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Sample records for chytridiomycete blastocladiella emersonii

  1. Large-subunit rRNA sequence of the chytridiomycete Blastocladiella emersonii, and implications for the evolution of zoosporic fungi.

    PubMed

    Van der Auwera, G; De Wachter, R

    1996-11-01

    The 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNA sequences of the chytridiomycete Blastocladiella emersonii were determined. These data were combined with 18S rRNA sequences in order to carry out a phylogenetic analysis based on distance matrix, parsimony, and maximum likelihood methods. The new data confirmed that chytridiomycetes are true fungi and not protists, as was already suggested on the basis of biochemical, ultrastructural, and 18S rRNA data. Within the fungal clade, B. emersonii formed the first line of divergence. The position of the fungi within the eukaryotic "crown" taxa was also reassessed, and the alveolate-stramenopile cluster appeared as their sister group. The stramenopiles also comprise a number of zoosporic fungi, which resemble chytridiomycetes in so many respects, e.g., production of motile spores, thallus morphology, and absorptive nutrition, that they have been classified together with them in the past. This suggests that the possible common ancestor of the fungi, stramenopiles, and alveolates may have been a zoosporic fungus, which would mean that zoosporic fungi are paraphyletic instead of polyphyletic as previously suggested.

  2. Gene Discovery and Expression Profile Analysis through Sequencing of Expressed Sequence Tags from Different Developmental Stages of the Chytridiomycete Blastocladiella emersonii†

    PubMed Central

    Ribichich, Karina F.; Salem-Izacc, Silvia M.; Georg, Raphaela C.; Vêncio, Ricardo Z. N.; Navarro, Luci D.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2005-01-01

    Blastocladiella emersonii is an aquatic fungus of the chytridiomycete class which diverged early from the fungal lineage and is notable for the morphogenetic processes which occur during its life cycle. Its particular taxonomic position makes this fungus an interesting system to be considered when investigating phylogenetic relationships and studying the biology of lower fungi. To contribute to the understanding of the complexity of the B. emersonii genome, we present here a survey of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from various stages of the fungal development. Nearly 20,000 cDNA clones from 10 different libraries were partially sequenced from their 5′ end, yielding 16,984 high-quality ESTs. These ESTs were assembled into 4,873 putative transcripts, of which 48% presented no matches with existing sequences in public databases. As a result of Gene Ontology (GO) project annotation, 1,680 ESTs (35%) were classified into biological processes of the GO structure, with transcription and RNA processing, protein biosynthesis, and transport as prevalent processes. We also report full-length sequences, useful for construction of molecular phylogenies, and several ESTs that showed high similarity with known proteins, some of which were not previously described in fungi. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression profile (digital Northern analysis) of each transcript throughout the life cycle of the fungus using Bayesian statistics. The in silico approach was validated by Northern blot analysis with good agreement between the two methodologies. PMID:15701807

  3. Specific Inhibitors of the Three RNA Polymerases from the Aquatic Fungus Blastocladiella emersonii

    PubMed Central

    Horgen, Paul A.; Griffin, David H.

    1971-01-01

    Specific inhibitors of each of the three RNA polymerases of Blastocladiella emersonii have been found. Cycloheximide specifically inhibited the in vitro activity of the DEAE-fraction I enzyme, alpha-amanitin specifically inhibited the DEAE-fraction II enzyme, and rifampicin specifically inhibited the fraction III enzyme. DNA stimulation and dependency on the four riboside triphosphates were shown to be characteristic of each of the three fractions. Optimum concentrations of magnesium ions required were shown to differ among the three fractions and to be somewhat higher than optimum concentrations of manganese ions. The effect of pH on activity was essentially identical for each of the three fractions. Kinetic experiments and nuclease assays indicated the presence of some interfering substances in the partially purified RNA polymerase fractions. PMID:5277081

  4. Structural and thermodynamic studies of two centrin isoforms from Blastocladiella emersonii upon calcium binding.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Ana I; Wiggers, Helton J; Damalio, Julio C P; Araujo, Ana P U; Ribichich, Karina F; de Camargo, Paulo C

    2013-12-01

    Centrins are calcium-binding proteins associated with microtubules organizing centers. Members of two divergent subfamilies of centrins were found in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii, contrasting with the occurrence of only one member known for the better explored terrestrial fungi. BeCen1 shows greatest identity with human centrins HsCen1, HsCen2 and green algae centrin CrCenp, while BeCen3 records largest identity with human centrin HsCen3 and yeast centrin Cdc31p. Following the discovery of this unique feature, BeCen1 and BeCen3 centrins were produced to study whether these proteins had distinct features upon calcium binding. Circular dichroism showed opposite calcium binding effects on the α-helix arrangement of the secondary structure. The spectra indicated a decrease in α-helix signal for holo-BeCen1 contrasting with an increase for holo-BeCen3. In addition, only BeCen1 refolds after being de-natured. The fluorescence emission of the hydrophobic probe ANS increases for both proteins likely due to hydrophobic exposure, however, only BeCen1 presents a clear blue shift when calcium is added. ITC experiments identified four calcium binding sites for both proteins. In contrast to calcium binding to BeCen1, which is mainly endothermic, binding to BeCen3 is mainly exothermic. Light-scattering evidenced the formation of large particles in solution for BeCen1 and BeCen3 at temperatures above 30°C and 40°C, respectively. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the presence of supramolecular structures, which differ in the compactness and branching degree. Binding of calcium leads to different structural changes in BeCen1 and BeCen3 and the thermodynamic characteristics of the interaction also differ. PMID:24157662

  5. Molecular evolution of the fungi: relationship of the Basidiomycetes, Ascomycetes, and Chytridiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Bowman, B H; Taylor, J W; Brownlee, A G; Lee, J; Lu, S D; White, T J

    1992-03-01

    Establishing the phylogeny of fungi and protists often has proved difficult owing to the simple morphologies and convergent characters in these organisms. We used DNA sequences of nuclear small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes to determine phylogenetic relationships among three major classes of organisms considered to be fungi--Basidiomycetes, Ascomycetes and Chytridiomycetes--and to assess the taxonomic position of Neocallimastix, an economically important anaerobic rumen microorganism whose classification is controversial. The Basidiomycetes and Ascomycetes, two classes of nonflagellated fungi, are the most closely related taxa. Chytridiomycetes, though bearing flagella, group with these higher fungi rather than with the protists. Neocallimastix, a eukaryote lacking mitochondria and variously classified as a protist or as a fungus, shows closest molecular affinities with the Chytridiomycete fungi in the order Spizellomycetales.

  6. NUTRIENT COMPOSITION DEGRADATION OF DAPHNIA PULICARIA BY A HIGHLY PREVALENT CHYTRIDIOMYCETE FUNGAL PATHOGEN (POLYCARYUM LEAVE) DURING NATURALLY OCCURRING LAKE-WIDE EPIDEMICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite evidence illustrating that chytridiomycete fungal infection can be highly prevalent in Daphnia (>80%) and that infected individuals are preferentially consumed by fish, no studies have measured the nutritional consequences of using chytrid-infected Daphnia as a food sourc...

  7. Cloning, overexpression in Escherichia coli, and characterization of a thermostable fungal acetylxylan esterase from Talaromyces emersonii.

    PubMed

    Waters, Deborah M; Murray, Patrick G; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, Angel T; Tuohy, Maria G; Faulds, Craig B

    2012-05-01

    The gene encoding an acetylxylan esterase (AXE1) from the thermophilic ascomycete Talaromyces emersonii was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized. This form of AXE1, rTeAXE1, exhibits increased thermostability and activity at a higher temperature than other known fungal acetyl esterases, thus having huge potential application in biomass bioconversion to high value chemicals or biofuels. PMID:22407679

  8. Inhibition of a Secreted Glutamic Peptidase Prevents Growth of the Fungus Talaromyces emersonii*

    PubMed Central

    O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Mahon, Cathal S.; Goetz, David H.; O'Malley, James M.; Gallagher, Denise M.; Zhou, Min; Murray, Patrick G.; Craik, Charles S.; Tuohy, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    The thermophilic filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii secretes a variety of hydrolytic enzymes that are of interest for processing of biomass into fuel. Many carbohydrases have been isolated and characterized from this fungus, but no studies had been performed on peptidases. In this study, two acid-acting endopeptidases were isolated and characterized from the culture filtrate of T. emersonii. One of these enzymes was identified as a member of the recently classified glutamic peptidase family and was subsequently named T. emersonii glutamic peptidase 1 (TGP1). The second enzyme was identified as an aspartyl peptidase (PEP1). TGP1 was cloned and sequenced and shown to exhibit 64 and 47% protein identity to peptidases from Aspergillus niger and Scytalidium lignocolum, respectively. Substrate profiling of 16 peptides determined that TGP1 has broad specificity with a preference for large residues in the P1 site, particularly Met, Gln, Phe, Lys, Glu, and small amino acids at P1′ such as Ala, Gly, Ser, or Thr. This enzyme efficiently cleaves an internally quenched fluorescent substrate containing the zymogen activation sequence (kcat/Km = 2 × 105 m-1 s-1). Maximum hydrolysis occurs at pH 3.4 and 50 °C. The reaction is strongly inhibited by a transition state peptide analog, TA1 (Ki = 1.5 nm), as well as a portion of the propeptide sequence, PT1 (Ki = 32 nm). Ex vivo studies show that hyphal extension of T. emersonii in complex media is unaffected by the aspartyl peptidase inhibitor pepstatin but is inhibited by TA1 and PT1. This study provides insight into the functional role of the glutamic peptidase TGP1 for growth of T. emersonii. PMID:18687686

  9. Cellulose hydrolysis by the cellulases produced by Talaromyces emersonii when grown on different inducing substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, A.P.; Considine, P.J.; Coughlan, M.P.

    1983-04-01

    Pulp obtained from the processing of sugar beet at a local factory is mixed with molasses and sold as cattle food. However, the value of the pulp would be increased considerably if its constituent cellulose and hemicellulose fractions could be converted to fermentable sugars. To this end we are investigating the enzymic hydrolysis of beet pulp using the cellulase system produced by the thermophilic fungus, Talaromyces emersonii. In this Communication, we report on the initial results of studies. (Refs. 21).

  10. An enigmatic fossil fungus from the 410 Ma Rhynie chert that resembles Macrochytrium (Chytridiomycota) and Blastocladiella (Blastocladiomycota).

    PubMed

    Krings, Michael; Taylor, Thomas N; Martin, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Litter layers in the Lower Devonian (~ 410 Ma) Rhynie chert were inhabited by a wide variety of saprotrophic fungi, however, only a few of these organisms have been described formally. A new microfungus, Trewinomyces annulifer gen. et sp. nov., occurs as tufts on decaying land plant axes from the Rhynie chert. The fungus consists of an intramatrical rhizoidal system and an erect extramatrical hypha (stalk) that bears a single, terminal sporangium. One or two successive rings often are present in the stalk immediately below the sporangium base. Overall morphology of T. annulifer resembles the extant genera Macrochytrium (Chytridiomycota) and Blastocladiella (Blastocladiomycota). However, the rhizoids are septate or pseudoseptate, a feature not known in extant zoosporic fungi, and thus render the systematic affinities of T. annulifer unresolved. Trewinomyces annulifer offers a rare view of the morphology of a distinctive Early Devonian saprotrophic microfungus. PMID:26740543

  11. Studies on the biosorption of uranium by Talaromyces emersonii CBS 814.70 biomass.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, L; Johansson, B; Hackett, T J; McHale, L; McHale, A P

    1995-01-01

    Residual biomass, produced by the thermophilic fungus, Talaromyces emersonii CBS 814.70, following growth on glucose-containing media, was examined for its ability to take up uranium from aqueous solution. It was found that the biomass had a relatively high observed biosorption capacity for the uranium (280 mg/g dry weight biomass). The calculated maximum biosorption capacity obtained by fitting the data to a Langmuir model was calculated to be 323 mg uranium/g dry weight biomass. Pretreatment of the biomass with either dilute HCl or NaOH brought about a significant decrease in biosorptive capacity for uranium. Studies on the effects of variation in temperature on the biosorptive capacity demonstrated no significant change in binding between 20 degrees C and 60 degrees C. However, a significant decrease in biosorptive capacity was observed at 5 degrees C. Binding of uranium to the biomass at all temperatures reached equilibrium within 2 min. While the routine binding assays were performed at pH 5.0, adjustment of the pH to 3.0 gave rise to a significant decrease in biosorption capacity by the biomass. The biosorptive capacity of the biomass for uranium was increased when extraction from solution in sea-water was examined. PMID:7765920

  12. Algae-facilitated chemical phosphorus removal during high-density Chlorella emersonii cultivation in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Bernards, Matthew; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    An algae-based membrane bioreactor (A-MBR) was evaluated for high-density algae cultivation and phosphorus (P) removal. The A-MBR was seeded with Chlorella emersonii and operated at a hydraulic retention time of 1day with minimal biomass wastage for about 150days. The algae concentration increased from initially 385mg/L (or 315mg biomass COD/L) to a final of 4840mg/L (or 1664mg COD/L), yielding an average solids (algae biomass+minerals) production rate of 32.5gm(-3)d(-1) or 6.2gm(-2)d(-1). The A-MBR was able to remove 66±9% of the total P from the water while the algal biomass had an average of 7.5±0.2% extracellular P and 0.4% of intracellular P. The results suggest that algae-induced phosphate precipitation by algae is key to P removal and high-density algae cultivation produces P-rich algal biomass with excellent settling properties. PMID:24374248

  13. Algae-facilitated chemical phosphorus removal during high-density Chlorella emersonii cultivation in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Bernards, Matthew; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    An algae-based membrane bioreactor (A-MBR) was evaluated for high-density algae cultivation and phosphorus (P) removal. The A-MBR was seeded with Chlorella emersonii and operated at a hydraulic retention time of 1day with minimal biomass wastage for about 150days. The algae concentration increased from initially 385mg/L (or 315mg biomass COD/L) to a final of 4840mg/L (or 1664mg COD/L), yielding an average solids (algae biomass+minerals) production rate of 32.5gm(-3)d(-1) or 6.2gm(-2)d(-1). The A-MBR was able to remove 66±9% of the total P from the water while the algal biomass had an average of 7.5±0.2% extracellular P and 0.4% of intracellular P. The results suggest that algae-induced phosphate precipitation by algae is key to P removal and high-density algae cultivation produces P-rich algal biomass with excellent settling properties.

  14. Structural and functional studies of the glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-glucosidase Cel3A from the moderately thermophilic fungus Rasamsonia emersonii.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Mikael; Hansson, Henrik; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Larsson, Anna; Stals, Ingeborg; Kim, Steve; Sunux, Sergio; Fujdala, Meredith; Larenas, Edmund; Kaper, Thijs; Sandgren, Mats

    2016-07-01

    The filamentous fungus Hypocrea jecorina produces a number of cellulases and hemicellulases that act in a concerted fashion on biomass and degrade it into monomeric or oligomeric sugars. β-Glucosidases are involved in the last step of the degradation of cellulosic biomass and hydrolyse the β-glycosidic linkage between two adjacent molecules in dimers and oligomers of glucose. In this study, it is shown that substituting the β-glucosidase from H. jecorina (HjCel3A) with the β-glucosidase Cel3A from the thermophilic fungus Rasamsonia emersonii (ReCel3A) in enzyme mixtures results in increased efficiency in the saccharification of lignocellulosic materials. Biochemical characterization of ReCel3A, heterologously produced in H. jecorina, reveals a preference for disaccharide substrates over longer gluco-oligosaccharides. Crystallographic studies of ReCel3A revealed a highly N-glycosylated three-domain dimeric protein, as has been observed previously for glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-glucosidases. The increased thermal stability and saccharification yield and the superior biochemical characteristics of ReCel3A compared with HjCel3A and mixtures containing HjCel3A make ReCel3A an excellent candidate for addition to enzyme mixtures designed to operate at higher temperatures. PMID:27377383

  15. A thermophilic endo-1,4-β-glucanase from Talaromyces emersonii CBS394.64 with broad substrate specificity and great application potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Luo, Huiying; Bai, Yingguo; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Xue, Xianli; Yao, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic cellulases are of significant interest to the efficient conversion of plant cell wall polysaccharides into simple sugars. In this study, a thermophilic and thermostable endo-1,4-β-glucanase, TeEgl5A, was identified in the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii CBS394.64 and functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified recombinant TeEgl5A exhibits optimal activity at pH 4.5 and 90 °C. It is highly stable at 70 °C and over a broad pH range of 1.0-10.0, and shows strong resistance to most metal ions, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and proteases. TeEgl5A has broad substrate specificity and exhibits high activity on substrates containing β-1,4-glycosidic bonds and β-1,3-glycosidic bonds (barley β-glucan, laminarin, lichenan, CMC-Na, carob bean gum, and birchwood xylan). Under simulated mashing conditions, addition of 60 U TeEgl5A reduced more viscosity (10.0 vs.7.6 %) than 80 U of Ultraflo XL from Novozymes. These properties make TeEgl5A a good candidate for extensive application in the detergent, textile, feed, and food industries. PMID:24668246

  16. The xylan-degrading enzyme system of Talaromyces emersonii: novel enzymes with activity against aryl beta-D-xylosides and unsubstituted xylans.

    PubMed Central

    Tuohy, M G; Puls, J; Claeyssens, M; Vrsanská, M; Coughlan, M P

    1993-01-01

    Talaromyces emersonii, a thermophilic aerobic fungus, produces a complete xylan-degrading enzyme system when grown on appropriate substrates. In this paper we present the physicochemical and catalytic properties of three enzymes, xylosidase (Xyl) I (M(r) 181,000; pI 8.9), II (M(r) 131,000; pI 5.3) and III (M(r) 54,200; pI 4.2). Xyl I and II appear to be dimeric and Xyl III is a single-subunit protein. All three enzymes catalyse the hydrolysis of aryl beta-D-xylosides and xylo-oligosaccharides. Xyl I is a classic beta-xylosidase (1,4-beta-D-xylan xylohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.37), and Xyl II and III are novel xylanases (endo-1,4-beta-D-xylan xylanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.8) which we believe have not hitherto been reported. In addition to the above substrates, they also catalyse the extensive hydrolysis of unsubstituted xylans, and may have considerable biotechnological potential. The hydrolysis product profiles and bond-cleavage frequencies with various substrates are presented. PMID:8452541

  17. Structural and functional studies of the glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-glucosidase Cel3A from the moderately thermophilic fungus Rasamsonia emersonii

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Mikael; Hansson, Henrik; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Larsson, Anna; Stals, Ingeborg; Kim, Steve; Sunux, Sergio; Fujdala, Meredith; Larenas, Edmund; Kaper, Thijs; Sandgren, Mats

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Hypocrea jecorina produces a number of cellulases and hemicellulases that act in a concerted fashion on biomass and degrade it into monomeric or oligomeric sugars. β-Glucosidases are involved in the last step of the degradation of cellulosic biomass and hydrolyse the β-glycosidic linkage between two adjacent molecules in dimers and oligomers of glucose. In this study, it is shown that substituting the β-glucosidase from H. jecorina (HjCel3A) with the β-glucosidase Cel3A from the thermophilic fungus Rasamsonia emersonii (ReCel3A) in enzyme mixtures results in increased efficiency in the saccharification of lignocellulosic materials. Biochemical characterization of ReCel3A, heterologously produced in H. jecorina, reveals a preference for disaccharide substrates over longer gluco-oligosaccharides. Crystallographic studies of ReCel3A revealed a highly N-glycosylated three-domain dimeric protein, as has been observed previously for glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-glucosidases. The increased thermal stability and saccharification yield and the superior biochemical characteristics of ReCel3A compared with HjCel3A and mixtures containing HjCel3A make ReCel3A an excellent candidate for addition to enzyme mixtures designed to operate at higher temperatures. PMID:27377383

  18. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii: cloning and heterologous expression of the native gene (Texr) and a double mutant (TexrK271R + N273D) with altered coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sara; Tuohy, Maria G; Murray, Patrick G

    2009-12-01

    Xylose reductase is involved in the first step of the fungal pentose catabolic pathway. The gene encoding xylose reductase (Texr) was isolated from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Texr encodes a 320 amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 36 kDa, which exhibited high sequence identity with other xylose reductase sequences and was shown to be a member of the aldoketoreductase (AKR) superfamily with a preference for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) as coenzyme. Given the potential application of xylose reductase enzymes that preferentially utilize the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) rather than NADPH in the fermentation of five carbon sugars by genetically engineered microorganisms, the coenzyme selectivity of TeXR was altered by site-directed mutagenesis. The TeXR K271R+N273D double mutant displayed an altered coenzyme preference with a 16-fold improvement in NADH utilization relative to the wild type and therefore has the potential to reduce redox imbalance of xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae strains. Expression of Texr was shown to be inducible by the same carbon sources responsible for the induction of genes encoding enzymes relevant to lignocellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a coordinated expression of intracellular and extracellular enzymes relevant to hydrolysis and metabolism of pentose sugars in T. emersonii in adaptation to its natural habitat. This indicates a potential advantage in survival and response to a nutrient-poor environment.

  19. Cyclopsomyces plurioperculatus: a new genus and species of Lobulomycetales (Chytridiomycota, Chytridiomycetes) from Japan.

    PubMed

    Seto, Kensuke; Degawa, Yousuke

    2015-01-01

    Lobulomycetales is one of the smallest orders of Chytridiomycota, containing only four genera and five species. In a survey in Japan we isolated a chytrid from a soil sample collected in a broadleaf forest, which grouped in Lobulomycetales by BLAST query. To identify this chytrid and determine its taxonomic position, thallus development and morphology were observed by light microscopy and zoospore ultrastructure was examined using a transmission electron microscopy. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis using nuc 28S rDNA sequences. Thallus morphology was characterized by a spherical zoosporangium with multiple operculate discharge papillae, which is different from that of any other species in Lobulomycetales. This chytrid is similar to Chytriomyces multioperculatus in having multiple operculate discharge papillae, but these are distinguished by characters of the discharge papillae and rhizoidal systems. Zoospores of this chytrid had electron-dense material in the kinetosome, a unique character in the order. Our 28S phylogeny placed it in a distinct clade, sister to all described species in Lobulomycetaceae. Based on these results, we propose a new genus and species of Lobulomycetales, Cyclopsomyces plurioperculatus. PMID:25800251

  20. FESTERING FOOD: CHYTRIDIOMYCETE PATHOGEN REDUCES QUALITY OF DAPHNIA HOST AS A FOOD RESOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    When parasitic infections are severe or highly prevalent among prey, a significant component of the predator’s diet may consist of parasitized hosts. However, despite the ubiquity of parasites in most food webs, comparisons of the nutritional quality of prey as a function of inf...

  1. Optogenetic manipulation of cGMP in cells and animals by the tightly light-regulated guanylyl-cyclase opsin CyclOp.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiqiang; Nagpal, Jatin; Schneider, Martin W; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Nagel, Georg; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) signalling regulates multiple biological functions through activation of protein kinase G and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. In sensory neurons, cGMP permits signal modulation, amplification and encoding, before depolarization. Here we implement a guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin from Blastocladiella emersonii as a new optogenetic tool (BeCyclOp), enabling rapid light-triggered cGMP increase in heterologous cells (Xenopus oocytes, HEK293T cells) and in Caenorhabditis elegans. Among five different fungal CyclOps, exhibiting unusual eight transmembrane topologies and cytosolic N-termini, BeCyclOp is the superior optogenetic tool (light/dark activity ratio: 5,000; no cAMP production; turnover (20 °C) ∼17 cGMP s(-1)). Via co-expressed CNG channels (OLF in oocytes, TAX-2/4 in C. elegans muscle), BeCyclOp photoactivation induces a rapid conductance increase and depolarization at very low light intensities. In O2/CO2 sensory neurons of C. elegans, BeCyclOp activation evokes behavioural responses consistent with their normal sensory function. BeCyclOp therefore enables precise and rapid optogenetic manipulation of cGMP levels in cells and animals.

  2. Optogenetic manipulation of cGMP in cells and animals by the tightly light-regulated guanylyl-cyclase opsin CyclOp

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shiqiang; Nagpal, Jatin; Schneider, Martin W.; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Nagel, Georg; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) signalling regulates multiple biological functions through activation of protein kinase G and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. In sensory neurons, cGMP permits signal modulation, amplification and encoding, before depolarization. Here we implement a guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin from Blastocladiella emersonii as a new optogenetic tool (BeCyclOp), enabling rapid light-triggered cGMP increase in heterologous cells (Xenopus oocytes, HEK293T cells) and in Caenorhabditis elegans. Among five different fungal CyclOps, exhibiting unusual eight transmembrane topologies and cytosolic N-termini, BeCyclOp is the superior optogenetic tool (light/dark activity ratio: 5,000; no cAMP production; turnover (20 °C) ∼17 cGMP s−1). Via co-expressed CNG channels (OLF in oocytes, TAX-2/4 in C. elegans muscle), BeCyclOp photoactivation induces a rapid conductance increase and depolarization at very low light intensities. In O2/CO2 sensory neurons of C. elegans, BeCyclOp activation evokes behavioural responses consistent with their normal sensory function. BeCyclOp therefore enables precise and rapid optogenetic manipulation of cGMP levels in cells and animals. PMID:26345128

  3. Optogenetic manipulation of cGMP in cells and animals by the tightly light-regulated guanylyl-cyclase opsin CyclOp.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiqiang; Nagpal, Jatin; Schneider, Martin W; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Nagel, Georg; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) signalling regulates multiple biological functions through activation of protein kinase G and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. In sensory neurons, cGMP permits signal modulation, amplification and encoding, before depolarization. Here we implement a guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin from Blastocladiella emersonii as a new optogenetic tool (BeCyclOp), enabling rapid light-triggered cGMP increase in heterologous cells (Xenopus oocytes, HEK293T cells) and in Caenorhabditis elegans. Among five different fungal CyclOps, exhibiting unusual eight transmembrane topologies and cytosolic N-termini, BeCyclOp is the superior optogenetic tool (light/dark activity ratio: 5,000; no cAMP production; turnover (20 °C) ∼17 cGMP s(-1)). Via co-expressed CNG channels (OLF in oocytes, TAX-2/4 in C. elegans muscle), BeCyclOp photoactivation induces a rapid conductance increase and depolarization at very low light intensities. In O2/CO2 sensory neurons of C. elegans, BeCyclOp activation evokes behavioural responses consistent with their normal sensory function. BeCyclOp therefore enables precise and rapid optogenetic manipulation of cGMP levels in cells and animals. PMID:26345128

  4. Engineering ionic liquid-tolerant cellulases for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Wolski, Paul W; Dana, Craig M; Clark, Douglas S; Blanch, Harvey W

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution of lignocellulosic biomass in certain ionic liquids (ILs) can provide an effective pretreatment prior to enzymatic saccharification of cellulose for biofuels production. Toward the goal of combining pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, we evolved enzyme variants of Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A to be more active and stable than wild-type T. emersonii Cel7A or Trichoderma reesei Cel7A in aqueous-IL solutions (up to 43% (w/w) 1,3-dimethylimdazolium dimethylphosphate and 20% (w/w) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate). In general, greater enzyme stability in buffer at elevated temperature corresponded to greater stability in aqueous-ILs. Post-translational modification of the N-terminal glutamine residue to pyroglutamate via glutaminyl cyclase enhanced the stability of T. emersonii Cel7A and variants. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed an increase in melting temperature of 1.9-3.9°C for the variant 1M10 over the wild-type T. emersonii Cel7A in aqueous buffer and in an IL-aqueous mixture. We observed this increase both with and without glutaminyl cyclase treatment of the enzymes. PMID:26819239

  5. Engineering ionic liquid-tolerant cellulases for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Wolski, Paul W; Dana, Craig M; Clark, Douglas S; Blanch, Harvey W

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution of lignocellulosic biomass in certain ionic liquids (ILs) can provide an effective pretreatment prior to enzymatic saccharification of cellulose for biofuels production. Toward the goal of combining pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, we evolved enzyme variants of Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A to be more active and stable than wild-type T. emersonii Cel7A or Trichoderma reesei Cel7A in aqueous-IL solutions (up to 43% (w/w) 1,3-dimethylimdazolium dimethylphosphate and 20% (w/w) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate). In general, greater enzyme stability in buffer at elevated temperature corresponded to greater stability in aqueous-ILs. Post-translational modification of the N-terminal glutamine residue to pyroglutamate via glutaminyl cyclase enhanced the stability of T. emersonii Cel7A and variants. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed an increase in melting temperature of 1.9-3.9°C for the variant 1M10 over the wild-type T. emersonii Cel7A in aqueous buffer and in an IL-aqueous mixture. We observed this increase both with and without glutaminyl cyclase treatment of the enzymes.

  6. Preliminary checklist of fungi of the Fernow Experimental Forest. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, S.L.; Kumar, A.; Bhatt, R.; Dubey, T.; Landolt, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The report provides a checklist of fungi found on the Fernow Experimental Forest in West Virginia during 4 years of research and collecting by the authors. More than 500 fungi in seven major taxonomic groups (Acrasiomycetes, Myxomycetes, Chytridiomycetes, Oomycetes, Ascomycetes, Deuteromycetes, and Basidiomycetes) are listed alphabetically by genus and species. Also provided is a general description of the forest vegetation of the Fernow Experimental Forest.

  7. The emerging amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis globally infects introduced populations of the North American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Garner, Trenton W J; Perkins, Matthew W; Govindarajulu, Purnima; Seglie, Daniele; Walker, Susan; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fisher, Matthew C

    2006-09-22

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is the chytridiomycete fungus which has been implicated in global amphibian declines and numerous species extinctions. Here, we show that introduced North American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) consistently carry this emerging pathogenic fungus. We detected infections by this fungus on introduced bullfrogs from seven of eight countries using both PCR and microscopic techniques. Only native bullfrogs from eastern Canada and introduced bullfrogs from Japan showed no sign of infection. The bullfrog is the most commonly farmed amphibian, and escapes and subsequent establishment of feral populations regularly occur. These factors taken together with our study suggest that the global threat of B. dendrobatidis disease transmission posed by bullfrogs is significant. PMID:17148429

  8. Parallels in amphibian and bat declines from pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Eskew, Evan A; Todd, Brian D

    2013-03-01

    Pathogenic fungi have substantial effects on global biodiversity, and 2 emerging pathogenic species-the chytridiomycete Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians, and the ascomycete Geomyces destructans, which causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats-are implicated in the widespread decline of their vertebrate hosts. We synthesized current knowledge for chytridiomycosis and white-nose syndrome regarding disease emergence, environmental reservoirs, life history characteristics of the host, and host-pathogen interactions. We found striking similarities between these aspects of chytridiomycosis and white-nose syndrome, and the research that we review and propose should help guide management of future emerging fungal diseases. PMID:23622255

  9. Parallels in amphibian and bat declines from pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Eskew, Evan A; Todd, Brian D

    2013-03-01

    Pathogenic fungi have substantial effects on global biodiversity, and 2 emerging pathogenic species-the chytridiomycete Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians, and the ascomycete Geomyces destructans, which causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats-are implicated in the widespread decline of their vertebrate hosts. We synthesized current knowledge for chytridiomycosis and white-nose syndrome regarding disease emergence, environmental reservoirs, life history characteristics of the host, and host-pathogen interactions. We found striking similarities between these aspects of chytridiomycosis and white-nose syndrome, and the research that we review and propose should help guide management of future emerging fungal diseases.

  10. The emerging amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis globally infects introduced populations of the North American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Garner, Trenton W J; Perkins, Matthew W; Govindarajulu, Purnima; Seglie, Daniele; Walker, Susan; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fisher, Matthew C

    2006-09-22

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is the chytridiomycete fungus which has been implicated in global amphibian declines and numerous species extinctions. Here, we show that introduced North American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) consistently carry this emerging pathogenic fungus. We detected infections by this fungus on introduced bullfrogs from seven of eight countries using both PCR and microscopic techniques. Only native bullfrogs from eastern Canada and introduced bullfrogs from Japan showed no sign of infection. The bullfrog is the most commonly farmed amphibian, and escapes and subsequent establishment of feral populations regularly occur. These factors taken together with our study suggest that the global threat of B. dendrobatidis disease transmission posed by bullfrogs is significant.

  11. Parallels in Amphibian and Bat Declines from Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Eskew, Evan A.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi have substantial effects on global biodiversity, and 2 emerging pathogenic species—the chytridiomycete Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians, and the ascomycete Geomyces destructans, which causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats—are implicated in the widespread decline of their vertebrate hosts. We synthesized current knowledge for chytridiomycosis and white-nose syndrome regarding disease emergence, environmental reservoirs, life history characteristics of the host, and host–pathogen interactions. We found striking similarities between these aspects of chytridiomycosis and white-nose syndrome, and the research that we review and propose should help guide management of future emerging fungal diseases. PMID:23622255

  12. Importance of algae as a potential source of biofuel.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Singh, M P

    2014-12-24

    Algae have a great potential source of biofuels and also have unique importance to reduce gaseous emissions, greenhouse gases, climatic changes, global warming receding of glaciers, rising sea levels and loss of biodiversity. The microalgae, like Scenedesmus obliquus, Neochloris oleabundans, Nannochloropsis sp., Chlorella emersonii, and Dunaliella tertiolecta have high oil content. Among the known algae, Scenedesmus obliquus is one of the most potential sources for biodiesel as it has adequate fatty acid (linolenic acid) and other polyunsaturated fatty acids. Bio—ethanol is already in the market of United States of America and Europe as an additive in gasoline. Bio—hydrogen is the cleanest biofuel and extensive efforts are going on to bring it to market at economical price. This review highlights recent development and progress in the field of algae as a potential source of biofuel.

  13. Synthesis of substrates for periodate-coupled assay of phospholipases C and sphingomyelinases.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Kira Løw; Andersen, Rokhsana J; Brask, Jesper

    2016-09-01

    A series of 4-nitrophenyl (pNP) and 4-methylumbelliferyl (4MU) substrate analogues of phosphatidyl choline (PC) and phosphatidic acid (PA) were synthesized from 4-bromo-1-butene by ether formation, olefin epoxidation and ring opening with the phosphate head group. The pNP PC analogue, 4-(4-nitrophenoxy)-2-hydroxy-butyl-1-phosphoryl choline (1) was evaluated in assays of fungal sphingomyelinases, also displaying phospholipase C activity. Reactions were terminated with a periodate-containing stop solution, leading to liberation of pNP, quantified spectrophotometrically in an end-point measurement. A kinetic evaluation of sphingomyelinases from Kionochaeta sp. and Penicillium emersonii showed relatively high KM and low kcat values for this substrate, limiting its practical applicability in assays with low sphingomyelinase concentrations. PMID:27444331

  14. Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans sp. nov. causes lethal chytridiomycosis in amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Martel, An; Spitzen-van der Sluijs, Annemarieke; Blooi, Mark; Bert, Wim; Ducatelle, Richard; Fisher, Matthew C.; Woeltjes, Antonius; Bosman, Wilbert; Chiers, Koen; Bossuyt, Franky; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The current biodiversity crisis encompasses a sixth mass extinction event affecting the entire class of amphibians. The infectious disease chytridiomycosis is considered one of the major drivers of global amphibian population decline and extinction and is thought to be caused by a single species of aquatic fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. However, several amphibian population declines remain unexplained, among them a steep decrease in fire salamander populations (Salamandra salamandra) that has brought this species to the edge of local extinction. Here we isolated and characterized a unique chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans sp. nov., from this salamander population. This chytrid causes erosive skin disease and rapid mortality in experimentally infected fire salamanders and was present in skin lesions of salamanders found dead during the decline event. Together with the closely related B. dendrobatidis, this taxon forms a well-supported chytridiomycete clade, adapted to vertebrate hosts and highly pathogenic to amphibians. However, the lower thermal growth preference of B. salamandrivorans, compared with B. dendrobatidis, and resistance of midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans) to experimental infection with B. salamandrivorans suggest differential niche occupation of the two chytrid fungi. PMID:24003137

  15. Experimental transmission of cutaneous chytridiomycosis in dendrobatid frogs.

    PubMed

    Nichols, D K; Lamirande, E W; Pessier, A P; Longcore, J E

    2001-01-01

    In a series of three experiments during March-October, 1998, two species of captive-bred poison dart frogs (Dendrobates tinctorius and D. auratus) were exposed to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a recently-described chytridiomycete fungus (chytrid) that was originally isolated from a blue poison dart frog (D. azureus). All frogs exposed to the chytrids developed a fatal skin disease, whereas none of the control frogs developed skin lesions. The most consistent clinical sign in chytrid-exposed frogs was excessive shedding of skin. Gross lesions were subtle, usually affected the legs and ventrum, and consisted of mild skin thickening and discoloration. Microscopic examination of shed skin pieces and/or skin imprints demonstrated the presence of chytrids and was used for ante mortem and post mortem confirmation of chytrid infection. Histologically, there was epidermal hyperkeratosis, hyperplasia, and hypertrophy associated with low to moderate numbers of chytrids in the keratinized layers. These experiments demonstrated that Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis can be a fatal pathogen in poison dart frogs. The experimentally-induced disease in these frogs resembled cases of cutaneous chytridiomycosis that have recently been described in several other species of captive and wild amphibians. PMID:11272482

  16. Evidence for the copepods Acanthocyclops robustus and Mesocyclops edax as competent intermediate hosts for Coelomomyces punctatus during an epizootic in a larval population of the mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Apperson, C S; Federici, B A; Stewart, W; Tarver, F R

    1992-11-01

    Field and laboratory experiments were conducted during an epizootic of Coelomomyces punctatus (Chytridiomycetes: Blastocladiales) in a population of the mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus in a North Carolina farm pond to examine the interactions of several potential copepod hosts with the mosquito and fungus. The diel vertical migratory behavior of the copepod species Acanthocyclops robustus, Eucyclops serrulatus, Macrocyclops albidus, and Mesocyclops edax were monitored in relation to infection rates in sentinel mosquito larvae. Mosquito infection occurred primarily around dusk, the same period during which A. robustus and E. serrulatus were most abundant near the surface of the pond. However, exposure of A. robustus, E. serrulatus, M. albidus, M. edax, Microcyclops varicans, and Paracyclops poppei to fungal meiospores in the laboratory showed that only A. robustus and M. edax were competent intermediate hosts for C. punctatus. Laboratory studies of the diel periodicity of gametangial dehiscence in A. robustus and M. edax infected with C. punctatus revealed that gamete release and zygote formation also occurred around dusk. The combined results of the laboratory and field studies on copepod abundance, susceptibility to infection, and periodicity of gametangial dehiscence suggest that A. robustus was the principal intermediate host for C. punctatus during the epizootic, though it is probable that M. edax also contributed importantly to the overall rate of larval infection.

  17. Mitigating amphibian chytridiomycosis in nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, Trenton W. J.; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Muths, Erin L.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Weldon, Che; Fisher, Matthew C.; Bosch, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians across the planet face the threat of population decline and extirpation caused by the disease chytridiomycosis. Despite consensus that the fungal pathogens responsible for the disease are conservation issues, strategies to mitigate their impacts in the natural world are, at best, nascent. Reducing risk associated with the movement of amphibians, non-amphibian vectors and other sources of infection remains the first line of defence and a primary objective when mitigating the threat of disease in wildlife. Amphibian-associated chytridiomycete fungi and chytridiomycosis are already widespread, though, and we therefore focus on discussing options for mitigating the threats once disease emergence has occurred in wild amphibian populations. All strategies have shortcomings that need to be overcome before implementation, including stronger efforts towards understanding and addressing ethical and legal considerations. Even if these issues can be dealt with, all currently available approaches, or those under discussion, are unlikely to yield the desired conservation outcome of disease mitigation. The decision process for establishing mitigation strategies requires integrated thinking that assesses disease mitigation options critically and embeds them within more comprehensive strategies for the conservation of amphibian populations, communities and ecosystems.

  18. Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans sp. nov. causes lethal chytridiomycosis in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Martel, An; Spitzen-van der Sluijs, Annemarieke; Blooi, Mark; Bert, Wim; Ducatelle, Richard; Fisher, Matthew C; Woeltjes, Antonius; Bosman, Wilbert; Chiers, Koen; Bossuyt, Franky; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-09-17

    The current biodiversity crisis encompasses a sixth mass extinction event affecting the entire class of amphibians. The infectious disease chytridiomycosis is considered one of the major drivers of global amphibian population decline and extinction and is thought to be caused by a single species of aquatic fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. However, several amphibian population declines remain unexplained, among them a steep decrease in fire salamander populations (Salamandra salamandra) that has brought this species to the edge of local extinction. Here we isolated and characterized a unique chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans sp. nov., from this salamander population. This chytrid causes erosive skin disease and rapid mortality in experimentally infected fire salamanders and was present in skin lesions of salamanders found dead during the decline event. Together with the closely related B. dendrobatidis, this taxon forms a well-supported chytridiomycete clade, adapted to vertebrate hosts and highly pathogenic to amphibians. However, the lower thermal growth preference of B. salamandrivorans, compared with B. dendrobatidis, and resistance of midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans) to experimental infection with B. salamandrivorans suggest differential niche occupation of the two chytrid fungi.

  19. Leaf-associated fungal diversity in acidified streams: insights from combining traditional and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Clivot, Hugues; Cornut, Julien; Chauvet, Eric; Elger, Arnaud; Poupin, Pascal; Guérold, François; Pagnout, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    We combined microscopic and molecular methods to investigate fungal assemblages on alder leaf litter exposed in the benthic and hyporheic zones of five streams across a gradient of increasing acidification for 4 weeks. The results showed that acidification and elevated Al concentrations strongly depressed sporulating aquatic hyphomycetes diversity in both zones of streams, while fungal diversity assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) appeared unaffected. Clone library analyses revealed that fungal communities on leaves were dominated by members of Ascomycetes and to a lesser extent by Basidiomycetes and Chytridiomycetes. An important contribution of terrestrial fungi was observed in both zones of the most acidified stream and in the hyporheic zone of the reference circumneutral stream. The highest leaf breakdown rate was observed in the circumneutral stream and occurred in the presence of both the highest diversity of sporulating aquatic hyphomycetes and the highest contribution to clone libraries of sequences affiliated with aquatic hyphomycetes. Both methods underline the major role played by aquatic hyphomycetes in leaf decomposition process. Our findings also bring out new highlights on the identity of leaf-associated fungal communities and their responses to anthropogenic alteration of running water ecosystems.

  20. Do we need many genes for phylogenetic inference?

    PubMed

    Aleshin, V V; Konstantinova, A V; Mikhailov, K V; Nikitin, M A; Petrov, N B

    2007-12-01

    Fifty-six nuclear protein coding genes from Taxonomically Broad EST Database and other databases were selected for phylogenomic-based examination of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses concerning intergroup relationship between multicellular animals (Metazoa) and other representatives of Opisthokonta. The results of this work support sister group relationship between Metazoa and Choanoflagellata. Both of these groups form the taxon Holozoa along with the monophyletic Ichthyosporea or Mesomycetozoea (a group that includes Amoebidium parasiticum, Sphaeroforma arctica, and Capsaspora owczarzaki). These phylogenetic hypotheses receive high statistical support both when utilizing whole alignment and when only 5000 randomly selected alignment positions are used. The presented results suggest subdivision of Fungi into Eumycota and lower fungi, Chytridiomycota. The latter form a monophyletic group that comprises Chytridiales+Spizellomycetales+Blastocladiales (Batrachochytrium, Spizellomyces, Allomyces, Blastocladiella), contrary to the earlier reports based on the analysis of 18S rRNA and a limited set of protein coding genes. The phylogenetic distribution of genes coding for a ubiquitin-fused ribosomal protein S30 implies at least three independent cases of gene fusion: in the ancestors of Holozoa, in heterotrophic Heterokonta (Oomycetes and Blastocystis) and in the ancestors of Cryptophyta and Glaucophyta. Ubiquitin-like sequences fused with ribosomal protein S30 outside of Holozoa are not FUBI orthologs. Two independent events of FUBI replacement by the ubiquitin sequence were detected in the lineage of C. owczarzaki and in the monophyletic group of nematode worms Tylenchomorpha+Cephalobidae. Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Aphelenchoidoidea) retains a state typical of the rest of the Metazoa. The data emphasize the fact that the reliability of phylogenetic reconstructions depends on the number of analyzed genes to a lesser extent than on our ability to recognize

  1. Improvement of the catalytic performance of a Bispora antennata cellulase by replacing the N-terminal semi-barrel structure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Xiaoyu; Tu, Tao; Liu, Qiong; Meng, Kun; Wang, Yuan; Su, Xiaoyun; Xie, Xiangming; Luo, Huiying

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the contribution of the N-terminal structure to cellulase catalytic performance. A wild-type cellulase (BaCel5) of glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 5 from Bispora antennata and two hybrid enzymes (BaCel5(127) and BaCel5(167)) with replacement of the N-terminal (βα)3 (127 residues) or (βα)4 (167 residues)-barrel with the corresponding sequences of TeEgl5A from Talaromyces emersonii were produced in Pichia pastoris and biochemically characterized. BaCel5 exhibited optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 50°C but had low catalytic efficiency (25.4±0.8mLs(-1)mg(-1)). In contrast, BaCel5(127) and BaCel5(167) showed similar enzymatic properties but improved catalytic performance. When using CMC-Na, barley β-glucan, lichenan, and cellooligosaccharides as substrates, BaCel5(127) and BaCel5(167) had increased specific activities and catalytic efficiencies by ∼1.8-6.7-fold and ∼1.0-4.7-fold, respectively. The catalytic efficiency of BaCel5(167) was even higher than that of parental proteins. The underlying mechanism was analyzed by molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:27372007

  2. Redox-initiated hydrogel system for detection and real-time imaging of cellulolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Klara H; Verdorfer, Tobias; Meinhold, Aylin; Milles, Lukas F; Funk, Victor; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the process of biomass degradation by cellulolytic enzymes is of urgent importance for biofuel and chemical production. Optimizing pretreatment conditions and improving enzyme formulations both require assays to quantify saccharification products on solid substrates. Typically, such assays are performed using freely diffusing fluorophores or dyes that measure reducing polysaccharide chain ends. These methods have thus far not allowed spatial localization of hydrolysis activity to specific substrate locations with identifiable morphological features. Here we describe a hydrogel reagent signaling (HyReS) system that amplifies saccharification products and initiates crosslinking of a hydrogel that localizes to locations of cellulose hydrolysis, allowing for imaging of the degradation process in real time. Optical detection of the gel in a rapid parallel format on synthetic and natural pretreated solid substrates was used to quantify activity of T. emersonii and T. reesei enzyme cocktails. When combined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and AFM imaging, the reagent system provided a means to visualize enzyme activity in real-time with high spatial resolution (<2 μm). These results demonstrate the versatility of the HyReS system in detecting cellulolytic enzyme activity and suggest new opportunities in real-time chemical imaging of biomass depolymerization. PMID:25116339

  3. Direct utilization of waste water algal biomass for ethanol production by cellulolytic Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183.

    PubMed

    Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Kumar, Thangarathinam; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-02-01

    Direct bioconversion of waste water algal biomass into ethanol using Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183 was demonstrated in this study. Fermentation of 2% (w/v) autoclaved algal biomass produced ethanol concentration of 0.52 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.19 g/g) where as fermentation of acid pretreated algal biomass (2%, w/v) produced ethanol concentration of 4.6 g L(-1) in GS2 media (solvent yield of 0.26 g/g). The control experiment with 2% (w/v) glucose in GS2 media produced ethanol concentration of 2.8 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.25 g/g). The microalgal strains from waste water algal biomass were identified as Chlamydomonas dorsoventralis, Graesiella emersonii, Coelastrum proboscideum, Scenedesmus obliquus, Micractinium sp., Desmodesmus sp., and Chlorella sp., based on ITS-2 molecular marker. The presence of glucose, galactose, xylose and rhamnose were detected by high performance liquid chromatography in the algal biomass. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of fermentation samples showed characteristic morphological changes in algal cells and bioaccessibility of C. phytofermentans.

  4. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  5. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  6. Efficient screening of fungal cellobiohydrolase class I enzymes for thermostabilizing sequence blocks by SCHEMA structure-guided recombination.

    PubMed

    Heinzelman, Pete; Komor, Russell; Kanaan, Arvind; Romero, Philip; Yu, Xinlin; Mohler, Shannon; Snow, Christopher; Arnold, Frances

    2010-11-01

    We describe an efficient SCHEMA recombination-based approach for screening homologous enzymes to identify stabilizing amino acid sequence blocks. This approach has been used to generate active, thermostable cellobiohydrolase class I (CBH I) enzymes from the 390 625 possible chimeras that can be made by swapping eight blocks from five fungal homologs. Constructing and characterizing the parent enzymes and just 32 'monomeras' containing a single block from a homologous enzyme allowed stability contributions to be assigned to 36 of the 40 blocks from which the CBH I chimeras can be assembled. Sixteen of 16 predicted thermostable chimeras, with an average of 37 mutations relative to the closest parent, are more thermostable than the most stable parent CBH I, from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii. Whereas none of the parent CBH Is were active >65°C, stable CBH I chimeras hydrolyzed solid cellulose at 70°C. In addition to providing a collection of diverse, thermostable CBH Is that can complement previously described stable CBH II chimeras (Heinzelman et al., Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 2009;106:5610-5615) in formulating application-specific cellulase mixtures, the results show the utility of SCHEMA recombination for screening large swaths of natural enzyme sequence space for desirable amino acid blocks.

  7. High Protein- and High Lipid-Producing Microalgae from Northern Australia as Potential Feedstock for Animal Feed and Biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Van Thang; Ahmed, Faruq; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Quigley, Simon; Nowak, Ekaterina; Schenk, Peer M.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgal biomass can be used for biodiesel, feed, and food production. Collection and identification of local microalgal strains in the Northern Territory, Australia was conducted to identify strains with high protein and lipid contents as potential feedstock for animal feed and biodiesel production, respectively. A total of 36 strains were isolated from 13 samples collected from a variety of freshwater locations, such as dams, ponds, and streams and subsequently classified by 18S rDNA sequencing. All of the strains were green microalgae and predominantly belong to Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus sp., Desmodesmus sp., Chlamydomonas sp., Pseudomuriella sp., Tetraedron caudatum, Graesiella emersonii, and Mychonastes timauensis. Among the fastest growing strains, Scenedesmus sp. NT1d possessed the highest content of protein; reaching up to 33% of its dry weight. In terms of lipid production, Chlorella sp. NT8a and Scenedesmus dimorphus NT8e produced the highest triglyceride contents of 116.9 and 99.13 μg mL−1 culture, respectively, as measured by gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy of fatty acid methyl esters. These strains may present suitable candidates for biodiesel production after further optimization of culturing conditions, while their protein-rich biomass could be used for animal feed. PMID:26042215

  8. Improvement of the catalytic performance of a Bispora antennata cellulase by replacing the N-terminal semi-barrel structure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Xiaoyu; Tu, Tao; Liu, Qiong; Meng, Kun; Wang, Yuan; Su, Xiaoyun; Xie, Xiangming; Luo, Huiying

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the contribution of the N-terminal structure to cellulase catalytic performance. A wild-type cellulase (BaCel5) of glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 5 from Bispora antennata and two hybrid enzymes (BaCel5(127) and BaCel5(167)) with replacement of the N-terminal (βα)3 (127 residues) or (βα)4 (167 residues)-barrel with the corresponding sequences of TeEgl5A from Talaromyces emersonii were produced in Pichia pastoris and biochemically characterized. BaCel5 exhibited optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 50°C but had low catalytic efficiency (25.4±0.8mLs(-1)mg(-1)). In contrast, BaCel5(127) and BaCel5(167) showed similar enzymatic properties but improved catalytic performance. When using CMC-Na, barley β-glucan, lichenan, and cellooligosaccharides as substrates, BaCel5(127) and BaCel5(167) had increased specific activities and catalytic efficiencies by ∼1.8-6.7-fold and ∼1.0-4.7-fold, respectively. The catalytic efficiency of BaCel5(167) was even higher than that of parental proteins. The underlying mechanism was analyzed by molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation.

  9. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants. Eightieth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a brief description of general considerations addressed at the meeting, including updates on matters of interest to the work of the Committee. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and/or dietary exposure data for seven food additives (benzoates; lipase from Fusarium heterosporum expressed in Ogataea polymorpha; magnesium stearate; maltotetraohydrolase from Pseudomonas stutzeri expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; mixed β-glucanase, cellulase and xylanase from Rasamsonia emersonii; mixed β-glucanase and xylanase from Disporotrichum dimorphosporum; polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- polyethylene glycol (PEG) graft copolymer) and two groups of contaminants (non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and pyrrolizidine alkaloids). Specifications for the following food additives were revised or withdrawn: advantame; annatto extracts (solavnt extracted bixin, ad solvent-extracted norbixin); food additives containing aluminium and/or silicon (aluminium silicate; calcium aluminium silicate; calcium silicate; silicon dioxide, amorphous; sodium aluminium silicate); and glycerol ester of gum rosin. Annexed to the report are tables or text summarizing the toxicological and dietary exposure information and information on specifications as well as the Committees recommendations on the food additives and contaminants considered at this meeting.

  10. High protein- and high lipid-producing microalgae from northern australia as potential feedstock for animal feed and biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Duong, Van Thang; Ahmed, Faruq; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Quigley, Simon; Nowak, Ekaterina; Schenk, Peer M

    2015-01-01

    Microalgal biomass can be used for biodiesel, feed, and food production. Collection and identification of local microalgal strains in the Northern Territory, Australia was conducted to identify strains with high protein and lipid contents as potential feedstock for animal feed and biodiesel production, respectively. A total of 36 strains were isolated from 13 samples collected from a variety of freshwater locations, such as dams, ponds, and streams and subsequently classified by 18S rDNA sequencing. All of the strains were green microalgae and predominantly belong to Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus sp., Desmodesmus sp., Chlamydomonas sp., Pseudomuriella sp., Tetraedron caudatum, Graesiella emersonii, and Mychonastes timauensis. Among the fastest growing strains, Scenedesmus sp. NT1d possessed the highest content of protein; reaching up to 33% of its dry weight. In terms of lipid production, Chlorella sp. NT8a and Scenedesmus dimorphus NT8e produced the highest triglyceride contents of 116.9 and 99.13 μg mL(-1) culture, respectively, as measured by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy of fatty acid methyl esters. These strains may present suitable candidates for biodiesel production after further optimization of culturing conditions, while their protein-rich biomass could be used for animal feed.

  11. Temperature Effects on Kinetic Parameters and Substrate Affinity of Cel7A Cellobiohydrolases*

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Trine Holst; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Badino, Silke Flindt; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We measured hydrolytic rates of four purified cellulases in small increments of temperature (10–50 °C) and substrate loads (0–100 g/liter) and analyzed the data by a steady state kinetic model that accounts for the processive mechanism. We used wild type cellobiohydrolases (Cel7A) from mesophilic Hypocrea jecorina and thermophilic Rasamsonia emersonii and two variants of these enzymes designed to elucidate the role of the carbohydrate binding module (CBM). We consistently found that the maximal rate increased strongly with temperature, whereas the affinity for the insoluble substrate decreased, and as a result, the effect of temperature depended strongly on the substrate load. Thus, temperature had little or no effect on the hydrolytic rate in dilute substrate suspensions, whereas strong temperature activation (Q10 values up to 2.6) was observed at saturating substrate loads. The CBM had a dual effect on the activity. On one hand, it diminished the tendency of heat-induced desorption, but on the other hand, it had a pronounced negative effect on the maximal rate, which was 2-fold larger in variants without CBM throughout the investigated temperature range. We conclude that although the CBM is beneficial for affinity it slows down the catalytic process. Cel7A from the thermophilic organism was moderately more activated by temperature than the mesophilic analog. This is in accord with general theories on enzyme temperature adaptation and possibly relevant information for the selection of technical cellulases. PMID:26183777

  12. Temperature Effects on Kinetic Parameters and Substrate Affinity of Cel7A Cellobiohydrolases.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Trine Holst; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Badino, Silke Flindt; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2015-09-01

    We measured hydrolytic rates of four purified cellulases in small increments of temperature (10-50 °C) and substrate loads (0-100 g/liter) and analyzed the data by a steady state kinetic model that accounts for the processive mechanism. We used wild type cellobiohydrolases (Cel7A) from mesophilic Hypocrea jecorina and thermophilic Rasamsonia emersonii and two variants of these enzymes designed to elucidate the role of the carbohydrate binding module (CBM). We consistently found that the maximal rate increased strongly with temperature, whereas the affinity for the insoluble substrate decreased, and as a result, the effect of temperature depended strongly on the substrate load. Thus, temperature had little or no effect on the hydrolytic rate in dilute substrate suspensions, whereas strong temperature activation (Q10 values up to 2.6) was observed at saturating substrate loads. The CBM had a dual effect on the activity. On one hand, it diminished the tendency of heat-induced desorption, but on the other hand, it had a pronounced negative effect on the maximal rate, which was 2-fold larger in variants without CBM throughout the investigated temperature range. We conclude that although the CBM is beneficial for affinity it slows down the catalytic process. Cel7A from the thermophilic organism was moderately more activated by temperature than the mesophilic analog. This is in accord with general theories on enzyme temperature adaptation and possibly relevant information for the selection of technical cellulases. PMID:26183777

  13. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs.

  14. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants. Eightieth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a brief description of general considerations addressed at the meeting, including updates on matters of interest to the work of the Committee. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and/or dietary exposure data for seven food additives (benzoates; lipase from Fusarium heterosporum expressed in Ogataea polymorpha; magnesium stearate; maltotetraohydrolase from Pseudomonas stutzeri expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; mixed β-glucanase, cellulase and xylanase from Rasamsonia emersonii; mixed β-glucanase and xylanase from Disporotrichum dimorphosporum; polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- polyethylene glycol (PEG) graft copolymer) and two groups of contaminants (non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and pyrrolizidine alkaloids). Specifications for the following food additives were revised or withdrawn: advantame; annatto extracts (solavnt extracted bixin, ad solvent-extracted norbixin); food additives containing aluminium and/or silicon (aluminium silicate; calcium aluminium silicate; calcium silicate; silicon dioxide, amorphous; sodium aluminium silicate); and glycerol ester of gum rosin. Annexed to the report are tables or text summarizing the toxicological and dietary exposure information and information on specifications as well as the Committees recommendations on the food additives and contaminants considered at this meeting. PMID:27514183

  15. Occurrence of fungi and fungus-like organisms in the Horodnianka River in the vicinity of Białystok, Poland.

    PubMed

    Kiziewicz, Bozena; Zdrojkowska, Ewa; Gajo, Bernadetta; Godlewska, Anna; Muszyńska, Elzbieta; Mazalska, Bozenna

    2011-01-01

    Studies of fungi and fungus- like organisms in the northeastern Poland have mainly concentrated on running waters in the vicinity of Białystok, including the Horodnianka River. The main objective was to investigate biodiversity of fungi and fungus-like organisms which take part in decomposition of organic matter commonly found in inland waters. To obtain a complete picture of species composition of fungi and fungus-like organisms in running waters we decided to explore representative sites of the Horodnianka River such as Olmonty, Hryniewicze and Horodniany with close localization of landfill. Fungal species were isolated using baiting technique. Baits of onion skin (Alium cepa), hemp-seeds (Cannabis sativa), impregnated cellophane and snake skin (Natrix natrix) were applied to isolate fungi from water of the Horodnianka River. The fungal community consists of 26 species, 10 species of fungi belonging to class Chytridiomycetes (3), anamorphic fungi (6), and Zygomycetes (1). 16 species belong to fungus-like organisms from class Oomycetes. Most of the recognized species have already been found in other running waters. From all the examined habitats the fungi belonging to 26 species of 18 genera Achlya, Alternaria, Aphanomyces, Aspergillus, Catenophlyctis, Dictyuchus, Fusarium, Karlingia, Lagenidium, Leptomitus, Olpidiopsis, Penicillium, Phlyctochytrium, Pythium, Saprolegnia, Scoliognia, Thraustotheca and Zoophagus were obtained. Certain fungal species like Aphanomyces laevis, Fusarium aqueductum, F. moniliforme, F. oxysporum, Leptomitus lacteus, Saprolegnia feax and S. parasitica were found at all the study sites. Among fungi potentially pathogenic and allergogenic for humans the genera Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Lagenidium and Penicillium have already been described. However, the species Lagenidium giganteum and Achlya androgyna are new in the fungal biota of Poland. The greatest number of fungal species occurred in Olmonty (24), the smallest in Horodniany

  16. Hyaloraphidium curvatum: a linear mitochondrial genome, tRNA editing, and an evolutionary link to lower fungi.

    PubMed

    Forget, Lise; Ustinova, Jana; Wang, Zhang; Huss, Volker A R; Lang, B Franz

    2002-03-01

    We have sequenced the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Hyaloraphidium curvatum, an organism previously classified as a colorless green alga but now recognized as a lower fungus based on molecular data. The 29.97-kbp mitochondrial chromosome is maintained as a monomeric, linear molecule with identical, inverted repeats (1.43 kbp) at both ends, a rare genome architecture in mitochondria. The genome encodes only 14 known mitochondrial proteins, 7 tRNAs, the large subunit rRNA and small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA), and 3 ORFs. The SSU rRNA is encoded in two gene pieces that are located 8 kbp apart on the mtDNA. Scrambled and fragmented mitochondrial rRNAs are well known from green algae and alveolate protists but are unprecedented in fungi. Protein genes code for apocytochrome b; cytochrome oxidase 1, 2, and 3, NADH dehydrogenase 1, 2, 3, 4, 4L, 5, and 6, and ATP synthase 6, 8, and 9 subunits, and several of these genes are organized in operon-like clusters. The set of seven mitochondrially encoded tRNAs is insufficient to recognize all codons that occur in the mitochondrial protein genes. When taking into account the pronounced codon bias, at least 16 nuclear-encoded tRNAs are assumed to be imported into the mitochondria. Three of the seven predicted mitochondria-encoded tRNA sequences carry mispairings in the first three positions of the acceptor stem. This strongly suggests that these tRNAs are edited by a mechanism similar to the one seen in the fungus Spizellomyces punctatus and the rhizopod amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. Our phylogenetic analysis confirms with overwhelming support that H. curvatum is a member of the chytridiomycete fungi, specifically related to the Monoblepharidales.

  17. Distribution of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent hexose kinases in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Delvalle, J A; Asensio, C

    1978-08-01

    A systematic study of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent hexose kinases among microorganisms has been undertaken. Sixteen hexose kinases of five major types were partially purified from 12 microorganisms and characterized with respect to specificity for sugar and nucleotide substrates and Michaelis constants for the sugar substrates. Glucokinase activities that phosphorylate glucose and glucosamine are inhibited by N-acetyl-glucosamine and xylose, were found to be present in the non-sulphur photosynthetic bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, the blue-green algae Anacystis montana, and the protists Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Hypochytrium catenoides (Hypochytridiomycete) and Saprolegnia Iitoralis (Oomycete). The myxobacteria Stigmatella aurantiaca contains a glucokinase activity with a different specificity pattern. Anacystis and Chlorella, besides their glucokinase activities, contain highly specific fructokinases, although that from Anacystis can also phosphorylate fructosamine; fructokinase from Anacystis has a molecular weight of 20 000, and exhibits a sigmoidal saturation curve for ATP when the Mg2+/ATP ratio is 2; this curve is transformed to a Michaelian one when under the same conditions an excess of Mg2+ (5 mM) is added. Saprolegnia however, besides the glucokinase, contains a mannofructokinase activity that phosphorylates mannose (Km 0.06 mM) and fructose (1 mM). On the other hand, hexokinase, a low specificity enzyme, was detected in the protist Allomyces arbuscula (Chytridiomycete) and in fungi Mucor hiemalis and Phycomyces blakesleeanus (Zygomycetes), and Schizophyllum commune (Basidiomycete). Schizophyllum contains a glucomannokinase activity together with hexokinase activity. The pattern of distribution of ATP-dependent hexose kinases among microorganisms seems to parallel that reported for biosynthetic pathways for lysine. The correlation with other biochemical parameters is also considered.

  18. Occurrence of fungi and fungus-like organisms in the Horodnianka River in the vicinity of Białystok, Poland.

    PubMed

    Kiziewicz, Bozena; Zdrojkowska, Ewa; Gajo, Bernadetta; Godlewska, Anna; Muszyńska, Elzbieta; Mazalska, Bozenna

    2011-01-01

    Studies of fungi and fungus- like organisms in the northeastern Poland have mainly concentrated on running waters in the vicinity of Białystok, including the Horodnianka River. The main objective was to investigate biodiversity of fungi and fungus-like organisms which take part in decomposition of organic matter commonly found in inland waters. To obtain a complete picture of species composition of fungi and fungus-like organisms in running waters we decided to explore representative sites of the Horodnianka River such as Olmonty, Hryniewicze and Horodniany with close localization of landfill. Fungal species were isolated using baiting technique. Baits of onion skin (Alium cepa), hemp-seeds (Cannabis sativa), impregnated cellophane and snake skin (Natrix natrix) were applied to isolate fungi from water of the Horodnianka River. The fungal community consists of 26 species, 10 species of fungi belonging to class Chytridiomycetes (3), anamorphic fungi (6), and Zygomycetes (1). 16 species belong to fungus-like organisms from class Oomycetes. Most of the recognized species have already been found in other running waters. From all the examined habitats the fungi belonging to 26 species of 18 genera Achlya, Alternaria, Aphanomyces, Aspergillus, Catenophlyctis, Dictyuchus, Fusarium, Karlingia, Lagenidium, Leptomitus, Olpidiopsis, Penicillium, Phlyctochytrium, Pythium, Saprolegnia, Scoliognia, Thraustotheca and Zoophagus were obtained. Certain fungal species like Aphanomyces laevis, Fusarium aqueductum, F. moniliforme, F. oxysporum, Leptomitus lacteus, Saprolegnia feax and S. parasitica were found at all the study sites. Among fungi potentially pathogenic and allergogenic for humans the genera Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Lagenidium and Penicillium have already been described. However, the species Lagenidium giganteum and Achlya androgyna are new in the fungal biota of Poland. The greatest number of fungal species occurred in Olmonty (24), the smallest in Horodniany

  19. Enzymatic solubilization of arabinoxylans from native, extruded, and high-shear-treated rye bran by different endo-xylanases and other hydrolyzing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Espinoza, Maria-Cruz; Poulsen, Charlotte; Borch Søe, Jorn; Zargahi, Masoud Rajabi; Rouau, Xavier

    2004-06-30

    The overall objective of this research was to find a new way to valorize rye bran, by producing a gellifier from the enzymatic solubilization of arabinoxylans (AX). The effects of three pure endo-xylanases from Aspergillus niger (Xyl-1), Talaromyces emersonii (Xyl-2), and Bacillus subtilis (Xyl-3) and of Grindamyl S100 (GS100), a commercial enzyme preparation containing a Xyl-1 type endo-xylanase, were tested on rye bran to study the solubilization of water-unextractable arabinoxylans (WUAX). Eight different extrusion-treated rye brans were also used as substrates to find the best physical treatment to facilitate enzymatic arabinoxylan (AX) solubilization. Arabinoxylans were better solubilized from the bran extruded at high temperature using Xyl-3. This enzyme was then tested in combination with pure (1,4)-beta-d-arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase (AXH) and endo-beta-d-glucanase or ferulic acid esterase (FAE), from A. niger. Only beta-glucanase in combination with Xyl-3 improved the AX extraction, but it did not have a marked effect on the viscosity of the extracts. Xyl-3 was then tested on a high-shear-treated rye bran, and results were compared to those obtained with the high-temperature-extruded rye bran. The high-shear treatment did not improve the bran AX enzymatic solubilization. The combination of FAE with Xyl-1 or Xyl-3 did not improve the AX extraction from untreated and high-shear-treated rye bran. Finally, to study the gelation capacity of the enzymatically solubilized AX, the effect of the hydrogen peroxide/horseradish peroxidase (H(2)O(2)/POD) was tested on the Xyl-3 high-temperature-extruded bran extracts. Solubilized AX did not gel in the presence of the oxidizing system.

  20. Bioprospecting the thermal waters of the Roman baths: isolation of oleaginous species and analysis of the FAME profile for biodiesel production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The extensive diversity of microalgae provides an opportunity to undertake bioprospecting for species possessing features suited to commercial scale cultivation. The outdoor cultivation of microalgae is subject to extreme temperature fluctuations; temperature tolerant microalgae would help mitigate this problem. The waters of the Roman Baths, which have a temperature range between 39°C and 46°C, were sampled for microalgae. A total of 3 green algae, 1 diatom and 4 cyanobacterial species were successfully isolated into ‘unialgal’ culture. Four isolates were filamentous, which could prove advantageous for low energy dewatering of cultures using filtration. Lipid content, profiles and growth rates of the isolates were examined at temperatures of 20, 30, 40°C, with and without nitrogen starvation and compared against the oil producing green algal species, Chlorella emersonii. Some isolates synthesized high levels of lipids, however, all were most productive at temperatures lower than those of the Roman Baths. The eukaryotic algae accumulated a range of saturated and polyunsaturated FAMEs and all isolates generally showed higher lipid accumulation under nitrogen deficient conditions (Klebsormidium sp. increasing from 1.9% to 16.0% and Hantzschia sp. from 31.9 to 40.5%). The cyanobacteria typically accumulated a narrower range of FAMEs that were mostly saturated, but were capable of accumulating a larger quantity of lipid as a proportion of dry weight (M. laminosus, 37.8% fully saturated FAMEs). The maximum productivity of all the isolates was not determined in the current work and will require further effort to optimise key variables such as light intensity and media composition. PMID:23369619

  1. Heterologous expression of cellulase genes in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Davison, Steffi A; den Haan, Riaan; van Zyl, Willem Heber

    2016-09-01

    Enzyme cost is a major impediment to second-generation (2G) cellulosic ethanol production. One strategy to reduce enzyme cost is to engineer enzyme production capacity in a fermentative microorganism to enable consolidated bio-processing (CBP). Ideally, a strain with a high secretory phenotype, high fermentative capacity as well as an innate robustness to bioethanol-specific stressors, including tolerance to products formed during pre-treatment and fermentation of lignocellulosic substrates should be used. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust fermentative yeast but has limitations as a potential CBP host, such as low heterologous protein secretion titers. In this study, we evaluated natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains for superior secretion activity and other industrially relevant characteristics needed during the process of lignocellulosic ethanol production. Individual cellulases namely Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (β-glucosidase), Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase), and Trichoderma reesei Cel5A (endoglucanase) were utilized as reporter proteins. Natural strain YI13 was identified to have a high secretory phenotype, demonstrating a 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher Cel7A and Cel5A activity, respectively, compared to the reference strain S288c. YI13 also demonstrated other industrially relevant characteristics such as growth vigor, high ethanol titer, multi-tolerance to high temperatures (37 and 40 °C), ethanol (10 % w/v), and towards various concentrations of a cocktail of inhibitory compounds commonly found in lignocellulose hydrolysates. This study accentuates the value of natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains to serve as potential robust and highly productive chassis organisms for CBP strain development. PMID:27470141

  2. A Thermostable Glucoamylase from Bispora sp. MEY-1 with Stability over a Broad pH Range and Significant Starch Hydrolysis Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yingguo; Wang, Kun; Niu, Canfang; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Wang, Caihong; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucoamylase is an exo-type enzyme that converts starch completely into glucose from the non-reducing ends. To meet the industrial requirements for starch processing, a glucoamylase with excellent thermostability, raw-starch degradation ability and high glucose yield is much needed. In the present study we selected the excellent Carbohydrate-Activity Enzyme (CAZyme) producer, Bispora sp. MEY-1, as the microbial source for glucoamylase gene exploitation. Methodology/Principal Findings A glucoamylase gene (gla15) was cloned from Bispora sp. MEY-1 and successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris with a high yield of 34.1 U/ml. Deduced GLA15 exhibits the highest identity of 64.2% to the glucoamylase from Talaromyces (Rasamsonia) emersonii. Purified recombinant GLA15 was thermophilic and showed the maximum activity at 70°C. The enzyme was stable over a broad pH range (2.2–11.0) and at high temperature up to 70°C. It hydrolyzed the breakages of both α-1,4- and α-1,6-glycosidic linkages in amylopectin, soluble starch, amylose, and maltooligosaccharides, and had capacity to degrade raw starch. TLC and H1-NMR analysis showed that GLA15 is a typical glucoamylase of GH family 15 that releases glucose units from the non-reducing ends of α-glucans. The combination of Bacillus licheniformis amylase and GLA15 hydrolyzed 96.14% of gelatinized maize starch after 6 h incubation, which was about 9% higher than that of the combination with a commercial glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger. Conclusion/Significance GLA15 has a broad pH stability range, high-temperature thermostability, high starch hydrolysis capacity and high expression yield. In comparison with the commercial glucoamylase from A. niger, GLA15 represents a better candidate for application in the food industry including production of glucose, glucose syrups, and high-fructose corn syrups. PMID:25415468

  3. Expression and evaluation of enzymes required for the hydrolysis of galactomannan.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, A R; Rose, S H; Viljoen-Bloom, M; van Zyl, W H

    2014-08-01

    The cost-effective production of bioethanol from lignocellulose requires the complete conversion of plant biomass, which contains up to 30 % mannan. To ensure utilisation of galactomannan during consolidated bioprocessing, heterologous production of mannan-degrading enzymes in fungal hosts was explored. The Aspergillus aculeatus endo-β-mannanase (Man1) and Talaromyces emersonii α-galactosidase (Agal) genes were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y294, and the Aspergillus niger β-mannosidase (cMndA) and synthetic Cellvibrio mixtus β-mannosidase (Man5A) genes in A. niger. Maximum enzyme activity for Man1 (374 nkat ml(-1), pH 5.47), Agal (135 nkat ml(-1), pH 2.37), cMndA (12 nkat ml(-1), pH 3.40) and Man5A (8 nkat ml(-1), pH 3.40) was observed between 60 and 70 °C. Co-expression of the Man1 and Agal genes in S. cerevisiae Y294[Agal-Man1] reduced the extracellular activity relative to individual expression of the respective genes. However, the combined action of crude Man1, Agal and Man5A enzyme preparations significantly decreased the viscosity of galactomannan in locust bean gum, confirming hydrolysis thereof. Furthermore, when complemented with exogenous Man5A, S. cerevisiae Y294[Agal-Man1] produced 56 % of the theoretical ethanol yield, corresponding to a 66 % carbohydrate conversion, on 5 g l(-1) mannose and 10 g l(-1) locust bean gum. PMID:24888762

  4. Application of high rate, high temperature anaerobic digestion to fungal thermozyme hydrolysates from carbohydrate wastes.

    PubMed

    Forbes, C; O'Reilly, C; McLaughlin, L; Gilleran, G; Tuohy, M; Colleran, E

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of using a two-step, fully biological and sustainable strategy for the treatment of carbohydrate rich wastes. The primary step in this strategy involves the application of thermostable enzymes produced by the thermophilic, aerobic fungus, Talaromyces emersonii, to carbohydrate wastes producing a liquid hydrolysate discharged at elevated temperatures. To assess the potential of thermophilic treatment of this hydrolysate, a comparative study of thermophilic and mesophilic digestion of four sugar rich thermozyme hydrolysate waste streams was conducted by operating two high rate upflow anaerobic hybrid reactors (UAHR) at 37 degrees C (R1) and 55 degrees C (R2). The operational performance of both reactors was monitored from start-up by assessing COD removal efficiencies, volatile fatty acid (VFA) discharge and % methane of the biogas produced. Rapid start-up of both R1 and R2 was achieved on an influent composed of the typical sugar components of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). Both reactors were subsequently challenged in terms of volumetric loading rate (VLR) and it was found that a VLR of 9 gCOD l(-1)d(-1) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1 day severely affected the thermophilic reactor with instability characterised by a build up of volatile fatty acid (VFA) intermediates in the effluent. The influent to both reactors was changed to a simple glucose and sucrose-based influent supplied at a VLR of 4.5 gCOD l(-1)d(-1) and HRT of 2 days prior to the introduction of thermozyme hydrolysates. Four unique thermozyme hydrolysates were subsequently supplied to the reactors, each for a period of 10 HRTs. The applied hydrolysates were derived from apple pulp, bread, carob powder and cardboard, all of which were successfully and comparably converted by both reactors. The % total carbohydrate removal by both reactors was monitored during the application of the sugar rich thermozyme

  5. Engineering towards a complete heterologous cellulase secretome in Yarrowia lipolytica reveals its potential for consolidated bioprocessing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wei, Hui; Wang, Wei; Alahuhta, Markus; Vander Wall, Todd; Baker, John O.; Taylor, Larry E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zhang, Min

    2014-10-16

    Background: Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast capable of metabolizing glucose to lipids, which then accumulate intracellularly. However, it lacks the suite of cellulolytic enzymes required to break down biomass cellulose and cannot therefore utilize biomass directly as a carbon source. Toward the development of a direct microbial conversion platform for the production of hydrocarbon fuels from cellulosic biomass, the potential for Y. lipolytica to function as a consolidated bioprocessing strain was investigated by first conducting a genomic search and functional testing of its endogenous glycoside hydrolases. Once the range of endogenous enzymes was determined, the critical cellulases from Trichodermamore » reesei were cloned into Yarrowia. Results: Initially, work to express T. reesei endoglucanase II (EGII) and cellobiohydrolase (CBH) II in Y. lipolytica resulted in the successful secretion of active enzymes. However, a critical cellulase, T. reesei CBHI, while successfully expressed in and secreted from Yarrowia, showed less than expected enzymatic activity, suggesting an incompatibility (probably at the post-translational level) for its expression in Yarrowia. This result prompted us to evaluate alternative or modified CBHI enzymes. Our subsequent expression of a T. reesei-Talaromyces emersonii (Tr-Te) chimeric CBHI, Chaetomium thermophilum CBHI, and Humicola grisea CBHI demonstrated remarkably improved enzymatic activities. Specifically, the purified chimeric Tr-Te CBHI showed a specific activity on Avicel that is comparable to that of the native T. reesei CBHI. Furthermore, the chimeric Tr-Te CBHI also showed significant synergism with EGII and CBHII in degrading cellulosic substrates, using either mixed supernatants or co-cultures of the corresponding Y. lipolytica transformants. The consortia system approach also allows rational volume mixing of the transformant cultures in accordance with the optimal ratio of cellulases required for efficient

  6. Engineering towards a complete heterologous cellulase secretome in Yarrowia lipolytica reveals its potential for consolidated bioprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Hui; Wang, Wei; Alahuhta, Markus; Vander Wall, Todd; Baker, John O.; Taylor, Larry E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zhang, Min

    2014-10-16

    Background: Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast capable of metabolizing glucose to lipids, which then accumulate intracellularly. However, it lacks the suite of cellulolytic enzymes required to break down biomass cellulose and cannot therefore utilize biomass directly as a carbon source. Toward the development of a direct microbial conversion platform for the production of hydrocarbon fuels from cellulosic biomass, the potential for Y. lipolytica to function as a consolidated bioprocessing strain was investigated by first conducting a genomic search and functional testing of its endogenous glycoside hydrolases. Once the range of endogenous enzymes was determined, the critical cellulases from Trichoderma reesei were cloned into Yarrowia. Results: Initially, work to express T. reesei endoglucanase II (EGII) and cellobiohydrolase (CBH) II in Y. lipolytica resulted in the successful secretion of active enzymes. However, a critical cellulase, T. reesei CBHI, while successfully expressed in and secreted from Yarrowia, showed less than expected enzymatic activity, suggesting an incompatibility (probably at the post-translational level) for its expression in Yarrowia. This result prompted us to evaluate alternative or modified CBHI enzymes. Our subsequent expression of a T. reesei-Talaromyces emersonii (Tr-Te) chimeric CBHI, Chaetomium thermophilum CBHI, and Humicola grisea CBHI demonstrated remarkably improved enzymatic activities. Specifically, the purified chimeric Tr-Te CBHI showed a specific activity on Avicel that is comparable to that of the native T. reesei CBHI. Furthermore, the chimeric Tr-Te CBHI also showed significant synergism with EGII and CBHII in degrading cellulosic substrates, using either mixed supernatants or co-cultures of the corresponding Y. lipolytica transformants. The consortia system approach also allows rational volume mixing of the transformant cultures in accordance with the optimal ratio of cellulases required for efficient

  7. Two structurally discrete GH7-cellobiohydrolases compete for the same cellulosic substrate fiber

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellulose consisting of arrays of linear beta-1,4 linked glucans, is the most abundant carbon-containing polymer present in biomass. Recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose towards enzymatic degradation is widely reported and is the result of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds within and among the linear glucans. Cellobiohydrolases are enzymes that attack crystalline cellulose. Here we report on two forms of glycosyl hydrolase family 7 cellobiohydrolases common to all Aspergillii that attack Avicel, cotton cellulose and other forms of crystalline cellulose. Results Cellobiohydrolases Cbh1 and CelD have similar catalytic domains but only Cbh1 contains a carbohydrate-binding domain (CBD) that binds to cellulose. Structural superpositioning of Cbh1 and CelD on the Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A 3-dimensional structure, identifies the typical tunnel-like catalytic active site while Cbh1 shows an additional loop that partially obstructs the substrate-fitting channel. CelD does not have a CBD and shows a four amino acid residue deletion on the tunnel-obstructing loop providing a continuous opening in the absence of a CBD. Cbh1 and CelD are catalytically functional and while specific activity against Avicel is 7.7 and 0.5 U.mg prot-1, respectively specific activity on pNPC is virtually identical. Cbh1 is slightly more stable to thermal inactivation compared to CelD and is much less sensitive to glucose inhibition suggesting that an open tunnel configuration, or absence of a CBD, alters the way the catalytic domain interacts with the substrate. Cbh1 and CelD enzyme mixtures on crystalline cellulosic substrates show a strong combinatorial effort response for mixtures where Cbh1 is present in 2:1 or 4:1 molar excess. When CelD was overrepresented the combinatorial effort could only be partially overcome. CelD appears to bind and hydrolyze only loose cellulosic chains while Cbh1 is capable of opening new cellulosic substrate molecules away from the cellulosic

  8. Modern taxonomy of biotechnologically important Aspergillus and Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    Houbraken, Jos; de Vries, Ronald P; Samson, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomy is a dynamic discipline and name changes of fungi with biotechnological, industrial, or medical importance are often difficult to understand for researchers in the applied field. Species belonging to the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium are commonly used or isolated, and inadequate taxonomy or uncertain nomenclature of these genera can therefore lead to tremendous confusion. Misidentification of strains used in biotechnology can be traced back to (1) recent changes in nomenclature, (2) new taxonomic insights, including description of new species, and/or (3) incorrect identifications. Changes in the recent published International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants will lead to numerous name changes of existing Aspergillus and Penicillium species and an overview of the current names of biotechnological important species is given. Furthermore, in (biotechnological) literature old and invalid names are still used, such as Aspergillus awamori, A. foetidus, A. kawachii, Talaromyces emersonii, Acremonium cellulolyticus, and Penicillium funiculosum. An overview of these and other species with their correct names is presented. Furthermore, the biotechnologically important species Talaromyces thermophilus is here combined in Thermomyces as Th. dupontii. The importance of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and related genera is also illustrated by the high number of undertaken genome sequencing projects. A number of these strains are incorrectly identified or atypical strains are selected for these projects. Recommendations for correct strain selection are given here. Phylogenetic analysis shows a close relationship between the genome-sequenced strains of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus. Talaromyces stipitatus and T. marneffei (syn. Penicillium marneffei) are closely related to Thermomyces lanuginosus and Th. dupontii (syn. Talaromyces thermophilus), and these species appear to be distantly related to Aspergillus and Penicillium. In the last part of

  9. Overexpression of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae ER-to-Golgi SNARE genes increased heterologous cellulase secretion.

    PubMed

    Van Zyl, John Henry D; Den Haan, Riaan; Van Zyl, Willem H

    2016-01-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor proteins (SNAREs) are essential components of the yeast protein-trafficking machinery and are required at the majority of membrane fusion events in the cell, where they facilitate SNARE-mediated fusion between the protein transport vesicles, the various membrane-enclosed organelles and, ultimately, the plasma membrane. We have demonstrated an increase in secretory titers for the Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (Te-Cel7A, a cellobiohydrolase) and the Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (Sf-Cel3A, a β-glucosidase) expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through single and co-overexpression of some of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi SNAREs (BOS1, BET1, SEC22 and SED5). Overexpression of SED5 yielded the biggest improvements for both of the cellulolytic reporter proteins tested, with maximum increases in extracellular enzyme activity of 22 % for the Sf-Cel3A and 68 % for the Te-Cel7A. Co-overexpression of the ER-to-Golgi SNAREs yielded proportionately smaller increases for the Te-Cel7A (46 %), with the Sf-Cel3A yielding no improvement. Co-overexpression of the most promising exocytic SNARE components identified in literature for secretory enhancement of the cellulolytic proteins tested (SSO1 for Sf-Cel3A and SNC1 for Te-Cel7A) with the most effective ER-to-Golgi SNARE components identified in this study (SED5 for both Sf-Cel3A and Te-Cel7A) yielded variable results, with Sf-Cel3A improved by 131 % and Te-Cel7A yielding no improvement. Improvements were largely independent of gene dosage as all strains only integrated single additional SNARE gene copies, with episomal variance between the most improved strains shown to be insignificant. This study has added further credence to the notion that SNARE proteins fulfil an essential role within a larger cascade of secretory machinery components that could contribute significantly to future improvements to S. cerevisiae as protein production host. PMID:26450509

  10. Analysis of the dynamics of fungal communities in soil via fungal-specific PCR of soil DNA followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    van Elsas, J D; Duarte, G F; Keijzer-Wolters, A; Smit, E

    2000-12-15

    A molecular method for profiling of fungal communities in soil was applied in experiments in soil microcosms, with two objectives, (1) to assess the persistence of two selected fungal species in soil, and (2) to analyze the response of the natural fungal community to a spill of sulphurous petrol in the same soil. To achieve the aims, two soil DNA extraction methods, one originally designed for the direct extraction of bacterial community DNA and the other one aimed to obtain fungal DNA, were tested for their efficiency in recovering DNA of fungal origin from soil. Both methods allowed for the efficient extraction of DNA from introduced Trichoderma harzianum spores as well as Arthrobotrys oligospora mycelial fragments, at comparable rates. Several PCR amplification systems based on primers specific for fungal 18S ribosomal RNA genes were tested to design strategies for the assessment of fungal communities in soil. The PCR systems produced amplicons of expected size with DNA of most fungi studied, which included members of the Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, Zygomycetes and Chytridiomycetes. On the other hand, the 18S rRNA genes of Oomycetes (including key plant pathogens) were poorly amplified. Plant (Solanum tuberosum), nematode (Meloidogyne sp.) and bacterial DNA was not amplified. For studies of soil fungal communities, a nested PCR approach was selected, in which the first PCR provided the required specificity for fungi, whereas the second (nested) PCR served to produce amplicons separable on denaturing gradient gels. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) allowed the resolution of mixtures of PCR products of several different fungi, as well as products resulting from mixed-template amplifications, into distinct banding patterns. The persistence of fungal species in soil was assessed using T. harzianum spores and A. oligospora hyphal fragments added to silt loam soil microcosms. Using PCR-DGGE, these fungi were detectable for about 14 days and 2 months