Science.gov

Sample records for chronically inflamed bladder

  1. Deterioration of Mechanical Properties of Discs in Chronically Inflamed TMJ

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.D.; Cui, S.J.; Liu, Y.; Luo, Q.; Du, R.J.; Kou, X.X.; Zhang, J.N.; Zhou, Y.H.; Gan, Y.H.

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs frequently undergo degenerative changes in arthritis. However, the biomechanical properties of pathogenic discs remain to be explored. In this study, we evaluated the effects of chronic inflammation on the biomechanical properties of TMJ discs in rats. Chronic inflammation of TMJs was induced by double intra-articular injections of complete Freund’s adjuvant for 5 weeks, and biomechanical properties and ultrastructure of the discs were examined by mechanical testing, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The instantaneous compressive moduli of the anterior and posterior bands of discs in inflamed TMJs were decreased significantly compared with those in the control group. The instantaneous tensile moduli of the discs of inflamed TMJs also showed significant decreases in both the anterior-posterior and mesial-lateral directions. The relaxation moduli of the discs of inflamed TMJs showed nearly the same tendency as the instantaneous moduli. The surfaces of the discs of inflamed TMJs became rough and porous due to the loss of the superficial gel-like stratum, with many collagen fibers exposed and degradation of the sub-superficial collagen fibrils. Our results suggested that chronic inflammation of TMJ could lead to deterioration of mechanical properties and alteration of disc ultrastructure, which might contribute to TMJ disc displacement. PMID:25266714

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Chronically Inflamed Periapical Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Kosuke; Takeichi, Osamu; Hatori, Keisuke; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2015-01-01

    Periapical granulomas are lesions around the apex of a tooth caused by a polymicrobial infection. Treatment with antibacterial agents is normally performed to eliminate bacteria from root canals; however, loss of the supporting alveolar bone is typically observed, and tooth extraction is often selected if root canal treatment does not work well. Therefore, bacteria and other microorganisms could be involved in this disease. To understand the pathogenesis of periapical granulomas more precisely, we focused on the association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) using surgically removed periapical granulomas (n = 32). EBV DNA was detected in 25 of 32 periapical granulomas (78.1%) by real-time PCR, and the median number of EBV DNA copies was approximately 8,688.01/μg total DNA. In contrast, EBV DNA was not detected in healthy gingival tissues (n = 10); the difference was statistically significant according to the Mann-Whitney U test (p = 0.0001). Paraffin sections were also analyzed by in situ hybridization to detect EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER)-expressing cells. EBER was detected in the cytoplasm and nuclei of B cells and plasma cells in six of nine periapical granulomas, but not in healthy gingival tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis for latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) of EBV using serial tissue sections showed that LMP-1-expressing cells were localized to the same areas as EBER-expressing cells. These data suggest that B cells and plasma cells in inflamed granulomas are a major source of EBV infection, and that EBV could play a pivotal role in controlling immune cell responses in periapical granulomas. PMID:25884725

  3. Is chronic urinary infection a cause of overactive bladder?

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Aswini A; Wildman, Scott S; Strutt, Matthew; Duckett, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a diagnosis resulting from a combination of multiple underlying factors. Current traditional treatments are based on anticholinergic blockade which have marginal benefits and are associated with poor tolerability and continuation rates. There is mounting evidence that chronic low grade bacterial bladder colonisation may exacerbate OAB symptoms and may explain why the current treatment strategies are not always successful. However, standard diagnostic laboratory tests to identify the presence of such bacterial infection are unreliable. Newer technologies such as RNA sequencing and extended culture techniques, show that urine is not sterile and organisms that are found in urine may be responsible for OAB symptoms. This article aims to review the current evidence suggesting that micro-organisms in urine may be important in the aetiology of OAB or may exacerbate OAB symptoms. PMID:27088624

  4. Chronic bladder ischemia and oxidative stress: new pharmacotherapeutic targets for lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Masanori; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bladder ischemia is potentially a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in the elderly. Epidemiological studies have shown a close association between lower urinary tract symptoms and vascular risk factors for atherosclerosis, and investigations using transrectal color Doppler ultrasonography have shown a negative correlation between decreased lower urinary tract perfusion and International Prostate Symptom Score in elderly patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Bladder blood flow is also known to decrease in men with bladder outlet obstruction as a result of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Studies in animal models suggest that chronic bladder ischemia and repeated ischemia/reperfusion during a micturition cycle might produce oxidative stress, leading to denervation of the bladder and the expression of tissue-damaging molecules in the bladder wall, which could be responsible for the development of bladder hyperactivity progressing to bladder underactivity. The effects of drugs with different mechanisms of action; for example, α1-adrenoceptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, free radical scavengers and β3-adrenoceptor agonist, have been studied in animal models of chronic bladder ischemia. The drugs, representing different treatment principles for increasing blood flow and decreasing oxidative stress, showed protective effects not only on urodynamic parameters, but also on negative effects on muscle contractility and on detrimental structural bladder wall changes. Improvement of lower urinary tract perfusion and control of oxidative stress can be considered new therapeutic strategies for treatment of bladder dysfunction induced by chronic ischemia.

  5. Triple cancer: chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bladder and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Sharma, Rashi; Sahoo, Manas Kumar

    2015-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) is a common lymphoproliferative disorder with an increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The decreased immunity and B-cell dysfunction in CLL probably accounts for this emergence of second malignancies. We report a case of synchronous bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma with CLL. A 74-year-old male who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia 2 years before, presented with recurrent urinary tract infection. Peripheral blood smear revealed leukocytosis with absolute lymphocytosis (absolute lymphocyte count: 37870 cells/mm³). Flow cytometric immunophenotyping revealed 75% abnormal lymphoid cells which were positive for CD 19, CD5, CD23, CD22, CD200, CD20 (moderate) with lambda light chain restriction and negative for CD3, CD10, FMC7, CD38, CD138, IgM, CD103, CD123. F Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed increased metabolic activity of the left lateral wall of the urinary bladder extending to the left UV junction, adjacent part of trigone and bladder neck region along with multiple heterogeneous enhancing areas with increased FDG avidity within the prostate. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumour by cystoscopy was performed. Histopathology showed high grade, muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. Due to presence of uptake in the prostate, transurethral resection of the prostate was done and histopathology revealed adenocarcinoma of prostate (prostate specific antigen- positive), Gleason grade III+III and Gleason score 6. A high index of suspicion is required to detect synchronous and metachronous malignancies. Ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and PET/CT are often essential for detection and an accurate diagnosis.

  6. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Andrea; Facchin, Sonia; Dassie, Elisa; Casarin, Elisabetta; Jepson, Mark A; Neumann, Helmut; Hatem, Giorgia; Realdon, Stefano; D’Incà, Renata; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS) platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent- labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of ANANAS in inflamed tissues supports the potential of this platform as a targeted carrier for bioactive moieties in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25609952

  7. Detection of a fluorescent-labeled avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly by confocal laser endomicroscopy in the microvasculature of chronically inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Buda, Andrea; Facchin, Sonia; Dassie, Elisa; Casarin, Elisabetta; Jepson, Mark A; Neumann, Helmut; Hatem, Giorgia; Realdon, Stefano; D'Incà, Renata; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal pathologies causing great discomfort in both children and adults. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases is not yet fully understood and their diagnosis and treatment are often challenging. Nanoparticle-based strategies have been tested in local drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Here, we have investigated the use of the novel avidin-nucleic acid nanoassembly (ANANAS) platform as a potential diagnostic carrier in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel diseases. Fluorescent- labeled ANANAS nanoparticles were administered to mice with chemically induced chronic inflammation of the large intestine. Localization of mucosal nanoparticles was assessed in vivo by dual-band confocal laser endomicroscopy. This technique enables characterization of the mucosal microvasculature and crypt architecture at subcellular resolution. Intravascular nanoparticle distribution was observed in the inflamed mucosa but not in healthy controls, demonstrating the utility of the combination of ANANAS and confocal laser endomicroscopy for highlighting intestinal inflammatory conditions. The specific localization of ANANAS in inflamed tissues supports the potential of this platform as a targeted carrier for bioactive moieties in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25609952

  8. Acute and Chronic Deficits in the Urinary Bladder after Spinal Contusion Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Juan J.; Haywood-Watson, Ricky J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) permanently alters bladder function in humans. Hematuria and cystitis occur in both human SCI as well as in rodent models of SCI. Others have reported early SCI-dependent disruption to bladder uroepithelial integrity that results in increased permeability to urine and urine-borne substances. This can result in cystitis, or inflammation of the bladder, an ongoing pathological condition present throughout the chronic phase of SCI in humans. The goals of our study were twofold: (1) to begin to examine the inflammatory and molecular changes that occur within the bladder uroepithelium using a clinically-relevant spinal contusion model of injury, and (2) to assess whether these alterations continue into the chronic phase of SCI. Rats received either moderate SCI or sham surgery. Urine was collected from SCI and sham subjects over 7 days or at 7 months to assess levels of excreted proteins. Inflammation in the bladder wall was assessed via biochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Bladder tight junction proteins, mediators of uroepithelial integrity, were also measured in both the acute and chronic phases of SCI. Urine protein and hemoglobin levels rapidly increase following SCI. An SCI-dependent elevation in numbers of neutrophils within the bladder wall peaked at 48 h. Bladder tight junction proteins demonstrate a rapid but transient decrease as early as 2 h post-SCI. Surprisingly, elevated levels of urine proteins and significant deficits in bladder tight junction proteins could be detected in chronic SCI, suggesting that early pathological changes to the bladder may continue throughout the chronic phase of injury. PMID:19891526

  9. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia of the bladder: an atypical etiology of gross hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Isharwal, Sudhir; Pooli, Aydin; Lele, Subodh; Feloney, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a rare hematologic disorder with affected patients having complications of frequent infections and possible transformation to a more aggressive malignancy. The occurrence of CLL in the bladder is a rare event, with few reported cases. As a result, its aggressiveness and the optimal course for treatment are unknown. Despite this, its presence in the bladder warrants continued surveillance, as recurrence and progression to other bladder malignancies are possible. We present a 71-year-old woman initially diagnosed with CLL who was plagued by recurrent hematuria and dysuria for over a decade, which lead to multiple negative urologic workups. However, these continued workups eventually lead to her diagnosis of bladder CLL with a subsequent finding of carcinoma in situ that was prompted by a suspicious surveillance cystoscopy performed 4 months after her initial bladder diagnosis. Hence, infiltration of CLL in the urinary bladder merits close follow up, including additional urologic procedures. PMID:25276230

  10. Implantable wireless battery recharging system for bladder pressure chronic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J; Cong, Peng; Suster, Michael A; Damaser, Margot

    2015-11-21

    This paper presents an implantable wireless battery recharging system design for bladder pressure chronic monitoring. The wireless recharging system consists of an external 15 cm-diameter 6-turn powering coil and a silicone-encapsulated implantable rectangular coil with a dimension of 7 mm × 17 mm × 2.5 mm and 18 turns, which further encloses a 3 mm-diameter and 12 mm-long rechargeable battery, two ferrite rods, an ASIC, and a tuning capacitor. For a constant recharging current of 100 μA, an RF power of 700 μW needs to be coupled into the implantable module through the tuned coils. Analyses and experiments confirm that with the two coils aligned coaxially or with a 6 cm axial offset and a tilting angle of 30°, an external power of 3.5 W or 10 W is required, respectively, at an optimal frequency of 3 MHz to cover a large implant depth of 20 cm.

  11. Chronic Infections of the Urinary Tract and Bladder Cancer Risk: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Otunu, Oghenetejiri; Akhtar, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Literature on the relationship between recurrent urinary tract infections and urinary bladder carcinoma risk has been inconsistent. Therefore, we carried out this systematic review of observational studies to ascertain if there is any association between chronic urinary tract infection and urinary bladder carcinoma. A total of 10 databases were searched using Boolean: CINAHL, PUBMED, Google Scholar, Medline, Science Direct, SCIRUS, Cochrane, UK PubMed central, NHS evidence and WHO-website. The search yielded an initial hit of 3,518 articles and after screening and critical appraisal, seven studies were included for this review. Four articles reported an association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer while three concluded a weak or no association at least in one gender. Main findings in this review were that most of the studies reported an association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk. However, inferences about the causal association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk should be drawn cautiously considering the methodological limitations of case-control studies included in this review. Therefore, more empirical evidence is needed to determine the causal nature of relationships between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk. PMID:27644620

  12. Chronic Psychological Stress Enhances Nociceptive Processing in the Urinary Bladder in High-Anxiety Rats

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, M.T.; DeBerry, J.; Ness, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether acute and/or chronic psychological stress produce changes in urinary bladder nociception. Female Sprague-Dawley (SD; low/moderate anxiety) or Wistar-Kyoto (WK; high-anxiety) rats were exposed to either an acute (1 day) or a chronic (10 days) water avoidance stress paradigm or a sham stress paradigm. Paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli and fecal pellet output, were quantified at baseline and after the final stress or sham stress exposure. Rats were then sedated, and visceromotor responses (VMRs) to urinary bladder distension (UBD) were recorded. While acute stress exposure did not significantly alter bladder nociceptive responses in either strain of rats, WK rats exposed to a chronic stress paradigm exhibited enhanced responses to UBD. These high-anxiety rats also exhibited somatic analgesia following acute, but not chronic, stress. Furthermore, WK rats had greater fecal pellet output than SD rats when stressed. Significant stress-induced changes in nociceptive responses to mechanical stimuli were observed in SD rats. That chronic psychological stress significantly enhanced bladder nociceptive responses only in high-anxiety rats provides further support for a critical role of genetics, stress and anxiety as exacerbating factors in painful urogenital disorders such as interstitial cystitis (IC). PMID:17521683

  13. Transgenic Mice Expressing MCP-1 by the Urothelium Demonstrate Bladder Hypersensitivity, Pelvic Pain and Voiding Dysfunction: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain Research Network Animal Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaoqin; Lutgendorf, Susan; Bradley, Catherine; Schrepf, Andrew; Kreder, Karl; O'Donnell, Michael; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is one of the key chemokines that play important roles in diverse inflammatory and chronic pain conditions. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the urinary bladder characterized by the hallmark symptoms of pelvic pain and voiding dysfunction. To facilitate IC/BPS research, we used transgenic technology to develop a novel urothelial MCP-1 secretion mouse model (URO-MCP-1). A transgene consisting of the uroplakin II gene promoter and the mouse MCP-1 coding sequence with a secretory element was constructed and microinjected. URO-MCP-1 mice were found to express MCP-1 mRNA in the bladder epithelium and MCP-1 protein in the urine, and developed bladder inflammation 24 hours after intravesical administration of a single sub-noxious dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The inflamed bladders of URO-MCP-1 mice exhibited elevated mRNAs for interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-6, substance P precursor, and nerve growth factor as well as increased macrophage infiltration. In parallel with these phenotypic changes, URO-MCP-1 mice manifested significant functional changes at days 1 and 3 after cystitis induction. These functional changes included pelvic pain as measured by von Frey filament stimulation and voiding dysfunction (increased urinary frequency, reduced average volume voided per micturition, and reduced maximum volume voided per micturition) as measured by micturition cages. Micturition changes remained evident at day 7 after cystitis induction, although these changes were not statistically significant. Control wild-type C57BL/6 mice manifested no clear changes in histological, biochemical and behavioral features after similar cystitis induction with LPS. Taken together, our results indicate that URO-MCP-1 mice are hypersensitive to bladder irritants such as LPS and develop pelvic pain and voiding dysfunction upon cystitis induction, providing a novel model for IC

  14. A Case of Isolated Coronary Artery Ectasia in the Setting of Chronic Inflamation From human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Heckle, Mark R; Askari, Raza; Morsy, Mohamed; Ibebuogu, Uzoma N

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery ectasia also known as dilated coronopathy is a relatively rare finding that is most commonly associated with atherosclerosis. Several alternative reasons including congenital malformations and chronic inflammation have been identified as a cause of CAE. In this case, we discuss a 61-year-old male with postoperative chest pain who was found to have localized CAE in the absence of significant atherosclerosis. We also elucidate the recently proposed markers of chronic inflammation that might be associated with coronary artery ectasia. PMID:27598894

  15. Microcirculation and structural reorganization of the bladder mucosa in chronic cystitis under conditions of ozone therapy.

    PubMed

    Neimark, A I; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Lushnikova, E L; Bakarev, M A; Abdullaev, N A; Sizov, K A

    2014-01-01

    Structural reorganization of the bladder mucosa in chronic cystitis and its correction by ozone therapy were studied. A relationship between the epithelial layer restructuring of different kinds (dystrophy, metaplasia, and degeneration), level of cell proliferation, and ultrastructural organization of urotheliocytes was detected. This complex of structural reactions was combined with dysregulation of tissue bloodflow in the bladder mucosa, shown by laser Doppler flowmetry. Positive structural changes were most marked in intravesical and less so in parenteral ozone therapy added to the therapeutic complex and manifested in reduction of inflammation and alteration in parallel with more intense reparative reactions. A special feature of parenteral ozone therapy was a significant improvement of microcirculation in the bladder mucosa.

  16. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G.; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4+ lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4+ Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  17. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4(+) lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4(+) Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  18. Wireless, Ultra-Low-Power Implantable Sensor for Chronic Bladder Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    MAJERUS, STEVE J. A.; GARVERICK, STEVEN L.; SUSTER, MICHAEL A.; FLETTER, PAUL C.; DAMASER, MARGOT S.

    2015-01-01

    The wireless implantable/intracavity micromanometer (WIMM) system was designed to fulfill the unmet need for a chronic bladder pressure sensing device in urological fields such as urodynamics for diagnosis and neuromodulation for bladder control. Neuromodulation in particular would benefit from a wireless bladder pressure sensor which could provide real-time pressure feedback to an implanted stimulator, resulting in greater bladder capacity while using less power. The WIMM uses custom integrated circuitry, a MEMS transducer, and a wireless antenna to transmit pressure telemetry at a rate of 10 Hz. Aggressive power management techniques yield an average current draw of 9 μA from a 3.6-Volt micro-battery, which minimizes the implant size. Automatic pressure offset cancellation circuits maximize the sensing dynamic range to account for drifting pressure offset due to environmental factors, and a custom telemetry protocol allows transmission with minimum overhead. Wireless operation of the WIMM has demonstrated that the external receiver can receive the telemetry packets, and the low power consumption allows for at least 24 hours of operation with a 4-hour wireless recharge session. PMID:26778926

  19. Managing chronic bladder diseases with the administration of exogenous glycosaminoglycans: an update on the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Massimo; Hurle, Rodolfo; Casale, Paolo; Buffi, NicolòMaria; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Fiorini, Girolamo; Peschechera, Roberto; Pasini, Luisa; Zandegiacomo, Silvia; Benetti, Alessio; Taverna, Gianluigi; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Barbagli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of acute chronic cystitis and other ‘sensory’ disorders, i.e. painful bladder syndrome (PBS) or interstitial cystitis (IC), often remains multifactorial, there is a wide consensus that such clinical conditions may arise from a primary defective urothelium lining or from damaged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). A ‘cascade’ of events starting from GAG injury, which fails to heal, may lead to chronic bladder epithelial damage and neurogenic inflammation. To restore the GAG layer is becoming the main aim of new therapies for the treatment of chronic cystitis and PBS/IC. Preliminary experiences with GAG replenishment for different pathological conditions involving the lower urinary tract have been reported. There is a range of commercially available intravesical formulations of these components, alone or in combination. Literature evidence shows that exogenous intravesical hyaluronic acid markedly reduces recurrences of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients treated with exogenous GAGs have fewer UTI recurrences, a longer time to recurrence and a greater improvement in quality of life. Exogenous intravesical GAGs have been used for the treatment of PBS/IC. Despite the limitations of most of the studies, findings confirmed the role of combination therapy with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as a safe and effective option for the treatment of PBS/IC. To prevent and/or treat radiotherapy and chemotherapy induced cystitis, GAG replenishment therapy has been used showing preliminary encouraging results. The safety profile of exogenous GAGs has been reported to be very favourable, without adverse events of particular significance. PMID:27034722

  20. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome/bladder pain syndrome: taking stock, looking ahead: ICI-RS 2011.

    PubMed

    Hanno, Philip; Andersson, Karl Eric; Birder, Lori; Elneil, Suzy; Kanai, Anthony; Pontari, Michel

    2012-03-01

    This review reflects the presentations and subsequent discussions at the International consultation on Incontinence Research Society's annual meeting. It updates the current definitions and diagnostic and treatment algorithms for bladder pain syndrome and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (non-bacterial prostatitis), highlights some specific basic research findings from discussion participants, looks at what we can hope to eventually learn from a large multicenter National Institutes of Health study, reviews future research pathways as articulated by the National Urologic Research Agenda of the American Urological Association and others, discusses recent therapeutic efforts, and concludes with discussion points from the ICI-RS meeting.

  1. Treating Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome as a Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Philip C; Bosch, David C

    2014-01-01

    The management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is both frustrating and difficult. The etiology is uncertain and there is no definitive treatment. Consequently, both patients and doctors tend to be unhappy and unsatisfied with the quality of care. The American Urological Association (AUA) provides a guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of IC/BPS. Recommended first-line treatments include patient education, self-care practices, behavior modifications, and stress management. Management of IC/BPS may be also improved if both patients and doctors treat this condition as a chronic disease. This article reviews the AUA first-line treatments for IC/BPS and considers the benefits of treating this condition as a chronic disease. PMID:25009448

  2. Novel Treatment of Chronic Bladder Pain Syndrome and Other Pelvic Pain Disorders by OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    PubMed Central

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is defined as pain in the pelvic organs and related structures of at least 6 months’ duration. The pathophysiology of CPP is uncertain, and its treatment presents challenges. Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A), known for its antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and muscle relaxant activity, has been used recently to treat refractory CPP with promising results. In patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, most studies suggest intravesical BoNT-A injection reduces bladder pain and increases bladder capacity. Repeated BoNT-A injection is also effective and reduces inflammation in the bladder. Intraprostatic BoNT-A injection could significantly improve prostate pain and urinary frequency in the patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Animal studies also suggest BoNT-A injection in the prostate decreases inflammation in the prostate. Patients with CPP due to pelvic muscle pain and spasm also benefit from localized BoNT-A injections. BoNT-A injection in the pelvic floor muscle improves dyspareunia and decreases pelvic floor pressure. Preliminary studies show intravesical BoNT-A injection is useful in inflammatory bladder diseases such as chemical cystitis, radiation cystitis, and ketamine related cystitis. Dysuria is the most common adverse effect after BoNT-A injection. Very few patients develop acute urinary retention after treatment. PMID:26094697

  3. Novel Treatment of Chronic Bladder Pain Syndrome and Other Pelvic Pain Disorders by OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection.

    PubMed

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-06-18

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is defined as pain in the pelvic organs and related structures of at least 6 months' duration. The pathophysiology of CPP is uncertain, and its treatment presents challenges. Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A), known for its antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and muscle relaxant activity, has been used recently to treat refractory CPP with promising results. In patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, most studies suggest intravesical BoNT-A injection reduces bladder pain and increases bladder capacity. Repeated BoNT-A injection is also effective and reduces inflammation in the bladder. Intraprostatic BoNT-A injection could significantly improve prostate pain and urinary frequency in the patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Animal studies also suggest BoNT-A injection in the prostate decreases inflammation in the prostate. Patients with CPP due to pelvic muscle pain and spasm also benefit from localized BoNT-A injections. BoNT-A injection in the pelvic floor muscle improves dyspareunia and decreases pelvic floor pressure. Preliminary studies show intravesical BoNT-A injection is useful in inflammatory bladder diseases such as chemical cystitis, radiation cystitis, and ketamine related cystitis. Dysuria is the most common adverse effect after BoNT-A injection. Very few patients develop acute urinary retention after treatment.

  4. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  5. Biospectral analysis of the bladder channel point in chronic low back pain patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Alberto Espinosa; Nava, Juan José Godina; Segura, Miguel Ángel Rodriguez; Bastida, Albino Villegas

    2012-10-01

    Chronic pain is the main cause of disability in the productive age people and is a public health problem that affects both the patient and society. On the other hand, there isn't any instrument to measure it; this is only estimated using subjective variables. The healthy cells generate a known membrane potential which is part of a network of biologically closed electric circuits still unstudied. It is proposed a biospectral analysis of a bladder channel point as a diagnosis method for chronic low back pain patients. Materials and methods: We employed a study group with chronic low back pain patients and a control group without low back pain patients. The visual analog scale (VAS) to determine the level of pain was applied. Bioelectric variables were measured for 10 seconds and the respective biostatistical analyses were made. Results: Biospectral analysis on frequency domain shows a depression in the 60-300 Hz frequency range proportional to the chronicity of low back pain compared against healthy patients.

  6. Low-power wireless micromanometer system for acute and chronic bladder-pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Majerus, Steve J A; Fletter, Paul C; Damaser, Margot S; Garverick, Steven L

    2011-03-01

    This letter describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a wireless bladder-pressure-sensing system for chronic, point-of-care applications, such as urodynamics or closed-loop neuromodulation. The system consists of a miniature implantable device and an external RF receiver and wireless battery charger. The implant is small enough to be cystoscopically implanted within the bladder wall, where it is securely held and shielded from the urine stream. The implant consists of a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a pressure transducer, a rechargeable battery, and wireless telemetry and recharging antennas. The ASIC includes instrumentation, wireless transmission, and power-management circuitry, and on an average draws less than 9 μA from the 3.6-V battery. The battery charge can be wirelessly replenished with daily 6-h recharge periods that can occur during the periods of sleep. Acute in vivo evaluation of the pressure-sensing system in canine models has demonstrated that the system can accurately capture lumen pressure from a submucosal implant location.

  7. New pharmacological approaches against chronic bowel and bladder problems in paralytics

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads generally to an irreversible loss of sensory functions and voluntary motor control below injury level. Cures that could repair SCI and/or restore voluntary walking have not been yet developed nor commercialized. Beyond the well-known loss of walking capabilities, most SCI patients experience also a plethora of motor problems and health concerns including specific bladder and bowel dysfunctions. Indeed, chronic constipation and urinary retention, two significant life-threatening complications, are typically found in patients suffering of traumatic (e.g., falls or car accidents) or non-traumatic SCI (e.g., multiple sclerosis, spinal tumors). Secondary health concerns associated with these dysfunctions include hemorrhoids, abdominal distention, altered visceral sensitivity, hydronephrosis, kidney failure, urinary tract infections, sepsis and, in some cases, cardiac arrest. Consequently, individuals with chronic SCI are forced to regularly seek emergency and critical care treatments when some of these conditions occur or become intolerable. Increasing evidence supports the existence of a novel experimental approach that may be capable of preventing the occurrence or severity of bladder and bowel problems. Indeed, recent findings in animal models of SCI have revealed that, despite paraplegia or tetraplegia, it remains possible to elicit episodes of micturition and defecation by acting pharmacologically or electrically upon specialized lumbosacral neuronal networks, namely the spinal or sacral micturition center (SMC) and lumbosacral defecation center (LDC). Daily activation of SMC and LDC neurons could potentially become, new classes of minimally invasive treatments (i.e., if orally active) against these dysfunctions and their many life-threatening complications. PMID:26855887

  8. Chronic treatment with resveratrol improves overactive bladder in obese mice via antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Eduardo C; Calmasini, Fabiano B; de Oliveira, Mariana G; Silva, Fábio H; da Silva, Carmem P V; André, Diana M; Leonardo, Flávia C; Delbin, Maria A; Antunes, Edson

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate whether oral intake with resveratrol ameliorates overactive bladder in high-fat fed mice. Male C57BL6 mice fed with standard chow or high-fat diet to induce obesity received a two-week therapy with resveratrol (100mg/kg, given as a daily gavage). Weight and metabolic profile, together with cystometry and in vitro bladder contractions were evaluated. Measurements of gp91phox and SOD1 mRNA expressions and reactive-oxygen species (ROS) in bladder tissues, and serum TBARS were performed. Obese mice exhibited increases in body weight and epididymal fat mass, which were significantly reduced by oral treatment with resveratrol. Cystometric study in obese mice showed increases in non-voiding contractions, post-voiding pressure and voiding frequency that were reversed by resveratrol treatment. Likewise, the in vitro bladder overactivity in response to electrical-field stimulation (80V, 1-32Hz) or carbachol (1nM to 10mM) were normalized by resveratrol. The gp91phox and SOD1 mRNA expressions in bladder tissues were markedly higher in obese mice compared with lean group. In addition, ROS levels in bladder tissues and serum lipid peroxidation (TBARS assay) were markedly higher in obese compared with lean mice, all of which were reduced by resveratrol treatment. In lean group, resveratrol had no effect in any parameter evaluated. Our results show that two-week therapy of obese mice with resveratrol reduces the systemic and bladder oxidative stress, and greatly ameliorated the cystometry alterations and in vitro bladder overactivity. Resveratrol treatment could be an option to prevent obesity-associated overactive bladder.

  9. Arthritis: joints inflamed.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    ARTHRITIS IS a generic term for inflammatory joint disease. There are various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Arthritis can be a chronic debilitating condition or a transient effect of bacterial or viral infections. As a chronic condition, arthritis can cause loss of quality of life, disability and, with rheumatoid disease, early death. The economic burden of arthritis, in terms of management and loss of productivity due to disability, is high and set to increase with the ageing population. Recent advances in our understanding of the causes and progression of a number of forms of arthritis have raised hopes of better management and possible remission. Pharmacotherapy has moved from symptom management to addressing underlying disease processes. However, therapies that prevent or cure arthritis remain elusive. Current care for people with arthritis relies on a multidisciplinary approach and substantial pharmacological intervention. Nurses have a key role to play in guiding patients through treatment, ensuring they receive optimal therapy to reduce the impact of arthritis and its management on their lives.

  10. Intraspinal stimulation for bladder voiding in cats before and after chronic spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikov, Victor; Bullara, Leo; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2007-12-01

    The long-term objective of this study is to develop neural prostheses for people with spinal cord injuries who are unable to voluntarily control their bladder. This feasibility study was performed in 22 adult cats. We implanted an array of microelectrodes into locations in the sacral spinal cord that are involved in the control of micturition reflexes. The effect of microelectrode stimulation was studied under light Propofol anesthesia at monthly intervals for up to 14 months. We found that electrical stimulation in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus at S2 level or in adjacent ventrolateral white matter produced bladder contractions insufficient for inducing voiding, while stimulation at or immediately dorsal to the dorsal gray commissure at S1 level produced strong (at least 20 mmHg) bladder contractions as well as strong (at least 40 mm Hg) external urethral sphincter relaxation, resulting in bladder voiding in 14 animals. In a subset of three animals, spinal cord transection was performed. For several months after the transection, intraspinal stimulation continued to be similarly or even more effective in inducing the bladder voiding as before the transection. We speculate that in the absence of the supraspinal connections, the plasticity in the local spinal circuitry played a role in the improved responsiveness to intraspinal stimulation.

  11. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... of underactive bladder: Full bladder and possibly urine leakage Inability to tell when the bladder is full ... Constant urine leakage can cause skin to break down and lead to pressure sores Kidney damage may occur if the bladder ...

  12. Efficacy of sacral neuromodulation in treating chronic pain related to painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Devjit

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sacral neuromodulation in treating chronic pelvic pain related to Painful bladder syndrome/Interstitial-cystitis. Design: The databases searched were MEDLINE and EMBASE [1950- Nov 2011]. Additional searches were performed on the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews (CDSR), Scopus, CINAHL, BIOSIS, The Cochrane controlled trials register, the science citation index, TRIP DATABASE. Results: Overall 70.8% or 170/244 patients were successful at the trial stage. The only randomized controlled trial reported a decrease in Visual analogue pain scores of 49% (7.9 to 4.0) for sacral nerve stimulation [SNS] and 29%(4.5 to 3.2) for pudendal nerve stimulation [PNS] at 6 months follow up. Nine observational studies reported a decrease in pain scores/decrease in pain medications at long term follow up following permanent sacral neuromodulation. One study showed an 80% improvement in Global response assessment score. Conclusion: The results from the randomised controlled trial and case series/case reports demonstrate a reduction of pain symptoms of Painful bladder syndrome following sacral neuromodulation PMID:23225919

  13. Malakoplakia of the Urinary Bladder in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Under Ibrutinib Therapy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sachanas, Sotirios; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Karouzakis, Petros; Koulieris, Efstathios; Moschogiannis, Maria; Kalpadakis, Christina; Yiakoumis, Xanthi; Rontogianni, Dimitra

    2016-09-01

    Malakoplakia, a rare granulomatous disease of infectious etiology, is commonly observed in immunocompromised patients. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by profound immune dysregulation resulting in significant infection-related morbidity and mortality, and several drugs used in CLL treatment have a severe immunosuppressive effect. Ibrutinib, has become a new standard-of-care in patients with CLL, especially for those harboring unfavorable genetic characteristics such as 17 p deletion, with however, unknown long-term immunological consequences. Here we report a case of a patient with CLL with 17 p deletion diagnosed with malakoplakia of the urinary bladder under ibrutinib therapy who developed severe hypogammaglobulinemia during treatment administration. Presumably, ibrutinib might contribute to the development of malakoplakia on the grounds of induced immunosuppression. This case report highlights the need for regular assessment of immunogammaglobulin adequacy during treatment with ibrutinib, considering that it should be given on a permanent basis. PMID:27630324

  14. Painful Bladder Filling and Painful Urgency Are Distinct Characteristics in Men and Women with Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes – A MAPP Research Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. Henry; Krieger, John N.; Pontari, Michel A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Hou, Xiaoling; Landis, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe bladder-associated symptoms in patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS) and to correlate these symptoms with urologic, non-urologic, psychosocial, and quality of life measures. Methods Participants were 233 women and 191 men with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome or chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in a multi-center study. They completed a battery of measures, including items asking if their pain worsened with bladder filling (“painful filling”) or if their urge to urinate was due to pain, pressure, or discomfort (“painful urgency”). Participants were categorized into 3 groups: 1) “both” painful filling and painful urgency, 2) “either” painful filling or painful urgency, or 3) “neither.” Results Seventy-five percent of men and 88% of women were categorized as “both” or “either.” These bladder characteristics were associated with more severe urologic symptoms (increased pain, frequency, urgency), higher somatic symptom burden, depression, and worse quality of life (all p<0.01, 3-group trend test). A gradient effect was observed across groups (both > either > neither). Compared to those in the “neither” group, men categorized as “both” or “either” reported more frequent UCPPS symptom flares, catastrophizing, and irritable bowel syndrome, and women categorized as “both” or “either” were more likely to have negative affect and chronic fatigue syndrome. Conclusions Men and women with bladder symptoms characterized as painful filling or painful urgency had more severe urologic symptoms, more generalized symptoms, and worse quality of life than participants who reported neither characteristic, suggesting that these symptom characteristics might represent important subsets of UCPPS patients. PMID:26192257

  15. Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  16. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... removing the rest of the bladder Chemotherapy or immunotherapy placed directly into the bladder Stage II and ... IV), chemotherapy is usually given by vein (intravenously). IMMUNOTHERAPY Bladder cancers are often treated with immunotherapy. In ...

  17. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  18. Caudal clonidine-bupivicaine block with bladder hydrodistension: a novel combined treatment for the painful bladder.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Heidi; Stoneham, Mark; Frampton, Claire; Noble, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a new combination procedure consisting of bladder hydrodistension with clonidine-bupivicaine caudal block for the symptomatic relief of bladder pain. They report this new technique whereby patients who had tried multiple forms of therapy with little response, including bladder hydrodistension under general anaesthesia for their chronic pelvic bladder pain, responded to this novel combination therapy. PMID:22696635

  19. The defunctionalized bladder.

    PubMed

    Adeyoju, A B; Lynch, T H; Thornhill, J A

    1998-01-01

    Supravesical urinary diversion without cystectomy is a common procedure performed to manage a variety of lower urinary tract pathologies. The purpose of this article is to review the complications associated with the bladder left in situ and to relate this to the female patient. Complications related to the defunctionalized bladder include pyocystis, hemorrhage, pain/spasm and neoplastic transformation. The defunctionalized bladder also has implications for sexual function, pregnancy and undiversion. The risk factors for complications are chronic infection, inadequate drainage, interstitial cystitis and previous irradiation. The incidence of neoplastic change in the defunctionalized bladder is low, but long-term follow-up is advised, as carcinoma could develop many decades after diversion. Sexual function following urinary diversion is better preserved when the bladder is retained.

  20. Chronically symptomatic patients with undetectable gall bladder on ultrasonography could benefit from early cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Stephen D; Blackburn, Simon C; Adewole, Victoria A; Mahomed, Anies A

    2013-01-01

    90 percent of symptomatic patients undergoing cholecystectomy have cholelithiasis with 10% categorized as asymptomatic cholecystitis. In both instances, the gallbladder is evident on ultrasonography. In children with symptomatic biliary dyspepsia, the decision to proceed to cholecystectomy is made difficult if choleliths are not seen on ultrasonography. This decision is made even more difficult if the gallbladder itself is not seen on repeated imaging. In a cohort of 54 cholecystectomies, 3 cases, with recurrent right upper quadrant pain and undetectable gallbladders on repeat ultrasonography, were identified. After prolonged observation all underwent successful cholecystectomy. Histology demonstrated a markedly fibrotic and thickened gallbladder in all. Given this experience, we suggest that nonvisibility of the gallbladder, in fact, maybe be a feature of a chronic acalculous cholecystitis. We advise consideration of cholecystectomy for chronic biliary dyspepsia where repeat ultrasonography fails to demonstrate a gallbladder. PMID:23401761

  1. Chronic Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronic. Chronic bronchitis is one type of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The inflamed bronchial tubes produce a lot of mucus. This leads to coughing and difficulty breathing. Cigarette smoking is the most ... diagnose chronic bronchitis, your doctor will look at your signs ...

  2. Mechanical small bowel obstruction due to an inflamed appendix wrapping around the last loop of ileum.

    PubMed

    Assenza, M; Ricci, G; Bartolucci, P; Modini, C

    2005-01-01

    Acute apendicitis rarely presents with a clinical picture of mechanical small-bowel obstruction. The Authors report a case of this inusual clinical occurrence, arised like a complication of a common disease, characterized by a chronically inflamed appendix (mucocele) wrapping around the last loop of ileum that produced volvolus and strangulation. The few similar cases reported in the literature are moreover reviewed.

  3. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  4. Radiation Synovectomy: an effective alternative treatment for inflamed small joints

    PubMed Central

    Karavida, N; Notopoulos, A

    2010-01-01

    An inflamed painful joint is one of the most common indications for the patient to be referred to a rheumatologist or an orthopedician. In relation to the aetiology, the therapeutic approach might be systemic, local or a combination of them in some cases, always with the thought of balancing risk with benefit for the patient. In all cases, independently of the cause, the goal of therapy is to improve the quality of life through the reduction of pain, improvement of mobility and preservation of function. Nuclear Medicine has to offer Radiosynoviorthesis, an effective alternative procedure for treating inflamed small joints. Various radionuclides are available for radiosynoviorthesis. Their selection depends on the size of the joint to be treated. Small joints are mainly treated with [169Er] erbium under a fluoroscopic or sonographic guidance, usually with a simultaneous instillation of a corticoid. Candidates for radiosynoviorthesis should have been under a six-month systemic treatment without encouraging results or should have undergone at least one unsuccessful intra-articular injection of a long acting glucocorticoid. Since 1973, when [169Er] erbium was firstly suggested as a therapeutic agent for radiosynoviorthesis of the finger joints, there has been quite enough experience in its' application. It has been found to be cost effective in providing long term relief of pain and deformity of the inflamed joints in comparison to other therapeutic approaches. Additionally, there is no radiation risk and can be performed on an out patient basis. Therefore it can stand as an effective alternative procedure for treating early stages of chronic synovitis in RA (rheumatoid arthritis) patients, with minor damage of the cartilage and the adjacent bones, and for synovitis secondary to inflammatory arthropathies. PMID:20411055

  5. MORTALITY OF GASWORKERS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CANCERS OF THE LUNG AND BLADDER, CHRONIC BRONCHITIS, AND PNEUMOCONIOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R.; Fisher, R. E. W.; Gammon, E. J.; Gunn, W.; Hughes, G. O.; Tyrer, F. H.; Wilson, W.

    1965-01-01

    were very small. The death rate from cancer of the bladder in class A was four times that in class C, but the total number of deaths was only 14. Five deaths were attributed to pneumoconiosis, four of which occurred in bricklayers (class B). One death from cancer of the scrotum occurred in a retort house worker. For other causes of death the mortality rates were similar to or lower than the corresponding national rates. Examination of the data separately for each area Board showed that the excess mortality from lung cancer and chronic bronchitis in retort house workers persisted in each area. For two Boards the mortality from other causes was close to that recorded for other men living in the same region; in the other two Boards it was substantially lower. A comparison between the mortality of men who worked in horizontal retort houses and of those who worked in vertical houses suggested that the risk of lung cancer was greater in the horizontal houses and the risk of bronchitis was greater in the vertical houses, the differences being, however, not statistically significant. In the light of these and other data, it is concluded that exposure to products of coal carbonization can give rise to cancer of the lung and to bronchitis, and probably also to cancer of the bladder. A risk of pneumoconiosis from work on the repair and setting of retorts is confirmed. PMID:14261702

  6. Bladder Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... life (the person’s level of health, comfort, and happiness). In fact, people with bladder problems may have a lower quality of life than people with diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Bladder problems ...

  7. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SM. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 89. Sharma R, Dill CE, Gelman DY. Urinary ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemicals. Studies suggest that chronic bladder inflammation, a parasitic infection called schistosomiasis, and some medications used to treat ... Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) American Cancer ...

  9. Biomimetic proteolipid vesicles for targeting inflamed tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, R.; Corbo, C.; Martinez, J. O.; Taraballi, F.; Evangelopoulos, M.; Minardi, S.; Yazdi, I. K.; Zhao, P.; De Rosa, E.; Sherman, M. B.; de Vita, A.; Toledano Furman, N. E.; Wang, X.; Parodi, A.; Tasciotti, E.

    2016-09-01

    A multitude of micro- and nanoparticles have been developed to improve the delivery of systemically administered pharmaceuticals, which are subject to a number of biological barriers that limit their optimal biodistribution. Bioinspired drug-delivery carriers formulated by bottom-up or top-down strategies have emerged as an alternative approach to evade the mononuclear phagocytic system and facilitate transport across the endothelial vessel wall. Here, we describe a method that leverages the advantages of bottom-up and top-down strategies to incorporate proteins derived from the leukocyte plasma membrane into lipid nanoparticles. The resulting proteolipid vesicles--which we refer to as leukosomes--retained the versatility and physicochemical properties typical of liposomal formulations, preferentially targeted inflamed vasculature, enabled the selective and effective delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed tissues, and reduced phlogosis in a localized model of inflammation.

  10. Biomimetic proteolipid vesicles for targeting inflamed tissues.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, R; Corbo, C; Martinez, J O; Taraballi, F; Evangelopoulos, M; Minardi, S; Yazdi, I K; Zhao, P; De Rosa, E; Sherman, M B; De Vita, A; Toledano Furman, N E; Wang, X; Parodi, A; Tasciotti, E

    2016-09-01

    A multitude of micro- and nanoparticles have been developed to improve the delivery of systemically administered pharmaceuticals, which are subject to a number of biological barriers that limit their optimal biodistribution. Bioinspired drug-delivery carriers formulated by bottom-up or top-down strategies have emerged as an alternative approach to evade the mononuclear phagocytic system and facilitate transport across the endothelial vessel wall. Here, we describe a method that leverages the advantages of bottom-up and top-down strategies to incorporate proteins derived from the leukocyte plasma membrane into lipid nanoparticles. The resulting proteolipid vesicles-which we refer to as leukosomes-retained the versatility and physicochemical properties typical of liposomal formulations, preferentially targeted inflamed vasculature, enabled the selective and effective delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed tissues, and reduced phlogosis in a localized model of inflammation. PMID:27213956

  11. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  12. Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic☆

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Germolec, Dori R.; Borja-Aburto, Víctor H.; Contreras-Ruiz, José; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Del Razo, Luz M.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAsIII, MAsV, DMAsIII, DMAsV). This study examines the relationship between TGF-α concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-α in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-α concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-α levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areas with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-α concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p<0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-α than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p=0.003). These results suggest that TGF-α in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas. PMID:17267001

  13. Chronic arsenic exposure increases TGFalpha concentration in bladder urothelial cells of Mexican populations environmentally exposed to inorganic arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Germolec, Dori R.; Borja-Aburto, Victor H.; Contreras-Ruiz, Jose; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Razo, Luz M. del

    2007-08-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a well-established carcinogen and human exposure has been associated with a variety of cancers including those of skin, lung, and bladder. High expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-{alpha}) has associated with local relapses in early stages of urinary bladder cancer. iAs exposures are at least in part determined by the rate of formation and composition of iAs metabolites (MAs{sup III}, MAs{sup V}, DMAs{sup III}, DMAs{sup V}). This study examines the relationship between TGF-{alpha} concentration in exfoliated bladder urothelial cells (BUC) separated from urine and urinary arsenic species in 72 resident women (18-51 years old) from areas exposed to different concentrations of iAs in drinking water (2-378 ppb) in central Mexico. Urinary arsenic species, including trivalent methylated metabolites were measured by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method. The concentration of TGF-{alpha} in BUC was measured using an ELISA assay. Results show a statistically significant positive correlation between TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC and each of the six arsenic species present in urine. The multivariate linear regression analyses show that the increment of TGF-{alpha} levels in BUC was importantly associated with the presence of arsenic species after adjusting by age, and presence of urinary infection. People from areas with high arsenic exposure had a significantly higher TGF-{alpha} concentration in BUC than people from areas of low arsenic exposure (128.8 vs. 64.4 pg/mg protein; p < 0.05). Notably, exfoliated cells isolated from individuals with skin lesions contained significantly greater amount of TGF-{alpha} than cells from individuals without skin lesions: 157.7 vs. 64.9 pg/mg protein (p = 0.003). These results suggest that TGF-{alpha} in exfoliated BUC may serve as a susceptibility marker of adverse health effects on epithelial tissue in arsenic-endemic areas.

  14. Phage-display library biopanning and bioinformatic analysis yielded a high-affinity peptide to inflamed vascular endothelium both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Liu, Chenwu; Niu, Maochang; Hu, Yonghe; Guo, Mingyang; Zhang, Jun; Luo, Yong; Yuan, Weili; Yang, Mei; Yun, Mingdong; Guo, Linling; Yan, Jiao; Liu, Defang; Liu, Jinghua; Jiang, Yong

    2014-01-28

    Vascular inflammation is considered the primary pathological condition occurring in many chronic diseases. To detect the inflamed endothelium via imaging analysis or guide the drug to target lesions is therefore important for early diagnosis and treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases. In this study, we obtained a novel peptide NTTTH through high throughout biopanning and bioinformatic analysis. In vitro studies indicated that NTTTH homologs could especially target inflamed vascular endothelial cells, as imaging quantitative analysis indicated that the mean of integrated optical density (MIOD) and mean of stained area (MSA) were significantly higher versus control (P<0.05). In vivo studies showed that, after intravenous injection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled NTTTH homologs into the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed mice for 30min, NTTTH homologs were distributed in highly vascularized and inflamed organs like liver and kidney. As a control, little fluorescence could be detected in mice injected with EGFP alone. Cryosection showed that NTTTH homologs especially targeted inflamed vasculatures but not normal ones. We did not detect fluorescence signal in either normal or inflamed mice which were injected with EGFP alone. The results suggested the role of NTTTH homologs in guiding the targeted binding of EGFP to inflamed vasculature and the potential usage for imaging detection and drug delivery.

  15. MicroRNA expression in inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues from Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yorimasa; Matsui, Sari; Kato, Ayako; Zhou, Liming; Nakayama, Yohei; Takai, Hideki

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by specific bacteria and viruses. Local, systemic, and environmental factors affect the rate of disease progression. Immune responses to bacterial products, and the subsequent production of inflammatory cytokines, are crucial in the destruction of periodontal tissue. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs that control various cell processes by negatively regulating protein-coding genes. In this study, we compared miRNA expression in inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues from Japanese dental patients. Total RNAs were isolated from inflamed and noninflamed gingival tissues. miRNA expression profiles were examined by an miRNA microarray, and the data were analyzed by GeneSpring GX, Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, and the TargetScan databases. Observed miRNA expression levels in inflamed gingiva were confirmed by real-time PCR. The three most overexpressed (by >2.72-fold) miRNAs were hsa-miR-150, hsa-miR-223, and hsa-miR-200b, and the three most underexpressed (by <0.39-fold) miRNAs were hsa-miR-379, hsa-miR-199a-5p, and hsa-miR-214. In IPA analysis, hsa-miR-150, hsa-miR-223, and hsa-miR-200b were associated with inflammatory disease, organismal injury, abnormalities, urological disease, and cancer. The present findings suggest that miRNAs are associated with chronic periodontitis lesions in Japanese.

  16. No tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia in presence of opioid expression in inflamed synovia.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, C; Pflüger, M; Yassouridis, A; Hoelzl, J; Lehrberger, K; Welte, C; Hassan, A H

    1996-01-01

    Pain treatment with centrally acting opiates is limited by tolerance. Tolerance is a decreasing effect of a drug with prolonged administration of that drug or of a related (e.g., endogenous) compound acting at the same receptor. This is often associated with a downregulation of receptors. In peripheral inflamed tissue, both locally expressed opioid peptides and morphine can produce powerful analgesia mediated by similar populations of opioid receptors. We hypothesized that the chronic presence of endogenous opioids in inflamed joints might convey downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors and tolerance to the analgesic effects of intraarticular morphine. We assessed these effects after arthroscopic surgery in patients with and without histologically verified synovial cellular infiltration, and we examined synovial opioid peptides and opioid receptors by immunocytochemistry and autoradiography, respectively. We found that, despite an abundance of opioid-containing cells in pronounced synovitis, morphine is at least as effective as in patients without such cellular infiltrations, and there is no major downregulation of peripheral opioid receptors. Thus, opioids expressed in inflamed tissue do not produce tolerance to peripheral morphine analgesia. Tolerance may be less pronounced for peripherally than for centrally acting opioids, which provides a promising perspective for the treatment of chronic pain in arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:8698872

  17. Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    White, Nicola; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a condition affecting millions of individuals in the United States. Anticholinergics are the mainstay of treatment. Bladder botulinum toxin injections have shown an improvement in symptoms of OAB equivalent to anticholinergic therapy. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation can decrease symptoms of urinary frequency and urge incontinence. Sacral neuromodulation for refractory patients has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of OAB, urge incontinence, and urinary retention. Few randomized, head-to-head comparisons of the different available alternatives exist; however, patients now have increasing options to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

  18. Urinary Metabolomics Identifies a Molecular Correlate of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome in a Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network Cohort.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kaveri S; Crowley, Jan R; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Lucia, M Scott; Lai, H Henry; Andriole, Gerald L; Hooton, Thomas M; Mullins, Chris; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2016-05-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a poorly understood syndrome affecting up to 6.5% of adult women in the U.S. The lack of broadly accepted objective laboratory markers for this condition hampers efforts to diagnose and treat this condition. To identify biochemical markers for IC/BPS, we applied mass spectrometry-based global metabolite profiling to urine specimens from a cohort of female IC/BPS subjects from the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network. These analyses identified multiple metabolites capable of discriminating IC/BPS and control subjects. Of these candidate markers, etiocholan-3α-ol-17-one sulfate (Etio-S), a sulfoconjugated 5-β reduced isomer of testosterone, distinguished female IC/BPS and control subjects with a sensitivity and specificity >90%. Among IC/BPS subjects, urinary Etio-S levels are correlated with elevated symptom scores (symptoms, pelvic pain, and number of painful body sites) and could resolve high- from low-symptom IC/BPS subgroups. Etio-S-associated biochemical changes persisted through 3-6months of longitudinal follow up. These results raise the possibility that an underlying biochemical abnormality contributes to symptoms in patients with severe IC/BPS. PMID:27322470

  19. Copper-67 labeled porphyrin localization in inflamed tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.A.; Mercer-Smith, J.A.; Norman, J.K.; Bullington, K.P.; Roberts, J.C.; Lavellee, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    A series of experiments compared the uptake of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl) porphinato (/sup 67/Cu) copper(II), /sup 67/CuTCPP, by the lymph nodes of inflamed and two sets or control rats. The results demonstrate that /sup 67/CuTCPP localizes in greater concentration in inflamed lymph nodes than in noninflamed control lymph nodes. This enhanced uptake of /sup 67/CuTCPP by inflamed lymph nodes was 3.6 times greater than was the uptake by control lymph nodes. A time course study demonstrated that the uptake of /sup 67/CuTCPP inflamed lymph nodes reached the maximum level by 24 hours post-injection of /sup 67/CuTCPP and remained constant throughout the 96 hours examined. It was also found that the uptake of /sup 67/CuTCPP by inflamed lymph nodes was not exclusively dependent upon an increase in the weight of inflamed lymph nodes. These studies show that /sup 67/CuTCPP has potential as a lymphoscintigraphy agent. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Toll-like Receptor 4 and Comorbid Pain in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain Research Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Schrepf, Andrew; Bradley, Catherine S.; O'Donnell, Michael; Luo, Yi; Harte, Steven E.; Kreder, Karl; Lutgendorf, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS) is a condition characterized by pelvic pain and urinary symptoms. Some IC/BPS patients have pain confined to the pelvic region, while others suffer widespread pain. Inflammatory processes have previously been linked to pelvic pain in IC/BPS, but their association with widespread pain in IC/BPS has not been characterized. Methods Sixty-six women meeting criteria for IC/BPS completed self-report measures of pain as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP), collected 3 days of saliva for cortisol assays, and provided blood samples. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 2 and 4 agonists and cytokines were measured in supernatant; IL-6 was also measured in plasma. Associations between inflammatory variables and the likelihood of endorsing extra-pelvic pain, or the presence of a comorbid syndrome, were tested by logistic regression and General Linear Models, respectively. A subset of patients (n=32) completed Quantitative Sensory Testing. Results A one standard deviation increase in TLR-4 inflammatory response was associated with a 1.59 greater likelihood of endorsing extra-pelvic pain (p = .019). Participants with comorbid syndromes also had higher inflammatory responses to TLR-4 stimulation in PBMCs (p = .016). Lower pressure pain thresholds were marginally associated with higher TLR-4 inflammatory responses (p = .062), and significantly associated with higher IL-6 in plasma (p = .031). Conclusions TLR-4 inflammatory responses in PBMCs are a marker of widespread pain in IC/BPS, and should be explored in other conditions characterized by medically unexplained pain. PMID:25771510

  1. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... The JPB Foundation 2016 Bladder Cancer ... 2016 Young Investigator Awardees The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) has announced the recipients of the 2016 ...

  2. Bladder Retraining

    MedlinePlus

    ... IC in Other Languages Associated Conditions Allergies and Sensitivities Celiac Disease Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Chronic Prostatitis Constipation ... check out the information about IC and food sensitivities . There are also over-the-counter products and ...

  3. The overactive bladder progression to underactive bladder hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Michael B

    2014-09-01

    The overactive bladder (OAB) is a well-known and common urologic condition. However, the apparent opposite syndrome to the OAB, the underactive bladder (UAB), remains an enigma. Underactive bladder syndrome is complex condition that shares symptoms with other prevalent urologic diagnoses. UAB is not a pure condition-it is not the result of any single factor, but rather, it is multifactorial. As a result, UAB may overlap with OAB, bladder outlet obstruction, or even occur with no symptoms or associated diseases. To make it yet more challenging, in the elderly, detrusor hyperreflexia/impaired contractility (DHIC) is a condition that has the pathological elements of both OAB and UAB and is also common. I hypothesize that UAB and OAB may not be an entirely separate disease entity. Instead, chronic untreated or treatment refractory OAB--due to neurological diseases such as diabetes, bladder outlet obstruction or aging sarcopenia and frailty--may progress to DHIC and, finally, UAB. The progression of OAB to UAB hypothesis suggests that early education, behavioral modification and medical treatment may alter and/or prevent progression to UAB.

  4. The MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage).

    PubMed

    Orme, R L; Nordlund, J J; Barich, L; Brown, T

    1990-07-01

    We describe a 42-year-old man with features of both Behçet's disease and relapsing polychondritis. The term MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage) has previously been used to describe similarly affected patients. We discuss the diagnostic criteria and pathogenetic mechanisms.

  5. Expression of the Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 4 in Intact and Inflamed Pulmonary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varecza, Zoltán; Elekes, Krisztián; László, Terézia; Perkecz, Anikó; Pintér, Erika; Sándor, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János; Keszthelyi, Dániel; Szabó, Árpád; Sándor, Katalin; Molnár, Tamás F.; Szántó, Zalán; Pongrácz, Judit E.; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatin released from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of the lung during endotoxin-induced murine pneumonitis inhibits inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, presumably via somatostatin receptor subtype 4 (sst4). The goal of the present study was to identify sst4 receptors in mouse and human lungs and to reveal its inflammation-induced alterations with real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. In non-inflamed mouse and human lungs, mRNA expression and immunolocalization of sst4 are very similar. They are present on bronchial epithelial, vascular endothelial, and smooth-muscle cells. The sst4 receptor protein in the mouse lung significantly increases 24 hr after intranasal endotoxin administration as well as in response to 3 months of whole-body cigarette smoke exposure, owing to the infiltrating sst4-positivite mononuclear cells and neutrophils. In the chronically inflamed human lung, the large number of activated macrophages markedly elevate sst4 mRNA levels, although there is no change in acute purulent pneumonia, in which granulocytes accumulate. Despite mouse granulocytes, human neutrophils do not show sst4 immunopositivity. We provide the first evidence for the expression, localization, and inflammation-induced alterations of sst4 receptors in murine and human lungs. Inasmuch as tissue distribution of this receptor is highly similar, extrapolation of murine experimental results to human conditions might be possible. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:1127–1137, 2009) PMID:19687471

  6. MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    Epidemiological studies have shown a positive association between chronic exposure to chlorinated drinking water and human cancer, particularly of the urinary bladder. MX (3- chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydrox...

  7. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  8. Nanoparticles enhance therapeutic outcome in inflamed skin therapy.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mottaleb, Mona M A; Moulari, Brice; Beduneau, Arnaud; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2012-09-01

    Inflammatory reactions of the skin are a major therapeutic field; however, drug delivery is nowadays only related to the use of classical formulations like ointments and creams. Here, we report the behaviour of polymeric submicron particles (NP) for selective drug delivery to the inflamed skin. NPs of nominal diameters from 50 to 1000 nm were administered to an experimental dithranol-induced dermatitis inflammation model in mice ears. The results revealed that smaller particles had an around 3-fold stronger and deeper penetration tendency with a preferential accumulation in inflamed skin hair follicles and sebaceous glands (2.8 ± 0.6% and 2.3 ± 0.4% for NP100 and NP50 compared to 0.84 ± 0.04% and 0.92 ± 0.02% for the same sizes on healthy skin). Betamethasone loaded NP confirmed the size dependency by being therapeutically more efficient from histological examination and measurement of different inflammatory markers in the skin (myeloperoxidase activity of untreated control, 1.2 ± 0.4; NP1000, 1.0 ± 0.4; NP100, 0.5 ± 0.2, all U/mg). This approach holds a high potential for a selective therapy to the inflamed skin by increasing the local intradermal availability with simultaneous reduction in systemic adverse effects.

  9. The neurogenic bladder: introducing four contributions.

    PubMed

    Proesmans, Willem

    2008-04-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction in children is frequently seen in patients with meningomyelocele (MMC). The disorder carries a high risk for all kinds of complications, with renal damage being the most important. More than 95% of MMC patients have a neurogenic bladder, the paramount manifestation of which is a disturbed coordination between detrusor and sphincter muscles. This vesicourethral dysfunction leads to defective filling and emptying of the urinary bladder. Voiding at will is almost never possible. According to the location and extent of the neural tube lesion, patients have either an atonic or a hypertonic pelvic floor and either an atonic or a hypertonic detrusor, leading to four classic combinations. Hypertonic sphincter and detrusor hyperactivity lead to the most dangerous form of neurogenic bladder, referred to as the "unsafe" bladder. The presence of residual urine in a high-pressure container causes either decompensation of the detrusor with vesicoureteral reflux or deterioration of the bladder wall with hypertrophy and stiffness resulting in uterovesical obstruction. The subsequent insufficient drainage of the upper urinary tract leads to decompensation of the ureters and finally to chronic renal disease, the process being accelerated by urinary tract infections. The aim of treatment is to restore as much as possible both essential functions: urine storage and timely emptying of the reservoir. What should and can be achieved is a more or less adequate, low-pressure, functional capacity of the bladder that is emptied as completely as possible by clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). MMC leads to the prototype of neurogenic bladder in childhood. What we know and what we do for MMC patients can roughly be applied to all other forms of neurogenic bladder, either congenital or acquired.

  10. Bone single photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography disclosing chronic uterine perforation with intrauterine device migration into the anterior wall of the bladder: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Extraosseous uptake of 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate is a common situation of variable clinical relevance. Case presentation A 52-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our department for breast cancer staging. A 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate bone scan was performed and showed focal pelvic hyperfixation that disclosed intrauterine device migration into the anterior wall of the bladder on single photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography. Conclusion This observation confirms the major role of single photon emission computed tomography with computed tomography in achieving an exact diagnosis. PMID:23759143

  11. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  12. Analgesic effects evoked by a CCR2 antagonist or an anti-CCL2 antibody in inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Llorián-Salvador, María; Pevida, Marta; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Lastra, Ana; Fernández-García, María-Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine CCL2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a molecule that in addition to its well-established role in chemotaxis can also act as nociceptor sensitizer. The upregulation of this chemokine in inflamed tissues could suggest its involvement in inflammatory hypernociception. Thus, we have measured CCL2 levels in mice with acute or chronic inflammation due to the intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), respectively, and we have studied whether inflammatory hyperalgesia or allodynia could be attenuated by blocking CCR2 receptors or neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody. A remarkable increase in CCL2 concentration was detected by ELISA in paw homogenates coming from carrageenan- or CFA-inflamed mice, being its expression mainly localized in macrophages, as shown by immunohistochemical assays. The s.c. (0.3-3 mg/kg) or i.pl. (0.3-3 μg) administration of the CCR2 antagonist, RS 504393, dose dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia measured in acutely or chronically inflamed mice, whereas s.c. administration of this drug did not reduce inflammatory mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, the inhibition of inflammatory hyperalgesia after the administration of an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.1-1 μg; i.pl.) suggests that CCL2 could be the endogenous chemokine responsible for CCR2-mediated hyperalgesic effects. Besides, the acute administration of the highest antihyperalgesic dose of RS 504393 assayed did not reduce paw tumefaction or modify the presence of inflammatory cells. These results indicate that the blockade of the CCL2/CCR2 system can counteract inflammatory hyperalgesia, being this antinociceptive effect unrelated to a decrease in the inflammatory reaction. PMID:26820818

  13. Analgesic effects evoked by a CCR2 antagonist or an anti-CCL2 antibody in inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Llorián-Salvador, María; Pevida, Marta; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Lastra, Ana; Fernández-García, María-Teresa; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine CCL2, also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is a molecule that in addition to its well-established role in chemotaxis can also act as nociceptor sensitizer. The upregulation of this chemokine in inflamed tissues could suggest its involvement in inflammatory hypernociception. Thus, we have measured CCL2 levels in mice with acute or chronic inflammation due to the intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), respectively, and we have studied whether inflammatory hyperalgesia or allodynia could be attenuated by blocking CCR2 receptors or neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody. A remarkable increase in CCL2 concentration was detected by ELISA in paw homogenates coming from carrageenan- or CFA-inflamed mice, being its expression mainly localized in macrophages, as shown by immunohistochemical assays. The s.c. (0.3-3 mg/kg) or i.pl. (0.3-3 μg) administration of the CCR2 antagonist, RS 504393, dose dependently inhibited thermal hyperalgesia measured in acutely or chronically inflamed mice, whereas s.c. administration of this drug did not reduce inflammatory mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, the inhibition of inflammatory hyperalgesia after the administration of an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.1-1 μg; i.pl.) suggests that CCL2 could be the endogenous chemokine responsible for CCR2-mediated hyperalgesic effects. Besides, the acute administration of the highest antihyperalgesic dose of RS 504393 assayed did not reduce paw tumefaction or modify the presence of inflammatory cells. These results indicate that the blockade of the CCL2/CCR2 system can counteract inflammatory hyperalgesia, being this antinociceptive effect unrelated to a decrease in the inflammatory reaction.

  14. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  15. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer ... in bladder cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  16. Calcifying nanoparticles associated encrusted urinary bladder cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Roque, Rod; Yasar, Uzay; Tomchin, Shayna B; Serrato, Jose M; Deem, Samuel G; Tierney, James P; Chang, Ho-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Encrusted cystitis is a subtype of chronic cystitis characterized by multiple calcifications in the form of plaques located in the interstitium of the urinary bladder mucosa and frequently associated with mucosal ulcers. It is a very rare disease of controversial etiology. Our transmission electron microscopy of the calcified plaques of encrusted cystitis has revealed that the smallest formed particles (elementary units) of these calcifications are electron-dense shells surrounding an electron lucent core, diagnostic of calcifying nanoparticles (previously called nanobacteria). We pioneer the notion that calcifying nanoparticles are the causative agents of encrusted urinary bladder cystitis. PMID:18990947

  17. Calcifying nanoparticles associated encrusted urinary bladder cystitis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Roque, Rod; Yasar, Uzay; Tomchin, Shayna B; Serrato, Jose M; Deem, Samuel G; Tierney, James P; Chang, Ho-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Encrusted cystitis is a subtype of chronic cystitis characterized by multiple calcifications in the form of plaques located in the interstitium of the urinary bladder mucosa and frequently associated with mucosal ulcers. It is a very rare disease of controversial etiology. Our transmission electron microscopy of the calcified plaques of encrusted cystitis has revealed that the smallest formed particles (elementary units) of these calcifications are electron-dense shells surrounding an electron lucent core, diagnostic of calcifying nanoparticles (previously called nanobacteria). We pioneer the notion that calcifying nanoparticles are the causative agents of encrusted urinary bladder cystitis. PMID:18990947

  18. Influence of myeloperoxidase on colon tumor occurrence in inflamed versus non-inflamed colons of ApcMin/+ mice☆

    PubMed Central

    Al-Salihi, Mazin; Reichert, Ethan; Fitzpatrick, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Control of colorectal cancer needs to be tailored to its etiology. Tumor promotion mechanisms in colitis-associated colon cancer differ somewhat from the mechanisms involved in hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer. Unlike sporadic or inherited tumors, some experimental models show that colitis-associated colon tumors do not require cyclooxygenase (COX) expression for progression, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which prevent sporadic or inherited colon cancer do not prevent colitis-associated colon cancer. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO), an ancestor of the COX isoenzymes, is a determinant of colitis-associated colon tumors in ApcMin/+ mice. During experimentally induced colitis, inhibition of MPO by resorcinol dampened colon tumor development. Conversely, in the bowels of ApcMin/+ mice without colitis, resorcinol administration or ‘knockout’ of MPO gene coincided with a slight, but discernible increase in colon tumor incidence. Acrolein, a by-product of MPO catalysis, formed a covalent adduct with the phosphatase tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor and enhanced the activity of the Akt kinase proto-oncogene in vitro and in vivo. Thus, MPO may be an important determinant of diet and inflammation on colon cancer risk via its effect on endogenous exposure to oxidants and acrolein. We propose a hypothetical model to explain an apparent dichotomy between colon tumor occurrence and MPO inhibition in inflamed versus non-inflamed colons. PMID:26262998

  19. Anticholinergic therapy for overactive bladder: a nicotinic modality?

    PubMed

    Toler, Steven M; Yohannes, Daniel; Lippiello, Patrick M; Chancellor, Michael B

    2013-09-01

    Until recently the treatment of Overactive Bladder (OAB) has primarily been aimed at mitigating hypercholinergic activity in the bladder via antagonism of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. However, antimuscarinic therapies have limited efficacy and significant side effects. It is now known that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes are expressed in the urothelium and on afferent nerve fibers in the bladder, and it is believed that these receptors serve to communicate urgency and facilitate voiding function. This presents the opportunity for an alternative to the antimuscarinic approach, one which involves inhibition of nAChRs in the bladder that are chronically overstimulated by acetylcholine. Specifically, we hypothesize that an orally administered nAChR-selective inhibitor with extensive renal elimination will result in higher local concentrations in the bladder and lower systemic exposure than current therapies, representing a novel targeted approach to the treatment of OAB with a more favorable side effect profile.

  20. Scientific Results from the FIRST Instrument Deployment to Cerro Toco, Chile and from the Flight of the INFLAME Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Cageao, Richard P.; Johnson, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Results from the FIRST and INFLAME infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometers are presented. These are comprehensive measurements of the far-IR spectrum (FIRST) and the net infrared fluxes within the atmosphere (INFLAME).

  1. Overactive bladder: strategies to ensure treatment compliance and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Prabhpreet; Wagg, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder is a common, debilitating condition for many patients who may benefit from pharmacological management of their condition. However, adherence to medication in this condition is markedly worse than other chronic medical conditions. This review explores what is known about persistence and the factors which influence medication adherence for overactive bladder, those factors that might be modifiable to improve adherence, and the measures the health care provider can take to optimize adherence to therapy and thereby improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27350744

  2. Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic and Definitive Therapeutic Tool in Cases of Inflamed Simple Lymphatic Cysts of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Sulieman, Ibnouf; Aftab, Zia; Ahmed, Ayman; Al-Mudares, Saif; Al Tarakji, Mohannad; Almuzrakchi, Ahmad; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are rare benign abdominal tumors. These cysts, especially those of lymphatic origin, very rarely become inflamed. The diagnosis of inflamed lymphatic cysts of the mesentery may be difficult. We herein report two cases of inflamed simple lymphatic cysts of the mesentery definitively diagnosed and excised by laparoscopy. PMID:26064760

  3. Botulinum Toxin A for Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Bin; Tai, Huai-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Birder, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A), derived from Clostridium botulinum, has been used clinically for several diseases or syndrome including chronic migraine, spasticity, focal dystonia and other neuropathic pain. Chronic pelvic or bladder pain is the one of the core symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). However, in the field of urology, chronic bladder or pelvic pain is often difficult to eradicate by oral medications or bladder instillation therapy. We are looking for new treatment modality to improve bladder pain or associated urinary symptoms such as frequency and urgency for patients with BPS/IC. Recent studies investigating the mechanism of the antinociceptive effects of BoNT A suggest that it can inhibit the release of peripheral neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators from sensory nerves. In this review, we will examine the evidence supporting the use of BoNTs in bladder pain from basic science models and review the clinical studies on therapeutic applications of BoNT for BPS/IC. PMID:27376330

  4. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Alis Kolter

    2007-02-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, painful bladder syndrome primarily found in women. Although the direct cause(s) of IC are unknown, several theories exist. Common symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, and pain. Treatment options include behavioral therapies, use of pharmacologic agents, and surgery. Patients benefit from prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatments. Important clinical features of IC in women including the pathology, common symptoms, and recommended evaluation and management strategies are reviewed.

  5. Urinary Incontinence: Bladder Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... following ways: Lengthen the amount of time between bathroom trips. Increase the amount of urine your bladder ... Kegel exercises may also help control urges. Scheduled bathroom trips: Some people control their incontinence by going ...

  6. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  7. Diagnosis of urinary bladder diseases in dogs by using two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Dinesh, Dehmiwal; Behl, S.M.; Singh, Prem; Tayal, Rishi; Pal, Madan; Chandolia, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to obtain and compare two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonographic images of the urinary bladder in different disease conditions. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducting on total 10clinical cases of the urinary bladder in dogs. The ultrasound (US) machine used for this study was 3D US machine (Nemio-XG: Toshiba, Japan) having a four-dimensional volumetric probe. Results: In the present study, the inflamed thickened wall was clearly visible with the distinction of different layers of the urinary bladder wall in some of the cases of cystitis using 2D ultrasonography. In 3D sonogram, the urinary bladder was visualized as a large anechoic structure with no distinction of different layers of the bladder wall. The cystoliths were clearly visible as hyperechoic structures with distal acoustic shadow in 2D sonogram and appeared as a bright echogenic area in 3D sonogram. In case of urinary bladder neoplasia in 2D ultrasonogram, the bladder lumen was found to be occluded with a large growth imaged as focal anechoic areas in the tissue of mixed echogenicity with small hyperechoic dots in this tissue parenchyma. In 3D ultrasonogram, a tissue of mixed echogenicity of pus was also observed. Conclusion: From the present study it was concluded that 2D and 3D ultrasonography is very helpful for diagnosis of different clinical conditions of the urinary bladder such as cystitis, cystoliths, and urinary bladder neoplasia. The cavity of urinary bladder was more clearly visualized in 3D ultrasonography, but the distinction of different layers of the bladder wall was visualized only in 2D ultrasonography. The distinct shadow of pus and cystoliths were visible in 2D ultrasonogram. The visualization of pus in 3D ultrasonography was done for the first time in present study. PMID:27047159

  8. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  9. Microcirculation and micromorphology of healthy and inflamed gingivae.

    PubMed

    Kerdvongbundit, Varunee; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Soo-Ampon, Surin; Hasegawa, Akira

    2003-09-01

    Inflammation changes the microcirculatory and micromorphological dynamics of human gingiva. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and a replica technique for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to examine the facial soft tissues of six maxillary anterior teeth, before and after treatment, in 12 patients exhibiting clinically healthy tissues and in 12 others with moderate gingivitis. All patients received oral hygiene instructions and scaling. The gingiva in the gingivitis group became healthy within 3 months after treatment. LDF results were recorded at the free gingivae, interdental gingivae, attached gingivae, and alveolar mucosae of the six maxillary anterior teeth. The gingival blood flows in the gingivitis group before treatment were significantly different from those in the healthy gingiva group. Flows were restored to the same level as the healthy gingiva, with no significant difference, at P > 0.01, 3 months after treatment. However, there were significant differences among sites during the same period. In addition, blood flow was reduced to a normal level after the inflammation subsided. Initially, the gingival morphology of the inflamed sites exhibited irregular free gingival margins, in contrast to that of healthy gingivae, which were characterized by rounded margins closely adapted to the tooth. One month post-treatment, the gingivae exhibited a wrinkled appearance, but they had reverted to normal micromorphology by 3 months post-treatment. The replica impression technique can be used to record gingival micromorphology both before and after reduction of inflammation.

  10. Modulation of leukocyte behavior by an inflamed extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Schor, H; Vaday, G G; Lider, O

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation is a response of the immune system to foreign insult or physical damage. Various cellular and humoral components of the immune system are recruited from the vascular system and are translocated through endothelium, and into extracellular matrix (ECM) compartments of inflamed tissues. This translocation is orchestrated by various types of accessory signals, in the form of soluble or complexed molecules, which evoke remarkable transitions in leukocyte activities. Recruited inflammatory cells give rise to mechanisms of migration, including the secretion of enzymes and other pro-inflammatory mediators and the alteration of their adhesive contacts with the ECM. Hence, migrating cells secrete enzymes, chemokines, and cytokines which interact with the ECM, and thereby, provide the cells with intrinsic signals for coordinating their responses. Resultant products of enzymatic modifications to the ECM microenvironment, such as cytokine- and ECM-derived molecules, may be also part of a cell-signaling mechanism that provides leukocytes with information about the nature of their inflammatory activity; such a mechanism may give the immune system data that can be cognitively interpreted for consequential activities. This article reviews the findings that support this notion and describe the dynamic interactions between participants of the inflammatory processes. PMID:11097214

  11. Modulation of adult-born neurons in the inflamed hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Belarbi, Karim; Rosi, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Throughout life new neurons are continuously added to the hippocampal circuitry involved with spatial learning and memory. These new cells originate from neural precursors in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, migrate into the granule cell layer, and integrate into neural networks encoding spatial and contextual information. This process can be influenced by several environmental and endogenous factors and is modified in different animal models of neurological disorders. Neuroinflammation, as defined by the presence of activated microglia, is a common key factor to the progression of neurological disorders. Analysis of the literature shows that microglial activation impacts not only the production, but also the migration and the recruitment of new neurons. The impact of microglia on adult-born neurons appears much more multifaceted than ever envisioned before, combining both supportive and detrimental effects that are dependent upon the activation phenotype and the factors being released. The development of strategies aimed to change microglia toward states that promote functional neurogenesis could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities against neurological disorders associated with cognitive deficits and neuroinflammation. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on how production, distribution, and recruitment of new neurons into behaviorally relevant neural networks are modified in the inflamed hippocampus. PMID:24046730

  12. The other bladder syndrome: underactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Minoru; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Detrusor underactivity, or underactive bladder (UAB), is defined as a contraction of reduced strength and/or duration resulting in prolonged bladder emptying and/or a failure to achieve complete bladder emptying within a normal time span. UAB can be observed in many neurologic conditions and myogenic failure. Diabetic cystopathy is the most important and inevitable disease developing from UAB, and can occur silently and early in the disease course. Careful neurologic and urodynamic examinations are necessary for the diagnosis of UAB. Proper management is focused on prevention of upper tract damage, avoidance of overdistension, and reduction of residual urine. Scheduled voiding, double voiding, al-blockers, and intermittent self-catheterization are the typical conservative treatment options. Sacral nerve stimulation may be an effective treatment option for UAB. New concepts such as stem cell therapy and neurotrophic gene therapy are being explored. Other new agents for UAB that act on prostaglandin E2 and EP2 receptors are currently under development. The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries that have a pipeline in urology and women's health may want to consider UAB as a potential target condition. Scientific counsel and review of the current pharmaceutical portfolio may uncover agents, including those in other therapeutic fields, that may benefit the management of UAB.

  13. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  14. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Pant-Purohit, Mukta; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Montironi, Rodolfo; MacLennan, Gregory T; Cheng, Liang

    2010-02-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (SCCUB) is a rare and aggressive cancer of the bladder. SCCUB is part of neuroendocrine family of tumors that affect several organ systems including respiratory, gastrointestinal and male and female genitourinary tract. SCCUB affect males predominantly with common risk factors include smoking, bladder calculi, bladder manipulation, and chronic cystitis. Prognosis of SCCUB remains poor due to high metastatic potential and lack of symptoms in earlier stages of the disease. Pathogenesis of the disease is linked to loss of genetic material, hypermethylation of tumor suppressors and at times amplification of the chromosomal regions carrying oncogenes. Majority of cases are treated with local resection of the tumor with neoadjuvant or adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Radiation therapy is used as alternative to radical cystectomy or as palliative measure. This article provides epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, histochemistry, and current management options for SCCUB. Furthermore we reviewed all recent studies involving advancement in targeted molecular therapy for neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:20017108

  15. Radiochemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ott, O J; Rödel, C; Weiss, C; Wittlinger, M; St Krause, F; Dunst, J; Fietkau, R; Sauer, R

    2009-09-01

    Standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is cystectomy. Multimodality treatment, including transurethral resection of the bladder tumour, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and deep regional hyperthermia, has been shown to produce survival rates comparable with those of cystectomy. With these programmes, cystectomy has been reserved for patients with incomplete response or local relapse. During the past two decades, organ preservation by multimodality treatment has been investigated in prospective series from single centres and co-operative groups, with more than 1000 patients included. Five-year overall survival rates in the range of 50-60% have been reported, and about three-quarters of the surviving patients maintained their bladder. Clinical criteria helpful in determining patients for bladder preservation include such variables as small tumour size (<5 cm), early tumour stage, a visibly and microscopically complete transurethral resection, absence of ureteral obstruction, and no evidence of pelvic lymph node metastases. On multivariate analysis, the completeness of transurethral resection of a bladder tumour was found to be one of the strongest prognostic factors for overall survival. Patients at greater risk of new tumour development after initial complete response are those with multifocal disease and extensive associated carcinoma in situ at presentation. Close co-ordination among all disciplines is required to achieve optimal results. Future investigations will focus on optimising radiation techniques, including all possibilities of radiosensitisation (e.g. concurrent radiochemotherapy, deep regional hyperthermia), and incorporating more effective systemic chemotherapy, and the proper selection of patients based on predictive molecular makers.

  16. General Information about Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  17. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN MOUSE BLADDER TISSUE IN RESPONSE TO INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic human exposures to high arsenic concentrations are associated with lung, skin, and bladder cancer. Considerable controversy exists concerning arsenic mode of action and low dose extrapolation. This investigation was designed to identify dose-response changes in gene expre...

  18. Similarities between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and vulvodynia: implications for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Moldwin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and vulvodynia are chronic pain syndromes that appear to be intertwined from the perspectives of embryology, pathology and epidemiology. These associations may account for similar responses to various therapies. PMID:26816866

  19. Ultrastructural evaluation of mesenchymal stem cells from inflamed periodontium in different in vitro conditions.

    PubMed

    Zaganescu, Raluca; Barbu Tudoran, Lucian; Pall, Emoke; Florea, Adrian; Roman, Alexandra; Soanca, Andrada; Mihaela Mihu, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed to observe the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from periodontal granulation tissue (gt) when manipulated ex vivo to induce three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (aggregates) formation as well as when seeded on two bone scaffolds of animal origin. Periodontal gt was chosen as a MSC source because of its availability, considering that it is eliminated as a waste material during conventional surgical therapies. 3D aggregates of cells were generated; they were grown for 3 and 7 days, respectively, and then prepared for transmission electron microscopic analysis. The two biomaterials were seeded for 72 h with gtMSCs and prepared for scanning electronic microscopic observation. The ultrastructural analysis of 3D spheroids remarked some differences between the inner and the outer cell layers, with a certain commitment observed at the inner cells. Both scaffolds showed a relatively smooth surface at low magnification. Macro- and micropores having a scarce distribution were observed on both bone substitutes. gtMSCs grew with relative difficulty on the biomaterials. After 72 h of proliferation, gtMSCs scarcely covered the surface of bovine bone scaffolds, demonstrating fibroblast-like or star-like shapes with elongated filiform extensions. Our results add other data on the possible usefulness of gtMSC and could question the current paradigm regarding the complete removal of chronically inflamed gts from the defects during periodontal surgeries. Until optimal protocols for ex vivo manipulation of MSCs are available for clinical settings, it is advisable to use biocompatible bone substitutes that allow the development of progenitor cells.

  20. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future. PMID:26327873

  1. The gall of subordination: changes in gall bladder function associated with social stress.

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Ryan L.; Blumer, Lawrence S.; Grober, Matthew S.

    2004-01-01

    Diverse physiological and behavioural mechanisms allow animals to effectively deal with stressors, but chronic activation of the stress axis can have severe consequences. We explored the effects of chronic social stress on agonistic behaviour and gall bladder function, a critical but widely neglected component of stress-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. Prolonged cohabitation with dominant individuals elicited behavioural modifications and dramatically increased bile retention in subordinate convict cichlid fish (Archocentrus nigrofasciatum). The key predictor of gall bladder hypertrophy was social subordination rather than status-related differences in food intake or body size. Stress-induced inhibition of gall bladder emptying could affect energy assimilation such that subordinate animals would not be able to effectively convert energy-rich food into mass gain. These results parallel changes in gall bladder function preceding cholesterol gallstone formation in humans and other mammals. Thus, social stress may be an important diagnostic criterion in understanding pathologies associated with gall bladder dysfunction. PMID:15002765

  2. Chronic prostatitis: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adam B; Macejko, Amanda; Taylor, Aisha; Nadler, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has redefined prostatitis into four distinct entities. Category I is acute bacterial prostatitis. It is an acute prostatic infection with a uropathogen, often with systemic symptoms of fever, chills and hypotension. The treatment hinges on antimicrobials and drainage of the bladder because the inflamed prostate may block urinary flow. Category II prostatitis is called chronic bacterial prostatitis. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of documented urinary tract infections with the same uropathogen and causes pelvic pain, urinary symptoms and ejaculatory pain. It is diagnosed by means of localization cultures that are 90% accurate in localizing the source of recurrent infections within the lower urinary tract. Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis comprises NIH category IV. This entity is, by definition, asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally during the evaluation of infertility or prostate cancer. The clinical significance of category IV prostatitis is unknown and it is often left untreated. Category III prostatitis is called chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). It is characterized by pelvic pain for more than 3 of the previous 6 months, urinary symptoms and painful ejaculation, without documented urinary tract infections from uropathogens. The syndrome can be devastating, affecting 10-15% of the male population, and results in nearly 2 million outpatient visits each year. The aetiology of CP/CPPS is poorly understood, but may be the result of an infectious or inflammatory initiator that results in neurological injury and eventually results in pelvic floor dysfunction in the form of increased pelvic muscle tone. The diagnosis relies on separating this entity from chronic bacterial prostatitis. If there is no history of documented urinary tract infections with a urinary tract pathogen, then cultures should be taken when patients are symptomatic. Prostatic localization cultures, called the

  3. Bacterial biofilm formation on the bladder epithelium of spinal cord injured patients. II. Toxic outcome on cell viability.

    PubMed

    Reid, G; Kang, Y S; Lacerte, M; Tieszer, C; Hayes, K C

    1993-08-01

    As a follow up to our first study of 10 spinal cord injured patients, a further 8 patients were investigated over 2 months for biofilm formation on their bladder epithelial cells and for evidence that these uropathogens damage the host bladder. All the patients were found to be colonized with uropathogens, regardless of whether or not they were receiving antibiotics. Using vital staining, it was discovered that there was a significant reduction (33%) in bladder cell viability in the presence of bacterial biofilms compared to controls. This was not associated with cell turnover rates. In vitro tests showed a similar reduction in cell viability when uropathogens were incubated with bladder cells. In addition, white cell counts were significantly elevated in the patients' urine, indicative of an infectious and/or inflamed state. There was no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients in their mean bacterial adhesion counts. Patients were just as likely to be symptomatic as asymptomatic when on antibiotics. In summary, the presence of virulent organisms in the bladder does adversely affect the host, even when the patient has insignificant signs and symptoms of infection, thereby raising concerns over the decision not to treat the patient. Unless specific antibiotics are used which eradicate adherent biofilms from the bladder, the treatment of symptomatic patients will only impact upon the signs and symptoms in some patients, and not alter their susceptibility to reinfection.

  4. Bladder leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Jun; Lai, Hai-ping; Lin, Shao-kun; Zhang, Qing-quan; Shao, Chu-xiao; Jin, Lie; Lei, Wen-hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Leiomyoma of the bladder is a rare tumor arising from the submucosa. Most patients with bladder leiomyoma may present with urinary frequency or obstructive urinary symptoms. However, there are a few cases of bladder leiomyoma coexisting with uterine leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia. We herein report an unusual case of coexisting bladder leiomyoma and uterine leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia. Case presentation: A 44-year-old Asian female presented to urologist and complained that she had experienced dyspareunia over the preceding several months. A pelvic ultrasonography revealed a mass lesion located in the trigone of urinary bladder. The mass lesion was confirmed on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). The CT scan also revealed a lobulated and enlarged uterus consistent with uterine leiomyoma. Then, the biopsies were then taken with a transurethral resection (TUR) loop and these biopsies showed a benign proliferation of smooth muscle in a connective tissue stroma suggestive of bladder leiomyoma. An open local excision of bladder leiomyoma and hysteromyomectomy were performed successfully. Histological examination confirmed bladder leiomyoma coexisting with uterine leiomyoma. Conclusion: This case highlights a rare presentation of bladder leiomyoma, dyspareunia, as the chief symptom in a patient who had coexisting uterine leiomyoma. Bladder leiomyomas coexisting with uterine leiomyomas are rare and can present with a wide spectrum of complaints including without symptoms, irritative symptoms, obstructive symptoms, or even dyspareunia. PMID:27428187

  5. Prostatic inflammation induces fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show-for the first time-that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  6. Pachydermoperiostosis and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Famularo, Guiseppe; Stasolla, Alessandro; Gasbarrone, Laura

    2015-06-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis or the Touraine-Soulente-Golé syndrome is a rare monogenetic disorder characterized by pachydermia, periostosis and digital clubbing accounts for approximately 3∼5% of all patients with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Missense mutations in SLCO2A1 and HPGD genes could plausibly underlie the pathogenesis of pachydermoperiostosis. Patients have usually a favorable outcome with very few cases associated with cancer. Herein, we report the first case of a patient with pachydermoperiostosis associated with bladder cancer. PMID:26158372

  7. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula.

    PubMed

    Pham, Khanh N; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  8. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  9. Pharmacogenomics in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide. For patients presenting with muscle-invasive disease, the five year survival rate is approximately 50%. Cisplatinum-based combination chemotherapy is recommended in the neoadjuvant setting prior to cystectomy and is also the first line in the metastatic setting. However, the survival benefit of such therapy is modest. The identification of pharmacogenomic biomarkers would enable the rational and personalized treatment of patients by selecting those patients that would benefit most from such therapies sparing others the unnecessary toxicity. Conventional therapies would be recommended for an expected responder while a non-responder would be considered for alternative therapies selected on the basis of the individual’s molecular profile. Although few effective bladder cancer therapies have been introduced in the past 30 years, several targeted therapies against the molecular drivers of bladder cancer appear promising. This review summarizes pharmacogenomic biomarkers that require further investigation and/or prospective evaluation, publicly available tools for drug discovery and biomarker identification from in vitro data, and targeted agents that have been evaluated in preclinical models. PMID:24360659

  10. [Management of endometrioma, recto-vaginal and bladder endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Vulliemoz N; Meuwly J Y; Jichlinski P; Hahnloser D; Achtari C

    2014-10-22

    Endometriosis is a frequent, benign, chronic disease associated with pain and/or infertility. Classically the lesions are found on the pelvic peritoneum, ovary (endometrioma), rectovaginal septum and bladder. Management of endometrioma has evolved over the last few years to individualised treatment. Indeed endometrioma cystectomy can decrease pain and the risk of recurrence but is also associated with a decrease in ovarian reserve. A multi-disciplinary team should manage recto-vaginal or bladder endometriosis. Surgical resection of these lesions must be as complete as possible and can be complex.

  11. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  12. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  13. Expression of epithelial adhesion proteins and integrins in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Haapasalmi, K.; Mäkelä, M.; Oksala, O.; Heino, J.; Yamada, K. M.; Uitto, V. J.; Larjava, H.

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cell behavior in chronic inflammation is poorly characterized. During inflammation of tooth-supporting structures (periodontal disease), increased proliferation of epithelial cells into the inflamed connective tissue stroma is commonly seen. In some areas ulceration and degeneration take place. We studied alterations in the expression of adhesion molecules and integrins during chronic periodontal inflammation. In inflamed tissue, laminin-1 and type IV collagen were still present in the basement membrane and surrounding blood vessels, but they were also found extravascularly in inflamed connective tissue stroma. Type VII collagen and laminin-5 (also known as kalinin, epiligrin, or nicein) were poorly preserved in the basement membrane zone, but both were found in unusual streak-like distributions in the subepithelial connective tissue stroma in inflamed tissue. Both fibronectin and tenascin were substantially decreased in chronically inflamed connective tissue, showing only punctate staining at the basement membrane zone. Integrins of the beta 1 family showed two distinct staining patterns in epithelial cells during chronic inflammation; focal losses of beta 1 integrins (alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 3 beta 1) were found in most areas, while in other areas the entire pocket epithelium was found to be strongly positive for beta 1 integrins. No members of the alpha v integrin family were found in any epithelia studied. Expression of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin was high in basal cells of healthy tissue, but weak in epithelium associated with chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation therefore involves alterations in both adhesion proteins and integrins expressed by epithelial cells. Basement membrane components found at abnormal sites in stroma in chronic inflammation might serve as new adhesive ligands for various cell types in inflamed stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7541610

  14. Self assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles as a potential carrier for targeting the inflamed intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esmaeili, Motahareh; Amini, Mohsen; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-06-25

    To develop a nanoparticulate drug carrier for targeting of the inflamed intestinal mucosa, amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugates were synthesized, which could form self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution and budesonide (BDS) was loaded into the HANPs. Their particle sizes were in the range of 177 to 293nm with negative surface charge. The model of inflammatory CACO-2 cells was utilized to investigate the therapeutic potential of budesonide loaded HA nanocarriers. The highest expression of CD44 receptors was found on inflamed Caco-2 cells, as determined by flow cytometry. FITC-labeled HANPs revealed greater uptake in inflamed CACO-2 cells compared to untreated CACO-2 and CD44-negative cell lines, NIH3T3. BDS loaded HANPs displayed almost no toxicity indicating HANPs are excellent biocompatible nano-carriers. BDS loaded HANPs demonstrated higher anti-inflammatory effect on IL-8 and TNF-α secretion in inflamed cell model compared to the same dose of free drug. These results revealed the promising potential of HA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for IBD treatment. PMID:27083829

  15. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in inflamed tissue is required for intrinsic peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M; Mousa, S A; Zhang, Q; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1996-01-01

    Immune cell-derived opioid peptides can activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves to inhibit inflammatory pain. The intrinsic mechanisms triggering this neuroimmune interaction are unknown. This study investigates the involvement of endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). A specific stress paradigm, cold water swim (CWS), produces potent opioid receptor-specific antinociception in inflamed paws of rats. This effect is dose-dependently attenuated by intraplantar but not by intravenous alpha-helical CRF. IL-1 receptor antagonist is ineffective. Similarly, local injection of antiserum against CRF, but not to IL-1, dose-dependently reverses this effect. Intravenous anti-CRF is only inhibitory at 10(4)-fold higher concentrations and intravenous CRF does not produce analgesia. Pretreatment of inflamed paws with an 18-mer 3'-3'-end inverted CRF-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide abolishes CWS-induced antinociception. The same treatment significantly reduces the amount of CRF extracted from inflamed paws and the number of CRF-immunostained cells without affecting gross inflammatory signs. A mismatch oligodeoxynucleotide alters neither the CWS effect nor CRF immunoreactivity. These findings identify locally expressed CRF as the predominant agent to trigger opioid release within inflamed tissue. Endogenous IL-1, circulating CRF or antiinflammatory effects, are not involved. Thus, an intact immune system plays an essential role in pain control, which is important for the understanding of pain in immunosuppressed patients with cancer or AIDS. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8650225

  16. Long-term complications following bladder augmentations in patients with spina bifida: bladder calculi, perforation of the augmented bladder and upper tract deterioration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background We desire to review our experience with bladder augmentation in spina bifida patients followed in a transitional and adult urologic practice. This paper will specifically focus on three major complications: bladder calculi, the most frequent complication found following bladder augmentation, perforation of the augmentation, its most lethal complication and finally we will address loss of renal function as a direct result of our surgical reconstructive procedures. Methods We reviewed a prospective data base maintained on patients with spina bifida followed in our transitional and adult urology clinic from 1986 to date. Specific attention was given to patients who had developed bladder calculi, sustained a spontaneous perforation of the augmented bladder or had developed new onset of renal scarring or renal insufficiency (≥ stage 3 renal failure) during prolonged follow-up. Results The development of renal stones (P<0.05) and symptomatic urinary tract infections (P<0.0001) were found to be significantly reduced by the use of high volume (≥240 mL) daily bladder wash outs. Individuals who still developed bladder calculi recalcitrant to high volume wash outs were not benefited by the correction of underlying metabolic abnormalities or mucolytic agents. Spontaneous bladder perforations in the adult patient population with spina bifida were found to be directly correlated to substance abuse and noncompliance with intermittent catheterization, P<0.005. Deterioration of the upper tracts as defined by the new onset of renal scars occurred in 40% (32/80) of the patients managed by a ileocystoplasty and simultaneous bladder neck outlet procedure during a median follow-up interval 14 years (range, 8–45 years). Development of ≥ stage 3 chronic renal failure occurred within 38% (12/32) of the patients with scarring i.e., 15% (12/80) of the total patient population. Prior to the development of the renal scarring, 69% (22/32) of the patients had been noncompliant

  17. Immunological Basis in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David B.; Siref, Larry E.; Feloney, Michael P.; Hauke, Ralph J.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis and transition of normal urothelium into bladder carcinoma are multifactorial processes. Chronic inflammation causes initiation and progression of the underlying pathophysiology of invasive and metastatic cancer. A dichotomy is observed in the role of immune cells in bladder cancer. While the immune response defends the host by suppressing neoplastic growth, several immune cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes, promote tumor development and progression. The levels of human neutrophil peptide-1, -2, and -3, produced by neutrophils, increase in bladder cancer and might promote tumor angiogenesis and growth. The effect of macrophages is primarily mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. Additionally, the underlying immunological mechanisms of two treatments, BCG and cytokine gene-modified tumor vaccines, and future directions are critically discussed. PMID:25391391

  18. Overexpression of NGF in mouse urothelium leads to neuronal hyperinnervation, pelvic sensitivity, and changes in urinary bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Schnegelsberg, Birthe; Sun, Tung-Tien; Cain, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anindya; Nunn, Philip A.; Ford, Anthony P. D. W.; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    NGF has been suggested to play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction by mediating inflammation, as well as morphological and functional changes, in sensory and sympathetic neurons innervating the urinary bladder. To further explore the role of NGF in bladder sensory function, we generated a transgenic mouse model of chronic NGF overexpression in the bladder using the urothelium-specific uroplakin II (UPII) promoter. NGF mRNA and protein were expressed at higher levels in the bladders of NGF-overexpressing (NGF-OE) transgenic mice compared with wild-type littermate controls from postnatal day 7 through 12–16 wk of age. Overexpression of NGF led to urinary bladder enlargement characterized by marked nerve fiber hyperplasia in the submucosa and detrusor smooth muscle and elevated numbers of tissue mast cells. There was a marked increase in the density of CGRP- and substance P-positive C-fiber sensory afferents, neurofilament 200-positive myelinated sensory afferents, and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive sympathetic nerve fibers in the suburothelial nerve plexus. CGRP-positive ganglia were also present in the urinary bladders of transgenic mice. Transgenic mice had reduced urinary bladder capacity and an increase in the number and amplitude of nonvoiding bladder contractions under baseline conditions in conscious open-voiding cystometry. These changes in urinary bladder function were further associated with an increased referred somatic pelvic hypersensitivity. Thus, chronic urothelial NGF overexpression in transgenic mice leads to neuronal proliferation, focal increases in urinary bladder mast cells, increased urinary bladder reflex activity, and pelvic hypersensitivity. NGF-overexpressing mice may, therefore, provide a useful transgenic model for exploring the role of NGF in urinary bladder dysfunction. PMID:20032263

  19. Gene Expression Pattern of Cells From Inflamed and Normal Areas of Osteoarthritis Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cécile; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, Eulàlia; Vergés, Josep; Munaut, Carine; Noël, Agnès; Henrotin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the gene expression patterns of synovial cells from inflamed or normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane obtained from the same patient with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods At the time of total knee replacement, synovial tissues were obtained from 12 patients with knee OA. The inflammation status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria and classified as normal/reactive or inflamed. Biopsy samples were cultured separately for 7 days. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on normal/reactive and inflamed areas. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm the identified genes that were differentially expressed. Results We identified 896 genes that were differentially expressed between normal/reactive and inflamed areas. The key pathways were related to inflammation, cartilage metabolism, Wnt signaling, and angiogenesis. In the inflammation network, the genes TREM1 and S100A9 were strongly up-regulated. The genes MMP3, MMP9, CTSH (cathepsin H), and CTSS (cathepsin S) were significantly up-regulated in the cartilage catabolism pathway, while the most up-regulated anabolism enzyme gene was HAS1. In the Wnt signaling pathway, the genes for Wnt-5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 were up-regulated, while the gene FZD2 and the gene for Dkk-3 were down-regulated. Finally, STC1, which codes for a protein involved in angiogenesis, was identified as the most up-regulated gene in inflamed compared with normal/reactive areas. Conclusion This study is the first to identify different expression patterns between 2 areas of the synovial membrane from the same patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. This analysis also provides information regarding new genes and proteins as potential targets of treatment. PMID:24757147

  20. Penetration of Moxifloxacin into Healthy and Inflamed Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Joukhadar, Christian; Stass, Heino; Müller-Zellenberg, Ulrike; Lackner, Edith; Kovar, Florian; Minar, Erich; Müller, Markus

    2003-01-01

    The present study addressed the ability of moxifloxacin to penetrate into healthy and inflamed subcutaneous adipose tissues in 12 patients with soft tissue infections (STIs). Penetration of moxifloxacin into the interstitial space fluid of healthy and inflamed subcutaneous adipose tissues was measured by use of in vivo microdialysis following administration of a single intravenous dosage of 400 mg in six diabetic and six nondiabetic patients with STIs. For the entire study population, the mean time-concentration profile of free moxifloxacin in plasma was identical to the time-concentration profile of free moxifloxacin in tissue (P was not significant). For healthy and inflamed adipose tissues for the diabetic subgroup, the mean moxifloxacin areas under the concentration-time curves (AUCs) from 0 to 8 h (AUC0-8s) were 8.1 ± 7.1 and 3.7 ± 1.9 mg·h/liter, respectively (P was not significant). The ratios of the mean AUC0-8 for inflamed tissue/AUC0-8 for free moxifloxacin in plasma were 0.5 ± 0.4 for diabetic patients and 1.2 ± 0.8 for nondiabetic patients (P was not significant). The ratios of the AUCs from 0 to 24 h for free moxifloxacin in plasma/MIC at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were >58 and 121 h for Streptococcus species and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. Concentrations of moxifloxacin effective against clinically relevant bacterial strains are reached in plasma and in inflamed and healthy adipose tissues. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin in tissue and plasma support its use for the treatment of STIs in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. PMID:14506015

  1. Impact of diabetes mellitus on bladder uroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Ruiz, Giovanni W; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A

    2013-01-15

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency, and incontinence. As DBD is commonly diagnosed late, it is important to understand the chronic impact of DM on bladder tissues. While changes in bladder smooth muscle and innervation have been reported in diabetic patients, the impact of DM on the specialized epithelial lining of the urinary bladder, the urothelium (UT), is largely unknown. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and electron microscopy were used to evaluate UT gene expression and cell morphology 3, 9, and 20 wk following streptozotocin (STZ) induction of DM in female Sprague-Dawley rats compared with age-matched control tissue. Desquamation of superficial (umbrella) cells was noted at 9 wk DM, indicating a possible breach in barrier function. One causative factor may be metabolic burden due to chronic hyperglycemia, suggested by upregulation of the polyol pathway and glucose transport genes in DM UT. While superficial UT repopulation occurred by 20 wk DM, the phenotype was different, with significant upregulation of receptors associated with UT mechanosensation (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1; TRPV1) and UT autocrine/paracrine signaling (acetylcholine receptors AChR-M2 and -M3, purinergic receptors P2X(2) and P2X(3)). Compromised barrier function and alterations in UT mechanosensitivity and cell signaling could contribute to bladder instability, hyperactivity, and altered bladder sensation by modulating activity of afferent nerve endings, which appose the urothelium. Our results show that DM impacts urothelial homeostasis and may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of DBD. PMID:23174855

  2. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and glycosaminoglycans replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a debilitating chronic disease characterized by discomfort or recurrent abdominal and pelvic pains in the absence of urinary tract infections. Its symptomatology includes discomfort, increased bladder pressure, sensitivity and intense pain in the bladder and pelvic areas, increased voiding frequency and urgency, or a combination of these symptoms. For these reasons, this pathology has a very negative impact on quality of life. The etiology of IC/BPS is still not well understood and different hypotheses have been formulated, including autoimmune processes, allergic reactions, chronic bacterial infections, exposure to toxins or dietary elements, and psychosomatic factors. The finding of an effective and specific therapy for IC/BPS remains a challenge for the scientific community because of the lack of a consensus regarding the causes and the inherent difficulties in the diagnosis. The last recent hypothesis is that IC/BPS could be pathophysiologically related to a disruption of the bladder mucosa surface layer with consequent loss of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). This class of mucopolysaccharides has hydrorepellent properties and their alteration expose the urothelium to many urinary toxic agents. It has been hypothesized that when these substances penetrate the bladder wall a chain is triggered in the submucosa. In order to improve the integrity and function of the bladder lining, GAG layer replenishment therapy is widely accepted as therapy for patients with IC/BPS who have poor or inadequate response to conventional therapy. Currently, Chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin, hyaluronic acid (HA), and pentosan polysulphate (PPS), and combinations of two GAGs (CS and HA) are the available substances with different effectiveness rates in patients with IC/BPS. There are four different commercially available products for GAG replenishment including CS, heparin, HA and PPS. Each product has different concentrations and

  3. Simple cyst of urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bo, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Simple cysts are rare in the urinary bladder and can pose a diagnostic dilemma to both the urologist and the histopathologist. No case study was found in the database of Elsevier Science Direct, Spring-Link, or PubMed. We present two cases of subserous cyst in the bladder and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the condition. The cystic lesion at bladder dome was detected by radiologic examination and confirmed by cystoscopy. In case 1, transurethral resection was first performed which was followed by partial cystectomy; In case 2, the cyst was removed with the urachus using laparoscopic surgery. The patients recovered uneventfully and the histopathology showed cysts in subserous layer of urinary bladder. The bladder cyst should be distinguished from urachal tumor, and laparoscopic partial cystectomy is the preferred operative procedure.

  4. Emerging Immunotargets in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Vau, Nuno; Santoni, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cheng, Liang; Marques, Rita C; Scarpelli, Marina; Fonseca, Jorge; Matrana, Marc R; Holger, Moch; Cascinu, Stefano; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer treatment, namely systemic therapy, was dominated in the last three decades due to the absence of newer therapeutic options other than chemotherapy regimens. Chemotherapy, by itself, both in first and second-line seems to have achieved the modest plateau of its possibilities at the cost of non-negligible toxicity. Targeted therapies, which changed the therapy of many different tumors, seem rather ineffective in bladder cancer. More recently, a new generation of Immunotherapy based regimens represent the most promising avenue for the future systemic treatment of bladder cancer. Checkpoint inhibition, namely PD1/PD-L1 pathway inhibition, showed impressive results in many other tumor types and are expected to become a major player in the treatment of bladder cancer. Other immunotherapy strategies such as fusion proteins represent distant, although promising, options. A brief overview of the current status of bladder cancer immunotherapy is presented.

  5. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  6. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  7. Tissue performance of bladder following stretched electrospun silk fibroin matrix and bladder acellular matrix implantation in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Xu, Yue-Min; Li, Zhao-Bo; Murphy, Sean V; Zhao, Weixin; Liu, Qiang-Qiang; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Yao-Peng; Song, Lu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the tissue performance of bladder following stretched electrospun silk fibroin matrix (SESFM) implantation compared with bladder acellular matrix (BAM). We compared SESFM with BAM based on porosity and pore size. Scaffolds were separately transplanted into opposite walls of the bladder of 30 rabbits after stripping the bladder mucosa and smooth muscle (1.5 × 2.0 cm(2)). Gross anatomical observation, histological analysis and muscle contractility studies were performed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-op. SESFM has higher porosity and larger pore size compared with BAM (p < 0.05). At 2 weeks, the presence of vesical calculus was evident in 7/10 rabbits. Histological analysis showed that SESFM and BAM promoted similar degree of urothelium regeneration (p > 0.05). However, SESFM promoted a higher degree of smooth muscle and vessel regeneration compared to BAM (p < 0.05). In addition, muscle strips supported by SESFM displayed higher contractile responses to carbachol, KCl, and phenylephrine compared with BAM. At 8 weeks, both matrices elicited similar mild acute and chronic inflammatory reactions. Our results demonstrated that SESFM has greater ability to promote bladder tissue regeneration with structural and functional properties compared to BAM, and with similar biocompatibility. PMID:26148477

  8. Antispasmodic effects of myrrh due to calcium antagonistic effects in inflamed rat small intestinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Vissiennon, Cica; Goos, Karl-Heinz; Goos, Ole; Nieber, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Myrrh is the oleo-gum resin of mainly Commiphora molmol and as a powdered substance, one compound in the traditional medicinal product Myrrhinil-Intest®, which has been used for the treatment of unspecific, inflammatory intestinal disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antispasmodic effect of myrrh under healthy and inflamed conditions, and to evaluate a calcium-antagonistic effect as a possible mode of action. Therefore, an ethanolic myrrh extract was tested for its effects on muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contractions in untreated and inflamed rat ileum/jejunum preparations. Inflammation was experimentally induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (10 mM, 30 min). Additionally, the effect of the calcium channel agonist Bay K8644 in the presence of varying myrrh extract concentrations was examined. Myrrh extract (0.99 mg/mL) suppressed the acetylcholine-induced contraction down to 25.8 % in untreated and 15.2 % in inflamed preparations. Myrrh extract (0.15; 0.25 and 0.35 mg/mL) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the Bay K8644 concentration-response curve in untreated and inflamed preparations with a significant EC50 shift. Schild analysis resulted in a pA2 value of 0.93 for untreated preparations. Increasing myrrh extract concentrations induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the agonistic maximum effect in untreated and inflamed preparations down to 15.8 % and 25.8 %, respectively, for the highest concentration leading to a pD2 value of 0.58. Myrrh extract reduced intestinal muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contraction of untreated and inflamed ileum/jejunum preparations based on dual calcium antagonism characterized by a right shift of the agonistic dose-response curve and a depression of the maximum effect. The resulting reduction of intestinal motility and spasmolytic effects provide a rationale for the symptom treatment of intestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome

  9. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  10. Imidazolium salts as small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wagers, Patrick O; Tiemann, Kristin M; Shelton, Kerri L; Kofron, William G; Panzner, Matthew J; Wooley, Karen L; Youngs, Wiley J; Hunstad, David A

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties.

  11. Imidazolium Salts as Small-Molecule Urinary Bladder Exfoliants in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Patrick O.; Tiemann, Kristin M.; Shelton, Kerri L.; Kofron, William G.; Panzner, Matthew J.; Wooley, Karen L.; Youngs, Wiley J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel family of small-molecule urinary bladder exfoliants that are expected to be of great value in preclinical studies of urologic conditions and have improved potential for translation compared with prior agents. There is broad urologic interest in the therapeutic potential of such exfoliating agents. The primary agent used in preclinical models, the cationic peptide protamine sulfate (PS), has limited translational potential due to concerns including systemic adverse reactions and bladder tissue injury. Intravesical application of a safe, systemically nontoxic exfoliant would have potential utility in the eradication of Escherichia coli and other uropathogens that reside in the bladder epithelium following cystitis, as well as in chronic bladder pain and bladder cancer. Here, we introduce a family of imidazolium salts with potent and focused exfoliating activity on the bladder epithelium. Synthesis and purification were straightforward and scalable, and the compounds exhibited prolonged stability in lyophilized form. Most members of the compound family were cytotoxic to cultured uroepithelial cells, with >10-fold differences in potency across the series. Upon topical (intravesical) administration of selected compounds to the murine bladder, complete epithelial exfoliation was achieved with physiologically relevant imidazolium concentrations and brief contact times. The exfoliative activity of these compounds was markedly improved in comparison to PS, as assessed by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting for uroplakins. Bladder uroepithelium regenerated within days to yield a histologically normal appearance, and no toxicity was observed. Finally, the chemical scaffold offers an opportunity for inclusion of antimicrobials or conjugation with chemotherapeutic or other moieties. PMID:26124168

  12. Biomarkers in overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Alka A; Cartwright, Rufus; Khullar, Vik; Digesu, G Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    A biomarker is an indicator of a particular disease. It is generally used to define the presence (diagnostic biomarker), severity, progression (prognostic biomarker) of a condition and/or its response to a specific treatment (predictive biomarker). Biomarkers can be specific cells, enzymes, hormones, genes or gene products, which can be detected and measured in parts of the body such as blood, urine or tissue. Therefore, biomarkers have been suggested to play an important role in both the clinical assessment and the management of patients, as well as in the research setting. Recently, interest has gathered in urinary biomarkers as a tool to assess overactive bladder (OAB), potentially playing a role in the diagnosis, disease progression and monitoring response to treatment. Urinary biomarkers identified so far include nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), prostaglandins, cytokines and C-reactive protein. The aim of this review was to review the published literature on biomarkers in OAB. A literature review using Pub Med, clinicaltrials.gov and the controlled trials online registries was performed from 1970 up to June 2012. The search keywords were: the International Continence Society (ICS) definition of "OAB", "nerve growth fac- tor" (NGF), "brain derived growth factor" (BDNF), "prostaglandins," "cytokines," "genetic biomarkers" and "C reactive protein".The results were limited for fully published English-language articles. The search was then subsequently expanded to include urinary biomarkers in interstitial cystitis and bladder pain where relevant. Each of the studies/articles was reviewed, interpreted and discussed to consider the role of urinary biomarkers in OAB. Using the search criteria, a total of 20 studies (animal and human) that investigated the role of urinary biomarkers in OAB were identified. Full text versions of these articles were obtained and reviewed. Studies on NGF suggested that urinary levels were higher in OAB

  13. Underactive Bladder in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Plata, Mauricio; Lamb, Laura E; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder is one of the most common bladder problems, but an estimated 20 million Americans have underactive bladder (UAB), which makes going to the bathroom difficult, increases the risk of urinary tract infections, and even leads to institutionalization. This article provides an overview of UAB in older adults, and discusses the prevalence, predisposing factors, cause, clinical investigations, and treatments. At present, there is no effective therapy for UAB. A great deal of work still needs to be done on understanding the pathogenesis and the development of effective therapies. PMID:26476113

  14. Underactive Bladder in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Plata, Mauricio; Lamb, Laura E; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder is one of the most common bladder problems, but an estimated 20 million Americans have underactive bladder (UAB), which makes going to the bathroom difficult, increases the risk of urinary tract infections, and even leads to institutionalization. This article provides an overview of UAB in older adults, and discusses the prevalence, predisposing factors, cause, clinical investigations, and treatments. At present, there is no effective therapy for UAB. A great deal of work still needs to be done on understanding the pathogenesis and the development of effective therapies.

  15. Bladder diverticulitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  16. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  17. Fructose-asparagine is a primary nutrient during growth of Salmonella in the inflamed intestine.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohamed M; Newsom, David L; González, Juan F; Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Stahl, Christopher; Steidley, Brandi; Dubena, Judith; Dyszel, Jessica L; Smith, Jenee N; Dieye, Yakhya; Arsenescu, Razvan; Boyaka, Prosper N; Krakowka, Steven; Romeo, Tony; Behrman, Edward J; White, Peter; Ahmer, Brian M M

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella) is one of the most significant food-borne pathogens affecting both humans and agriculture. We have determined that Salmonella encodes an uptake and utilization pathway specific for a novel nutrient, fructose-asparagine (F-Asn), which is essential for Salmonella fitness in the inflamed intestine (modeled using germ-free, streptomycin-treated, ex-germ-free with human microbiota, and IL10-/- mice). The locus encoding F-Asn utilization, fra, provides an advantage only if Salmonella can initiate inflammation and use tetrathionate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (the fra phenotype is lost in Salmonella SPI1- SPI2- or ttrA mutants, respectively). The severe fitness defect of a Salmonella fra mutant suggests that F-Asn is the primary nutrient utilized by Salmonella in the inflamed intestine and that this system provides a valuable target for novel therapies.

  18. Fructose-Asparagine Is a Primary Nutrient during Growth of Salmonella in the Inflamed Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohamed M.; Newsom, David L.; González, Juan F.; Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Stahl, Christopher; Steidley, Brandi; Dubena, Judith; Dyszel, Jessica L.; Smith, Jenee N.; Dieye, Yakhya; Arsenescu, Razvan; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Krakowka, Steven; Romeo, Tony; Behrman, Edward J.; White, Peter; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella) is one of the most significant food-borne pathogens affecting both humans and agriculture. We have determined that Salmonella encodes an uptake and utilization pathway specific for a novel nutrient, fructose-asparagine (F-Asn), which is essential for Salmonella fitness in the inflamed intestine (modeled using germ-free, streptomycin-treated, ex-germ-free with human microbiota, and IL10−/− mice). The locus encoding F-Asn utilization, fra, provides an advantage only if Salmonella can initiate inflammation and use tetrathionate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (the fra phenotype is lost in Salmonella SPI1− SPI2− or ttrA mutants, respectively). The severe fitness defect of a Salmonella fra mutant suggests that F-Asn is the primary nutrient utilized by Salmonella in the inflamed intestine and that this system provides a valuable target for novel therapies. PMID:24967579

  19. Host-Pathogen Checkpoints and Population Bottlenecks in Persistent and Intracellular Uropathogenic E. coli Bladder Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Totsika, Makrina; Mansfield, Kylie J.; Moore, Kate H.; Schembri, Mark A.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder infections affect millions of people yearly, and recurrent symptomatic infections (cystitis) are very common. The rapid increase in infections caused by multi-drug resistant uropathogens threatens to make recurrent cystitis an increasingly troubling public health concern. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of bladder infections. Upon entry into the lower urinary tract, UPEC face obstacles to colonization that constitute population bottlenecks, reducing diversity and selecting for fit clones. A critical mucosal barrier to bladder infection is the epithelium (urothelium). UPEC bypass this barrier when they invade urothelial cells and form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs), a process which requires type 1 pili. IBCs are transient in nature, occurring primarily during acute infection. Chronic bladder infection is common and can be either latent, in the form of the Quiescent Intracellular Reservoir (QIR), or active, in the form of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB/ABU) or chronic cystitis. In mice, the fate of bladder infection: QIR, ASB, or chronic cystitis, is determined within the first 24 hours of infection and constitutes a putative host-pathogen mucosal checkpoint that contributes to susceptibility to recurrent cystitis. Knowledge of these checkpoints and bottlenecks is critical for our understanding of bladder infection and efforts to devise novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22404313

  20. Phaeochromocytomas of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, O; Williams, G; Chisholm, G D; Welbourn, R B

    1982-01-01

    Phaeochromocytomas of the bladder are rare, only about 100 cases having been reported previously. Four adults with these lesions have been managed at Hammersmith Hospital in the past 10 years. Three patients had hypertension, together with syncopal attacks and/or headaches, induced by micturition. The fourth patient presented with haematuria. After control of blood pressure and localization of the tumours by various combinations of cystoscopy, intravenous urography, venous sampling, ultrasound, angiography and computerized coaxial tomography (CT scanning), 3 patients underwent partial cystectomy, and the fourth pelvic exenteration. Two patients were apparently cured of the disease, but 2 were not. One developed modal metastases and recurrence of hypertension after 18 months and one rapidly developed metastases in the lungs and elsewhere. Effective therapy probably requires a high index of suspicion in diagnosing the condition and possibly an aggressive surgical and radiotherapeutic policy. PMID:7057406

  1. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach.

  2. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  3. A time-dependent degeneration manner of condyle in rat CFA-induced inflamed TMJ

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liqin; Guo, Huilin; Li, Cheng; Xu, Jie; Fang, Wei; Long, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation is a potential risk factor of osteoarthritis (OA) but the detailed degenerative changes in the inflamed TMJ remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the changes of condylar cartilage and subchondral bone in rat inflamed TMJ induced by Freund’s complete adjuvant (CFA). Articular cavity was injected with CFA and the TMJ samples were collected 1, 2, 3, and 4-week post-injection. Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) staining, toluidine blue (TB) staining, Safranin O (S.O) staining, Masson trichrome staining and micro-CT were used to assess TMJ degeneration during inflammation. Osteoclast and osteoblast activities were analyzed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and osteocalcin (OCN) immunohistochemistry staining respectively. The expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone was also evaluated through immunohistochemistry and RANKL/OPG ratio was evaluated. Reduced cartilage thickness, decreased number of chondrocytes, and down-regulated proteoglycan expression were observed in the condylar cartilage in the inflamed TMJ. Enhanced osteoclast activity, and expanded bone marrow cavity were reached the peak in the 2-week after CFA-injection. Meanwhile the RANKL/OPG ratio in the cartilage and subchondral bone also increased in the 2-week CFA-injection. Immature, unmineralized new bones with irregular trabecular bone structure, atypical condylar shape, up-regulated OCN expression, and decreased bone mineral density (BMD) were found in the inflamed TMJ. The time-dependent degeneration manner of TMJ cartilage and subchondral bone was found in CFA-induced arthritis rat model. The degeneration in the TMJ with inflammation might be a risk factor and should be concerned. PMID:27158347

  4. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  5. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Çetinel, Bülent; Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  6. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  7. [Melanosis of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Wöllner, J; Janzen, J; Pannek, J

    2016-01-01

    Melanosis of the bladder is rare. Only 10 cases have been described in the literature. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal paralysis. During the diagnostic work-up which included cystoscopy, black spots in the bladder wall were observed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a benign suburothelial melanosis. Thus, with cystoscopic suspicion of a malignancy (melanoma), a biopsy is mandatory and regular cystoscopic follow-up is recommended. PMID:26358438

  8. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Adraktas, Dionesia; Caserta, Melanie; Tchelepi, Hisham

    2014-09-01

    Extra-adrenal paragangliomas of the urinary bladder are rare. Typically, patients present with symptoms related to catecholamine hypersecretion or mass effect, but these tumors can also be encountered incidentally on imaging studies obtained for a different purpose. It is important to recognize the key imaging features of this entity so that it may be suggested as a possible differential diagnosis in the setting of a newly identified bladder mass.

  9. Clinical study of bladder diseases using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagainova, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Strelzova, O.; Sumin, A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Iksanov, Rashid R.

    2000-11-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), a new optical bioimaging technique was used to evaluate the state of mucosa in the urinary bladder. The state of mucosa of the bladder was evaluated in patients with prostatic adenoma (11 male patients) during the course of prostatectomy operation via a resection cytoscope. An OCT probe was inserted into the biopsy channel of a cystoscope. The sites to be imaged by OCT were determined visually and, after OCT study, underwent excisional biopsy and subsequent histological examination. Children (9 girls) were examined during diagnostic cystoscopy. Our analysis of diagnostic capabilities of OCT in urology relies on the comparison of OCT information on normal and morphologically altered tissues. OCT is able to provide objective data concerning the structure of mucosa of the bladder due to the difference in optical properties of different layers in tissue. The epithelium and the layers of connective tissue, both in norm and pathology, are clearly visualized in the tomograms. Our OCT study of healthy mucosa of the urinary bladder has demonstrated that the epithelium appears in the tomograms as an upper highly backscattering layer. An underlying optically less transparent layer, much greater in size than the previous one, corresponds to the connective tissue of the mucosa. Inside this layer, elongated poorly backscattering formations with clear contours are seen; they do not alter the longitudinal structure of the submucosal layer. These formations are blood vessels. Optical patterns characteristic of chronic inflammation are obtained. They correspond, as confirmed histologically, to liquid accumulation, cellular infiltration of mucosal layers, hypervascularization, and fibrosis. OCT information on proliferative processes, such as papillomatosis of the urinary bladder and squamous cell carcinoma, is analyzed. It is shown that OCT can reliably reveal edema of the mucous membrane of the bladder and identify the character of appearing

  10. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Sillén, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB) and the dysfunctional voiding (DV), have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome), most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES) are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB), with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed. PMID:19009037

  11. Novel research approaches for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: thinking beyond the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bavendam, Tamara; Kirkali, Ziya; Kusek, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite years of basic and clinical research focused on interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), including clinical trials of candidate therapies, there remains an insufficient understanding of underlying cause(s), important clinical features and a lack of effective treatments for this syndrome. Progress has been limited and is likely due to many factors, including a primary focus on the bladder and lower urinary tract as origin of symptoms without adequately considering the potential influence of other local (pelvic) or systemic factors. Traditionally, there has been a lack of sufficiently diverse expertise and application of novel, integrated methods to study this syndrome. However, some important insights have been gained. For example, epidemiological studies have revealed that IC/BPS is commonly associated with other chronic pain conditions, including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome. These observations suggest that IC/BPS may involve systemic pathophysiology, including alterations of the central nervous system in some patients. Furthermore, there may be multiple causes and contributing factors that manifest in the symptoms of IC/BPS leading to multiple patient sub-groups or phenotypes. Innovative research is necessary to allow for a more complete description of the relationship between this syndrome and other disorders with overlapping symptoms. This report provides examples of such innovative research studies and their findings which have the potential to provide fresh insights into IC/BPS and disorders associated with chronic pain through characterization of broad physiologic systems, as well as assessment of the contribution of the bladder and lower urinary tract. They may also serve as models for future investigation of symptom-based urologic and non-urologic disorders that may remain incompletely characterized by previous, more traditional research approaches. Furthermore, it is anticipated a more holistic

  12. Effect of genetic SSTR4 ablation on inflammatory peptide and receptor expression in the non-inflamed and inflamed murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Van Op den Bosch, Joeri; Torfs, Pascal; De Winter, Benedicte Y; De Man, Joris G; Pelckmans, Paul A; Van Marck, Eric; Grundy, David; Van Nassauw, Luc; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2009-09-01

    The recently suggested pivotal role of somatostatin (SOM) receptor 4 (SSTR4) in inflammation and nociception in several non-intestinal organs and in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, necessitates exploration of the role of SSTR4 in GI pathophysiology. Therefore, the role of SSTR4 in GI activity was explored by investigating the effects of SSTR4 deficiency on intestinal motility, smooth muscle contractility and on the expression of SSTRs and neuropeptides in the healthy and Schistosoma mansoni-infected murine small intestine. Functional experiments revealed no differences in intestinal motility or smooth muscle cell contractility between wild-type and SSTR4 knockout (SSTR4(-/-)) mice in physiological conditions. As revealed by multiple immunofluorescent labellings, RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qPCR), genetic deficiency of SSTR4 considerably altered the expression of SOM and SSTRs in non-inflamed and inflamed conditions, affecting both extrinsic and intrinsic components of the intestinal innervation, along with SSTR expression in several non-neuronal cell types. Moreover, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression were significantly elevated in SSTR4(-/-) mice, confirming the modulatory role of SSTR4 on intestinal pro-inflammatory neuropeptide expression. These data suggest that SSTR4 plays a previously unexpected modulatory role in the regulation of intestinal SSTR expression. Moreover, in addition to the recently described inhibitory effects of SSTR4 on the neuronal release of pro-inflammatory peptides, SSTR4 appears also to be involved in the neuronal expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory peptides in the murine small intestine.

  13. Overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Franco, Israel

    2016-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a ubiquitous syndrome that is defined by urinary urgency with, or without urinary incontinence. OAB is observed in all parts of the world, with a prevalence of 5-12% in children (5-10 years of age) and a prevalence of 0.5% in older adolescents (16-18 years of age). Published data indicate that around a third of children with OAB are likely to become adults with similar complaints. Studies in children and in adults with OAB indicate that these individuals are more likely to also have anxiety, depression and attention deficit problems, and that appropriate treatment of these comorbidities can often improve the patient's OAB symptoms. Furthermore, data from twin studies and familial surveys seem to indicate a genetic component of OAB. Pharmacological treatments of OAB in children have improved in the past 5 years, moving beyond anticholinergic agents and including the off-label use of α-blockers, β3-agonists and intravesical botulinum toxin. Use of several different electrical stimulation techniques is also effective, both as first-line treatments, and for patients with treatment-refractory symptoms. Overall the outlook of children with OAB seems to be improving, with a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Treatment modalities that target the source of the underlying problem, especially in children, are likely to provide the best patient outcomes.

  14. Overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Franco, Israel

    2016-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a ubiquitous syndrome that is defined by urinary urgency with, or without urinary incontinence. OAB is observed in all parts of the world, with a prevalence of 5-12% in children (5-10 years of age) and a prevalence of 0.5% in older adolescents (16-18 years of age). Published data indicate that around a third of children with OAB are likely to become adults with similar complaints. Studies in children and in adults with OAB indicate that these individuals are more likely to also have anxiety, depression and attention deficit problems, and that appropriate treatment of these comorbidities can often improve the patient's OAB symptoms. Furthermore, data from twin studies and familial surveys seem to indicate a genetic component of OAB. Pharmacological treatments of OAB in children have improved in the past 5 years, moving beyond anticholinergic agents and including the off-label use of α-blockers, β3-agonists and intravesical botulinum toxin. Use of several different electrical stimulation techniques is also effective, both as first-line treatments, and for patients with treatment-refractory symptoms. Overall the outlook of children with OAB seems to be improving, with a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Treatment modalities that target the source of the underlying problem, especially in children, are likely to provide the best patient outcomes. PMID:27530266

  15. [Multiple bladder diverticula caused by occipital horn syndrome].

    PubMed

    Legros, L; Revencu, N; Nassogne, M-C; Wese, F-X; Feyaerts, A

    2015-11-01

    We report on the case of a child who presented with recurrent, multiple, and voluminous bladder diverticula. Bladder diverticula are defined as a herniation of the mucosa through the bladder muscle or the detrusor. Causes are numerous and diverticula can be classified into primary congenital diverticula (para-ureteral - or Hutch diverticula - and posterolateral diverticula); secondary diverticula (resulting from chronic mechanical obstruction or from neurological disease; and diverticula secondary to connective tissue or muscle fragility. The latter is seen in disease entities such as prune belly syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, cutis laxa syndrome, OHS (occipital horn syndrome), Menkes disease, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. In this patient, the cause of these diverticula was OHS, a genetic, recessive X-chromosome-linked syndrome, responsible for abnormal tissue caused by a disorder in copper metabolism. This case reminds us of the importance of pushing the diagnostic workup when presented with multiple and/or large bladder diverticula, and in particular to search for rare malformation syndromes after exclusion of an obstacle. PMID:26386812

  16. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; MacDiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-01-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, ‘healthy’ bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the

  17. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB); A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sawalmeh, Haitham; Al-Ozaibi, Labib; Hussein, Ahmed; Al-Badri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous urinary bladder rupture is a rare urological emergency. It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology and it is an uncommon complication of urosepsis. We report a case of spontaneous urinary bladder rupture as a complication of urosepsis in a 67 year old male patient, who was admitted as a case of left diabetic foot and urinary tract infection. Case presentation A 67 year old male patient with a long standing indwelling urinary catheter and chronic cystitis developed acute peritonitis. Intraoperative finding was ruptured urinary bladder. Discussion A few cases of spontaneous urinary bladder rupture due to infection were found in literature. The majority of the patients present with diffuse abdominal pain, and tenderness due to chemical peritonitis. In the majority of cases the bladder perforation was diagnosed intra-operative. Conclusion A diagnosis of spontaneous perforation of the bladder should be considered in patients presenting with an acute abdomen. The general surgeon is more likely than the urologist to encounter such patients in the first instance. There should be a high index of suspicion in patients with an acute abdomen and have associated urinary bladder condition. PMID:26451645

  18. Metastatic cancer of the urinary bladder: can it be a nonnatural death?

    PubMed

    Dolinak, David

    2007-09-01

    Deaths from metastatic carcinoma are almost exclusively viewed as wholly natural deaths. However, if it can be shown that a cancer has arisen as a result of a prior traumatic injury and the body's healing response to the injury, or treatment thereof, then in select cases, the manner of death shall reflect that of the precipitating injury. This case report is that of a woman who was rendered quadriplegic from spinal cord injury sustained in a motor vehicle crash when she was 22 years old. She died at the age of 49 years from widely metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. Her bladder cancer most likely arose from decades-long chronic irritation of the bladder epithelium by physical contact with an indwelling Foley catheter and urinary infections. Over the years, the chronic bladder irritation likely precipitated metaplastic, dysplastic, and finally neoplastic changes of the bladder epithelium, providing a link between her spinal cord injury, the indwelling Foley catheter, and her bladder cancer, engendering an accidental manner of death. The manner of death reflected the circumstances of her injury that predisposed her to the cancer that eventually caused her death.

  19. Transcriptomic dose-and-time-course indicators of early key events in a cytotoxicity-mediated mode of action for rodent urinary bladder tumorigenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTOMIC DOSE- AND TIME-COURSE INDICATORS OF EARLY KEY EVENTS IN A CYTOTOXICITY-MEDIATED MODE OF ACTION FOR RODENT URINARY BLADDER TUMORIGENESISDiuron is a substituted urea compound used globally as an herbicide. Urinary bladder tumors were induced in rats after chronic die...

  20. Kidney transplantation in abnormal bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shashi K.; Muthu, V.; Rajapurkar, Mohan M.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural urologic abnormalities resulting in dysfunctional lower urinary tract leading to end stage renal disease may constitute 15% patients in the adult population and up to 20-30% in the pediatric population. A patient with an abnormal bladder, who is approaching end stage renal disease, needs careful evaluation of the lower urinary tract to plan the most satisfactory technical approach to the transplant procedure. Past experience of different authors can give an insight into the management and outcome of these patients. This review revisits the current literature available on transplantation in abnormal bladder and summarizes the clinical approach towards handling this group of difficult transplant patients. We add on our experience as we discuss the various issues. The outcome of renal transplant in abnormal bladder is not adversely affected when done in a reconstructed bladder. Correct preoperative evaluation, certain technical modification during transplant and postoperative care is mandatory to avoid complications. Knowledge of the abnormal bladder should allow successful transplantation with good outcome. PMID:19718334

  1. Establishment of a Persistent Escherichia coli Reservoir during the Acute Phase of a Bladder Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Matthew A.; Schilling, Joel D.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2001-01-01

    The vast majority of urinary tract infections are caused by strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli that encode filamentous adhesive organelles called type 1 pili. These structures mediate both bacterial attachment to and invasion of bladder epithelial cells. However, the mechanism by which type 1 pilus-mediated bacterial invasion contributes to the pathogenesis of a urinary tract infection is unknown. Here we show that type 1-piliated uropathogens can invade the superficial epithelial cells that line the lumenal surface of the bladder and subsequently replicate, forming massive foci of intracellular E. coli termed bacterial factories. In response to infection, superficial bladder cells exfoliate and are removed with the flow of urine. To avoid clearance by exfoliation, intracellular uropathogens can reemerge and eventually establish a persistent, quiescent bacterial reservoir within the bladder mucosa that may serve as a source for recurrent acute infections. These observations suggest that urinary tract infections are more chronic and invasive than generally assumed. PMID:11402001

  2. Intraperitoneally placed Foley catheter via verumontanum initially presenting as a bladder rupture.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Omer A; Jeong, Young Beom

    2011-09-01

    Since urethral Foley catheterization is usually easy and safe, serious complications related to this procedure have been rarely reported. Herein, we describe a case of intraperitoneally placed urethral catheter via verumontanum presenting as intraperitoneal bladder perforation in a chronically debilitated elderly patient. A 82-yr-old male patient was admitted with symptoms of hematuria, lower abdominal pain after traumatic Foley catheterization. The retrograde cystography showed findings of intraperitoneal bladder perforation, but emergency laparotomy with intraoperative urethrocystoscopy revealed a tunnel-like false passage extending from the verumontanum into the rectovesical pouch between the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum with no bladder injury. The patient was treated with simple closure of the perforated rectovesical pouch and a placement of suprapubic cystostomy tube. PMID:21935283

  3. Detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in inflamed dental pulp specimens from Japanese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ogaya, Yuko; Nomura, Ryota; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity has been implicated as a source of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood. Various PCR methods have been used to detect H. pylori DNA in oral specimens with various detection rates reported. Such disparity in detection rates complicates the estimation of the true infection rate of H. pylori in the oral cavity. In the present study, we constructed a novel PCR system for H. pylori detection and used it to analyse oral specimens. Firstly, the nucleotide alignments of genes commonly used for H. pylori detection were compared using the complete genome information for 48 strains registered in the GenBank database. Candidate primer sets with an estimated amplification size of approximately 300-400 bp were selected, and the specificity and sensitivity of the detection system using each primer set were evaluated. Five sets of primers targeting ureA were considered appropriate, of which a single primer set was chosen for inclusion in the PCR system. The sensitivity of the system was considered appropriate and its detection limit established as one to ten cells per reaction. The novel PCR system was used to examine H. pylori distribution in oral specimens (40 inflamed pulp tissues, 40 saliva samples) collected from Japanese children, adolescents and young adults. PCR analysis revealed that the detection rate of H. pylori in inflamed pulp was 15 %, whereas no positive reaction was found in any of the saliva specimens. Taken together, our novel PCR system was found to be reliable for detecting H. pylori. The results obtained showed that H. pylori was detected in inflamed pulp but not saliva specimens, indicating that an infected root canal may be a reservoir for H. pylori. PMID:25332373

  4. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C.; Fernandes, Ninoshka R. J.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell’s antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function. PMID:27790220

  5. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome complicated by aneurysmal aortitis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chin Soon; Hogan, Patrick; McKenzie, Scott; Gibbs, Harry; Strutton, Geoff; Wong, Richard

    2007-08-01

    "MAGIC syndrome" (Mouth And Genital ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage) has been proposed to describe patients with clinical features of both relapsing polychondritis and Behcet disease. A total of 18 cases have been reported with only 1 case associated with aneurysmal aortitis described in 1997. Herein, we describe a patient with MAGIC syndrome complicated by aneurysmal aortitis requiring cardiothoracic surgery and intensive immunosuppression. Monitoring for the possible development of inflammatory aortic aneurysms should thus be considered in patients with MAGIC syndrome who have persistently elevated serum inflammatory markers. If an aortic aneurysm is detected, cardiothoracic surgical referral is necessary, close monitoring for enlargement is mandatory, and intensification of immunosuppressive therapy should be considered.

  6. [Occupational hazards and bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Nizamova, R S

    1991-01-01

    Occupational exposure to health hazards was studied in 258 industrial workers who had developed cancer of the bladder against 454 matched controls. All the test subjects and controls were residents of the Tambov Province centers of chemical industry. Statistical significance (relative risk-4.7) was established for exposure to aromatic amines. For those contacting with aniline dyes the relative risk (RR) made up 2.4. The risk to develop bladder cancer in powder shops (RR-3.2) was attributed to the hazards of dyes and diphenylamine. In leather-shoe and textile industry the exposure to dyes was not safe (RR-6.1), neither was it to chemicals, oil products, pesticides, overheating (RR-3.2, 1.6, 3.2 and 2.9, respectively). It is stated that in line with a significant risk to develop bladder cancer at exposure to aromatic amines there exist a number of occupational factors contributing to this risk.

  7. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor.

  8. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  9. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  10. Leukocyte-inspired biodegradable particles that selectively and avidly adhere to inflamed endothelium in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhalkar, Harshad S.; Dalal, Milind K.; Salem, Aliasger K.; Ansari, Ramin; Fu, Jie; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Hanes, Justin; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Goetz, Douglas J.

    2003-12-01

    We exploited leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion chemistry to generate biodegradable particles that exhibit highly selective accumulation on inflamed endothelium in vitro and in vivo. Leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive particles exhibit up to 15-fold higher adhesion to inflamed endothelium, relative to noninflamed endothelium, under in vitro flow conditions similar to that present in blood vessels, a 6-fold higher adhesion to cytokine inflamed endothelium relative to non-cytokine-treated endothelium in vivo, and a 10-fold enhancement in adhesion to trauma-induced inflamed endothelium in vivo due to the addition of a targeting ligand. The leukocyte-inspired particles have adhesion efficiencies similar to that of leukocytes and were shown to target each of the major inducible endothelial cell adhesion molecules (E-selectin, P-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) that are up-regulated at sites of pathological inflammation. The potential for targeted drug delivery to inflamed endothelium has significant implications for the improved treatment of an array of pathologies, including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer.

  11. Monocyte-mediated delivery of polymeric backpacks to inflamed tissues: a generalized strategy to deliver drugs to treat inflammation.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gilbert, Jonathan B; Kumar, Sunny; Gupta, Vivek; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-02-10

    Targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents to inflamed tissues, as in the cases of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and arthritis, represents one of the major challenges in drug delivery. Monocytes possess a unique ability to target and penetrate into sites of inflammation. Here, we describe a broad approach to take advantage of the natural ability of monocytes to target and deliver flat polymeric particles ("Cellular Backpacks") to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks attach strongly to the surface of monocytes but do not undergo phagocytosis due to backpack's size, disk-like shape and flexibility. Following attachment of backpacks, monocytes retain important cellular functions including transmigration through an endothelial monolayer and differentiation into macrophages. In two separate in vivo inflammation models, backpack-laden monocytes exhibit increased targeting to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks, and their abilities to attach to monocytes without impairing monocyte functions and 'hitchhike' to a variety of inflamed tissues, offer a new platform for both cell-mediated therapies and broad targeting of inflamed tissues. PMID:25481443

  12. [Rare cases of bladder stones].

    PubMed

    Sampalmieri, Gregorio; Moretti, Antonello; Sampalmieri, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We present here two special cases of urolithiasis. The first one shows a giant bladder lithiasis resulting in severe renal insufficiency in a 63-year-old patient, who had previously had nicturia (2-3 times), occasional episodes of urinary frequency and burning micturition, in the absence of renal colic, hematuria or interrupted urination. The second case referes to an 85-year-old man suffering from prostatic enlargement and bladder stones, hospitalized to undergo intervention of trans-vesical prostatic adenomectomy, during which two star-shaped stones were found without obvious symptoms.

  13. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  14. Do antibiotics clear bladder infections?

    PubMed

    Reid, G

    1994-09-01

    An examination of transitional bladder epithelial cells from 69 urine specimens from 23 spinal cord injury patients showed the presence of adherent bacterial biofilms in 66 cases (96%). All patients were receiving antimicrobial therapy, primarily trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (41 of 69), without any apparent effect on the bladder colonization. The large number of bacteria that emerged with highly virulent and potentially multi-drug resistant characteristics, especially Enterococcus faecalis (33% of isolates), was of concern. These findings raise questions about the proved efficacy and effectiveness of antibiotics against uropathogenic biofilms adherent to tissues.

  15. Pharmacologic management of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sum; Hilas, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a prevalent and costly condition that can affect any age group. Typical symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence and nocturia. OAB occurs as a result of abnormal contractions of the bladder detrusor muscle caused by the stimulation of certain muscarinic receptors. Therefore, antimuscarinic agents have long been considered the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for OAB. Currently, there are five such agents approved for the management of OAB in the United States: oxybutynin, tolterodine, trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin. This article summarizes the efficacy, contraindications, precautions, dosing and common side effects of these agents. All available clinical trials on trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin were reviewed to determine its place in therapy.

  16. Dose Distribution in Bladder and Surrounding Normal Tissues in Relation to Bladder Volume in Conformal Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Wojciech; Wesolowska, Iwona; Urbanczyk, Hubert; Hawrylewicz, Leszek; Schwierczok, Barbara; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate bladder movements and changes in dose distribution in the bladder and surrounding tissues associated with changes in bladder filling and to estimate the internal treatment margins. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with bladder cancer underwent planning computed tomography scans with 80- and 150-mL bladder volumes. The bladder displacements associated with the change in volume were measured. Each patient had treatment plans constructed for a 'partially empty' (80 mL) and a 'partially full' (150 mL) bladder. An additional plan was constructed for tumor irradiation alone. A subsequent 9 patients underwent sequential weekly computed tomography scanning during radiotherapy to verify the bladder movements and estimate the internal margins. Results: Bladder movements were mainly observed cranially, and the estimated internal margins were nonuniform and largest (>2 cm) anteriorly and cranially. The dose distribution in the bladder worsened if the bladder increased in volume: 70% of patients (11 of 16) would have had bladder underdosed to <95% of the prescribed dose. The dose distribution in the rectum and intestines was better with a 'partially empty' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 23%, 20%, and 15% for the rectum and 162, 144, 123 cm{sup 3} for the intestines, respectively) than with a 'partially full' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 28%, 24%, and 18% for the rectum and 180, 158, 136 cm{sup 3} for the intestines, respectively). The change in bladder filling during RT was significant for the dose distribution in the intestines. Tumor irradiation alone was significantly better than whole bladder irradiation in terms of organ sparing. Conclusion: The displacements of the bladder due to volume changes were mainly related to the upper wall. The internal margins should be nonuniform, with the largest margins cranially and anteriorly. The changes in bladder

  17. Detecting bladder fullness through the ensemble activity patterns of the spinal cord unit population in a somatovisceral convergence environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Chang-Eop; Shin, Jaewoo; Im, Changkyun; Koh, Chin Su; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Sang Jeong; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Chronic monitoring of the state of the bladder can be used to notify patients with urinary dysfunction when the bladder should be voided. Given that many spinal neurons respond both to somatic and visceral inputs, it is necessary to extract bladder information selectively from the spinal cord. Here, we hypothesize that sensory information with distinct modalities should be represented by the distinct ensemble activity patterns within the neuronal population and, therefore, analyzing the activity patterns of the neuronal population could distinguish bladder fullness from somatic stimuli. Approach. We simultaneously recorded 26-27 single unit activities in response to bladder distension or tactile stimuli in the dorsal spinal cord of each Sprague-Dawley rat. In order to discriminate between bladder fullness and tactile stimulus inputs, we analyzed the ensemble activity patterns of the entire neuronal population. A support vector machine (SVM) was employed as a classifier, and discrimination performance was measured by k-fold cross-validation tests. Main results. Most of the units responding to bladder fullness also responded to the tactile stimuli (88.9-100%). The SVM classifier precisely distinguished the bladder fullness from the somatic input (100%), indicating that the ensemble activity patterns of the unit population in the spinal cord are distinct enough to identify the current input modality. Moreover, our ensemble activity pattern-based classifier showed high robustness against random losses of signals. Significance. This study is the first to demonstrate that the two main issues of electroneurographic monitoring of bladder fullness, low signals and selectiveness, can be solved by an ensemble activity pattern-based approach, improving the feasibility of chronic monitoring of bladder fullness by neural recording.

  18. Does central sensitization help explain idiopathic overactive bladder?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, W Stuart; Dmochowski, Roger; Wein, Alan; Bruehl, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) can include dysfunction of sensory pathways of the peripheral and central nervous systems, resulting in bladder hypersensitivity. Central sensitization describes an induced state of spinal hypersensitivity that is associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders that share many attributes with OAB, albeit without the presence of pain. As such, the concept of central sensitization might be relevant to understanding the mechanisms and clinical manifestations of OAB syndrome. An understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of central sensitization, and the evidence that supports a role of central sensitization in OAB, including the potential implications of mechanisms of central sensitization for the treatment of patients with OAB could provide a novel approach to the treatment of patients with this disease. Such an approach would be especially relevant to those patients with central sensitization-related comorbidities, and has the potential to improve the outcomes of these patients in particular.

  19. Does central sensitization help explain idiopathic overactive bladder?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, W. Stuart; Dmochowski, Roger; Wein, Alan; Bruehl, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) can include dysfunction of sensory pathways of the peripheral and central nervous systems, resulting in bladder hypersensitivity. Central sensitization describes an induced state of spinal hypersensitivity that is associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders that share many attributes with OAB, albeit without the presence of pain. As such, the concept of central sensitization might be relevant to understanding the mechanisms and clinical manifestations of OAB syndrome. An understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of central sensitization, and the evidence that supports a role of central sensitization in OAB, including the potential implications of mechanisms of central sensitization for the treatment of patients with OAB could provide a novel approach to the treatment of patients with this disease. Such an approach would be especially relevant to those patients with central sensitization-related comorbidities, and has the potential to improve the outcomes of these patients in particular. PMID:27245505

  20. Transcriptional Modulation of the ERK1/2 MAPK and NF-kB pathways in Human Urothelial cells after trivalent arsenical exposure: Implications for urinary bladder cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with an increased risk ofurinary bladder (DB) cancers in humans. Rodent models administered particular arsenicals have indicated urothelial necrosis followed by regenerative proliferation i...

  1. VIP-antiserum inhibits fluid secretion by the inflamed gallbladder mucosa.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, B; Theodorsson, E; Jivegård, L; Thune, A; Friman, S; Svanvik, J

    1994-01-13

    The inflammatory fluid secretion by the gallbladder mucosa in experimental cholecystitis is induced by an increased prostaglandin formation and is mediated by intramural nerves. In the present study the effect of VIP-antiserum on the inflammatory fluid secretion in the gallbladder was tested in a validated experimental model in cats. The animals were studied in acute experiments 6 weeks after a procedure when the cystic duct was tied and gallstones were implanted in the gallbladder. During basal conditions there was a continuous secretion of fluid into the lumen of the inflamed gallbladder averaging 0.43 +/- 0.18 ml/h. Injection of VIP antiserum, obtained from immunized rabbits and diluted with saline 1:10 in a bolus of 4 ml into the coeliac artery reversed this secretion into an absorption of 1.72 +/- 0.44 ml h-1 (P < 0.001). VIP-antiserum did not affect the fluid adsorption in control animals with an intact gallbladder and injection of control serum from rabbits not immunized to VIP did not affect fluid secretion in the inflamed gallbladders. The results support the idea that the inflammatory fluid secretion in the gallbladder mucosa is mediated by VIP-ergic nerve fibres.

  2. Reduction of sensory responses to passive movements of inflamed knee joints by hylan, a hyaluronan derivative.

    PubMed

    Pozo, M A; Balazs, E A; Belmonte, C

    1997-08-01

    Hyaluronan (sodium hyaluronate) is a glycosaminoglycan that is present in all joint tissues. Painful arthritic joints have been characterized by hyaluronan of reduced elastoviscosity. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether hyaluronan has an influence on joint nociceptor sensitivity and whether restoration of elastoviscosity would decrease nerve responses from nociceptive afferent fibers in arthritic joints. Nerve impulse activity was recorded from nociceptive afferent fibers of the medial articular nerve in anesthetized cats. An acute experimental arthritis was produced by intra-articular injection of kaolin and carrageenan. This caused, within 3 h, the development of ongoing nerve activity and enhancement of nerve impulse responses to passive movements in the normal range of the joint. Intra-articular injection of an elastoviscous solution of hylan, a hyaluronan derivative, significantly reduced both the ongoing activity and the movement-evoked responses in 1-2 h. This effect was not obtained when a nonelastoviscous solution of hylan was injected into the inflamed joint. The results indicate that intra-articularly injected elastoviscous solutions of hylan reduced nociceptive activity in inflamed joints through an elastoviscous, rheological effect on nociceptive afferent fibers through the intercellular matrix in which these fibers are embedded.

  3. Viscoelastic properties of the normal human bladder.

    PubMed

    Andersson, S; Kronström, A; Bjerle, P

    1989-01-01

    Continuous and stepwise cystometry were performed through suprapubic catheters in 12 healthy young subjects in order to assess passive viscoelastic variables of the normal human bladder during the collection phase. Elastic contants increased non-linearly with bladder distension. Relative elastic modulus and relaxation time of the bladder wall increased or tended to increase with bladder distension and infusion rate. There was considerable interindividual variation in all variables suggesting that discrimination between normal and abnormal bladder wall viscoelasticity may be difficult in routine clinical practice.

  4. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  5. Cancer of the Urinary Bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 76,960 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 16,390 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 587,426 people living with bladder cancer in ...

  6. Urothelial Bladder Cancer Urinary Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Noon, Aidan P

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Urothelial bladder cancer is the fourth most prevalent male malignancy in the United States and also one of the ten most lethal. Superficial or non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer has a high rate of recurrence and can progress to muscle invasive disease. Conventional surveillance requires regular cystoscopy and is used often with urinary cytology. Unfortunately, the cystoscopy procedure is invasive for patients and costly for health care providers. Urinary biomarkers have the potential to improve bladder cancer diagnosis, the efficiency and also the cost-effectiveness of follow up. It may also be possible for urinary biomarkers to help prognosticate particularly for patients with high-grade bladder cancer who may want enhanced assessment of their risk of disease progression. In this review the important historical urinary biomarkers and the newly emerging biomarkers are discussed. As will be presented, although many of the tests have good performance characteristics, unfortunately no single test can fulfill all the roles currently provided by cystoscopy and cytology. It is likely that in the future, urinary biomarker testing will be used selectively in a personalized manner to try and improve prognostication or reduce the necessity for invasive cystoscopy in patients understanding the limits of the test.

  7. [Specific types of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Bertz, S; Hartmann, A; Knüchel-Clarke, R; Gaisa, N T

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer shows rare variants and special subtypes with diverse prognostic importance and therefore may necessitate different therapeutic approaches. For pathologists it is important to histologically diagnose and specify such variants. Nested variants of urothelial carcinoma with inconspicuous, well-formed tumor cell nests present with an aggressive course. The plasmacytoid variant, which morphologically resembles plasma cells is associated with a shorter survival time and a high frequency of peritoneal metastasis. Micropapillary urothelial carcinoma with small papillary tumor cell islands within artificial tissue retraction spaces and frequent lymphovascular invasion also has a poor prognosis. Other important rare differential variants listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification are microcystic, lymphoepithelioma-like, sarcomatoid, giant cell and undifferentiated urothelial carcinomas. Additionally, there are three special types of bladder cancer: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the bladder. These tumors are characterized by pure squamous cell or glandular differentiation and are sometimes less responsive to adjuvant (chemo)therapy. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder mimics the neuroendocrine features of its pulmonary counterpart, shows an aggressive course but is sensitive to (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy. The morphology and histology of the most important variants and special types are discussed in this review. PMID:26782034

  8. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. Stem Cells in Functional Bladder Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Smolar, Jakub; Salemi, Souzan; Horst, Maya; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Conditions impairing bladder function in children and adults, such as myelomeningocele, posterior urethral valves, bladder exstrophy or spinal cord injury, often need urinary diversion or augmentation cystoplasty as when untreated they may cause severe bladder dysfunction and kidney failure. Currently, the gold standard therapy of end-stage bladder disease refractory to conservative management is enterocystoplasty, a surgical enlargement of the bladder with intestinal tissue. Despite providing functional improvement, enterocystoplasty is associated with significant long-term complications, such as recurrent urinary tract infections, metabolic abnormalities, stone formation, and malignancies. Therefore, there is a strong clinical need for alternative therapies for these reconstructive procedures, of which stem cell-based tissue engineering (TE) is considered to be the most promising future strategy. This review is focused on the recent progress in bladder stem cell research and therapy and the challenges that remain for the development of a functional bladder wall. PMID:27781020

  10. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  11. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF AP-1 IN HUMAN BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY INORGANIC AND METHYLATED ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential Activation of AP-1 in Human Bladder Epithelial Cells by Inorganic and Methylated Arsenicals

    Zuzana Drobna, Ilona Jaspers, David J. Thomas, and Miroslav Styblo

    ABSTRACT

    Epidemiological studies have linked chronic ingestion of drinking water contai...

  12. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENICAL EXPOSURES (SOT 2008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  13. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CULTURED HUMAN BLADDER CELLS AFTER TRIVALENT ARSENIC EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been associated with human cancers of the bladder, kidney, lung, liver, and skin. Inorganic arsenic is biotransformed in a stepwise manner via both a reduction and then an oxidative methylation step in which arsenic cycles between +5 and +3 oxidati...

  14. Knockdown of sodium channel NaV1.6 blocks mechanical pain and abnormal bursting activity of afferent neurons in inflamed sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A; Ye, Ling; Mao, Ju-Xian; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Inflammatory processes in the sensory ganglia contribute to many forms of chronic pain. We previously showed that local inflammation of the lumbar sensory ganglia rapidly leads to prolonged mechanical pain behaviors and high levels of spontaneous bursting activity in myelinated cells. Abnormal spontaneous activity of sensory neurons occurs early in many preclinical pain models and initiates many other pathological changes, but its molecular basis is not well understood. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 can underlie repetitive firing and excitatory persistent and resurgent currents. We used in vivo knockdown of this channel via local injection of siRNA to examine its role in chronic pain after local inflammation of the rat lumbar sensory ganglia. In normal dorsal root ganglion (DRG), quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that cells capable of firing repetitively had significantly higher relative expression of NaV1.6. In inflamed DRG, spontaneously active bursting cells expressed high levels of NaV1.6 immunoreactivity. In vivo knockdown of NaV1.6 locally in the lumbar DRG at the time of DRG inflammation completely blocked development of pain behaviors and abnormal spontaneous activity, while having only minor effects on unmyelinated C cells. Current research on isoform-specific sodium channel blockers for chronic pain is largely focused on NaV1.8 because it is present primarily in unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors, or on NaV1.7 because lack of this channel causes congenital indifference to pain. However, the results suggest that NaV1.6 may be a useful therapeutic target for chronic pain and that some pain conditions may be mediated primarily by myelinated A fiber sensory neurons. PMID:23622763

  15. Knockdown of sodium channel NaV1.6 blocks mechanical pain and abnormal bursting activity of afferent neurons in inflamed sensory ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Ye, Ling; Mao, Ju-Xian; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory processes in the sensory ganglia contribute to many forms of chronic pain. We previously showed that local inflammation of the lumbar sensory ganglia rapidly leads to prolonged mechanical pain behaviors and high levels of spontaneous bursting activity in myelinated cells. Abnormal spontaneous activity of sensory neurons occurs early in many preclinical pain models, and initiates many other pathological changes, but its molecular basis is not well understood. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 can underlie repetitive firing and excitatory persistent and resurgent currents. We used in vivo knockdown of this channel via local injection of siRNA to examine its role in chronic pain following local inflammation of the rat lumbar sensory ganglia. In normal DRG, quantitative PCR showed that cells capable of firing repetitively had significantly higher relative expression of NaV1.6. In inflamed DRG, spontaneously active bursting cells expressed high levels of NaV1.6′ immunoreactivity. In vivo knockdown of NaV1.6 locally in the lumbar DRG at the time of DRG inflammation completely blocked development of pain behaviors and abnormal spontaneous activity, while having only minor effects on unmyelinated C-cells. Current research on isoform-specific sodium channel blockers for chronic pain is largely focused on NaV1.8, because it is present primarily in unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors, or on NaV1.7, because lack of this channel causes congenital indifference to pain. However, the results suggest that NaV1.6 may be a useful therapeutic target for chronic pain, and that some pain conditions may be primarily mediated by myelinated A-fiber sensory neurons. PMID:23622763

  16. Overlap Chronic Placental Inflammation Is Associated with a Unique Gene Expression Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Kripa; Wang, Huaqing; Troncone, Michael J.; Khan, Waliul I.; Pare, Guillaume; Terry, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of the balance between maternal pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways is thought to allow an anti-fetal maternal immune response that underlies development of chronic placental inflammation. Chronic placental inflammation is manifested by the influx of maternal inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes, histiocytes, and plasma cells, into the placental membranes, villi, and decidua. These infiltrates are recognized pathologically as chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis. Each of these histological entities is associated with adverse fetal outcomes including intrauterine growth restriction and preterm birth. Studying the gene expression patterns in chronically inflamed placenta, particularly when overlapping histologies are present, may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s). Therefore, this study compared tissue with and without chronic placental inflammation, manifested as overlapping chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis. RNA expression profiling was conducted on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded placental tissue using Illumina microarrays. IGJ was the most significant differentially expressed gene identified and had increased expression in the inflamed tissue. In addition, IGLL1, CXCL13, CD27, CXCL9, ICOS, and KLRC1 had increased expression in the inflamed placental samples. These differentially expressed genes are associated with T follicular helper cells, natural killer cells, and B cells. Furthermore, these genes differ from those typically associated with the individual components of chronic placental inflammation, such as chronic villitis, suggesting that the inflammatory infiltrate associated with overlapping chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis differs is unique. To further explore and validate gene expression findings, we conducted immunohistochemical assessment of protein level

  17. Assessment of bladder wall thickness in women with overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Üçer, Oktay; Gümüş, Bilal; Albaz, Ali Can; Pekindil, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare bladder wall thickness (BWT) between female patients with overactive bladder (OAB) and aged-matched healthy controls. Material and methods Thirty-six female patients with OAB and 31 healthy women were enrolled in the present prospective observational study. Qmax and Qave were measured by using uroflowmetry in all of the women in the patient and control groups, and also maximum bladder capacity (MBC), post- void residual urine (PVRU), prevoiding and postvoiding BWT were measured by using transabdominal ultrasound. Lower urinary tract symptoms of the participants were assessed by using Overactive Bladder Version-8 (OAB-V8) and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF). All of the data were statistically compared between the patient and control groups. In the patient group, the relationships between parameters were evaluated correlation analysis. Results The mean age of the patients and controls were similar (respectively, 45.58±12.35 and 44.21±11.60 years (p=0.68). The mean pre- and post-voiding BWT, OAB-V8 and ICIQ-SF scores of the patients were significantly higher than the controls. In the patient group, the moderate positive correlations between BWT with Qmax (p=0.02) and Qave (p=0.02) were found. Conclusion This study showed that the BWTs of the female patients with OAB are higher than those of healthy women. Further studies should investigate the changes in BWT of patients with OAB after treatment of OAB. PMID:27274895

  18. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme

  19. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme

  20. Identification of a New Stromal Cell Type Involved in the Regulation of Inflamed B Cell Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Mionnet, Cyrille; Mondor, Isabelle; Jorquera, Audrey; Loosveld, Marie; Maurizio, Julien; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Ruddle, Nancy H.; Nowak, Jonathan; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Luche, Hervé; Bajénoff, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) stromal cells provide survival signals and adhesive substrata to lymphocytes. During an immune response, B cell follicles enlarge, questioning how LN stromal cells manage these cellular demands. Herein, we used a murine fate mapping system to describe a new stromal cell type that resides in the T cell zone of resting LNs. We demonstrated that upon inflammation, B cell follicles progressively trespassed into the adjacent T cell zone and surrounded and converted these stromal cells into CXCL13 secreting cells that in return delineated the new boundaries of the growing follicle. Acute B cell ablation in inflamed LNs abolished CXCL13 secretion in these cells, while LT-β deficiency in B cells drastically affected this conversion. Altogether, we reveal the existence of a dormant stromal cell subset that can be functionally awakened by B cells to delineate the transient boundaries of their expanding territories upon inflammation. PMID:24130458

  1. Sympathetic activation triggers endogenous opioid release and analgesia within peripheral inflamed tissue.

    PubMed

    Binder, Waltraud; Mousa, Shaaban A; Sitte, Nicolle; Kaiser, Myriam; Stein, Christoph; Schäfer, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Stress induces analgesia by mechanisms within and outside the brain. Here we show that the sympathetic nervous system is an essential trigger of intrinsic opioid analgesia within peripheral injured tissue. Noradrenaline, injected directly into inflamed hind paws of male Wistar rats, produced dose-dependent antinociception, reversible by alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-antagonists. alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors were demonstrated on beta-endorphin-containing immune cells and noradrenaline induced adrenergic receptor-specific release of beta-endorphin from immune cell suspensions. This antinociceptive effect of noradrenaline was reversed by micro - and delta-opioid antagonists as well as by anti-beta-endorphin. Stress-induced peripheral analgesia was abolished by chemical sympathectomy and by adrenergic antagonists. These findings indicate that sympathetic neuron-derived noradrenaline stimulates adrenergic receptors on inflammatory cells to release beta-endorphin, which induces analgesia via activation of peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15245482

  2. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC syndrome): a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Imai, H; Motegi, M; Mizuki, N; Ohtani, H; Komatsuda, A; Hamai, K; Miura, A B

    1997-11-01

    A 39-year-old woman had relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease, which was described as mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage syndrome (MAGIC). Serologic human leukocyte antigen analysis showed A24 (9), A31 (19), B56 (22), B62 (15), Cw6, DR4, DR9. Human leukocyte antigen allele analysis revealed DRB1* 0406/0901, DQA1* 0301/0301, DQB1* 0302/0303, DPB1* 0201/0501 through determining the genotype using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Treatment with methotrexate (5 mg/week) and pentoxifylline (300 mg/d) was effective to control oral ulcers, erythema nodosum, and arthritis.

  3. X-ray tube with a graphite field emitter inflamed at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Yusuke; Koike, Takayoshi; Hayama, Youhei; Jouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-01-01

    The authors developed a class of novel graphite-based field emitters, known as graphite field emitters inflamed at high temperature (GFEIHTs), which includes numerous edges and juts. The GFEIHT field emission characteristics are investigated in a vacuum tube (10−7 Pa), and an anode current exceeding 2 mA is obtained. The authors also fabricated tipped-off x-ray tubes using GFEIHTs. No degradation in the anode current is observed under the operating conditions of 16.6 kV anode voltage and 160 μA anode current. The current dispersion, defined as the standard deviation (σ)/mean over 24 h, is 2.8%. The authors successfully demonstrated radiography and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry using an x-ray tube with GFEIHT. PMID:23847750

  4. Cells Isolated from Inflamed Periapical Tissue Express Mesenchymal Stem Cell Markers and Are Highly Osteogenic

    PubMed Central

    Liao, James; Al Shahrani, Mohammed; Al-Habib, Mey; Tanaka, Toshinori; Huang, George T.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported the presence of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in inflamed pulp tissue. Here we asked whether MSCs also exist in inflamed periapical tissues resulting from endodontic infection. The objectives of this study were to detect the expression of MSC markers in periapical inflammatory tissues and to characterize isolated cells from these tissues. Methods Human periapical inflammatory tissues were collected and processed to detect MSC marker expression by immunohistochemistry. Cells were isolated and tested for cell surface marker expression by using flow cytometry and examined for multiple differentiation potential into osteogenic and adipogenic pathways. In vivo formation of mineralized tissues was assessed in a mouse model. Results Immunohistochemistry showed positive staining for MSC markers STRO-1, CD90, and CD146. Isolated cells at passage 0 appeared as typical fibroblastic cells, and a few cells formed colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs). After passaging, the CFU-F forming ability diminished dramatically, and the population doubling was up to 26. Flow cytometry data showed that these cells at passage 2 expressed low levels of STRO-1 and CD146 and moderate to high levels of CD90, CD73, and CD105. At passage 6, the levels of these markers decreased. When incubated in specific differentiation medium, cells demonstrated a strong osteogenic but weak adipogenic capacity. After in vivo cell transplantation, mineralized tissues formed in immunocompromised mice. Conclusions Human periapical inflammatory tissues expressed MSC markers, suggesting the presence of MSCs. Isolated cells exhibited typical mesenchymal cell immunophenotype with a capacity to form mineralized matrix in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21846537

  5. DPSCs from Inflamed Pulp Modulate Macrophage Function via the TNF-α/IDO Axis.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Zhang, Q Z; Karabucak, B; Le, A D

    2016-10-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) can be isolated from inflamed pulp derived from carious teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis (I-DPSCs), which possess stemness and multidifferentiation potentials similar to DPSCs from healthy pulp. Since macrophages-essential cell players of the pulpal innate immunity-can regulate pulpal inflammation and repair, the authors investigated the immunomodulatory effects of DPSCs/I-DPSCs on macrophage functions and their underlying mechanisms. Similar to DPSCs, I-DPSCs were capable of colony-forming efficiency and adipogenic and osteo/dentinogenic differentiation under in vitro induction conditions. I-DPSCs also expressed a similar phenotypic profile of mesenchymal stem cell markers, except a relatively higher level of CD146 as compared with DPSCs. Coculture of DPSCs or I-DPSCs with differentiated THP-1 cells, the human monocyte cell line, markedly suppressed tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) secretion in response to stimulation with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and/or nigericin. However, unlike TNF-α, the secreted level of interleukin 1β was not affected by coculture with DPSCs or I-DPSCs. Furthermore, DPSC/I-DPSC-mediated inhibition of TNF-α secretion by macrophages was abolished by pretreatment with 1-methyl-D-tryptophan, a specific inhibitor of indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), but not by NSC-398, a specific inhibitor of COX-2, suggesting IDO as a mediator. Interestingly, IDO expression was significantly augmented in macrophages and mesenchymal stromal cells in inflamed human pulp tissues. Collectively, these findings show that I-DPSCs, similar to DPSCs, possess stem cell properties and suppress macrophage functions via the TNF-α/IDO axis, thereby providing a physiologically relevant context for their innate immunomodulatory activity in the dental pulp and their capability for pulp repair.

  6. Tracking the Spatial and Functional Gradient of Monocyte-To-Macrophage Differentiation in Inflamed Lung

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Debasish; Jones, Stephen M.; Oswald, Erin M.; Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages are at the heart of the immune effector function in an inflammatory response. But because of the lack of an efficient imaging system to trace these cells live during their migration and maturation in their native environment at sub-cellular resolution, our knowledge is limited to data available from specific time-points analyzed by flow cytometry, histology, genomics and other immunological methods. Here, we have developed a ratiometric imaging method for measuring monocyte maturation in inflamed mouse lungs in situ using real-time using 2-photon imaging and complementary methods. We visualized that while undifferentiated monocytes were predominantly found only in the vasculature, a semi-differentiated monocyte/macrophage population could enter the tissue and resembled more mature and differentiated populations by morphology and surface phenotype. As these cells entered and differentiated, they were already selectively localized near inflamed airways and their entry was associated with changes in motility and morphology. We were able to visualize these during the act of differentiation, a process that can be demonstrated in this way to be faster on a per-cell basis under inflammatory conditions. Finally, our in situ analyses demonstrated increases, in the differentiating cells, for both antigen uptake and the ability to mediate interactions with T cells. This work, while largely confirming proposed models for in situ differentiation, provides important in situ data on the coordinated site-specific recruitment and differentiation of these cells and helps elaborate the predominance of immune pathology at the airways. Our novel imaging technology to trace immunogenic cell maturation in situ will complement existing information available on in situ differentiation deduced from other immunological methods, and assist better understanding of the spatio-temporal cellular behavior during an

  7. Visfatin as a Novel Mediator Released by Inflamed Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Romacho, Tania; Villalobos, Laura A.; Cercas, Elena; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Peiró, Concepción

    2013-01-01

    Background Visfatin is a multifaceted adipokine whose circulating levels are enhanced in different metabolic diseases. Extracellular visfatin can exert various deleterious effects on vascular cells, including inflammation and proliferation. Limited evidence exists, however, on the capacity of human vascular cells to synthesize and release visfatin by themselves, under basal or pro-inflammatory conditions. Methods and Results Intracellular visfatin was detected by Western blot in non-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). However, exposing HUVEC for 18 h to a series of pro-inflammatory stimulus, such as interleukin (IL)-1β (1 to 10 ng/mL), tumor necrosis factor-α (1 to 10 ng/mL) or angiotensin II (10 pmol/L to 1 μmol/L) markedly enhanced intracellular visfatin content. Using IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 18 h), it was determined that the increase in intracellular visfatin, which was paralleled by enhanced visfatin mRNA levels, relied on a signalling mechanism involving both nuclear factor-κB and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 activation. Moreover, IL-1β modified the sub-cellular localization of visfatin; while in non-stimulated HUVEC immunoreactive visfatin predominantly showed an intra-nuclear granular pattern, in IL-1β-inflamed cells an extra-nuclear filamentous staining, co-localising with F-actin fibers and suggesting a secretory pattern, was mainly found. Indeed, IL-1β promoted visfatin secretion, as determined by both ELISA and immunocytochemistry. Conclusions Human endothelial cells synthesize and release visfatin, particularly in response to inflammation. We suggest that the inflamed endothelium can be a source of visfatin, which arises as a local inflammatory mediator and a potential therapeutic target to interfere with vascular inflammation. PMID:24130902

  8. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xufang; Jiang, Hongwei; Gong, Qimei; Fan, Chen; Huang, Yihua; Ling, Junqi

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  9. Emulating a Fish Swim Bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesenka, James; Meredith, Dawn; Bolker, Jessica; Schubert, Christopher; Kraut, Gertrud

    2009-10-01

    The University of New Hampshire and the University of New England are developing biologically relevant physics laboratories for their predominantly health science audiences. Buoyancy plays an important role in a variety of biological processes. We describe an inexpensive laboratory activity based on the Cartesian Diver that allows students to quantitatively emulate the swim bladder of a fish. Inflation of the ``bladder'' is externally controlled through an external gas syringe or squeezing on the plastic water containment vessel (a 2L soda bottle). The students can accurately determine the volume of a ``fish'' at the point of neutral buoyancy by visual measurement of the trapped air pocket. A simple electronic gas pressure sensor allows the hydrostatic pressure on the fish to be analyzed simultaneously.

  10. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  11. [Oral anticholinergics in overactive bladder].

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    2006-07-01

    Behavioural therapy and anticholinergics are the mainstays in the treatment of symptoms of overactive bladder in patients with idiopathic and neurogenic detrusor overactivity; they are the first-line treatment. Oxybutynin, propiverine, tolterodine and trospium chloride as well as the "newcomers" solifenacin and darifenacin are comparable in regards to their efficacy. However, based on different pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics with different resorption velocity, different metabolisation and different CNS penetration, the profile of adverse events is different, qualitatively and quantitatively. Substances that are resorbed slowly or available as slow-release formulations are tolerated better. Lipophilic anticholinergics which pass the blood-brain barrier may compromise cognitive functions, especially in geriatric patients, who are already on cholinesterase inhibitors due to memory disorders. The following article gives an overview of the anticholinergics currently prescribed in patients with symptoms of overactive bladder with special attention to the influence of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics on the adverse events profile including possible CNS side effects.

  12. Surgical Options for Drug-Refractory Overactive Bladder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Starkman, Jonathan S; Smith, Christopher P; Staskin, David R

    2010-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom complex of urinary frequency, urinary urgency, and nocturia, with or without urgency incontinence. This syndrome is idiopathic in most instances without clearly defined pathophysiology. Studies clearly show that OAB negatively impacts health-related quality of life and impairs daily functioning in a large proportion of patients. Despite recent advances in drug delivery and improved tolerability of antimuscarinic drug class, a large percentage of patients remain refractory to conventional pharmacological therapy for this chronic condition. There are several unique and effective treatments that are available for this difficult population. We review the various surgical options within the urological armamentarium to treat patients with refractory OAB. PMID:20811558

  13. Association Between Overactive Bladder and Polyneuropathy in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder that often leads to complications. We aimed to correlate two complications of DM, polyneuropathy and hyperactive bladder syndrome, using noninvasive measures, such as screening tests. Methods We included 80 female and 40 male type 2 diabetic patients in this prospective study. Diabetic polyneuropathy evaluations were conducted using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions (DN4), and overactive bladder (OAB) evaluations were performed using the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-V8). The patients were also evaluated for retinopathy and nephropathy. The diabetic male and female patients with or without OAB were chosen and compared for microvascular complications (polyneuropathy, retinopathy, and nephropathy). Results There were no significant correlations between OAB and retinopathy as well as between OAB and nephropathy among diabetic patients (female patients, P>0.05; male patients, P>0.05). However, the patients with OAB were significantly more likely to develop polyneuropathy (female patients, P<0.05; male patients, P<0.05). Conclusions In diabetic patients, OAB and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are significantly correlated. These correlations were demonstrated using short, understandable, valid, and reliable disease-specific tests without invasive measures. Using these screening tests, both neurologists and urologists can easily diagnose these complications. PMID:27706007

  14. [Neurogenic bladder, 20 years later].

    PubMed

    Perrigot, M

    1995-10-28

    The therapeutic armamentarium--physical therapy, drugs, surgery--developed over the last 20 years now gives us the means of providing curative care to nearly all patients with manifestations of neuropathic bladder, meaning that the clinical examination and complementary tests must be conducted under strictly controlled conditions to identify the underlying mechanism. The examination of the perineum almost always reveals a defect when the origin is neurological but is often normal when gynaecologic or urologic factors are involved. Motor command, tonus, reflexes and sensitivity should all be carefully explored to distinguish between central and peripheral causes. Much progress has been made in complementary examinations. For example, nearly 100% of the neurological aetiologies can be identified with precision. Tests include electromyography of the perineum, measurement of the latency of the bulbocavernous reflex and that of the distal part of the internal pudental nerve. Complementary tests evaluating bladder and sphincter function include urine sediment with cytology, intravenous pyelography and echography of the urinary tract. Pressure measurements with cystomanometry, sphincterometry and flowmetry add further precisions. Whether the underlying mechanism of bladder dysfunction is purely neurological as is the case in many young patients with multiple sclerosis, spina bifida or caudia equina syndrome, results from several causes as in patients with Parkinson's disease and enlargement of the prostate, or is among the increasing number of post-radiation sequellae, the essential step is careful clinical examination and detailed interpretation of complementary examinations. Thus the wide range of techniques now available for the management of the neuropathic bladder can be adapted to each individual case according to the pathological processes causing the clinical manifestations. PMID:8545359

  15. Role of angiogenesis in urothelial bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Górnicka, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bladder cancer is the most common urinary tract malignancy in western countries. In recent years, extensive research has suggested that angiogenesis plays an important role in bladder cancer biology, contributing to tumor growth and progression. Material and methods In this review, we discuss general mechanisms of angiogenesis and highlight the influence of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, and cancer stem cells on bladder cancer biology, their relation to disease progression, and potential use in novel targeted therapies. Results Expression of a number of proangiogenic factors, including HIF-1, VEGF, bFGF, IL-8 and MMPs, as well as anti-angiogenic factor TSP-1, was found to be altered in bladder tumors. Involvement of cancer stem cells in bladder cancer development was also proposed. Conclusions High expression of most pro-angiogenic factors correlated with disease progression and shorter patient survival, but discrepancies between studies urge us to continue evaluating the significance of angiogenesis in bladder cancer. PMID:27729991

  16. UTIs in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Mona S; Mure, Amanda; Gomez, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) remain one of the most prevalent and frustrating morbidities for neurogenic bladder patients, and death attributed to urosepsis in the spinal cord injury (SCI) patient is higher when compared to the general population. Risk factors include urinary stasis, high bladder pressures, bladder stones, and catheter use. While classic symptoms of UTI include dysuria, increased frequency and urgency, neurogenic bladder patients present differently with increased spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary incontinence, and vague pains. Multiple modalities have been assessed for prevention including catheter type, oral supplements, bladder irrigation, detrusor injections and prophylactic antimicrobials. Of these, bladder inoculation with E. coli HU2117, irrigation with iAluRil(®), detrusor injections, and weekly prophylaxis with alternating antibiotics appear to have a positive reduction in UTI but require further study. Ultimately, treatment for symptomatic UTI should account for the varied flora and possible antibiotic resistances including relying on urine cultures to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:25113150

  17. [Overactive bladder syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Persson de Geeter, C

    2004-07-01

    According to recent terminology, the symptom complex of frequency and urgency with or without urge incontinence in childhood is called overactive bladder. The main etiologic factor seems to be a delayed maturation of complex neuroanatomic structures responsible for normal bladder control. Afflicted children show a typical pattern of reflex voiding with different degrees of severity. In many cases nocturnal incontinence is the main complaint and this may lead to the wrong diagnosis of nocturnal enuresis with resulting false treatment. The diagnostic work-up consists of standardized evaluation of children with enuresis and voiding dysfunction and should concentrate on the exclusion of any possible underlying neurological disorder. Treatment focuses primarily on behavioral modification and cognitive education with regard to bladder sensation and voluntary micturition. Muscarinic receptor antagonists are very useful as supportive medical treatment with a rather low rate of adverse effects. Children who fail to respond to treatment or children suffering from side effects can profit from alternative treatment modalities including biofeedback programs, pelvic floor stimulation, or acupuncture.

  18. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  19. The contribution of activated peripheral kappa opioid receptors (kORs) in the inflamed knee joint to anti-nociception.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sun Wook; Park, Eui Ho; Suh, Hye Rim; Ko, Duk Hwan; Kim, Yang In; Han, Hee Chul

    2016-10-01

    The systemic administration of opioids can be used for their strong analgesic effect. However, extensive activation of opioid receptors (ORs) beyond the targeted tissue can cause dysphoria, pruritus, and constipation. Therefore, selective activation of peripheral ORs present in the afferent fibers of the targeted tissue can be considered a superior strategy in opioid analgesia to avoid potential adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of peripheral kappa opioid receptors (kORs) in arthritic pain for the possible use of peripheral ORs as a target in anti-nociceptive therapy. We administered U50488 or nor-BNI/DIPPA, a selective agonist or antagonist of kOR, respectively into arthritic rat knee joints induced using 1% carrageenan. After the injection of U50488 or U50488 with nor-BNI or DIPPA into the inflamed knee joint, we evaluated nociceptive behavior as indicated by reduced weight-bearing on the ipsilateral limbs of the rat and recorded the activity of mechanosensitive afferents (MSA). In the inflamed knee joint, the intra-articular application of 1μM, 10nM, or 0.1nM U50488 resulted in a significant reduction in nociceptive behavior. In addition, 1μM and 10nM U50488 decreased MSA activity. However, in a non-inflamed knee joint, 1μM U50488 had no effect on MSA activity. Additionally, intra-articular pretreatment with 20μM nor-BNI or 10μM DIPPA significantly blocked the inhibitory effects of 1μM U50488 on nociceptive behavior and MSA activity in the inflamed knee joint. These results implicate that peripheral kORs can contribute to anti-nociceptive processing in an inflamed knee joint. PMID:27378583

  20. Review of intravesical therapies for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosamilia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic pain condition characterised by urinary frequency, urgency and pain or discomfort which the patient attributes to the bladder. It is a complex condition to manage and treat and requires a multi-disciplinary and multi-modal approach. As well as lifestyle and behavioural modifications, physical therapy and oral medications, intravesical treatments can be used in the treatment algorithm for BPS/IC. A number of intravesical agents are reviewed in this paper along with the available evidence for their use. PMID:26816864

  1. Gall-Bladder Agenesis and Associated Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Brian; Spigelman, Allan D.

    1995-01-01

    Congenital absence of the gall-bladder is a rare condition. It is sometimes associated with other congenital defects. We report here two cases of gall-bladder agenesis discovered at laparoscopy. Both had a history of skeletal and cardiovascular anomalies. The investigation of patients with absent gall-bladder can be very difficult. Ultrasound scanning is usually inconclusive and further noninvasive tests should be performed to establish the diagnosis and prevent an unnecessary operation. The presence of other congenital defects should alert the clinician to the possibility of gall-bladder agenesis. PMID:18612357

  2. Intravesical drug delivery for dysfunctional bladder.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Chien; Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chancellor, Michael B

    2013-06-01

    The bladder is a hollow organ that can be treated locally by transurethral catheter for intravesical drug instillation or cystoscopy for intravesical drug injection. With advancing technology, local organ-specific therapy and drug delivery is of expanding interest for treating dysfunctional bladder, including interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, overactive bladder and sterile hemorrhagic cystitis after chemotherapy or pelvic radiation. Intravesical therapy has shown varying degrees of efficacy and safety in treating interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, overactive bladder and hemorrhagic cystitis with new modalities being developed. Intravesical (regional) therapy has several advantages than oral (systemic) therapy, including high local concentration and less systemic toxicity. In recent years, intravesical delivery of biotechnological products including neurotoxins and immunosuppressive agents, and delivery platform including liposomes has shown promise for lower urinary tract symptoms. This review considers the current status of intravesical therapy in dysfunctional bladder including interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, overactive bladder and hemorrhagic cystitis with special attention to lipid based novel drug-delivery.

  3. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  4. Elevated bladder cancer risk due to colorants--a statewide case-control study in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Heitmann, Peter; Gieseler, Frank; Hodzic, Jasmin; Masche, Nicolas; Bolt, Hermann M; Geller, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Occupational exposure to aromatic amines is a known bladder cancer risk factor, whereas the impact of exposure to azo dyes, which may release aromatic amines in humans, is at present controversial. Therefore, the impact of occupational exposures to colorants was investigated in 156 bladder cancer cases and 336 controls in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. All bladder cancer cases and controls (diagnosed with prostate cancer) requested after-care treatment. The subjects were investigated using a questionnaire for all occupations ever performed for more than 6 mo and for exposures to several possible occupational and nonoccupational bladder carcinogens. The relative bladder cancer risk was adjusted for age and smoking. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for bladder cancer was elevated in 7 painters (OR 1.98, 95% CI 0.64-6.11), 4 hairdressers (OR 4.9, 95% CI 0.85-28.39), and 16 cases who reported a wood processing occupation (OR 1.19, 95% CI 0.58-2.41). Ten of these 16 cases reported chronic exposure to colorants (OR 1.84, 95% CI 0.68-4.95). The results of this epidemiological study confirm the hypothesis that individuals exposed to colorants show an elevated bladder cancer risk.

  5. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V) ) changed the expressions of proliferative related factors and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhang; Shengnan, Liu; Fei, Wang; Yingli, Song; Qingshan, Sun; Wei, Sheng; Shuhua, Xi; Guifan, Sun

    2015-02-01

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V) ), the major urinary metabolite of inorganic arsenic, is a urinary bladder carcinogen and bladder tumor promoter in adult rats. Increased urothelial cellular proliferation has been considered as an earlier phenotype in DMA(V) -induced bladder carcinogenesis. The present study examined the ultrastructural changes of bladder epithelial cells and expressions of proliferation factors, as well as the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in rats exposed to DMA(V) for 10 weeks by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical staining and ELISA methods. The results showed that DMA(V) administered in the drinking water produced urothelial cytotoxicity and ultrastructural changes in rats. PCNA, cyclin D1 and COX-2 mRNA expressions and immunoreactivities were elevated in bladder urothelium. In addition, 200 ppm DMA(V) treatment increased the transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) secretion and decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-α level in the urine of rats. These data suggest that chronic inflammation, bladder epithelium lesions and proliferation might be the basic process of the chronic toxicity effects in DMA(V) -treated rats.

  6. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V) ) changed the expressions of proliferative related factors and secretion of inflammatory cytokines in rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhang; Shengnan, Liu; Fei, Wang; Yingli, Song; Qingshan, Sun; Wei, Sheng; Shuhua, Xi; Guifan, Sun

    2015-02-01

    Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V) ), the major urinary metabolite of inorganic arsenic, is a urinary bladder carcinogen and bladder tumor promoter in adult rats. Increased urothelial cellular proliferation has been considered as an earlier phenotype in DMA(V) -induced bladder carcinogenesis. The present study examined the ultrastructural changes of bladder epithelial cells and expressions of proliferation factors, as well as the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in rats exposed to DMA(V) for 10 weeks by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical staining and ELISA methods. The results showed that DMA(V) administered in the drinking water produced urothelial cytotoxicity and ultrastructural changes in rats. PCNA, cyclin D1 and COX-2 mRNA expressions and immunoreactivities were elevated in bladder urothelium. In addition, 200 ppm DMA(V) treatment increased the transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) secretion and decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-α level in the urine of rats. These data suggest that chronic inflammation, bladder epithelium lesions and proliferation might be the basic process of the chronic toxicity effects in DMA(V) -treated rats. PMID:24832369

  7. Effect of Dietary Treatment with Dimethylarsinous Acid (DMAIII) on the Urinary Bladder Epithelium of Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase (As3mt) Knockout and C57BL/6 Wild Type Female Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is carcinogenic to the human urinary bladder. It produces urothelial cytotoxicity and proliferation in rats and mice. DMAv, a major methylated urinary metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder carcinogen, but without effects on the...

  8. Urinary Bladder Cancer in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samawi, Abdullah Saleh; Aulaqi, Saleh Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study are to highlight the clinicopathological features of urinary bladder cancer in Yemen, and to describe the histological grading of urothelial neoplasms according to the World Health Organization and International Society of Urologic pathology (WHO/ISUP 1998) classification. Methods This is a descriptive record-based study of 316 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed by two pathologists at the Department of pathology, Sana'a University from 1st January 2005 to 30th April 2009. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and categorized according to WHO/ISUP 1998 classification. Results Out of 316 urinary bladder cancers, 248 (78%) were urothelial neoplasms, 53 (17%) were squamous cell carcinoma, 7 (2%) were adenocarcinoma, and 3 (1%) were rhabdomyosarcoma. The remaining cases were metastatic carcinomas (n=3), small cell carcinoma (n=1), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=1). The urothelial neoplasms observed were carcinoma in situ 4 (2%), papilloma 7 (3%), papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential 26 (11%), papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade 107 (43%), papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 18 (7%), and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 85 (34%), with 60 years mean age for males and 58 years for females; along with a male to female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was observed in the 61-70 years age group. Conclusion This study documents a high frequency of urothelial neoplasms, mostly papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade with male preponderance and peak incidence in 6th decade of age. PMID:24044060

  9. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  10. Bladder cancer documentation of causes: multilingual questionnaire, 'bladder cancer doc'.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Abreu-Villaca, Yael; Anbari Attar, Rowshanak; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Aslam, Muhammad; Basaran, Nursen; Belik, Rouslana; Butryee, Chaniphun; Dalpiaz, Orietta; Dzhusupov, Keneshbek; Ecke, Thorsten H; Galambos, Henrieta; Galambos, Henrieta; Gerilovica, Helena; Gerullis, Holger; Gonzalez, Patricia Casares; Goossens, Maria E; Gorgishvili-Hermes, Lela; Heyns, Chris F; Hodzic, Jasmin; Ikoma, Fumihiko; Jichlinski, Patrice; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Martinova, Irina; Mittal, Rama Devi; Ravichandran, Beerappa; Romics, Imre; Roy, Bidyut; Rungkat-Zakaria, Fransiska; Rydzynski, Konrad; Scutaru, Cristian; Shen, Jianhua; Soufi, Maria; Toguzbaeva, Karlygash; Vu Duc, Trinh; Widera, Agata; Wishahi, Mohamed; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-06-01

    There is a considerable discrepancy between the number of identified occupational-related bladder cancer cases and the estimated numbers particularly in emerging nations or less developed countries where suitable approaches are less or even not known. Thus, within a project of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health, a questionnaire of the Dortmund group, applied in different studies, was translated into more than 30 languages (Afrikaans, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Korean, Latvian, Malay, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese/Brazilian, Romanian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, Spanish, Spanish/Mexican, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Vietnamese). The bipartite questionnaire asks for relevant medical information in the physician's part and for the occupational history since leaving school in the patient's part. Furthermore, this questionnaire is asking for intensity and frequency of certain occupational and non-occupational risk factors. The literature regarding occupations like painter, hairdresser or miner and exposures like carcinogenic aromatic amines, azo dyes, or combustion products is highlighted. The questionnaire is available on www.ifado.de/BladderCancerDoc.

  11. Selected Th1 and Th2 cytokine mRNA expression by CD4+ T cells isolated from inflamed human gingival tissues

    PubMed Central

    FUJIHASHI, K.; YAMAMOTO, M.; HIROI, T.; BAMBERG, T. V.; MCGHEE, J R; KIYONO, H.

    1996-01-01

    Elevated numbers of plasma cells are associated with localized and chronically inflamed gingiva of patients with adult periodontitis. However, only limited information is currently available as to how cytokines produced by CD4+ T cells are involved in these increased B cell responses in affected gingival tissues. When gingival mononuclear cells (GMC) were isolated from inflamed tissues and examined by flow cytometry, ∼20–30% of lymphocytes were CD4+ T cells. For the analysis of Th1 and Th2 cytokine expression by these CD4+ T cells, RNA was extracted and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed by using specific 5' and 3' primers for interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-2 (Th1), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 (Th2) and β-actin (internal control). Two distinct cytokine profiles were noted based on the expression of selected Th1 and Th2 cytokines, where one pattern was represented by expression of mRNA for IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13, while the second consisted of mRNA for IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-13. In most samples, mRNA for IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 were not detected by cytokine-specific RT-PCR. When RNA was isolated from CD4+ T cells of concanavalin A-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear celts (PBMC) of the same patients and examined by RT-PCR. mRNA for all Th1 and Th2 cytokines were detected. These findings suggest that although human CD4+ T cells are capable of producing an array of Th1- and Th2-type cytokines, the CD4+ T cells associated with periodontitis are limited to production of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-13 and in some instances IL-10. CD4+ T cells from diseased periodontal tissues are divisible into two groups based upon whether or not IL-10 is produced, together with IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-13. PMID:8608641

  12. Clinical Impact of Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Nitti, Victor W

    2002-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a medical condition with the symptoms of urinary frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence. Traditionally, epidemiologic studies have focused on the symptom of incontinence, and therefore the prevalence and clinical impact have been grossly underestimated. Recently, several population-based studies have been conducted that have provided insight into the true magnitude of OAB. This article will review the latest data on the prevalence of OAB and discuss the impact of the condition on quality of life. Furthermore, it will examine some of the comorbidities associated with OAB and look at the potential economic impact of OAB. PMID:16986018

  13. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  14. Improved bladder emptying in urinary retention by electrical stimulation of pudendal afferents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Cheng, Chen-Li; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-06-01

    Urinary retention is the inability to empty the bladder completely, and may result from bladder hypocontractility, increases in outlet resistance or both. Chronic urinary retention can lead to several urological complications and is often refractory to pharmacologic, behavioral and surgical treatments. We sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of sensory fibers in the pudendal nerve could engage an augmenting reflex and thereby improve bladder emptying in an animal model of urinary retention. We measured the efficiency of bladder emptying with and without concomitant electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents in urethane-anesthetized rats. Voiding efficiency (VE = voided volume/initial volume) was reduced from 72 ± 7% to 29 ± 7% following unilateral transection of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve (UST) and from 70 ± 5% to 18 ± 4% following bilateral transection (BST). Unilateral electrical stimulation of the proximal transected sensory pudendal nerve during distention-evoked voiding contractions significantly improved VE. Low-intensity stimulation at frequencies of 1-50 Hz increased VE to 40-51% following UST and to 39-49% following BST, while high-intensity stimulation was ineffective at increasing VE. The increase in VE was mediated by increases in the duration of distention-evoked voiding bladder contractions, rather than increases in contraction amplitude. These results are consistent with an essential role for pudendal sensory feedback in efficient bladder emptying, and raise the possibility that electrical activation of pudendal nerve afferents may provide a new approach to restore efficient bladder emptying in persons with urinary retention.

  15. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children with overactive bladder; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Rafiei, Mohammad; Salehi, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common childhood psychiatric disorder. This disorder is more prevalent in some chronic diseases. Objectives: To investigate ADHD in children with overactive bladder. Patients and Methods: A number of 92 children with overactive bladder and 92 healthy children without overactive bladder (age range of both groups 5 to 12 years old) were included in this study as case and control groups, respectively. Participants were selected from children who had referred to a pediatric clinic in Arak city, Iran. ADHD types (inattentive, hyperactive-impulsive, and mixed) were diagnosed by Conner’s Parent Rating Scale and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV-TR (DSM-IV-TR) criteria. Data were analyzed by chi-square and t tests. Results: In both groups, 51 children (27.7%) had ADHD. The prevalence of ADHD in the case group (33 cases, 35.9%) was significantly higher than the control group (18 cases, 19.6%) (P = 0.021). Inattentive ADHD was observed in 22 participants (23.9%) of the case group and nine participants of the control group (9.7%) (P = 0.047). Despite this significant difference, three (3.2%) and four (4.3%) children were affected by hyperactive-impulsive ADHD (P = 0.73), and eight (8.6%) and five (5.4%) children were affected by mixed ADHD (P = 0.42) in the case and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: ADHD bladder is significantly more common in children with overactive bladder than healthy children. The observed correlation between ADHD and overactive bladder makes psychological counseling mandatory in children with overactive bladder. PMID:27689122

  16. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children with overactive bladder; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Sharafkhah, Mojtaba; Rafiei, Mohammad; Salehi, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common childhood psychiatric disorder. This disorder is more prevalent in some chronic diseases. Objectives: To investigate ADHD in children with overactive bladder. Patients and Methods: A number of 92 children with overactive bladder and 92 healthy children without overactive bladder (age range of both groups 5 to 12 years old) were included in this study as case and control groups, respectively. Participants were selected from children who had referred to a pediatric clinic in Arak city, Iran. ADHD types (inattentive, hyperactive-impulsive, and mixed) were diagnosed by Conner’s Parent Rating Scale and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV-TR (DSM-IV-TR) criteria. Data were analyzed by chi-square and t tests. Results: In both groups, 51 children (27.7%) had ADHD. The prevalence of ADHD in the case group (33 cases, 35.9%) was significantly higher than the control group (18 cases, 19.6%) (P = 0.021). Inattentive ADHD was observed in 22 participants (23.9%) of the case group and nine participants of the control group (9.7%) (P = 0.047). Despite this significant difference, three (3.2%) and four (4.3%) children were affected by hyperactive-impulsive ADHD (P = 0.73), and eight (8.6%) and five (5.4%) children were affected by mixed ADHD (P = 0.42) in the case and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: ADHD bladder is significantly more common in children with overactive bladder than healthy children. The observed correlation between ADHD and overactive bladder makes psychological counseling mandatory in children with overactive bladder.

  17. Functional and biochemical characteristics of urinary bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To re-examine the function of the urinary bladder in vivo as well as to determine the functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan-induced diabetes rats. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were injected with alloxan and the animals showing blood glucose levels >300mg/dL together with age-paired untreated animals were kept for 11 months. Body weight, bladder weight, blood glucose, and urinary volume over a period of 24 hours were determined in both groups of animals. A voiding cystometry in conscious control and diabetic rats was performed to determine maximal micturition pressure, micturition contraction interval and duration as well as voided and post-voiding residual volume. In addition, concentration-response curves for bethanechol in isolated bladder strips, as well as [3H]-N methyl-scopolamine binding site characteristics in bladder homogenates were determined. Results Mean bladder weight was 162.5±21.2mg versus 290±37.9mg in control and treated animals, respectively (p<0.05). Micturition contraction amplitude (34.6±4.7mmHg versus 49.6±2.5mmHg), duration (14.5±1.7 seconds versus 23.33±4.6 seconds) and interval (87.5±17.02 seconds versus 281.11±20.24 seconds) were significantly greater in alloxan diabetic rats. Voided urine volume per micturition contraction was also significantly higher in diabetic animals. However the post-voiding residual volume was not statistically different. Bethanechol potency (EC50 3µM versus 5µM) and maximal effect (31.2±5.9g/g versus 36.1±6.8g/g) in isolated bladder strips as well as number (169±4fmol/mg versus 176±3fmol/mg protein) and affinity (0.69±0.1nM versus 0.57±0.1nM) of bladder muscarinic receptors were also not statistically different. Conclusion Bladder function in vivo is altered in chronic alloxan-induced diabetes rats without changes in functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors. PMID:26466064

  18. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-21

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  19. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  20. Expression and function of CXCL12/CXCR4 in rat urinary bladder with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Arms, Lauren; Girard, Beatrice M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines, otherwise known as chemotactic cytokines, are proinflammatory mediators of the immune response and have been implicated in altered sensory processing, hyperalgesia, and central sensitization following tissue injury or inflammation. To address the role of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in normal micturition and inflammation-induced bladder hyperreflexia, bladder inflammation in adult female Wistar rats (175–250 g) was induced by injecting cyclophosphamide (CYP) intraperitoneally at acute (150 mg/kg; 4 h), intermediate (150 mg/kg; 48 h), and chronic (75 mg/kg; every 3rd day for 10 days) time points. CXCL12, and its receptor, CXCR4, were examined in the whole urinary bladder of control and CYP-treated rats using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunostaining techniques. ELISAs, qRT-PCR, and immunostaining experiments revealed a significant (P ≤ 0.01) increase in CXCL12 and CXCR4 expression in the whole urinary bladder, and particularly in the urothelium, with CYP treatment. The functional role of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in micturition was evaluated using conscious cystometry with continuous instillation of saline and CXCR4 receptor antagonist (AMD-3100; 5 μM) administration in control and CYP (48 h)-treated rats. Receptor blockade of CXCR4 using AMD-3100 increased bladder capacity in control (no CYP) rats and reduced CYP-induced bladder hyperexcitability as demonstrated by significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in intercontraction interval, bladder capacity, and void volume. These results suggest a role for CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in both normal micturition and with bladder hyperreflexia following bladder inflammation. PMID:20032115

  1. Interplay between enterobactin, myeloperoxidase and lipocalin 2 regulates E. coli survival in the inflamed gut.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishal; Yeoh, Beng San; Xiao, Xia; Kumar, Manish; Bachman, Michael; Borregaard, Niels; Joe, Bina; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2015-01-01

    During an inflammatory response in the gut, some commensal bacteria such as E. coli can thrive and contribute to disease. Here we demonstrate that enterobactin (Ent), a catecholate siderophore released by E. coli, is a potent inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a bactericidal enzyme of the host. Glycosylated Ent (salmochelin) and non-catecholate siderophores (yersiniabactin and ferrichrome) fail to inhibit MPO activity. An E. coli mutant (ΔfepA) that overproduces Ent, but not an Ent-deficient double mutant (ΔaroB/ΔfepA), inhibits MPO activity and exhibits enhanced survival in inflamed guts. This survival advantage is counter-regulated by lipocalin 2, a siderophore-binding host protein, which rescues MPO from Ent-mediated inhibition. Spectral analysis reveals that Ent interferes with compound I [oxoiron, Fe(IV)=O] and reverts the enzyme back to its native ferric [Fe(III)] state. These findings define a fundamental mechanism by which E. coli surpasses the host innate immune responses during inflammatory gut diseases and gains a distinct survival advantage. PMID:25964185

  2. Granzyme activity in the inflamed lung is not controlled by endogenous serine proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, G M; Wolbink, A M; Cormier, Y; Hack, C E

    2000-10-01

    Numerous lung diseases, such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), are characterized by the presence of activated alveolar CTL and NK cells. Since these cells produce granzymes, granzyme A and B levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from 14 normal subjects and 12 patients with HP were measured by ELISA. Median (range) BAL granzyme A and B levels were 4 (0-37) and 0 (0-6) pg/ml in normal subjects. BAL granzyme levels were significantly higher in HP patients, being at 74 (0-1,889) and 10 (0-78) pg/ml for granzymes A and B, respectively. In vitro, neither of the three main serine protease inhibitors of the lung, namely alpha1-antitrypsin, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, and elafin, showed any effect on granzyme A or B activity. In addition, granzyme A was shown to be fully active in BAL fluids. Hence, these data show that granzyme activity may be poorly controlled by protease inhibitors in inflamed tissues. Thus, granzymes could contribute to tissue remodeling and inflammation characterizing HP.

  3. Relevance of Ultrastructural Alterations of Intercellular Junction Morphology in Inflamed Human Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Chin; Lee, Jeng Woei; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Yi, Chih-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Detailed characterization of the ultrastructural morphology of intercellular space in gastroesophageal reflux disease has not been fully studied. We aimed to investigate whether subtle alteration in intercellular space structure and tight junction proteins might differ among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods Esophageal biopsies at 5 cm above the gastroesophageal junction were obtained from 6 asymptomatic controls, 10 patients with reflux symptoms but without erosions, and 18 patients with erosions. The biopsies were morphologically evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, and by using immunohistochemistry for tight junction proteins (claudin-1 and claudin-2 proteins). Results The expressions of tight junction proteins did not differ between asymptomatic controls and gastroesophageal reflux disease patients. In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, altered desmosomal junction morphology was only found in upper stratified squamous epithelium. Dilated intercellular space occurred only in upper stratified squamous epithelium and in patients with erosive esophagitis. Conclusions This study suggests that dilated intercellular space may not be uniformly present inside the esophageal mucosa and predominantly it is located in upper squamous epithelium. Presence of desmosomal junction alterations is associated with increased severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Besides dilated intercellular space, subtle changes in ultrastructural morphology of intercellular space allow better identification of inflamed esophageal mucosa relevant to acid reflux. PMID:23875099

  4. Comparative Ability of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Different Tissues to Limit Neutrophil Recruitment to Inflamed Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Hafsa; Luu, Nguyet-Thin; Clarke, Lewis S. C.; Nash, Gerard B.; McGettrick, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are tissue-resident stromal cells capable of modulating immune responses, including leukocyte recruitment by endothelial cells (EC). However, the comparative potency of MSC from different sources in suppressing recruitment, and the necessity for close contact with endothelium remain uncertain, although these factors have implications for use of MSC in therapy. We thus compared the effects of MSC isolated from bone marrow, Wharton’s jelly, and trabecular bone on neutrophil recruitment to cytokine-stimulated EC, using co-culture models with different degrees of proximity between MSC and EC. All types of MSC suppressed neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium but not neutrophil transmigration, whether directly incorporated into endothelial monolayers or separated from them by thin micropore filters. Further increase in the separation of the two cell types tended to reduce efficacy, although this diminution was least for the bone marrow MSC. Immuno-protective effects of MSC were also diminished with repeated passage; with BMMSC, but not WJMSC, completing losing their suppressive effect by passage 7. Conditioned media from all co-cultures suppressed neutrophil recruitment, and IL-6 was identified as a common bioactive mediator. These results suggest endogenous MSC have a homeostatic role in limiting inflammatory leukocyte infiltration in a range of tissues. Since released soluble mediators might have effects locally or remotely, infusion of MSC into blood or direct injection into target organs might be efficacious, but in either case, cross-talk between EC and MSC appears necessary. PMID:27171357

  5. The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is a discriminator of macrophage function in the inflamed lung

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas J; Fujino, Naoya; Cook, Peter C; Svedberg, Freya R; MacDonald, Andrew S; Maciewicz, Rose A; Singh, Dave; Hussell, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Much of the biology surrounding macrophage functional specificity has arisen through examining inflammation-induced polarising signals, but this also occurs in homeostasis, requiring tissue-specific environmental triggers that influence macrophage phenotype and function. The TAM receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl and MerTK) mediates the non-inflammatory removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes through the bridging phosphatidylserine-binding molecules Gas6 or Protein S. We show that one such TAM receptor (Axl) is exclusively expressed on mouse airway macrophages, but not interstitial macrophages and other lung leukocytes, under homeostatic conditions and is constitutively ligated to Gas6. Axl expression is potently induced by GM-CSF expressed in the healthy and inflamed airway, and by type I interferon or TLR3 stimulation on human and mouse macrophages, indicating potential involvement of Axl in apoptotic cell removal under inflammatory conditions. Indeed, an absence of Axl does not cause sterile inflammation in health, but leads to exaggerated lung inflammatory disease upon influenza infection. These data imply that Axl allows specific identification of airway macrophages, and that its expression is critical for macrophage functional compartmentalisation in the airspaces or lung interstitium. We propose that this may be a critical feature to prevent excessive inflammation due to secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells that have not been cleared by efferocytosis. PMID:25603826

  6. Resveratrol suppresses PAI-1 gene expression in a human in vitro model of inflamed adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Zagotta, Ivana; Dimova, Elitsa Y; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Wabitsch, Martin; Kietzmann, Thomas; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels are associated with a number of pathophysiological complications; among them is obesity. Resveratrol was proposed to improve obesity-related health problems, but the effect of resveratrol on PAI-1 gene expression in obesity is not completely understood. In this study, we used SGBS adipocytes and a model of human adipose tissue inflammation to examine the effects of resveratrol on the production of PAI-1. Treatment of SGBS adipocytes with resveratrol reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments showed that obesity-associated inflammatory conditions lead to the upregulation of PAI-1 gene expression which was antagonized by resveratrol. Although signaling via PI3K, Sirt1, AMPK, ROS, and Nrf2 appeared to play a significant role in the modulation of PAI-1 gene expression under noninflammatory conditions, those signaling components were not involved in mediating the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 production under inflammatory conditions. Instead, we demonstrate that the resveratrol effects on PAI-1 induction under inflammatory conditions were mediated via inhibition of the NF κ B pathway. Together, resveratrol can act as NF κ B inhibitor in adipocytes and thus the subsequently reduced PAI-1 expression in inflamed adipose tissue might provide a new insight towards novel treatment options of obesity. PMID:23819014

  7. Gastrointestinal endocannabinoid system: multifaceted roles in the healthy and inflamed intestine.

    PubMed

    Smid, Scott D

    2008-11-01

    1. The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) system is emerging as a key modulator of intestinal physiology, influencing motility, secretion, epithelial integrity and immune function in the gut, in addition to influencing satiety and emesis. 2. Accumulating evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system may play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease, particularly in the light of recent studies demonstrating an effect of endocannabinoids on the development of experimental inflammation and linkages with functional clinical disorders characterized by altered motility. 3. The predominant endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, not only mediate their effects via two recognized cannabinoid receptor subtypes, namely CB(1) and CB(2), but emerging evidence now shows they are also substrates for cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2, generating a distinct and novel class of prostaglandin ethanolamides (prostamides) and prostaglandin glycerol esters. These compounds are bioactive and may mediate an array of biological effects distinct to those of conventional prostanoids. 4. The effects of prostamides on gastrointestinal motility, secretion, sensation and immune function have not been characterized extensively. Prostamides may play an important role in gastrointestinal inflammation, particularly given the enhanced expression of both COX-2 and endocannabinoids that occurs in the inflamed gut. 5. Further preclinical studies are needed to determine the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting the endocannabinoid system in functional and inflammatory gut disorders, to assist with the determination of feasibility for clinical translation. PMID:18671715

  8. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome. PMID:27293269

  9. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome. PMID:27293269

  10. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.

  11. Influence of rapid laser heating on the optical properties of in-flame soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffaripour, M.; Geigle, K.-P.; Snelling, D. R.; Smallwood, G. J.; Thomson, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    To understand the effect of rapid heating on the optical properties of in-flame soot and its potential influence on the laser-induced incandescence (LII) signal, the time-resolved extinction coefficient of soot is measured in diffusion and premixed flames during laser heating. Heating is performed using a 1064-nm pulsed laser with fluences ranging from 0.2 to 6.2 mJ/mm2. Extinction measurements are carried out using continuous-wave lasers at four different wavelengths. A rapid enhancement of extinction, by up to 10 % in the diffusion flame and 18 % in the premixed flame, occurs during laser heating most likely as a result of temperature-dependent optical properties and laser-induced thermal annealing of soot. The thermal expansion of flame gases causes a gradual decline of soot concentration for about 2 μs after the laser pulse. Significant loss of soot material by sublimation is observed at fluences as low as 1.03 and 2.06 mJ/mm2 for the diffusion and premixed flames, respectively. A secondary rise in extinction coefficient is observed from about 50 to 800 ns after the laser pulse at low monitoring wavelengths, attributed to the formation of light-absorbing gaseous species from the sublimated soot material. These effects may impact the LII signal and should be accounted for in LII analysis.

  12. Comparative analysis of Salmonella genomes identifies a metabolic network for escalating growth in the inflamed gut.

    PubMed

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-03-18

    The Salmonella genus comprises a group of pathogens associated with illnesses ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. We performed an in silico analysis of comparatively reannotated Salmonella genomes to identify genomic signatures indicative of disease potential. By removing numerous annotation inconsistencies and inaccuracies, the process of reannotation identified a network of 469 genes involved in central anaerobic metabolism, which was intact in genomes of gastrointestinal pathogens but degrading in genomes of extraintestinal pathogens. This large network contained pathways that enable gastrointestinal pathogens to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients as well as many of the biochemical reactions used for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars. Thus, comparative genome analysis identifies a metabolic network that provides clues about the strategies for nutrient acquisition and utilization that are characteristic of gastrointestinal pathogens. IMPORTANCE While some Salmonella serovars cause infections that remain localized to the gut, others disseminate throughout the body. Here, we compared Salmonella genomes to identify characteristics that distinguish gastrointestinal from extraintestinal pathogens. We identified a large metabolic network that is functional in gastrointestinal pathogens but decaying in extraintestinal pathogens. While taxonomists have used traits from this network empirically for many decades for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars, our findings suggest that it is part of a "business plan" for growth in the inflamed gastrointestinal tract. By identifying a large metabolic network characteristic of Salmonella serovars associated with gastroenteritis, our in silico analysis provides a blueprint for potential strategies to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients and edge out competing gut microbes.

  13. Specific Transfection of Inflamed Brain by Macrophages: A New Therapeutic Strategy for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Matthew J.; Zhao, Yuling; Harrison, Emily B.; Mahajan, Vivek; Ahmed, Shaheen; He, Zhijian; Suresh, Poornima; Hingtgen, Shawn D.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Batrakova, Elena V.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to precisely upregulate genes in inflamed brain holds great therapeutic promise. Here we report a novel class of vectors, genetically modified macrophages that carry reporter and therapeutic genes to neural cells. Systemic administration of macrophages transfected ex vivo with a plasmid DNA (pDNA) encoding a potent antioxidant enzyme, catalase, produced month-long expression levels of catalase in the brain resulting in three-fold reductions in inflammation and complete neuroprotection in mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD). This resulted in significant improvements in motor functions in PD mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that transfected macrophages secreted extracellular vesicles, exosomes, packed with catalase genetic material, pDNA and mRNA, active catalase, and NF-κb, a transcription factor involved in the encoded gene expression. Exosomes efficiently transfer their contents to contiguous neurons resulting in de novo protein synthesis in target cells. Thus, genetically modified macrophages serve as a highly efficient system for reproduction, packaging, and targeted gene and drug delivery to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23620794

  14. Lymphocyte binding to vascular endothelium in inflamed skin revisited: a central role for vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1).

    PubMed

    Arvilommi, A M; Salmi, M; Kalimo, K; Jalkanen, S

    1996-04-01

    The binding of leukocytes to vascular endothelium and their migration into tissues is mediated by adhesion molecules on the endothelial cells and leukocytes. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a 170-180/90-kDa endothelial molecule expressed most prominently in high endothelial venules in peripheral lymph node (PLN) type lymphatic tissues. VAP-1 mediates lymphocyte binding to PLN, tonsil and synovium. The expression of VAP-1 is induced in inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and gut inflammation. We examined the expression, structure and function of VAP-1 in normal and inflamed skin and compared it to those of other adhesion molecules implicated in skin homing. In psoriasis lichen ruber planus, pemphigoid and allergic lesions, VAP-1 was markedly upregulated. The expression of VAP-1 was also increased in biopsies of healthy skin of the patients. The VAP-1 molecule induced in skin is decorated with abundant sialic acids. VAP-1 inflamed skin is functional, since inhibition with anti-VAP-1 monoclonal antibodies caused a 60% reduction in lymphocytes adhesion to vascular endothelium. Antibodies against E-selectin, which has been regarded as the major vascular addressin directing cutaneous lymphocyte traffic, and, surprisingly, against peripheral lymph node addressin (PNAd), caused inhibitions of 30% and 60%, respectively, in the frozen section adhesion assay. These findings suggest important roles also for VAP-1 and PNAd in lymphocyte homing into inflamed skin. PMID:8625974

  15. Extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus attenuate bupivacaine-induced spinal neurotoxicity in pregnant rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Rui; Xu, Shiyuan; Wang, Liang; Lei, Hongyi; Cai, Qingxiang; Zhang, Hongfei; Wang, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus can relieve pain and promote repair of nerve injury. The present study intraperitoneally injected extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus for 3 and 4 days prior to and following intrathecal injection of bupivacaine into pregnant rats. The pain threshold test after bupivacaine injection showed that the maximum possible effect of tail-flick latency peaked 1 day after intrathecal injection of bupivacaine in the extract-pretreatment group, and gradually decreased, while the maximum possible effect in the bupivacaine group continued to increase after intrathecal injection of bupivacaine. Histological observation showed that after 4 days of intrathecal injection of bupivacaine, the number of shrunken, vacuolated, apoptotic and caspase-9-positive cells in the dorsal root ganglion in the extract-pretreatment group was significantly reduced compared with the bupivacaine group. These findings indicate that extracts from rabbit skin inflamed by the vaccinia virus can attenuate neurotoxicity induced by intrathecal injection of bupivacaine in pregnant rats, possibly by inhibiting caspase-9 protein expression and suppressing nerve cell apoptosis. PMID:25206391

  16. Specific accumulation of orally administered redox nanotherapeutics in the inflamed colon reducing inflammation with dose-response efficacy.

    PubMed

    Vong, Long Binh; Mo, John; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-07-28

    Although current medications for ulcerative colitis (UC) are effective to some extent, there are still some limitation of their use due to the non-specific distribution, drug metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract, and severe adverse effects. In our previous studies, we developed oral redox nanoparticles (RNP(O)) that specifically accumulated and scavenged overproduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in an inflamed colon. However, the mechanism leading to specific accumulation of RNP(O) in an inflamed colon is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the cellular uptake of RNP(O) into ROS-treated epithelial colonic cells in vitro, and compared to the untreated cells, found a significantly increased uptake in ROS-treated cells. In vivo, we discovered that orally administered RNP(O) were not internalized into the cells of a normal colon. A significant amount of disintegrated RNP(O) was detected in the cells of an inflamed colon of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis mice, resulting in scavenging of ROS and suppression of inflammation with low adverse effects. Furthermore, we confirmed a significant reduction of disease activity and a robust dose response efficacy following RNP(O) treatment in acute DSS-induced colitis mice, outperforming the positive control 5-aminosalicylic acid. Oral administration of RNP(O) is a promising approach to develop a new therapy for UC disease. PMID:25998050

  17. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  18. [Classification and natural history of bladder tumors].

    PubMed

    Allory, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Urinary bladder tumors are mainly of urothelial type. Classifications include stage and grade to provide with the required prognostic factors and help to select the most adequate treatment. Though somatic mutations in bladder tumors are known, their used for targeted therapy are restricted to clinical trials. Upper urinary tract tumors are classified as urinary bladder tumor at histological level, but tumor staging is specified according to calyx, renal pelvis or ureter location; in young patients with upper urinary tract tumor, a Lynch syndrome should be eliminated. PMID:25668829

  19. Bladder exstrophy: current management and postoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Ketsia; Borer, Joseph; Phelps, Andrew; Chow, Jeanne S

    2014-07-01

    Bladder exstrophy is a rare malformation characterized by an infra-umbilical abdominal wall defect, incomplete closure of the bladder with mucosa continuous with the abdominal wall, epispadias, and alterations in the pelvic bones and muscles. It is part of the exstrophy-epispadias complex, with cloacal exstrophy on the severe and epispadias on the mild ends of the spectrum. Bladder exstrophy is the most common of these entities and is more common in boys. The goal of this paper is to describe common methods of repair and to provide an imaging review of the postoperative appearances. PMID:24939762

  20. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis.

  1. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis. PMID:25926919

  2. Bladder reconstruction: The past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    EL-TAJI, OMAR M.S.; KHATTAK, ALTAF Q.; HUSSAIN, SYED A.

    2015-01-01

    Ileal conduit urinary diversion is the gold standard treatment for urinary tract reconstruction following cystectomy. This procedure uses gastrointestinal segments for bladder augmentation, a technique that is often associated with significant complications. The substantial progression in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine over the previous two decades has resulted in the development of techniques that may lead to the construction of functional de novo urinary bladder substitutes. The present review identifies and discusses the complications associated with current treatment options post-cystectomy. The current techniques, achievements and perspectives of the use of biomaterials and stem cells in the field of urinary bladder reconstruction are also reviewed. PMID:26170968

  3. Leptin consumption in the inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bokarewa, M; Bokarew, D; Hultgren, O; Tarkowski, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Leptin has been shown to participate in bone remodelling and leptin substitution reported to have a protective effect in experimental septic arthritis. Objective: To assess leptin levels in inflamed joints and plasma of patients with RA. Material and methods: Leptin concentrations were assessed in matched blood and synovial fluid samples from 76 patients with RA. Blood samples from 34 healthy subjects acted as additional controls. Results were analysed and correlated with duration and activity of RA, x ray changes, and treatment at time of sampling. Results: In patients with RA, leptin levels were significantly higher in plasma than in synovial fluid samples obtained simultaneously and higher than in control samples. Plasma and synovial fluid leptin levels correlated strongly. Locally in the joint, leptin levels were related to WBC count. Such a relation was not seen in the bloodstream. Leptin levels were not related to sex, age, or disease duration. Difference between leptin levels in plasma and synovial fluid was greater in non-erosive arthritis (5.1 (SEM 1.2) v 3.7 (0.9) ng/ml, p=0.006), than in patients with erosive joint disease (6.2 (1.0) v 5.4 (0.8) ng/ml, NS). Methotrexate treatment was associated with relatively high plasma leptin levels, while treatment with other DMARDs was associated with lower leptin levels than in patients receiving no DMARD treatment (p=0.0005). Conclusions: Leptin production was significantly increased in patients with RA compared with healthy controls. Synovial fluid leptin levels were significantly lower than in matched plasma samples, suggesting an in situ consumption of this molecule. PMID:12972473

  4. MR Imaging of Myeloperoxidase Activity in a Model of the Inflamed Aneurysm Wall

    PubMed Central

    Gounis, M.J.; van der Bom, I.M.J.; Wakhloo, A.K.; Zheng, S.; Chueh, J.-Y.; Kühn, A.L.; Bogdanov, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in vivo can be visualized using non-invasive imaging, successful clinical translation requires further optimization of the imaging approach. We report a motion-sensitized-driven-equilibrium (MSDE) for the detection of an MPO activity-specific gadolinium (Gd)-containing imaging agent (IA) in experimental aneurysm models that compensates for irregular blood flow enabling vascular wall imaging in the aneurysm. Materials and Methods We deployed a phantom model to optimize a MSDE MR sequence that suppresses complex flow patterns within the aneurysm for detection of an MPO-specific Gd-chelate. The phantom was built from rotational angiography of a rabbit elastase aneurysm model and connected to a cardiac pulse duplicator mimicking rabbit-specific flow conditions. Thereafter, we further refined the MSDE sequence and applied it in vivo to rabbit aneurysm models with and without inflammation in the aneurysmal wall. Under each condition, the aneurysms were imaged before and after intravenous administration of the IA. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of each MR slice through the aneurysm was calculated. Results The MSDE sequence was optimized to reduce flow signal enabling detection of the MPO-IA in the phantom. The optimized imaging protocol in the rabbit model of saccular aneurysms revealed a significant increase in the change of SNR pre- to postcontrast MR signal intensities in the inflamed aneurysms as compared to naïve aneurysms and the adjacent carotid artery (p<0.0001). Conclusion A diagnostic MR protocol was optimized for molecular imaging of an MPO-specific molecular imaging agent in an animal model of brain aneurysms. PMID:25273534

  5. Patrolling monocytes promote intravascular neutrophil activation and glomerular injury in the acutely inflamed glomerulus.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Michaela; Hall, Pam; Li, Anqi; Devi, Sapna; Westhorpe, Clare L V; Kitching, A Richard; Hickey, Michael J

    2016-08-30

    Nonclassical monocytes undergo intravascular patrolling in blood vessels, positioning them ideally to coordinate responses to inflammatory stimuli. Under some circumstances, the actions of monocytes have been shown to involve promotion of neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanisms whereby patrolling monocytes control the actions of neutrophils in the circulation are unclear. Here, we examined the contributions of monocytes to antibody- and neutrophil-dependent inflammation in a model of in situ immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Multiphoton and spinning disk confocal intravital microscopy revealed that monocytes patrol both uninflamed and inflamed glomeruli using β2 and α4 integrins and CX3CR1. Monocyte depletion reduced glomerular injury, demonstrating that these cells promote inappropriate inflammation in this setting. Monocyte depletion also resulted in reductions in neutrophil recruitment and dwell time in glomerular capillaries and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by neutrophils, suggesting a role for cross-talk between monocytes and neutrophils in induction of glomerulonephritis. Consistent with this hypothesis, patrolling monocytes and neutrophils underwent prolonged interactions in glomerular capillaries, with the duration of these interactions increasing during inflammation. Moreover, neutrophils that interacted with monocytes showed increased retention and a greater propensity for ROS generation in the glomerulus. Also, renal patrolling monocytes, but not neutrophils, produced TNF during inflammation, and TNF inhibition reduced neutrophil dwell time and ROS production, as well as renal injury. These findings show that monocytes and neutrophils undergo interactions within the glomerular microvasculature. Moreover, evidence indicates that, in response to an inflammatory stimulus, these interactions allow monocytes to promote neutrophil recruitment and activation within the glomerular microvasculature, leading to neutrophil

  6. [Management of metastatic bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Hélène; Serrate, Camille; Pouessel, Damien; Le Maignan, Christine; Teixeira, Luis; Culine, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The management of patients with metastatic bladder cancer is mainly based on cytotoxic chemotherapy. The reference molecule is cisplatin. In 2014, first-line regimens include gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC protocol) or methotrexate, vinblastine, and cisplatin doxorubicin (MVAC protocol). When cisplatin is contra-indicated, another platinum Salt, carboplatin, is used in combination with gemcitabine. Vinflunine is the only molecule to have obtained a marketing approval for patients who failed first-line chemotherapy including a platinum salt. The overall prognosis of patients remains dismal, since the median overall survival is 12 to 14 months for patients being treated with cisplatin, whereas it is less than 1 year for patients receiving carboplatin. The identification of new effective drugs is a major challenge for the coming years. PMID:25668832

  7. Differentiating bladder carcinoma from bladder wall using 3D textural features: an initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaopan; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Yang; Tian, Qiang; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating bladder tumors from wall tissues is of critical importance for the detection of invasion depth and cancer staging. The textural features embedded in bladder images have demonstrated their potentials in carcinomas detection and classification. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of differentiating bladder carcinoma from bladder wall using three-dimensional (3D) textural features extracted from MR bladder images. The widely used 2D Tamura features were firstly wholly extended to 3D, and then different types of 3D textural features including 3D features derived from gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and grey level-gradient co-occurrence matrix (GLGCM), as well as 3D Tamura features, were extracted from 23 volumes of interest (VOIs) of bladder tumors and 23 VOIs of patients' bladder wall. Statistical results show that 30 out of 47 features are significantly different between cancer tissues and wall tissues. Using these features with significant differences between these two types of tissues, classification performance with a supported vector machine (SVM) classifier demonstrates that the combination of three types of selected 3D features outperform that of using only one type of features. All the observations demonstrate that significant textural differences exist between carcinomatous tissues and bladder wall, and 3D textural analysis may be an effective way for noninvasive staging of bladder cancer.

  8. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: Can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    SciTech Connect

    Stam, Marcel R. . E-mail: m.stam@rther.umcn.nl; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. Results: A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 Sd = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. Conclusions: This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  9. Intravesical chondroitin sulphate for interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, DB; Curry, D; Cartwright, C; Downey, P; Pahuja, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the bladder. Bladder instillation is one avenue of treatment but evidence for its effectiveness is limited. Chondroitin sulphate solution 2.0% (Urocyst) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) replenishment therapy instilled for patients with IC/PBS. We assessed its effectiveness for treating IC/PBS in Northern Ireland. Methods Patients with IC/PBS were assessed with the O'Leary-Sant interstitial cystitis index score and global response assessment questionnaire prior to commencing treatment. Assessment with these questionnaires was performed after 6 treatments (10 weeks) and again after 10 treatments (24 weeks). Assessment end points were pain, urgency, symptom score and problem score. Results Data was collected on 10 patients, 9 female and 1 male. 6 patients had failed RIMSO-50 dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) 50% treatment prior. At baseline the mean pain score was 6.6, urgency score 7.00, symptom score 13.5 and problem score 12.5. After 24 weeks the mean pain score fell to 2.0, urgency score to 1.80, symptom score to 6.89 and problem score to 5.67. At 10 weeks the global response to treatment was 100%. Nocturia was the first symptom to improve with urgency and pain following. No side effects were noted during instillation and all patients tolerated the treatments. Conclusion IC/PBS is a difficult disease to treat. It requires a multimodal approach. We found that intravesical chondroitin sulphate reduced pain, urgency and O'Leary-Sant symptom and problem scores in patients with IC/PBS. All patients tolerated the treatment and no side effects were reported. PMID:26668417

  10. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  11. [Intradiverticular bladder tumors. Three case reports].

    PubMed

    Fekak, H; Rabu, R; Joual, A; Bennani, S; Moufid, K; Sarf, S; Debragh, A; el Mimu, M; Benjelloun, S

    2002-01-01

    The bladder tumours in vesical diverticula is rare, and the poor prognosis, because it was often with early invasion. We reported three cases of bladder tumours in vesical diverticula, with delay of diagnosis two, eight and twelve months respectively. The radiology exploration suspected the diagnosis and the histology biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of primary transitional cell carcinoma in two cases: PTa GI and T2 GII, and in an other case it was a invasive epidermoid carcinoma. The first patient was dead by urethral resection of the bladder tumour. The second required a cytoprototectomy and the last patient. The treatment consisted of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We insisted of the particularity diagnosis, histology and therapeutic for bladder tumour in vesical diverticula and the early diagnosis in order to have a good prognosis.

  12. Aging changes in the kidneys and bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... and urethra. Muscle changes and changes in the reproductive system can affect bladder control. Aging Changes and Their ... the bones, muscles, and joints In the male reproductive system In the female reproductive system In organs, tissues, ...

  13. A new technique for bladder washing.

    PubMed

    Miller, D C; Fitkin, D L; Kropp, K A; Selman, S H

    1992-01-01

    We describe a simple adaptation of the Water Pik (Teledyne Water Pik, Fort Collins, Colorado) irrigating device which allows vigorous, direct-vision agitation of the bladder wall. Three groups of mongrel dogs were subjected to cystoscopy and either syringe barbotage, half-speed Water Pik irrigation, or full-speed Water Pik irrigation of the bladder wall. Transitional cell counts were then done on centrifuged aliquots of each bladder wash specimen. The average number of transitional cells per high-power field were similar between the control group and the syringe barbotage group (2.5 and 1.5 respectively). However, both the half-speed and the full-speed Water Pik groups demonstrated statistically higher cell counts (5.7 and 13.7) when compared to both the controls and syringe barbotage groups. We conclude that Water Pik irrigation is an effective method to increase cell yield in bladder wash specimens. PMID:1729530

  14. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    MedlinePlus

    ... urination.  Urinary retention – trouble urinating or not completely emptying your bladder.  Constipation – being unable to have a ... or a specialist in medical problems of the stomach, intestines and associated organs.  Many nurses are trained ...

  15. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Events Upcoming and past meetings Follow Us Social media, RSS feeds, and more Follow Us Health Information > ... Chronic Pain Association American Pain Society American Urogynecologic ... Claimants' Representatives Social Security Administration United Ostomy ...

  16. Holmium laser lithotripsy of bladder calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Although the overall incidence of bladder calculi has been decreasing, it is still a significant disease affecting adults and children. Prior treatment options have included open cystolitholapaxy, blind lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and visual lithotripsy with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes. The holmium laser has been found to be extremely effective in the treatment of upper tract calculi. This technology has also been applied to the treatment of bladder calculi. We report our experience with the holmium laser in the treatment of bladder calculi. Twenty- five patients over a year and a half had their bladder calculi treated with the Holmium laser. This study was retrospective in nature. Patient demographics, stone burden, and intraoperative and post-operative complications were noted. The mean stone burden was 31 mm with a range of 10 to 60 mm. Preoperative diagnosis was made with either an ultrasound, plain film of the abdomen or intravenous pyelogram. Cystoscopy was then performed to confirm the presence and determine the size of the stone. The patients were then taken to the operating room and given a regional or general anesthetic. A rigid cystoscope was placed into the bladder and the bladder stone was then vaporized using the holmium laser. Remaining fragments were washed out. Adjunctive procedures were performed on 10 patients. These included transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral incision of the prostate, optic internal urethrotomy, and incision of ureteroceles. No major complications occurred and all patients were rendered stone free. We conclude that the Holmium laser is an effective and safe modality for the treatment of bladder calculi. It was able to vaporize all bladder calculi and provides a single modality of treating other associated genitourinary pathology.

  17. The "bends" and neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D S; Mutchnik, S; Boone, T B

    2001-02-01

    Decompression sickness (the "bends") is a well-known risk of scuba diving. The pathophysiology and treatment is well documented. In the urologic data, no reference to the development of a neurogenic bladder as a result of an episode of the bends was found. We present the evaluation and management of a previously asymptomatic man who developed detrusor hyperreflexia after an episode of decompression sickness. Urologists in coastal communities should be aware of the potential risk of the development of neurogenic bladder.

  18. Progressive changes in detrusor function and micturition patterns with chroinc bladder ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zuohui; Azad, Roya; Yang, Jing-Hua; Siroky, Mike B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are bothersome constellation of voiding symptoms in men and women as they age. Multiple factors and comorbidities are attributed to this problem but underlying mechanisms of nonobstructive nonneurogenic detrusor overactivity, detrusor underactivity and LUTS remain largely unknown. Our goal was to characterize detrusor function and voiding patterns in relation to muscarinic receptors expression, nerve fiber density, and neural ultrastructure in chronic bladder ischemia. Materials and Methods Iliac artery atherosclerosis and bladder ischemia were produced in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 8 and 16 weeks after ischemia, micturition patterns and cystometrograms were recorded in conscious rats then bladder blood flow and nonvoiding spontaneous contractions were measured under general anesthesia. Bladder tissues were processed for Western blotting, immunostaining, and transmission electron microscopy. Results Bladder responses to ischemic insult depended on the duration of ischemia. Micturition patterns and cystometric changes at 8-week ischemia suggested detrusor overactivity, while voiding behavior and cystometrograms at 16-week ischemia implied abnormal detrusor function resembling underactivity. Upregulation of muscarinic M2 receptor was found after 8- and 16 weeks of ischemia. Downregulation of M3 and upregulation of M1 were detected at 16-week ischemia. Neural structural damage and marked neurodegeneration were found after 8 and 16 weeks of ischemia, respectively. Conclusions Prolonged ischemia may be a mediating variable in progression of overactive bladder to dysfunctional patterns similar to detrusor underactivity. The mechanism appears to involve differential expression of M1, M2, and M3 receptors, neural structural injury, and progressive loss of nerve fibers. PMID:27437534

  19. Laparoscopic Hernia Repair and Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyrul, Sunil; Mulvihill, Sean J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Bladder injury is a complication of laparoscopic surgery with a reported incidence in the general surgery literature of 0.5% and in the gynecology literature of 2%. We describe how to recognize and treat the injury and how to avoid the problem. Case Reports: We report two cases of bladder injury repaired with a General Surgical Interventions (GSI) trocar and a balloon device used for laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. One patient had a prior appendectomy; the other had a prior midline incision from a suprapubic prostatectomy. We repaired the bladder injury, and the patients made a good recovery. Conclusion: When using the obturator and balloon device, it is important to stay anterior to the preperitoneal space and bladder. Prior lower abdominal surgery can be considered a relative contraindication to extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair. Signs of gas in the Foley bag or hematuria should alert the surgeon to a bladder injury. A one- or two-layer repair of the bladder injury can be performed either laparoscopically or openly and is recommended for a visible injury. Mesh repair of the hernia can be completed provided no evidence exists of urinary tract infection. A Foley catheter is placed until healing occurs. PMID:11394432

  20. The mouse cyclophosphamide model of bladder pain syndrome: tissue characterization, immune profiling, and relationship to metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Golubeva, Anna V.; Zhdanov, Alexander V.; Mallel, Giuseppe; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Painful bladder syndrome/Interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) is a chronic disorder characterized clinically by recurring episodes of pelvic pain and increased urination frequency, significantly impairing patients' quality of life. Despite this, there is an unmet medical need in terms of effective diagnostics and treatment. Animal models are crucial in this endeavor. Systemic chronic administration of cyclophosphamide (CYP) in mice has been proposed as a relevant preclinical model of chronic bladder pain. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this model are lacking. Here, we show that mice, subjected to repetitive systemic injections of CYP, developed mild inflammatory response in bladder tissue characterized by submucosal edema, moderate increase in proinflammatory cytokine gene expression, and mastocytosis. No signs of massive inflammatory infiltrate, tissue hemorrhages, mucosal ulcerations and urothelium loss were observed. Instead, CYP treatment induced urothelium hyperplasia, accompanied by activation of proliferative signaling cascades, and a decrease in the expression of urothelium‐specific markers. Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have been implicated in chronic pain disorders. CYP administration induced differential changes in mGlu receptors mRNA levels in bladder tissue, without affecting gene expression at spinal cord level, pointing to the potential link between peripheral mGlu receptors and inflammation‐induced bladder malfunction and hyperalgesia. Taken together, these data indicate that chronic CYP treatment in mice is a model of PBS mostly relevant to the major, nonulcerative subtype of the syndrome, characterized by a relatively unaltered mucosa and a sparse inflammatory response. This model can help to elucidate the pathogenetic mechanisms of the disease. PMID:24760514

  1. [Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS)].

    PubMed

    Scheiner, David A; Perucchini, Daniele; Fink, Daniel; Betschart, Cornelia

    2015-08-19

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is still an etiologically poorly understood chronic pain syndrome. BPS is a clinical diagnosis. The current treatment modalities are aimed at symptom relief because no cure is possible. Analgesics may be used at any point in treatment but preferably for short-term relief for flares or bladder pain. AUA has issued clinical practice guidelines with a stepwise approach. The first-line therapy begins with self-care and behavior modification. Physical therapy and oral medications such as amitriptyline, PPS, or antihistamines belong to the second-line therapy. Third-line therapy requires cystoscopy and hydrodistension, treatment of Hunner lesions, or intravesical use of e.g. DMSO. Neuromodulation is considered a fourth-line therapy in patients who have failed third-line treatments. Fifth-line therapies consist of intravesical injection of BoNT or oral cyclosporin A. Cystectomy is the sixth-line therapy and the treatment of last resort. PMID:26286495

  2. Reproducibility of the bladder shape and bladder shape changes during filling

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, Heidi T.; Herk, Marcel van; Betgen, Anja; Pos, Floris; Lebesque, Joos V.; Remeijer, Peter

    2005-08-15

    The feasibility of high precision radiotherapy to the bladder region is limited by bladder motion and volume changes. In the near future, we plan to begin treatment delivery of bladder cancer patients with the acquisition of a cone beam CT image on which the complete bladder will be semi-automatically localized. Subsequently, a bladder shape model that was developed in a previous study will be used for bladder localization and for the prediction of shape changes in the time interval between acquisition and beam delivery. For such predictions, knowledge about urinary inflow rate is required. Therefore, a series of MR images was acquired over 1 h with time intervals of 10 min for 18 healthy volunteers. To gain insight in the reproducibility of the bladder shape over longer periods of time, two additional MRI series were recorded for 10 of the volunteers. To a good approximation, the bladder volume increased linearly in time for all individuals. Despite receiving drinking instructions, we found a large variation in the inflow rate between individuals, ranging from 2.1 to 15 cc/min (mean value: 9{+-}3 cc/min). In contrast, the intravolunteer variation was much smaller, with a mean standard deviation (SD) of 0.4 cc/min. The inflow rate was linearly correlated with age (negative slope). To study the reproducibility of the bladder shape, we compared bladder shapes of equal volume. For all individuals, the caudal part of the bladder was the most reproducible (variations<0.3 cm in all cases). The cranial and posterior parts of the bladder was much less reproducible, with local SD values up to {approx}1.2 cm for bladders with a volume of 200 cc. These large long-term variations were primarily caused by changes in position and filling of the small bowel and rectum. However, for short time intervals, the rectal filling was (nearly) constant. Therefore, the reproducibility of urinary inflow, combined with the previously developed shape model gives us an excellent tool to

  3. Work Capacity of the Bladder During Voiding: A Novel Method to Evaluate Bladder Contractile Function and Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Man, Li-Bo; He, Feng; Huang, Guang-Lin; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Work in voiding (WIV) of the bladder may be used to evaluate bladder status throughout urination rather than at a single time point. Few studies, however, have assessed WIV owing to the complexity of its calculations. We have developed a method of calculating work capacity of the bladder while voiding and analyzed the associations of bladder work parameters with bladder contractile function and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 160 men and 23 women, aged >40 years and with a detrusor pressure at maximal flow rate (Pdet Qmax) of ≥40 cmH2O in men, who underwent urodynamic testing. The bladder power integration method was used to calculate WIV; WIV per second (WIV/t) and WIV per liter of urine voided (WIV/v) were also calculated. In men, the relationships between these work capacity parameters and Pdet Qmax and Abrams-Griffiths (AG) number were determined using linear-by-linear association tests, and relationships between work capacity parameters and BOO grade were investigated using Spearman's association test. Results: The mean WIV was 1.15 ± 0.78 J and 1.30 ± 0.88 J, mean WIV/t was 22.95 ± 14.45 mW and 23.78 ± 17.02 mW, and mean WIV/v was 5.59 ± 2.32 J/L and 2.83 ± 1.87 J/L in men and women, respectively. In men, WIV/v showed significant positive associations with Pdet Qmax (r = 0.845, P = 0.000), AG number (r = 0.814, P = 0.000), and Schafer class (r = 0.726, P = 0.000). Conversely, WIV and WIV/t showed no associations with Pdet Qmax or AG number. In patients with BOO (Schafer class > II), WIV/v correlated positively with increasing BOO grade. Conclusions: WIV can be calculated from simple urodynamic parameters using the bladder power integration method. WIV/v may be a marker of BOO grade, and the bladder contractile function can be evaluated by WIV and WIV/t. PMID:26668148

  4. Cone Beam CT Imaging Analysis of Interfractional Variations in Bladder Volume and Position During Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Rathee, Satyapal; Ghosh, Sunita; Ko, Lawrence; Murray, Brad

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm). The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (+- standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm{sup 3} (SD, 29.71 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm{sup 3} (SD, 21.64 cm{sup 3}). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm{sup 3} (SD, 36.51 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm{sup 3} (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm{sup 3} (SD, 3.97 cm{sup 3}). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.

  5. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  6. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  7. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  8. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions.

  9. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  10. Use of coculture of colonic mucosal biopsies to investigate the release of eicosanoids by inflamed and uninflamed mucosa from patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, T D; Hall, L; Turnberg, L A

    1992-01-01

    Eicosanoid production was measured in cultured biopsies of colonic mucosa from control patients, with the irritable bowel syndrome, and from patients with proctosigmoiditis and with colonic Crohn's disease. Cultured inflamed colonic mucosa from patients with proctosigmoiditis and Crohn's disease produced more prostaglandin E2 and leukotrienes C4 than control tissues. In addition, eicosanoid production by macroscopically uninflamed or 'quiescent' mucosa from the right colon was examined in patients with proctosigmoiditis and between skip lesions in Crohn's disease patients. In the proctosigmoiditis group quiescent mucosa produced eicosanoids in similar quantities to control tissue. Coculture of quiescent plus inflamed tissue however, generated a marked increase in eicosanoid output in 12 of 20 of the patients and this was similar to the quantity obtained from two pieces of inflamed tissue. In the Crohn's disease group, quiescent mucosa produced more eicosanoids than control mucosa but production was markedly stimulated by coculture with inflamed mucosa in all patients. These findings suggest that in some patients with proctosigmoiditis and in all patients with Crohn's disease quiescent mucosa appears to be sensitised. A small but significant increase in the macrophage population may be partly responsible but it is likely that these and other cells are primed to release eicosanoids, and may be induced to do so by soluble mediators produced by actively inflamed tissue. Images Figure 1 PMID:1487166

  11. Quercetin for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shoskes, Daniel A; Nickel, J Curtis

    2011-08-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a common condition with a heterogeneous origin that responds best to multimodal therapy. The bioflavonoid quercetin has antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects that have proven useful for treating this condition. Using the clinical phenotype system UPOINT, quercetin can be helpful for those with organ-specific complaints (bladder or prostate) and pelvic floor spasm. This article discusses the current understanding of CP/CPPS and how treatment with quercetin can be used alone or as part of multimodal therapy.

  12. The enigma of men with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Hans C.

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a common and frequently misdiagnosed disorder in men. Hallmark symptoms are the presence of chronic discomfort attributed to the urinary bladder associated with bladder filling and relieved with bladder emptying, often associated with irritative voiding symptoms, in the absence of any other identifiable cause. It is often grouped with another common clinical entity, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). Men with IC/BPS often suffer from a delay in diagnosis and subsequent treatment, often being categorized as having prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, or epididymitis before the correct diagnosis is reached. The etiology of IC/BPS is poorly understood, and its pathogenesis may involve multiple pathways leading to a common clinical entity. Diagnostic criteria continue to evolve over time as the understanding of IC/BPS improves, and a clinical diagnosis with properly performed history and physical exam is suitable for diagnosis after other processes such as infection, radiation, or pharmaceutical exposure are appropriately excluded. No set pathological findings, biomarkers, or phenotypic descriptions have been universally accepted as a result of conflicting studies. Guidelines for diagnostic and treatment options are limited by available data, and few studies incorporate substantial numbers of male patients. Reported outcomes for common therapies are mixed or have not yet been subjected to study in rigorous placebo-controlled clinical trials in men. Lessons learned from the treatment of CP/CPPS can be applied to IC/BPS, by favoring a phenotypically directed, multimodal approach rather than a stepwise algorithm as advocated by current practice guidelines. PMID:26813678

  13. Up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in primary afferent pathway regulates colon-to-bladder cross-sensitization in rat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In humans, inflammation of either the urinary bladder or the distal colon often results in sensory cross-sensitization between these organs. Limited information is known about the mechanisms underlying this clinical syndrome. Studies with animal models have demonstrated that activation of primary afferent pathways may have a role in mediating viscero-visceral cross-organ sensitization. Methods Colonic inflammation was induced by a single dose of tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) instilled intracolonically. The histology of the colon and the urinary bladder was examined by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. The protein expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel of the vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were examined by immunohistochemistry and/or western blot. The inter-micturition intervals and the quantity of urine voided were obtained from analysis of cystometrograms. Results At 3 days post TNBS treatment, the protein level of TRPV1 was increased by 2-fold (p < 0.05) in the inflamed distal colon when examined with western blot. TRPV1 was mainly expressed in the axonal terminals in submucosal area of the distal colon, and was co-localized with the neural marker PGP9.5. In sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), BDNF expression was augmented by colonic inflammation examined in the L1 DRG, and was expressed in TRPV1 positive neurons. The elevated level of BDNF in L1 DRG by colonic inflammation was blunted by prolonged pre-treatment of the animals with the neurotoxin resiniferatoxin (RTX). Colonic inflammation did not alter either the morphology of the urinary bladder or the expression level of TRPV1 in this viscus. However, colonic inflammation decreased the inter-micturition intervals and decreased the quantities of urine voided. The increased bladder activity by colonic inflammation was attenuated by prolonged intraluminal treatment with RTX or treatment with intrathecal BDNF

  14. Glucocorticoid therapy and risk of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, K; Schned, A; Fortuny, J; Heaney, J; Marsit, C; Kelsey, K T; Karagas, M R

    2009-01-01

    Background: Use of immunosuppressive drugs post organ transplantation, and prolonged use of glucorticoids for other conditions have been associated with subsequent risk of certain malignancies, that is, skin cancers and lymphoma. There is evidence that the incidence of bladder cancer is also elevated among organ transplant recipients, however, it is unknown whether other groups of patients, that is, those taking oral glucocorticoids, likewise are at an increased risk. Methods: In a population-based case–control study in New Hampshire, USA, we compared the use of glucocorticoids in 786 bladder cancer cases and in 1083 controls. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis to compute adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associated with oral glucocorticoid use. Results: In our analysis, the risk of bladder cancer was related to a history of prolonged oral glucocorticoid use (OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.24–2.76, adjusted for age, gender and smoking). Associations with oral glucocorticoid use were stronger for invasive tumours (OR=2.12, 95% CI=1.17–3.85) and tumours with high (3+) p53 staining intensity (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.26–4.36). Conclusion: Our results raise the possibility of an increased risk of bladder cancer from systemic use of glucocorticoids, and a potential role of immune surveillance in bladder cancer aetiology. PMID:19773763

  15. Noninvasive Electromagnetic Detection of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cormio, Luigi; Vedruccio, Clarbruno; Leucci, Giorgio; Massenio, Paolo; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Vincenzo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Normal and neoplastic human tissues have different electromagnetic properties. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive electromagnetic detection of bladder cancer (BC) by the tissue-resonance interaction method (TRIM-prob). Patients and Methods. Consecutive patients were referred for cystoscopy because of (i) microscopic or gross hematuria and/or irritative voiding symptoms and (ii) bladder ultrasounds and urinary cytology findings negative or just suspicious of malignancy. Patients were first submitted to TRIM-prob bladder scanning by a single investigator and then to cystoscopy by another investigator blind to TRIM-prob data. Results. In 125 evaluated patients cystoscopy was positive for BC in 47 and negative in the remaining 78; conversely, TRIM-prob bladder scanning was positive for BC in 53 and negative in 72. In particular, TRIM-prob scanning yielded 7 false positives and only one false negative; therefore, its overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were 97.9%, 89.9%, 86.8%, 98.6%, and 93.6%, respectively. Conclusions. TRIM-prob bladder scanning was a simple and quite accurate method for non-invasive electromagnetic detection of BC. If the elevated positive and negative predictive values will be replicated in further well-designed studies, it could be used to screen asymptomatic patients at high risk of BC. PMID:24563795

  16. [Epidemiological investigation on bladder cancer and occupations].

    PubMed

    Obata, K; Ohno, Y; Aoki, K

    1989-12-01

    A population-based case-control study was conducted in Boston, U.S.A., Manchester, U.K., and Nagoya, Japan to assess the associations of occupations with bladder cancer in men. In Nagoya, cancer cases were identified through Nagoya Bladder Cancer Registry, and controls were randomly selected from the general population using electoral registers. Study subjects, all males, analyzed were 430 cases and 397 controls in Boston; 339 and 493 in Manchester, and 220 and 443 in Nagoya, respectively. Occupations significantly related to an increased bladder cancer risk were those manufacturing or handling dyes, leather, paint or organic chemicals in Boston, and leather or medical workers in Manchester. Occupations significantly associated with bladder cancer development were not found in Nagoya. In general, risk related to occupations was relatively higher in the younger age group (less than 65 years old) than in the older age group (greater than or equal to 65 yrs old). Statistically significant differences in bladder cancer risk were not demonstrated between manufacturing workers and service workers.

  17. K+ Channel Inhibition Differentially Regulates Migration of Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Inflamed vs. Non-Inflamed Conditions in a PI3K/Akt-Mediated Manner

    PubMed Central

    Zundler, Sebastian; Caioni, Massimiliano; Müller, Martina; Strauch, Ulrike; Kunst, Claudia; Woelfel, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Background Potassium channels have been shown to determine wound healing in different tissues, but their role in intestinal epithelial restitution–the rapid closure of superficial wounds by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)–remains unclear. Methods In this study, the regulation of IEC migration by potassium channel modulation was explored with and without additional epidermal growth factor (EGF) under baseline and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-pretreated conditions in scratch assays and Boyden chamber assays using the intestinal epithelial cell lines IEC-18 and HT-29. To identify possibly involved subcellular pathways, Western Blot (WB)-analysis of ERK and Akt phosphorylation was conducted and PI3K and ERK inhibitors were used in scratch assays. Furthermore, mRNA-levels of the potassium channel KCNN4 were determined in IEC from patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Results Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent potassium channels significantly increased intestinal epithelial restitution, which could not be further promoted by additional EGF. In contrast, inhibition of KCNN4 after pretreatment with IFN-γ led to decreased or unaffected migration. This effect was abolished by EGF. Changes in Akt, but not in ERK phosphorylation strongly correlated with these findings and PI3K but not ERK inhibition abrogated the effect of KCNN4 inhibition. Levels of KCNN4 mRNA were higher in samples from IBD patients compared with controls. Conclusions Taken together, we demonstrate that inhibition of KCNN4 differentially regulates IEC migration in IFN-γ-pretreated vs. non pretreated conditions. Moreover, our data propose that the PI3K signaling cascade is responsible for this differential regulation. Therefore, we present a cellular model that contributes new aspects to epithelial barrier dysfunction in chronic intestinal inflammation, resulting in propagation of inflammation and symptoms like ulcers or diarrhea. PMID:26824610

  18. Percutaneous absorption of methylprednisolone aceponate following topical application of Advantan lotion on intact, inflamed and stripped skin of male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Günther, C; Kecskes, A; Staks, T; Täuber, U

    1998-01-01

    Six healthy, elderly volunteers received three topical treatments with Advantan lotion containing 0.1% of methylprednisolone aceponate (MPA, CAS 86401-95-8) on intact, inflamed and stripped skin in a consecutive fashion at weekly intervals. The lotion (O/W emulsion) containing 14C-MPA (specific radioactivity 1.8 MBq/mg MPA) was applied in an area dose of 5 mg lotion/cm2 on a marked area of 100 cm2 on the back for 24 h. Inflammation was caused by UV-B irradiation at 3 MED 6 h prior to the treatment with the test preparation. Removal of stratum corneum was performed by 20-fold adhesive tape stripping. The concentration of radioactivity was measured in the plasma and in the urine up to 7 days following each treatment. The concentration of radioactivity in the plasma did not exceed the limit of detection of 1.5 ng MPA Eq/ml at any time point. The percutaneous absorption was assessed from the cumulated excretion of radiolabelled substances in the urine corrected for biliary excretion. Less than 0.5% of the dose was percutaneously absorbed through intact skin and through inflamed skin. After removal of the penetration barrier ('stripping') the percutaneous absorption increased to 15.4 +/- 7.7% of the applied dose.

  19. Expression profiles of variation integration genes in bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, J M; Wang, Y Q; Gao, Z L; Wu, J T; Shi, B K; Yu, C C

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide and its incidence continues to increase. There are approximately 261,000 cases of bladder cancer resulting in 115,000 deaths annually. This study aimed to integrate bladder cancer genome copy number variation information and bladder cancer gene transcription level expression data to construct a causal-target module network of the range of bladder cancer-related genomes. Here, we explored the control mechanism underlying bladder cancer phenotype expression regulation by the major bladder cancer genes. We selected 22 modules as the initial module network to expand the search to screen more networks. After bootstrapping 100 times, we obtained 16 key regulators. These 16 key candidate regulatory genes were further expanded to identify the expression changes of 11,676 genes in 275 modules, which may all have the same regulation. In conclusion, a series of modules associated with the terms 'cancer' or 'bladder' were considered to constitute a potential network.

  20. Complete duplication of bladder and urethra: a case report.

    PubMed

    Esham, W; Holt, H A

    1980-05-01

    A case of complete duplication of the bladder and urethra in a girl is reported, demonstrating outlet obstruction in the bladder on the left side. Associated anomalies and pertinent literature are reviewed.

  1. Autophagy and urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: A review

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Thenappan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder (bladder cancer) remains high. While other solid organ malignancies have seen significant improvement in morbidity and mortality, there has been little change in bladder cancer mortality in the past few decades. The mortality is mainly driven by muscle invasive bladder cancer, but the cancer burden remains high even in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer due to high recurrence rates and risk of progression. While apoptosis deregulation has long been an established pathway for cancer progression, nonapoptotic pathways have gained prominence of late. Recent research in the role of autophagy in other malignancies, including its role in treatment resistance, has led to greater interest in the role of autophagy in bladder cancer. Herein, we summarize the literature regarding the role of autophagy in bladder cancer progression and treatment resistance. We address it by systematically reviewing treatment modalities for nonmuscle invasive and muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27326411

  2. [Urethral invagination by Solovov's technic in a patient with obliteration of the posterior urethra and a small bladder as a consequence of prostatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Baranov, S D; Sukhanov, S V

    1996-01-01

    In cases of missed preoperative diagnosis of prostatic cancer and benign hyperplasia, the recovery of unassisted urination in patients who previously have undergone transvesicular adenomectomy is often accompanied by traumatic removal of the tissues. This leads to severe anatomical changes of the cervicourethral segment in the form of postoperative strictures with occasional complete obliteration of the posterior urethra. If endoscopic correction of the posterior urethra fails to produce a persistent therapeutic effect, it is valid to perform urethral invagination into the bladder cervix according to Solovov for restoration of the bladder reservoir function, prevention of its fusion and progression of chronic interstitial cystitis. The case demonstrates successful recovery of the patency of the vesicourethral segment and capacity of the bladder in complete obliteration of the posterior urethra and small urinary bladder.

  3. [Bladder stone surrounding a foreign body: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fekak, H; Rabii, R; Moufid, K; Guessous, H; Joual, A; Bennani, S; Elmrini, M; Benjeloun, S

    2003-04-01

    The bladder can be the site of various foreign bodies. We report one case of bladder stone including a foreign body in a 24 years old man with a psychomotor deficiency who was admitted for pyuria, block miction and bladder symptoms. The pelvic X-Ray film showed a bladder stone including a sewing needle. We analysed the diagnosis, aspect and therapeutic management of this case. PMID:12741198

  4. Delayed Diagnosis of Iatrogenic Bladder Perforation in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose A.; Rich, Mark A.; Swana, Hubert S.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic bladder injuries have been reported in the neonate during umbilical artery/vein catheterization, voiding cystourethrogram, urinary catheterizations, and overwhelming hypoxic conditions. Patients with iatrogenic bladder perforations can present with acute abdomen indicating urinary peritonitis, septic-uremic shock, or subtle symptoms like abdominal distension, pain, hematuria, uremia, electrolyte imbalances, and/or difficulty urinating. The following neonatal case report of perforated bladder includes a review of the signs, symptoms, diagnostic tools, and management of bladder injury in neonates. PMID:27747129

  5. Gall bladder Adenocarcinoma in a Young Girl.

    PubMed

    Date, Shivprasad V; Rizvi, S J

    2015-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with abdominal discomfort, weakness, and jaundice. General examination revealed deep icterus with hard lymph nodes in left supraclavicular region. On gastrointestinal examination, we appreciated a hard intra-abdominal lump in the right hypochondrium. Biochemical evaluation showed features of obstructive jaundice. Imaging confirmed the presence of gall bladder lump with multiple intra-abdominal lymph nodes. Fine needle aspiration cytology of neck nodes demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the gall bladder lump (done under sonographic guidance) confirmed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, malignancy of the gall bladder has not been reported in individuals less than 18 years in India, and only three cases have been reported worldwide in English literature. PMID:26139973

  6. The underactive bladder: detection and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Nadir; Mangera, Altaf; Hillary, Christopher; Inman, Richard; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The inability to generate a voiding contraction sufficient to allow efficient bladder emptying within a reasonable time frame is a common problem seen in urological practice. Typically, the symptoms that arise are voiding symptoms, such as weak and slow urinary flow. These symptoms can cause considerable bother to patients and impact upon quality of life. The urodynamic finding of inadequate detrusor contraction has been termed detrusor underactivity (DUA). Although a definition is available for this entity, there are no widely accepted diagnostic criteria. Drawing parallels to detrusor overactivity and the overactive bladder, the symptoms arising from DUA have been referred to as the "underactive bladder" (UAB), while attempts to crystallize the definition of UAB are now ongoing. In this article, we review the contemporary literature pertaining to the epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of DUA as well as discuss the definitional aspects that are currently under consideration. PMID:27081483

  7. A flowgraph model for bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Superficial bladder cancer has been the subject of numerous studies for many years, but the evolution of the disease still remains not well understood. After the tumor has been surgically removed, it may reappear at a similar level of malignancy or progress to a higher level. The process may be reasonably modeled by means of a Markov process. However, in order to more completely model the evolution of the disease, this approach is insufficient. The semi-Markov framework allows a more realistic approach, but calculations become frequently intractable. In this context, flowgraph models provide an efficient approach to successfully manage the evolution of superficial bladder carcinoma. Our aim is to test this methodology in this particular case. Results We have built a successful model for a simple but representative case. Conclusion The flowgraph approach is suitable for modeling of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:25080066

  8. The underactive bladder: detection and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Nadir; Mangera, Altaf; Hillary, Christopher; Inman, Richard; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The inability to generate a voiding contraction sufficient to allow efficient bladder emptying within a reasonable time frame is a common problem seen in urological practice. Typically, the symptoms that arise are voiding symptoms, such as weak and slow urinary flow. These symptoms can cause considerable bother to patients and impact upon quality of life. The urodynamic finding of inadequate detrusor contraction has been termed detrusor underactivity (DUA). Although a definition is available for this entity, there are no widely accepted diagnostic criteria. Drawing parallels to detrusor overactivity and the overactive bladder, the symptoms arising from DUA have been referred to as the "underactive bladder" (UAB), while attempts to crystallize the definition of UAB are now ongoing. In this article, we review the contemporary literature pertaining to the epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of DUA as well as discuss the definitional aspects that are currently under consideration.

  9. Gall bladder Adenocarcinoma in a Young Girl.

    PubMed

    Date, Shivprasad V; Rizvi, S J

    2015-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with abdominal discomfort, weakness, and jaundice. General examination revealed deep icterus with hard lymph nodes in left supraclavicular region. On gastrointestinal examination, we appreciated a hard intra-abdominal lump in the right hypochondrium. Biochemical evaluation showed features of obstructive jaundice. Imaging confirmed the presence of gall bladder lump with multiple intra-abdominal lymph nodes. Fine needle aspiration cytology of neck nodes demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the gall bladder lump (done under sonographic guidance) confirmed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, malignancy of the gall bladder has not been reported in individuals less than 18 years in India, and only three cases have been reported worldwide in English literature.

  10. Botulinum Toxin to Treat Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher P; Chancellor, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    Alteration in neural control from suprapontine areas to the nerves innervating the bladder can lead to bladder dysfunction and the development of a neurogenic bladder (NGB). Patients with NGB often suffer from urinary incontinence, which can lead to adverse events such as urinary tract infections and decubiti, in addition to creating a large care burden for family members or healthcare providers and significantly impairing patient quality of life. The common failure of anticholinergic medications has spurned the development of second-line treatments, including the use of botulinum toxin. OnabotulinumtoxinA (onaBoNT-A; BOTOX, Allergan, Inc.) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2011 to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with urinary incontinence resulting from a NGB. In this review the authors summarize pertinent results from key trials leading to FDA approval of onaBoNT-A as well as more recent long-term data.

  11. Optimizing systemic therapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sumanta K; Milowsky, Matthew I; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2013-07-01

    Over the past several decades, few new systemic agents have been incorporated into the treatment paradigm for bladder cancer. Platinum-based therapy remains the cornerstone of treatment in the perioperative and metastatic settings. Despite level one evidence, use of cisplatin-based therapy in the neoadjuvant setting has been dismal. Second-line therapy for metastatic disease has only modest activity with no survival benefit. However, the elucidation and investigation of novel molecular targets, new therapeutics, and associated biomarkers with strong biologic rationale are actively changing the landscape in bladder cancer. Although the field is moving rapidly, no new drug approvals are currently pending and a need remains to continue to educate the medical oncology and urology communities on the optimal use of currently available treatments. This article outlines the evidence, including that from prospective studies and meta-analyses, providing the basis for the current recommendations from NCCN, and details previous and ongoing studies of targeted therapy for bladder cancer.

  12. Urothelial bladder cancer with cavitary lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Anil; Lee, Jason; Born, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder tends to remain superficial; however, in 5% to 20% of cases, it progresses to muscle invasion and, more rarely, can metastasize. TCC of the bladder primarily spreads via regional lymphatics. The most common sites of distant metastases of TCC are the liver, lung, mediastinum and bone. Longterm survival of patients with metastatic bladder cancer is rare. Patterns of pulmonary metastasis include multiple nodules, a solitary mass or interstitial micronodule. When multiple nodules are present, they are round and well-circumscribed, without calcification or cavitation. An unusual case of rapidly metastatic TCC to the lung causing large cavitary masses and nodules is presented. Imaging performed after the patient began chemotherapy revealed widespread necrosis of the metastatic cavitary masses causing moderate volume hemoptysis. PMID:21766082

  13. Neural reconstruction methods of restoring bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, Sandra M.; Barbe, Mary F.; de Groat, William C.; Brown, Justin M.; Tuite, Gerald F.; Corcos, Jacques; Fecho, Susan B.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, diverse studies have focused on the development of surgical strategies to restore function of a decentralized bladder after spinal cord or spinal root injury via repair of the original roots or by transferring new axonal sources. The techniques included end-to-end sacral root repairs, transfer of roots from other spinal segments to sacral roots, transfer of intercostal nerves to sacral roots, transfer of various somatic nerves to the pelvic or pudendal nerve, direct reinnervation of the detrusor muscle, or creation of an artificial reflex pathway between the skin and the bladder via the central nervous system. All of these surgical techniques have demonstrated specific strengths and limitations. The findings made to date already indicate appropriate patient populations for each procedure, but a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of each technique to restore urinary function after bladder decentralization is required to guide future research and potential clinical application. PMID:25666987

  14. Nociceptor Sensitization Depends on Age and Pain Chronicity123

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Amanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral inflammation causes mechanical pain behavior and increased action potential firing. However, most studies examine inflammatory pain at acute, rather than chronic time points, despite the greater burden of chronic pain on patient populations, especially aged individuals. Furthermore, there is disagreement in the field about whether primary afferents contribute to chronic pain. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the contribution of nociceptor activity to the generation of pain behaviors during the acute and chronic phases of inflammation in both young and aged mice. We found that both young (2 months old) and aged (>18 months old) mice exhibited prominent pain behaviors during both acute (2 day) and chronic (8 week) inflammation. However, young mice exhibited greater behavioral sensitization to mechanical stimuli than their aged counterparts. Teased fiber recordings in young animals revealed a twofold mechanical sensitization in C fibers during acute inflammation, but an unexpected twofold reduction in firing during chronic inflammation. Responsiveness to capsaicin and mechanical responsiveness of A-mechanonociceptor (AM) fibers were also reduced chronically. Importantly, this lack of sensitization in afferent firing during chronic inflammation occurred even as these inflamed mice exhibited continued behavioral sensitization. Interestingly, C fibers from inflamed aged animals showed no change in mechanical firing compared with controls during either the acute or chronic inflammatory phases, despite strong behavioral sensitization to mechanical stimuli at these time points. These results reveal the following two important findings: (1) nociceptor sensitization to mechanical stimulation depends on age and the chronicity of injury; and (2) maintenance of chronic inflammatory pain does not rely on enhanced peripheral drive. PMID:26866058

  15. Pelvic organ cross-sensitization to enhance bladder and urethral pain behaviors in rats with experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, S; Kawamorita, N; Oguchi, T; Funahashi, Y; Tyagi, P; Chancellor, M B; Yoshimura, N

    2015-01-22

    Neural cross-sensitization has been postulated as a mechanism underlying overlaps of chronic pelvic pain disorders such as bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Animals with experimental colitis have been used to study the underlying mechanisms for overlapped pelvic pain symptoms, and shown to exhibit bladder overactivity evidenced by frequent voiding; however, it has not directly been evaluated whether pain sensation derived from the lower urinary tract is enhanced in colitis models. Also, the cross-sensitization between the colon and urethra has not been studied previously. In the present study, we therefore investigated pain behaviors induced by nociceptive stimuli in the lower urinary tract and the involvement of C-fiber afferent pathways using rats with colitis induced by intracolonic application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). In TNBS-induced colitis rats at 10 days, intravesical application of resiniferatoxin (RTx) induced a significantly greater number of episodes of both licking and freezing behaviors, which were reduced by capsaicin-sensitive C-fiber afferent desensitization. Histochemical studies using fluorescent dye tracers injected into the colon, bladder or urethra showed that dichotomized afferent neurons comprised 6.9-14.5% of L1, L6 and S1 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons innervating the colon or the lower urinary tract. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) mRNA expression was significantly increased in, the bladder, urethra and S1 DRG in colitis rats. An increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was found in the colon, but not in the bladder or urethra after intracolonic TNBS treatment. These results indicate that TNBS-induced colitis increased pain sensitivity in the bladder and urethra via activation of C-fiber afferent pathways due to colon-to-bladder and colon-to-urethral cross-sensitization, suggesting the contribution of pelvic organ cross

  16. Bladder Leiomyoma Presenting With LUTS and Coexisting Bladder and Uterine Leiomyomata: A Review of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Tanwar, Raman; Mitra, Aparajita

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal tumors of the urinary bladder are a rare occurrence, the most common among them being leiomyoma of the bladder. These tumors commonly present with irritative urinary symptoms progressing gradually to obstructive symptoms as the size increases. We report on two patients who presented with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). One of the patients also had concomitant bladder and uterine leiomyomata, which is the first such case to be reported in the literature. It is essential to differentiate leiomyoma from other common causes of LUTS. Cold cup biopsy has a significant false-negative rate and, in such cases, a wide local excision provides an optimal cure with excellent results. PMID:24791156

  17. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:26475949

  18. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Bruno Nagel; Maron, Paulo Eduardo Goulart; Vedovato, Bruno César; Barrese, Tomas Zecchini; Fernandes, Roni de Carvalho; Perez, Marjo Deninson Cardenuto

    2015-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely aggressive and rare tumor. Even though small cell carcinoma most commonly arises from the lungs there are several reports of small cell carcinoma in extrapulmonary sites. Due to its low frequency there is no well-established management for this disease. We report the case of a 61 year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the bladder who underwent radical cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also reviewed the literature for the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25517085

  19. Whyever bladder tissue engineering clinical applications still remain unusual even though many intriguing technological advances have been reached?

    PubMed

    Alberti, C

    2016-01-01

    To prevent problematic outcomes of bowel-based bladder reconstructive surgery, such as prosthetic tumors and systemic metabolic complications, research works, to either regenerate and strengthen failing organ or build organ replacement biosubstitute, have been turned, from 90s of the last century, to both regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.Various types of acellular matrices, naturally-derived materials, synthetic polymers have been used for either "unseeded" (cell free) or autologous "cell seeded" tissue engineering scaffolds. Different categories of cell sources - from autologous differentiated urothelial and smooth muscle cells to natural or laboratory procedure-derived stem cells - have been taken into consideration to reach the construction of suitable "cell seeded" templates. Current clinically validated bladder tissue engineering approaches essentially consist of augmentation cystoplasty in patients suffering from poorly compliant neuropathic bladder. No clinical applications of wholly tissue engineered neobladder have been carried out to radical-reconstructive surgical treatment of bladder malignancies or chronic inflammation-due vesical coarctation. Reliable reasons why bladder tissue engineering clinical applications so far remain unusual, particularly imply the risk of graft ischemia, hence its both fibrous contraction and even worse perforation. Therefore, the achievement of graft vascular network (vasculogenesis) could allow, together with the promotion of host surrounding vessel sprouting (angiogenesis), an effective graft blood supply, so avoiding the ischemia-related serious complications.

  20. Whyever bladder tissue engineering clinical applications still remain unusual even though many intriguing technological advances have been reached?

    PubMed Central

    ALBERTI, C.

    2016-01-01

    To prevent problematic outcomes of bowel-based bladder reconstructive surgery, such as prosthetic tumors and systemic metabolic complications, research works, to either regenerate and strengthen failing organ or build organ replacement biosubstitute, have been turned, from 90s of the last century, to both regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Various types of acellular matrices, naturally-derived materials, synthetic polymers have been used for either “unseeded” (cell free) or autologous “cell seeded” tissue engineering scaffolds. Different categories of cell sources – from autologous differentiated urothelial and smooth muscle cells to natural or laboratory procedure-derived stem cells – have been taken into consideration to reach the construction of suitable “cell seeded” templates. Current clinically validated bladder tissue engineering approaches essentially consist of augmentation cystoplasty in patients suffering from poorly compliant neuropathic bladder. No clinical applications of wholly tissue engineered neobladder have been carried out to radical-reconstructive surgical treatment of bladder malignancies or chronic inflammation-due vesical coarctation. Reliable reasons why bladder tissue engineering clinical applications so far remain unusual, particularly imply the risk of graft ischemia, hence its both fibrous contraction and even worse perforation. Therefore, the achievement of graft vascular network (vasculogenesis) could allow, together with the promotion of host surrounding vessel sprouting (angiogenesis), an effective graft blood supply, so avoiding the ischemia-related serious complications. PMID:27142819

  1. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting.

  2. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting. PMID:27656309

  3. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function

    PubMed Central

    Walker, K. A.; Ikeda, Y.; Zabbarova, I.; Schaefer, C. M.; Bushnell, D.; De Groat, W. C.; Kanai, A.

    2015-01-01

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2BM−/−). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2BM−/− bladders had thin muscle layers with less α-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2BM−/− bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2BM−/− bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  4. Distinct expression patterns of Notch ligands, Dll1 and Dll4, in normal and inflamed mice intestine

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiromichi; Ito, Go; Fujii, Satoru; Nakata, Toru; Suzuki, Kohei; Murano, Tatsuro; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Hozumi, Katsuto; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Reports have suggested that the two Notch ligands, Dll1 and Dll4, are indispensable to maintain the homeostasis of the intestinal epithelium. However, within the intestinal epithelium, the precise distribution of the cells that express those ligands at the protein level remains largely unknown. Here, we show a series of immunohistochemical analysis through which we successfully identified mice intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that endogenously express Dll1 or Dll4. Results showed that Dll1-positive (Dll1+ve) IECs reside exclusively within the crypt, whereas Dll4-positive (Dll4+ve) IECs can locate both in the crypt and in the villus of the small intestine. Also in the colon, Dll1+ve IECs resided at the lower part of the crypt, whereas Dll4+ve IECs resided at both upper and lower part of the crypt, including the surface epithelium. Both Dll1+ve and Dll4+ve IECs were ATOH1-positive, but Hes1-negative cells, and located adjacent to Hes1-positive cells within the crypts. A sub-population of both Dll1+ve and Dll4+ve IECs appeared to co-express Muc2, but rarely co-expressed other secretory lineage markers. However, as compared to Dll1+ve IECs, Dll4+ve IECs included larger number of Muc2-postive IECs, suggesting that Dll4 is more preferentially expressed by goblet cells. Also, we identified that Dll4 is expressed in the Paneth cells of the small intestine, whereas Dll1 and Dll4 is expressed in the c-kit-positive IECs of the colon, indicating that Dll1+ve and Dll4+ve IECs may contribute to constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. Compared to the normal colon, analysis of DSS-colitis showed that number of Dll1+ve IECs significantly decrease in the elongated crypts of the inflamed colonic mucosa. In sharp contrast, number of Dll4+ve IECs showed a significant increase in those crypts, which was accompanied by the increase in number of Hes1-positive IECs. Those Dll4+ve IECs were mostly found adjacent to the Hes1-positive IECs, suggesting that Dll4 may act as a major Notch

  5. Assessment of antiseptic bladder washout procedures using a physical model of the catheterised bladder.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J; Clayton, C L; Chawla, J C

    1987-11-01

    A simple physical model of the catheterised bladder has been used to assess the activities of antiseptic agents that have been recommended as bladder instillations in the treatment of urinary tract infections in patients with indwelling catheters. The activities of povidone-iodine, phenoxyethanol, chlorhexidine, chlorhexidine supplemented with EDTA + Tris, noxythiolin and neomycin were examined against selected species of uropathogens. Except for phenoxyethanol against Pv. stuartii and possibly Ps. aeruginosa, single applications of these antibacterials for 30 min were not effective in sterilising urine in the artificial bladder. However, a second application 1 h later of phenoxyethanol but not chlorhexidine or povidone-iodine did eradicate Ps. aeruginosa. It is suggested that bacteria growing as a film on the bladder wall are particularly resistant to antimicrobials.

  6. Neurogenic Bladder Repair Using Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Pradeep V; Subramanian, Swetha; Danke, Amit; Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the urinary bladder is to store and expel urine in a coordinated, controlled fashion, the activity of which is regulated by the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurogenic bladder is a term applied to a malfunctioning urinary bladder due to neurologic dysfunction or insult emanating from internal or external trauma, disease, or injury. This report describes a case of neurogenic bladder following laminectomy procedure and long-standing diabetes mellitus with neuropathy treated with autologous cellular therapy. The differentiation potential and paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells on bladder function have been highlighted. PMID:27656308

  7. Solitary Fibrous Tumor in a Female Urinary Bladder.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Hiba J; Menon, Sharifa

    2016-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors of the bladder are extremely rare especially in the females. This is the third case of SFT in a female urinary bladder. We are presenting a case of 36-years-old female who underwent a procedure for what thought to be cervical myoma. Cystectomy and bilateral ureteral re-implantation were performed. Mass showed to be solitary fibrous tumor of the urinary bladder. These tumors are rarely occur in extrapleural spaces. Only few cases had been reported in the urinary bladder including 2 in the female and 10 in the male bladder.

  8. Solitary Fibrous Tumor in a Female Urinary Bladder.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Hiba J; Menon, Sharifa

    2016-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors of the bladder are extremely rare especially in the females. This is the third case of SFT in a female urinary bladder. We are presenting a case of 36-years-old female who underwent a procedure for what thought to be cervical myoma. Cystectomy and bilateral ureteral re-implantation were performed. Mass showed to be solitary fibrous tumor of the urinary bladder. These tumors are rarely occur in extrapleural spaces. Only few cases had been reported in the urinary bladder including 2 in the female and 10 in the male bladder. PMID:27335777

  9. Neurogenic Bladder Repair Using Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the urinary bladder is to store and expel urine in a coordinated, controlled fashion, the activity of which is regulated by the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurogenic bladder is a term applied to a malfunctioning urinary bladder due to neurologic dysfunction or insult emanating from internal or external trauma, disease, or injury. This report describes a case of neurogenic bladder following laminectomy procedure and long-standing diabetes mellitus with neuropathy treated with autologous cellular therapy. The differentiation potential and paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells on bladder function have been highlighted.

  10. Novel therapeutic approaches for recurrent nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Brock E; Svatek, Robert S

    2015-05-01

    This article summarizes strategies being investigated in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Progress has been made toward improving the delivery method of intravesical agents. Intravesical therapy is limited by the amount of time that the agent remains in contact with the bladder. Bladder cancer is considered to be responsive to immune therapy. Thus, many novel approaches are immune-based therapies and include cancer vaccines, use of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) subcomponents, and checkpoint inhibitors. Finally, access to bladder mucosa via direct catheterization into the bladder via the urethra has enabled unique strategies for delivery of cancer therapy including viral- or plasmid-based gene therapy.

  11. Neurogenic Bladder Repair Using Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the urinary bladder is to store and expel urine in a coordinated, controlled fashion, the activity of which is regulated by the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neurogenic bladder is a term applied to a malfunctioning urinary bladder due to neurologic dysfunction or insult emanating from internal or external trauma, disease, or injury. This report describes a case of neurogenic bladder following laminectomy procedure and long-standing diabetes mellitus with neuropathy treated with autologous cellular therapy. The differentiation potential and paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells on bladder function have been highlighted. PMID:27656308

  12. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-09-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence.

  13. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-09-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence. PMID:26793538

  14. Noninvasive Evaluation of Bladder Wall Mechanical Properties as a Function of Filling Volume: Potential Application in Bladder Compliance Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mynderse, Lance; Husmann, Douglas; Urban, Matthew; Alizad, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We propose a novel method to monitor bladder wall mechanical properties as a function of filling volume, with the potential application to bladder compliance assessment. The proposed ultrasound bladder vibrometry (UBV) method uses ultrasound to excite and track Lamb waves on the bladder wall from which its mechanical properties are derived by fitting measurements to an analytical model. Of particular interest is the shear modulus of bladder wall at different volumes, which we hypothesize, is similar to measuring the compliance characteristics of the bladder. Materials and Methods Three experimental models were used: 1) an ex vivo porcine model where normal and aberrant (stiffened by formalin) bladders underwent evaluation by UBV; 2) an in vivo study to evaluate the performance of UBV on patients with clinically documented compliant and noncompliant bladders undergoing UDS; and 3) a noninvasive UBV protocol to assess bladder compliance using oral hydration and fractionated voiding on three healthy volunteers. Results The ex vivo studies showed a high correlation between the UBV parameters and direct pressure measurement (R2 = 0.84–0.99). A similar correlation was observed for 2 patients with compliant and noncompliant bladders (R2 = 0.89–0.99) undergoing UDS detrusor pressure-volume measurements. The results of UBV on healthy volunteers, performed without catheterization, were comparable to a compliant bladder patient. Conclusion The utility of UBV as a method to monitor changes in bladder wall mechanical properties is validated by the high correlation with pressure measurements in ex vivo and in vivo patient studies. High correlation UBV and UDS in vivo studies demonstrated the potential of UBV as a bladder compliance assessment tool. Results of studies on healthy volunteers with normal bladders demonstrated that UBV could be performed noninvasively. Further studies on a larger cohort are needed to fully validate the use of UBV as a clinical tool for

  15. Bladder leiomyoma: Presentation, evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Nazih; Sakr, Ghazi

    2012-01-01

    Background Bladder leiomyomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms and very rare urinary tumours that represent <0.5% of all bladder tumours, with only 250 cases reported worldwide to date. The importance of recognising their characteristic features, leading to their correct treatment, is fundamental. Therefore, we reviewed reports of leiomyomas of the urinary bladder, their causes, clinical presentations, imaging methods and surgical management, updated to 2012. Methods We retrospectively reviewed articles published in the USA, Europe and Asia, from 1953 to date, using PubMed, Medscape, Medline and the several major journals. We report areas of controversies and well-established guidelines. Results We reviewed 36 articles that confirmed, with a high level of evidence-based medicine, that the male to female ratio is equal, the cause of bladder leiomyomas remains unknown, and their most common presentation is obstructive uropathy; endovesical tumours are the most common. Their radiological diagnosis can be made by ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Complete surgical resection is a very effective treatment, associated with almost no recurrence. Conclusion In symptomatic patients a complete surgical resection can give a very good outcome, with almost no recurrence. PMID:26579246

  16. Bladder cancer: molecular determinants of personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cheng, Liang; Moch, Holger; Scarpelli, Marina; Reymundo, Carlos; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular and genetic studies have provided new perspectives on the histologic classification of bladder tumors. Recent developments in the field of molecular mutational pathway analyses based on next generation sequencing technology together with classic data derived from the description of mutations in the FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3) gene, mutations on TP53 gene, and cDNA technology profiling data gives support to a differentiated taxonomy of bladder cancer. All these changes are behind the use of non-traditional approach to therapy of bladder cancer patients and are ready to change our daily practice of uro-oncology. The observed correlation of some molecular alterations with tumor behavior and the identification of their targets at cellular level might support the use of molecular changes together with morphological data to develop new clinical and biological strategies to manage patients with urothelial cancer. The current review provides comprehensive data to support personalized therapy for bladder cancer based on an integrated approach including pathologic and clinical features and molecular biology.

  17. Arsenic and bladder cancer: observations and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, Vladan; Jakovljević, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Arsenic from drinking water is a well-known risk factor for bladder cancer. The purpose of this paper is to systematize some important yet often overlooked facts considering the relationship between arsenic exposure and the occurrence of bladder cancer. Since the exposure to inorganic arsenic from food, inhaled air, and skin absorption as well as arsenic methylation ability are not fully investigated, our assumption is that the exposure of arsenic only from drinking water is underestimated and its role as a risk factor is highly overestimated. This paper proposes some qualitative and quantitative parameters of arsenic as a risk factor for bladder cancer. The recommended qualitative parameters of arsenic intake are first, pathways of exposure, and second, toxicity and metabolism. The suggested quantitative parameters of arsenic intake include amounts of arsenic absorbed in the body, duration of arsenic exposure, and duration of arsenic presence in the urinary bladder. This approach can be implemented in a systematic classification and explanation of various risk factors and their mutual interactions for other types of cancer or diseases in general.

  18. Somatic mutation of PTEN in bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aveyard, J S; Skilleter, A; Habuchi, T; Knowles, M A

    1999-01-01

    The tumour suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1, which is mutated or homozygously deleted in glioma, breast and prostate cancer, is mapped to a region of 10q which shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in bladder cancer. We screened 123 bladder tumours for LOH in the region of PTEN. In 53 informative muscle invasive tumours (≥ pT2), allele loss was detected in 13 (24.5%) and allelic imbalance in four tumours (overall frequency 32%). LOH was found in four of 60 (6.6%) informative, non-invasive tumours (pTa/pT1). We screened 63 muscle invasive tumours for PTEN mutations by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and for homozygous deletion by duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two homozygous deletions were identified but no mutations. Of 15 bladder tumour cell lines analysed, three showed homozygous deletion of all or part of the PTEN gene, but none had mutations detectable by SSCP analysis. Our results indicate that PTEN is involved in the development of some bladder tumours. The low frequency of mutation of the retained allele in tumours with 10q23 LOH suggests that there may be another predominant mechanism of inactivation of the second allele, for example small intragenic deletions, that hemizygosity may be sufficient for phenotypic effect, or that there is another target gene at 10q23. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360673

  19. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    PubMed Central

    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Material and Methods Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. Results The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). Conclusion It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms. PMID:24592016

  20. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  1. Salmonella Mitigates Oxidative Stress and Thrives in the Inflamed Gut by Evading Calprotectin-Mediated Manganese Sequestration.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Ochoa, Vladimir E; Lam, Diana; Lee, Carlin S; Klaus, Suzi; Behnsen, Judith; Liu, Janet Z; Chim, Nicholas; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Rathi, Subodh G; Mastroianni, Jennifer R; Edwards, Robert A; Jacobo, Christina M; Cerasi, Mauro; Battistoni, Andrea; Ouellette, André J; Goulding, Celia W; Chazin, Walter J; Skaar, Eric P; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophils hinder bacterial growth by a variety of antimicrobial mechanisms, including the production of reactive oxygen species and the secretion of proteins that sequester nutrients essential to microbes. A major player in this process is calprotectin, a host protein that exerts antimicrobial activity by chelating zinc and manganese. Here we show that the intestinal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium uses specialized metal transporters to evade calprotectin sequestration of manganese, allowing the bacteria to outcompete commensals and thrive in the inflamed gut. The pathogen's ability to acquire manganese in turn promotes function of SodA and KatN, enzymes that use the metal as a cofactor to detoxify reactive oxygen species. This manganese-dependent SodA activity allows the bacteria to evade neutrophil killing mediated by calprotectin and reactive oxygen species. Thus, manganese acquisition enables S. Typhimurium to overcome host antimicrobial defenses and support its competitive growth in the intestine. PMID:27281571

  2. Fesoterodine for overactive bladder: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanchan; Kaur, Kirandeep; Aulakh, Baldev Singh; Kaushal, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Background: Overactive bladder (OAB) is a chronic condition affecting both men and women, with prevalence increasing with age. Antimuscarinics form the cornerstone of treatment of OAB. Fesoterodine, a nonselective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in late 2008 for once daily, oral administration in the treatment of OAB to relieve the symptoms of urinary urge incontinence, urgency, and frequency. Objective: The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the mechanism of action of and clinical trial data for fesoterodine, and to discuss the present status of fesoterodine in the management of OAB. Methods: The MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases were searched (June 1, 1999–December 1, 2009) using the terms fesoterodine, overactive bladder, and muscarinic antagonists. Full-text articles in English were selected for reference, and articles presenting the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, and data from clinical trials were included. The parameters measured were tolerability, efficacy, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Trials involving animals and Phase I studies were excluded. Results: The initial literature search yielded 48 papers. A total of 20 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. In two 12-week, randomized, multicenter, Phase III clinical trials involving patients with increased micturition frequency and urgency and/or urinary urge incontinence (n = 836 and 1132 in each trial), both fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg were associated with significantly improved symptoms of OAB (frequency of micturition, urgency, and urge incontinence) compared with placebo (P < 0.05). In a post hoc analysis of pooled data of the Phase III trials, HRQoL improved significantly with both doses. In a 12-week, Phase Illb trial, fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg led to treatment satisfaction in ∼80% of patients (of 516 enrolled) who were initially unsatisfied with their previous treatment. Conclusion: A review of the literature

  3. A Comparative Study of Lidocaine and Lidocaine­ Mannitol in Anesthetizing Human Teeth with Inflamed Pulps

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Ali; Bidar, Maryam; Sadeghi, Ghazal; Nezami, Hossein

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Failure to achieve adequate and profound anesthesia in teeth with acute pulp inflammation is a common condition during emergency visits in root canal therapy. Many different anesthetic solutions such as morphine and capsaicin have accordingly been examined. Mannitol­ an alcoholic sugar with high osmotic pressure level- is applicated for reducing intracranial and post retinal pressure in medicine. It has also been used for its diuretic effect. In combination with local anesthetic solution, it increases permeability of the nerve fiber sheath and leads to influx of the local anesthetic through cytoplasmic membrane .The purpose of the present study was to compare the efficacy of routine local anesthesia with or without using mannitol in teeth with inflamed pulps. MATERIALS AND METHODS: one hundred patients with acute dental pain in posterior teeth were selected. Vials with 3 ml anesthetic solution containing 2.5% lidocaine with 1/80000 epinephrine or 2.5% lidocaine with 1/80000 epinephrine and 0.5 mol mannitol were used for anesthesia. For each patient, the routine injection technique was applied, during the removal of decay and dentine. Depth of anesthesia was evaluated and the supplementary injection was done in case of pain feeling and then pulpotomy was done. The analysis of data was done using chi-square statistical test. RESULTS: The results showed that complete anesthesia after the first injection was obtained with lidocaine mannitol in 46% and with lidocaine alone in 38% of cases. However, the difference was not significant. CONCLUSION: These finding suggest that the addition of mannitol to the standard anesthetic solution could insignificantly increase the level of anesthesia in teeth with inflamed pulps. PMID:24494021

  4. Genetics of Bladder Malignant Tumors in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Zangari, Andrea; Zaini, Johan; Gulìa, Caterina

    2016-02-01

    Bladder masses are represented by either benign or malignant entities. Malignant bladder tumors are frequent causes of disease and death in western countries. However, in children they are less common. Additionally, different features are found in childhood, in which non epithelial tumors are more common than epithelial ones. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric bladder tumor, but many other types of lesions may be found, such as malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and neuroblastoma. Other rarer tumors described in literature include urothelial carcinoma and other epithelial neoplasms. Rhabdomyosarcoma is associated to a variety of genetic syndromes and many genes are involved in tumor development. PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR (P-F) fusion state has important implications in the pathogenesis and biology of RMS, and different genes alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of P-F negative and embryonal RMS, which are the subsets of tumors most frequently affecting the bladder. These genes include p53, MEF2, MYOG, Ptch1, Gli1, Gli3, Myf5, MyoD1, NF1, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, FGFR4, PIK3CA, CTNNB1, FBXW7, IGF1R, PDGFRA, ERBB2/4, MET, BCOR. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) usually shows SMARCB1/INI1 alterations. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene translocations are the most frequently associated alterations in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Few genes alterations in urothelial neoplasms have been reported in the paediatric population, which are mainly related to deletion of p16/lnk4, overexpression of CK20 and overexpression of p53. Here, we reviewed available literature to identify genes associated to bladder malignancies in children and discussed their possible relationships with these tumors. PMID:27013922

  5. Bladder perforation in a peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Ounissi, M; Sfaxi, M; Fayala, H; Abderrahim, E; Ben Abdallah, T; Chebil, M; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2012-05-01

    The dysfunction of the catheter in peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a frequent complication. However, perforation of organs are rare, particularly that of the urinary bladder. This requires an early diagnosis and prompt treatment of patients. We report here the case of a 38-year-old woman having end-stage renal disease due to autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease treated by PD since November 2000. Three years later, she was treated for Staphylococcal peritonitis. Four months later, she presented with a severe urge to urinate at the time of the fluid exchanges. The biochemical analysis of the fluid from the bladder showed that it was dialysis fluid. Injection of contrast through the catheter demonstrated the presence of a fistula between the bladder and the peritoneal cavity. She underwent cystoscopic closure of the fistulous tract and the PD catheter was removed. Subsequently, the patient was treated by hemodialysis. One month later, a second catheter was implanted surgically after confirming the closure of the fistula. Ten days later, she presented with pain at the catheter site and along the tunnel, which was found to be swollen along its track. The injection of contrast produced swelling of the subcutaneous tunnel but without extravasation of the dye. PD was withdrawn and the patient was put back on hemodialysis. Bladder fistula is a rare complication in PD and diagnosis should be suspected when patient complains of an urge to pass urine during the exchanges, which can be confirmed by contrast study showing presence of dye in the bladder. PD may be possible after the closure of the fistula, but recurrence may occur. PMID:22569443

  6. Bladder cancer: clinical and pathological profile.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Bladder tumours represent a heterogeneous group of cancers. The natural history of these bladder cancers is that of recurrence of disease and progression to higher grade and stage disease. Furthermore, recurrence and progression rates of superficial bladder cancer vary according to several tumour characteristics, mainly tumour grade and stage. The most recent World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the urinary system includes urothelial flat lesions: flat hyperplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma in situ. The papillary lesions are broadly subdivided into benign (papilloma and inverted papilloma), papillary urothelial neoplasia of low malignant potential (PUNLMP) and non-invasive papillary carcinoma (low or high grade). The initial proposal of the 2004 WHO has been achieved, with most reports supporting that categories are better defined than in previous classifications. An additional important issue is that PUNLMP, the most controversial proposal of the WHO in 2004, has lower malignant behaviour than low-grade carcinoma. Whether PUNLMP remains a clinically useful category, or whether this category should be expanded to include all low-grade, stage Ta lesions (PUNLMP and low-grade papillary carcinoma) as a wider category of less aggressive tumours not labelled as cancer, needs to be discussed in the near future. This article summarizes the recent literature concerning important issues in the pathology and the clinical management of patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. Emphasis is placed on clinical presentation, the significance of haematuria, macroscopic appearance (papillary, solid or mixed, single or multiple) and synchronous or metachronous presentation (field disease vs monoclonal disease with seeding), classification and microscopic variations of bladder cancer with clinical significance, TNM distribution and the pathological grading according to the 2004 WHO proposal.

  7. Genetics of Bladder Malignant Tumors in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Andrea; Zaini, Johan; Gulìa, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Bladder masses are represented by either benign or malignant entities. Malignant bladder tumors are frequent causes of disease and death in western countries. However, in children they are less common. Additionally, different features are found in childhood, in which non epithelial tumors are more common than epithelial ones. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric bladder tumor, but many other types of lesions may be found, such as malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and neuroblastoma. Other rarer tumors described in literature include urothelial carcinoma and other epithelial neoplasms. Rhabdomyosarcoma is associated to a variety of genetic syndromes and many genes are involved in tumor development. PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR (P-F) fusion state has important implications in the pathogenesis and biology of RMS, and different genes alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of P-F negative and embryonal RMS, which are the subsets of tumors most frequently affecting the bladder. These genes include p53, MEF2, MYOG, Ptch1, Gli1, Gli3, Myf5, MyoD1, NF1, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, FGFR4, PIK3CA, CTNNB1, FBXW7, IGF1R, PDGFRA, ERBB2/4, MET, BCOR. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) usually shows SMARCB1/INI1 alterations. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene translocations are the most frequently associated alterations in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Few genes alterations in urothelial neoplasms have been reported in the paediatric population, which are mainly related to deletion of p16/lnk4, overexpression of CK20 and overexpression of p53. Here, we reviewed available literature to identify genes associated to bladder malignancies in children and discussed their possible relationships with these tumors. PMID:27013922

  8. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette-Guérin).

  9. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  10. Anti-inflammatory properties of fruit juices enriched with pine bark extract in an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium: the effect of gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Frontela-Saseta, Carmen; López-Nicolás, Rubén; González-Bermúdez, Carlos A; Martínez-Graciá, Carmen; Ros-Berruezo, Gaspar

    2013-03-01

    Enrichment of fruit juices with pine bark extract (PBE) could be a strategy to compensate for phenolic losses during the gastrointestinal digestion. A coculture system with Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages was established as an in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium for evaluating the anti-inflammatory capacity of fruit juices enriched with PBE (0.5 g L(-1)) before and after in vitro digestion. The digestion of both PBE-enriched pineapple and red fruit juice led to significant changes in most of the analysed phenolic compounds. The in vitro inflammatory state showed cell barrier dysfunction and overproduction of IL-8, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the inflamed cells, incubation with nondigested samples reduced (P<0.05) the production of IL-8 and NO compared with digested samples. ROS production increased in the inflamed cells exposed to digested commercial red fruit juice (86.8±1.3%) compared with fresh juice (77.4±0.8%) and increased in the inflamed cells exposed to digested enriched red fruit juice (82.6±1.6%) compared with the fresh enriched juice (55.8±6%). The anti-inflammatory properties of PBE-enriched fruit juices decreased after digestion; further research on the bioavailability of the assayed compounds is needed to properly assess their usefulness for the treatment of gut inflammation.

  11. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage: MAGIC syndrome. Five patients with features of relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Firestein, G S; Gruber, H E; Weisman, M H; Zvaifler, N J; Barber, J; O'Duffy, J D

    1985-07-01

    Five patients with features of coexistent relapsing polychondritis and Behçet's disease are described. Review of the literature supports the overlap of the clinical manifestations of these two conditions. A common immunologic abnormality is likely, and elastin is cited as a possible target antigen. The "mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome" is the proposed name for this entity.

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma of the suprapubic tract: A rare presentation in patients with chronic indwelling urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Peter Alexander; Moore, Jonathan; Rahmeh, Tarek; Morse, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder is uncommon, but can arise in the setting of long-term bladder catheterization and chronic inflammation. SCC can arise primarily from the suprapubic catheter tract, but fewer than 10 such cases have been reported. We document 2 cases of SCC arising from the suprapubic tract associated with chronic indwelling urinary catheters. SCC must be differentiated from granulomatous conditions, which are quite common in patients with suprapubic catheters.

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma of the suprapubic tract: A rare presentation in patients with chronic indwelling urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Peter Alexander; Moore, Jonathan; Rahmeh, Tarek; Morse, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder is uncommon, but can arise in the setting of long-term bladder catheterization and chronic inflammation. SCC can arise primarily from the suprapubic catheter tract, but fewer than 10 such cases have been reported. We document 2 cases of SCC arising from the suprapubic tract associated with chronic indwelling urinary catheters. SCC must be differentiated from granulomatous conditions, which are quite common in patients with suprapubic catheters. PMID:25132900

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma of the suprapubic tract: A rare presentation in patients with chronic indwelling urinary catheters

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, Peter Alexander; Moore, Jonathan; Rahmeh, Tarek; Morse, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder is uncommon, but can arise in the setting of long-term bladder catheterization and chronic inflammation. SCC can arise primarily from the suprapubic catheter tract, but fewer than 10 such cases have been reported. We document 2 cases of SCC arising from the suprapubic tract associated with chronic indwelling urinary catheters. SCC must be differentiated from granulomatous conditions, which are quite common in patients with suprapubic catheters. PMID:25132900

  15. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-02-27

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  16. INDUCTION OF URINARY BLADDER PATHOLOGY IN MALE AND FEMALE C3H MICE EXPOSED TO SODIUM ARSENITE FROM GESTATION THROUGH YOUNG ADULTHOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiology studies suggest that chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic is associated with cancer of the skin, urinary bladder and lung as well as the kidney and liver. Recently, an in utero animal model was developed to characterize the carcinogenic properties of inorganic arsen...

  17. Effects of Endogenous Ovarian Estrogen Versus Exogenous Estrogen Replacement on Blood Flow and ERα and ERβ Levels in the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ablove, Tova S.; Austin, Jason L.; Phernetton, Terry M.; Magness, Ronald R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Determine the effect of endogenous estrogen versus estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on bladder blood flow (BBF) and estrogen receptors (ERs). Methods BBF was determined with radio-labeled microspheres in luteal, follicular, pregnant, oophorectomized (Ovx) sheep, and Ovx sheep with ERT. Estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ) were quantified using Western blot analysis. Results Compared to luteal and follicular ewes, BBF was reduced in pregnancy and following oophorectomy. Estrogen replacement therapy in Ovx sheep restored BBF to luteal levels. Estrogen receptor α predominated, whereas ERβ was not detectable. Estrogen receptor-α levels were unaffected by the ovarian cycle and increased in pregnancy, as well as in Ovx sheep with and without chronic ERT. Conclusion The combination of diminished BBF and elevated ERα levels in both pregnant and Ovx sheep suggests an inverse relationship between BBF and ERα in the bladder. Although chronic ERT in Ovx sheep restored BBF, it did not restore ERα back to luteal levels. PMID:19535742

  18. Regulatory T Cell Numbers in Inflamed Skin Are Controlled by Local Inflammatory Cues That Upregulate CD25 and Facilitate Antigen-Driven Local Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Billroth-MacLurg, Alison C; Ford, Jill; Rosenberg, Alexander; Miller, Jim; Fowell, Deborah J

    2016-09-15

    CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key immune suppressors that regulate immunity in diverse tissues. The tissue and/or inflammatory signals that influence the magnitude of the Treg response remain unclear. To define signals that promote Treg accumulation, we developed a simple system of skin inflammation using defined Ags and adjuvants that induce distinct cytokine milieus: OVA protein in CFA, aluminum salts (Alum), and Schistosoma mansoni eggs (Sm Egg). Polyclonal and Ag-specific Treg accumulation in the skin differed significantly between adjuvants. CFA and Alum led to robust Treg accumulation, with >50% of all skin CD4(+) T cells being Foxp3(+) In contrast, Tregs accumulated poorly in the Sm Egg-inflamed skin. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of inflammation-specific changes to the Treg gene program between adjuvant-inflamed skin types, suggesting a lack of selective recruitment or adaptation to the inflammatory milieu. Instead, Treg accumulation patterns were linked to differences in CD80/CD86 expression by APC and the regulation of CD25 expression, specifically in the inflamed skin. Inflammatory cues alone, without cognate Ag, differentially supported CD25 upregulation (CFA and Alum > Sm Egg). Only in inflammatory milieus that upregulated CD25 did the provision of Ag enhance local Treg proliferation. Reduced IL-33 in the Sm Egg-inflamed environment was shown to contribute to the failure to upregulate CD25. Thus, the magnitude of the Treg response in inflamed tissues is controlled at two interdependent levels: inflammatory signals that support the upregulation of the important Treg survival factor CD25 and Ag signals that drive local expansion. PMID:27511734

  19. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  20. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  1. Bladder Cancer: A Simple Model Becomes Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pierro, Giovanni Battista Di; Gulia, Caterina; Cristini, Cristiano; Fraietta, Giorgio; Marini, Lorenzo; Grande, Pietro; Gentile, Vincenzo; Piergentili, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in developed countries and it is also characterized by a high number of recurrences. Despite this, several authors in the past reported that only two altered molecular pathways may genetically explain all cases of bladder cancer: one involving the FGFR3 gene, and the other involving the TP53 gene. Mutations in any of these two genes are usually predictive of the malignancy final outcome. This cancer may also be further classified as low-grade tumors, which is always papillary and in most cases superficial, and high-grade tumors, not necessarily papillary and often invasive. This simple way of considering this pathology has strongly changed in the last few years, with the development of genome-wide studies on expression profiling and the discovery of small non-coding RNA affecting gene expression. An easy search in the OMIM (On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database using “bladder cancer” as a query reveals that genes in some way connected to this pathology are approximately 150, and some authors report that altered gene expression (up- or down-regulation) in this disease may involve up to 500 coding sequences for low-grade tumors and up to 2300 for high-grade tumors. In many clinical cases, mutations inside the coding sequences of the above mentioned two genes were not found, but their expression changed; this indicates that also epigenetic modifications may play an important role in its development. Indeed, several reports were published about genome-wide methylation in these neoplastic tissues, and an increasing number of small non-coding RNA are either up- or down-regulated in bladder cancer, indicating that impaired gene expression may also pass through these metabolic pathways. Taken together, these data reveal that bladder cancer is far to be considered a simple model of malignancy. In the present review, we summarize recent progress in the genome-wide analysis of bladder cancer, and analyse non

  2. The chronic enteropathogenic disease schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Olveda, David U; Olveda, Remigio M; McManus, Donald P; Cai, Pengfei; Chau, Thao N P; Lam, Alfred K; Li, Yuesheng; Harn, Donald A; Vinluan, Marilyn L; Ross, Allen G P

    2014-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic enteropathogenic disease caused by blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. The disease afflicts approximately 240 million individuals globally, causing approximately 70 million disability-adjusted life years lost. Chronic infections with morbidity and mortality occur as a result of granuloma formation in the intestine, liver, or in the case of Schistosoma haematobium, the bladder. Various methods are utilized to diagnose and evaluate liver fibrosis due to schistosomiasis. Liver biopsy is still considered the gold standard, but it is invasive. Diagnostic imaging has proven to be an invaluable method in assessing hepatic morbidity in the hospital setting, but has practical limitations in the field. The potential of non-invasive biological markers, serum antibodies, cytokines, and circulating host microRNAs to diagnose hepatic fibrosis is presently undergoing evaluation. This review provides an update on the recent advances made with respect to gastrointestinal disease associated with chronic schistosomiasis.

  3. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  4. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  5. Hyperthermia as a treatment for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Rampersaud, Edward N; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Inman, Brant A

    2010-11-15

    Modern cancer care is characterized by a focus on organ-sparing multi-modal treatments. In the case of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer this is particularly true; treatment is focused on reducing the frequency of low-risk recurrences and preventing high-risk progression. Deep regional hyperthermia is an oncologic therapeutic modality that can help achieve these two goals. The combination of hyperthermia with chemotherapy and radiotherapy has improved patient outcomes in several tumor types. In this review, we highlight the biology of therapeutic fever-range hyperthermia, discuss how hyperthermia is administered and dosed, demonstrate how heat can be added to other treatment regimens, and summarize the data supporting the role of hyperthermia in the management of bladder cancer.

  6. HLA class I expression in bladder carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, T; Pedrajas, G; Cozar, J M; Garrido, A; Vicente, J; Tallada, M; Garrido, F

    2003-10-01

    HLA class I molecules are frequently lost in a large variety of human carcinomas, possibly because of T-cell immune selection of major histocompatibility complex class I deficient tumor variants. We report that this phenomenon is also a frequent event in bladder carcinomas. Of a total of 72 bladder carcinomas, 72% of the tumors had at least one alteration in HLA class I expression. These altered HLA class I phenotypes were classified as total HLA class I loss (25%; phenotype I); HLA-A or/and HLA-B locus-specific loss (12%; phenotype III); and HLA class I allelic loss (35%; phenotype II or IV). Comparison of histopathological parameters with HLA class I expression showed a statistically significant relationship with the degree of differentiation and tumor recurrence.

  7. Bladder cancer: approaches to prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Koroltchouk, V; Stanley, K; Stjernswärd, J; Mott, K

    1987-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the twelfth most common cancer globally, with approximately 170 000 new cases each year; a third of these cases are in the developing countries. There are two major etiological types. The first is more common in the industrialized countries and is associated with exposure to certain occupational and environmental carcinogens, but most importantly with tobacco smoking. The second type is associated with Schistosoma haematobium infection of the urinary tract and is one of the most frequent tumours in eastern Mediterranean and African countries. Both types of bladder cancer are largely preventable. Comprehensive education and legislative approaches are recommended to reduce tobacco consumption and exposure to industrial carcinogens. Safe and effective drugs are available to treat schistosomiasis within integrated control programmes in endemic areas.

  8. [Phytoperfusion of the bladder after adenomectomy].

    PubMed

    Davidov, M I; Goriunov, V G; Kubarikov, P G

    1995-01-01

    For continuous irrigation of the bladder after prostatic adenomectomy herb infusion (Urtica dioica L. 12-15 g/l, Hypericum perforatum L. 8-12 g/l. Marticaria recutita L. 8-10 g/l, folia Plantaginis majoris 7-10 g/l, Herba Millefolii 4-6 g/l, folia Betula 3-5 g/l. Artemisia vulgaris L. 1-2 g/l, folia Fragaria vesca 3-4 g/l, water 11 maximum) was dripped through a thin suprapubic and urethral drainages. Such phytoperfusion of the urinary bladder used in 22 patients reduced postoperative blood loss, bacteriuria, prevented hemorrhagic and purulent inflammation following adenomectomy. Side systemic effects were not reported. PMID:8571476

  9. The underactive bladder: detection and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nadir; Mangera, Altaf; Hillary, Christopher; Inman, Richard; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The inability to generate a voiding contraction sufficient to allow efficient bladder emptying within a reasonable time frame is a common problem seen in urological practice. Typically, the symptoms that arise are voiding symptoms, such as weak and slow urinary flow. These symptoms can cause considerable bother to patients and impact upon quality of life. The urodynamic finding of inadequate detrusor contraction has been termed detrusor underactivity (DUA). Although a definition is available for this entity, there are no widely accepted diagnostic criteria. Drawing parallels to detrusor overactivity and the overactive bladder, the symptoms arising from DUA have been referred to as the “underactive bladder” (UAB), while attempts to crystallize the definition of UAB are now ongoing. In this article, we review the contemporary literature pertaining to the epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of DUA as well as discuss the definitional aspects that are currently under consideration. PMID:27081483

  10. Improving Systemic Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tracy L; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-05-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is integral to the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (BCa). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been increasingly utilized for muscle-invasive BCa over the past several years, and several options for cisplatin-based regimens have emerged. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be considered for select patients who did not receive neoadjuvant therapy. Systemic chemotherapy added to radiotherapy is a critical component of a bladder-preserving approach and superior to radiotherapy alone. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been the mainstay for metastatic BCa for more than three decades. Novel targeted agents are in development fueled by the recent molecular characterization of BCa. Recent trials of immunotherapy have demonstrated the possibility of a less toxic and potentially more effective treatment for metastatic disease. It is an extremely exciting time for BCa research, and much needed improvements in systemic treatment are most certainly on the horizon. PMID:26984414

  11. Treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome as a neuropathic pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pattanik, Manorama; Titarmore, Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    A lady of 52 years with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) presented with chronic pelvic pain, irritative voiding with sphincter dominance on urodynamics. 3 yrs of oral analgesics, antispasmodics and intravesical therapy was ineffective. We surmised her pain, and irritative voiding to be secondary to constant straining against a dysfunctional pelvic floor. We treated PBS/IC as a neuropathic phenomenon with a combination of neuromodulator medications and continuous caudal epidural analgesia to reduce the pain induced peripheral and central sensitisation. Botulinum toxin type A injection into pelvic floor muscles appeared to address their dysfuction. Clinical and urodynamics response was encouraging. PMID:25097327

  12. Botulinum Toxin A Injection in the Bladder Neck: A Promising Treatment for Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Marianne; Zgheib, Joseph; El Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Secondary to failure of optimal medical therapy and the high morbidity that accompanies surgical techniques in high risk patients, the use of de novo treatments including botulinum toxin A is emerging in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the treatment of urinary retention secondary to BPH via injecting botulinum toxin into the bladder neck is not well established in the literature. This case report describes the case of a 75-year-old male patient with a chronic history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and multiple comorbidities who was admitted to the hospital for management of recurrent urinary retention. The patient was not a surgical candidate for transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Botulinum toxin injection into the bladder neck was performed with very satisfying results. Botulinum toxin injection in the bladder neck presents a promising minimally invasive, tolerated, and cost-effective approach for the treatment of urinary retention in patients with benign prostatic obstruction who are not candidates for surgery or in whom medical treatment has failed. More research is needed to identify the efficacy of this novel approach. PMID:27088032

  13. [Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours of the bladder].

    PubMed

    Dakir, Mohamed; Taha, Abdellatif; Attar, Hicham; Sarf, Ismail; Aboutaib, Rachid; Moussaoui, Ali; Meziane, Fathi

    2004-12-01

    The inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the bladder is a rare benign affection that interests mainly young adults. Its etiopathogeny remains unknown, but its tumoral origin was evocated recently by Griffin (1999), incriminating a chromosomic abnormality involving the ALK gene. We will discuss the etiopathogenic, anatopathological and therapeutical aspects of this lesion for which the diagnosis is histological and the treatment remains conservative with a good prognosis.

  14. Iatrogenic foreign body in the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Shah, Safdar; Qureshi, Farhan; Rakhio, Sain

    2015-04-01

    A 60 years old man presented with a history of suprapubic pain, painful micturition, perineal pain, and acute retention of urine followed by catheterization. On abdominal ultrasound, there was a metallic needle found in the urinary bladder which was confirmed on pelvis X-ray. The needle was found to be a metallic piece of a resectoscope cutting loop which was removed through cystourethroscopy. PMID:25899202

  15. New method of postprostatectomy bladder irrigation.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, J P; Ewing, R; Gray, B K

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial filters have been used to sterilise the hospital water supply in order to provide irrigant for postprostatectomy irrigation. This method was compared retrospectively to bladder irrigation derived from a still on the ward. Postoperative bacteriuria was similar in both groups of 75 patients, occurring in 23.7% of patients irrigated from the still and in 20% of patients irrigated via the filters. The bacterial filter proved reliable and as safe as using water from the still. PMID:2714320

  16. Persistent neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to infantile botulism.

    PubMed

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-13

    We present a child, 5 months of age, diagnosed with infantile botulism, showing the signs of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The patient presented with progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia, suckling and swallowing problems and absent peripheral reflexes at clinical examination. Botulinum neurotoxin type A was detected in her serum, confirming the diagnosis. Starting at day 6, the girl presented with a urinary retention initially necessitating free bladder drainage and subsequently intermittent catheterisation. After 6 weeks in intensive care, the patient recovered but the bladder underactivity persisted. Four months following recovery, a urodynamic evaluation was performed, showing a near normal detrusor activity and normal bladder emptying, and the catheterisation was ceased. At 6 months, the girl was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and bladder emptying problems, which persisted, and clean intermittent catheterisation was started. The final urodynamic evaluation, a year and a half after her initial presentation, revealed a normal detrusor activity and an adequate bladder emptying.

  17. [The biochemical carcinogenesis of selected heavy metals in bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Rorbach-Dolata, Anna; Marchewka, Zofia; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer takes the second place in the classification of morbidity of urinary system cancers. Many chemical factors take part in cancerogenesis. It is suggested that exposure to heavy metals such as arsenic, chromium, nickel and cadmium as well as its metabolites may trigger the bladder cancer through inducing excessive reactive oxygen species production and oxidative stress formation which are responsible for DNA damage. In patients with bladder cancer is observed the disorder of processes regulated by p-53, including apoptosis. There are many patients with bladder cancer with confirmed absence of retinoblastoma protein, which is responsible of holding on the process of coming up the cells with mutation into synthesis, where the replication process undergoes. It is mentioned that excessive expression of proto-oncogenes may also cause the bladder cancer. The article concerns biochemical effects of exposure to chosen heavy metals and their potential role in bladder cancer progression. PMID:26689010

  18. Anatomic Variant of Liver, Gall Bladder and Inferior Vena Cava.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Yogesh Ashok; Gladwin, V; Chand, Parkash

    2016-07-01

    The morphology and relations of liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava are cardinal. Their anatomical variations may be a reason for the adverse surgical outcome. During routine anatomy dissection of an abdomen, we noticed a variant liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava in a 63-year-old male cadaver. In the specimen, a retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava was found to be intrahepatic. On dissection, it was observed that inferior vena cava was covered entirely by a liver tissue on its dorsal aspect. In the same specimen, the gall bladder had undulated inferior surface. On dissection of the gall bladder, numerous mucosal folds were present in the interior. A band of fibrous tissue was found, which was extending from the right side of the gall bladder to the falciform ligament. Hence, preoperative scanning of congenital variations of the liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava may be compassionate in planning safe surgeries and interventional abdominal procedures. PMID:27630832

  19. Anatomic Variant of Liver, Gall Bladder and Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, V.; Chand, Parkash

    2016-01-01

    The morphology and relations of liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava are cardinal. Their anatomical variations may be a reason for the adverse surgical outcome. During routine anatomy dissection of an abdomen, we noticed a variant liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava in a 63-year-old male cadaver. In the specimen, a retrohepatic segment of inferior vena cava was found to be intrahepatic. On dissection, it was observed that inferior vena cava was covered entirely by a liver tissue on its dorsal aspect. In the same specimen, the gall bladder had undulated inferior surface. On dissection of the gall bladder, numerous mucosal folds were present in the interior. A band of fibrous tissue was found, which was extending from the right side of the gall bladder to the falciform ligament. Hence, preoperative scanning of congenital variations of the liver, gall bladder and inferior vena cava may be compassionate in planning safe surgeries and interventional abdominal procedures. PMID:27630832

  20. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder, mesonephroid type: a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Mahmoud; Kramer, Mario W.; Wolters, Mathias; Herrman, Thomas R.W.; Becker, Jan U.; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare disease. It occurs in 0.5–2% of all bladder cancers and is discussed as the malignant counterpart of nephrogenic adenomas. We report a 46-year-old white female presented with gross hematuria for clinical examination. Histopathology revealed pT2, Pn1, L1, G2 adenocarcinoma of the bladder and carcinoma in situ according to the TNM classification. Computed tomography scan diagnostic was unremarkable. Patients with adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder should be treated vigorously and without time delay. Only 7 cases of adenocarcinoma in the urinary bladder (mesonephroid) have been described until now. We present a case of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder, mesonephroid type that early diagnosed and till now 3 months after the cystectomy without symptoms and without complications. PMID:23772302

  1. Reduction in Bladder-Related Autonomic Dysreflexia after OnabotulinumtoxinA Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fougere, Renée J.; Currie, Katharine D.; Nigro, Mark K.; Stothers, Lynn; Rapoport, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bladder-related events, including neurogenic detrusor overactivity, are the leading cause of autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injured individuals. Self-reported autonomic dysreflexia is reduced following onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for neurogenic detrusor overactivity; however, none of these trials have assessed autonomic dysreflexia events using the clinical cutoff of an increase in systolic blood pressure ≥20 mm Hg. This study used a prospective, open-labelled design from 2013 to 2014 to quantitatively assess the efficacy of one cycle 200 U intradetrusor-injected onabotulinumtoxinA (20 sites) on reducing the severity and frequency of bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events and improving quality of life. Twelve men and five women with chronic, traumatic spinal cord injuries at or above the sixth thoracic level, and concomitant autonomic dysreflexia and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, underwent blood pressure monitoring during urodynamics and over a 24 h period using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring pre- and 1 month post-treatment. Post-onabotulinumtoxinA, autonomic dysreflexia severity was reduced during urodynamics (systolic blood pressure increase: 42 ± 23 mm Hg vs. 20 ± 10 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and during bladder-related events across the 24 h period (systolic blood pressure increase: 49 ± 2 mm Hg vs. 26 ± 22 mm Hg, p = 0.004). Frequency of 24 h bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events was also decreased post-onabotulinumtoxinA (4 ± 2 events vs. 1 ± 1 events, p < 0.001). Autonomic dysreflexia and incontinence quality of life indices were also improved post-onabotulinumtoxinA (p < 0.05). Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in individuals with high level spinal cord injuries decreased the severity and frequency of bladder-related episodes of autonomic dysreflexia, and improved bladder function and quality of

  2. Targeting glycogen metabolism in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Carolyn Ritterson; Guin, Sunny; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism has been a heavily investigated topic in cancer research for the past decade. Although the role of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer has been extensively studied, abnormalities in other metabolic pathways are only just being understood in cancer. One such pathway is glycogen metabolism; its involvement in cancer development, particularly in urothelial malignancies, and possible ways of exploiting aberrations in this process for treatment are currently being studied. New research shows that the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a novel tumour suppressor in bladder cancer. Loss of AGL leads to rapid proliferation of bladder cancer cells. Another enzyme involved in glycogen debranching, glycogen phosphorylase, has been shown to be a tumour promoter in cancer, including in prostate cancer. Studies demonstrate that bladder cancer cells in which AGL expression is lost are more metabolically active than cells with intact AGL expression, and these cells are more sensitive to inhibition of both glycolysis and glycine synthesis—two targetable pathways. As a tumour promoter and enzyme, glycogen phosphorylase can be directly targeted, and preclinical inhibitor studies are promising. However, few of these glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors have been tested for cancer treatment in the clinical setting. Several possible limitations to the targeting of AGL and glycogen phosphorylase might also exist. PMID:26032551

  3. Bladder management after total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Knight, R M; Pellegrini, V D

    1996-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the impact of an indwelling Foley catheter on bladder dysfunction and incidence of urinary tract infections after total joint arthroplasty. A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted assigning use of an indwelling Foley catheter (group 1) or intermittent catheterization (group 2) for 48 hours following operation. Postoperative cultures were obtained on days 2 and 5, and the number of intermittent catheterization events and void and catheterization volumes were recorded. Concurrent cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. One hundred nineteen of 174 consecutive patients having elective primary total joint arthroplasty completed the study. Five of 62 patients (8%) in group 1 and 7 of 57 patients (12%) in group 2 developed urinary tract infections (NS, P = 45). Twenty patients (35%) in group 2 and 12 (19%) in group 1 required straight catheterization for inability to void 48 hours after surgery (P = .05). Seventeen patients (35%) in group 2 and eight patients (16%) in group 1 required straight catheterization after epidural analgesia was discontinued (P = .024). Bladder management by indwelling Foley catheter saved more than 150 minutes of direct nursing contact per patient and $3,000 in total hospital costs. Indwelling Foley catheters reduced the frequency of postoperative urinary retention, were less labor intensive than intermittent straight catheterization, and were not associated with an increased risk of urinary infection. In the setting of epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for total joint arthroplasty, management by indwelling catheter is a cost-effective strategy to facilitate postoperative return of normal bladder function.

  4. Hypercompliant Apical Membranes of Bladder Umbrella Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, John C.; Zhou, Enhua H.; Yu, Weiqun; Kim, Jae Hun; Zhou, Ge; Liao, Yi; Sun, Tung-Tien; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Zeidel, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary bladder undergoes dramatic volume changes during filling and voiding cycles. In the bladder the luminal surface of terminally differentiated urothelial umbrella cells is almost completely covered by plaques. These plaques (500 to 1000 nm) are made of a family of proteins called uroplakins that are known to form a tight barrier to prevent leakage of water and solutes. Electron micrographs from previous studies show these plaques to be interconnected by hinge regions to form structures that appear rigid, but these same structures must accommodate large changes in cell shape during voiding and filling cycles. To resolve this paradox, we measured the stiffness of the intact, living urothelial apical membrane and found it to be highly deformable, even more so than the red blood cell membrane. The intermediate cells underlying the umbrella cells do not have uroplakins but their membranes are an order of magnitude stiffer. Using uroplakin knockout mouse models we show that cell compliance is conferred by uroplakins. This hypercompliance may be essential for the maintenance of barrier function under dramatic cell deformation during filling and voiding of the bladder. PMID:25229135

  5. Dietary factors associated with bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is biologically plausible for dietary factors to influence bladder cancer risk considering that beneficial as well as harmful components of a diet are excreted through the urinary tract and in direct contact with the epithelium of the bladder. However, studies that investigated the association between dietary factors and bladder cancer (BC) risk have largely reported inconsistent results. The macronutrient intake and risk of BC could have yield inconsistent results across studies because of lack of details on the type, source and the quantities of different dietary fatty acids consumed. There is evidence to suggest that consumption of processed meat may increase BC risk. Dietary carbohydrate intake does not appear to be directly associated with BC risk. Even though a large number of studies have investigated the association between fruit/vegetable consumption/micronutrients in those and BC risk, they have yielded inconsistent results. Gender-specific subgroup analysis, details of how fruits and vegetables are consumed (raw vs. cooked), adequate control for smoking status/aggressiveness of the cancer and consideration of genetic make-up may clarify these inconsistent results. There is no strong evidence to suggest that supplementation with any common micronutrient is effective in reducing BC risk. These limitations in published research however do not totally eclipse the observation that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables and low in processed meat along with especially smoking cessation may convey some protective effects against BC risk. PMID:27326403

  6. Diagnostics techniques in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soubra, Ayman; Risk, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is the most common presentation of bladder cancer and is often treatable with endoscopic resection and intravesical therapies. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are the gold standard in diagnosis and surveillance but are limited by their sensitivity in some situations. We seek to provide an overview of recent additions to the diagnostic armamentarium for urologists treating this disease. Methods: Articles were identified through a literature review of articles obtained through PubMed searches including the terms “bladder cancer” and various diagnostic techniques described in the article. Results: A variety of urinary biomarkers are available to assist the diagnosis and management of patients with NMIBC. Many have improved sensitivity over urine cytology, but less specificity. There are certain situations in which this has proved valuable, but as yet these are not part of the standard guidelines for NMIBC. Fluorescence cystoscopy has level 1 evidence demonstrating increased rates of tumor detection and prolonged recurrence-free survival when utilized for transurethral resection. Other technologies seeking to enhance cystoscopy, such as narrow band imaging, confocal laser endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography are still under evaluation. Conclusions: A variety of urine biomarker and adjunctive endoscopic technologies have been developed to assist the management of NMIBC. While some, such as fluorescence cystoscopy, have demonstrated a definite benefit in this disease, others are still finding their place in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Future studies should shed light on how these can be incorporated to improve outcomes in NMIBC. PMID:26604438

  7. Targeting glycogen metabolism in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ritterson Lew, Carolyn; Guin, Sunny; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Metabolism has been a heavily investigated topic in cancer research for the past decade. Although the role of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer has been extensively studied, abnormalities in other metabolic pathways are only just being understood in cancer. One such pathway is glycogen metabolism; its involvement in cancer development, particularly in urothelial malignancies, and possible ways of exploiting aberrations in this process for treatment are currently being studied. New research shows that the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a novel tumour suppressor in bladder cancer. Loss of AGL leads to rapid proliferation of bladder cancer cells. Another enzyme involved in glycogen debranching, glycogen phosphorylase, has been shown to be a tumour promoter in cancer, including in prostate cancer. Studies demonstrate that bladder cancer cells in which AGL expression is lost are more metabolically active than cells with intact AGL expression, and these cells are more sensitive to inhibition of both glycolysis and glycine synthesis--two targetable pathways. As a tumour promoter and enzyme, glycogen phosphorylase can be directly targeted, and preclinical inhibitor studies are promising. However, few of these glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors have been tested for cancer treatment in the clinical setting. Several possible limitations to the targeting of AGL and glycogen phosphorylase might also exist.

  8. Bladder Cancer Screening in Aluminum Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Oyebode A.; Slade, Martin D.; Cantley, Linda F.; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Galusha, Deron; Kirsche, Sharon R.; Donoghue, A. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present results of a bladder cancer screening program conducted in 18 aluminum smelters in the United States from January 2000 to December 2010. Methods: Data were collected on a cohort of workers with a history of working in coal tar pitch volatile exposed areas including urine analysis for conventional cytology and ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ assay. Results: ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and cytology in combination showed a sensitivity of 62.30%, a specificity of 92.60%, a negative predictive value of 99.90%, and a positive predictive value of 2.96%. Fourteen cases of bladder cancer were detected, and the standardized incidence ratio of bladder cancer was 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.99). Individuals who tested positive on either test who were later determined to be cancer free had undergone expensive and invasive tests. Conclusions: Evidence to support continued surveillance of this cohort has not been demonstrated. PMID:25525927

  9. Bladder cancer and occupational exposure to leather.

    PubMed Central

    Marrett, L D; Hartge, P; Meigs, J W

    1986-01-01

    A large case-control study of bladder cancer (2982 cases; 5782 controls) included information about occupational exposure to leather. Occupational histories of exposed white study subjects were reviewed and 150 were determined to have had "true" on the job exposure to leather. The odds ratio estimate (OR) of bladder cancer associated with such exposure in white subjects (n = 8063) was 1.4 (95% confidence limits = 1.0, 1.9) after adjustment for sex, age, and cigarette smoking. The risk was highest in those first employed in a leather job before 1945, although no dose-response relation with duration of leather employment was found. Subjects employed in "dusty" leather jobs had a slightly higher risk than those with other types of leather jobs. Our results are consistent with reports of an increased risk of bladder cancer associated with exposure to leather. Although the agents responsible have not been identified, our findings of an increased risk associated with exposure in the earlier years of this century and in dusty jobs suggest that leather dusts may be important. PMID:3947575

  10. Bladder neck sparing in radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Smolski, Michal; Esler, Rachel C.; Turo, Rafal; Collins, Gerald N.; Oakley, Neil; Brough, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The role of a bladder neck sparing (BNS) technique in radical prostatectomy (RP) remains controversial. The potential advantages of improved functional recovery must be weighed against oncological outcomes. We performed a literature review to evaluate the current knowledge regarding oncological and functional outcomes of BNS and bladder neck reconstruction (BNr) in RP. A systematic literature review using on-line medical databases was performed. A total of 33 papers were identified evaluating the use of BNS in open, laparoscopic and robotic-assisted RP. The majority were retrospective case series, with only one prospective, randomised, blinded study identified. The majority of papers reported no significant difference in oncological outcomes using a BNS or BNr technique, regardless of the surgical technique employed. Quoted positive surgical margin rates ranged from 6% to 32%. Early urinary continence (UC) rates were ranged from 36% to 100% at 1 month, with long-term UC rate reported at 84-100% at 12 months if the bladder neck (BN) was spared. BNS has been shown to improve early return of UC and long-term UC without compromising oncological outcomes. Anastomotic stricture rate is also lower when using a BNS technique. PMID:24235797

  11. [Tissue engineering in urology, new approaches for urinary bladder reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, A N; Orlova, N V; Blinova, M I; Iudintseva, N M

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering as applied to urologic pathology is covered extremely poor in the literature despite recently gaining popularity of regenerative medicine. The review reflects the current problems associated with reconstructive surgery of the urinary bladder, experience of the researchers from the United States in implementing cellular technologies for bladder replacement, the problems and prospects of this direction in case of such a severe pathology, as fibrous transformated bladder.

  12. Robotic repair of scrotal bladder hernia during robotic prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ee-Rah; Park, Sung Yul; Ham, Won Sik; Jeong, Wooju; Lee, Woo Jung; Rha, Koon Ho

    2008-09-01

    We report a case of scrotal bladder hernia in a 68-year-old man who was also diagnosed with prostate cancer. We fixed the herniated portion of the bladder using robotics after having successfully accomplished robotic prostatectomy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report on simultaneous repair of scrotal bladder hernia and prostate cancer where both pathological findings have been treated with the assistance of robotics at a single operation. PMID:27628264

  13. Complete transurethral bladder eversion 3 months after hemipelvectomy.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Gregory; Mandalapu, Subbarao; Gilleran, Jason

    2010-02-01

    A 46-year-old white female underwent a left hemipelvectomy for chondrosarcoma. She presented with total incontinence and a bulging vaginal mass. Exam confirmed complete transurethral bladder eversion that was addressed with transvaginal multilayer bladder neck closure and suprapubic tube placement. Eventually she underwent abdominal hysterectomy, mesh sacral colpopexy, and catheterizable stoma creation. Patient is continent of urine 3 months postoperatively. We present the first reported case of bladder eversion after hemipelvectomy and propose possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:19629370

  14. Hair dye use and risk of bladder cancer in the New England bladder cancer study.

    PubMed

    Koutros, Stella; Silverman, Debra T; Baris, Dalsu; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Morton, Lindsay M; Colt, Joanne S; Hein, David W; Moore, Lee E; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Cherala, Sai; Schned, Alan; Doll, Mark A; Rothman, Nathaniel; Karagas, Margaret R

    2011-12-15

    Aromatic amine components in hair dyes and polymorphisms in genes that encode enzymes responsible for hair dye metabolism may be related to bladder cancer risk. We evaluated the association between hair dye use and bladder cancer risk and effect modification by N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1), NAT2, glutathione S-transferase Mu-1 (GSTM1) and glutathione S-transferase theta-1 (GSTT1) genotypes in a population-based case-control study of 1193 incident cases and 1418 controls from Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire enrolled between 2001 and 2004. Individuals were interviewed in person using a computer-assisted personal interview to assess hair dye use and information on potential confounders and effect modifiers. No overall association between age at first use, year of first use, type of product, color, duration or number of applications of hair dyes and bladder cancer among women or men was apparent, but increased risks were observed in certain subgroups. Women who used permanent dyes and had a college degree, a marker of socioeconomic status, had an increased risk of bladder cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-8.9]. Among these women, we found an increased risk of bladder cancer among exclusive users of permanent hair dyes who had NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype (OR = 7.3, 95% CI: 1.6-32.6) compared to never users of dye with NAT2 rapid/intermediate acetylation phenotype. Although we found no relation between hair dye use and bladder cancer risk in women overall, we detected evidence of associations and gene-environment interaction with permanent hair dye use; however, this was limited to educated women. These results need confirmation with larger numbers, requiring pooling data from multiple studies. PMID:21678399

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer: how can we improve?

    PubMed

    Gorin, Michael A; Ayyathurai, Rajinikanth; Soloway, Mark S

    2012-05-01

    The majority of patients with bladder cancer will be diagnosed following an episode of hematuria. With few exceptions, these patients should be referred for a complete urologic evaluation, including a history and physical examination, flexible cystoscopy, imaging of the upper urinary tract, and optional urine cytology. Those found to have a bladder tumor should undergo transurethral resection for the combined purposes of initial staging and treatment. Delays in diagnosing invasive bladder cancer are associated with adverse outcomes. In this review, we cover the diagnosis and management of bladder cancer. In addition, we discuss ways to improve outcomes through increased public awareness, improvements in tumor detection, accurate staging, and regimented patient surveillance.

  16. Biomarkers for bladder cancer management: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Wang, Li; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; McBride, Russell; Galsky, Matthew D; Zhu, Jun; Boffetta, Paolo; Zhang, David Y; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and sensitive detection of bladder cancer is critical to diagnose this deadly disease at an early stage, estimate prognosis, predict response to treatment, and monitor recurrence. In past years, laboratory diagnosis and surveillance of urinary bladder cancer have improved significantly. Although urine cytology remains the gold standard test, many new urinary biomarkers have been identified. Furthermore, recent advances in genomic studies of bladder cancer have helped to refine our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, the biological basis for outcome disparities, and to inform more efficient treatment and surveillance strategies. In this article, the established diagnostic tests, newly identified biomarkers and genomic landscape of bladder cancer will be reviewed. PMID:25374904

  17. Initial evaluation of whole bladder wall photodynamic therapy after intravesical ALA sensitization for carcinoma in situ of the bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hallewin, Marie-Ange; Star, Willem M.; Baert, Luc

    1997-12-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the bladder is a treacherous entity, that will develop into invasive cancer. Early treatment is mandatory in order to prevent progression. When conservative measures, such as Bacillus Calmette Querin (BCG) instillations have failed, radical cystectomy and urinary diversion is recommended. Whole bladder wall photodynamic therapy (PDT) with Photofrin II has been shown to be effective in eradicating carcinoma in situ, but often resulted in bladder shrinking. We wanted to evaluate the effects of PDT after aminolevulinic acid (ALA) sensitization. Six patients with refractory carcinoma in situ of the bladder were treated with whole bladder wall photodynamic therapy, after intravesical sensitization with aminolevulinic acid. The total light dose (scattered plus non scattered) was 75 J/cm2. No skin sensitization occurred, nor loss of bladder capacity. One patient did not respond and was successfully treated with BCG. Another patient developed distant metastases. Carcinoma in situ was completely absent after 3 months in four patients (66%).

  18. Proteomics Analysis of Bladder Cancer Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Joanne L.; Khanna, Sanjay; Giles, Peter J.; Brennan, Paul; Brewis, Ian A.; Staffurth, John; Mason, Malcolm D.; Clayton, Aled

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles, secreted by various cell types, present in biological fluids that are particularly rich in membrane proteins. Ex vivo analysis of exosomes may provide biomarker discovery platforms and form non-invasive tools for disease diagnosis and monitoring. These vesicles have never before been studied in the context of bladder cancer, a major malignancy of the urological tract. We present the first proteomics analysis of bladder cancer cell exosomes. Using ultracentrifugation on a sucrose cushion, exosomes were highly purified from cultured HT1376 bladder cancer cells and verified as low in contaminants by Western blotting and flow cytometry of exosome-coated beads. Solubilization in a buffer containing SDS and DTT was essential for achieving proteomics analysis using an LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS approach. We report 353 high quality identifications with 72 proteins not previously identified by other human exosome proteomics studies. Overrepresentation analysis to compare this data set with previous exosome proteomics studies (using the ExoCarta database) revealed that the proteome was consistent with that of various exosomes with particular overlap with exosomes of carcinoma origin. Interrogating the Gene Ontology database highlighted a strong association of this proteome with carcinoma of bladder and other sites. The data also highlighted how homology among human leukocyte antigen haplotypes may confound MASCOT designation of major histocompatability complex Class I nomenclature, requiring data from PCR-based human leukocyte antigen haplotyping to clarify anomalous identifications. Validation of 18 MS protein identifications (including basigin, galectin-3, trophoblast glycoprotein (5T4), and others) was performed by a combination of Western blotting, flotation on linear sucrose gradients, and flow cytometry, confirming their exosomal expression. Some were confirmed positive on urinary exosomes from a bladder cancer patient. In summary, the

  19. Discordance Between Preoperative and Postoperative Bladder Cancer Location: Implications for Partial-Bladder Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Tucker, Kai; Conway, Robert Greg; He, Jiwei; Guzzo, Thomas; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is strong interest in partial-bladder radiation whether as a boost or definitive therapy to limit long-term toxicity. It is unclear that a standard preoperative examination can accurately identify all sites of disease within the bladder. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between preoperative localization of bladder tumors with postoperative findings to facilitate partial-bladder radiation techniques when appropriate. Methods and Materials: We examined patients with clinically staged T1-T4 invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) or TCC with variant histology with no history of radiation or partial cystectomy undergoing radical cystectomy. Patients were scored as “under-detected” if a bladder site was involved with invasive disease (≥T1) at the time of cystectomy, but not identified preoperatively. Patients were additionally scored as “widely under-detected” if they had postoperative lesions that were not identified preoperatively in a given site, nor in any adjacent site. Rates of under-detected and widely under-detected lesions, as well as univariate and multivariate association between clinical variables and under-detection, were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: Among 222 patients, 96% (213/222) had at least 1 area of discordance. Fifty-eight percent of patients were under-detected in at least 1 location, whereas 12% were widely under-detected. Among 24 patients with a single site of disease on preoperative evaluation, 21/24 (88%) had at least 1 under-detected lesion and 14/24 (58%) were widely under-detected. On multivariate analysis, only solitary site of preoperative disease was associated with increased levels of under-detection of invasive disease (OR = 4.161, 95% CI, 1.368-12.657). Conclusion: Our study shows a stark discordance between preoperative and postoperative localization of bladder tumors. From a clinical perspective, incomplete localization of all sites of disease within the bladder

  20. Genital Sparing Cystectomy for Female Bladder Cancer and its Functional Outcome; a Seven Years' Experience with 24 Cases.

    PubMed

    Roshdy, Sameh; Senbel, Ahmed; Khater, Ashraf; Farouk, Omar; Fathi, Adel; Hamed, EmadEldeen; Denewer, Adel

    2016-09-01

    The surgical treatment of bladder cancer is the curative treatment especially in early cases. In this study, our aim was to assess the outcome of preservation of internal genital organs in selected females both oncologically and functionally, and to assess the feasibility of technique and its complication. 24 females with clinically and radiologically diagnosed T2 bladder cancer underwent gynecologic-tract sparing cystectomy (GTSC). Age ranged from 45 to 60 years. Patients with diffuse carcinoma-in-situ, those with tumors involving the bladder neck, those with poor general condition and those with preoperative incontinence were excluded. 1 patient, who developed local recurrence after 6 months. One patient lost follow up after 15 months. No recurrence developed in the retained genital organs. The remaining 20 patients remained free of disease. Among women who were eligible for functional evaluation, Daytime and nighttime continence were satisfactory in 21/22 (95.4 %) and in 20/22 (90.9 %) respectively. Chronic urinary retention, pouch-vaginal fistula was not noted. Most of patients showed superior Sexual Function index. Cystectomy with preservation of the internal genital organs is feasible in female with early, solitary or T2 bladder cancer with satisfactory functional and oncologic outcomes with proper case selection. PMID:27651690

  1. Local T/B cooperation in inflamed tissues is supported by T follicular helper-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Vu Van, Dana; Beier, Katja C.; Pietzke, Lea-Jean; Al Baz, Maysun S.; Feist, Randi K.; Gurka, Stephanie; Hamelmann, Eckard; Kroczek, Richard A.; Hutloff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases and other inflammatory conditions are characterized by large lymphocytic tissue infiltrates in which T and B cells can be found in close contact. Here, using a murine airway inflammation model, we compare antigen-specific T and B cells in lung tissue versus lung-draining lymph node. In the lung we identify a B-cell population exhibiting a classical germinal centre phenotype without being organized into ectopic lymphoid tissue. By contrast, classical CXCR5+ Bcl-6+ T follicular helper cells are not present. Nevertheless, lung-infiltrating T cells exhibit follicular helper-like properties including the potential to provide help to naive B cells. The lung tissue is also a survival niche for memory T and B cells remaining in residual peribronchial infiltrates after resolution of inflammation. Collectively, this study shows the importance of T/B cooperation not only in lymph nodes but also in inflamed peripheral tissues for local antibody responses to infection and autoimmunity. PMID:26915335

  2. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ. PMID:25835957

  3. Interaction of CD44 and hyaluronan is the dominant mechanism for neutrophil sequestration in inflamed liver sinusoids

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Braedon; McAvoy, Erin F.; Lam, Florence; Gill, Varinder; de la Motte, Carol; Savani, Rashmin C.; Kubes, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion molecules known to be important for neutrophil recruitment in many other organs are not involved in recruitment of neutrophils into the sinusoids of the liver. The prevailing view is that neutrophils become physically trapped in inflamed liver sinusoids. In this study, we used a biopanning approach to identify hyaluronan (HA) as disproportionately expressed in the liver versus other organs under both basal and inflammatory conditions. Spinning disk intravital microscopy revealed that constitutive HA expression was restricted to liver sinusoids. Blocking CD44–HA interactions reduced neutrophil adhesion in the sinusoids of endotoxemic mice, with no effect on rolling or adhesion in postsinusoidal venules. Neutrophil but not endothelial CD44 was required for adhesion in sinusoids, yet neutrophil CD44 avidity for HA did not increase significantly in endotoxemia. Instead, activation of CD44–HA engagement via qualitative modification of HA was demonstrated by a dramatic induction of serum-derived HA-associated protein in sinusoids in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS-induced hepatic injury was significantly reduced by blocking CD44–HA interactions. Administration of anti-CD44 antibody 4 hours after LPS rapidly detached adherent neutrophils in sinusoids and improved sinusoidal perfusion in endotoxemic mice, revealing CD44 as a potential therapeutic target in systemic inflammatory responses involving the liver. PMID:18362172

  4. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  5. Atrial natriuretic peptide down-regulates neutrophil recruitment on inflamed endothelium by reducing cell deformability and resistance to detachment force

    PubMed Central

    Morikis, Vasilios A.; Radecke, Chris; Jiang, Yanyan; Heinrich, Volkmar; Curry, Fitz-Roy; Simon, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recombinant atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is administered in patients with acute heart failure in Japan to improve renal function and hemodynamics, but its anti-inflammatory effect on activated leukocytes may also contribute to its therapeutic efficacy. OBJECTIVE Examine unconventional role of ANP in neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium. METHODS Human neutrophils were perfused over endothelial monolayers in a microfluidic lab-chip assay. Cell rheology was assessed by micropipette aspiration to assess changes in cortical tension and viscosity. Fluorescence microscopy was applied to measure adhesive contact area and β2-integrin focal bond formation. RESULTS ANP inhibited neutrophil rolling and firm adhesion without influencing the upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules on endothelium or the regulation of high affinity CD18 and shedding of L-selectin during neutrophil activation. Exposed to fluid shear, integrin mediated arrest was disrupted with ANP treatment, which elicited formation of long tethers and diminished cell spreading and contact. This correlated with a ~40% increase in neutrophil viscosity and a reduction in the adhesive footprint. CONCLUSIONS A decrease in cell deformation and neutrophil flattening with ANP results in fewer integrin bond clusters, which translates to higher tensile forces and impaired adhesion strengthening and cell detachment. PMID:26639357

  6. Zinc-rich inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) as regulatory factors in the epithelium of normal and inflamed airways.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, Eugene; Hamon, Rhys; Lester, Susan; Murgia, Chiara; Grant, Janet; Zalewski, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Integrity of the airway epithelium (AE) is important in the context of inhaled allergens and noxious substances, particularly during asthma-related airway inflammation where there is increased vulnerability of the AE to cell death. Apoptosis involves a number of signaling pathways which activate procaspases leading to cleavage of critical substrates. Understanding the factors which regulate AE caspases is important for development of strategies to minimize AE damage and airway inflammation, and therefore to better control asthma. One such factor is the essential dietary metal zinc. Zinc deficiency results in enhanced AE apoptosis, and worsened airway inflammation. This has implications for asthma, where abnormalities in zinc homeostasis have been observed. Zinc is thought to suppress the steps involved in caspase-3 activation. One target of zinc is the family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) which are endogenous regulators of caspases. More studies are needed to identify the roles of IAPs in regulating apoptosis in normal and inflamed airways and to study their interaction with labile zinc ions. This new information will provide a framework for future clinical studies aimed at monitoring and management of airway zinc levels as well as minimising airway damage and inflammation in asthma.

  7. Modeling the transcriptome of genital tract epithelial cells and macrophages in healthy mucosa versus mucosa inflamed by Chlamydia muridarum infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Raymond M; Kerr, Micah S

    2015-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis urogenital serovars are intracellular bacteria that parasitize human reproductive tract epithelium. As the principal cell type supporting bacterial replication, epithelial cells are central to Chlamydia immunobiology initially as sentries and innate defenders, and subsequently as collaborators in adaptive immunity-mediated bacterial clearance. In asymptomatic individuals who do not seek medical care a decisive struggle between C. trachomatis and host defenses occurs at the epithelial interface. For this study, we modeled the immunobiology of epithelial cells and macrophages lining healthy genital mucosa and inflamed/infected mucosa during the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. Upper reproductive tract epithelial cell line responses were compared to bone marrow-derived macrophages utilizing gene expression microarray technology. Those comparisons showed minor differences in the intrinsic innate defenses of macrophages and epithelial cells. Major lineage-specific differences in immunobiology relate to epithelial collaboration with adaptive immunity including an epithelial requirement for inflammatory cytokines to express MHC class II molecules, and a paucity and imbalance between costimulatory and coinhibitory ligands on epithelial cells that potentially limits sterilizing immunity (replication termination) to Chlamydia-specific T cells activated with limited or unconventional second signals.

  8. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    PubMed Central

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27004454

  9. TNF signals are dispensable for the generation of CD23+ CD21/35-high CD1d-high B cells in inflamed lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzin, Igor I; Bouta, Echoe M; Schwarz, Edward M; Bottaro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a key cytokine in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis, as underscored by the clinical effectiveness of TNF antagonists. While several of TNF’s key targets in RA are well understood, its many pleiotropic effects remain to be elucidated. TNF-transgenic mice develop inflammatory-erosive arthritis associated with disruption of draining lymph node histology and function, and accumulation of B cells with unique phenotypic and functional features consistent with contribution to pathogenesis (B cells in inflamed nodes, Bin). Bin cell induction depends on the inflamed microenvironment, but the specific signals are unknown. Using anti-TNF treatment and TNF-receptor-deficient mice, here we show that Bin cells are induced and maintained independently of B cell-intrinsic TNF signals. PMID:25959608

  10. Time-dependent bladder tissue regeneration using bilayer bladder acellular matrix graft-silk fibroin scaffolds in a rat bladder augmentation model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; He, Yi; Zhou, Zhe; Guo, Jian-hua; Wu, Jia-sheng; Zhang, Ming; Li, Wei; Zhou, Juan; Xiao, Dong-dong; Wang, Zhong; Sun, Kang; Zhu, Ying-jian; Lu, Mu-jun

    2015-09-01

    With advances in tissue engineering, various synthetic and natural biomaterials have been widely used in tissue regeneration of the urinary bladder in rat models. However, reconstructive procedures remain insufficient due to the lack of appropriate scaffolding, which should provide a waterproof barrier function and support the needs of various cell types. To address these problems, we have developed a bilayer scaffold comprising a porous network (silk fibroin [SF]) and an underlying natural acellular matrix (bladder acellular matrix graft [BAMG]) and evaluated its feasibility and potential for bladder regeneration in a rat bladder augmentation model. Histological (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining) and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the bilayer BAMG-SF scaffold promoted smooth muscle, blood vessel, and nerve regeneration in a time-dependent manner. At 12weeks after implantation, bladders reconstructed with the BAMG-SF matrix displayed superior structural and functional properties without significant local tissue responses or systemic toxicity. These results demonstrated that the bilayer BAMG-SF scaffold may be a promising scaffold with good biocompatibility for bladder regeneration in the rat bladder augmentation model.

  11. Time-dependent bladder tissue regeneration using bilayer bladder acellular matrix graft-silk fibroin scaffolds in a rat bladder augmentation model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; He, Yi; Zhou, Zhe; Guo, Jian-hua; Wu, Jia-sheng; Zhang, Ming; Li, Wei; Zhou, Juan; Xiao, Dong-dong; Wang, Zhong; Sun, Kang; Zhu, Ying-jian; Lu, Mu-jun

    2015-09-01

    With advances in tissue engineering, various synthetic and natural biomaterials have been widely used in tissue regeneration of the urinary bladder in rat models. However, reconstructive procedures remain insufficient due to the lack of appropriate scaffolding, which should provide a waterproof barrier function and support the needs of various cell types. To address these problems, we have developed a bilayer scaffold comprising a porous network (silk fibroin [SF]) and an underlying natural acellular matrix (bladder acellular matrix graft [BAMG]) and evaluated its feasibility and potential for bladder regeneration in a rat bladder augmentation model. Histological (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining) and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the bilayer BAMG-SF scaffold promoted smooth muscle, blood vessel, and nerve regeneration in a time-dependent manner. At 12weeks after implantation, bladders reconstructed with the BAMG-SF matrix displayed superior structural and functional properties without significant local tissue responses or systemic toxicity. These results demonstrated that the bilayer BAMG-SF scaffold may be a promising scaffold with good biocompatibility for bladder regeneration in the rat bladder augmentation model. PMID:26049152

  12. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    PubMed Central

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  13. Allogeneic Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Migration to Inflamed Joints In Vivo and Amelioration of Collagen Induced Arthritis When Transduced to Express CTLA4Ig

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Frank; Ritter, Thomas; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Howard, Linda; Shaw, Georgina; Anegon, Ignacio; Murphy, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Despite the immunosuppressive, homing, and regenerative capabilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their ability to migrate to arthritic joints and influence the course of arthritis in vivo remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine if allogeneic MSCs migrate to inflamed joints in vivo and to determine if MSCs expressing the costimulation blocker cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 coupled to immunoglobulin-G (CTLA4Ig) could be used to ameliorate collagen induced arthritis (CIA). The migration of systemically delivered inbred mouse strain (FVB) MSCs to migrate to inflamed joints in CIA was studied using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effect of BALB/c MSCs modified with an adenoviral vector to express CTLA4Ig, on T cell function in vitro and on CIA in vivo was assessed. After systemic delivery of FVB MSCs, eGFP DNA was detectable in the joints of mice with CIA confirming that some MSCs had reached to inflamed joints. BALB/c MSCs suppressed the secretion of both TNFα and IFNγ, and reduced the ratio of Th1:Th2 cytokine expression, by DBA/1 T cells in vitro irrespective of viral modification. The expression of CTLA4Ig did not augment this effect. Despite a worsening of disease scores after infusion of BALB/c MSCs in vivo, BALB/c MSCs expressing CTLA4Ig significantly delayed the onset of inflammatory arthritis in CIA. These data demonstrate that allogeneic MSCs can migrate to the inflamed joints of CIA in vivo and that genetically modified allogeneic MSCs may be considered for development of gene therapy strategies for inflammatory arthritis PMID:23895495

  14. Bladder wall thickness in the assessment of neurogenic bladder: a translational discussion of current clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Renea M.

    2016-01-01

    The prospective trial by Kim et al. “Can Bladder Wall Thickness Predict Videourodynamic Findings in Children with Spina Bifida?” published in Journal of Urology investigated the measurement of bladder wall thickness (BWT) as a non-invasive assessment tool for lower urinary tract changes in neurogenic bladder (NGB). In this study, no significant association was observed between BWT and high-risk urodynamic parameters. This editorial discusses the basic science of bladder wall thickening as well as prior studies relating wall thickness to clinical parameters. Although Kim et al. provide a unique literature contribution in terms of assessment of BWT at defined percent cystometric capacity, specific aspects of study methodology and population may have contributed to a lack of correlation with high-risk urodynamic findings. The application of non-invasive modalities to lower urinary tract assessment of NGB remains a promising and relevant area of future research to prevent progression to end stage lower urinary tract changes for all individuals with spina bifida. PMID:26889485

  15. Bladder Neck Urothelial Carcinoma: A Urinary Bladder Subsite Carcinoma With Distinct Clinicopathology.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Rashid, Hani

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the clinicopathology of carcinomas originating in the urinary bladder neck, 316 cystectomies for urinary bladder carcinoma performed between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were analyzed. Clinicopathological parameters were compared between bladder neck carcinomas (BNCs) and non-BNCs. Among the 316 cystectomies were 19 BNCs and 297 non-BNCs. BNCs accounted for 19/316 (6%) of all the cases, with a male-to-female ratio 18:1. Bladder neck location was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage. Ninety percent and 58% BNCs presented at stage ≥T2 and ≥T3, respectively, versus 62% and 38% non-BNCs at ≥T2 and ≥T3, respectively. Significantly higher percentage of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were also seen in BNCs (68% and 47%, respectively) than in non-BNCs (29% and 17%, respectively). In conclusion, BNCs present with a significantly higher frequency of muscle invasion and advanced tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion, as well as local and distant metastasis at diagnosis compared with the non-BNCs group. Recognition of these unique clinicopathologic features with early detection and possibly more aggressive management of BNC can potentially have a significant impact on the patient's outcome.

  16. Not all neurogenic bladders are the same: a proposal for a new neurogenic bladder classification system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NGB) has long been defined as a clinical entity that describes a heterogeneous collection of syndromes. The common theme is a bladder disorder concomitant with a neurologic disorder. This definition does not give the clinician much information about the bladder disorder, nor how to treat it, or even what the natural history of the disorder is likely to be. It may be time for a new classification scheme to better define the bladder defect and prognosis, as well as inform treatment. We propose a classification system based on seven categories, each having a neurologic defect in a distinct anatomic location. This is termed SALE (Stratify by Anatomic Location and Etiology). In addition, the presence or absence of bowel dysfunction and autonomic dysreflexia will be reported. In the future, as more definite prognostic information can be gleaned from biomarkers, we anticipate adding urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels to the definition. We expect the SALE system to efficiently describe a patient suffering from NGB and simultaneously inform the most appropriate treatment, follow-up regimen, and long-term prognosis. PMID:26904408

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Wei; Li, Xiang; Sun, Chengwen; Guo, Jia; Xue, Peng; Guan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia), KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC), and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer) have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC) progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO) term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer. PMID:26230496

  18. Investigation of in-flame soot optical properties in laminar coflow diffusion flames using thermophoretic particle sampling and spectral light extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempema, Nathan J.; Ma, Bin; Long, Marshall B.

    2016-09-01

    Soot optical properties are essential to the noninvasive study of the in-flame evolution of soot particles since they allow quantitative interpretation of optical diagnostics. Such experimental data are critical for comparison to results from computational models and soot sub-models. In this study, the thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostic (TSPD) technique is applied along with data from a previous spectrally resolved line-of-sight light attenuation experiment to determine the soot volume fraction and absorption function. The TSPD technique is applied in a flame stabilized on the Yale burner, and the soot scattering-to-absorption ratio is calculated using the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory for fractal aggregates and morphology information from a previous sampling experiment. The soot absorption function is determined as a function of wavelength and found to be in excellent agreement with previous in-flame measurements of the soot absorption function in coflow laminar diffusion flames. Two-dimensional maps of the soot dispersion exponent are calculated and show that the soot absorption function may have a positive or negative exponential wavelength dependence depending on the in-flame location. Finally, the wavelength dependence of the soot absorption function is related to the ratio of soot absorption functions, as would be found using two-excitation-wavelength laser-induced incandescence.

  19. Comparison and efficacy of LigaSure and rubber band ligature in closing the inflamed cecal stump in a rat model of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Jan, Chia-Ing; Yang, Horng-Ren; Huang, Po-Han; Jeng, Long-Bin; Su, Wen-Pang; Chen, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Safety of either LigaSure or rubber band in closing inflamed appendiceal stump in acute appendicitis has been less investigated. In this study, cecal ligation followed by resecting inflamed cecum was performed to mimic appendectomy in a rat model of acute appendicitis. Rats were sacrificed immediately (Group A) and 7 days (Group B) after cecal resection, respectively. The cecal stumps were closed by silk ligature (S), 5 mm LigaSure (L), or rubber band (R). Seven days after cecal resection, the LigaSure (BL) and silk subgroups (BS) had significantly less intra-abdominal adhesion and better laparotomy wound healing than rubber band subgroup (BR). The initial bursting pressure at cecal stump was comparable among the three methods; along with tissue healing process, both BL and BS provided a higher bursting pressure than BR 7 days after appendectomy. BL subgroup had more abundant hydroxyproline deposition than BS and BR subgroup. Furthermore, serum TNF-α in BR group kept persistently increasing along with time after cecal resection. Thus, the finding that LigaSure but not rubber band is safe in sealing off the inflamed cecal stump in rat model of acute appendicitis suggests the possibility of applying LigaSure for appendectomy via single port procedure or natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES).

  20. Histochemical Detection of Collagen Fibers by Sirius Red/Fast Green Is More Sensitive than van Gieson or Sirius Red Alone in Normal and Inflamed Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, Luca; Pellegrini, Carolina; Blandizzi, Corrado; Dolfi, Amelio; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2015-01-01

    Collagen detection in histological sections and its quantitative estimation by computer-aided image analysis represent important procedures to assess tissue localization and distribution of connective fibers. Different histochemical approaches have been proposed to detect and quantify collagen deposition in paraffin slices with different degrees of satisfaction. The present study was performed to compare the qualitative and quantitative efficiency of three histochemical methods available for collagen staining in paraffin sections of colon. van Gieson, Sirius Red and Sirius Red/Fast Green stainings were carried out for collagen detection and quantitative estimation by morphometric image analysis in colonic specimens from normal rats or animals with 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS) induced colitis. Haematoxylin/eosin staining was carried out to assess tissue morphology and histopathological lesions. Among the three investigated methods, Sirius Red/Fast Green staining allowed to best highlight well-defined red-stained collagen fibers and to obtain the highest quantitative results by morphometric image analysis in both normal and inflamed colon. Collagen fibers, which stood out against the green-stained non-collagen components, could be clearly appreciated, even in their thinner networks, within all layers of normal or inflamed colonic wall. The present study provides evidence that, as compared with Sirius Red alone or van Gieson staining, the Sirius Red/Fast Green method is the most sensitive, in terms of both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of collagen fibers, in paraffin sections of both normal and inflamed colon. PMID:26673752

  1. Ly6C hi monocytes in the inflamed colon give rise to proinflammatory effector cells and migratory antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Ehud; Varol, Chen; Farache, Julia; Elmaliah, Elinor; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Friedlander, Gilgi; Mack, Matthias; Shpigel, Nahum; Boneca, Ivo G; Murphy, Kenneth M; Shakhar, Guy; Halpern, Zamir; Jung, Steffen

    2012-12-14

    Ly6C(hi) monocytes seed the healthy intestinal lamina propria to give rise to resident CX(3)CR1(+) macrophages that contribute to the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Here we report on two alternative monocyte fates in the inflamed colon. We showed that CCR2 expression is essential to the recruitment of Ly6C(hi) monocytes to the inflamed gut to become the dominant mononuclear cell type in the lamina propria during settings of acute colitis. In the inflammatory microenvironment, monocytes upregulated TLR2 and NOD2, rendering them responsive to bacterial products to become proinflammatory effector cells. Ablation of Ly6C(hi) monocytes ameliorated acute gut inflammation. With time, monocytes differentiated into migratory antigen-presenting cells capable of priming naive T cells, thus acquiring hallmarks reminiscent of dendritic cells. Collectively, our results highlight cellular dynamics in the inflamed colon and the plasticity of Ly6C(hi) monocytes, marking them as potential targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) therapy.

  2. Deficiency in Toll-interacting protein (Tollip) skews inflamed yet incompetent innate leukocytes in vivo during DSS-induced septic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Na; Zhang, Yao; Chen, Keqiang; Yuan, Ruoxi; Lee, Christina; Geng, Shuo; Kowalski, Elizabeth; Guo, Wen; Xiong, Huabao; Li, Mingsong; Li, Liwu

    2016-01-01

    Functionally compromised neutrophils contribute to adverse clinical outcomes in patients with severe inflammation and injury such as colitis and sepsis. However, the ontogeny of dysfunctional neutrophil during septic colitis remain poorly understood. We report that the dysfunctional neutrophil may be derived by the suppression of Toll-interacting-protein (Tollip). We observed that Tollip deficient neutrophils had compromised migratory capacity toward bacterial product fMLF due to reduced activity of AKT and reduction of FPR2, reduced potential to generate bacterial-killing neutrophil extra-cellular trap (NET), and compromised bacterial killing activity. On the other hand, Tollip deficient neutrophils had elevated levels of CCR5, responsible for their homing to sterile inflamed tissues. The inflamed and incompetent neutrophil phenotype was also observed in vivo in Tollip deficient mice subjected to DSS-induced colitis. We observed that TUDCA, a compound capable of restoring Tollip cellular function, can potently alleviate the severity of DSS-induced colitis. In humans, we observed significantly reduced Tollip levels in peripheral blood collected from human colitis patients as compared to blood samples from healthy donors. Collectively, our data reveal a novel mechanism in Tollip alteration that underlies the inflamed and incompetent polarization of neutrophils leading to severe outcomes of colitis. PMID:27703259

  3. Computed tomography demonstration of cholecystogastric fistula.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chung Kuao

    2016-06-01

    Cholecystogastric fistula is a rare complication of chronic cholecystitis or long-standing cholelithiasis. It results from the gradual erosion of the approximated, chronically inflamed wall of the gall bladder and stomach with fistulous tract formation. The present case describes the direct visualization of a cholecystogastric fistula by computed tomography in a patient without prior biliary system complaints. PMID:27257453

  4. P2X2 and P2X5 Receptors Mediate Bladder Hyperesthesia in ICC in Female Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Meng, Mingsen; Zheng, Ji; Yan, Junan; Li, Qianwei; Fang, Qiang; Li, Weibing

    2015-06-01

    This study was set to explore the role of P2X2 and P2X5 as the important molecules in sensory afferent of bladder in female overactive bladder (OAB) patients with the bladder hyperesthesia. Sixty-eight OAB patients admitted in Southwest Hospital affiliated to the Third Military Medical University during September, 2011-December, 2012 were selected and included in the experimental group (OAB group) and 30 healthy volunteers during the same period were included as the control group. We recorded voiding diary and urodynamic results, and immunohistochemistry analysis was used to detect P2X2 and P2X5 receptor in interstitial cell of Caja (ICC) in bladder tissue of female OAB patients and healthy volunteers, to tentatively explore the effect of P2X2 and P2X5 in bladder hyperesthesia. Urodynamic study has important diagnostic value in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of OAB. P2X2 receptor was significantly up-regulated in bladder ICC in OAB group. The blockage of P2X2 receptor could significantly inhibit the contraction of bladder muscle strips, decrease the bladder pressure and the electric discharge of pelvic nerve. PET and urodynamic study showed that micturition desire sense in PAG area of pons in OAB patients was significantly increased compared with the control group. The up-regulation of P2X2 in ICC is an important factor to cause bladder hyperesthesia in OAB patients. PET and urodynamic study indicate that the bladder-originated nervous impulses are important cause of OAB. This study provides a basis for the study of P2X2 receptor in ICC in bladder hyperesthesia of OAB patients.

  5. [Immunotherapy of Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder -  from BCG Vaccines to Targeted Therapy].

    PubMed

    Matoušková, M

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer has high prevalence in men and women. Bladder cancer usually originates from urothelium. More than 75% of cases are classified as nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Urothelial bladder carcinoma is usually managed by transurethral resection of the bladder tumor. Role of transurethral resection of the bladder tumor is also essential in bladder cancer staging. Local prophylaxis is used in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer to reduce risk of recurrence. While local chemoprophylaxis is sufficient in low and middle risk patients, intravesical instillation of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus CalmetteGuerin (BCG) is preferred in high risk bladder cancer. Chemotherapy alone or in combination with locoregional treatment is used in advanced bladder cancer. New immunotherapy modalities have proven their efficacy in several clinical studies in advanced bladder cancer.

  6. Treatment of bladder cancer with Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hong-Min; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo; Zhang, Mei-Jue; Xu, Jian; Dai, Shen-guo; Wu, Jia-Jun; Jiang, Yu

    1998-11-01

    Among tumors of urinary system, the morbidity of bladder cancer is the first one. It is multiple, also has high risk of regeneration. The paper reports that 679 bladder tumors in 108 patients had treated for 284 times by pulsed HO:YAG laser from July 1994-June 1997.

  7. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the commonest malignancy of the urinary tract. In this review, we look at the latest developments in the diagnosis and management of this condition. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are the most important tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of bladder cancer. Various alternatives have been investigated, either to reduce the frequency of cystoscopy, or improve its sensitivity for detection of tumors. These include urine-based markers and point-of-care tests. Narrow-band imaging and photodynamic diagnosis/blue-light cystoscopy have shown promise in improving detection and reducing recurrence of bladder tumors, by improving the completion of bladder resection when compared with standard resection in white light. The majority of patients with a new diagnosis of bladder cancer have non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, which requires adjuvant intravesical chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy. Recent developments in post-resection intravesical regimens are discussed. For patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, both laparoscopic radical cystectomy and robot-assisted radical cystectomy have been shown to reduce peri-operative morbidity, while being oncologically equivalent to open radical cystectomy in the medium term. Bladder-preserving strategies entail resection and chemoradiation, and in selected patients give equivalent results to surgery. The development, advantages, and disadvantages of these newer approaches are also discussed. PMID:23327481

  8. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects of the Urinary Bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Shipley, William U.

    2010-03-01

    An in-depth overview of the normal-tissue radiation tolerance of the urinary bladder is presented. The most informative studies consider whole-organ irradiation. The data on partial-organ/nonuniform irradiation are suspect because the bladder motion is not accounted for, and many studies lack long enough follow-up data. Future studies are needed.

  9. A Methylation Panel for Bladder Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Participate in a prevalidation study for methylation based detection of bladder cancer. In addition, a panel of three markers identified will be evaluated for their ability to a) identify bladder cancer patients from those with benign urologic disease; b) identify patients with superficial (papillary) cancers from those with high grade invasive cancers

  10. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Karnik, N D; Gupta, V A; Hase, N K

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure.

  11. High Frequency Sacral Root Nerve Block Allows Bladder Voiding

    PubMed Central

    Boger, Adam S.; Bhadra, Narendra; Gustafson, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    1) Aims Dyssynergic reflexive external urethral sphincter (EUS) activity following spinal cord injury can prevent bladder voiding, resulting in significant medical complications. Irreversible sphincterotomies or neurotomies can prevent EUS activation and allow bladder voiding, but may cause incontinence or loss of sacral reflexes. We investigated whether kilohertz frequency (KF) electrical conduction block of the sacral roots could prevent EUS activation and allow bladder voiding. 2) Methods The S2 sacral nerve roots were stimulated bilaterally to generate bladder pressure in 6 cats. One S1 nerve root was stimulated proximally (20 Hz biphasic pulse trains) to evoke EUS pressure, simulating worst-case dyssynergic EUS reflexes. KF waveforms (12.5 kHz biphasic square wave) applied to an electrode implanted distally on the S1 nerve root blocked nerve conduction, preventing the increase in EUS pressure and allowing voiding. 3) Results Applying KF waveforms increased bladder voiding in single, limited-duration trials from 3 ± 6% to 59 ± 12%. Voiding could be increased to 82 ± 9% of the initial bladder volume by repeating or increasing the duration of the trials. 4) Conclusions Sacral nerve block can prevent EUS activation and allow complete bladder voiding, potentially eliminating the need for a neurotomy. Eliminating neurotomy requirements could increase patient acceptance of bladder voiding neuroprostheses, increasing patient quality of life and reducing the cost of patient care. PMID:22473837

  12. Uterine inversion with massive uterovaginal prolapse and multiple bladder stones.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Aruku; Nusee, Zalina; Tayib, Shahila

    2011-06-01

    A non-puerperal uterine inversion in advanced uterovaginal prolapse is a rare occurrence. Even more unusual is the presence of bladder calculi in these two conditions, which has not been documented before. We report a case of acute urinary retention secondary to severe uterovaginal prolapse associated with uterine inversion and multiple bladder calculi.

  13. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Karnik, N D; Gupta, V A; Hase, N K

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure. PMID:26440398

  14. Bladder emptying by intermittent electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Joseph W.; Wenzel, Brian J.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2006-03-01

    Persons with a suprasacral spinal cord injury cannot empty their bladder voluntarily. Bladder emptying can be restored by intermittent electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots (SR) to cause bladder contraction. However, this therapy requires sensory nerve transection to prevent dyssynergic contraction of the external urethral sphincter (EUS). Stimulation of the compound pudendal nerve trunk (PN) activates spinal micturition circuitry, leading to a reflex bladder contraction without a reflex EUS contraction. The present study determined if PN stimulation could produce bladder emptying without nerve transection in cats anesthetized with α-chloralose. With all nerves intact, intermittent PN stimulation emptied the bladder (64 ± 14% of initial volume, n = 37 across six cats) more effectively than either distention-evoked micturition (40 ± 19%, p < 0.001, n = 27 across six cats) or bilateral intermittent SR stimulation (25 ± 23%, p < 0.005, n = 4 across two cats). After bilateral transection of the nerves innervating the urethral sphincter, intermittent SR stimulation voided 79 ± 17% (n = 12 across three cats), comparable to clinical results obtained with SR stimulation. Voiding via intermittent PN stimulation did not increase after neurotomy (p > 0.10), indicating that PN stimulation was not limited by bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. Intermittent PN stimulation holds promise for restoring bladder emptying following spinal injury without requiring nerve transection.

  15. Morphology of the gas bladder in bumblebee catfishes (Siluriformes, Pseudopimelodidae).

    PubMed

    Birindelli, José L O; Shibatta, Oscar A

    2011-07-01

    The gross morphology of the gas bladder is described and compared for representatives of all valid genera of Pseudopimelodidae (Siluriformes). Cephalosilurus albomarginatus and species of Batrochoglanis, and Microglanis have the most basic form: a large, cordiform gas bladder with a simple internal T-shaped septum. Cephalosilurus apurensis, C. fowleri, and C. nigricauda also have a large, cordiform gas bladder, but they have well-developed trabeculae associated with the internal T-shaped septum, and a pair of well-developed constrictor muscles inserted on the external wall; the latter feature is present in most species of Pimelodidae, but absent in all other catfishes. The monotypic Lophiosilurus alexandri also has well-developed constrictor muscles, and its gas bladder is moderately sized. The species of Pseudopimelodus and Cruciglanis have a diminutive gas bladder partially divided into two lateral sacs without internal communication, and lack constrictor muscles. The parapophysis of the fourth vertebra is a wide and long shelf connected to the dorsal surface of the gas bladder in most pseudopimelodid genera. However, in the species of Pseudopimelodus and Cruciglanis the parapophysis of the fourth vertebra is shorter and has its anterior ramus folded back, partially covering the gas bladder anteroventrally; and the tympanic opening is smaller than in species of the other genera. Five phylogenetic characters are proposed based on the morphology of the gas bladder and associated structures in species of Pseudopimelodidae, and the evolution of those characters in the family is discussed. J. Morphol., 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21538478

  16. Inguinal bladder hernia associated with vesico-ureteric reflux.

    PubMed

    Noble, J G; Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Rickards, D

    1992-04-01

    The urinary bladder is frequently found as a component of inguinal herniae. This report describes a case of 'bladder hernia' associated with vesico-ureteric reflux. The current methods of investigation and subsequent treatment for this condition are reviewed along with the possible underlying cause of vesico-ureteric reflux in this case.

  17. Predictors for Chronic Urinary Toxicity After the Treatment of Prostate Cancer With Adaptive Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy: Dose-Volume Analysis of a Phase II Dose-Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Vargas, Carlos; Yan Di; Brabbins, Donald; Lockman, David; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary; Vicini, Frank; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive for chronic urinary toxicity secondary to high-dose adaptive three-dimensional conformal radiation. Methods and Materials: From 1999 to 2002, 331 consecutive patients with clinical Stage II-III prostate cancer were prospectively treated (median dose, 75.6 Gy). The bladder was contoured, and the bladder wall was defined as the outer 3 mm of the bladder solid volume. Toxicity was quantified according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Results: The 3-year rates of Grade {>=}2 and Grade 3 chronic urinary toxicity were 17.0% and 3.6%, respectively. Prostate volume, confidence-limited patient-specific planning target volume, bladder wall volume, and acute urinary toxicity were all found to be accurate predictors for chronic urinary toxicity. The volume of bladder wall receiving {>=}30 Gy (V30) and {>=}82 Gy (V82), along with prostate volume, were all clinically useful predictors of Grade {>=}2 and Grade 3 chronic urinary toxicity and chronic urinary retention. Both Grade {>=}2 (p = 0.001) and Grade 3 (p = 0.03) acute urinary toxicity were predictive for the development of Grade {>=}2 (p = 0.001, p = 0.03) and Grade 3 (p = 0.05, p < 0.001) chronic urinary toxicity. On Cox multivariate analysis the development of acute toxicity was independently predictive for the development of both Grade {>=}2 and Grade 3 chronic urinary toxicity. Conclusions: Acute urinary toxicity and bladder wall dose-volume endpoints are strong predictors for the development of subsequent chronic urinary toxicity. Our recommendation is to attempt to limit the bladder wall V30 to <30 cm{sup 3} and the V82 to <7 cm{sup 3} when possible. If bladder wall information is not available, bladder solid V30 and V82 may be used.

  18. Ingested arsenic, keratoses, and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, J; Sasieni, P; Evans, S

    1992-08-15

    A cohort of 478 patients treated with Fowler's solution (potassium arsenite) in Lancashire, England, during the period 1945-1969 and previously followed until January 1, 1980, was followed for an additional 11 years. A significant excess of bladder cancer mortality occurred (observed/expected ratio = 5/1.6; p = 0.05). No excess was found for other causes of death. In a subcohort of 142 patients examined for signs of arsenicism around 1970, all 11 subsequent cancer deaths occurred in those with signs of arsenicism (p = 0.0009).

  19. Carcinoma of gall bladder presenting as dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhaiah, Deepti Akkihebbal; Premkumar, Jennifer Anne; Moses, Viju; Chacko, Geeta

    2011-01-01

    Cancer-related muscle diseases are usually paraneoplastic disorders. Dermatomyositis (DM) is a type of inflammatory myopathy that is strongly associated with a broad range of malignant disorders. The malignancy can occur before, concomitantly or after the onset of myositis. The malignancies most commonly associated with DM are carcinomas of ovary, lung, stomach, colorectal and pancreas, as well as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. An association of DM with carcinoma of the gall bladder (GB) is extremely rare with only two previously reported cases in the literature. We report a case of carcinoma of GB with DM as the paraneoplastic manifestation. PMID:21655205

  20. Ten genetic polymorphisms in bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R A; Adib, R; Appleyard, I; Coxon, J G; Glashan, R W; Richards, B; Robinson, M R; Sunderland, E; Barham-Hall, D

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented on a group of cases of primary carcinoma of the bladder, detailing red cell surface blood group antigenic phenotypes, serum haptoglobin phenotypes, and some red cell isoenzyme phenotypes. Account is taken of the stage of the disease at presentation. The results are compared with corresponding phenotype frequencies in groups of presumed healthy persons originating either in Yorkshire or County Durham. Differences in relative incidences were found in the haptoglobin, phosphoglucomutase (PGM), and some other systems. These are both differences between all cases and controls and between particular stages at presentation and controls. PMID:6221102

  1. Pathophysiology and animal modeling of underactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Smith, Phillip P; Kuchel, George A; de Groat, William C; Birder, Lori A; Chermansky, Christopher J; Adam, Rosalyn M; Tse, Vincent; Chancellor, Michael B; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    While the symptomology of underactive bladder (UAB) may imply a primary dysfunction of the detrusor muscle, insights into pathophysiology indicate that both myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms need to be considered. Due to lack of proper animal models, the current understanding of the UAB pathophysiology is limited, and much of what is known about the clinical etiology of the condition has been derived from epidemiological data. We hereby review current state of the art in the understanding of the pathophysiology of and animal models used to study the UAB.

  2. Emerging neural stimulation technologies for bladder dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Woong; Kim, Daejeong; Yoo, Sangjin; Lee, Hyungsup; Lee, Gu-Haeng; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-03-01

    In the neural engineering field, physiological dysfunctions are approached by identifying the target nerves and providing artificial stimulation to restore the function. Neural stimulation and recording technologies play a central role in this approach, and various engineering devices and stimulation techniques have become available to the medical community. For bladder control problems, electrical stimulation has been used as one of the treatments, while only a few emerging neurotechnologies have been used to tackle these problems. In this review, we introduce some recent developments in neural stimulation technologies including microelectrode array, closed-loop neural stimulation, optical stimulation, and ultrasound stimulation.

  3. Bladder cancer: innovative approaches beyond the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Piergentili, R; Carradori, S; Gulia, C; De Monte, C; Cristini, C; Grande, P; Santini, E; Gentile, V; Di Pierro, G B

    2014-01-01

    Bladder carcinoma (BC) is the most common urinary malignant tumor. In the light of the unsuccessful current therapies and their side effects, new pharmacological strategies are needed. In addition to the well known therapeutic possibilities described in the first section, we focused our attention on very recent and innovative tools to approach this target (new drug candidates from epigenetic modulators to endothelin receptor inhibitors, improved technological formulations, active principles from plants, and dietary components). Then, in the last paragraph, we analyzed the etiology of recurrent BC, with particular attention to cellular microenvironment. In fact, the incidence of recurrence is up to 90%, and 25% of tumours show progression towards invasiveness.

  4. Solitary fibrous tumor in bladder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Ruibao; Qiao, Jiankun; Hu, Tao; Liu, Jihong; Yang, Weiming; Ye, Zhangqun

    2010-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) in bladder is extremely rare. In this study, we reported one case of bladder SFT and reviewed the only ten cases of the disease that had been reported so far. The patient suffered from residual urine sensation and urethral pain. Cystoscopy revealed a 7-cm protruding mass at the dome of the bladder, and bladder mucosa biopsy showed normal differentiation of the bladder mucosa with a small amount of inflammatory cells. Radical resection of the tumor was performed in this patient. Pathological examination found uniform, haphazardly arranged spindle cells, the majority of which were CD34-positive and Vimentin-positive and proved that the mass was a solitary fibrous tumor. Within a period of 9 months of follow-up, no reoccurrence was found.

  5. Efficient intravesical therapy of bladder cancer with cationic doxorubicin nanoassemblies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xun; Zhang, Peilan; Luo, Li; Cheng, Hao; Li, Yunzu; Du, Ting; Zou, Bingwen; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have promising applications in drug delivery for cancer therapy. Herein, we prepared cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane/methoxypoly (ethyleneglycol) (DPP) nanoparticles to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) for intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. The DPP micelles have a mean dynamic diameter of 18.65 nm and a mean zeta potential of +19.6 mV. The DPP micelles could prolong the residence of Dox in the bladder, enhance the penetration of Dox into the bladder wall, and improve cellular uptake of Dox. The encapsulation by DPP micelles significantly improved the anticancer effect of Dox against orthotopic bladder cancer in vivo. This work described a Dox-loaded DPP nanoparticle with potential applications in intravesical therapy of bladder cancer.

  6. Radical Cystectomy and Orthotopic Bladder Substitution Using Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinsung

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, continent urinary diversion, especially orthotopic bladder substitutions, has become increasingly popular following radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. The ultimate goal of orthotopic bladder substitution is to offer patients the best quality of life, similar to that of patients with native bladders. To achieve that purpose, surgeons should be familiar with the characteristics of good candidates for neobladders, the possible intraoperative and postoperative problems related to the surgery, and the solutions to these problems. Postoperative surveillance and instructions given to the patients also contribute to successful, functional results. Here, we reviewed the indications, pitfalls, and solutions for orthotopic bladder substitutions and the patients' quality of life after surgery. When performed properly, orthotopic continent diversion offers good quality of life with few long-term complications. Therefore, we believe it is the best option for the majority of patients requiring cystectomy. PMID:21556208

  7. Bladder Cancer Patient Advocacy: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Quale, Diane Zipursky; Bangs, Rick; Smith, Monica; Guttman, David; Northam, Tammy; Winterbottom, Andrew; Necchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Edoardo; Demkiw, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, cancer patient advocacy groups have demonstrated that patient engagement in cancer care is essential to improving patient quality of life and outcomes. Bladder cancer patient advocacy only began 10 years ago in the United States, but is now expanding around the globe with non-profit organizations established in Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, and efforts underway in Australia. These organizations, at different levels of maturity, are raising awareness of bladder cancer and providing essential information and resources to bladder cancer patients and their families. The patient advocacy organizations are also helping to advance research efforts by funding research proposals and facilitating research collaborations. Strong partnerships between these patient advocates and the bladder cancer medical community are essential to ensuringsustainability for these advocacy organizations, increasing funding to support advances in bladder cancer treatment, and improving patient outcomes. PMID:27398397

  8. Efficient intravesical therapy of bladder cancer with cationic doxorubicin nanoassemblies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xun; Zhang, Peilan; Luo, Li; Cheng, Hao; Li, Yunzu; Du, Ting; Zou, Bingwen; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have promising applications in drug delivery for cancer therapy. Herein, we prepared cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane/methoxypoly (ethyleneglycol) (DPP) nanoparticles to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) for intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. The DPP micelles have a mean dynamic diameter of 18.65 nm and a mean zeta potential of +19.6 mV. The DPP micelles could prolong the residence of Dox in the bladder, enhance the penetration of Dox into the bladder wall, and improve cellular uptake of Dox. The encapsulation by DPP micelles significantly improved the anticancer effect of Dox against orthotopic bladder cancer in vivo. This work described a Dox-loaded DPP nanoparticle with potential applications in intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. PMID:27660445

  9. Gall bladder sludge and stones in multitransfused Egyptian thalassaemic patients.

    PubMed

    el-Nawawy, A; Kassem, A S; Eissa, M; Abdel-Fattah, M; Safwat, M

    2001-01-01

    One hundred Egyptian beta-thalassaemic patients on a long-term transfusion/chelation programme were evaluated for the prevalence of gall bladder sludge and stones and the associated risk factors. Fifty healthy individuals served as controls. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed that 14% of the thalassaemic patients had gall bladder sludge or stones (6% stones and 8% sludge). The thalassaemic patients with this complication were older, had a higher prevalence of gall bladder symptoms, higher levels of pretransfusion haemoglobin, larger amounts of transfused red cells, and more were regularly transfused. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence that gall bladder symptoms and the amount of transfused red cells were the only significant predictors of the occurrence of gall bladder sludge or stones.

  10. Novel non invasive diagnostic strategies in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    TRUTA, ANAMARIA; POPON, TUDOR ADRIAN HODOR; SARACI, GEORGE; GHERVAN, LIVIU; POP, IOAN VICTOR

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies worldwide, derived from the urothelium of the urinary bladder and defined by long asymptomatic and atypical clinical picture. Its complex etiopathogenesis is dependent on numerous risk factors that can be divided into three distinct categories: genetic and molecular abnormalities, chemical or environmental exposure and previous genitourinary disorders and family history of different malignancies. Various genetic polymorphisms and microRNA might represent useful diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Genetic and molecular abnormalities - risk factors are represented by miRNA or genetic polymorphisms proved to be part of bladder carcinogenesis such as: genetic mutations of oncogenes TP53, Ras, Rb1 or p21 oncoproteins, cyclin D or genetic polymorhisms of XPD,ERCC1, CYP1B1, NQO1C609T, MDM2SNP309, CHEK2, ERCC6, NRF2, NQO1Pro187Ser polymorphism and microRNA (miR-143, −145, −222, −210, −10b, 576-3p). The aim of our article is to highlight the most recent acquisitions via molecular biomarkers (miRNAs and genetic polymorphisms) involved in bladder cancer in order to provide early diagnosis, precise therapy according to the molecular profile of bladder tumors, as well as to improve clinical outcome, survival rates and life quality of oncological patients. These molecular biomarkers play a key role in bladder carcinogenesis, clinical evolution, prognosis and therapeutic response and explain the molecular mechanisms involved in bladder carcinogenesis; they can also be selected as therapeutic targets in developing novel therapeutic strategies in bladder malignancies. Moreover, the purpose in defining these molecular non invasive biomarkers is also to develop non invasive screening programs in bladder malignancies with the result of decreasing bladder cancer incidence in risk population. PMID:27152066

  11. Computer-aided detection of bladder tumors based on the thickness mapping of bladder wall in MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongbin; Duan, Chaijie; Jiang, Ruirui; Li, Lihong; Fan, Yi; Yu, Xiaokang; Zeng, Wei; Gu, Xianfeng; Liang, Zhengrong

    2010-03-01

    Bladder cancer is reported to be the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Recent advances in medical imaging technologies, such as magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, make virtual cystoscopy a potential alternative with advantages as being a safe and non-invasive method for evaluation of the entire bladder and detection of abnormalities. To help reducing the interpretation time and reading fatigue of the readers or radiologists, we introduce a computer-aided detection scheme based on the thickness mapping of the bladder wall since locally-thickened bladder wall often appears around tumors. In the thickness mapping method, the path used to measure the thickness can be determined without any ambiguity by tracing the gradient direction of the potential field between the inner and outer borders of the bladder wall. The thickness mapping of the three-dimensional inner border surface of the bladder is then flattened to a twodimensional (2D) gray image with conformal mapping method. In the 2D flattened image, a blob detector is applied to detect the abnormalities, which are actually the thickened bladder wall indicating bladder lesions. Such scheme was tested on two MR datasets, one from a healthy volunteer and the other from a patient with a tumor. The result is preliminary, but very promising with 100% detection sensitivity at 7 FPs per case.

  12. Time-dependent effects of castration on the bladder function and histological changes in the bladder and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Magari, Tomohiro; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Arai, Seiji; Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effect of androgens on bladder blood flow (BBF), bladder function and histological changes in castrated male rats. Male Wistar rats were classified into unoperated group (control group), groups castrated at the age of 8 weeks (group 8wPC) and groups castrated at the age of 4 weeks (group 4wPC). Each rat was used at the age of 20 weeks. BBF was measured using fluorescent microspheres. Bladder cystometry was performed without anesthesia or restraint; the bladder was first irrigated with saline and then with 0.25% acetic acid (AA) solution. Maximum voiding pressure and voiding interval were measured. The bladder and iliac artery were histologically examined for differences in smooth muscle and quantity of collagen fiber to analyze the effect of castration on the smooth muscle content. No differences were noted in BBF following castration. The voiding intervals for all groups were shortened (P < 0.001) following AA irrigation. No significant difference was noted in the maximum voiding pressure. Histological changes were observed in bladder and iliac artery. Smooth muscle/collagen ratio at the bladder was lower in groups 8wPC and 4wPC compared to the control group (P< 0.01), while that at the iliac artery was decreased in group 4wPC compared to the control group (P< 0.001). In conclusion, our findings indicate that castration does not alter BBF, but leads to histological changes in the bladder as well as its associated blood vessels.

  13. Life style and occupational risk factors for bladder cancer in Germany. A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, E.; Chang-Claude, J.; Frentzel-Beyme, R. )

    1992-04-01

    A hospital-based, case-control study of 531 male and 144 female matched pairs was conducted in Germany to analyze the role of nonoccupational and occupational risk factors in the etiology of tumors of the lower urinary tract (bladder cancer). Smoking of cigarettes was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.6 for men and 3.2 for women, compared with not smoking and showed a significant dose- and time-response relationship for both sexes. Heavy pipe smoking significantly increased the risk (OR = 1.9 in men), and smoking of cigars did not alter the risk of bladder cancer. Controlling for smoking, a significantly twofold or more increase in risk was found for heavy consumption of coffee in both sexes and for heavy intake of beer in males. Increasing levels of total fluid intake were associated with increasing, smoking-adjusted risks in men. Significant associations were found for chronic infection of the lower urinary tract (OR = 1.8), familial history of bladder cancer (OR = 2.5), and frequent consumption of high fat meals (OR = 1.4) among men and for frequent consumption of canned food in both sexes. With regard to occupational history, significantly elevated odds ratios were found for ever-employment in the printing (5.0), plastics and synthetics (2.6), rubber (2.5), mining (2.0), and dyestuffs (1.9) industries, for exposure to spray paints (2.9), zinc (2.3), chromium/chromate (2.2), oils (1.5), petroleum (1.4), stone dust (1.4) and metal dust/fumes (1.3), and for occupation as mining worker (2.0) and truck driver (1.8) among men. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed significant contribution of coffee and beer drinking, ingestion of canned food, and familial occurrence of urothelial tumors to the risk of bladder cancer in men after accounting for the effects of tobacco smoking, occupational exposures, and a history of bladder infection.

  14. Host lysozyme-mediated lysis of Lactococcus lactis facilitates delivery of colitis-attenuating superoxide dismutase to inflamed colons.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Sonia A; Veiga, Patrick; Fenn, Kathrin; Michaud, Monia; Kim, Jason H; Gallini, Carey Ann; Glickman, Jonathan N; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; Béal, Chloé; Derrien, Muriel; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Garrett, Wendy S

    2015-06-23

    Beneficial microbes that target molecules and pathways, such as oxidative stress, which can negatively affect both host and microbiota, may hold promise as an inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Prior work showed that a five-strain fermented milk product (FMP) improved colitis in T-bet(-/-) Rag2(-/-) mice. By varying the number of strains used in the FMP, we found that Lactococcus lactis I-1631 was sufficient to ameliorate colitis. Using comparative genomic analyses, we identified genes unique to L. lactis I-1631 involved in oxygen respiration. Respiration of oxygen results in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, ROS are produced at high levels during intestinal inflammation and cause tissue damage. L. lactis I-1631 possesses genes encoding enzymes that detoxify ROS, such as superoxide dismutase (SodA). Thus, we hypothesized that lactococcal SodA played a role in attenuating colitis. Inactivation of the sodA gene abolished L. lactis I-1631's beneficial effect in the T-bet(-/-) Rag2(-/-) model. Similar effects were obtained in two additional colonic inflammation models, Il10(-/-) mice and dextran sulfate sodium-treated mice. Efforts to understand how a lipophobic superoxide anion (O2 (-)) can be detoxified by cytoplasmic lactoccocal SodA led to the finding that host antimicrobial-mediated lysis is a prerequisite for SodA release and SodA's extracytoplasmic O2 (-) scavenging. L. lactis I-1631 may represent a promising vehicle to deliver antioxidant, colitis-attenuating SodA to the inflamed intestinal mucosa, and host antimicrobials may play a critical role in mediating SodA's bioaccessibility.

  15. Host lysozyme-mediated lysis of Lactococcus lactis facilitates delivery of colitis-attenuating superoxide dismutase to inflamed colons

    PubMed Central

    Ballal, Sonia A.; Veiga, Patrick; Fenn, Kathrin; Michaud, Monia; Kim, Jason H.; Gallini, Carey Ann; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; Béal, Chloé; Derrien, Muriel; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial microbes that target molecules and pathways, such as oxidative stress, which can negatively affect both host and microbiota, may hold promise as an inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Prior work showed that a five-strain fermented milk product (FMP) improved colitis in T-bet−/− Rag2−/− mice. By varying the number of strains used in the FMP, we found that Lactococcus lactis I-1631 was sufficient to ameliorate colitis. Using comparative genomic analyses, we identified genes unique to L. lactis I-1631 involved in oxygen respiration. Respiration of oxygen results in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, ROS are produced at high levels during intestinal inflammation and cause tissue damage. L. lactis I-1631 possesses genes encoding enzymes that detoxify ROS, such as superoxide dismutase (SodA). Thus, we hypothesized that lactococcal SodA played a role in attenuating colitis. Inactivation of the sodA gene abolished L. lactis I-1631’s beneficial effect in the T-bet−/− Rag2−/− model. Similar effects were obtained in two additional colonic inflammation models, Il10−/− mice and dextran sulfate sodium-treated mice. Efforts to understand how a lipophobic superoxide anion (O2−) can be detoxified by cytoplasmic lactoccocal SodA led to the finding that host antimicrobial-mediated lysis is a prerequisite for SodA release and SodA’s extracytoplasmic O2− scavenging. L. lactis I-1631 may represent a promising vehicle to deliver antioxidant, colitis-attenuating SodA to the inflamed intestinal mucosa, and host antimicrobials may play a critical role in mediating SodA’s bioaccessibility. PMID:26056274

  16. A Protocol for the Comprehensive Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells in Normal and Inflamed Murine Non-Lymphoid Tissues.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yen-Rei A; O'Koren, Emily G; Hotten, Danielle F; Kan, Matthew J; Kopin, David; Nelson, Erik R; Que, Loretta; Gunn, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is used extensively to examine immune cells in non-lymphoid tissues. However, a method of flow cytometric analysis that is both comprehensive and widely applicable has not been described. We developed a protocol for the flow cytometric analysis of non-lymphoid tissues, including methods of tissue preparation, a 10-fluorochrome panel for cell staining, and a standardized gating strategy, that allows the simultaneous identification and quantification of all major immune cell types in a variety of normal and inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. We demonstrate that our basic protocol minimizes cell loss, reliably distinguishes macrophages from dendritic cells (DC), and identifies all major granulocytic and mononuclear phagocytic cell types. This protocol is able to accurately quantify 11 distinct immune cell types, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, inflammatory monocytes, resident monocytes, alveolar macrophages, resident/interstitial macrophages, CD11b- DC, and CD11b+ DC, in normal lung, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, skin, eyes, and mammary gland. We also characterized the expression patterns of several commonly used myeloid and macrophage markers. This basic protocol can be expanded to identify additional cell types such as mast cells, basophils, and plasmacytoid DC, or perform detailed phenotyping of specific cell types. In examining models of primary and metastatic mammary tumors, this protocol allowed the identification of several distinct tumor associated macrophage phenotypes, the appearance of which was highly specific to individual tumor cell lines. This protocol provides a valuable tool to examine immune cell repertoires and follow immune responses in a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions.

  17. Influence of fuel injection timing and pressure on in-flame soot particles in an automotive-size diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon

    2014-07-15

    The current understanding of soot particle morphology in diesel engines and their dependency on the fuel injection timing and pressure is limited to those sampled from the exhaust. In this study, a thermophoretic sampling and subsequent transmission electron microscope imaging were applied to the in-flame soot particles inside the cylinder of a working diesel engine for various fuel injection timings and pressures. The results show that the number count of soot particles per image decreases by more than 80% when the injection timing is retarded from -12 to -2 crank angle degrees after the top dead center. The late injection also results in over 90% reduction of the projection area of soot particles on the TEM image and the size of soot aggregates also become smaller. The primary particle size, however, is found to be insensitive to the variations in fuel injection timing. For injection pressure variations, both the size of primary particles and soot aggregates are found to decrease with increasing injection pressure, demonstrating the benefits of high injection velocity and momentum. Detailed analysis shows that the number count of soot particles per image increases with increasing injection pressure up to 130 MPa, primarily due to the increased small particle aggregates that are less than 40 nm in the radius of gyration. The fractal dimension shows an overall decrease with the increasing injection pressure. However, there is a case that the fractal dimension shows an unexpected increase between 100 and 130 MPa injection pressure. It is because the small aggregates with more compact and agglomerated structures outnumber the large aggregates with more stretched chain-like structures. PMID:24933154

  18. Influence of fuel injection timing and pressure on in-flame soot particles in an automotive-size diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon

    2014-07-15

    The current understanding of soot particle morphology in diesel engines and their dependency on the fuel injection timing and pressure is limited to those sampled from the exhaust. In this study, a thermophoretic sampling and subsequent transmission electron microscope imaging were applied to the in-flame soot particles inside the cylinder of a working diesel engine for various fuel injection timings and pressures. The results show that the number count of soot particles per image decreases by more than 80% when the injection timing is retarded from -12 to -2 crank angle degrees after the top dead center. The late injection also results in over 90% reduction of the projection area of soot particles on the TEM image and the size of soot aggregates also become smaller. The primary particle size, however, is found to be insensitive to the variations in fuel injection timing. For injection pressure variations, both the size of primary particles and soot aggregates are found to decrease with increasing injection pressure, demonstrating the benefits of high injection velocity and momentum. Detailed analysis shows that the number count of soot particles per image increases with increasing injection pressure up to 130 MPa, primarily due to the increased small particle aggregates that are less than 40 nm in the radius of gyration. The fractal dimension shows an overall decrease with the increasing injection pressure. However, there is a case that the fractal dimension shows an unexpected increase between 100 and 130 MPa injection pressure. It is because the small aggregates with more compact and agglomerated structures outnumber the large aggregates with more stretched chain-like structures.

  19. Role of ERK1/2 activation on itch sensation induced by bradykinin B1 activation in inflamed skin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanzhen; Jiang, Shuyan; Liu, Yuying; Xiong, Jialing; Liang, Jiexian; Ji, Wenjin

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that bradykinin receptor B1 (B1R) agonists evoke an itch-related scratching response in inflamed skin via the B1 receptor; however, the mechanisms responsible for this abnormal itch sensation remain unclear. Therefore, the present study utilized a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced mouse model of inflammation to elucidate the mechanisms responsible. Over a period of 30 min, scratching behavior was quantified by the number of hind limb scratches of the area surrounding the drug injection site on the neck. Furthermore, western blot analysis was used to investigate the potential role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 signaling as a mediator of itch in CFA-treated mice. The results demonstrated that CFA-induced inflammation at the back of the neck is associated with sustained enhancement of ERK1/2 activation in the spinal cord. Moreover, B1R agonist treatment resulted in increased expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 in the spinal cord, which peaked at 45 min. Consistent with these findings, inhibition of either mitogen-activated protein/ERK kinase or ERK1/2, as well as inhibition of ERK1/2 activation following inflammation, attenuated B1 receptor-mediated scratching responses to a greater extent, as compared with control mice. Collectively, the results of the present study indicated that enhanced and persistent ERK1/2 activation in the spinal cord may be required to induce a scratching response to B1R agonists following CFA-induced inflammation. PMID:27446253

  20. A Protocol for the Comprehensive Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells in Normal and Inflamed Murine Non-Lymphoid Tissues.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yen-Rei A; O'Koren, Emily G; Hotten, Danielle F; Kan, Matthew J; Kopin, David; Nelson, Erik R; Que, Loretta; Gunn, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is used extensively to examine immune cells in non-lymphoid tissues. However, a method of flow cytometric analysis that is both comprehensive and widely applicable has not been described. We developed a protocol for the flow cytometric analysis of non-lymphoid tissues, including methods of tissue preparation, a 10-fluorochrome panel for cell staining, and a standardized gating strategy, that allows the simultaneous identification and quantification of all major immune cell types in a variety of normal and inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. We demonstrate that our basic protocol minimizes cell loss, reliably distinguishes macrophages from dendritic cells (DC), and identifies all major granulocytic and mononuclear phagocytic cell types. This protocol is able to accurately quantify 11 distinct immune cell types, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, inflammatory monocytes, resident monocytes, alveolar macrophages, resident/interstitial macrophages, CD11b- DC, and CD11b+ DC, in normal lung, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, skin, eyes, and mammary gland. We also characterized the expression patterns of several commonly used myeloid and macrophage markers. This basic protocol can be expanded to identify additional cell types such as mast cells, basophils, and plasmacytoid DC, or perform detailed phenotyping of specific cell types. In examining models of primary and metastatic mammary tumors, this protocol allowed the identification of several distinct tumor associated macrophage phenotypes, the appearance of which was highly specific to individual tumor cell lines. This protocol provides a valuable tool to examine immune cell repertoires and follow immune responses in a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions. PMID:26938654

  1. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty.

    PubMed

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M

    2015-03-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ≈4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter∗∗ procedure probably provides the most successful results.

  2. Solitary fibrous tumor of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hoon; Cha, Kyung Bin; Choi, Young Deuk; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2004-06-30

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a distinct spindle cell tumor arising mainly in the pleura, however, SFT of extra-pleural sites had been reported. To our knowledge, five cases of the urinary bladder SFT had been reported. We have recently experienced a case of SFT of the urinary bladder in a 56-year- old man who was admitted to the hospital with a 4-month history of voiding difficulty, frequency, and residual urine sensation. A computerized tomography scan revealed a 12cm sized intravesical mass. The mass was marginally excised under the impression of it being a benign spindle cell tumor by pre-operative needle biopsy. On gross examination, the mass was multinodular, creamy white, and the cut surface was fibrotic with a rubbery consistency. Microscopic examination revealed haphazardly arranged spindle cells with a lace-like deposition of inter- and pericellular collagen. Areas of increased cellularity show nuclear atypia and occasional mitoses (2-3/10HPF). The immunohistochemical staining revealed an intense CD34 and bcl-2 immunoreactivity. Although the exact biologic behavior of these tumors has not been clarified, most of the reported cases have undergone a benign clinical course.

  3. Polymeric Bladder for Storing Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, David H.; Harvey, Andrew C.; Leary, William

    2009-01-01

    A proposed system for storing oxygen in liquid form and dispensing it in gaseous form is based on (1) initial subcooling of the liquid oxygen; (2) containing the liquid oxygen in a flexible vessel; (3) applying a gas spring to the flexible vessel to keep the oxygen compressed above the saturation pressure and, thus, in the liquid state; and (4) using heat leakage into the system for vaporizing the oxygen to be dispensed. In a typical prior system based on these principles, the flexible vessel is a metal bellows housed in a rigid tank, and the gas spring consists of pressurized helium in the tank volume surrounding the bellows. Unfortunately, the welds in the bellows corrugations are subject to fatigue, and, because bellows have large ullage, a correspondingly large fraction of the oxygen content cannot be expelled. In the proposed system, the flexible vessel would be a bladder made of a liquid- crystal polymer (LCP). (LCPs are strong and compatible with liquid oxygen.) In comparison with a metal bellows, a polymeric bladder would have less ullage and would weigh less. In experiments involving fatigue cycling at liquid-nitrogen temperatures, two LCPs were found to be suitable for this application.

  4. Active surveillance for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Makito; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is known to be a heterogeneous malignancy that requires varying treatment modalities and follow-up schedules. Low-grade Ta papillary tumors are categorized as low-risk NMIBC because of their favorable prognosis. There is an expanding movement that overdiagnosis and overtreatment should be avoided considering the economic impact and the patients' quality of life. It has been over 10 years since the initial assessment of active surveillance for low-risk NMIBC suggested its feasibility and safety. However, urologists are still unfamiliar with this treatment option, which can be ideal in appropriately selected patients. In this review article, we focus on active surveillance for low-risk NMIBC and discuss the evidence and rationale for this treatment option. There are several issues to resolve in order to advocate active surveillance as a standard option in selected patients. A specific follow-up protocol including intervals of cystoscopy, urine cytology, urine markers, and other radiographic examinations need to be optimized and validated. Finally, we integrate the available data into the follow-up strategy and propose a new surveillance protocol for active surveillance of recurrent low-risk bladder cancer. PMID:27326406

  5. Bladder Endometriosis Mimicking TCC - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asish; Bhatnagar, Atul; Seth, B N; Dang, Arbinder; Gupta, Vineeta

    2016-02-01

    Endometriosis is the ectopic presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus. Though on its own endometriosis is not a rare lesion, the involvement of the urinary tract is rare but with the bladder being the most commonly affected organ. Endometriosis is usually seen in females between the ages of 30-40 years and may occur due to fluctuating levels of oestrogen and progesterone. Clinically the patient maybe asymptomatic or show symptoms of dysmenorrhea, irregular or heavy periods, pain in the pelvic area, lower abdomen or in the back. It has been suggested that ultrasonography should be done either before or during menstruation as the lesion becomes more evident and a biopsy taken during this period is a strong aid in reaching a final diagnosis. We report here an unusual case of bladder endometriosis where the patient came with severe pelvic pain and an endoluminal mass seen on the ultrasonographic report. Based on these findings a differential of transitional cell carcinoma was given which was ruled out based on the cystoscopic findings.

  6. Bladder Endometriosis Mimicking TCC - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asish; Bhatnagar, Atul; Seth, B N; Dang, Arbinder; Gupta, Vineeta

    2016-02-01

    Endometriosis is the ectopic presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus. Though on its own endometriosis is not a rare lesion, the involvement of the urinary tract is rare but with the bladder being the most commonly affected organ. Endometriosis is usually seen in females between the ages of 30-40 years and may occur due to fluctuating levels of oestrogen and progesterone. Clinically the patient maybe asymptomatic or show symptoms of dysmenorrhea, irregular or heavy periods, pain in the pelvic area, lower abdomen or in the back. It has been suggested that ultrasonography should be done either before or during menstruation as the lesion becomes more evident and a biopsy taken during this period is a strong aid in reaching a final diagnosis. We report here an unusual case of bladder endometriosis where the patient came with severe pelvic pain and an endoluminal mass seen on the ultrasonographic report. Based on these findings a differential of transitional cell carcinoma was given which was ruled out based on the cystoscopic findings. PMID:27042525

  7. Application of Bladder Acellular Matrix in Urinary Bladder Regeneration: The State of the Art and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Drewa, Gerard; Drewa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Construction of the urinary bladder de novo using tissue engineering technologies is the “holy grail” of reconstructive urology. The search for the ideal biomaterial for urinary bladder reconstruction has been ongoing for decades. One of the most promising biomaterials for this purpose seems to be bladder acellular matrix (BAM). In this review we determine the most important factors, which may affect biological and physical properties of BAM and its regeneration potential in tissue engineered urinary bladder. We also point out the directions in modification of BAM, which include incorporation of exogenous growth factors into the BAM structure. Finally, we discuss the results of the urinary bladder regeneration with cell seeded BAM. PMID:25793199

  8. Dose to the gall bladder from a /sup 99m/Tc labeled gall bladder scanning agent

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.R.; Chen, S.M.

    1981-06-01

    A mathematical gall bladder was added to the mathematical phantom and the specific absorbed fractions (PHI) were calculated for the 22 target organs (for the source in the gall bladder) by the Monte Carlo code. From these data and the /sup 99m/Tc decay scheme data, the S factors (rads per ..mu..Ci-day residence) for the organs when the source is in the gall bladder were estimated. From the reciprocity relationship for PHI, the S factors for the gall bladder when the source is located in any of the 22 source organs of the phantom were also estimated. The dose to the gall bladder wall from a single injection of the /sup 99m/Tc labeled scanning agent into man is estimated to be approx. 0.52 rads/mCi plus or minus about 1/2 this value depending on the assumptions in the estimation of this value.

  9. Whole-Pelvis or Bladder-Only Chemoradiation for Lymph Node-Negative Invasive Bladder Cancer: Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tunio, Mutahir A.; Hashmi, Altaf; Qayyum, Abdul; Mohsin, Rehan; Zaeem, Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Whole-pelvis (WP) concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) is the standard bladder preserving option for patients with invasive bladder cancer. The standard practice is to treat elective pelvic lymph nodes, so our aim was to evaluate whether bladder-only (BO) CCRT leads to results similar to those obtained by standard WP-CCRT. Methods and Materials: Patient eligibility included histopathologically proven muscle-invasive bladder cancer, lymph nodes negative (T2-T4, N-) by radiology, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor with normal hematologic, renal, and liver functions. Between March 2005 and May 2006, 230 patients were accrued. Patients were randomly assigned to WP-CCRT (120 patients) and BO-CCRT (110 patients). Data regarding the toxicity profile, compliance, initial complete response rates at 3 months, and occurrence of locoregional or distant failure were recorded. Results: With a median follow-up time of 5 years (range, 3-6), WP-CCRT was associated with a 5-year disease-free survival of 47.1% compared with 46.9% in patients treated with BO-CCRT (p = 0.5). The bladder preservation rates were 58.9% and 57.1% in WP-CCRT and BO-CCRT, respectively (p = 0.8), and the 5-year overall survival rates were 52.9% for WP-CCRT and 51% for BO-CCRT (p = 0.8). Conclusion: BO-CCRT showed similar rates of bladder preservation, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates as those of WP-CCRT. Smaller field sizes including bladder with 2-cm margins can be used as bladder preservation protocol for patients with muscle-invasive lymph node-negative bladder cancer to minimize the side effects of CCRT.

  10. Differential effects of intravesical resiniferatoxin on excitability of bladder spinal neurons upon colon–bladder cross-sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Malykhina, Anna P.; Qin, Chao; Lei, Qi; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Meerveld, Beverley Greenwood-Van; Foreman, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sensitization in the pelvis may contribute to etiology of functional pelvic pain disorders such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). Increasing evidence suggests the involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the development of neurogenic inflammation in the pelvis and pelvic organ cross-sensitization. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that desensitization of TRPV1 receptors in the urinary bladder can minimize the effects of cross-sensitization induced by experimental colitis on excitability of bladder spinal neurons. Extracellular activity of bladder neurons was recorded in response to graded urinary bladder distension (UBD) in rats pretreated with intravesical resiniferatoxin (RTX, 10−7 M). Colonic inflammation was induced by intracolonic instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The duration of excitatory responses to noxious UBD during acute colonic inflammation (3 days post-TNBS) was significantly shortened in the group with RTX pretreatment (25.37±.5 s, n=49) when compared to the control group (35.1±4.2 s, n=43, p≤0.05). The duration of long-lasting excitatory responses, but not short-lasting responses of bladder spinal neurons during acute colitis was significantly reduced by RTX from 52.9±6.6 s (n=21, vehicle group) to 34.4±2.1 s (RTX group, n=21, p≤0.05). However, activation of TRPV1 receptors in the urinary bladder prior to acute colitis increased the number of bladder neurons receiving input from large somatic fields from 22.7% to 58.2% (p≤0.01). The results of our study provide evidence that intravesical RTX reduces the effects of viscerovisceral cross-talk induced by colonic inflammation on bladder spinal neurons. However, RTX enhances the responses of bladder neurons to somatic stimulation, thereby limiting its therapeutic potential. PMID:23146715

  11. A microangiographic study of the effect of hyperthermia on the rabbit bladder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hietala, S. O.; Howells, R.; Hazra, I. A.

    1978-01-01

    A model was used to study the effect of hyperthermia on a normal tissue. The model selected was the rabbit bladder and the end point measured was the changes in the micro-vasculature of the bladder wall. It was already demonstrated clinically that hot water bladder infusions produce regression in bladder tumors.

  12. Assessment of Bladder Motion for Clinical Radiotherapy Practice Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McBain, Catherine A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Buckley, David L.; Sykes, Jonathan S.; Green, Melanie M.; Cowan, Richard A.; Hutchinson, Charles E.; Moore, Christopher J.; Price, Patricia M.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. Methods and Materials: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. Results: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. Conclusions: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.

  13. Male chronic pelvic pain: An update

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome collectively referred to as urologic CPPS (UCPPS) is defined by the absence of identifiable bacterial infection as a cause for the chronic pain and urinary symptoms. Methods: A PubMed search of all recent relevant articles using the keywords/phrases: CPPS, CPPS, and male pelvic pain, was conducted. Results: CPPS has a high worldwide prevalence and its negative impact on quality of life compares with or exceeds common chronic morbidities. Triggers include certain comestibles as well as psychosocial factors that promote catastrophizing and illness focused behavior. Several validated tools are currently available to help diagnose and direct targeted therapy. Treatment should begin with the most simple and least invasive based on the presenting clinical phenotype. Conclusions: Although no gold-standard treatment exists, a multidisciplinary approach with multimodal therapy gives the UCPPS patient the best chance of symptom relief. PMID:26941492

  14. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Prevents Chronic and Recurrent Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Roberts, Pacita L.; Riehl, Terrence E.; van der Post, Sjoerd; Binkley, Jana M.; Schwartz, Drew J.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Mack, Matthias; Schwendener, Reto A.; Hooton, Thomas M.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Stenson, William F.; Colonna, Marco; Stapleton, Ann E.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant microorganisms globally has created an urgent need for novel therapeutic strategies to combat urinary tract infections (UTIs). Immunomodulatory therapy may provide benefit, as treatment of mice with dexamethasone during acute UTI improved outcome by reducing the development of chronic cystitis, which predisposes to recurrent infection. Here we discovered soluble biomarkers engaged in myeloid cell development and chemotaxis that were predictive of future UTI recurrence when elevated in the sera of young women with UTI. Translation of these findings revealed that temperance of the neutrophil response early during UTI, and specifically disruption of bladder epithelial transmigration of neutrophils by inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2, protected mice against chronic and recurrent cystitis. Further, proteomics identified bladder epithelial remodeling consequent to chronic infection that enhances sensitivity to neutrophil damage. Thus, cyclooxygenase-2 expression during acute UTI is a critical molecular trigger determining disease outcome and drugs targeting cyclooxygenase-2 could prevent recurrent UTI. PMID:26125048

  15. Overview of bladder heating technology: matching capabilities with clinical requirements.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Paul R; van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2016-06-01

    Moderate temperature hyperthermia (40-45°C for 1 h) is emerging as an effective treatment to enhance best available chemotherapy strategies for bladder cancer. A rapidly increasing number of clinical trials have investigated the feasibility and efficacy of treating bladder cancer with combined intravesical chemotherapy and moderate temperature hyperthermia. To date, most studies have concerned treatment of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) limited to the interior wall of the bladder. Following the promising results of initial clinical trials, investigators are now considering protocols for treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). This paper provides a brief overview of the devices and techniques used for heating bladder cancer. Systems are described for thermal conduction heating of the bladder wall via circulation of hot fluid, intravesical microwave antenna heating, capacitively coupled radio-frequency current heating, and radiofrequency phased array deep regional heating of the pelvis. Relative heating characteristics of the available technologies are compared based on published feasibility studies, and the systems correlated with clinical requirements for effective treatment of MIBC and NMIBC. PMID:26939993

  16. HPLC assisted Raman spectroscopic studies on bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, W. L.; Cheng, Y.; Yu, W.; Zhang, X. B.; Shen, A. G.; Hu, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    We applied confocal Raman spectroscopy to investigate 12 normal bladder tissues and 30 tumor tissues, and then depicted the spectral differences between the normal and the tumor tissues and the potential canceration mechanism with the aid of the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique. Normal tissues were demonstrated to contain higher tryptophan, cholesterol and lipid content, while bladder tumor tissues were rich in nucleic acids, collagen and carotenoids. In particular, β-carotene, one of the major types of carotenoids, was found through HPLC analysis of the extract of bladder tissues. The statistical software SPSS was applied to classify the spectra of the two types of tissues according to their differences. The sensitivity and specificity of 96.7 and 66.7% were obtained, respectively. In addition, different layers of the bladder wall including mucosa (lumps), muscle and adipose bladder tissue were analyzed by Raman mapping technique in response to previous Raman studies of bladder tissues. All of these will play an important role as a directive tool for the future diagnosis of bladder cancer in vivo.

  17. Botulinum toxin treatment of urethral and bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Smith, Christopher P; Somogyi, George T; Chancellor, Michael B

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is the most lethal naturally occurring toxin known to mankind. Injection of BTX into the urethral sphincter or bladder is an effective treatment for lower urinary tract dysfunction. We reviewed the literature on the mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy of BTX treatment in urologic diseases, with a focus on lower urinary tract dysfunction. Injection of BTX is safe and effective in the treatment of detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia, non-neurogenic pelvic floor spasticity, and refractory overactive bladder. Urodynamic assessment after sphincter injection with BTX reveals a decrease of bladder voiding pressure, urethral pressure profile, and post-void residual urine. An increase of the functional bladder capacity and a decrease of the bladder voiding pressure can be seen after bladder injection with BTX. Clinical improvement was found in a moderate percentage of treated patients in most reported series and lasted for 3 to 14 months without significant adverse effects. In addition, BTX-A treatment inhibits afferent-nerve-mediated bladder contraction. This analgesic effect may expand the application of BTX in the localized genitourinary tract pain syndrome, such as interstitial cystitis and prostatodynia. In conclusion, application of BTX is a promising treatment for lower urinary tract dysfunction with profound basic and clinical implications.

  18. Endoscopic Gold Fiducial Marker Placement into the Bladder Wall to Optimize Radiotherapy Targeting for Bladder-Preserving Management of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Feasibility and Initial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maurice M.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Brajtbord, Jonathan; Konety, Badrinath R.; Meng, Maxwell V.; Roach, Mack; Carroll, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bladder radiotherapy is a management option for carefully selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the inability to visualize the tumor site during treatment and normal bladder movement limits targeting accuracy and increases collateral radiation. A means to accurately and reliably target the bladder during radiotherapy is needed. Materials and Methods Eighteen consecutive patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T1–T4) elected bladder-preserving treatment with maximal transurethral resection (TUR), radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. All underwent endoscopic placement of 24-K gold fiducial markers modified with micro-tines (70 [2.9×0.9 mm.]; 19 [2.1×0.7 mm.) into healthy submucosa 5-10 mm. from the resection margin, using custom-made coaxial needles. Marker migration was assessed for with intra-op bladder-filling cystogram and measurement of distance between markers. Set-up error and marker retention through completion of radiotherapy was confirmed by on-table portal imaging. Results Between 1/2007 and 7/2012, a total of 89 markers (3–5 per tumor site) were placed into 18 patients of mean age 73.6 years. Two patients elected cystectomy before starting treatment; 16/18 completed chemo-radiotherapy. All (100%) markers were visible with all on-table (portal, cone-beam CT), fluoroscopy, plain-film, and CT-scan imaging. In two patients, 1 of 4 markers placed at the tumor site fell-out (voided) during the second half of radiotherapy. All other markers (80/82, 98%) were present through the end of radio-therapy. No intraoperative (e.g. uncontrolled bleeding, collateral injury) or post-operative complications (e.g. stone formation, urinary tract infection, post-TUR hematuria >48 hours) occurred. Use of micro-tined fiducial tumor-site markers afforded a 2 to 6-fold reduction in bladder-area targeted with high-dose radiation. Discussion Placement of the micro-tined fiducial markers into the bladder was feasible and

  19. Inflammasomes are important mediators of cyclophosphamide-induced bladder inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francis M; Vivar, Nivardo P; Kennis, James G; Pratt-Thomas, Jeffery D; Lowe, Danielle W; Shaner, Brooke E; Nietert, Paul J; Spruill, Laura S; Purves, J Todd

    2014-02-01

    Bladder inflammation (cystitis) underlies numerous bladder pathologies and is elicited by a plethora of agents such as urinary tract infections, bladder outlet obstruction, chemotherapies, and catheters. Pattern recognition receptors [Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nod-like receptors (NLRs)] that recognize pathogen- and/or damage-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and/or DAMPs, respectively) are key components of the innate immune system that coordinates the production (TLRs) and maturation (NLRs) of proinflammatory IL-1β. Despite multiple studies of TLRs in the bladder, none have investigated NLRs beyond one small survey. We now demonstrate that NLRP3 and NLRC4, and their binding partners apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a COOH-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and NLR family apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP), are expressed in the bladder and localized predominantly to the urothelia. Activated NLRs form inflammasomes that activate caspase-1. Placement of a NLRP3- or NLRC4-activating PAMP or NLRP3-activating DAMPs into the lumen of the bladder stimulated caspase-1 activity. To investigate inflammasomes in vivo, we induced cystitis with cyclophosphamide (CP, 150 mg/kg ip) in the presence or absence of the inflammasome inhibitor glyburide. Glyburide completely blocked CP-induced activation of caspase-1 and the production of IL-1β at 4 h. At 24 h, glyburide reduced two markers of inflammation by 30-50% and reversed much of the inflammatory morphology. Furthermore, glyburide reversed changes in bladder physiology (cystometry) induced by CP. In conclusion, NLRs/inflammasomes are present in the bladder urothelia and respond to DAMPs and PAMPs, whereas NLRP3 inhibition blocks bladder dysfunction in the CP model. The coordinated response of NLRs and TLRs in the urothelia represents a first-line innate defense that may provide an important target for pharmacological intervention.

  20. Structure and function in urinary bladder of foetal sheep.

    PubMed

    France, V M; Stanier, M W; Wooding, F B

    1974-06-01

    1. The structure and function of the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder of sheep foetuses was investigated by electron microscopic studies made in conjunction with a series of experiments in which the permeability of the bladder to sodium and water was measured in vitro. Measurements were made at gestational ages ranging from 50 to 141 days (term = 147 days) Osmolarity and electrolyte concentrations of urine found in the foetal bladder were also measured.2. The development of tight junctions between the bladder epithelial cells was investigated by incubating the tissue with solutions containing 1 mM-LaCl(3) on the mucosal surface. No penetration of the junctions by lanthanum was observed in foetuses of 90 days or older. In younger bladders, the epithelial layer was stripped by treatment with lanthanum, but tight junctions appeared to be fully developed in early bladders incubated without lanthanum.3. The surface structure of the luminal (mucosal) plasmalemma was fully developed at 50 days.4. Unidirectional fluxes of labelled sodium and water were measured with identical solutions bathing the two surfaces of the bladder wall. No net water movement occurred; the mean ratio of efflux to influx in nine bladders was 1.002 +/- 0.039 (S.E. of mean). Under these conditions, the flux ratio for sodium was 1.735 +/- 0.143 (S.E. of mean) in twelve bladders.5. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) had no effect on net water movement but reduced the net efflux of sodium so that the flux ratio became 1.285 +/- 0.255 (S.E. of mean) n = 8. ADH also had a striking effect on the structure of the epithelium, causing marked swelling of the intercellular spaces. The tight junctions remained an effective barrier to lanthanum penetration under these conditions; lanthanum was not observed in the enlarged spaces.

  1. Clinicopathologic features and treatment outcome of urinary bladder neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hooda, M N; Siddique, F H; Nabi, S; Islam, M W; Ara, K; Bhuiyan, Z I

    2014-04-01

    More than ninety percent of bladder neoplasm is Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC). About 85% of patients present with symptom of painless haematuria. However haematuria is quite often intermittent so that a negative result has little meaning in ruling out the presence of bladder cancer. The present study was conducted to observe the natural history of different clinicopathologic stages of bladder cancer after transurethral resection bladder tumor (TURBT), either intravescical chemotherapy (IVC) or immunotherapy with BCG and of other forms of therapy like radio-chemotherapy (RCT) and radical surgery in few cases. A consecutive series of 52 cases with different grades and stages of bladder cancer patients were studied. Those who were noncompliant with surgery were sent for RCT. The age range of the patients was 34 to 75 with mean 53 year. Macroscopic haematuria, flank pain, microscopic haematuria, bladder irritability was found in 43(82.7%), 06(11.5%), 03(5.8%), 32(61.5%) cases respectively and coincidental ureteral TCC with hydronephrosis was found in 04(7.7%) cases for whom radical nephreureterectomy and cystectomy with ileal conduit was done. Amongst the other muscle invasive tumor only three cases were compliant to do radical surgery; rest were advised to consult with oncologist for possible RCT. Superficial bladder cancer was 19(36.5%) and invasive bladder cancer was 33(63.5%). TURBT and IVT were offered for all superficial bladder tumors. Of them 06(31.5%) patients showed recurrence during the study period. More recurrences occur in IVC group (35.7%) than immunotherapy with BCG group (20%) Re-TURBT and stage wise treatment was offered to them. All recurrent cases were G-3 tumor and were multifocal. Recurrence rate is about 30%. Screening program and structured referral system should be developed to have early diagnosis for prompt treatment and best prognosis.

  2. Preclinical Dosimetry of Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea; Etienne, Wiguins; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite positive efficacy, thermotherapy is not widely used in clinical oncology. Difficulties associated with field penetration and controlling power deposition patterns in heterogeneous tissue have limited its use for heating deep in the body. Heat generation using iron-oxide super-paramagnetic nanoparticles excited with magnetic fields has been demonstrated to overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this preclinical study is to investigate the feasibility of treating bladder cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Methods The bladders of 25 female rats were injected with 0.4 ml of Actium Biosystems magnetite-based nanoparticles (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) via catheters inserted in the urethra. To assess the distribution of nanoparticles in the rat after injection we used the 7 T small animal MRI system (Bruker ClinScan, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany). Heat treatments were performed with a small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) with a goal of raising bladder temperature to 42°C in <10min and maintaining for 60min. Temperatures were measured throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic temperature probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec Canada) to characterize our ability to localize heat within the bladder target. Results The MRI study confirms the effectiveness of the catheterization procedure to homogenously distribute nanoparticles throughout the bladder. Thermal dosimetry data demonstrate our ability to controllably raise temperature of rat bladder ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that a MFH system provides well-localized heating of rat bladder with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:23837123

  3. Best practice in the assessment of bladder function in infants

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michael; Castagnetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review normal developmental bladder physiology in infants and bladder dysfunction in conditions such as neurogenic bladder, posterior urethral valves and high grade vesicoureteric reflux. We contrast the classical concept that bladder function in nontoilet-trained children is thought to be ‘reflexive’ or ‘uninhibited’, with the results of more recent research showing that infants most commonly have a stable detrusor. The infant bladder is physiologically distinct from the state seen in older children or adults. The voiding pattern of the infant is characterized by an interrupted voiding stream due to lack of proper urinary sphincter relaxation during voiding. This is called physiologic detrusor sphincter dyscoordination and is different from the pathologic ‘detrusor sphincter dyssynergy’ seen in patients with neurogenic bladder. Urodynamic abnormalities in neonates born with spina bifida are common and depend on the level and severity of the spinal cord malformation. Upper neuron lesions most commonly lead to an overactive bladder with or without detrusor sphincter dyssynergy while a lower neuron lesion is associated with an acontractile detrusor with possible denervation of the external urinary sphincter. In infants with neurogenic bladder, the role of ‘early prophylactic treatment (clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergics)’ versus initial ‘watchful waiting and treatment as needed’ is still controversial and needs more research. Many urodynamic-based interventions have been suggested in patients with posterior urethral valves and are currently under scrutiny, but their impact on the long-term outcome of the upper and lower urinary tract is still unknown. Cumulative data suggest that there is no benefit to early intervention regarding bladder function in infants with high-grade vesicoureteric reflux. PMID:25083164

  4. Preclinical dosimetry of magnetic fluid hyperthermia for bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea; Etienne, Wiguins; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-02-01

    Background Despite positive efficacy, thermotherapy is not widely used in clinical oncology. Difficulties associated with field penetration and controlling power deposition patterns in heterogeneous tissue have limited its use for heating deep in the body. Heat generation using iron-oxide super-paramagnetic nanoparticles excited with magnetic fields has been demonstrated to overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this preclinical study is to investigate the feasibility of treating bladder cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Methods The bladders of 25 female rats were injected with 0.4 ml of Actium Biosystems magnetite-based nanoparticles (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) via catheters inserted in the urethra. To assess the distribution of nanoparticles in the rat after injection we used the 7 T small animal MRI system (Bruker ClinScan, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany). Heat treatments were performed with a small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) with a goal of raising bladder temperature to 42°C in <10min and maintaining for 60min. Temperatures were measured throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic temperature probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec Canada) to characterize our ability to localize heat within the bladder target. Results The MRI study confirms the effectiveness of the catheterization procedure to homogenously distribute nanoparticles throughout the bladder. Thermal dosimetry data demonstrate our ability to controllably raise temperature of rat bladder >1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that a MFH system provides well-localized heating of rat bladder with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues.

  5. Inflammasomes are important mediators of cyclophosphamide-induced bladder inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francis M; Vivar, Nivardo P; Kennis, James G; Pratt-Thomas, Jeffery D; Lowe, Danielle W; Shaner, Brooke E; Nietert, Paul J; Spruill, Laura S; Purves, J Todd

    2014-02-01

    Bladder inflammation (cystitis) underlies numerous bladder pathologies and is elicited by a plethora of agents such as urinary tract infections, bladder outlet obstruction, chemotherapies, and catheters. Pattern recognition receptors [Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nod-like receptors (NLRs)] that recognize pathogen- and/or damage-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and/or DAMPs, respectively) are key components of the innate immune system that coordinates the production (TLRs) and maturation (NLRs) of proinflammatory IL-1β. Despite multiple studies of TLRs in the bladder, none have investigated NLRs beyond one small survey. We now demonstrate that NLRP3 and NLRC4, and their binding partners apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a COOH-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and NLR family apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP), are expressed in the bladder and localized predominantly to the urothelia. Activated NLRs form inflammasomes that activate caspase-1. Placement of a NLRP3- or NLRC4-activating PAMP or NLRP3-activating DAMPs into the lumen of the bladder stimulated caspase-1 activity. To investigate inflammasomes in vivo, we induced cystitis with cyclophosphamide (CP, 150 mg/kg ip) in the presence or absence of the inflammasome inhibitor glyburide. Glyburide completely blocked CP-induced activation of caspase-1 and the production of IL-1β at 4 h. At 24 h, glyburide reduced two markers of inflammation by 30-50% and reversed much of the inflammatory morphology. Furthermore, glyburide reversed changes in bladder physiology (cystometry) induced by CP. In conclusion, NLRs/inflammasomes are present in the bladder urothelia and respond to DAMPs and PAMPs, whereas NLRP3 inhibition blocks bladder dysfunction in the CP model. The coordinated response of NLRs and TLRs in the urothelia represents a first-line innate defense that may provide an important target for pharmacological intervention. PMID:24285499

  6. A Mouse Model of Furosemide-Induced Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Saporito, Michael S; Zuvich, Eva; DiCamillo, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Detailed in this unit is a mouse model of overactive bladder and urinary incontinence based on diuretic stress-induced urination. The procedure involves the use of a unique, highly sensitive, and automated urine capturing method to measure urinary latency, frequency, and void volume. Although this method was first described and validated using an anti-muscarinic drug used for treating overactive bladder, subsequent work has shown that effective non-cholinergic agents can be detected. These findings indicate good predictive value for this model regarding the possible clinical utility of test agents as treatments for overactive bladder, regardless of their site of action. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27636110

  7. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Vivek; George, Arun Jacob Philip; Chandrasingh, J.; Panda, Arabind; Devasia, Antony

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy. PMID:27127361

  8. Transitional cell bladder carcinoma with presentation mimicking ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R; Dabbs, D J; Olt, G J

    1996-05-01

    In the case described here, the patient's initial presentation suggested ovarian carcinoma. She had recurrent ascites, a pelvic mass, elevated CA-125, and extensive peritoneal carcinomatosis with transitional cell histology. The presence of hematuria prompted a cystoscopy, which revealed the true site of origin to be the urinary bladder rather than ovaries. This presentation is extremely rare for bladder cancer. Since transitional cell tumors from the bladder have a much worse prognosis than those of ovarian origin, it is important to identify the primary site correctly. Therefore, cystoscopy is essential for patients with hematuria, and should be considered in cases of apparent primary peritoneal carcinoma with transitional cell histology.

  9. Photoacoustic imaging of the bladder: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Chung, Benjamin I; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2013-07-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a promising new technology that combines tissue optical characteristics with ultrasound transmission and can potentially visualize tumor depth in bladder cancer. We imaged simulated tumors in 5 fresh porcine bladders with conventional pulse-echo sonography and photoacoustic imaging. Isoechoic biomaterials of different optical qualities were used. In all 5 of the bladder specimens, photoacoustic imaging showed injected biomaterials, containing varying degrees of pigment, better than control pulse-echo sonography. Photoacoustic imaging may be complementary to diagnostic information obtained by cystoscopy and urine cytologic analysis and could potentially obviate the need for biopsy in some tumors before definitive treatment.

  10. Role of autologous bladder-neck slings: a urogynecology perspective.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, Dani; Karram, Mickey

    2012-08-01

    The concept of the autologous pubovaginal sling involves supporting the proximal urethra and bladder neck with a piece of graft material, achieving continence either by providing a direct compressive force on the urethra/bladder outlet or by reestablishing a reinforcing platform or hammock against which the urethra is compressed during transmission of increased abdominal pressure. Pubovaginal slings using a biological sling material (whether autologous, allograft, or xenograft) can be used successfully to manage primary or recurrent stress incontinence. This article addresses the indications for the use of an autologous bladder-neck sling, describes the surgical techniques, and discusses outcomes and technical considerations. PMID:22877713

  11. Naftopidil inhibits 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced bladder contraction in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takumi; Kasahara, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Ken-ichi; Ikegaki, Ichiro; Kuriyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-30

    Naftopidil is an α(1D) and α(1A) subtype-selective α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist that has been used to treat lower urinary tract symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this study, we investigated the effects of naftopidil on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced rat bladder contraction (10(-8)-10(-4) M). Naftopidil (0.3, 1, and 3 μM) inhibited 5-HT-induced bladder contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, other α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists, tamsulosin, silodosin or prazosin, did not inhibit 5-HT-induced bladder contraction. The 5-HT-induced bladder contraction was inhibited by both ketanserin and 4-(4-fluoronaphthalen-1-yl)-6-propan-2-ylpyrimidin-2-amine (RS127445), serotonin 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonists, respectively. In addition, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) and α-methyl-5-HT, 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2) receptor agonists, respectively, induced bladder contraction. The 5-HT-induced bladder contraction was not inhibited by N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-N-pyridin-2-yl-cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY-100635), [1-[2[(methylsulfonyl)amino]ethyl]-4-piperidinyl]methyl-1-methyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylate (GR113808) or (R)-3-[2-[2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)ethyl]pyrrolidine-1-sulphonyl]phenol (SB269970), 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(4) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, respectively. Naftopidil inhibited both the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2) receptor agonists-induced bladder contractions. Naftopidil binds to the human 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) receptors with pKi values of 6.55 and 7.82, respectively. These results suggest that naftopidil inhibits 5-HT-induced bladder contraction via blockade of the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) receptors in rats. Furthermore, 5-HT-induced bladder contraction was enhanced in bladder strips obtained from bladder outlet obstructed rats, with this contraction inhibited by naftopidil. The beneficial effects of naftopidil on storage symptoms such as urinary frequency and nocturia in patients with benign

  12. Changes in Aquaporin 1 Expression in Rat Urinary Bladder after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Ouck; Song, Seung Hee; Ahn, Kuyoun; Kwon, Dongdeuk; Ryu, Soo Bang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins that facilitate water movement across biological membranes. AQPs are also called water channels, and they have recently been reported to be expressed in rat and human urothelium. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effect of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) on the rat urothelium and AQP1 expression in rat urothelium. Materials and Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-240 g each, n=20) were divided into 2 groups: the sham group (the Con group, n=10) and the partial BOO group (the BOO group, n=10). The BOO group underwent a partial BOO. The expression and cellular localization of AQP1 were determined by performing Western blotting and immunohistochemistry on the rat urinary bladder. Results AQP1 immunoreactivity in both the control and the BOO groups was localized in the capillaries, arterioles, and venules of the lamina propria of the urinary bladder. The protein expression of AQP1 was significantly increased in the BOO group. Conclusions This study showed that BOO causes a significant increase in the expression of AQP1. This may imply that AQP1 has a functional role in the detrusor instability that occurs in association with BOO. PMID:20428433

  13. Use of cone-beam computed tomography to characterize daily urinary bladder variations during fractionated radiotherapy for canine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nieset, Jessica R; Harmon, Joseph F; Larue, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is difficult to treat accurately with fractionated radiation therapy (RT) due to daily positional changes of the bladder and surrounding soft-tissue structures. We quantified the daily motion experienced by the canine bladder with patients in dorsal vs. sternal vs. lateral recumbency. We also described the dose distribution for three different planning target volume expansions (5, 10, and 15 mm) for each of the three positions to ensure adequate bladder dose and minimize irradiation of nearby healthy tissues. Analysis was based on data from retrospective daily cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) images obtained for positioning of canine patients undergoing routine RT. Organs of interest were contoured on each CBCT data set and the images, along with the contours, were registered to the original planning CT. All measurements were made relative to the planning CT and dosimetric data for the organs of interest was determined using a dose volume histogram generated from sample parallel-opposed beam configuration. There was a wide range in bladder position throughout treatment. The least amount of bladder variation and the lowest rectal dose was with dogs in lateral recumbency. It was also determined that a margin of 10 mm would allow for sufficient dose to be delivered to the bladder while minimizing rectal dose.

  14. CCDC34 is up-regulated in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yanqing; Qiu, Wei; Ning, Xianghui; Yang, Xinyu; Liu, Libo; Wang, Zicheng; Lin, Jian; Li, Xuesong; Guo, Yinglu

    2015-01-01

    The coiled coil is a superhelical structural protein motif involved in a diverse array of biological functions, and the abnormal expression of the coiled-coil domain containing proteins has a direct link with the phenotype of tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the critical role of Coiled-coil domain-containing protein 34 (CCDC34) in bladder carcinogenesis, which has never been reported to date. Here, we found CCDC34 expression was elevated in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. The knockdown of CCDC34 via lentivirus-mediated siRNA significantly suppressed bladder cancer cells proliferation and migration, and induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and increased apoptosis in vitro. In addition, CCDC34 knockdown suppressed bladder tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, CCDC34 silencing decreased the phosphorylation of MEK, ERK1/2, JNK, p38 and Akt, and the expressions of c-Raf and c-Jun, indicating MAPK and AKT pathways (ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, JNK/MAPK and PI3K/Akt) might be involved in CCDC34 regulation of bladder cancer cell proliferation and migration. Our findings revealed for the first time a potential oncogenic role for CCDC34 in bladder carcinoma pathogenesis and it may serve as a biomarker or even a therapeutic target for bladder cancer. PMID:26312564

  15. INDUCTION OF TRANSTITIONAL CELL HYPERPLASIA IN THE URINARY BLADDER AND ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLON OF RATS TREATED WITH INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Cancer of the urinary bladder and colon are significant human health concerns. Epidemiological studies have suggested a correlation between these cancers and the chronic consumption of drinking water containing disinfection by-products (DBPs). The present study...

  16. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Angela

    2014-10-01

    We review the morphology and differential diagnoses of pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of the bladder, using a study case to illustrate the discussion. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia is a rare, reactive response to an ischemic insult, classically to radiation therapy, and consists of proliferative, pseudoinfiltrative urothelial nests within the stroma. The presence of background radiation therapy-related changes, such as numerous dilated thrombosed vessels, reactive-appearing endothelial and stromal cells, edema, and hemorrhage, can provide clues to the diagnosis. The main differential diagnoses include invasive urothelial carcinoma and the nested variant of urothelial carcinoma; morphologic features, such as the presence or absence of background therapy-related changes and the architecture and the cytologic atypia of the nests, can help distinguish between pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia and urothelial carcinoma.

  17. Review of the epidemiology of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Renu S; Radomski, Sidney B

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is common in both men and women. It is a symptom complex that causes significant detriment to quality of life in patients. Although the prevalence of OAB is similar in both sexes, there are sex-specific differences in individual symptoms and the impact on quality of life. The coexistence of benign prostatic hyperplasia with OAB can worsen quality of life in men. This review examines the major studies that looked at the epidemiology of OAB as it relates to both sexes. It focuses on both the overall prevalence rates and the incidence of individual symptoms. This paper also addresses the level of bother and quality of life in men and women with OAB. In addition, the relationship between OAB and benign prostatic hyperplasia is reviewed. PMID:27350947

  18. Protein Profiling of Bladder Urothelial Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinghai; Ye, Fei; Cui, Miao; Lee, Peng; Wei, Chengguo; Hao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yanbo; Lu, Zhihua; Galsky, Matthew; McBride, Russell; Wang, Li; Wang, Dongwen; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Wang, Chunxi; Zhang, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to detect protein changes that can assist to understand the underlying biology of bladder cancer. The data showed forty five proteins were found to be differentially expressed comparing tumors vs non-tumor tissues, of which EGFR and cdc2p34 were correlated with muscle invasion and histological grade. Ten proteins (ß-catenin, HSP70, autotaxin, Notch4, PSTPIP1, DPYD, ODC, cyclinB1, calretinin and EPO) were able to classify muscle invasive BCa (MIBC) into 2 distinct groups, with group 2 associated with poorer survival. Finally, 3 proteins (P2X7, cdc25B and TFIIH p89) were independent factors for favorable overall survival. PMID:27626805

  19. Protein Profiling of Bladder Urothelial Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinghai; Ye, Fei; Cui, Miao; Lee, Peng; Wei, Chengguo; Hao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yanbo; Lu, Zhihua; Galsky, Matthew; McBride, Russell; Wang, Li; Wang, Dongwen; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Wang, Chunxi; Zhang, David Y

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to detect protein changes that can assist to understand the underlying biology of bladder cancer. The data showed forty five proteins were found to be differentially expressed comparing tumors vs non-tumor tissues, of which EGFR and cdc2p34 were correlated with muscle invasion and histological grade. Ten proteins (ß-catenin, HSP70, autotaxin, Notch4, PSTPIP1, DPYD, ODC, cyclinB1, calretinin and EPO) were able to classify muscle invasive BCa (MIBC) into 2 distinct groups, with group 2 associated with poorer survival. Finally, 3 proteins (P2X7, cdc25B and TFIIH p89) were independent factors for favorable overall survival. PMID:27626805

  20. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Gall Bladder.

    PubMed

    Haid, Max; Gahju, Badri; Schulz, Craig; Sterner, David; Falconer, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the gall bladder (SCCGB) is a rare condition, with only 53 prior cases reported in the world literature when our case was first diagnosed. Our patient was found to have limited stage disease and was treated with sequential laparoscopic cholecystectomy, etoposide/carboplatin chemotherapy followed by consolidating loco-regional radiation therapy. She is alive and well without evidence of disease more than 132 months since diagnosis. We describe here our experience in the diagnosis, staging workup, treatment, and surveillance of a case of SCCGB and review the published literature. Treated aggressively with currently available methods, patients with limited stage SCCGB can have an excellent prognosis. The authors' intent is to provide a reasonable plan of treatment for other physicians facing such an unusual patient. PMID:27197345