suggest that controlling pulse-to-pulse timing at multiple stimulation sources provides a novel strategy to optimize spinal stepping by fine-tuning the physiological state of the locomotor networks. These findings hold direct relevance to the clinician who will incorporate electrical stimulation strategies for optimizing control of locomotion after complete paralysis.

  12. Spinal cord stimulation for radicular pain following retained bullet in the spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Keel, John C; Lau, Mary E; Gulur, Padma

    2013-01-01

    We are reporting on the implantation of a spinal cord stimulator to treat intractable radicular pain following a retained bullet fragment in the spinal canal. Such retained fragments are associated with risks including pain, neurological deficit, infection, toxic effects, and migration. Our patient was a young man with radicular pain and history of a gunshot entering the abdomen. Computed tomography of the spine had revealed a nearly complete bullet in the right paracentral canal at L4, partially extending into the lateral recess. He presented 17 months after his injury with gradually worsening pain and parasthesias radiating from the back to the whole right leg and foot. There was no weakness. As the patient had failed conservative therapy, procedural options were considered. In this case, the potential benefits of epidural steroid injection by any approach might not have outweighed risks of infection, related to foreign body and local steroid, or possible migration due to mechanical forces during injection. As he may well need repeated epidural steroid injections to manage his pain, this increases his risk for infection. A percutaneous trial spinal cord stimulation lead was placed, with epidural entry well away from the bullet. After good results, a permanent system was implanted. There was no evidence of infection or migration, and excellent pain relief was achieved. Bullets and other foreign bodies retained in the spinal canal can cause progressive neurologic symptoms through reactive tissue formation and compression. Spinal cord stimulation can relieve radicular pain while avoiding risks associated with altering the location of the offending foreign body. PMID:23511684

  13. Glial changes in the phrenic nucleus following superimposed cervical spinal cord hemisection and peripheral chronic phrenicotomy injuries in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gould, D J; Goshgarian, H G

    1997-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the microglial and astroglial reaction in the phrenic nucleus following either an ipsilateral C2 spinal cord hemisection, a peripheral phrenicotomy, or a combination of the two injuries in the same adult rat. The present study used three different fluorescent markers and a confocal laser image analysis system to study glial cells and phrenic motoneurons at the light microscopic level. Young adult female rats were divided into one combined injury group (left phrenicotomy and left C2 spinal hemisection with periods of 1 to 4 weeks between injuries, N = 12) and three other groups consisting of noninjured animals (N = 3), animals that received C2 hemisection only (N = 3), and animals with phrenicotomy only (survival periods of 2 (N = 3) and 4 (N = 3) weeks after phrenicotomy). Fluorogold was injected into the diaphragm to label phrenic motoneurons in all animals. Microglia and astrocytes were labeled with Texas red and fluorescein, respectively, and were visualized simultaneously along with phrenic motoneurons. The results suggest that the microglial and astrocytic response in the superimposed injury model are similar to the glial reactions characteristically seen in a peripheral axotomy alone model. These reactions include proliferation and migration of microglial cells along the perineuronal surface (peaking at 2 weeks) and the hypertrophy of astrocytes (peaking at 4 weeks). In addition, the increase in astrocytic tissue, which is characteristically seen in response to axotomy alone, is significantly enhanced in the superimposed injury model. Also, there is a large and rapid increase in GFAP-positive astrocytes within 24 hours after hemisection alone. The information gained from the present study will aid in determining, predicting, and eventually manipulating central nervous system responses to multiple injuries with the objective of reestablishing function in the damaged CNS.

  14. Applier tool for intradural spinal cord implants.

    PubMed

    Oya, H; Reddy, C G; Dahdaleh, N S; Wilson, S; Howard, M A; Jeffery, N D; Utz, M; Gillies, G T

    2012-04-01

    We have designed, built and tested a novel device for placing intradural neurmodulator implants directly on the pial surface of the spinal cord. This applier tool is designed for ergonomic handling of delicate electro-mechanical devices such as the Iowa-Patch™ spinal cord stimulator implant, which is aimed at overcoming certain shortcomings in the performance of standard epidural stimulator devices. The applier is approximately 14 cm long, 6 mm in diameter, made of stainless steel components, and has simple and reliable mechanisms for the attachment and release of the implant from it. We describe the design of the device, details of its construction, and its performance during in vivo testing of somatosensory evoked potentials in an ovine model of intradural spinal cord stimulation. PMID:22339111

  15. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  16. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  17. Intracortical and Thalamocortical Connections of the Hand and Face Representations in Somatosensory Area 3b of Macaque Monkeys and Effects of Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Chand, Prem; Jain, Neeraj

    2015-09-30

    Brains of adult monkeys with chronic lesions of dorsal columns of spinal cord at cervical levels undergo large-scale reorganization. Reorganization results in expansion of intact chin inputs, which reactivate neurons in the deafferented hand representation in the primary somatosensory cortex (area 3b), ventroposterior nucleus of the thalamus and cuneate nucleus of the brainstem. A likely contributing mechanism for this large-scale plasticity is sprouting of axons across the hand-face border. Here we determined whether such sprouting takes place in area 3b. We first determined the extent of intrinsic corticocortical connectivity between the hand and the face representations in normal area 3b. Small amounts of neuroanatomical tracers were injected in these representations close to the electrophysiologically determined hand-face border. Locations of the labeled neurons were mapped with respect to the detailed electrophysiological somatotopic maps and histologically determined hand-face border revealed in sections of the flattened cortex stained for myelin. Results show that intracortical projections across the hand-face border are few. In monkeys with chronic unilateral lesions of the dorsal columns and expanded chin representation, connections across the hand-face border were not different compared with normal monkeys. Thalamocortical connections from the hand and face representations in the ventroposterior nucleus to area 3b also remained unaltered after injury. The results show that sprouting of intrinsic connections in area 3b or the thalamocortical inputs does not contribute to large-scale cortical plasticity. Significance statement: Long-term injuries to dorsal spinal cord in adult primates result in large-scale somatotopic reorganization due to which chin inputs expand into the deafferented hand region. Reorganization takes place in multiple cortical areas, and thalamic and medullary nuclei. To what extent this brain reorganization due to dorsal column injuries

  18. Intracortical and Thalamocortical Connections of the Hand and Face Representations in Somatosensory Area 3b of Macaque Monkeys and Effects of Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Chand, Prem; Jain, Neeraj

    2015-09-30

    Brains of adult monkeys with chronic lesions of dorsal columns of spinal cord at cervical levels undergo large-scale reorganization. Reorganization results in expansion of intact chin inputs, which reactivate neurons in the deafferented hand representation in the primary somatosensory cortex (area 3b), ventroposterior nucleus of the thalamus and cuneate nucleus of the brainstem. A likely contributing mechanism for this large-scale plasticity is sprouting of axons across the hand-face border. Here we determined whether such sprouting takes place in area 3b. We first determined the extent of intrinsic corticocortical connectivity between the hand and the face representations in normal area 3b. Small amounts of neuroanatomical tracers were injected in these representations close to the electrophysiologically determined hand-face border. Locations of the labeled neurons were mapped with respect to the detailed electrophysiological somatotopic maps and histologically determined hand-face border revealed in sections of the flattened cortex stained for myelin. Results show that intracortical projections across the hand-face border are few. In monkeys with chronic unilateral lesions of the dorsal columns and expanded chin representation, connections across the hand-face border were not different compared with normal monkeys. Thalamocortical connections from the hand and face representations in the ventroposterior nucleus to area 3b also remained unaltered after injury. The results show that sprouting of intrinsic connections in area 3b or the thalamocortical inputs does not contribute to large-scale cortical plasticity. Significance statement: Long-term injuries to dorsal spinal cord in adult primates result in large-scale somatotopic reorganization due to which chin inputs expand into the deafferented hand region. Reorganization takes place in multiple cortical areas, and thalamic and medullary nuclei. To what extent this brain reorganization due to dorsal column injuries

  19. Epidural anesthesia and analgesia in the neonate: a review of current evidences.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip K; Arora, Mahesh Kumar; Khanna, Puneet

    2014-10-01

    The role of single shot spinal anesthesia has been established in ex-premature infants at risk of apnea. However, use of epidural anesthesia in neonates is on the rise. In this systematic analysis, we have reviewed the current evidence on the safety and efficacy of the use of single shot and continuous epidural anesthesia/analgesia in neonates. Current clinical practice is guided by evidence based mostly on non-randomized studies, prospective/retrospective case series and surveys. Single shot caudal blockade as a sole technique has been used in neonates mainly for inguinal hernia repair and circumcision. Use of continuous epidural anesthesia through the caudal route or caudo-thoracic advancement of the catheter for major thoracic and abdominal surgery offers good perioperative analgesia. Other observed benefits are early extubation, attenuation of stress response, early return of bowel function and reduction of general anesthesia-related postoperative complications. However, risk of procedure-related and drug-related complications to the developing neural structure remains a serious concern.

  20. Composite split cord malformation associated with a dermal sinus tract, dermoid cyst, and epidural abscess: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saad; Azeem, Abdul; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad; Tahir, Muhammad Zubair

    2016-01-01

    Background: Split cord malformation (SCM) is typically present at a single level but rarely, may be present at multiple levels in the spinal cord and can be associated with a wide array of lesions such as myelomeningoceles, lipomas, teratomas, and dermal sinus tracts (DSTs). Case Description: We describe a case of a 15-month-old female child who presented with high-grade fever and progressive motor weakness in the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of SCM along with an epidural abscess, DST, and dermoid cyst. The child underwent surgery for excision of DST along with removal of the dermoid cyst and drainage of epidural abscess. The postoperative course was uneventful. Elective repair of the SCM was performed 4 weeks later. The postoperative course was uneventful again. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, the combination of a composite SCM with a DST and dermoid cyst with associated epidural abscess has rarely been reported in literature. PMID:27168946

  1. Large animal model for development of functional restoration paradigms using epidural and intraspinal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hachmann, Jan T; Jeong, Ju Ho; Grahn, Peter J; Mallory, Grant W; Evertz, Loribeth Q; Bieber, Allan J; Lobel, Darlene A; Bennet, Kevin E; Lee, Kendall H; Lujan, J Luis

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of movement following spinal cord injury (SCI) has been achieved using electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and skeletal muscles. However, practical limitations such as the rapid onset of muscle fatigue hinder clinical application of these technologies. Recently, direct stimulation of alpha motor neurons has shown promise for evoking graded, controlled, and sustained muscle contractions in rodent and feline animal models while overcoming some of these limitations. However, small animal models are not optimal for the development of clinical spinal stimulation techniques for functional restoration of movement. Furthermore, variance in surgical procedure, targeting, and electrode implantation techniques can compromise therapeutic outcomes and impede comparison of results across studies. Herein, we present a protocol and large animal model that allow standardized development, testing, and optimization of novel clinical strategies for restoring motor function following spinal cord injury. We tested this protocol using both epidural and intraspinal stimulation in a porcine model of spinal cord injury, but the protocol is suitable for the development of other novel therapeutic strategies. This protocol will help characterize spinal circuits vital for selective activation of motor neuron pools. In turn, this will expedite the development and validation of high-precision therapeutic targeting strategies and stimulation technologies for optimal restoration of motor function in humans. PMID:24339929

  2. Treatment of shivering after epidural lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Harris, M M; Lawson, D; Cooper, C M; Ellis, J

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravenous meperidine and warm local anesthetic for prevention of postanesthetic shivering was evaluated in urology patients undergoing epidural blockade for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. When administered before the blockade, meperidine, 12.5 mg or 25 mg, was not significantly better than saline placebo for preventing postepidural shivering. Changes in the concentrations of catecholamines or lidocaine did not result in differences between patients who shivered and those who did not shiver. In a second experiment, patients receiving body-temperature or room-temperature epidural lidocaine did not differ with respect to the incidence of postanesthetic shivering, onset of sensory blockade, or core temperature during a 30-minute observation period. The authors concluded that neither meperidine, in doses employed, nor body-temperature lidocaine prevents shivering after epidural blockade. This shivering appears to be different from that observed during emergence from general anesthesia.

  3. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  4. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  5. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    PubMed

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  6. Chronic ibuprofen administration reduces neuropathic pain but does not exert neuroprotection after spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Castro, Elena; Navarro, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    Ibuprofen is commonly used as an anti-inflammatory analgesic drug, although it is not amongst the first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Its main effects are mediated by non-specific inhibition of COX enzymes, but it also exerts some COX-independent effects, such as the inhibition of RhoA signaling and the modulation of glial activity. These effects have boosted the use of ibuprofen as a tool to promote axonal regeneration and to increase functional recovery after neural injuries, although with controversial results showing positive and negative outcomes of ibuprofen treatment in several experimental models. We have evaluated the effects of ibuprofen administered at 60 mg/kg twice a day to rats subjected to a mild spinal cord contusion. Our results indicate that ibuprofen ameliorates mechanical hyperalgesia in rats by reducing central hyperexcitability, but failed to produce improvements in the recovery of locomotion. Despite an early effect on reducing microglial reactivity, the ibuprofen treatment did not provide histological evidence of neuroprotection; indeed the volume of cord tissue spared rostral to the lesion was decreased in ibuprofen treated rats. In summary, the early modulation of neuroinflammation produced by the administration of ibuprofen seems to eventually lead to a worse resolution of detrimental events occurring in the secondary injury phase, but also to reduce the development of neuropathic pain.

  7. Epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin, a GnRH analogue, for the resolution of follicular cysts in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Annalisa, Rizzo; Campanile, Debora; Debora, Campanile; Mutinati, Maddalena; Maddalena, Mutinati; Minoia, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Minoia; Spedicato, Massimo; Massimo, Spedicato; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi; Luigi, Sciorsci Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Bovine follicular cysts are an ovarian disorder of dairy cows associated with abnormal estrous behaviour and infertility. The treatment of choice is intramuscular administration of a GnRH analogue, which acts by triggering pituitary release of LH. However, the presence of GnRH and GnRH receptors on spinal cord and ovary in some species, and the kind of innervation of the ovary, let us hypothesize that GnRH and its analogues may also act when administered by epidural route, as happens for other drugs. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the effects of epidural vs intramuscular administration of lecirelin (a GnRH analogue) on FC regression, estrus detection and pregnancy outcomes. The study was conducted on 220 Friesian cows affected by follicular cysts, divided among 4 groups: Group L(epid) and Group L(im) received, respectively 50 μg of lecirelin in the epidural space and intramuscular; Group C(epid) and Group C(im) were used as control groups. In Group L(epid), estrus induction and pregnancy rates were significantly higher than in Group L(im). The results of this study show that the epidural administration of lecirelin promoted the remission of follicular cysts and an improvement of reproductive parameters compared to intramuscular administration. Thus, an alternative therapeutical approach is available for FC treatment, in order to obtain an easier restoration of the ovarian activity, especially in those cases refractory to classical therapeutic approaches.

  8. AANA journal course: update for nurse anesthetists-improving the safety of subarachnoid and epidural blocks--Part A.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, M A

    1997-08-01

    Hypotension caused by reduced venous return to the heart is a common hazard during subarachnoid and epidural anesthesia. Reduced venous return can also cause severe bradycardia and even cardiac arrest. The infusion of a crystalloid intravenous preload prior to the injection of local anesthetic helps prevent these complications. Unfortunately, intravenous fluid preloading prior to subarachnoid or epidural block is neither appropriate for all patients nor is it always effective. Vasopressor infusions and lower extremity compression, though not completely studied, may allow for further decreases in the incidence of hypotension and bradycardia. When dosing an epidural catheter, making each dose a test dose and observing for signs of subarachnoid or intravascular injection decreases the incidence of hypotension, seizure, and cardiotoxicity. The pathophysiology of cardiac arrest and resuscitation is different during major conduction block due primarily to changes in peripheral vascular tone and venous return to the heart. Neural injury associated with regional anesthesia is due to needle trauma, hematoma, injectate toxicity, ischemia, and compression. Though neural injury is rare, it is more commonly associated with blocks performed in the lumbar region (spinals and epidurals) than in other types of blocks. PMID:9281920

  9. Effective Dose of CT-Guided Epidural and Periradicular Injections of the Lumbar Spine: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Artner, Juraj; Lattig, Friederike; Reichel, Heiko; Cakir, Balkan

    2012-01-01

    Spinal injection procedures can be performed blindly or, more accurately, with fluoroscopic or computed tomography (CT) guidance. Radiographic guidance for selective nerve root blocks and epidural injections allows an accurate needle placement, reduces the procedure time and is more secure for the patient, especially in patients with marked degenerative changes and scoliosis, resulting in a narrowing of the interlaminar space. Limiting factors remain the availability of scanners and the radiation dose. Interventional CT scan protocols in axial CT-acquisition mode for epidural and periradicular injections help to limit the radiation dose without a significant decrease of image quality. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effective radiation dosage patients are exposed during CT-guided epidural lumbar and periradicular injections. A total amount of n=1870 datasets from 18 months were analyzed after multiplying the dose length product with conversion factor k for each lumbar segment. For lumbar epidural injections (n=1286), a mean effective dose of 1.34 mSv (CI 95%, 1.30-1.38), for periradicular injections (n=584) a mean effective dose of 1.38 mSv (CI 95%, 1.32-1.44) were calculated. PMID:22942924

  10. Heightened TWEAK-NF-κB signaling and inflammation-associated fibrosis in paralyzed muscles of men with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yarar-Fisher, Ceren; Bickel, C Scott; Kelly, Neil A; Stec, Michael J; Windham, Samuel T; McLain, Amie B; Oster, Robert A; Bamman, Marcas M

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI) often present with extreme muscle atrophy and impaired glucose metabolism at both the skeletal muscle and whole body level. Persistent inflammation and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the skeletal muscle are potential contributors to dysregulation of glucose metabolism and atrophy; however, to date no study has assessed the effects of long-standing SCI on their expression or intracellular signaling in the paralyzed muscle. In the present study, we assessed the expression of genes (TNFαR, TNFα, IL-6R, IL-6, TWEAK, TWEAK R, atrogin-1, and MuRF1) and abundance of intracellular signaling proteins (TWEAK, TWEAK R, NF-κB, and p-p65/p-50/105) that are known to mediate inflammation and atrophy in skeletal muscle. In addition, based on the effects of muscle inflammation on promotion of skeletal muscle fibrosis, we assessed the degree of fibrosis between myofibers and fascicles in both groups. For further insight into the distribution and variability of muscle fiber size, we also analyzed the frequency distribution of SCI fiber size. Resting vastus lateralis (VL) muscle biopsy samples were taken from 11 men with long-standing SCI (≈22 yr) and compared with VL samples from 11 able-bodied men of similar age. Our results demonstrated that chronic SCI muscle has heightened TNFαR and TWEAK R gene expression and NF-κB signaling (higher TWEAK R and phospho-NF-κB p65) and fibrosis, along with substantial myofiber size heterogeneity, compared with able-bodied individuals. Our data suggest that the TWEAK/TWEAK R/NF-κB signaling pathway may be an important mediator of chronic inflammation and fibrotic adaptation in SCI muscle. PMID:26931128

  11. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  12. Spinal infections in children: A review.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Spinal infections are uncommon but significant causes of morbidity and hospitalization in the paediatric population. These infections encompass a broad range of conditions, from discitis to osteomyelitis and spinal epidural and intramedullary abscesses. Paediatric spinal infections can be caused by a range of bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic agents. Ultrastructural differences of the vertebrae and associated structures result in distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis of spinal infections in children compared to adults. The non-specific nature of symptoms produced by them can cause considerable diagnostic delays. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging can facilitate early identification of the disease, and distinguish it from other spinal pathologies. The association of antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains from some of the cases appears worrisome; as is the increasing incidence of Kingella kingae infections causing spinal infections. Rest and immobilization are the general treatment, and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is warranted to ensure optimal clinical outcome. Most patients generally have a good prognosis; however, early identification and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential to achieve the best therapeutic response. PMID:27408498

  13. [Spinal cord ischaemia and preoperative clopidogrel withdrawal in an arteriosclerotic patient].

    PubMed

    Murat, O; Durand, E; Delépine, G; Nguyen, P; Malinovsky, J-M

    2008-04-01

    We report the case of a motor impairment associated with bladder dysfunction several days after clopidogrel withdrawal in an arteriosclerotic woman scheduled for thoracotomy under general and thoracic epidural anaesthesia. Even if spinal artery syndrome may have a lot of aetiologies, we believe in a direct link between clopidogrel withdrawal and medulla ischaemia. PMID:18378112

  14. Circulatory collapse following epidural bolus for Caesarean section a profound vasovagal reaction? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Oddby, Eva; Hein, Anette; Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reduced blood pressure is commonly seen associated to spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section and efforts to reduce its occurrence and its magnitude is common practice. Cardiovascular collapse requiring cardio-pulmonary resuscitation after putting the spinal/epidural block for Caesarean section is however a rare but most dramatic event. Presentation of case We describe a case with sudden short loss of circulation, circulatory collapse, short after start of emergency Caesarean section in top up epidural anaesthesia (3 + 12 ml ropivaciane 7.5 mg/ml), requiring CPR. The neonate was delivered during CPR with Apgar 1, 10, 10 at 1, 5 and 10 min. Circulation was restored following 60–90 s of CPR and administration of 0.5 mg adrenaline. No cardioversion was administered sinus rhythm was regained spontaneously. The mother and child had a further uncomplicated course. No signs of cardiac damage/anomaly, emboli, septicaemia, pereclampisa or local anaesthetic toxicity was found. The patient had prior to the decision about Caesarean section had fever and was subsequently relatively dehydrated. Discussion The patient had a fast return of sinus rhythm following birth of the child, without cardioversion. None of common causes for cardiac arrest was found and the patient an uncomplicated post Caesarean section course. The combination of epidural induced sympathetic block and reduced preload possibly triggered a Bezold-Jarisch reflex with a profound vasovagal reaction. Concluiosn A structured plan for the handling of cardiovascular crisis must be available wherever Caesarean section are performed. Adequate volume loading, left tilt and vigilant control of circulation following regional block performance is of outmost importance. PMID:27100952

  15. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Polyneuropathy - chronic inflammatory; CIDP; Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy; Guillain-Barré - CIDP ... CIDP is one cause of damage to nerves outside the brain or spinal cord ( peripheral neuropathy ). Polyneuropathy ...

  16. The effects of spinal cord stimulation on quality of life in patients with therapeutically chronic refractory angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Vulink, N C; Overgaauw, D M; Jessurun, G A; Tenvaarwerk, I A; Kropmans, T J; van der Schans, C P; Middel, B; Staal, M J; Dejongste, M J

    1999-01-01

    Objective. For patients with refractory angina pectoris, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a beneficial and safe adjuvant therapy. However, it has not yet been established whether SCS alters the quality of life (QoL) in these patients. Methods. In this study, 26 consecutive patients (age 61.3 ± 7.0 years, 13 females, angina duration 12.7 ± 6.0 years) were recruited. Social, mental, and physical aspects of QoL were determined by Nottingham Health Profile (NHP I), depression scale (CES-D), scoring of angina pectoris attacks and short-acting nitroglycerine intake, pain score on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), perceived health percentage, Satisfaction With Life scale (SWLS), and one-aspect Linear Analog Self Assessment scale (LASA). QoL outcomes at baseline were compared with reference values from healthy subjects. Within-group changes and magnitude of changes (effect size, ES) were assessed after 3 months and 1 year of SCS. Results. Compared to healthy subjects, the patients had significantly worse scores at baseline on NHP, SWLS, and LASA. After 3 months of SCS, NHP I aspect pain (ES = 1.39), AP-score (ES = 0.85), perceived health percentage (ES =- 0.80), NTG-use (ES = 1.08) and VAS-score (ES = 1.13) were all significantly improved (p < 0.05). After 3 months, moderate changes were observed; however, they were not statistically significant on the NHP-aspects "emotion" (ES = 0.57) and "sleep" (ES = 0.56). At the 1-year follow-up, significant and substantial improvements were found on NHP-I aspects: pain, energy, emotional reactions, social isolation, sleep, and physical mobility (p < 0.05) with changes that can be interpreted as large (ES > 0.80). Conclusion. QoL in patients with refractory angina pectoris is poor. Both pain and health aspects of QoL improved significantly after 3 months of SCS. Social, mental, and physical aspects of QoL were found improved after 1 year of SCS. PMID:22151060

  17. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Neely, John C; Jones, Blaise V; Crone, Kerry R

    2008-03-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma.

  18. [SCS (spinal cord stimulation) in severe ischemia of the legs].

    PubMed

    Polisca, R; Domenichini, M; Signoretti, P; Marchi, P

    1992-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) of the low thoracic spinal epidural space was carried out in 11 patients with pain from peripheral arterial disease of the lower limbs. Conservative treatment or vasoactive drugs also failed. Results are reported relating to pain, exercise endurance on the bicycle ergometer, trophic lesion changes and TCpO2. After a mean postimulation follow-up period of 15 months, substantial pain relief was preoperative non healing skin ulcerations, but gangrenous conditions were not benefited. Exercise tolerance as measured on a bicycle ergometer increased by 40%. It is concluded that SCS is vary promising in severe limb ischemia where reconstruction surgery is not possible or has been unsuccessful.

  19. Congenital neuroblastoma with symptoms of epidural compression at birth.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, A R; De Ioris, M A; De Grandis, E; Podda, M; Cellini, M; Sorrentino, S; De Bernardi, B; Paladini, D; Gandolfo, C

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence of congenital neuroblastoma presenting at birth with symptoms of epidural compression secondary to spinal canal invasion is rare. Almost all cases reported in the literature have survived from the tumor but suffer severe sequelae, with the exception of the 2 most recently described whose birth was anticipated. The 3 cases of this article have been followed for a minimum of 5 years with the aim to describe their definitive late complications. In none of these cases had the routine ultrasound scan performed in third trimester of pregnancy discovered a tumor mass, nor had it shown abnormal fetal movements. All had leg hypotonia detected on the first day of life. In all, both primary and intraspinal tumors responded well to chemotherapy. All survive with motor deficit and severe bladder dysfunction despite early physiotherapy. Scoliosis has developed in the case with the longest follow-up. The description of these patients enforces the importance of early diagnosis of tumor masses in late pregnancy. Neonatologists should be aware of this rare clinical entity and take it into account in the differential diagnosis with other conditions of early-onset hypotonia. On the other hand, obstetric sonologists should be aware of the possibility to detect such rare tumors in late pregnancy, as anticipation of delivery may reduce the risk of late sequelae. PMID:26901768

  20. [The effect of combination epidural anesthesia techniques in upper abdominal surgery on the stress reaction, pain control and respiratory mechanics].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, B; Leibe, S; Kätzel, R; Grube, U; Landgraf, R; Bierwolf, B

    1991-11-01

    Twenty-eight patients undergoing upper abdominal operations (mainly selective proximal vagotomy [SPV]) were referred for assessment of the hormonal metabolic reaction (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], arginine vasopressin [AVP], cortisol, and glucose), the postoperative pain reaction, and respiration according to the method of anesthesia (group 1: neuroleptanesthesia [NLA], group 2: NLA in combination with epidural opiate analgesia, group 3: NLA in combination with local anesthesia). To alleviate postoperative pain piritramide was systematically administered in group 1, whereas in groups 2 and 3 a thoracic epidural catheter was injected with morphine or bupivacaine. Postoperative analgesia was better in patients with epidural administration than in those with systemic application. On the 1st and 2nd postoperative days the vital capacity was statistically significantly higher by 10%-15% in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1. As expected, the neurohormonal and metabolic stress response was highest in all patients in the intraoperative and immediate postoperative phases: ACTH, AVP, and glucose levels were in most cases significantly higher compared with the initial values. However, cortisol levels decreased intraoperatively, probably as a result of the generally used induction agent etomidate. Comparison of the three methods of anesthesia revealed that all mean hormone levels analyzed in group 2 patients were lower both intraoperatively and 2 h postoperatively, which implies that epidurally administered morphine reduces the stress reaction, probably indirectly through additional selective alleviation of pain at the spinal cord level. The various differences in hormonal reactions of patients in groups 1 and 3 gave no clear evidence, however, of possible mitigation of the stress reaction by epidural local anesthetics in upper abdominal operations.

  1. The role of spinal serotonin receptor and alpha adrenoceptor on the antiallodynic effects induced by intrathecal milnacipran in chronic constriction injury rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takehiro; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Takeda, Ryuichiro; Igawa, Kaori; Naono-Nakayama, Rumi; Sakoda, Sumio; Nishimori, Toshikazu; Ishida, Yasushi

    2014-09-01

    Milnacipran, a reuptake inhibitor of noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT), elicits an antiallodynic effect in rats with neuropathic pain; however, the role of NA and 5-HT receptors in the induction of the antiallodynic effect of milnacipran remains unclear. Thus, we examined the effects of prazosin as an α1 adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine as an α2 adrenoceptor antagonist, metergoline as a 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, cyanopindolol as a 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonist, ketanserin as a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, and ondansetoron as a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist on the antiallodynic effect of milnacipran in neuropathic rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI). The CCI rats expressed mechanical and thermal allodynia, which was attenuated by intrathecal injection of milnacipran. Yohimbine, but not prazosin, reversed the milnacipran-induced antiallodynic effect. The antiallodynic effect of milnacipran was also reversed by metergoline, ketanserin and ondansetron, while cyanopindolol reversed the antiallodynic effect on mechanical, but not thermal stimulation. Furthermore, c-Fos expression in lamina I/II of the spinal dorsal horn was enhanced by thermal stimulation and the enhanced expression of c-Fos was suppressed by milnacipran. This effect of milnacipran was reversed by yohimbine, metergoline, katanserin and ondansetron, but not prazosin. These results indicate that the effect of milnacipran on mechanical and thermal allodynia and c-Fos expression is elicited through the α2 adrenoceptor, but not α1 adrenoceptor, and 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors; furthermore, the 5-HT1A/1B receptor is involved in mechanical allodynia, but not thermal allodynia. PMID:24876059

  2. Anesthetic requirements and stress hormone responses in chronic spinal cord-injured patients undergoing surgery below the level of injury: nitrous oxide vs remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Ho; Lee, Seong-Heon; Kim, Seok Jai; Choi, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Cheol-Won; Jeong, Seong Wook

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitrous oxide (N2O) and remifentanil both have anesthetic-reducing and antinociceptive effects. We aimed to determine the anesthetic requirements and stress hormone responses in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients undergoing surgery under sevoflurane anesthesia with or without pharmacodynamically equivalent doses of N2O or remifentanil. Methods Forty-five chronic, complete SCI patients undergoing surgery below the level of injury were randomly allocated to receive sevoflurane alone (control, n = 15), or in combination with 67% N2O (n = 15) or target-controlled infusion of 1.37 ng/ml remifentanil (n = 15). Sevoflurane concentrations were titrated to maintain a Bispectral Index (BIS) value between 40 and 50. Measurements included end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and plasma catecholamine and cortisol concentrations. Results During surgery, MAP, HR, and BIS did not differ among the groups. Sevoflurane concentrations were lower in the N2O group (0.94 ± 0.30%) and the remifentanil group (1.06 ± 0.29%) than in the control group (1.55 ± 0.34%) (P < 0.001, both). Plasma concentrations of norepinephrine remained unchanged compared to baseline values in each group, with no significant differences among groups throughout the study. Cortisol levels decreased during surgery as compared to baseline values, and returned to levels higher than baseline at 1 h after surgery (P < 0.05) without inter-group differences. Conclusions Remifentanil (1.37 ng/ml) and N2O (67%) reduced the sevoflurane requirements similarly by 31-39%, with no significant differences in hemodynamic and neuroendocrine responses. Either remifentanil or N2O can be used as an anesthetic adjuvant during sevoflurane anesthesia in SCI patients undergoing surgery below the level of injury. PMID:24427459

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Continuous Lumbar Paravertebral Versus Continuous Epidural Block for Post-Operative Pain Relief in Hip Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Surange, Pankaj N; Venkata Rama Mohan, Brig Chadalavada

    2012-01-01

    Background: Effective control of postoperative pain remains one of the most important and pressing issues in the field of surgery and has a significant impact on our health care system. In too many patients, pain is treated inadequately, causing them needless suffering and they can develop complications as an indirect consequence of pain. Analgesic modalities, if properly applied, can prevent or at least minimize this needless suffering and these complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of continuous infusions of local anesthetic drugs by paravertebral and epidural routes in controlling postoperative pain in patients undergoing hip surgeries. Patients and Methods: The study involved 60 patients who were undergoing hip surgery under the subarachnoid block. They were randomly divided into 2 groups of 30 patients. Group I (paravertebral group) received a single dose of spinal anesthesia with 2.5 mL 0.5% bupivacaine (heavy) + a continuous infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine at 5 mL/h in the paravertebral space. Group II (epidural group) received a single dose of spinal anesthesia with 0.5% bupivacaine (heavy) + a continuous infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine at a rate of 5 mL/hr in the epidural space for 48 hours in the postoperative period. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score, vital statistics, rescue analgesia, and procedure time were compared with the corresponding times between the 2 groups by student’s t-test and repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni. P < 0.05 was considered significant. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding mean pain score in the first 48 hours. Results: Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in the epidural group compared with the paravertebral group from 2 hours after start of the infusion until 48 hrs. Regional anesthesia procedure time was significantly longer in the epidural group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups

  4. Electrophysiological biomarkers of neuromodulatory strategies to recover motor function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Parag; Roy, Roland R.; Choe, Jaehoon; Creagmile, Jack; Zhong, Hui; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord contains the circuitry to control posture and locomotion after complete paralysis, and this circuitry can be enabled with epidural stimulation [electrical enabling motor control (eEmc)] and/or administration of pharmacological agents [pharmacological enabling motor control (fEmc)] when combined with motor training. We hypothesized that the characteristics of the spinally evoked potentials after chronic administration of both strychnine and quipazine under the influence of eEmc during standing and stepping can be used as biomarkers to predict successful motor performance. To test this hypothesis we trained rats to step bipedally for 7 wk after paralysis and characterized the motor potentials evoked in the soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles with the rats in a non-weight-bearing position, standing and stepping. The middle responses (MRs) to spinally evoked stimuli were suppressed with either or both drugs when the rat was suspended, whereas the addition of either or both drugs resulted in an overall activation of the extensor muscles during stepping and/or standing and reduced the drag duration and cocontraction between the TA and soleus muscles during stepping. The administration of quipazine and strychnine in concert with eEmc and step training after injury resulted in larger-amplitude evoked potentials [MRs and late responses (LRs)] in flexors and extensors, with the LRs consisting of a more normal bursting pattern, i.e., randomly generated action potentials within the bursts. This pattern was linked to more successful standing and stepping. Thus it appears that selected features of the patterns of potentials evoked in specific muscles with stimulation can serve as effective biomarkers and predictors of motor performance. PMID:25695648

  5. Further evidence of olfactory ensheathing glia facilitating axonal regeneration after a complete spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Matthias D; Hsu, Derek; Takeoka, Aya; Zhong, Hui; Ramón-Cueto, Almudena; Phelps, Patricia E; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2011-05-01

    Spinal Wistar Hannover rats injected with olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) have been shown to recover some bipedal stepping and climbing abilities. Given the intrinsic ability of the spinal cord to regain stepping with pharmacological agents or epidural stimulation after a complete mid-thoracic transection, we asked if functional recovery after OEG injections is due to changes in the caudal stump or facilitation of functional regeneration of axons across the transection site. OEG were injected rostral and caudal to the transection site immediately after transection. Robotically assisted step training in the presence of intrathecal injections of a 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist (quipazine) was used to facilitate recovery of stepping. Bipedal stepping as well as climbing abilities were tested over a 6-month period post-transection to determine any improvement in hindlimb functional due to OEG injections and/or step training. The ability for OEG to facilitate regeneration was analyzed electrophysiologically by transcranially stimulating the brainstem and recording motor evoked potentials (MEP) with chronically implanted intramuscular EMG electrodes in the soleus and tibalis anterior with and without intrathecal injections of noradrenergic, serotonergic, and glycinergic receptor antagonists. Analyses confirmed that along with improved stepping ability and increased use of the hindlimbs during climbing, only OEG rats showed recovery of MEP. In addition the MEP signals were eliminated after a re-transection of the spinal cord rostral to the original transection and were modified in the presence of receptor antagonists. These data indicate that improved hindlimb function after a complete transection was coupled with OEG-facilitated functional regeneration of axons. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair. PMID:21272578

  6. Spinal segmental stabilisation exercises for chronic low back pain: programme adherence and its influence on clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mannion, Anne F; Helbling, Daniel; Pulkovski, Natascha; Sprott, Haiko

    2009-12-01

    Exercise rehabilitation is one of the few evidence-based treatments for chronic non-specific low back pain (cLBP), but individual success is notoriously variable and may depend on the patient's adherence to the prescribed exercise regime. This prospective study examined factors associated with adherence and the relationship between adherence and outcome after a programme of physiotherapeutic spine stabilisation exercises. A total of 32/37 patients with cLBP completed the study (mean age, 44.0 (SD = 12.3) years; 11/32 (34%) male). Adherence to the 9-week programme was documented as: percent attendance at therapy, percent adherence to daily home exercises (patient diary) and percent commitment to rehabilitation (Sports Injury Rehabilitation Adherence Scale (SIRAS)). The average of these three measures formed a multidimensional adherence index (MAI). Psychological disturbance, fear-avoidance beliefs, catastrophising, exercise self-efficacy and health locus of control were measured by questionnaire; disability in everyday activities was scored with the Roland-Morris disability scale and back pain intensity with a 0-10 graphic rating scale. Overall, adherence to therapy was very good (average MAI score, 85%; median (IQR), 89 (15)%). The only psychological/beliefs variable showing a unique significant association with MAI was exercise self-efficacy (Rho = 0.36, P = 0.045). Pain intensity and self-rated disability decreased significantly after therapy (each P < 0.01). Adherence to home exercises showed a moderate, positive correlation with the reduction in average pain (Rho = 0.54, P = 0.003) and disability (Rho = 0.38, P = 0.036); higher MAI scores were associated with greater reductions in average pain (Rho = 0.48, P = 0.008) and a (n.s.) tendency for greater reductions in disability (Rho = 0.32, P = 0.07) Neither attendance at therapy nor SIRAS were significantly related to any of the outcomes. The benefits of rehabilitation depended to a large extent on the patient

  7. Spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Izzo, R; Popolizio, T; D'Aprile, P; Muto, M

    2015-05-01

    The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic pain, much more difficult to treat. The clinical assessment of pain source can be a challenge because of the complex anatomy and function of the spine; the advanced imaging methods are often not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis because similar findings could be present in either asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects: a clinical correlation is always mandatory and the therapy cannot rely uniquely upon any imaging abnormalities. Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally

  8. Lab in a needle for epidural space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, B.; Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Amorizzo, E.; Mercieri, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    This work relies on the development of a sensorized medical needle with an all-optical guidance (Lab in a Needle) system for epidural space identification. The device is based on the judicious integration of a Fiber Bragg grating sensor inside the lumen of an epidural needle to discriminate between different types of tissue and thus providing continuous and real time measurements of the pressure experienced by the needle tip during its advancement. Experiments carried out on an epidural training phantom demonstrate the validity of our approach for the correct and effective identification of the epidural space.

  9. Pre-puncture ultrasound guided epidural insertion before vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mahmoud; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A

    2015-10-01

    Palpation method is widely used in clinical practice to identify the puncture site during combined spinal-epidural (CSE) blocks. Tuffier's line, is an anatomical landmark between two iliac crests (inter-cristal), which is widely used to identify the puncture site during CSE blocks is not always an indicator for specific vertebral level or inter-vertebral space. One hundred and Ten (110) women were scheduled for normal vaginal delivery and were randomized into two equal groups; palpation group and an ultrasound guided group to detect the efficacy of puncture ultrasound before CSE blocks to increase chances of successful CSE procedure on the first attempt and to reduce the number of attempts or punctures during insertion of CSE catheter. There were no significant differences between two studied groups regarding; maternal age, weight and height, while, there was a significant difference between two studied groups regarding; parity. Percentage of successful CSE procedure on the first attempt was significantly higher (67.27%) in ultrasound compared to palpation group (40%). Number of punctures (attempts) were significantly less in ultrasound (1.2 ± 0.6) compared to palpation group (2.3 ± 0.8) and the number of redirections was also significantly less in ultrasound (1.4 ± 0.5) compared to palpation group (2.8 ± 1.6). Although, time to identify puncture site was significantly longer in ultrasound compared to palpation group and total procedure time was longer in ultrasound (9.1 ± 1.5 min) compared to palpation group (6.2 ± 1.2 min), there was no significant difference between two studied groups regarding; time to identify puncture site and total procedure time. Two cases of dural puncture in palpation versus no cases in ultrasound group and two cases of intravascular catheter placement (one in each group), with no significant difference between two groups. Pre- puncture ultrasound guided epidural insertion before vaginal delivery, increases the chance of a

  10. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alexander D.; Rolston, John D.; Gauger, Grant E.; Larson, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 87 • Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Spinal subdural abscess Symptoms: Fever • pain • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laminectomy • durotomy • drainage • debridement Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. Case Report: Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3–4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. Conclusions: These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID

  11. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronic pain in people with spinal cord injury. Robotic-assisted therapy Most recovery following SCI takes place ... the safety and efficacy of a type of robotic therapy device known as the AMES device. The ...

  12. [Spinal stroke in the acute myeloblast leucosis].

    PubMed

    Kotova, N A; Klimovich, A V; Krasnoruzhskiĭ, A I; Skoromets, A A; Aliev, K T; Volkova, S A; Lalaian, T V

    2013-01-01

    Data of literature on the frequency of the nervous system lesions in different variants of leucosis are analyzed. A case of a man with petechial skin rash and bruises on the body, gingival hemorrhage and general sickness is described in details. The hematologic tests revealed acute myeloblast leucosis. A lumbar puncture revealed blood in the cerebrospinal fluid and MRI showed an epidural hematoma in lumbar segments 3 and 4. At this level, the hematoma compressed the dural bag and roots of the horse tail with accompanying vessels (the radicular medullar artery and large radicular veins). A paracentetic removal of the hematoma with the decompression of spinal roots was carried out. The blasts in the cerebrospinal fluid and symptoms of the left facial nerve lesion allowed to diagnose neuroleucosis. This case presented the mixed pathogenesis of myeloischemia. The epidural hematoma compressed not only the roots of the horse tail but the accompanying vessels (arteries and veins). The venous outflow obstruction along radicular veins worsened the microcirculation in the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord. Complex polychemotherapy in the combination with neuroprotectors (cortexin, gliatiline), antiaggregants and vitamins is recommended. PMID:23612398

  13. The Role of C Fibers in Spinal Microglia Induction and Possible Relation with TRPV3 Expression During Chronic Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gazerani, Sasan; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Manaheji, Homa; Golabi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Stimulation of peptidergic fibers activates microglia in the dorsal horn. Microglia activation causes fractalkine (FKN) release, a neuron-glia signal, which enhances pain. The transient vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) mediates the release of neuropeptides, which can subsequently activate glia. TRPV1 and TRPV2 are generally expressed on C and Aδ fibers, respectively. Expression of both proteins is upregulated during inflammation, but expression of TRPV3 after induction of inflammation is unclear. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were used in all experiments. Arthritis was induced in them by single subcutaneous injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) in their right hindpaws. Resiniferatoxin (RTX) was used to eliminate peptidergic fibers. We examined the relation between FKN and TRPV3 expression by administration of anti-FKN antibody. Results: Our study findings indicated that 1) spinal TRPV3 was mostly expressed on nonpeptidergic fibers, 2) expression of spinal TRPV3 increased following inflammation, 3) elimination of peptidergic fibers decreased spinal TRPV3 expression, 4) alteration of hyperalgesia was compatible with TRPV3 changes in RTX-treated rat, and 5) anti-FKN antibody reduced spinal TRPV3 expression. Discussion: It seems that the hyperalgesia variation during different phases of CFA-induced arthritis correlates with spinal TRPV3 expression variation on peptidergic fibers. Moreover, spinal microglial activation during CFA inflammation is involved in TRPV3 expression changes via FKN signaling. PMID:27563416

  14. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  15. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. PMID:27630712

  16. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eskandr, Ashraf; Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. PMID:27630712

  17. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome.

  18. [Iatrogenic spinal epidermoid tumors. A late complication of spinal puncture].

    PubMed

    Reina, M A; López-García, A; Dittmann, M; de Andrés, J A; Blázquez, M G

    1996-04-01

    causal relation between epidermoid spinal tumors and lumbar puncture is well documented, anesthesiologists are not sufficiently aware of this possible complication. Between 1977 and 1995, 28 new cases were published. We believe that a deeper understanding of such rare complications will show us how to prevent them while providing appropriate use of epidural and subarachnoid anesthesia. PMID:8815468

  19. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  20. A randomised controlled trial of preventive spinal manipulation with and without a home exercise program for patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates that supervised home exercises, combined or not with manual therapy, can be beneficial for patients with non-specific chronic neck pain (NCNP). The objective of the study is to investigate the efficacy of preventive spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) compared to a no treatment group in NCNP patients. Another objective is to assess the efficacy of SMT with and without a home exercise program. Methods Ninety-eight patients underwent a short symptomatic phase of treatment before being randomly allocated to either an attention-group (n = 29), a SMT group (n = 36) or a SMT + exercise group (n = 33). The preventive phase of treatment, which lasted for 10 months, consisted of meeting with a chiropractor every two months to evaluate and discuss symptoms (attention-control group), 1 monthly SMT session (SMT group) or 1 monthly SMT session combined with a home exercise program (SMT + exercise group). The primary and secondary outcome measures were represented by scores on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), active cervical ranges of motion (cROM), the neck disability index (NDI) and the Bournemouth questionnaire (BQ). Exploratory outcome measures were scored on the Fear-avoidance Behaviour Questionnaire (FABQ) and the SF-12 Questionnaire. Results Our results show that, in the preventive phase of the trial, all 3 groups showed primary and secondary outcomes scores similar to those obtain following the non-randomised, symptomatic phase. No group difference was observed for the primary, secondary and exploratory variables. Significant improvements in FABQ scores were noted in all groups during the preventive phase of the trial. However, no significant change in health related quality of life (HRQL) was associated with the preventive phase. Conclusions This study hypothesised that participants in the combined intervention group would have less pain and disability and better function than participants from the 2 other groups during the preventive phase

  1. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  2. Meningeal Infiltration of the Spinal Cord by Non-Classically Activated B Cells is Associated with Chronic Disease Course in a Spontaneous B Cell-Dependent Model of CNS Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Amy K.; Tesfagiorgis, Yodit; Jain, Rajiv W.; Craig, Heather C.; Kerfoot, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    We characterized B cell infiltration of the spinal cord in a B cell-dependent spontaneous model of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity that develops in a proportion of mice with mutant T and B cell receptors specific for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. We found that, while males are more likely to develop disease, females are more likely to have a chronic rather than monophasic disease course. B cell infiltration of the spinal cord was investigated by histology and FACs. CD4+ T cell infiltration was pervasive throughout the white and in some cases gray matter. B cells were almost exclusively restricted to the meninges, often in clusters reminiscent of those described in human multiple sclerosis. These clusters were typically found adjacent to white matter lesions and their presence was associated with a chronic disease course. Extensive investigation of these clusters by histology did not identify features of lymphoid follicles, including organization of T and B cells into separate zones, CD35+ follicular dendritic cells, or germinal centers. The majority of cluster B cells were IgD+ with little evidence of class switch. Consistent with this, B cells isolated from the spinal cord were of the naïve/memory CD38hi CD95lo phenotype. Nevertheless, they were CD62Llo and CD80hi compared to lymph node B cells suggesting that they were at least partly activated and primed to present antigen. Therefore, if meningeal B cells contribute to CNS pathology in autoimmunity, follicular differentiation is not necessary for the pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26441975

  3. The Epidural Treatment of Sciatica: Its Origin and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ter Meulen, Bastiaan C; Weinstein, Henry; Ostelo, Raymond; Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Epidural injection with corticosteroids is a common treatment option for patients with lower back pain or sciatica. In this paper we review its origin and evolution. The first injections were given around 1900 in Paris by Jean Sicard (1872-1929) and Fernand Cathelin (1873-1945), who worked independently. They both injected small volumes of cocaine into the sacral hiatus. After a slow start, the epidural treatment of back pain and sciatica gradually spread to other parts of Europe and Northern America. In the early 1950s, corticosteroids were introduced for epidural use. Since the 1970s, there have been numerous clinical trials that show a significant, although small, effect of epidural corticosteroid injections compared with placebo for leg pain in the short term. Despite an ongoing debate about effectiveness and safety, epidural injections remain popular. PMID:26820578

  4. Postoperative pain relief with epidural buprenorphine versus epidural butorphanol in laparoscopic hysterectomies: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Dona Elsa; Ganapathi, P.; Anish Sharma, N. G.; Shankaranarayana, P.; Aiyappa, D. S.; Nazim, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of postoperative analgesia with epidural buprenorphine and butorphanol tartrate. Methods: Sixty patients who were scheduled for elective laparoscopic hysterectomies were randomly enrolled in the study. At the end of the surgery, in study Group A 1 ml (0.3 mg) of buprenorphine and in Group B 1 ml (1 mg) of butorphanol tartrate both diluted to 10 ml with normal saline was injected through the epidural catheter. Visual analog pain scales (VAPSs) were assessed every hour till the 6th h, then 2nd hourly till the 12th h. To assess sedation, Ramsay sedation score was used. The total duration of postoperative analgesia was taken as the period from the time of giving epidural drug until the patients first complain of pain and the VAPS is more than 6. Patients were observed for any side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, hypotension, bradycardia, pruritus, and headache. Results: Buprenorphine had a longer duration of analgesia when compared to butorphanol tartrate (586.17 ± 73.64 vs. 342.53 ± 47.42 [P < 0.001]). Nausea, vomiting (13% vs. 10%), and headache (20% vs. 13%) were more in buprenorphine group; however, sedation score and pruritus (3% vs. 6%) were found to be more with butorphanol. Conclusion: Epidural buprenorphine significantly reduced pain and increased the quality of analgesia with a longer duration of action and was a better alternative to butorphanol for postoperative pain relief. PMID:26957696

  5. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexander D; Rolston, John D; Gauger, Grant E; Larson, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. CASE REPORT Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3-4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSIONS These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID:27402228

  6. Thoracic epidural angiolipoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Du, Yong; Yang, Han-Feng; Hu, Fu-Bi; Huang, Ya-Yong; Li, Bing; Zee, Chi-Shing

    2013-04-28

    Angiolipoma of the spine is a benign neoplasm consisting of both mature fatty tissue and abnormal vascular elements, and usually presents with a slow progressive clinical course. Our patient presented with bilateral lower extremity weakness and chest-back numbness. Physical examination revealed adipose elements superficial hypesthesia below the T5 level and analgesia below the T6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed an avidly and heterogeneously enhancing mass which was located in the posterior epidural space. Compression of the thoracic cord by the fusiform mass was seen between T3-T4. During the operation, a flesh pink vascular mass (4.7 cm × 1.0 cm × 1.0 cm) with obscure margin and strong but pliable texture was found in the posterior epidural space extending from T3 to T4. There was no infiltration of the dura or the adjacent bony spine. Histopathological study of the surgical specimen showed a typical angiolipoma. We review the previously documented cases of spinal extradural angiolipomas performed with MRI.

  7. Complications after spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jie; Guan, Zheng; Gao, Zhen; Xiang, Li; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Sheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Since little has been reported about complications of spinal anesthesia in adult tethered cord syndrome (TCS), we sought to delineate the characteristics of the condition.A total of 4 cases of adult TCS after spinal anesthesia were reviewed. The medical charts of the patients were obtained. Anesthesia, which was combined spinal and epidural anesthesia or spinal anesthesia was performed, and follow-up were carried out in all patients.The most common neurological symptom of adult TCS before surgery was occasional severe pain in back, perineal region, or legs. Frequent micturition, diminished knee and ankle reflexes, and difficulty in bending were exhibited in partial patients. Paraesthesia of perineal region or/and lower extremities existed 2 to 3 days after spinal anesthesia in all the cases. Weakness of lower extremities existed in 1 case. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed the low location of conus medullaris. At follow-up, 3 cases recovered completely within 3 weeks, and 1 case underwent permanent disability.These cases suggest anesthesiologists and surgeons alert to the association of adult TCS and spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia should be prohibited in patients with adult TCS to prevent neurological damages. PMID:27442670

  8. Low-dose epidural dexmedetomidine improves thoracic epidural anaesthesia for nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X Z; Xu, Y M; Cui, X G; Guo, Y P; Li, W Z

    2014-03-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia alone is an applied technique of anaesthesia for nephrectomy which has both advantages and limitations. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist which has both central and peripheral analgesic properties. Forty patients undergoing nephrectomy were enrolled in this clinical trial and allocated randomly to two groups, a control group (C group) and a dexmedetomidine group (D group). The C group received epidural 0.75% levobupivacaine 12 ml with 1 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution, while the D group received epidural 0.75% levobupivacaine 12 ml with 1 ml (0.5 µg/kg) of dexmedetomidine. Haemodynamic changes, onset time and duration of sensory and motor block, muscle relaxation score, verbal rating score for pain, sedation score and the total postoperative analgesic consumption were evaluated. Sensory blockade duration was longer in the D group than in the C group (P=0.01). The incidence of motor block and the muscle relaxation score were significantly higher in the D group compared with the C group (P=0.01). Compared with the C group, pain scores were significantly lower in the first four postoperative hours in the D group (two hours rest P=0.038; two hours activity P=0.009; four hours rest P=0.044; four hours activity P=0.003). The total amount of flurbiprofen analgesic was significantly lower in the D group compared with the C group (P=0.03). Epidural dexmedetomidine 0.5 µg/kg appears to intensify thoracic epidural anaesthesia with levobupivacaine.

  9. Risk of Chronic Low Back Pain Among Parturients Who Undergo Cesarean Delivery With Neuraxial Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Yuan-Yi; Lo, Yuan; Chen, Yan-Bo; Liu, Chun-Peng; Huang, Wei-Chun; Wen, Chun-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the risk of chronic low back pain (LBP) in parturients undergoing cesarean delivery (CD) with neuraxial anesthesia (NA). LBP is common during pregnancy and also after delivery, but its etiology is poorly understood. Previous studies that investigated the correlation between epidural labor analgesia and chronic low back pain were inconclusive. These studies lacked objective diagnostic criteria for LBP and did not exclude possible confounders. We performed this nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study to explore the relationship between CD with NA and subsequent LBP. From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), we identified all primiparas who had given birth between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedure codes, we identified the women who had vaginal delivery (VD) and those who had CD. The mode of anesthesia was ascertained by the NHI codes. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of postpartum LBP in women undergoing CD with NA compared with those having VD. The outcome was a diagnosis of LBP according to the first ICD-9-CM diagnosis code. The patients were observed for 3 years after delivery or until diagnosis of postpartum LBP, withdrawal from the NHI system, death, or December 31, 2013. Of the 61,027 primiparas who underwent delivery during the observation period, 40,057 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Of these women, 27,097 (67.6%) received VD, 8662 (21.6%) received CD with spinal anesthesia, and 4298 (10.7%) received CD with epidural anesthesia (EA). Women who received CD with EA were found to have higher risk of LBP than did women who received VD, with the adjusted OR being 1.26 (95% CI: 1.17–1.34). CD with EA might increase the risk of subsequent chronic LBP. PMID:27100449

  10. What is the Role of Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Discogenic Pain: A Systematic Review of Comparative Analysis with Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Peter S.; Nampiaparampil, Devi E.; Hirsch, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar discogenic pain without pain mediated by a disc herniation, facet joints, or the sacroiliac joints, is common and often results in chronic, persistent pain and disability. After conservative treatment failure, injection therapy, such as an epidural injection, is frequently the next step considered in managing discogenic pain. The objective of this systematic review is to determine the efficacy of lumbar epidural injections in managing discogenic pain without radiculopathy, and compare this approach to lumbar fusion or disc arthroplasty surgery. Methods A systematic review of randomized trials published from 1966 through October 2014 of all types of epidural injections and lumbar fusion or disc arthroplasty in managing lumbar discogenic pain was performed with methodological quality assessment and grading of evidence. The level of evidence was based on the grading of evidence criteria which, was conducted using 5 levels of evidence ranging from levels I to V. Results Based on a qualitative assessment of the evidence for both approaches, there is Level II evidence for epidural injections, either caudal or lumbar interlaminar. Conclusions The available evidence suggests fluoroscopically directed epidural injections provide long-term improvement in back and lower extremity pain for patients with lumbar discogenic pain. There is also limited evidence showing the potential effectiveness of surgical interventions compared to nonsurgical treatments. PMID:25852828

  11. Disseminated Staphylococcus aureus infection following spinal anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Xu, Xiao; Ni, Hongying

    2016-09-01

    We here presented a 65-year-old woman with disseminated Staphylococcus aureus infection following spinal anesthesia. The patient underwent spinal anesthesia for great saphenous vein stripping. Twenty days after the procedure, the patient developed hydrocephalus, pulmonary infection, and epidural abscess. Microbiological culture of the pus showed infection by S aureus. Appropriate antibiotic therapy and prompt surgical abscess drainage were associated with good outcome. Hydrocephalus is thought to be associated with arachnoiditis caused by S aureus infection, which provides new insights into the pathophysiology of arachnoiditis. Here we reported a case of disseminated S aureus infection following spinal anesthesia, implicating that appropriate interventions should not be delayed for waiting for the microbiological results. PMID:27555207

  12. Spinal computed tomography scanning in the evaluation of metastatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Spring, D.B.; Munderloh, S.H.; George, C.B.; Mansour, R.P.; Volk, S.A.

    1984-07-15

    Twenty patients with known metastatic cancer or high-risk primary cancer developed new lesions on Tc/sup 99m/ bone scans and had normal plain radiographs. Spinal computed tomography (CT) was performed on all new bone-scan-positive lesions in minimal examination time. Fifteen patients had extensive metastatic vertebral disease and received local radiotherapy. One patient with new metastatic vertebral disease on CT was treated only with chemotherapy and developed acute spinal cord compression. Four patients had discogenic disease or degenerative disease but no evidence of metastases. Radionuclide bone scans are more sensitive but less specific than plain radiographs in detecting early bone metastases. Early and accurate diagnosis of metastasis is particularly important in the axial spine to prevent epidural compression and fracture. Spinal CT is valuable for identifying the presence and extent of vertebral metastases, as well as the presence of benign disease in cancer patients.

  13. Epidural anaesthesia and familial dysautonomia (the Riley Day syndrome). Three case reports.

    PubMed

    Challands, J F; Facer, E K

    1998-01-01

    Epidural anaesthesia in Familial Dysautonomia (FD) or the Riley Day syndrome has not previously been reported. Three children with FD presenting for redo Nissen fundoplication were managed with epidural anaesthesia. Cases 1 and 2 had had their original Nissen fundoplication without epidural anaesthesia. In Case 3, FD had not yet been diagnosed when she had her first operation, and it was performed with epidural anaesthesia. The anaesthetic management of these cases with and without epidural anaesthesia is described and discussed.

  14. Spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with dystonia: a case report and discussion of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Voet, Caroline; le Polain de Waroux, Bernard; Forget, Patrice; Deumens, Ronald; Masquelier, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder, the physiopathology of which can lead to dystonia associated with changes in the autonomic, central and peripheral nervous system. An interdisciplinary approach (pharmacological, interventional and psychological therapies in conjunction with a rehabilitation pathway) is central to progress towards pain reduction and restoration of function. Aim: This case report aims to stimulate reflection and development of mechanism-based therapeutic strategies concerning CRPS associated with dystonia. Case description: A 31 year old female CRPS-1 patient presented with dystonia of the right foot following ligamentoplasty for chronic ankle instability. She did not have a satisfactory response to the usual therapies. Multiple anesthetic blocks (popliteal, epidural and intrathecal) were not associated with significant anesthesia and analgesia. Mobilization of the foot by a physiotherapist was not possible. A multidisciplinary approach with psychological support, physiotherapy and spinal cord stimulation (SCS) brought pain relief, rehabilitation and improvement in the quality of life. Conclusion: The present case report demonstrates the occurrence of multilevel (peripheral and central) pathological modifications in the nervous system of a CRPS-1 patient with dystonia. This conclusion is based on the patient’s pain being resistant to anesthetic blocks at different levels and the favourable, at least initially, response to SCS. The importance of the bio-psycho-social model is also suggested, permitting behavioural change. PMID:25254100

  15. Spinal deformity in children treated for neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.K.; Riseborough, E.J.; Jaffe, N.; Nehme, M.E.

    1981-02-01

    Of seventy-four children who were treated at a mean age of seventeen months for neuroblastoma and survived more than five years, fifty-six had spinal deformity due either to the disease or to the treatment after a mean follow-up of 12.9 years. Of these fifty-six, 50 per cent had post-radiation scoliosis, and 16 per cent had post-radiation kyphosis, most frequently at the thoracolumbar junction, at the time of follow-up. Two kyphotic thoracolumbar curve patterns were identified: an angular kyphosis with a short radius of curvature and its apex at the twelfth thoracic and first lumbar vertebrae, and a thoracic kyphosis with a long radius of curvature that extended into the lumbar spine. The post-radiation deformity - both the scoliosis and the kyphosis - progressed with growth, the scoliosis at a rate of 1 degree per year and the kyphosis at a rate of 3 degrees per year. Epidural spread of the neuroblastoma was associated with most of the cases of severe scoliosis and kyphosis. The deformity was due either to the laminectomy or to the paraplegia acting in conjunction with the radiation. Eighteen per cent of 419 children with this malignant disease survived more than five years, and of the survivors, 20 per cent had spinal deformity severe enough to warrant treatment. The factors associated with the development of spinal deformity in patient treated for neuroblastoma were: orthovoltage radiation exceeding 3000 rads, asymmetrical radiation of the spine, thoracolumbar kyphosis, and epidural spread of the tumor.

  16. Temporal and spatial patterns of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 protein and gene expression in spinal cord white matter after acute and chronic spinal cord injury in rats: implications for axonal pathophysiology after neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Fehlings, Michael G

    2004-02-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), surviving white matter axons display axonal dysfunction associated with demyelination and altered K+ channel activity. To clarify the molecular basis of posttraumatic axonal pathophysiology after SCI, we investigated the changes in expression and distribution of the axonal K+ channel subunits Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 in spinal cord white matter after in vivo SCI in the rat. Using Western blot analysis, we found an increased expression of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 at 2 and 6 weeks after SCI. By real-time PCR we observed an increase in Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 mRNA levels 1 day after SCI, which persisted until 6 weeks. Confocal immunohistochemistry showed a markedly dispersed labelling of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 along the injured axons, in contrast to the tight localization of these channels to the juxtaparanodes of noninjured axons. This redistribution of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 occurred as early as 1 h postinjury along some injured axons, and persisted at 6 weeks postinjury. In parallel with the redistribution of Kv1.1 and 1.2, contactin-associated protein (Caspr), which is normally confined to a paranodal location, also displayed a more diffuse distribution along the injured spinal cord axons. Our results suggest that the increased expression of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 proteins is transcriptionally regulated. In contrast, the redistribution of the axonal K+ channel subunits occurs very early postinjury and probably reflects a disruption of the juxtaparanodal axonal region due to physical trauma, as shown by altered localization of Caspr. PMID:14984408

  17. Sustained Effectiveness of 10 kHz High-Frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation for Patients with Chronic, Low Back Pain: 24-Month Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kaisy, Adnan; Van Buyten, Jean-Pierre; Smet, Iris; Palmisani, Stefano; Pang, David; Smith, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term efficacy and safety of paresthesia-free high-frequency spinal cord stimulation (HF10 SCS) for the treatment of chronic, intractable pain of the low back and legs. Design Prospective, multicenter, observational study. Method Patients with significant chronic low back pain underwent implantation of a spinal cord stimulator capable of HF10 SCS. Patients' pain ratings, disability, sleep disturbances, opioid use, satisfaction, and adverse events were assessed for 24 months. Results After a trial period, 88% (72 of 82) of patients reported a significant improvement in pain scores and underwent the permanent implantation of the system. Ninety percent (65 of 72) of patients attended a 24-month follow-up visit. Mean back pain was reduced from 8.4 ± 0.1 at baseline to 3.3 ± 0.3 at 24 months (P < 0.001), and mean leg pain from 5.4 ± 0.4 to 2.3 ± 0.3 (P < 0.001). Concomitantly to the pain relief, there were significant decreases in opioid use, Oswestry Disability Index score, and sleep disturbances. Patients' satisfaction and recommendation ratings were high. Adverse Events were similar in type and frequency to those observed with traditional SCS systems. Conclusions In patients with chronic low back pain, HF10 SCS resulted in clinically significant and sustained back and leg pain relief, functional and sleep improvements, opioid use reduction, and high patient satisfaction. These results support the long-term safety and sustained efficacy of HF10 SCS. PMID:24308759

  18. Forelimb EMG-based trigger to control an electronic spinal bridge to enable hindlimb stepping after a complete spinal cord lesion in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A complete spinal cord transection results in loss of all supraspinal motor control below the level of the injury. The neural circuitry in the lumbosacral spinal cord, however, can generate locomotor patterns in the hindlimbs of rats and cats with the aid of motor training, epidural stimulation and/or administration of monoaminergic agonists. We hypothesized that there are patterns of EMG signals from the forelimbs during quadrupedal locomotion that uniquely represent a signal for the “intent” to step with the hindlimbs. These observations led us to determine whether this type of “indirect” volitional control of stepping can be achieved after a complete spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to develop an electronic bridge across the lesion of the spinal cord to facilitate hindlimb stepping after a complete mid-thoracic spinal cord injury in adult rats. Methods We developed an electronic spinal bridge that can detect specific patterns of EMG activity from the forelimb muscles to initiate electrical-enabling motor control (eEmc) of the lumbosacral spinal cord to enable quadrupedal stepping after a complete spinal cord transection in rats. A moving window detection algorithm was implemented in a small microprocessor to detect biceps brachii EMG activity bilaterally that then was used to initiate and terminate epidural stimulation in the lumbosacral spinal cord. We found dominant frequencies of 180–220 Hz in the EMG of the forelimb muscles during active periods, whereas these frequencies were between 0–10 Hz when the muscles were inactive. Results and conclusions Once the algorithm was validated to represent kinematically appropriate quadrupedal stepping, we observed that the algorithm could reliably detect, initiate, and facilitate stepping under different pharmacological conditions and at various treadmill speeds. PMID:22691460

  19. Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma concurrent with cranial subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Wonjun; Joo, Wonil; Chough, Jeongki; Park, Haekwan

    2013-07-01

    A 39-year old female presented with chronic spinal subdural hematoma manifesting as low back pain and radiating pain from both legs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) extending from L4 to S2 leading to severe central spinal canal stenosis. One day after admission, she complained of nausea and severe headache. Computed tomography of the brain revealed chronic SDH associated with midline shift. Intracranial chronic SDH was evacuated through two burr holes. Back pain and radiating leg pain derived from the spinal SDH diminished about 2 weeks after admission and spinal SDH was completely resolved on MRI obtained 3 months after onset. Physicians should be aware of such a condition and check the possibility of concurrent cranial SDH in patients with spinal SDH, especially with non-traumatic origin.

  20. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

  1. Depth of the thoracic epidural space in children.

    PubMed

    Masir, F; Driessen, J J; Thies, K C; Wijnen, M H; van Egmond, J

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in anaesthetized children requires a meticulous technique and may have an increased success rate when the distance between skin and epidural space is known. The objective of this observational study was to measure the skin to epidural distance (SED) during thoracic epidural puncture in 61 children. The epidural puncture was performed using the loss of resistance technique with saline 0.9%. The distance from the needle tip to the point where the needle emerged from the skin was measured. The post-operative analgesia parameters were also measured. Skin to epidural distance correlated significantly with the age and weight of the children. The equation for the relation between SED (cm) and age was 2.15 + (0.01 x months) and for SED vs weight was 1.95 + (0.045 x kg). Despite considerable variability among individuals, the observed correlation of SED with both age and weight shows that this parameter may be helpful to guide thoracic epidural puncture in anaesthetized children. PMID:17067139

  2. Extraosseous, Epidural Cavernous Hemangioma with Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ozkal, Birol; Yaldiz, Can; Yaman, Onur; Ozdemır, Nail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cavernous malformations are characterized by enlarged vascular structures located in benign neural tissues within the cerebellum and spinal cord of the central nervous system. Cavernous hemangiomas (CHs) account for 5% to 12% of all spinal vascular malformations. Case Report We removed a hemorrhagic thoracic mass in a 40-year-old male patient who presented with progressive neurological deficits. Conclusions We found it appropriate to present this case due to its rarity. PMID:25960818

  3. Fever following an Epidural Blood Patch in a Child.

    PubMed

    Hunyady, Agnes I; Anderson, Corrie T M; Kuratani, John D; Kundu, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that children suffer from the consequences of spontaneous or iatrogenic intracranial hypotension. Pediatric epidural blood patch is gaining popularity because of its ability to alter cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and to alleviate headaches attributed to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. There is, however, still not enough data to document the safety profile of an epidural blood patch. Here we describe a case of a fever in a child temporally related to the administration of an epidural blood patch. This case depicts the dilemmas in making the diagnosis and instituting treatment for complications of this procedure in the pediatric population.

  4. Fever following an Epidural Blood Patch in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Hunyady, Agnes I.; Anderson, Corrie T. M.; Kuratani, John D.; Kundu, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that children suffer from the consequences of spontaneous or iatrogenic intracranial hypotension. Pediatric epidural blood patch is gaining popularity because of its ability to alter cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and to alleviate headaches attributed to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. There is, however, still not enough data to document the safety profile of an epidural blood patch. Here we describe a case of a fever in a child temporally related to the administration of an epidural blood patch. This case depicts the dilemmas in making the diagnosis and instituting treatment for complications of this procedure in the pediatric population. PMID:23029626

  5. [Epidural extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Rafael; Bernal-García, Luis Miguel; Pineda-Palomo, Manuel; Botana-Fernández, Marcos; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio Javier; Cabezudo-Artero, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant tumour of the bone that sometimes presents extraskeletal involvement, with the epidural location being rare. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with paresthesia, paresis and urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an epidural mass from C6 to D3. Laminectomy from C7 to D2 and partial resection of the lesion was performed. Pathological analysis was consistent with Ewing sarcoma. The patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without evidence of disease at 8 months follow-up. A review of the literature on all published cases of extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma with epidural involvement is presented. PMID:25497289

  6. [Severe and prolonged post-dural puncture headache: from pathological basis to therapeutic role and correct timing for epidural blood patch].

    PubMed

    Wetzl, R G; Taglione, G; Ceresa, F; D'Agostino, R; Foresta, S; Guarnerio, C; Ladiana, N; Megaro, F; Zanesi, R; De Vietro, A; Pavani, M

    2001-09-01

    Believed to be due to unbalance between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production rate and its loss through the spinal dural puncture hole, post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is often considered as a physiological syndrome, usually reversible without pathological sequelae after dural hole's closure. The clinical case here presented (incapacitating headache associated with diagnostic dural puncture in a leukaemic young female patient who underwent bone marrow transplantation) shows potentially fatal pathological sequelae following prolonged headache (untreated, due to the severe postransplant immunodeficiency and coagulopathy). The observed RMI lesions suggest interesting conclusions about the clinical indications and correct timing of autologous epidural blood patch (EBP). We also suggest the ways to preventing rebound intracranial hypertension following autologous epidural blood patch in patients suffering from incapacitating and prolonged headache.

  7. Which should be appropriate surgical treatment for subtentorial epidural empyema? Burr-hole evacuation versus decompressive craniectomy: Review of the literature with a case report

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Vaner; Özgür, Abdulkadir; Terzi, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Subtentorial empyema is a rare intracranial complication of chronic otitis media. Moreover, if not correctly treated, it is a life-threatening infection. Epidural and subdural empyemas on subtentorial space have different effects. This difference is not mentioned in literature. If the distinction can be made, surgical treatment method will be different, and the desired surgical treatment may be less minimal invasive. A 26-year-old male patient was found to have developed epidural empyema in the subtentorial space. We performed a burr-hole evacuation in this case because there was low cerebellar edema, Also, the general condition of the patient was good, the empyema was a convex image on the lower surface of tentorium on magnetic resonance images, and when the dura mater base is reached during mastoidectomy for chronic otitis media, we were observed to drain a purulent material through the epidural space. After 10 days from surgery increased posterior fossa edema caused hydrocephalus. Therefore, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed. The patient fully recovered and was discharged after 6 weeks. Complete correction in the posterior fossa was observed by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Burr-hole evacuation from inside of the mastoidectomy cavity for subtentorial epidural empyema is an effective and minimal invasive surgical treatment. PMID:27057210