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Sample records for ciliary muscle cells

  1. Ciliary Muscle Cell Changes During Guinea Pig Development

    PubMed Central

    Pucker, Andrew D.; Jackson, Ashley R.; Morris, Hugh J.; Fischer, Andrew J.; McHugh, Kirk M.; Mutti, Donald O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Guinea pig ciliary muscle (CM) increases robustly in volume, length, and thickness with age. We wanted to characterize CM cells during development to determine the contributions of hypertrophy (cell size increase) and hyperplasia (cell number increase) during development. Methods Six pigmented guinea pig eyes were collected at each of five ages: 1, 10, 20, 30, and 90 days. Refractive errors and axial lengths were determined. Eyes were temporally marked, enucleated, hemisected, and fixed. Nasal and temporal eye segments were embedded and 30-μm serial sections were collected; the two most central slides from each hemisection were analyzed with an epifluorescence microscope and Stereo Investigator software to determine normal morphologic parameters. Results Refractive errors became less hyperopic (P = 0.0001) while axial lengths and CM lengths, cross-sectional areas, volumes, and cell sizes all increased linearly with log age (all P < 0.00001). Ciliary muscle cell numbers increased only during the first 20 days of life (P = 0.02). Nasal and temporal CM lengths (P = 0.07), cross-sectional areas (P = 0.18), and cell numbers (P = 0.70) were not different, but CM cell sizes were initially larger temporally and became larger nasally after age 30 days. Conclusions The mechanism of guinea pig CM cell growth during the first 90 days of life was characterized by early hyperplasia combined with hypertrophic cell growth throughout development that results in larger CM lengths, cross-sectional areas, and volumes. Nasal-temporal CM development was generally symmetric, but there was more CM hypertrophy nasally at older ages. PMID:26641547

  2. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye’s accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45–50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accommodation mechanism of the ciliary muscle are complicated to apply in the older subjects, as they typically require fixation stability during long measurement times and/or to have an ultrasound probe directly in contact with the eye. Instead, we used our own developed method based on high-speed recording of lens wobbling to study the ciliary muscle activity in a small group of pseudophakic subjects (around 80 years old). There was a significant activity of the muscle, clearly able to contract under binocular stimulation of accommodation. This supports a purely lenticular-based theory of presbyopia and it might stimulate the search for new solutions to presbyopia by making use of the remaining contraction force still presented in the aging eye. PMID:27151778

  3. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye’s accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45–50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accommodation mechanism of the ciliary muscle are complicated to apply in the older subjects, as they typically require fixation stability during long measurement times and/or to have an ultrasound probe directly in contact with the eye. Instead, we used our own developed method based on high-speed recording of lens wobbling to study the ciliary muscle activity in a small group of pseudophakic subjects (around 80 years old). There was a significant activity of the muscle, clearly able to contract under binocular stimulation of accommodation. This supports a purely lenticular-based theory of presbyopia and it might stimulate the search for new solutions to presbyopia by making use of the remaining contraction force still presented in the aging eye.

  4. Parasympathetic denervation of the ciliary muscle following retinal photocoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, P.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys underwent unilateral PRP with xenon arc or argon or krypton laser light, employing burn intensity, size, spacing, and topography analogous to standard clinical (eg, Diabetic Retinopathy Study) treatment. Shortly thereafter, accommodative responsiveness to topical eserine and electrical stimulation of the EWN was diminished, accommodative responsiveness to systemic pilocarpine was enhanced, and the number of muscarinic receptors in the ciliary muscle was reduced in the PRP-treated eyes compared to the contralateral controls. In most instances, these parameters returned to normal over 6 to 12 weeks and the abnormalities could be induced again by another round of PRP. However, in some PRP-treated eyes, accommodative responsiveness to EWN stimulation and topical eserine remained subnormal permanently (greater than 1 year). Light and electron microscopy of the ciliary muscle and choroid confirmed the early interruption and degeneration and the subsequent regeneration of the intraocular parasympathetic nerves following PRP. These findings are similar to those seen after surgical removal of the ciliary ganglion and posterior ciliary nerves, and indicate that PRP produces an intraocular parasympathetic denervation of the ciliary muscle. This phenomenon may explain the loss of voluntary accommodation which can follow PRP in prepresbyopic humans. Three cynomolgus monkeys underwent nasal and temporal HRMP in one eye with the argon laser. One to four weeks later, accommodative responses to IM pilocarpine, topical eserine, and electric stimulation of the EWN did not differ markedly in the treated and control eyes. Five weeks after HRMP, posterior PRP was performed in the same eye, sparing the previously treated areas.

  5. Restoring ciliary function to differentiated Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia cells with a lentiviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Lawrence E; Yin, Weining; Patel, Manij; Sechelski, John; Rogers, Troy; Burns, Kimberlie; Grubb, Barbara R; Olsen, John C

    2014-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disease in which mutations disrupt ciliary function, leading to impaired mucociliary clearance and life-long lung disease. Mouse tracheal cells with a targeted deletion in the axonemal dynein intermediated chain gene Dnaic1 differentiate normally in culture but lack ciliary activity. Gene transfer to undifferentiated cultures of mouse Dnaic1−/− cells with a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with avian influenza hemagglutinin restored Dnaic1 expression and ciliary activity. Importantly, apical treatment of well-differentiated cultures of mouse Dnaic1−/− with lentiviral vector also restored ciliary activity, demonstrating successful gene transfer from the apical surface. Treatment of Dnaic1flox/flox mice expressing an estrogen responsive Cre recombinase with different doses of tamoxifen indicated that restoration of ~20% of ciliary activity may be sufficient to prevent the development of rhinosinusitis. However, while administration of a β-galactosidase expressing vector to control mice demonstrated efficient gene transfer to the nasal epithelium, treatment of Dnaic1−/− mice resulted in a low level of gene transfer, demonstrating that the severe rhinitis present in these animals impedes gene transfer. The results demonstrate that gene replacement therapy may be a viable treatment option for primary ciliary dyskinesia, but further improvements in the efficiency of gene transfer are necessary. PMID:24451115

  6. Ciliary Ectosomes: transmissions from the cell's antenna

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Christopher R.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    The cilium is the site of function for a variety of membrane receptors, enzymes and signal transduction modules critical to a spectrum of cellular processes. Through targeted transport and selective gating mechanisms, the cell localizes specific proteins to the cilium that equip it for the role of sensory antenna. This capacity of the cilium to serve as a specialized compartment where specific proteins can be readily concentrated for sensory reception also makes it an ideal organelle to employ for the regulated emission of specific biological material and information. In this review, we present and discuss an emerging body of evidence centered on ciliary ectosomes - bioactive vesicles released from the surface of the cilium. PMID:25618328

  7. Quantification of the ciliary muscle and crystalline lens interaction during accommodation with synchronous OCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Marco; de Freitas, Carolina; Williams, Siobhan; Hernandez, Victor M.; Cabot, Florence; Yesilirmak, Nilufer; Alawa, Karam; Chang, Yu-Cherng; Yoo, Sonia H.; Gregori, Giovanni; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Two SD-OCT systems and a dual channel accommodation target were combined and precisely synchronized to simultaneously image the anterior segment and the ciliary muscle during dynamic accommodation. The imaging system simultaneously generates two synchronized OCT image sequences of the anterior segment and ciliary muscle with an imaging speed of 13 frames per second. The system was used to acquire OCT image sequences of a non-presbyopic and a pre-presbyopic subject accommodating in response to step changes in vergence. The image sequences were processed to extract dynamic morphological data from the crystalline lens and the ciliary muscle. The synchronization between the OCT systems allowed the precise correlation of anatomical changes occurring in the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle at identical time points during accommodation. To describe the dynamic interaction between the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle, we introduce accommodation state diagrams that display the relation between anatomical changes occurring in the accommodating crystalline lens and ciliary muscle. PMID:27446660

  8. Bringing accommodation into focus: the several discoveries of the ciliary muscle.

    PubMed

    Harper, David G

    2014-05-01

    Since at least the 16th century, many investigators have speculated on the presence of a specialized muscle in the front of the eye designed to somehow alter its disposition to bring about changes in focus. By the 1850s, when Hermann von Helmholtz offered the first plausible theory of accommodation, the anatomy of the ciliary muscle was well known. The credit for this knowledge is generally given to Ernst Brücke and William Bowman, who published their observations on the muscle independently in the 1840s. In fact, not only were Bowman and Brücke wrong about the role of the ciliary muscle in accommodation, and for different reasons, but they shared this distinction with at least 3 investigators who came before them. In the 3 decades before 1840, Philip Crampton, Robert Knox, and William Wallace had all zeroed in on the ciliary muscle, describing its anatomy in varying detail. If none understood its precise role in accommodation--all ignored the work of Thomas Young, who by 1800 had proved that the lens must somehow round up to achieve near vision--each deserves a share of the credit for its discovery.

  9. [Effect of ciliary muscle electrical stimulation on ocular hydrodynamics and visual function in patients with glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Nesterov, A P; Khadikova, E V

    1997-01-01

    A course of transscleral electrostimulation of the ciliary muscle (10 sessions) using ESOF-1 device was administered to 20 patients (23 eyes) with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma. A lens with 4 electrodes was placed on the eyeball in the ciliary body projection. Rectangular bipolar pulses up to 15 msec long were generated in the pack mode with current amplitude up to 10 mA for 3 to 7 min. Control group consisted of 17 "paired" eyes. After electrostimulation the accommodation volume increased by 54%, relative accommodation reserve by 34%, coefficient of discharge by 42%, and vision acuity by 0.1 to 0.4 diopters in 6 out of 7 eyes in which vision was lower than 1.0 diopter; intraocular pressure was 16% decreased and the number of absolute and relative scotomas in the central visual field (Humphry, 24-2) dropped by 40%. Improvement of the visual functions and hydrodynamic parameters of the eye was gradual, reaching the maximum by the end of the follow-up (6 months). In control eyes no positive changes were observed. The results indicate a positive effect of electrostimulation of the ciliary body and posterior ocular structures on intraocular fluid circulation and visual functions.

  10. Culture of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Epithelial Cells at Air-Liquid Interface Can Alter Ciliary Phenotype but Remains a Robust and Informative Diagnostic Aid

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Janice L.; Williams, Gwyneth; Rutman, Andrew; Goggin, Patricia M.; Adam, Elizabeth C.; Page, Anthony; Evans, Hazel J.; Lackie, Peter M.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Lucas, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) requires the analysis of ciliary function and ultrastructure. Diagnosis can be complicated by secondary effects on cilia such as damage during sampling, local inflammation or recent infection. To differentiate primary from secondary abnormalities, re-analysis of cilia following culture and re-differentiation of epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface (ALI) aids the diagnosis of PCD. However changes in ciliary beat pattern of cilia following epithelial cell culture has previously been described, which has brought the robustness of this method into question. This is the first systematic study to evaluate ALI culture as an aid to diagnosis of PCD in the light of these concerns. Methods We retrospectively studied changes associated with ALI-culture in 158 subjects referred for diagnostic testing at two PCD centres. Ciliated nasal epithelium (PCD n = 54; non-PCD n = 111) was analysed by high-speed digital video microscopy and transmission electron microscopy before and after culture. Results Ciliary function was abnormal before and after culture in all subjects with PCD; 21 PCD subjects had a combination of static and uncoordinated twitching cilia, which became completely static following culture, a further 9 demonstrated a decreased ciliary beat frequency after culture. In subjects without PCD, secondary ciliary dyskinesia was reduced. Conclusions The change to ciliary phenotype in PCD samples following cell culture does not affect the diagnosis, and in certain cases can assist the ability to identify PCD cilia. PMID:24586956

  11. Intranuclear inclusions in Schwann cells of aged fowl ciliary ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, M G

    1987-01-01

    Schwann cells in ciliary ganglia of fowls aged five to seven years were found to contain numerous intranuclear inclusions and pseudo-inclusions. Similar inclusions were usually absent from both neurons and non-neuronal cells, including connective tissue cells, and were rare in Schwann cells of chickens aged less than five years. Inclusions were of two different types: filamentous bundles and granulofibrillar bodies. Individual nuclei contained one to three inclusions. Pseudo-inclusions, i.e. cytoplasmic pockets invaginated into the nuclei, were found more rarely and accompanied one or both types of 'true' inclusions. The possible significance of these findings in relation to ageing phenomena is discussed. It is concluded that intranuclear inclusions appear to be a consequence of nuclear/cellular activation and may be regarded as aggregates of previously dispersed intranuclear proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Figs. 11-12 Fig. 13 Figs. 14-19 PMID:2833482

  12. The Structure of the Trabecular Meshwork, Its Connections to the Ciliary Muscle, and the Effect of Pilocarpine on Outflow Facility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Darryl R.; Bertrand, Jacques; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Stamer, W. Daniel; Lütjen-Drecoll, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the connections between the ciliary muscle (CM), trabecular meshwork (TM), and Schlemm's canal (SC) and their innervations that allows CM contraction (by pilocarpine) to influence conventional outflow in mice. Methods. Sequential sections and whole mounts of murine corneoscleral angles were stained for elastin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Elastic (EL) fibers between the CM, TM, and SC were examined in ultrathin, sequential sections from different planes. The effect of pilocarpine (100 μM) on conventional outflow facility was measured by perfusion of enucleated mouse eyes. Results. The mouse TM contains a three-dimensional (3D) net of EL fibers connecting the inner wall of SC to the cornea anteriorly, the ciliary body (CB) internally and the choroid and CM posteriorly. The CM bifurcates near the posterior TM, extending outer tendons to the juxtacanalicular tissue and inner wall of SC and internal connections to the lamellated TM and CB. Ciliary muscle and lamellated TM cells stain with αSMA and are innervated by VAChT-containing nerve fibers, without TH, VIP, or nNOS. Pilocarpine doubled outflow facility. Conclusions. Mouse eyes resemble primate eyes not only by their well developed SC and TM, but also by their 3D EL net tethering together the TM and SC inner wall and by the tendinous insertion of the CM into this net. The increase in outflow facility following cholinergic stimulation in mice, as in primates, supports using mice for studies of aqueous humor dynamics and glaucoma. PMID:24833737

  13. Chibby promotes ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during airway cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Cyge, Benjamin; Arashiro, Takeshi; Brechbuhl, Heather M; Chen, Xingwang; Siller, Saul S; Weiss, Matthew A; O'Connell, Christopher B; Love, Damon; Westlake, Christopher J; Reynolds, Susan D; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2014-10-13

    Airway multiciliated epithelial cells play crucial roles in the mucosal defense system, but their differentiation process remains poorly understood. Mice lacking the basal body component Chibby (Cby) exhibit impaired mucociliary transport caused by defective ciliogenesis, resulting in chronic airway infection. In this paper, using primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells, we show that Cby facilitates basal body docking to the apical cell membrane through proper formation of ciliary vesicles at the distal appendage during the early stages of ciliogenesis. Cby is recruited to the distal appendages of centrioles via physical interaction with the distal appendage protein CEP164. Cby then associates with the membrane trafficking machinery component Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small guanosine triphosphatase Rab8, to promote recruitment of Rab8 and efficient assembly of ciliary vesicles. Thus, our study identifies Cby as a key regulator of ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during the differentiation of airway ciliated cells.

  14. PACAP27 regulates ciliary function in primary cultures of rat brain ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Mönkkönen, K S; Mnkkönen, K S; Hirst, R A; Laitinen, J T; O'Callaghan, C

    2008-01-01

    Ependymal cells line the brain ventricles and separate the CSF from the underlying neuronal tissue. The function of ependymal cilia is largely unclear however they are reported to be involved in the regulation of CSF homeostasis and host defence against pathogens. Here we present data that implicates a role of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the inhibition of ependymal ciliary function, and also that the PACAP effects are not entirely dependent on adenylyl cyclase activation. Primary ependymal cultures were treated with increasing doses of PACAP27 or adenylyl cyclase toxin (ACT), and ciliary beating was recorded using high-speed digital video imaging. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and amplitude were determined from the videos. Ependymal CBF and ciliary amplitude were attenuated by PACAP27 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The peptide antagonist PACAP6-27 blocked PACAP27-induced decreases in amplitude and CBF. Treatment with ACT caused a decrease in amplitude but had no effect on CBF, this suggests that the inhibition of CBF and amplitude seen with PACAP27 may not be completely explained by G(s)-AC-cAMP pathway. We present here the first observational study to show that activation of PAC1 receptors with PACAP27 has an important role to play in the regulation of ependymal ciliary function.

  15. Expression of a Novel Ciliary Protein, IIIG9, During the Differentiation and Maturation of Ependymal Cells.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, M; Baeza, V; Arrabal, P M; Visser, R; Grondona, J M; Saldivia, N; Martínez, F; Nualart, F; Salazar, K

    2017-02-13

    IIIG9 is the regulatory subunit 32 of protein phosphatase 1 (PPP1R32), a key phosphatase in the regulation of ciliary movement. IIIG9 localization is restricted to cilia in the trachea, fallopian tube, and testicle, suggesting its involvement in the polarization of ciliary epithelium. In the adult brain, IIIG9 mRNA has only been detected in ciliated ependymal cells that cover the ventricular walls. In this work, we prepared a polyclonal antibody against rat IIIG9 and used this antibody to show for the first time the ciliary localization of this protein in adult ependymal cells. We demonstrated IIIG9 localization at the apical border of the ventricular wall of 17-day-old embryonic (E17) and 1-day-old postnatal (PN1) brains and at the level of ependymal cilia at 10- and 20-day-old postnatal (PN10-20) using temporospatial distribution analysis and comparing the localization with a ciliary marker. Spectral confocal and super-resolution Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) analysis allowed us to demonstrate that IIIG9 shows a punctate pattern that is preferentially located at the borders of ependymal cilia in situ and in cultures of ependymocytes obtained from adult rat brains. Finally, by immunogold ultrastructural analysis, we showed that IIIG9 is preferentially located between the axoneme and the ciliary membrane. Taken together, our data allow us to conclude that IIIG9 is localized in the cilia of adult ependymal cells and that its expression is correlated with the process of ependymal differentiation and with the maturation of radial glia. Similarly, its particular localization within ependymal cilia suggests a role of this protein in the regulation of ciliary movement.

  16. Beta 2-adrenergic regulation of ciliary beat frequency in rat bronchiolar epithelium: potentiation by isosmotic cell shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Shiima-Kinoshita, Chisa; Min, Kyong-Yob; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Mori, Hiroshi; Nakahari, Takashi

    2004-01-15

    Single bronchiolar ciliary cells were isolated from rat lungs. The beta(2)-adrenergic regulation of ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was studied using video-optical microscopy. Terbutaline (a beta(2)-adrenergic agonist) increased CBF in a dose-dependent manner, and it also decreased the volume of the ciliary cells. These terbutaline actions were inhibited by a PKA inhibitor (H-89) and mimicked by forskolin, IBMX and DBcAMP. Ion transport inhibitors were used to isosmotically manipulate the volume of the terbutaline-stimulated bronchiolar ciliary cells. Amiloride (1 microM) and bumetanide (20 microM) potentiated cell shrinkage and the CBF increase, and they shifted the terbutaline dose-response curve to the lower-concentration side. Quinidine (500 microM), in contrast, increased cell volume and suppressed the CBF increase. Moreover, a KCl solution containing amiloride (1 microM) and strophanthidin (100 microM) increased cell volume and suppressed the CBF increase, and then the subsequent removal of either amiloride or strophanthidin decreased cell volume and further increased CBF. NPPB (10 microM) or glybenclamide (200 microM) had no effect on the action of terbutaline. Thus, in terbutaline-stimulated ciliary cells, cell shrinkage enhances the CBF increase; in contrast, cell swelling suppresses it. However, the results of direct manupulation of cell volume by applying osmotic stresses (hyperosmotic shrinkage or hyposmotic swelling) were the opposite of the findings of the isosmotic experiments: hyposmotic cell swelling enhanced the CBF increase, while isosmotic swelling suppressed it. These results suggest that isosmotic and non-isosmotic volume changes in terbutaline-stimulated bronchiolar ciliary cells may trigger different signalling pathways. In conclusion, terbutaline increases CBF and decreases the volume of rat bronchiolar ciliary cells via cAMP accumulation under isosmotic conditions, and the isosmotic cell shrinkage enhances the CBF increase by increasing c

  17. [Changes in the activity of the ciliary apparatus of the cerebral aqueduct ependymal cells induced by some cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters].

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    In vitro investigation of the effect of the neurotransmitter amino acids on motile activity of the ciliary apparatus of cerebral (Sylvian) aqueduct ependymal cells in the newborn rats has shown that the addition of glutamate, GABA, glycine, and taurine to the nutrient medium induced deceleration and, finally, complete disappearance of motile activity of the ciliary apparatus. Inhibition and blocking of the ciliary activity induced by the neurotransmitters, especially by high concentrations of glutamate, indicate the existence of respective receptors on the membrane of the cerebral aqueduct ependymal cells. This involvement of the receptors was confirmed in the experiments with the preliminary introduction of ion channel blockers (ketamine, strychnine, and bicuculine) into the culture medium that resulted in the attenuation of neurotransmitter destructive effect and the prolongation of motile activity of the ciliary apparatus.

  18. Voltage-activated currents recorded from rabbit pigmented ciliary body epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Fain, G L; Farahbakhsh, N A

    1989-01-01

    1. The whole-cell recording mode of the patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the presence of voltage-activated currents in the isolated pigmented cells from the rabbit ciliary body epithelium grown in culture. 2. In Ringer solution with composition similar to that of the rabbit aqueous humour, depolarizing voltage steps activated a transient inward current and a delayed outward current, while hyperpolarization elicited an inwardly rectified current. 3. The depolarization-activated inward current was mainly carried by Na+ and was blocked by submicromolar concentrations of tetrodotoxin. This current in many cells was sufficiently large to produce a regenerative Na+ spike. 4. The depolarization-activated outward current was carried by K+ and blocked by external TEA and Ba2+. Its activation appeared to be Ca2(+)-independent. 5. The hyperpolarization-activated inward current was almost exclusively carried by K+ and was blocked by Ba2+ and Cs+. For large hyperpolarizations below -120 mV, this current exhibited a biphasic activation with a fast transient peak followed by a slower sag, that appeared to be due to K+ depletion. 6. The voltage-dependent K+ conductances probably act to stabilize the cell membrane resting potential and may also play a role in ion transport. The function of the Na(+)-dependent inward current is unclear, but it may permit the electrically coupled epithelial cells of the ciliary body to conduct propagated action potentials. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2621623

  19. Intracellular pathways regulating ciliary beating of rat brain ependymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Chin, Wei-Chun; O’Brien, Jennifer A; Verdugo, Pedro; Berger, Albert J

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian brain ventricles are lined with ciliated ependymal cells. As yet little is known about the mechanisms by which neurotransmitters regulate cilia beat frequency (CBF). Application of 5-HT to ependymal cells in cultured rat brainstem slices caused CBF to increase. 5-HT had an EC50 of 30 μM and at 100 μM attained a near-maximal CBF increase of 52.7 ± 4.1 % (mean ± s.d.) (n= 8). Bathing slices in Ca2+-free solution markedly reduced the 5-HT-mediated increase in CBF. Fluorescence measurements revealed that 5-HT caused a marked transient elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) that then slowly decreased to a plateau level. Analysis showed that the [Ca2+]c transient was due to release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores; the plateau was probably due to extracellular Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Application of ATP caused a sustained decrease in CBF. ATP had an EC50 of about 50 μM and 100 μM ATP resulted in a maximal 57.5 ± 6.5 % (n= 12) decrease in CBF. The ATP-induced decrease in CBF was unaffected by lowering extracellular [Ca2+], and no changes in [Ca2+]c were observed. Exposure of ependymal cells to forskolin caused a decrease in CBF. Ciliated ependymal cells loaded with caged cAMP exhibited a 54.3 ± 7.5 % (n= 9) decrease in CBF following uncaging. These results suggest that ATP reduces CBF by a Ca2+-independent cAMP-mediated pathway. Application of 5-HT and adenosine-5′-O-3-thiotriphosphate (ATP-γ-S) to acutely isolated ciliated ependymal cells resulted in CBF responses similar to those of ependymal cells in cultured slices suggesting that these neurotransmitters act directly on these cells. The opposite response of ciliated ependymal cells to 5-HT and ATP provides a novel mechanism for their active involvement in central nervous system signalling. PMID:11179397

  20. Does the adult human ciliary body epithelium contain "true" retinal stem cells?

    PubMed

    Frøen, Rebecca; Johnsen, Erik O; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran; Moe, Morten C

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of retinal stem cells being present in several locations of the adult eye have sparked great hopes that they may be used to treat the millions of people worldwide who suffer from blindness as a result of retinal disease or injury. A population of proliferative cells derived from the ciliary body epithelium (CE) has been considered one of the prime stem cell candidates, and as such they have received much attention in recent years. However, the true nature of these cells in the adult human eye has still not been fully elucidated, and the stem cell claim has become increasingly controversial in light of new and conflicting reports. In this paper, we will try to answer the question of whether the available evidence is strong enough for the research community to conclude that the adult human CE indeed harbors stem cells.

  1. Flagellar Synchronization Is a Simple Alternative to Cell Cycle Synchronization for Ciliary and Flagellar Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Soumita

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an ideal model organism for studies of ciliary function and assembly. In assays for biological and biochemical effects of various factors on flagellar structure and function, synchronous culture is advantageous for minimizing variability. Here, we have characterized a method in which 100% synchronization is achieved with respect to flagellar length but not with respect to the cell cycle. The method requires inducing flagellar regeneration by amputation of the entire cell population and limiting regeneration time. This results in a maximally homogeneous distribution of flagellar lengths at 3 h postamputation. We found that time-limiting new protein synthesis during flagellar synchronization limits variability in the unassembled pool of limiting flagellar protein and variability in flagellar length without affecting the range of cell volumes. We also found that long- and short-flagella mutants that regenerate normally require longer and shorter synchronization times, respectively. By minimizing flagellar length variability using a simple method requiring only hours and no changes in media, flagellar synchronization facilitates the detection of small changes in flagellar length resulting from both chemical and genetic perturbations in Chlamydomonas. This method increases our ability to probe the basic biology of ciliary size regulation and related disease etiologies. IMPORTANCE Cilia and flagella are highly conserved antenna-like organelles that found in nearly all mammalian cell types. They perform sensory and motile functions contributing to numerous physiological and developmental processes. Defects in their assembly and function are implicated in a wide range of human diseases ranging from retinal degeneration to cancer. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an algal model system for studying mammalian cilium formation and function. Here, we report a simple synchronization method that allows detection of

  2. Effects of histamine on ciliary beat frequency of ciliated cells from guinea pigs nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    An, Fengwei; Xing, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Lei

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of histamine on ciliary beat frequency (CBF) through combining high-speed digital microscopy and patch-clamp technology. Ciliated cells were obtained from septum and turbinate of 90-120-day-old healthy male guinea pigs. Tight seal was formed by applying negative pressure on the glass electrode after the drawing and pushing progress. Then, we enrolled high-speed digital microscopy to measure CBF before and after treatment with histamine of different concentrations ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-1) mol/L in Hank's solution and D-Hank's solution as well as after administrating adenosine triphosphate. One-way ANOVA, Student's t test or Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical comparisons. Glass electrode fix up ciliated cell is available at tip diameter of 2-5 μm and negative pressure of 10-20 cmH2O column. The baseline CBF in Hank's solution was higher than in D-Hank's solution. Treatment with 10(-6)-l0(-3) mol/L histamine of concentrations can stimulate a rise of CBF. Nevertheless, CBF in all groups decreased to baseline CBF within 20 min. Generally, 10(-2) mol/L histamine can stimulate a rise of CBF; meanwhile, the high concentration of histamine killed 50% ciliated cell. Histamine at 10(-1) mol/L killed all ciliated cells. Ciliary beating activity decreased in Ca(2+)-free solution. Moreover, adenosine triphosphate could increase CBF effectively after the stimulation effect of histamine. We construct an effective technology integrating patch-clamp technique with CBF measurements on ciliated cells. Extracellular histamine stimulation could increase CBF effectively.

  3. Neural stem cells in the adult ciliary epithelium express GFAP and are regulated by Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ani V.; Zhao Xing; James, Jackson; Kim, Min; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Ahmad, Iqbal . E-mail: iahmad@unmc.edu

    2006-01-13

    The identification of neural stem cells with retinal potential in the ciliary epithelium (CE) of the adult mammals is of considerable interest because of their potential for replacing or rescuing degenerating retinal neurons in disease or injury. The evaluation of such a potential requires characterization of these cells with regard to their phenotypic properties, potential, and regulatory mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that rat CE stem cells/progenitors in neurosphere culture display astrocytic nature in terms of expressing glial intermediate neurofilament protein, GFAP. The GFAP-expressing CE stem cells/progenitors form neurospheres in proliferating conditions and generate neurons when shifted to differentiating conditions. These cells express components of the canonical Wnt pathway and its activation promotes their proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activation of the canonical Wnt pathway influences neuronal differentiation of CE stem cells/progenitors in a context dependent manner. Our observations suggest that CE stem cells/progenitors share phenotypic properties and regulatory mechanism(s) with neural stem cells elsewhere in the adult CNS.

  4. Functional and Molecular Characterization of Rod-like Cells from Retinal Stem Cells Derived from the Adult Ciliary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Demontis, Gian Carlo; Aruta, Claudia; Comitato, Antonella; De Marzo, Anna; Marigo, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    In vitro generation of photoreceptors from stem cells is of great interest for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for patients affected by retinal degeneration and for high throughput drug screens for these diseases. In this study, we show unprecedented high percentages of rod-fated cells from retinal stem cells of the adult ciliary epithelium. Molecular characterization of rod-like cells demonstrates that they lose ciliary epithelial characteristics but acquire photoreceptor features. Rod maturation was evaluated at two levels: gene expression and electrophysiological functionality. Here we present a strong correlation between phototransduction protein expression and functionality of the cells in vitro. We demonstrate that in vitro generated rod-like cells express cGMP-gated channels that are gated by endogenous cGMP. We also identified voltage-gated channels necessary for rod maturation and viability. This level of analysis for the first time provides evidence that adult retinal stem cells can generate highly homogeneous rod-fated cells. PMID:22432014

  5. RARβ regulates neuronal cell death and differentiation in the avian ciliary ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Boerries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Programmed cell death during chicken ciliary ganglion (CG) development is mostly discussed as an extrinsically regulated process, guided either by the establishment of a functional balance between preganglionic and postganglionic activity or the availability of target‐derived neurotrophic factors. We found that the expression of the gene coding for the nuclear retinoic acid receptor β (RARB) is transiently upregulated prior to and during the execution phase of cell death in the CG. Using retroviral vectors, the expression of RARB was knocked down during embryonic development in ovo. The knockdown led to a significant increase in CG neuron number after the cell death phase. BrdU injections and active caspase‐3 staining revealed that this increase in neuron number was due to an inhibition of apoptosis during the normal cell death phase. Furthermore, apoptotic neuron numbers were significantly increased at a stage when cell death is normally completed. While the cholinergic phenotype of the neurons remained unchanged after RARB knockdown, the expression of the proneural gene Cash1 was increased, but somatostatin‐like immunoreactivity, a hallmark of the mature choroid neuron population, was decreased. Taken together, these results point toward a delay in neuronal differentiation as well as cell death. The availability of nuclear retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) and RARβ‐induced transcription of genes could therefore be a new intrinsic cue for the maturation of CG neurons and their predisposition to undergo cell death. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1204–1218, 2015 PMID:25663354

  6. The ciliary margin zone of the mammalian retina generates retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Florencia; Murcia-Belmonte, Veronica; Coca, Yaiza; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Wang, Qing; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Khalid, Sania; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Herrera, Eloisa; Mason, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Summary The retina of lower vertebrates grows continuously by integrating new neurons generated from progenitors in the ciliary margin zone (CMZ). Whether the mammalian CMZ provides the neural retina with retinal cells is controversial. Live-imaging of embryonic retina expressing eGFP in the CMZ shows that cells migrate laterally from the CMZ to the neural retina where differentiated retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) reside. As Cyclin D2, a cell-cycle regulator, is enriched in ventral CMZ, we analyzed Cyclin D2−/− mice to test whether the CMZ is a source of retinal cells. Neurogenesis is diminished in Cyclin D2 mutants, leading to a reduction of RGCs in the ventral retina. In line with these findings, in the albino retina, the decreased production of ipsilateral RGCs is correlated with fewer Cyclin D2+ cells. Together, these results implicate the mammalian CMZ as a neurogenic site that produces RGCs and whose proper generation depends on Cyclin D2 activity. PMID:28009286

  7. Using myc genes to search for stem cells in the ciliary margin of the Xenopus retina.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao Yan; Harris, William A

    2012-04-01

    The ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) of fish and frog retinas contains cells that proliferate throughout postembryonic development as the retina grows with increasing body size, indicating the presence of stem cells in this region. However, neither the location nor the molecular identity of retinal stem cells has been identified. Here, we show in Xenopus that c-myc and n-myc are sequentially expressed both during development and in the post-embryonic retina. The c-myc+/n-myc- cells near the extreme periphery of the CMZ cycle more slowly and preferentially retain DNA label compared to their more central cmyc+/n-myc+ neighbors which cycle rapidly and preferentially dilute DNA label. During retinal development c-myc is functionally required earlier than n-myc, and n-myc expression depends on earlier c-myc expression. The expression of c-myc but not n-myc in the CMZ depends on growth factor signaling. Our results suggest that c-myc+/n-myc- cells in the far peripheral CMZ are candidates for a niche-dependent population of retinal stem cells that give rise to more centrally located and rapidly dividing n-myc+ progenitors of more limited proliferative potential. Analysis of homologues of these genes in the zebrafish CMZ suggests that the transition from c-myc to n-myc expression might be conserved in other lower vertebrates whose retinas growth throughout life.

  8. Differential volume regulation and calcium signaling in two ciliary body cell types is subserved by TRPV4 channels

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Andrew O.; Lakk, Monika; Frye, Amber M.; Phuong, Tam T. T.; Redmon, Sarah N.; Roberts, Robin; Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Yarishkin, Oleg; Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    Fluid secretion by the ciliary body plays a critical and irreplaceable function in vertebrate vision by providing nutritive support to the cornea and lens, and by maintaining intraocular pressure. Here, we identify TRPV4 (transient receptor potential vanilloid isoform 4) channels as key osmosensors in nonpigmented epithelial (NPE) cells of the mouse ciliary body. Hypotonic swelling and the selective agonist GSK1016790A (EC50 ∼33 nM) induced sustained transmembrane cation currents and cytosolic [Ca2+]i elevations in dissociated and intact NPE cells. Swelling had no effect on [Ca2+]i levels in pigment epithelial (PE) cells, whereas depolarization evoked [Ca2+]i elevations in both NPE and PE cells. Swelling-evoked [Ca2+]i signals were inhibited by the TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 (IC50 ∼0.9 μM) and were absent in Trpv4−/− NPE. In NPE, but not PE, swelling-induced [Ca2+]i signals required phospholipase A2 activation. TRPV4 localization to NPE was confirmed with immunolocalization and excitation mapping approaches, whereas in vivo MRI analysis confirmed TRPV4-mediated signals in the intact mouse ciliary body. Trpv2 and Trpv4 were the most abundant vanilloid transcripts in CB. Overall, our results support a model whereby TRPV4 differentially regulates cell volume, lipid, and calcium signals in NPE and PE cell types and therefore represents a potential target for antiglaucoma medications. PMID:27006502

  9. Chibby functions to preserve normal ciliary morphology through the regulation of intraflagellar transport in airway ciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Siller, Saul S; Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Airway cilia provide the coordinated motive force for mucociliary transport, which prevents the accumulation of mucus, debris, pollutants, and bacteria in our respiratory tracts. As airway cilia are constantly exposed to the environment and, hence, are an integral component of the pathogenesis of several congenital and chronic pulmonary disorders, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms that control ciliated cell differentiation and ciliogenesis. We have previously reported that loss of the basal body protein Chibby (Cby) results in chronic upper airway infection in mice due to a significant reduction in the number of airway cilia. In the present work, we demonstrate that Cby is required for normal ciliary structure and proper distribution of proteins involved in the bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT) system, which consists of 2 distinct sub-complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, and is essential for ciliary biogenesis and maintenance. In fully differentiated ciliated cells, abnormal paddle-like cilia with dilated ciliary tips are observed in Cby-/- airways and primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs). In addition, IFT88, an IFT-B sub-complex protein, robustly accumulates within the dilated tips of both multicilia in Cby-/- MTECs and primary cilia in Cby-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Furthermore, we show that only IFT-B components, including IFT20 and IFT57, but not IFT-A and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins, amass with IFT88 in these distended tips in Cby-/- ciliated cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that Cby plays a role in the proper distribution of IFT particles to preserve normal ciliary morphology in airway ciliated cells.

  10. Synergetic effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and olfactory ensheathing cells on optic nerve reparation (complete translation)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Dan-ping; Chen, Qing-ying; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    At present, there is no effective treatment for the repair of the optic nerve after injury, or improvement of its microenvironment for regeneration. Intravitreally injected ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) promote the long-distance regrowth of severed optic nerve fibers after intracranial injury. Here, we examined the efficacy of these techniques alone and in combination, in a rat model of optic nerve injury. We injected condensed OEC suspension at the site of injury, or CNTF into the vitreous body, or both simultaneously. Retrograde tracing techniques showed that 4 weeks postoperatively, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells and their axonal density in the optic nerve were greater in rats subjected to OEC injection only than in those receiving CNTF injection only. Furthermore, combined OEC + CNTF injection achieved better results than either monotherapy. These findings confirm that OECs are better than CNTF at protecting injured neurons in the eye, but that combined OEC and CNTF therapy is notably more effective than either treatment alone. PMID:27482233

  11. Reduced Ciliary Polycystin-2 in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients with PKD1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.; Lam, Albert Q.; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Iatrino, Rossella; Su, Xuefeng; Koon, Sarah J.; Wu, Maoqing; Daheron, Laurence; Harris, Peter C.; Zhou, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in PKD1 or PKD2, which encode polycystin-1 (PC1) and polycystin-2 (PC2), respectively, cause autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD), whereas mutations in PKHD1, which encodes fibrocystin/polyductin (FPC), cause autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD). However, the relationship between these proteins and the pathogenesis of PKD remains unclear. To model PKD in human cells, we established induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from fibroblasts of three ADPKD and two ARPKD patients. Genetic sequencing revealed unique heterozygous mutations in PKD1 of the parental ADPKD fibroblasts but no pathogenic mutations in PKD2. Undifferentiated PKD iPS cells, control iPS cells, and embryonic stem cells elaborated primary cilia and expressed PC1, PC2, and FPC at similar levels, and PKD and control iPS cells exhibited comparable rates of proliferation, apoptosis, and ciliogenesis. However, ADPKD iPS cells as well as somatic epithelial cells and hepatoblasts/biliary precursors differentiated from these cells expressed lower levels of PC2 at the cilium. Additional sequencing confirmed the retention of PKD1 heterozygous mutations in iPS cell lines from two patients but identified possible loss of heterozygosity in iPS cell lines from one patient. Furthermore, ectopic expression of wild-type PC1 in ADPKD iPS-derived hepatoblasts rescued ciliary PC2 protein expression levels, and overexpression of PC1 but not a carboxy-terminal truncation mutant increased ciliary PC2 expression levels in mouse kidney cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PC1 regulates ciliary PC2 protein expression levels and support the use of PKD iPS cells for investigating disease pathophysiology. PMID:24009235

  12. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  13. Untangling ciliary access and enrichment of two rhodopsin-like receptors using quantitative fluorescence microscopy reveals cell-specific sorting pathways.

    PubMed

    Geneva, Ivayla I; Tan, Han Yen; Calvert, Peter D

    2017-02-15

    Resolution limitations of optical systems are major obstacles for determining whether proteins are enriched within cell compartments. Here we use an approach to determine the degree of membrane protein ciliary enrichment that quantitatively accounts for the differences in sampling of the ciliary and apical membranes inherent to confocal microscopes. Theory shows that cilia will appear more than threefold brighter than the surrounding apical membrane when the densities of fluorescently labeled proteins are the same, thus providing a benchmark for ciliary enrichment. Using this benchmark, we examined the ciliary enrichment signals of two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)-the somatostatin receptor 3 and rhodopsin. Remarkably, we found that the C-terminal VxPx motif, required for efficient enrichment of rhodopsin within rod photoreceptor sensory cilia, inhibited enrichment of the somatostatin receptor in primary cilia. Similarly, VxPx inhibited primary cilium enrichment of a chimera of rhodopsin and somatostatin receptor 3, where the dual Ax(S/A)xQ ciliary targeting motifs within the third intracellular loop of the somatostatin receptor replaced the third intracellular loop of rhodopsin. Rhodopsin was depleted from primary cilia but gained access, without being enriched, with the dual Ax(S/A)xQ motifs. Ciliary enrichment of these GPCRs thus operates via distinct mechanisms in different cells.

  14. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  15. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  16. The organic mercury compounds, methylmercury and ethylmercury, inhibited ciliary movement of ventricular ependymal cells in the mouse brain around the concentrations reported for human poisoning.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Shinsaku; Kanchika, Takuya; Hagiwara, Teruki; Minami, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    Functions of the nervous system are supported by the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is driven by the ciliary beating of ventricular ependymal cells. The aim of the present study was to examine whether methylmercury (MeHg), a substance with potent neurotoxicity in humans, affects the ciliary movement. The effects of another organic mercury compound, ethylmercury (EtHg), were also assessed for comparison. Toxicity of MeHg or EtHg was evaluated by measuring alterations in the ciliary beat frequency of ependymal cells lining the third ventricle of mouse brain slices. The obtained results were: (1) Both MeHg and EtHg started to inhibit ciliary motility between 1 and 3μM, the reported threshold limit of MeHg in humans. (2) An abrupt increase was observed in the inhibitory curves from 3 to 6μM for MeHg and EtHg. (3) The "give-in" concentration, i.e., concentration at which the cilia lose the ability to recover, for MeHg and EtHg was 6μM and 12μM, respectively. (4) Ciliary beating was irreversibly halted by MeHg and EtHg at concentrations above 12μM and 30μM, respectively. (5) The estimated half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for MeHg and EtHg was 5.53μM and 5.80μM, respectively. Based on these findings, we conclude that: (a) Ependymal cell cilia movement in mice was inhibited by MeHg in a concentration-dependent manner around concentrations reported to cause poisoning in humans; EtHg inhibited ciliary motility to a less extent. (b) Inhibition of CSF flow by suppression of ciliary movement is suggested to be an additional route for MeHg poisoning in humans, especially in prenatal exposure than in adult exposure.

  17. The ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin are required for retinoic acid-dependent neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Romani, Sveva; Illi, Barbara; De Mori, Roberta; Savino, Mauro; Gleeson, Joseph G; Valente, Enza Maria

    2014-01-01

    The dysfunction of the primary cilium, a complex, evolutionarily conserved, organelle playing an important role in sensing and transducing cell signals, is the unifying pathogenetic mechanism of a growing number of diseases collectively termed "ciliopathies", typically characterized by multiorgan involvement. Developmental defects of the central nervous system (CNS) characterize a subset of ciliopathies showing clinical and genetic overlap, such as Joubert syndrome (JS) and Meckel syndrome (MS). Although several knock-out mice lacking a variety of ciliary proteins have shown the importance of primary cilia in the development of the brain and CNS-derived structures, developmental in vitro studies, extremely useful to unravel the role of primary cilia along the course of neural differentiation, are still missing. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) have been recently proven to mimic brain development, giving the unique opportunity to dissect the CNS differentiation process along its sequential steps. In the present study we show that mESCs express the ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin in a developmentally-regulated manner, and that these proteins co-localize with acetylated tubulin labeled cilia located at the outer embryonic layer. Further, mESCs differentiating along the neuronal lineage activate the cilia-dependent sonic hedgehog signaling machinery, which is impaired in Meckelin knock-out cells but results unaffected in Jouberin-deficient mESCs. However, both lose the ability to acquire a neuronal phenotype. Altogether, these results demonstrate a pivotal role of Meckelin and Jouberin during embryonic neural specification and indicate mESCs as a suitable tool to investigate the developmental impact of ciliary proteins dysfunction.

  18. The ciliary transition zone functions in cell adhesion but is dispensable for axoneme assembly in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, Clementine; Serwas, Daniel; Palfy, Mate; Dammermann, Alexander

    2015-07-06

    Cilia are cellular projections that perform sensory and motile functions. A key ciliary subdomain is the transition zone, which lies between basal body and axoneme. Previous work in Caenorhabditis elegans identified two ciliopathy-associated protein complexes or modules that direct assembly of transition zone Y-links. Here, we identify C. elegans CEP290 as a component of a third module required to form an inner scaffolding structure called the central cylinder. Co-inhibition of all three modules completely disrupted transition zone structure. Surprisingly, axoneme assembly was only mildly perturbed. However, dendrite extension by retrograde migration was strongly impaired, revealing an unexpected role for the transition zone in cell adhesion.

  19. Purinergically induced membrane fluidization in ciliary cells: characterization and control by calcium and membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Alfahel, E; Korngreen, A; Parola, A H; Priel, Z

    1996-02-01

    To examine the role of membrane dynamics in transmembrane signal transduction, we studied changes in membrane fluidity in mucociliary tissues from frog palate and esophagus epithelia stimulated by extracellular ATP. Micromolar concentrations of ATP induced strong changes in fluorescence polarization, possibly indicating membrane fluidization. This effect was dosage dependent, reaching a maximum at 10-microM ATP. It was dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (or Mg2+), though it was insensitive to inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels. It was inhibited by thapsigargin and by ionomycin (at low extracellular Ca2+ concentration), both of which deplete Ca2+ stores. It was inhibited by the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors quinidine, charybdotoxin, and apamine and was reduced considerably by replacement of extracellular Na+ with K+. Hyperpolarization, or depolarization, of the mucociliary membrane induced membrane fluidization. The degree of membrane fluidization depended on the degree of hyperpolarization or depolarization of the ciliary membrane potential and was considerably lower than the effect induced by extracellular ATP. These results indicate that appreciable membrane fluidization induced by extracellular ATP depends both on an increase in intracellular Ca2+, mainly from its internal stores, and on hyperpolarization of the membrane. Calcium-dependent potassium channels couple the two effects. In light of recent results on the enhancement of ciliary beat frequency, it would appear that extracellular ATP-induced changes both in ciliary beat frequency and in membrane fluidity are triggered by similar signal transduction pathways.

  20. [Specific features of centriole formation and ciliogenesis in ciliary epithelium cells of respiratory tracts in patients with Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Domaratskiĭ, K E; Uvakina, E V; Volkov, I K; Onishchenko, G E

    2005-01-01

    An electron microscopic study of the ciliary epithelium of respiratory tracts was carried out in children (members of the same family) with Kartagener syndrome, which is a variant of ciliary dyskinesia. It was shown that in the case of both mobile cilia and ciliary dyskinesia in man, centrioles are formed during formation of the ciliary basal bodies predominantly de novo, involving deuterosomes. A wide spectrum of pathological changes was described in literature, such as the absence of dynein arms in the axoneme and disorganization of axoneme structure. In addition to these changes in the ciliary system, we found integration of several ciliary axonemes by the same plasma membrane, running of microtubules from the plasma membrane as bundles, different orientation of basal legs, etc.

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin-presence in the ciliary body of eye in the pig (sus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Valentino, B; Valentino, A; Lipari, L; Lipari, A; Farina, E

    2014-01-01

    The aqueous humor is produced in the ciliary body, therefore in this study we investigated the Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP)-presence in the ciliary body of the pig eye since these peptide are involved in the homeostasis of body fluids. The results show ANP-presence in the epithelial cells and in the endothelial cells of the blood vessels and VP-presence in the epithelial cells, in the endothelium of canal of Schelmm and in the muscle cells of the blood vessels. These peptides might regulate the synthesis and the composition of the aqueous humor and regulate the hydrodynamic flow and haemodynamic flow of the blood.

  2. The ciliary GTPase Arl13b regulates cell migration and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Pruski, Michal; Rajnicek, Ann; Yang, Zhifu; Clancy, Hannah; Ding, Yu-Qiang; McCaig, Colin D.; Lang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The GTPase ARL13B is localized to primary cilia; small cellular protrusions that act as antennae. Its defective ARL13B hennin (HNN) variant is linked causally with Joubert Syndrome, a developmental ciliopathy attributed to poor sensing of extracellular chemical gradients. We tested the hypothesis that impaired detection of extracellular voltage gradients also contributes to the HNN phenotype. In vitro, extracellular electric fields stimulated migration of wild type (WT) and HNN fibroblasts toward the cathode but the field only increased the migration speed of WT cells. Cilia on WT cells did not align to the field vector. HNN cells divided more slowly than WT cells, arresting at the G2/M phase. Mechanistically, HNN cells had reduced phospho-ERK1/2 signaling and elevated levels of Suppressor of Fused protein. These suggest that cells may not be able to read extracellular chemical cues appropriately, resulting in deficits in cell migration and proliferation. Finally, an increase in tubulin stabilization (more detyrosinated tubulin) confirmed the general stagnation of HNN cells, which may further contribute to slower migration and cell cycle progression. We conclude that Arl13b dysfunction resulted in HNN cell stagnation due to poor growth factor signaling and impaired detection of extracellular electrical gradients, and that the role of Arl13b in cell proliferation may be understated. PMID:26963749

  3. Ciliary ultrastructure of polyplacophorans (Mollusca, Amphineura, Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Lundin, K; Schander, C

    2001-01-01

    This study is part of a series of papers aiming to investigate the phylogenetic significance of ciliary ultrastructure among molluscs and to test the hypothesis of a relationship between Xenoturbella and the molluscs. The ultrastructure of the ciliary apparatus on the gills of the polyplacophorans Leptochiton asellus and Tonicella rubra was studied. The gill cilia of the two species are similar in shape. The free part of the cilium is long with a slender distal part. There are two ciliary rootlets. One of them is short, broad and placed on the anterior face of the basal body. The other rootlet is conical and has a vertical orientation. Among the mollusca, two ciliary rootlets in the ciliary apparatus of multiciliate ectodermal cells have only been reported from the Chaetodermomorpha and Neomeniomorpha. This character state is likely plesiomorphic for the Mollusca and indicates a basal (nonderived) position of these taxa among the molluscs. No possible synapomorphic character with Xenoturbella bocki was found.

  4. Flagellar cells and ciliary cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Lacy, E R; Luciano, L; Reale, E

    1989-01-01

    Flagella or cilia are present on most epithelial cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranch fishes (little skate, spiny dogfish, smooth dogfish, Atlantic sharpnose, scalloped hammerhead, cow-nosed ray). Flagellar cells, those with numerous flagella ordered in one, two, or more rows on the luminal surface, are shown here for the first time in a vertebrate. The flagellar cells are intercalated among other epithelial cells, each bearing a single cilium, from Bowman's capsule to the third subdivision of the intermediate segment of the nephron. The flagella form undulated ribbons up to 55 microns long. In every ribbon the axis of the central pair of microtubules in the axoneme is oriented parallel to the long axis of the flagellar row. This suggests a beat perpendicular to these two axes. The arrangement of the flagella in ribbons most likely promotes movement of glomerular filtrate down the renal tubule. Cells bearing numerous cilia occur in the large collecting ducts of spiny dogfish but without apparent preferential orientation of the cilia.

  5. Satellite cells: the architects of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is attributed to the resident muscle stem cell termed satellite cell. Satellite cells are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration as they ultimately provide the myogenic precursors that rebuild damaged muscle tissue. Satellite cells characteristically are a heterogeneous population of stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Delineation of cellular hierarchy and understanding how lineage fate choices are determined within the satellite cell population will be invaluable for the advancement of muscle regenerative therapies.

  6. Structural Studies of Ciliary Components

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Naoko; Taschner, Michael; Engel, Benjamin D.; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, where they serve important functions in motility, sensory reception, and signaling. Recent advances in electron tomography have facilitated a number of ultrastructural studies of ciliary components that have significantly improved our knowledge of cilium architecture. These studies have produced nanometer‐resolution structures of axonemal dynein complexes, microtubule doublets and triplets, basal bodies, radial spokes, and nexin complexes. In addition to these electron tomography studies, several recently published crystal structures provide insights into the architecture and mechanism of dynein as well as the centriolar protein SAS-6, important for establishing the 9-fold symmetry of centrioles. Ciliary assembly requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process that moves macromolecules between the tip of the cilium and the cell body. IFT relies on a large 20-subunit protein complex that is thought to mediate the contacts between ciliary motor and cargo proteins. Structural investigations of IFT complexes are starting to emerge, including the first three‐dimensional models of IFT material in situ, revealing how IFT particles organize into larger train-like arrays, and the high-resolution structure of the IFT25/27 subcomplex. In this review, we cover recent advances in the structural and mechanistic understanding of ciliary components and IFT complexes. PMID:22683354

  7. The Ciliary Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Rajat; Snell, William J

    2010-01-01

    Cilia and flagella function as important organizing centers for signaling in both development and disease. A key to their function is a poorly characterized functional barrier at their base that allows the protein and lipid composition of the ciliary membrane to be distinct from that of the plasma membrane. We review current models on the biogenesis of the ciliary membrane, highlighting several structures, including the ciliary necklace and ciliary pocket, that appear during biogenesis and that likely contribute to the barrier. The regulated movement of membrane proteins and lipids across this barrier is central to the sensory function of these organelles. PMID:20399632

  8. Distribution of Müller stem cells within the neural retina: evidence for the existence of a ciliary margin-like zone in the adult human eye.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Bhairavi; Singhal, Shweta; Lawrence, Jean M; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, G Astrid

    2009-09-01

    Much interest has been generated by the identification of neural stem cells in the human neural retina and ciliary body. However, it is not clear whether stem cells identified in these ocular compartments are of the same origin or whether they ontogenically derive from different cell populations. This study examined the in situ anatomical distribution of these cells within the neural retina and ciliary body, as well as their ability to proliferate in response to EGF. Human retinae and ciliary body were examined for co-expression of Nestin, cellular retinaldehyde binding (CRALBP) or Vimentin, and the stem cell markers SOX2, CHX10, NOTCH1 and SHH. Retinal explants were cultured with epidermal growth factor (EGF) to assess retinal cell proliferation. Intense Nestin and CRALBP staining was observed in the neural retinal margin, where cells formed bundles of spindle cells (resembling glial cells) that lacked lamination and co-stained for SOX2, CHX10 and SHH. This staining differentiated the neural retina from the ciliary epithelium, which expressed SOX2, CHX10 and NOTCH1 but not Nestin or CRALBP. Nestin and CRALBP expression decreased towards the posterior retina, where it anatomically identified a population of Müller glia. All Vimentin positive Müller glia co-stained for SOX2, but only few Vimentin positive cells expressed Nestin and SOX2. Cells of the retinal margin and the inner nuclear layer (INL), where the soma of Müller glia predominate, re-entered the cell cycle upon retinal explant culture with EGF. Lack of lamination and abundance of Müller glia expressing stem cell markers in the marginal region of the adult human retina resemble the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) of fish and amphibians. The findings that cells in this CM-like zone, as well in the inner nuclear layer proliferate in response to EGF suggest that the adult human retina has regenerative potential. Identification of factors that may promote retinal regeneration in the adult human eye would

  9. A comparison of epithelial and neural properties in progenitor cells derived from the adult human ciliary body and brain.

    PubMed

    Moe, Morten C; Kolberg, Rebecca S; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Olstorn, Havard; Varghese, Mercy; Langmoen, Iver A; Nicolaissen, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Cells isolated from the ciliary body (CB) of the adult human eye possess properties of retinal stem/progenitor cells and can be propagated as spheres in culture. As these cells are isolated from a non-neural epithelium which has neuroepithelial origin, they may have both epithelial and neural lineages. Since it is the properties of neural progenitor cells that are sought after in a future scenario of autotransplantation, we wanted to directly compare human CB spheres with neurospheres derived from the human subventricular zone (SVZ), which is the best characterized neural stem cell niche in the CNS of adults. The CB epithelium was dissected from donor eyes (n = 8). Biopsies from the ventricular wall were harvested during neurosurgery due to epilepsy (n = 7). CB and SVZ tissue were also isolated from Brown Norwegian rats. Dissociated single cells were cultivated in a sphere-promoting medium and passaged every 10-30 days. Fixed spheres were studied by immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and scanning/transmission electron microscopy. We found that both CB and SVZ spheres contained a mixed population of cells embedded in extracellular matrix. CB spheres, in contrast to SVZ neurospheres, contained pigmented cells with epithelial morphology that stained for cytokeratins (3/12 + 19), were connected through desmosomes and tight-junctions and produced PEDF. Markers of neural progenitors (nestin, Sox-2, GFAP) were significantly lower expressed in human CB compared to SVZ spheres, and nestin positive cells in the CB spheres also contained pigment. There was higher expression of EGF and TGF-beta receptors in human CB spheres, and a comparative greater activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. These results indicate that adult human CB spheres contain progenitor cells with epithelial properties and limited expression of neural progenitor markers compared to CNS neurospheres. Further studies mapping the regulation between epithelial and neural properties in the adult human

  10. Development of the ciliary body: morphological changes in the distal portion of the optic cup in the human.

    PubMed

    Peces-Peña, M D; de la Cuadra-Blanco, C; Vicente, A; Mérida-Velasco, J R

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the main events that occur in the development of the ciliary body (CB) in the 5-14th week of development. The CB develops from the distal portion of the optic cup (OC) and the neighboring mesenchyme. During the 5th week of development, 4 zones were observed in the distal portion of the OC: in zone 1, the epithelia of the outer and inner layers of the OC came into contact. This contact coincided with the appearance of mainly apical granule pigments. This zone corresponded to the anlage of the epithelial layers of the CB. In zone 2, the cells surrounded the marginal sinus and contained scarce pigment granules and nuclei in the basal position. This zone corresponded to the anlage of the iris. Zone 3 was triangular in shape and its vertex ran towards the marginal sinus and corresponded to common cell progenitors. Zone 4 corresponded to the retinal pigment epithelium anlage and the neural retina anlage. We determined the onset of the stroma and the ciliary muscle anlage at the end of the 7th week. In the 13-14th week, we observed the anlage of the orbicularis ciliaris (pars plana of the CB) and corona ciliaris (pars plicata of the CB), in addition to the anlage of the ciliary muscle. Our study, therefore, establishes a precise timetable of the development of the CB.

  11. Tetrahymena IFT122A is not essential for cilia assembly but plays a role in returning IFT proteins from the ciliary tip to the cell body.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Che-Chia; Gorovsky, Martin A

    2008-02-15

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) moves multiple protein particles composed of two biochemically distinct complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, bi-directionally within cilia and is essential for cilia assembly and maintenance. We identified an ORF from the Tetrahymena macronuclear genome sequence, encoding IFT122A, an ortholog of an IFT-A complex protein. Tetrahymena IFT122A is induced during cilia regeneration, and epitope-tagged Ift122Ap could be detected in isolated cilia. IFT122A knockout cells still assembled cilia, albeit with lower efficiency, and could regenerate amputated cilia. Ift172p and Ift88p, two IFT-B complex proteins that localized mainly to basal bodies and along the cilia in wild-type cells, became preferentially enriched at the ciliary tips in IFT122A knockout cells. Our results indicate that Tetrahymena IFT122A is not required for anterograde transport-dependent ciliary assembly but plays a role in returning IFT proteins from the ciliary tip to the cell body.

  12. Intraocular elevation of cyclic AMP potentiates ciliary neurotrophic factor-induced regeneration of adult rat retinal ganglion cell axons.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qi; Yip, Henry K; Zhao, Robert C H; So, Kwok-Fai; Harvey, Alan R

    2003-01-01

    In vitro, cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevation alters neuronal responsiveness to diffusible growth factors and myelin-associated inhibitory molecules. Here we used an established in vivo model of adult central nervous system injury to investigate the effects of elevated cAMP on neuronal survival and axonal regeneration. We studied the effects of intraocular injections of neurotrophic factors and/or a cAMP analogue (CPT-cAMP) on the regeneration of axotomized rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons into peripheral nerve autografts. Elevation of cAMP alone did not significantly increase RGC survival or the number of regenerating RGCs. Ciliary neurotrophic factor increased RGC viability and axonal regrowth, the latter effect substantially enhanced by coapplication with CPT-cAMP. Under these conditions over 60% of surviving RGCs regenerated their axons. Neurotrophin-4/5 injections also increased RGC viability, but there was reduced long-distance axonal regrowth into grafts, an effect partially ameliorated by cAMP elevation. Thus, cAMP can act cooperatively with appropriate neurotrophic factors to promote axonal regeneration in the injured adult mammalian central nervous system.

  13. Mechanisms of GABA- and glycine-induced increases of cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations in chick embryo ciliary ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, M; Rhee, J S; Shimura, M; Akaike, N

    1997-08-01

    We used fura-2 microfluorometry and the gramicidin-perforated patch clamp technique in an attempt to clarify the mechanisms underlying the GABA- and glycine-induced increases in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]in) in acutely isolated chick embryo ciliary ganglion neurons. GABA, glycine, and isoguvacine, but not baclofen, increased [Ca]in in a dose- and a Ca2+-dependent manner. The GABA-induced [Ca]in increase was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin, and potentiated by pentobarbital, flunitrazepam, and alphaxalone, whereas the glycine-induced [Ca]in increase was inhibited by strychnine but not by bicuculline or picrotoxin. L- and N-type Ca2+ channel blockers inhibited the GABA- and glycine-induced [Ca]in increases, whereas Bay K-8644 potentiated these responses. These responses were also substantially potentiated by blockers of various K+ channels and by lowering the external Cl- concentrations. The high KCI- and nicotine-induced [Ca]in increases were substantially reduced during continuous stimulation with either 2 microM GABA or 1 mM glycine. Electrophysiological studies indicated that the reversal potential of the GABA-induced current exhibited a more depolarized value than the resting membrane potential in 17 of the 25 cells examined. Taken together, these results suggest that both GABA and glycine depolarize the membrane potentials by increasing Cl- conductance via respective receptors and thus increase the Ca2+ influxes through L- and N-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels.

  14. Recessive NEK9 mutation causes a lethal skeletal dysplasia with evidence of cell cycle and ciliary defects.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jillian P; Brennan, Kieran; Scheidel, Noemie; McGettigan, Paul; Lavin, Paul T; Carter, Stephen; Ennis, Sean; Dorkins, Huw; Ghali, Neeti; Blacque, Oliver E; Mc Gee, Margaret M; Murphy, Helen; Lynch, Sally Ann

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of bone and cartilage disorders. Whilst >450 skeletal dysplasias have been reported, 30% are genetically uncharacterized. We report two Irish Traveller families with a previously undescribed lethal skeletal dysplasia characterized by fetal akinesia, shortening of all long bones, multiple contractures, rib anomalies, thoracic dysplasia, pulmonary hypoplasia and protruding abdomen. Single nucleotide polymorphism homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous stop-gain mutation in NEK9 (c.1489C>T; p.Arg497*) as the cause of this disorder. NEK9 encodes a never in mitosis gene A-related kinase involved in regulating spindle organization, chromosome alignment, cytokinesis and cell cycle progression. This is the first disorder to be associated with NEK9 in humans. Analysis of NEK9 protein expression and localization in patient fibroblasts showed complete loss of full-length NEK9 (107 kDa). Functional characterization of patient fibroblasts showed a significant reduction in cell proliferation and a delay in cell cycle progression. We also provide evidence to support possible ciliary associations for NEK9. Firstly, patient fibroblasts displayed a significant reduction in cilia number and length. Secondly, we show that the NEK9 orthologue in Caenorhabditis elegans, nekl-1, is almost exclusively expressed in a subset of ciliated cells, a strong indicator of cilia-related functions. In summary, we report the clinical and molecular characterization of a lethal skeletal dysplasia caused by NEK9 mutation and suggest that this disorder may represent a novel ciliopathy.

  15. Characterization of a putative acetylcholine receptor in chick ciliary ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Stollberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the main immunogenic region on the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptors in muscle and electric organ recognize membrane components in chick brain and ciliary ganglia that are candidates for the neuronal receptor. The component in chick brain has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. It specifically binds nicotine but not alpha-bungarotoxin, and can be affinity labeled with (/sup 3/H)bromoacetylcholine. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is concentrated in synaptic membrane, and can be modulated by exposure of the cells to cholinergic ligands in culture. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is an integral membrane component that binds concanavalin A, and it is distinct from the alpha-bungarotoxin binding component. The acetylcholine receptor function in these neurons can be locked by affinity alkylation with bromoacetylcholine, indicating similarity in this respect to receptors from muscle and electric organ. Antisera raised against the partially purified component from chick brain also block receptor function on ciliary ganglion neurons. The subcellular distribution of the ganglion component in culture is assessed, and it is shown that approximately 2/3 of the cross-reacting components are intracellular; the majority of these seem not to be destined for insertion into the plasma membrane.

  16. Repairing skeletal muscle: regenerative potential of skeletal muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dellavalle, Arianna; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Messina, Graziella; Cossu, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle damaged by injury or by degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy is able to regenerate new muscle fibers. Regeneration mainly depends upon satellite cells, myogenic progenitors localized between the basal lamina and the muscle fiber membrane. However, other cell types outside the basal lamina, such as pericytes, also have myogenic potency. Here, we discuss the main properties of satellite cells and other myogenic progenitors as well as recent efforts to obtain myogenic cells from pluripotent stem cells for patient-tailored cell therapy. Clinical trials utilizing these cells to treat muscular dystrophies, heart failure, and stress urinary incontinence are also briefly outlined. PMID:20051632

  17. Ciliary neurotrophic factor delivered by encapsulated cell intraocular implants for treatment of geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kang; Hopkins, Jill J.; Heier, Jeffrey S.; Birch, David G.; Halperin, Lawrence S.; Albini, Thomas A.; Brown, David M.; Jaffe, Glenn J.; Tao, Weng; Williams, George A.

    2011-01-01

    There is no treatment available for vision loss associated with advanced dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or geographic atrophy (GA). In a pilot, proof of concept phase 2 study, we evaluated ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) delivered via an intraocular encapsulated cell technology implant for the treatment of GA. We designed a multicenter, 1-y, double-masked, sham-controlled dose-ranging study. Patients with GA were randomly assigned to receive a high-or low-dose implant or sham surgery. The primary endpoint was the change in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 12 mo. CNTF treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in retinal thickness. This change was followed by visual acuity stabilization (loss of less than 15 letters) in the high-dose group (96.3%) compared with low-dose (83.3%) and sham (75%) group. A subgroup analysis of those with baseline BCVA at 20/63 or better revealed that 100% of patients in the high-dose group lost <15 letters compared with 55.6% in the combined low-dose/sham group (P = 0.033). There was a 0.8 mean letter gain in the high-dose group compared with a 9.7 mean letter loss in the combined low-dose/sham group (P = 0.0315). Both the implant and the implant procedure were well-tolerated. These findings suggest that CNTF delivered by the encapsulated cell technology implant appears to slow the progression of vision loss in GA, especially in eyes with 20/63 or better vision at baseline. PMID:21444807

  18. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  19. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  20. The ciliary cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Schrøder, Jacob M; Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren T

    2012-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are surface-exposed, finger-like organelles whose core consists of a microtubule (MT)-based axoneme that grows from a modified centriole, the basal body. Cilia are found on the surface of many eukaryotic cells and play important roles in cell motility and in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, and tissue homeostasis. Defective cilia have been linked to a number of developmental disorders and diseases, collectively called ciliopathies. Cilia are dynamic organelles that assemble and disassemble in tight coordination with the cell cycle. In most cells, cilia are assembled during growth arrest in a multistep process involving interaction of vesicles with appendages present on the distal end of mature centrioles, and addition of tubulin and other building blocks to the distal tip of the basal body and growing axoneme; these building blocks are sorted through a region at the cilium base known as the ciliary necklace, and then transported via intraflagellar transport (IFT) along the axoneme toward the tip for assembly. After assembly, the cilium frequently continues to turn over and incorporate tubulin at its distal end in an IFT-dependent manner. Prior to cell division, the cilia are usually resorbed to liberate centrosomes for mitotic spindle pole formation. Here, we present an overview of the main cytoskeletal structures associated with cilia and centrioles with emphasis on the MT-associated appendages, fibers, and filaments at the cilium base and tip. The composition and possible functions of these structures are discussed in relation to cilia assembly, disassembly, and length regulation.

  1. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Kartagener syndrome with central giant cell granuloma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Türkoğlu, Kivanç; Orhan, Kaan; Demir, Pinar; Karabulut, Bariş; Can-Karabulut, Deniz C

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes a clinical case of both giant cell granuloma and Kartagener syndrome in a 15-year-old male patient, with emphasis on the radiographic aspects of this extremely unusual pathology. To our knowledge, the presence of these 2 rare clinical conditions in the same patient has not been previously reported.

  2. FGF19 is a target for FOXC1 regulation in ciliary body-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Yahya; Skarie, Jonathan M; Footz, Tim; Berry, Fred B; Link, Brian A; Walter, Michael A

    2006-11-01

    The forkhead C1 (FOXC1) transcription factor is involved in the development and regulation of several organs, including the eye, where FOXC1 alterations cause iris, trabecular meshwork and corneal anomalies. Using nickel agarose chromatin enrichment with human anterior segment cells, we previously identified the fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) locus as a gene potentially regulated by FOXC1. Here, we demonstrate that FGF19 is a direct target of FOXC1 in the eye. FOXC1 positively regulates FGF19 expression in corneal and periocular mesenchymal cells in cell culture and in zebrafish embryos. Through the FGFR4 tyrosine kinase, FGF19 promotes MAPK phosphorylation in the developing and mature cornea. During development, loss of either FOXC1 or FGF19 results in complementary, but distinct, anterior segment dysgeneses. This study reveals an important role for FOXC1 in the direct regulation of the FGF19-FGFR4-MAPK pathway to promote both the development and maintenance of anterior segment structures within the eye.

  3. Differences between the neurogenic and proliferative abilities of Müller glia with stem cell characteristics and the ciliary epithelium from the adult human eye.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Bhairavi; Jayaram, Hari; Singhal, Shweta; Jones, Megan F; Limb, G Astrid

    2011-12-01

    Much controversy has arisen on the nature and sources of stem cells in the adult human retina. Whilst ciliary epithelium has been thought to constitute a source of neural stem cells, a population of Müller glia in the neural retina has also been shown to exhibit neurogenic characteristics. This study aimed to compare the neurogenic and proliferative abilities between these two major cell populations. It also examined whether differences exist between the pigmented and non-pigmented ciliary epithelium (CE) from the adult human eye. On this basis, Müller glia with stem cell characteristics and pigmented and non-pigmented CE were isolated from human neural retina and ciliary epithelium respectively. Expression of glial, epithelial and neural progenitor markers was examined in these cells following culture under adherent and non-adherent conditions and treatments to induce neural differentiation. Unlike pigmented CE which did not proliferate, non-pigmented CE cells exhibited limited proliferation in vitro, unless epidermal growth factor (EGF) was present in the culture medium to prolong their survival. In contrast, Müller glial stem cells (MSC) cultured as adherent monolayers reached confluence within a few weeks and continued to proliferative indefinitely in the absence of EGF. Both MSC and non-pigmented CE expressed markers of neural progenitors, including SOX2, PAX6, CHX10 and NOTCH. Nestin, a neural stem cell marker, was only expressed by MSC. Non-pigmented CE displayed epithelial morphology, limited photoreceptor gene expression and stained strongly for pigmented epithelial markers upon culture with neural differentiation factors. In contrast, MSC adopted neural morphology and expressed markers of retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptors when cultured under similar conditions. This study provides the first demonstration that pigmented CE possess different proliferative abilities from non-pigmented CE. It also showed that although non-pigmented CE express genes

  4. Characterizing the normal proteome of human ciliary body

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ciliary body is the circumferential muscular tissue located just behind the iris in the anterior chamber of the eye. It plays a pivotal role in the production of aqueous humor, maintenance of the lens zonules and accommodation by changing the shape of the crystalline lens. The ciliary body is the major target of drugs against glaucoma as its inhibition leads to a drop in intraocular pressure. A molecular study of the ciliary body could provide a better understanding about the pathophysiological processes that occur in glaucoma. Thus far, no large-scale proteomic investigation has been reported for the human ciliary body. Results In this study, we have carried out an in-depth LC-MS/MS-based proteomic analysis of normal human ciliary body and have identified 2,815 proteins. We identified a number of proteins that were previously not described in the ciliary body including importin 5 (IPO5), atlastin-2 (ATL2), B-cell receptor associated protein 29 (BCAP29), basigin (BSG), calpain-1 (CAPN1), copine 6 (CPNE6), fibulin 1 (FBLN1) and galectin 1 (LGALS1). We compared the plasma proteome with the ciliary body proteome and found that the large majority of proteins in the ciliary body were also detectable in the plasma while 896 proteins were unique to the ciliary body. We also classified proteins using pathway enrichment analysis and found most of proteins associated with ubiquitin pathway, EIF2 signaling, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Conclusions More than 95% of the identified proteins have not been previously described in the ciliary body proteome. This is the largest catalogue of proteins reported thus far in the ciliary body that should provide new insights into our understanding of the factors involved in maintaining the secretion of aqueous humor. The identification of these proteins will aid in understanding various eye diseases of the anterior segment such as glaucoma and presbyopia. PMID:23914977

  5. (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine synthesis in cultured ciliary ganglion neurons: effects of myotube membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.B.; Tuttle, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Avian ciliary ganglion neurons in cell culture were examined for the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh) from the exogenously supplied precursor, choline. Relevant kinetic parameters of the ACh synthetic system in cultured neurons were found to be virtually the same as those of the ganglionic terminals in the intact iris. Neurons were cultured in the presence of and allowed to innervate pectoral muscle; this results in an capacity for ACh synthesis. In particular, the ability to increase ACh synthesis upon demand after stimulation is affected by interaction with the target. This effect is shown to be an acceleration of the maturation of the cultured neurons. Lysed and washed membrane remnants of the muscle target were able to duplicate, in part, this effect of live target tissue on neuronal transmitter metabolism. Culture medium conditioned by muscle, and by the membrane remnants of muscle, was without significant effect. Thus, substances secreted into the medium do not play a major role in this interaction. Neurons cultured with either muscle or muscle membrane remnants formed large, elongate structures on the target membrane surface. These were not seen in the absence of the target at the times examined. This morphological difference in terminal-like structures may parallel the developmental increases in size and vesicular content of ciliary ganglion nerve terminals in the chick iris, and may relate to the increased ACh synthetic activity. The results suggest that direct contact with an appropriate target membrane has a profound, retrograde influence upon neuronal metabolic and morphological maturation.

  6. Messenger role of calcium in ciliary electromotor coupling: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Y; Pernberg, J; Machemer, H

    1990-01-01

    Electrophysiological and cell reactivation studies in Paramecium and other ciliates have established that depolarizing stimulation opens voltage-sensitive ciliary Ca2+ channels leading to an elevation in intraciliary Ca2+, a rapid 'reversal' in sliding-microtubule based ciliary activity and backward swimming. Regulation of cilia by hyperpolarization modulates the pitch and rate of forward locomotion. The control of this predominant behaviour has been a matter of controversy because ciliary conductances do not change with negative shifts from the resting potential. Recordings of ciliary responses during electrophysiological manipulation of the Ca driving force in the ciliates Stylonychia and Didinium now suggests that a crucial step in hyperpolarization-induced ciliary activation (HCA) is a reduction in intraciliary Ca2+ from a resting steady-state level. The data are discussed with respect to previous hypotheses for the regulation of HCA.

  7. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  8. Interstitial cells: regulators of smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-07-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα(+) cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues.

  9. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  10. Regulatory T cells and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Pereira, Marcelo G; Ciciliot, Stefano; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration results from the activation and differentiation of myogenic stem cells, called satellite cells, located beneath the basal lamina of the muscle fibers. Inflammatory and immune cells have a crucial role in the regeneration process. Acute muscle injury causes an immediate transient wave of neutrophils followed by a more persistent infiltration of M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory/proregenerative) macrophages. New studies show that injured muscle is also infiltrated by a specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells, which control both the inflammatory response, by promoting the M1-to-M2 switch, and the activation of satellite cells. Treg cells accumulate in injured muscle in response to specific cytokines, such as IL-33, and promote muscle growth by releasing growth factors, such as amphiregulin. Muscle repair during aging is impaired due to reduced number of Treg cells and can be enhanced by IL-33 supplementation. Migration of Treg cells could also contribute to explain the effect of heterochronic parabiosis, whereby muscle regeneration of aged mice can be improved by a parabiotically linked young partners. In mdx dystrophin-deficient mice, a model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, muscle injury, and inflammation is mitigated by expansion of the Treg-cell population but exacerbated by Treg-cell depletion. These findings support the notion that immunological mechanisms are not only essential in the response to pathogenic microbes and tumor cells but also have a wider homeostatic role in tissue repair, and open new perspectives for boosting muscle growth in chronic muscle disease and during aging.

  11. Effect of silymarin and harpagoside on inflammation reaction of BEAS-2B cells, on ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of trachea explants and on mucociliary clearance (MCC).

    PubMed

    Boeckenholt, Corinna; Begrow, Frank; Verspohl, Eugen J

    2012-05-01

    Silymarin and harpagoside are derived from drugs which are used for their protective effects against hepatotoxicity and inflammatory processes. Both are now investigated with respect to the respiratory tract. They were able to reduce the release of the inflammatory cytokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cells expressed and secreted) from BEAS-2B cells in a concentration-dependent manner when stimulated by a cytokine mix (10 ng/mL of TNF- α and IFN- γ). This effect was not due to a possible toxic effect (control experiments using LDH release as a marker). Silymarin but not harpagoside was able to increase ciliary beat frequency. Effects were comparable to positive controls (isoprenaline and salbutamol). Silymarin also increases mucociliary clearance. In conclusion, silymarin should be further investigated for its clinical use in distinct respiratory diseases.

  12. Chloral hydrate alters the organization of the ciliary basal apparatus and cell organelles in sea urchin embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A.; Schatten, H.; Mitchell, K. D.; Crosser, M.; Taylor, M.

    1998-01-01

    The mitotic inhibitor, chloral hydrate, induces ciliary loss in the early embryo phase of Lytechinus pictus. It causes a breakdown of cilia at the junction of the cilium and the basal body known as the basal plate. This leaves the plasma membrane temporarily unsealed. The basal apparatus accessory structures, consisting of the basal body, basal foot, basal foot cap, striated side arm, and striated rootlet, are either misaligned or disintegrated by treatment with chloral hydrate. Furthermore, microtubules which are associated with the basal apparatus are disassembled. Mitochondria accumulate at the base of cilia - underneath the plasma membrane - and show alterations in their structural organization. The accumulation of mitochondria is observed in 40% of all electron micrograph sections while 60% show the areas mostly devoid of mitochondria. The microvilli surrounding a cilium and striated rootlet remain intact in the presence of chloral hydrate. These results suggest that deciliation in early sea urchin embryos by chloral hydrate is caused by combined effects on the ciliary membrane and on microtubules in the cilia. Furthermore, it is suggested that chloral hydrate can serve as a tool to explore the cytoskeletal mechanisms that are involved in cilia motility in the developing sea urchin embryo.

  13. Satellite Cells and Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Nicolas A; Bentzinger, C Florian; Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Skeletal muscles are essential for vital functions such as movement, postural support, breathing, and thermogenesis. Muscle tissue is largely composed of long, postmitotic multinucleated fibers. The life-long maintenance of muscle tissue is mediated by satellite cells, lying in close proximity to the muscle fibers. Muscle satellite cells are a heterogeneous population with a small subset of muscle stem cells, termed satellite stem cells. Under homeostatic conditions all satellite cells are poised for activation by stimuli such as physical trauma or growth signals. After activation, satellite stem cells undergo symmetric divisions to expand their number or asymmetric divisions to give rise to cohorts of committed satellite cells and thus progenitors. Myogenic progenitors proliferate, and eventually differentiate through fusion with each other or to damaged fibers to reconstitute fiber integrity and function. In the recent years, research has begun to unravel the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling satellite cell behavior. Nonetheless, an understanding of the complex cellular and molecular interactions of satellite cells with their dynamic microenvironment remains a major challenge, especially in pathological conditions. The goal of this review is to comprehensively summarize the current knowledge on satellite cell characteristics, functions, and behavior in muscle regeneration and in pathological conditions.

  14. Potential of laryngeal muscle regeneration using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dirja, Bayu Tirta; Yoshie, Susumu; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may be a new potential cell source for laryngeal muscle regeneration in the treatment of vocal fold atrophy after recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objectives Unilateral vocal fold paralysis can lead to degeneration, atrophy, and loss of force of the thyroarytenoid muscle. At present, there are some treatments such as thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and vocal fold injection. However, such treatments cannot restore reduced mass of the thyroarytenoid muscle. iPS cells have been recognized as supplying a potential resource for cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of iPS cells for the regeneration of laryngeal muscle through the evaluation of both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods Skeletal muscle cells were generated from tdTomato-labeled iPS cells using embryoid body formation. Differentiation into skeletal muscle cells was analyzed by gene expression and immunocytochemistry. The tdTomato-labeled iPS cell-derived skeletal muscle cells were transplanted into the left atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle. To evaluate the engraftment of these cells after transplantation, immunohistochemistry was performed. Results The tdTomato-labeled iPS cells were successfully differentiated into skeletal muscle cells through an in vitro experiment. These cells survived in the atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle after transplantation.

  15. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  16. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia*

    PubMed Central

    Olm, Mary Anne Kowal; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Mauad, Thais

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disorder of ciliary structure or function. It results in mucus accumulation and bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract which leads to chronic upper and lower airway infections, organ laterality defects, and fertility problems. We review the respiratory signs and symptoms of PCD, as well as the screening tests for and diagnostic investigation of the disease, together with details related to ciliary function, ciliary ultrastructure, and genetic studies. In addition, we describe the difficulties in diagnosing PCD by means of transmission electron microscopy, as well as describing patient follow-up procedures. PMID:26176524

  17. Muscle Interstitial Cells: A Brief Field Guide to Non-satellite Cell Populations in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Moyle, Louise A; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is mainly enabled by a population of adult stem cells known as satellite cells. Satellite cells have been shown to be indispensable for adult skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last two decades, other stem/progenitor cell populations resident in the skeletal muscle interstitium have been identified as "collaborators" of satellite cells during regeneration. They also appear to have a key role in replacing skeletal muscle with adipose, fibrous, or bone tissue in pathological conditions. Here, we review the role and known functions of these different interstitial skeletal muscle cell types and discuss their role in skeletal muscle tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and disease, including their therapeutic potential for cell transplantation protocols.

  18. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Jiang; Li, Ping-Hua; Huang, Rui-Hua; Sun, Wen-Xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-Fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-Jun; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  19. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona; Leigh, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia with chronic otosinopulmonary disease and organ laterality defects in ∼50% of cases. The prevalence of PCD is difficult to determine. Recent diagnostic advances through measurement of nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing has allowed rigorous diagnoses and determination of a robust clinical phenotype, which includes neonatal respiratory distress, daily nasal congestion, and wet cough starting early in life, along with organ laterality defects. There is early onset of lung disease in PCD with abnormal airflow mechanics and radiographic abnormalities detected in infancy and early childhood.

  20. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Promotes the Migration of Corneal Epithelial Stem/progenitor Cells by Up-regulation of MMPs through the Phosphorylation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jialin; Chen, Peng; Backman, Ludvig J.; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    The migration of limbal epithelial stem cells is important for the homeostasis and regeneration of corneal epithelium. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been found to promote corneal epithelial wound healing by activating corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells. However, the possible effect of CNTF on the migration of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells is not clear. This study found the expression of CNTF in mouse corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells (TKE2) to be up-regulated after injury, on both gene and protein level. CNTF promoted migration of TKE2 in a dose-dependent manner and the peak was seen at 10 ng/ml. The phosphorylation level of Akt (p-Akt), and the expression of MMP3 and MMP14, were up-regulated after CNTF treatment both in vitro and in vivo. Akt and MMP3 inhibitor treatment delayed the migration effect by CNTF. Finally, a decreased expression of MMP3 and MMP14 was observed when Akt inhibitor was applied both in vitro and in vivo. This study provides new insights into the role of CNTF on the migration of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and its inherent mechanism of Up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases through the Akt signalling pathway. PMID:27174608

  1. Myosin types in cultured muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Fluorescent antibodies against fast skeletal, slow skeletal, and ventricular myosins were applied to muscle cultures from embryonic pectoralis and ventricular myocadium of the chicken. A number of spindle-shaped mononucleated cells, presumably myoblasts, and all myotubes present in skeletal muscle cultures were labeled by all three antimyosin antisera. In contrast, in cultures from ventricular myocardium all muscle cells were labeled by anti-ventricular myosin, whereas only part of them were stained by anti-slow skeletal myosin and rare cells reacted with anti-fast skeletal myosin. The findings indicate that myosin(s) present in cultured embryonic skeletal muscle cells contains antigenic determinants similar to those present in adult fast skeletal, slow skeletal, and ventricular myosins. PMID:6156177

  2. Muscle cells provide instructions for planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Witchley, Jessica N; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E; Owen, Jared H; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-08-29

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region.

  3. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Jacob; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Maskey, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT) system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia. PMID:26840332

  4. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Jason; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Noone, Peadar G

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cilia structure, function, and biogenesis leading to chronic infections of the respiratory tract, fertility problems and disorders of organ laterality. The diagnosis can be challenging, using traditional tools such as characteristic clinical features, ciliary functional and ultra-structural defects; newer screening tools such as nasal nitric oxide levels and genetic testing add to the diagnostic algorithm. There are thirty-two known PCD causing genes, and in the future, comprehensive genetic testing may screen young infants prior to developing symptoms thus improving survival. Therapies include surveillance of pulmonary function and microbiology, in addition to airway clearance, antibiotics and ideally, early referral to bronchiectasis centers. As with CF, standardized care at specialized centers using a multidisciplinary approach likely improves outcomes. In conjunction with the CF foundation, the PCD foundation, and with lead investigators and clinicians, is developing a network of PCD clinical centers to coordinate the effort in North America and Europe. As the network grows, care and knowledge will improve. PMID:25826585

  5. Highly efficient, functional engraftment of skeletal muscle stem cells in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Cerletti, Massimiliano; Jurga, Sara; Witczak, Carol A; Hirshman, Michael F; Shadrach, Jennifer L; Goodyear, Laurie J; Wagers, Amy J

    2008-07-11

    Satellite cells reside beneath the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fibers and include cells that act as precursors for muscle growth and repair. Although they share a common anatomical localization and typically are considered a homogeneous population, satellite cells actually exhibit substantial heterogeneity. We used cell-surface marker expression to purify from the satellite cell pool a distinct population of skeletal muscle precursors (SMPs) that function as muscle stem cells. When engrafted into muscle of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, purified SMPs contributed to up to 94% of myofibers, restoring dystrophin expression and significantly improving muscle histology and contractile function. Transplanted SMPs also entered the satellite cell compartment, renewing the endogenous stem cell pool and participating in subsequent rounds of injury repair. Together, these studies indicate the presence in adult skeletal muscle of prospectively isolatable muscle-forming stem cells and directly demonstrate the efficacy of myogenic stem cell transplant for treating muscle degenerative disease.

  6. Amelanotic Irido-Ciliary Ring Melanoma: A Clinicopathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Hassan A.; Modi, Yasha S.; Plesec, Thomas P.; Singh, Arun D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of an amelanotic irido-ciliary ring melanoma. Design Interventional case report. Results A 44-year-old male was followed for asymptomatic amelanotic iris nevus of the right eye that was noted to have a localized ciliary body mass with ring extension along the trabecular meshwork. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was consistent with malignant melanoma. The patient underwent enucleation and remains disease free at 9 years of follow-up. Histopathology revealed malignant melanoma involving the iris and ciliary body with a 360-degree extension along the trabecular meshwork. The tumor was composed of a mixture of spindled and epithelioid cells with scant pigmentation. Conclusions Amelanotic irido-ciliary ring melanoma with growth along the trabecular meshwork is a rare form of uveal melanoma that could present as an inconspicuous amelanotic iris mass. PMID:27239456

  7. Replication of Muscle Cell Using Bioimprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsuri, Fahmi; Mitchell, John S.; Alkaisi, Maan M.; Evans, John J.

    2009-07-01

    In our earlier study a heat-curable PDMS or a UV curable elastomer, was used as the replicating material to introduce Bioimprint methodology to facilitate cell imaging [1-2] But, replicating conditions for thermal polymerization is known to cause cell dehydration during curing. In this study, a new type of polymer was developed for use in living cell replica formation, and it was tested on human muscle cells. The cells were incubated and cultured according to standard biological culturing procedures, and they were grown for about 10 days. The replicas were then separated from the muscle cells and taken for analysis under an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The new polymer was designed to be biocompatible with higher resolution and fast curing process compared to other types of silicon-based organic polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Muscle cell imprints were achieved and higher resolution images were able to show the micro structures of the muscle cells, including the cellular fibers and cell membranes. The AFM is able to image features at nanoscale resolution. This capacity enables a number of characteristics of biological cells to be visualized in a unique manner. Polymer and muscle cells preparations were developed at Hamilton, in collaboration between Plant and Food Research and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury. Tapping mode was used for the AFM image analysis as it has low tip-sample forces and non-destructive imaging capability. We will be presenting the bioimprinting processes of muscle cells, their AFM imaging and characterization of the newly developed polymer.

  8. Muscle cell attachment in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the body wall muscles exert their force on the cuticle to generate locomotion. Interposed between the muscle cells and the cuticle are a basement membrane and a thin hypodermal cell. The latter contains bundles of filaments attached to dense plaques in the hypodermal cell membranes, which together we have called a fibrous organelle. In an effort to define the chain of molecules that anchor the muscle cells to the cuticle we have isolated five mAbs using preparations enriched in these components. Two antibodies define a 200-kD muscle antigen likely to be part of the basement membrane at the muscle/hypodermal interface. Three other antibodies probably identify elements of the fibrous organelles in the adjacent hypodermis. The mAb IFA, which reacts with mammalian intermediate filaments, also recognizes these structures. We suggest that the components recognized by these antibodies are likely to be involved in the transmission of tension from the muscle cell to the cuticle. PMID:1860880

  9. Retinal stem/progenitor cells in the ciliary marginal zone complete retinal regeneration: a study of retinal regeneration in a novel animal model.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ayumi; Araki, Masasuke

    2014-07-01

    Our research group has extensively studied retinal regeneration in adult Xenopus laevis. However, X. laevis does not represent a suitable model for multigenerational genetics and genomic approaches. Instead, Xenopus tropicalis is considered as the ideal model for these studies, although little is known about retinal regeneration in X. tropicalis. In the present study, we showed that a complete retina regenerates at approximately 30 days after whole retinal removal. The regenerating retina was derived from the stem/progenitor cells in the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), indicating a novel mode of vertebrate retinal regeneration, which has not been previously reported. In a previous study, we showed that in X. laevis, retinal regeneration occurs primarily through the transdifferentiation of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. RPE cells migrate to the retinal vascular membrane and reform a new epithelium, which then differentiates into the retina. In X. tropicalis, RPE cells also migrated to the vascular membrane, but transdifferentiation was not evident. Using two tissue culture models of RPE tissues, it was shown that in X. laevis RPE culture neuronal differentiation and reconstruction of the retinal three-dimensional (3-D) structure were clearly observed, while in X. tropicalis RPE culture neither ßIII tubulin-positive cells nor 3-D retinal structure were seen. These results indicate that the two Xenopus species are excellent models to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms of retinal regeneration, as these animals have contrasting modes of regeneration; one mode primarily involves RPE cells and the other mode involves stem/progenitor cells in the CMZ.

  10. Regulation of Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Function by Interstitial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Kito, Yoshihiko; Hwang, Sung Jin; Ward, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin form gap junctions with smooth muscle cells in visceral smooth muscles and provide important regulatory functions. In gastrointestinal (GI) muscles, there are two distinct classes of interstitial cells, c-Kit(+) interstitial cells of Cajal and PDGFRα(+) cells, that regulate motility patterns. Loss of these cells may contribute to symptoms in GI motility disorders.

  11. Nonmyogenic cells in skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Paylor, Ben; Natarajan, Anuradha; Zhang, Regan-Heng; Rossi, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Although classical dogma dictates that satellite cells are the primary cell type involved in skeletal muscle regeneration, alternative cell types such as a variety of inflammatory and stromal cells are also actively involved in this process. A model describing myogenic cells as direct contributors to regeneration and nonmyogenic cells from other developmental sources as important accessories has emerged, with similar systems having been described in numerous other tissues in the body. Increasing evidence supports the notion that inflammatory cells function as supportive accessory cells, and are not merely involved in clearing damage following skeletal muscle injury. Additionally, recent studies have highlighted the role of tissue resident mesenchymal cell populations as playing a central role in regulating regeneration. These "accessory" cell populations are proposed to influence myogenesis via direct cell contact and secretion of paracrine trophic factors. The basic foundations of accessory cell understanding should be recognized as a crucial component to all prospects of regenerative medicine, and this chapter intends to provide a comprehensive background on the current literature describing immune and tissue-resident mesenchymal cells' role in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  12. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  13. Uni-directional ciliary membrane protein trafficking by a cytoplasmic retrograde IFT motor and ciliary ectosome shedding

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Muqing; Ning, Jue; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Belzile, Olivier; Wang, Qian; Dutcher, Susan K; Liu, Yanjie; Snell, William J

    2015-01-01

    The role of the primary cilium in key signaling pathways depends on dynamic regulation of ciliary membrane protein composition, yet we know little about the motors or membrane events that regulate ciliary membrane protein trafficking in existing organelles. Recently, we showed that cilium-generated signaling in Chlamydomonas induced rapid, anterograde IFT-independent, cytoplasmic microtubule-dependent redistribution of the membrane polypeptide, SAG1-C65, from the plasma membrane to the periciliary region and the ciliary membrane. Here, we report that the retrograde IFT motor, cytoplasmic dynein 1b, is required in the cytoplasm for this rapid redistribution. Furthermore, signaling-induced trafficking of SAG1-C65 into cilia is unidirectional and the entire complement of cellular SAG1-C65 is shed during signaling and can be recovered in the form of ciliary ectosomes that retain signal-inducing activity. Thus, during signaling, cells regulate ciliary membrane protein composition through cytoplasmic action of the retrograde IFT motor and shedding of ciliary ectosomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05242.001 PMID:25688564

  14. Uni-directional ciliary membrane protein trafficking by a cytoplasmic retrograde IFT motor and ciliary ectosome shedding.

    PubMed

    Cao, Muqing; Ning, Jue; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Belzile, Olivier; Wang, Qian; Dutcher, Susan K; Liu, Yanjie; Snell, William J

    2015-02-17

    The role of the primary cilium in key signaling pathways depends on dynamic regulation of ciliary membrane protein composition, yet we know little about the motors or membrane events that regulate ciliary membrane protein trafficking in existing organelles. Recently, we showed that cilium-generated signaling in Chlamydomonas induced rapid, anterograde IFT-independent, cytoplasmic microtubule-dependent redistribution of the membrane polypeptide, SAG1-C65, from the plasma membrane to the periciliary region and the ciliary membrane. Here, we report that the retrograde IFT motor, cytoplasmic dynein 1b, is required in the cytoplasm for this rapid redistribution. Furthermore, signaling-induced trafficking of SAG1-C65 into cilia is unidirectional and the entire complement of cellular SAG1-C65 is shed during signaling and can be recovered in the form of ciliary ectosomes that retain signal-inducing activity. Thus, during signaling, cells regulate ciliary membrane protein composition through cytoplasmic action of the retrograde IFT motor and shedding of ciliary ectosomes.

  15. Hamster thecal cells express muscle characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Self, D.A.; Schroeder, P.C.; Gown, A.M.

    1988-08-01

    Contraction of the follicular wall about the time of ovulation appears to be a coordinated event; however, the cells that mediate it remain poorly studied. We examined the theca externa cells in the wall of hamster follicles for the presence of a functional actomyosin system, both in developing follicles and in culture. We used a monoclonal antibody (HHF35) that recognizes the alpha and gamma isoelectric variants of actin normally found in muscle, but not the beta variant associated with non-muscle sources, to evaluate large preovulatory follicles for actin content and composition. Antibody staining of sectioned ovaries showed intense circumferential reactivity in the outermost wall of developing follicles. Immunoblots from two-dimensional gels of theca externa lysates demonstrated the presence of the two muscle-specific isozymes of actin. Immunofluorescence of cultured follicular cells pulse-labeled with (3H) thymidine (for autoradiographic detection of DNA replication) revealed the presence, in many dividing cells, of actin filaments aligned primarily along the longitudinal axis of the cells. In cultures exposed to the calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-4) M) for varying periods (5 min to 1 h), contraction of many individual muscle-actin-positive cells was observed. Immunofluorescence of these cells, fixed immediately after ionophore-induced contraction, revealed compaction of the actin filaments. Our findings demonstrate that the cells of the theca externa contain muscle actins from an early stage and that these cells are capable of contraction even while proliferating in subconfluent cultures. They suggest that follicular growth may include a naturally occurring developmental sequence in which a contractile cell type proliferates in the differentiated state.

  16. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  17. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  18. Ciliary neurotropic factor, interleukin 11, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M are growth factors for human myeloma cell lines using the interleukin 6 signal transducer gp130

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a major growth factor for tumor plasma cells involved in human multiple myeloma (MM). In particular, human myeloma cell lines (HMCL), whose growth is completely dependent on addition of exogenous IL-6, can be obtained reproducibly from every patient with terminal disease. Four cytokines, ciliary neurotropic factor (CNTF), IL- 11, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and oncostatin M (OM), use the same transducer chain (signal transducer gp130) as IL-6 and share numerous biological activities with this IL. We found that these four cytokines stimulated proliferation and supported the long-term growth of two out of four IL-6-dependent HMCL obtained in our laboratory. Half- maximal proliferation was obtained with cytokine concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 ng/ml for IL-11, LIF, and OM. CNTF worked at high concentrations only (90 ng/ml), but addition of soluble CNTF receptor increased sensitivity to CNTF 30-fold. The growth-promoting effect of these four cytokines was abrogated by anti-gp130 antibodies, contrary to results for anti-IL-6 receptor or anti-IL-6 antibodies. No detectable changes in the morphology and phenotype were found when myeloma cells were cultured with one of these four cytokines instead of IL-6. Concordant with their IL-6-dependent growth, the four HMCL expressed membrane IL-6R and gp130 detected by FACS analysis. LIF- binding chain gene (LIFR) was expressed only in the two HMCL responsive to LIF and OM. PMID:8145045

  19. Isolation of satellite cells from single muscle fibers from young, aged, or dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Di Foggia, Valentina; Robson, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains an identified resident stem cell population called the satellite cells. This cell is responsible for the majority of the postnatal growth and regenerative potential of skeletal muscle. Other cells do contribute to skeletal muscle regeneration and in cultures of minced whole muscle these cells are cultured along with the satellite cells and it is impossible to dissect out their contribution compared to the satellite cells. Therefore, a method to culture pure satellite cells has been developed to study the signaling pathways that control their proliferation and differentiation. In our studies into the role of the resident myogenic stem cells in regeneration, myopathic conditions, and aging, we have optimized the established techniques that already exist to isolate pure satellite cell cultures from single muscle fibers. We have successfully isolated satellite cells from young adults through to 24-month-old muscles and obtained populations of cells that we are studying for the signaling events that regulate their proliferative potential.

  20. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  1. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) role in ciliary assembly, resorption and signalling.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2008-01-01

    Cilia and flagella have attracted tremendous attention in recent years as research demonstrated crucial roles for these organelles in coordinating a number of physiologically and developmentally important signaling pathways, including the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) alpha, Sonic hedgehog, polycystin, and Wnt pathways. In addition, the realization that defective assembly or function of cilia can cause a plethora of diseases and developmental defects ("ciliopathies") has increased focus on the mechanisms by which these antenna-like, microtubular structures assemble. Ciliogenesis is a complex, multistep process that is tightly coordinated with cell cycle progression and differentiation. The ciliary axoneme is extended from a modified centriole, the basal body, which migrates to and docks onto the apical plasma membrane early in ciliogenesis as cells enter growth arrest. The ciliary axoneme is elongated via intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional transport system that tracks along the polarized microtubules of the axoneme, and which is required for assembly of almost all cilia and flagella. Here, we provide an overview of ciliogenesis with particular emphasis on the molecular mechanisms and functions of IFT. In addition to a general, up-to-date description of IFT, we discuss mechanisms by which proteins are selectively targeted to the ciliary compartment, with special focus on the ciliary transition zone. Finally, we briefly review the role of IFT in cilia-mediated signaling, including how IFT is directly involved in moving signaling moieties into and out of the ciliary compartment.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: primary ciliary dyskinesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... inversus totalis, they are often said to have Kartagener syndrome. Approximately 12 percent of people with primary ... Registry: Ciliary dyskinesia, primary, 17 Genetic Testing Registry: Kartagener syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: Primary ciliary dyskinesia Other ...

  3. Myogenic capacity of muscle progenitor cells from head and limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers, Mette A R; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M; Torensma, Ruurd; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2012-02-01

    The restoration of muscles in the soft palate of patients with cleft lip and/or palate is accompanied by fibrosis, which leads to speech and feeding problems. Treatment strategies that improve muscle regeneration have only been tested in limb muscles. Therefore, in the present study the myogenic potential of muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) isolated from head muscles was compared with that of limb muscles. Muscle progenitor cells were isolated from the head muscles and limb muscles of rats and cultured. The proliferation of MPCs was analysed by DNA quantification. The differentiation capacity was analysed by quantifying the numbers of fused cells, and by measuring the mRNA levels of differentiation markers. Muscle progenitor cells were stained to quantify the expression of paired box protein Pax 7 (Pax-7), myoblast determination protein 1 (MyoD), and myogenin. Proliferation was similar in the head MPCs and the limb MPCs. Differentiating head and limb MPCs showed a comparable number of fused cells and mRNA expression levels of myosin-1 (Myh1), myosin-3 (Myh3), and myosin-4 (Myh4). During proliferation and differentiation, the number of Pax-7(+), MyoD(+), and myogenin(+) cells in head and limb MPCs was equal. It was concluded that head and limb MPCs show similar myogenic capacities in vitro. Therefore, in vivo myogenic differences between those muscles might rely on the local microenvironment. Thus, regenerative strategies for limb muscles might also be used for head muscles.

  4. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells improve muscle function in a skeletal muscle re-injury model.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Bruno M; Baldanza, Marcelo R; Ribeiro, Karla C; Porto, Anderson; Peçanha, Ramon; Fortes, Fabio S A; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C; Goldenberg, Regina C S; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC) injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively). Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model.

  5. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells Improve Muscle Function in a Skeletal Muscle Re-Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Karla C.; Porto, Anderson; Peçanha, Ramon; Fortes, Fabio S. A.; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Goldenberg, Regina C. S.; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury is the most common problem in orthopedic and sports medicine, and severe injury leads to fibrosis and muscle dysfunction. Conventional treatment for successive muscle injury is currently controversial, although new therapies, like cell therapy, seem to be promise. We developed a model of successive injuries in rat to evaluate the therapeutic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMC) injected directly into the injured muscle. Functional and histological assays were performed 14 and 28 days after the injury protocol by isometric tension recording and picrosirius/Hematoxilin & Eosin staining, respectively. We also evaluated the presence and the fate of BMMC on treated muscles; and muscle fiber regeneration. BMMC treatment increased maximal skeletal muscle contraction 14 and 28 days after muscle injury compared to non-treated group (4.5 ± 1.7 vs 2.5 ± 0.98 N/cm2, p<0.05 and 8.4 ± 2.3 vs. 5.7 ± 1.3 N/cm2, p<0.05 respectively). Furthermore, BMMC treatment increased muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the presence of mature muscle fiber 28 days after muscle injury. However, there was no difference in collagen deposition between groups. Immunoassays for cytoskeleton markers of skeletal and smooth muscle cells revealed an apparent integration of the BMMC within the muscle. These data suggest that BMMC transplantation accelerates and improves muscle function recovery in our extensive muscle re-injury model. PMID:26039243

  6. Histoanatomical study of the lens and ciliary body in ostrich eye

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi Saadatlou, Mohammad Ali; Shahrouz, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the lenses and ciliary bodies of 20 ostrich eyes were studied macroscopically and microscopically. The histological slides were studied after staining by hematoxylin and eosin, Verhoeff, Van Gieson, and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). Posterior surface of lens was more convex than its anterior surface. The average lens diameter and thickness were respectively measured as 1.43 ± 0.00 and 0.85 ± 0.00 cm. The average ciliary body thickness was measured as 1.48 ± 0.01 cm. In addition, the ciliary body was seen annular with mean horizontal and vertical external diameters as 4.80 ± 0.07 and 4.36 ± 0.06 cm, respectively. The retina is extended on ciliary body in this bird. The number of ciliary body processes was about 120. The epithelium of lens was cuboidal and the lens capsule had intense positive PAS reaction. Also, the anterior surface of capsule was thicker than its posterior surface. The lens fibers in the central part were thicker than other parts. Elastic and collagen fibers were not observed in the lens. The epithelium of ciliary processes had two layers; superficial cuboidal non-pigmented layer, and deep heavily pigmented layer. The ciliary body was supported by a hyaline cartilage. In addition to the smooth muscle fibers, many isolated skeletal muscle fibers were also seen in ciliary body. In conclusion, the lens and ciliary body of ostrich were similar to other birds, although there were little differences in anatomical dimensions and histological characteristics. PMID:27872718

  7. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  8. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  9. Smooth muscle differentiation in scleroderma fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sappino, A. P.; Masouyé, I.; Saurat, J. H.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    Using antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin and desmin on paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue sections, the authors demonstrate that fibroblastic cells of localized and systemic scleroderma lesions express features of smooth muscle differentiation. Eleven of eleven skin specimens of systemic sclerosis patients and two of four skin specimens of localized scleroderma displayed the presence of fibroblasts expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin, a cell population that predominated in areas of prominent collagen deposition. A similar fibroblastic phenotype was found in the esophagus, the liver, and the lung specimens obtained from four patients who died of progressive systemic sclerosis. Immunostaining for desmin, performed on adjacent tissue sections, demonstrated that a minority of these fibroblastic cells present in skin and visceral lesions contained this protein. The authors' observations indicate that scleroderma fibroblasts are phenotypically related to the stromal cells previously identified in hypertrophic scars, fibromatoses, and desmoplasia; they might provide novel criteria for the characterization of scleroderma lesions and help to identify the factors responsible for phenotypic modulations in fibroblastic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698026

  10. Effects of axotomy on the expression and ultrastructural localization of N-cadherin and neural cell adhesion molecule in the quail ciliary ganglion: an in vivo model of neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Squitti, R; De Stefano, M E; Edgar, D; Toschi, G

    1999-01-01

    Postganglionic nerve crush of the avian ciliary ganglion induces detachment of preganglionic terminals from the soma of the injured ciliary neurons, followed by reattachment at about the same time that the postganglionic axons regenerate to their targets. In order to determine the role played by cell adhesion molecules in this response, we have studied injury-induced changes in the amount and distribution of N-cadherin and neural cell adhesion molecule, together with modifications in the expression of their messenger RNAs. Both N-cadherin and neural cell adhesion molecule immunoreactivities associated with postsynaptic specializations decreased between one and three days following postganglionic nerve crush, preceding the detachment of the preganglionic boutons. Immunoreactivities subsequently increased between 13 and 20 days, in parallel with restoration of synaptic contacts on the ganglion cells and the progressive reinnervation of the peripheral targets. In contrast to the rapid decrease in immunoreactivity, the messenger RNA levels of N-cadherin and neural cell adhesion molecule both increased after crush, and remained elevated throughout the 20-day period of the experiment. These results are consistent with roles for N-cadherin and neural cell adhesion molecule in the maintenance of synaptic contacts. The rapid regulation of these proteins in injury-induced synaptic plasticity occurs at the post-transcriptional level, whereas longer term regulation associated with the re-establishment of synapses may be promoted by the increased levels of gene expression.

  11. Nephrocystins and MKS proteins interact with IFT particle and facilitate transport of selected ciliary cargos.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengtian; Malicki, Jarema

    2011-05-20

    Cilia are required for the development and function of many organs. Efficient transport of protein cargo along ciliary axoneme is necessary to sustain these processes. Despite its importance, the mode of interaction between the intraflagellar ciliary transport (IFT) mechanism and its cargo proteins remains poorly understood. Our studies demonstrate that IFT particle components, and a Meckel-Gruber syndrome 1 (MKS1)-related, B9 domain protein, B9d2, bind each other and contribute to the ciliary localization of Inversin (Nephrocystin 2). B9d2, Inversin, and Nephrocystin 5 support, in turn, the transport of a cargo protein, Opsin, but not another photoreceptor ciliary transmembrane protein, Peripherin. Interestingly, the components of this mechanism also contribute to the formation of planar cell polarity in mechanosensory epithelia. These studies reveal a molecular mechanism that mediates the transport of selected ciliary cargos and is of fundamental importance for the differentiation and survival of sensory cells.

  12. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin-4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin-4 (Ten-4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten-4-deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten-4-deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten-4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten-4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells.

  13. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  14. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan.

  15. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn P. J.; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R.; Blacque, Oliver E.; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon–associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  16. Molecular modulation of airway epithelial ciliary response to sneezing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ke-Qing; Cowan, Andrew T; Lee, Robert J; Goldstein, Natalia; Droguett, Karla; Chen, Bei; Zheng, Chunquan; Villalon, Manuel; Palmer, James N; Kreindler, James L; Cohen, Noam A

    2012-08-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of the mechanical force of a sneeze on sinonasal cilia function and determine the molecular mechanism responsible for eliciting the ciliary response to a sneeze. A novel model was developed to deliver a stimulation simulating a sneeze (55 mmHg for 50 ms) at 26°C to the apical surface of mouse and human nasal epithelial cells. Ciliary beating was visualized, and changes in ciliary beat frequency (CBF) were determined. To interrogate the molecular cascades driving sneeze-induced changes of CBF, pharmacologic manipulation of intra- and extracellular calcium, purinergic, PKA, and nitric oxide (NO) signaling were performed. CBF rapidly increases by ≥150% in response to a sneeze, which is dependent on the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), calcium influx, and PKA activation. Furthermore, apical release of ATP is independent of calcium influx, but calcium influx and subsequent increase in CBF are dependent on the ATP release. Lastly, we observed a blunted ciliary response in surgical specimens derived from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis compared to control patients. Apical ATP release with subsequent calcium mobilization and PKA activation are involved in sinonasal ciliary response to sneezing, which is blunted in patients with upper-airway disease.

  17. GEF1 is a ciliary Sec7 GEF of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Bell, Aaron J; Guerra, Charles; Phung, Vincent; Nair, Saraswathy; Seetharam, Raviraja; Satir, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Ciliary guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) potentially activate G proteins in intraflagellar transport (IFT) cargo release. Several classes of GEFs have been localized to cilia or basal bodies and shown to be functionally important in the prevention of ciliopathies, but ciliary Arl-type Sec 7 related GEFs have not been well characterized. Nair et al. [ 1999] identified a Paramecium ciliary Sec7 GEF, PSec7. In Tetrahymena, Gef1p (GEF1), tentatively identified by PSec7 antibody, possesses ciliary and nuclear targeting sequences and like PSec7 localizes to cilia and macronuclei. Upregulation of GEF1 RNA followed deciliation and subsequent ciliary regrowth. Corresponding to similar Psec7 domains, GEF1domains contain IQ-like motifs and putative PH domains, in addition to GBF/BIG canonical motifs. Genomic analysis identified two additional Tetrahymena GBF/BIG Sec7 family GEFs (GEF2, GEF3), which do not possess ciliary targeting sequences. GEF1 and GEF2 were HA modified to determine cellular localization. Cells transformed to produce appropriately truncated GEF1-HA showed localization to somatic and oral cilia, but not to macronuclei. Subtle defects in ciliary stability and function were detected. GEF2-HA localized near basal bodies but not to cilia. These results indicate that GEF1 is the resident Tetrahymena ciliary protein orthologous to PSec7. Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Muscle disuse atrophy is not accompanied by changes in skeletal muscle satellite cell content.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Wall, Benjamin T; Dirks, Marlou L; Senden, Joan M G; Hartgens, Fred; Dolmans, John; Losen, Mario; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-04-01

    Muscle disuse leads to a considerable loss in skeletal muscle mass and strength. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying disuse-induced muscle fibre atrophy remain to be elucidated. Therefore we assessed the effect of muscle disuse on the CSA (cross-sectional area), muscle fibre size, satellite cell content and associated myocellular signalling pathways of the quadriceps muscle. A total of 12 healthy young (24±1 years of age) men were subjected to 2 weeks of one-legged knee immobilization via a full-leg cast. Before and immediately after the immobilization period and after 6 weeks of natural rehabilitation, muscle strength [1RM (one-repetition maximum)], muscle CSA [single slice CT (computed tomography) scan] and muscle fibre type characteristics (muscle biopsies) were assessed. Protein and/or mRNA expression of key genes [i.e. MYOD (myogenic differentiation), MYOG (myogenin) and MSTN (myostatin)] in the satellite cell regulatory pathways were determined using Western blotting and RT-PCR (real-time PCR) analyses respectively. The present study found that quadriceps CSA declined following immobilization by 8±2% (P<0.05). In agreement, both type I and type II muscle fibre size decreased 7±3% and 13±4% respectively (P<0.05). No changes were observed in satellite cell content following immobilization in either type I or type II muscle fibres. Muscle MYOG mRNA expression doubled (P<0.05), whereas MSTN protein expression decreased 30±9% (P<0.05) following immobilization. Muscle mass and strength returned to the baseline values within 6 weeks of recovery without any specific rehabilitative programme. In conclusion, 2 weeks of muscle disuse leads to considerable loss in skeletal muscle mass and strength. The loss in muscle mass was attributed to both type I and type II muscle fibre atrophy, and was not accompanied by a decline in satellite cell content.

  19. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

    PubMed

    Penton, Christopher M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Johnson, Eric K; McAllister, Cynthia; Montanaro, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Muscle side population (SP) cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45) and vascular (CD31) markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  20. Schwannoma of the ciliary body treated by block excision.

    PubMed Central

    Küchle, M; Holbach, L; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, U; Naumann, G O

    1994-01-01

    A 26-year-old man developed a non-pigmented ciliary body tumour of his right eye. A 7 mm block excision and tectonic corneoscleral graft were performed. The excised tissue was studied using histopathological, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic techniques. The tumour revealed characteristic features of a Schwann cell neoplasm including Antoni A and B patterns, acid mucopolysaccharides, S-100, and vimentin positivity, and--by electron microscopy--Luse bodies. It was classified as a schwannoma. Although rare, schwannoma should be included in the clinical differential diagnosis of non-pigmented ciliary body tumours. Local excision should be considered to avoid over-treatment by enucleation. Images PMID:8025076

  1. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  2. GEF1 is a Ciliary Sec7 GEF of Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Aaron J.; Guerra, Charles; Phung, Vincent; Nair, Saraswathy; Seetharam, Raviraja; Satir, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Ciliary guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) potentially activate G proteins in intraflagellar transport (IFT) cargo release. Several classes of GEFs have been localized to cilia or basal bodies and shown to be functionally important in the prevention of ciliopathies, but ciliary Arl-type Sec 7 related GEFs have not been well characterized. Nair et al. (1999) identified a Paramecium ciliary Sec7 GEF, PSec7. In Tetrahymena, Gef1p (GEF1), tentatively identified by PSec7 antibody, possesses ciliary and nuclear targeting sequences and like PSec7 localizes to cilia and macronuclei. Upregulation of GEF1 RNA followed deciliation and subsequent ciliary regrowth. Corresponding to similar Psec7 domains, GEF1domains contain IQ-like motifs and putative PH domains, in addition to GBF/BIG canonical motifs. Genomic analysis identified two additional Tetrahymena GBF/BIG Sec7 family GEFs (GEF2, GEF3), which do not possess ciliary targeting sequences. GEF1 and GEF2 were HA modified to determine cellular localization. Cells transformed to produce appropriately truncated GEF1-HA showed localization to somatic and oral cilia, but not to macronuclei. Subtle defects in ciliary stability and function were detected. GEF2-HA localized near basal bodies but not to cilia. These results indicate that GEF1 is the resident Tetrahymena ciliary protein orthologous to PSec7. PMID:19267341

  3. Assessment of ciliary phenotype in primary ciliary dyskinesia by micro-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, George M.; Francis, Richard; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Birket, Susan E.; Gabriel, George; Trombley, John E.; Lemke, Kristi L.; Klena, Nikolai; Turner, Brett; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2017-01-01

    Ciliary motion defects cause defective mucociliary transport (MCT) in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Current diagnostic tests do not assess how MCT is affected by perturbation of ciliary motion. In this study, we sought to use micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT) to delineate the mechanistic basis of cilia motion defects of PCD genes by functional categorization of cilia motion. Tracheae from three PCD mouse models were analyzed using μOCT to characterize ciliary motion and measure MCT. We developed multiple measures of ciliary activity, integrated these measures, and quantified dyskinesia by the angular range of the cilia effective stroke (ARC). Ccdc39–/– mice, with a known severe PCD mutation of ciliary axonemal organization, had absent motile ciliary regions, resulting in abrogated MCT. In contrast, Dnah5–/– mice, with a missense mutation of the outer dynein arms, had reduced ciliary beat frequency (CBF) but preserved motile area and ciliary stroke, maintaining some MCT. Wdr69–/– PCD mice exhibited normal motile area and CBF and partially delayed MCT due to abnormalities of ciliary ARC. Visualization of ciliary motion using μOCT provides quantitative assessment of ciliary motion and MCT. Comprehensive ciliary motion investigation in situ classifies ciliary motion defects and quantifies their contribution to delayed mucociliary clearance. PMID:28289722

  4. Abcg2 labels multiple cell types in skeletal muscle and participates in muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Michelle J.; Zhou, Sheng; Tanaka, Kathleen Kelly; Pisconti, Addolorata; Farina, Nicholas H.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains progenitor cells (satellite cells) that maintain and repair muscle. It also contains muscle side population (SP) cells, which express Abcg2 and may participate in muscle regeneration or may represent a source of satellite cell replenishment. In Abcg2-null mice, the SP fraction is lost in skeletal muscle, although the significance of this loss was previously unknown. We show that cells expressing Abcg2 increased upon injury and that muscle regeneration was impaired in Abcg2-null mice, resulting in fewer centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced myofiber size, and fewer satellite cells. Additionally, using genetic lineage tracing, we demonstrate that the progeny of Abcg2-expressing cells contributed to multiple cell types within the muscle interstitium, primarily endothelial cells. After injury, Abcg2 progeny made a minor contribution to regenerated myofibers. Furthermore, Abcg2-labeled cells increased significantly upon injury and appeared to traffic to muscle from peripheral blood. Together, these data suggest an important role for Abcg2 in positively regulating skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:21949413

  5. The role of muscle cells in regulating cartilage matrix production

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Dana M.; Lee, Philip G.; Uchimura, Tomoya; Seufert, Christopher R.; Kwon, Heenam; Zeng, Li

    2009-01-01

    Muscle is one of the tissues located in close proximity to cartilage tissue. Although it has been suggested that muscle could influence skeletal development through generating mechanical forces by means of contraction, very little is known regarding whether muscle cells release biochemical signals to regulate cartilage gene expression. We tested the hypothesis that muscle cells directly regulate cartilage matrix production by analyzing chondrocytes co-cultured with muscle cells in 2D or 3D conditions. We found that chondrocytes cultured with C2C12 muscle cells exhibited enhanced alcian blue staining and elevated expression of collagen II and collagen IX proteins. While non-muscle cells do not promote cartilage matrix production, converting them into muscle cells enhanced their pro-chondrogenic activity. Furthermore, muscle cell-conditioned medium led to increased cartilage matrix production, suggesting that muscle cells secrete pro-chondrogenic factors. Taken together, our study suggests that muscle cells may play an important role in regulating cartilage gene expression. This result may ultimately lead to the discovery of novel factors that regulate cartilage formation and homeostasis, and provide insights into improving the strategies for regenerating cartilage. PMID:19813241

  6. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Cultured Murine Muscle Cells Reproduces Gene Expression Changes of Trained Mouse Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Nathalie; Arnold, Anne-Sophie; Item, Flurin; Summermatter, Serge; Brochmann Santana Santos, Gesa; Christe, Martine; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco; Handschin, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Adequate levels of physical activity are at the center of a healthy lifestyle. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate the beneficial effects of exercise remain enigmatic. This gap in knowledge is caused by the lack of an amenable experimental model system. Therefore, we optimized electric pulse stimulation of muscle cells to closely recapitulate the plastic changes in gene expression observed in a trained skeletal muscle. The exact experimental conditions were established using the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) as a marker for an endurance-trained muscle fiber. We subsequently compared the changes in the relative expression of metabolic and myofibrillar genes in the muscle cell system with those observed in mouse muscle in vivo following either an acute or repeated bouts of treadmill exercise. Importantly, in electrically stimulated C2C12 mouse muscle cells, the qualitative transcriptional adaptations were almost identical to those in trained muscle, but differ from the acute effects of exercise on muscle gene expression. In addition, significant alterations in the expression of myofibrillar proteins indicate that this stimulation could be used to modulate the fiber-type of muscle cells in culture. Our data thus describe an experimental cell culture model for the study of at least some of the transcriptional aspects of skeletal muscle adaptation to physical activity. This system will be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms that regulate exercise adaptation in muscle. PMID:20532042

  7. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  8. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  9. Cell accumulation in the junctional region of denervated muscle

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    If skeletal muscles are denervated, the number of mononucleated cells in the connective tissue between muscle fibers increases. Since interstitial cells might remodel extracellular matrix, and since extracellular matrix in nerve and muscle plays a direct role in reinnervation of the sites of the original neuromuscular junctions, we sought to determine whether interstitial cell accumulation differs between junctional and extrajunctional regions of denervated muscle. We found in muscles from frog and rat that the increase in interstitial cell number was severalfold (14-fold for frog, sevenfold for rat) greater in the vicinity of junctional sites than in extrajunctional regions. Characteristics of the response at the junctional sites of frog muscles are as follows. During chronic denervation, the accumulation of interstitial cells begins within 1 wk and it is maximal by 3 wk. Reinnervation 1-2 wk after nerve damage prevents the maximal accumulation. Processes of the cells form a multilayered veil around muscle fibers but make little, if any, contact with the muscle cell or its basal lamina sheath. The results of additional experiments indicate that the accumulated cells do not originate from terminal Schwann cells or from muscle satellite cells. Most likely the cells are derived from fibroblasts that normally occupy the space between muscle fibers and are known to make and degrade extracellular matrix components. PMID:3491825

  10. Autofluorescent particles of human uterine muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gosden, R. G.; Hawkins, H. K.; Gosden, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    Smooth muscle tissue collected from the uterine fundus of 24 patients undergoing hysterectomy was examined for chromolipoid pigments by histochemical and electron microscopic techniques. Certain cytoplasmic particles were found, mainly in smooth muscle cells, which exhibited characteristic autofluorescence, sudanophilia, and acid phosphatase activity but did not correspond to any typical pigment described previously. These particles were present in all subjects and they tended to increase in number with age. Chemical tests on tissue lipid extracts failed to prove that vitamin A was responsible for the fluorescence. The ultrastructural appearance of the particles somewhat variable, but most particles were rounded and of low electron density, with a lucent central space and dense bodies, probably lysosomes, at the periphery. The whole complex was enclosed by a single trilaminar membrane. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 3 Figure 8 Figure 4 PMID:645817

  11. Conservation of ciliary proteins in plants with no cilia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic cilia are complex, highly conserved microtubule-based organelles with a broad phylogenetic distribution. Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and many proteins involved in cilia function have been conserved through eukaryotic diversification. However, cilia have also been lost multiple times in different lineages, with at least two losses occurring within the land plants. Whereas all non-seed plants produce cilia for motility of male gametes, some gymnosperms and all angiosperms lack cilia. During these evolutionary losses, proteins with ancestral ciliary functions may be lost or co-opted into different functions. Results Here we identify a core set of proteins with an inferred ciliary function that are conserved in ciliated eukaryotic species. We interrogate this genomic dataset to identify proteins with a predicted ancestral ciliary role that have been maintained in non-ciliated land plants. In support of our prediction, we demonstrate that several of these proteins have a flagellar localisation in protozoan trypanosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of these genes within the land plants indicates evolutionary scenarios of either sub- or neo-functionalisation and expression data analysis shows that these genes are highly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen cells. Conclusions A large number of proteins possess a phylogenetic ciliary profile indicative of ciliary function. Remarkably, many genes with an ancestral ciliary role are maintained in non-ciliated land plants. These proteins have been co-opted to perform novel functions, most likely before the loss of cilia, some of which appear related to the formation of the male gametes. PMID:22208660

  12. A Systematic Comparison of Mathematical Models for Inherent Measurement of Ciliary Length: How a Cell Can Measure Length and Volume

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, William B.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V.; Ritter, Alex; Hernandez-Lopez, Rogelio A.; Gunzenhauser, Julia; Kannegaard, Elisa; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    Cells control organelle size with great precision and accuracy to maintain optimal physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so are largely unknown. Cilia and flagella are simple organelles in which a single measurement, length, can represent size. Maintenance of flagellar length requires an active transport process known as intraflagellar transport, and previous measurements suggest that a length-dependent feedback regulates intraflagellar transport. But the question remains: how is a length-dependent signal produced to regulate intraflagellar transport appropriately? Several conceptual models have been suggested, but testing these models quantitatively requires that they be cast in mathematical form. Here, we derive a set of mathematical models that represent the main broad classes of hypothetical size-control mechanisms currently under consideration. We use these models to predict the relation between length and intraflagellar transport, and then compare the predicted relations for each model with experimental data. We find that three models—an initial bolus formation model, an ion current model, and a diffusion-based model—show particularly good agreement with available experimental data. The initial bolus and ion current models give mathematically equivalent predictions for length control, but fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments rule out the initial bolus model, suggesting that either the ion current model or a diffusion-based model is more likely correct. The general biophysical principles of the ion current and diffusion-based models presented here to measure cilia and flagellar length can be generalized to measure any membrane-bound organelle volume, such as the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:25809250

  13. Lkb1 deletion promotes ectopic lipid accumulation in muscle progenitor cells and mature muscles.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Zhang, Pengpeng; Bi, Pengpeng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-05-01

    Excessive intramyocellular triglycerides (muscle lipids) are associated with reduced contractile function, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes, but what governs lipid accumulation in muscle is unclear. Here we report a role of Lkb1 in regulating lipid metabolism in muscle stem cells and their descendent mature muscles. We used Myod(Cre) and Lkb1(flox/flox) mice to specifically delete Lkb1 in myogenic cells including stem and differentiated cells, and examined the lipid accumulation and gene expression of myoblasts cultured from muscle stem cells (satellite cells). Genetic deletion of Lkb1 in myogenic progenitors led to elevated expression of lipogenic genes and ectopic lipid accumulation in proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, the Lkb1-deficient myoblasts differentiated into adipocyte-like cells upon adipogenic induction. However, these adipocyte-like cells maintained myogenic gene expression with reduced ability to form myotubes efficiently. Activation of AMPK by AICAR prevented ectopic lipid formation in the Lkb1-null myoblasts. Notably, Lkb1-deficient muscles accumulated excessive lipids in vivo in response to high-fat diet feeding. These results demonstrate that Lkb1 acts through AMPK to limit lipid deposition in muscle stem cells and their derivative mature muscles, and point to the possibility of controlling muscle lipid content using AMPK activating drugs.

  14. The role of satellite cells in muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Bert; Reggiani, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    The role of satellite cells in muscle hypertrophy has long been a debated issue. In the late 1980s it was shown that proteins remain close to the myonucleus responsible for its synthesis, giving rise to the idea of a nuclear domain. This, together with the observation that during various models of muscle hypertrophy there is an activation of the muscle stem cells, i.e. satellite cells, lead to the idea that satellite cell activation is required for muscle hypertrophy. Thus, satellite cells are not only responsible for muscle repair and regeneration, but also for hypertrophic growth. Further support for this line of thinking was obtained after studies showing that irradiation of skeletal muscle, and therefore elimination of all satellite cells, completely prevented overload-induced hypertrophy. Recently however, using different transgenic approaches, it has become clear that muscle hypertrophy can occur without a contribution of satellite cells, even though in most situations of muscle hypertrophy satellite cells are activated. In this review we will discuss the contribution of satellite cells, and other muscle-resident stem cells, to muscle hypertrophy both in mice as well as in humans.

  15. Functional heterogeneity of side population cells in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Ojima, Koichi; Fukada, So-ichiro; Ikemoto, Madoka; Masuda, Satoru; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi . E-mail: takeda@ncnp.go.jp

    2006-03-17

    Skeletal muscle regeneration has been exclusively attributed to myogenic precursors, satellite cells. A stem cell-rich fraction referred to as side population (SP) cells also resides in skeletal muscle, but its roles in muscle regeneration remain unclear. We found that muscle SP cells could be subdivided into three sub-fractions using CD31 and CD45 markers. The majority of SP cells in normal non-regenerating muscle expressed CD31 and had endothelial characteristics. However, CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells, which are a minor subpopulation in normal muscle, actively proliferated upon muscle injury and expressed not only several regulatory genes for muscle regeneration but also some mesenchymal lineage markers. CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells showed the greatest myogenic potential among three SP sub-fractions, but indeed revealed mesenchymal potentials in vitro. These SP cells preferentially differentiated into myofibers after intramuscular transplantation in vivo. Our results revealed the heterogeneity of muscle SP cells and suggest that CD31{sup -}CD45{sup -} SP cells participate in muscle regeneration.

  16. Fetal muscle-derived cells can repair dystrophic muscles in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Auda-Boucher, Gwenola; Rouaud, Thierry; Lafoux, Aude; Levitsky, Dmitri; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Talon, Sophie; Fontaine-Pérus, Josiane; Gardahaut, Marie-France

    2007-03-10

    We have previously reported that CD34(+) cells purified from mouse fetal muscles can differentiate into skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo when injected into muscle tissue of dystrophic mdx mice. In this study, we investigate the ability of such donor cells to restore dystrophin expression, and to improve the functional muscle capacity of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of mdx mice. For this purpose green fluorescent-positive fetal GFP(+)/CD34(+) cells or desmin(+)/(-)LacZ/CD34(+) cells were transplanted into irradiated or non-irradiated mdx EDL muscle. Donor fetal muscle-derived cells predominantly fused with existing fibers. Indeed more than 50% of the myofibers of the host EDL contained donor nuclei delivering dystrophin along 80-90% of the length of their sarcolemma. The presence of significant amounts of dystrophin (about 60-70% of that found in a control wild-type mouse muscle) was confirmed by Western blot analyses. Dystrophin expression also outcompeted that of utrophin, as revealed by a spatial shift in the distribution of utrophin. At 1 month post-transplant, the recipient muscle appeared to have greater resistance to fatigue than control mdx EDL muscle during repeated maximal contractions.

  17. Measurement of ciliary flow generated on the surface of tracheal lumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, Koki; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-11-01

    Although we consistently take air with virus and bacteria, these harmful substances are trapped on the surface of tracheal lumen and transported toward larynx from the trachea and bronchi by effective ciliary motion and swallowed it (clearance function). However, the 3-dimensional flow field generated by inhomogeneously distributed ciliary cells are largely unknown. In this study, we first succeeded to measure the ciliated cells' density by staining actin of the epithelial cells and tubulin of the cilia, respectively. Second, we analyzed the ciliary motion by labeling the tip of cilia with fluorescent particles, and tracking their movements to understand the mechanism of the flow generation. Last, in order to clarify the flow field induced by the ciliary motion, we measured the motion of tracer particles on the surface of tracheal epithelial cells by a confocal micro-PTV system. The results show that the mean velocity and the velocity disturbance decayed rapidly as the height from the epithelial cells were increased.

  18. Muscle satellite cells are a functionally heterogeneous population in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yusuke; Boldrin, Luisa; Knopp, Paul; Morgan, Jennifer E; Zammit, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of body and limb are derived from somites, but most head muscles originate from cranial mesoderm. The resident stem cells of muscle are satellite cells, which have the same embryonic origin as the muscle in which they reside. Here, we analysed satellite cells with a different ontology, comparing those of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the limb with satellite cells from the masseter of the head. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts from MAS and EDL muscles had distinct gene expression profiles and masseter cells usually proliferated more and differentiated later than those from EDL. When transplanted, however, masseter-derived satellite cells regenerated limb muscles as efficiently as those from EDL. Clonal analysis showed that functional properties differed markedly between satellite cells: ranging from clones that proliferated extensively and gave rise to both differentiated and self-renewed progeny, to others that divided minimally before differentiating completely. Generally, masseter-derived clones were larger and took longer to differentiate than those from EDL. This distribution in cell properties was preserved in both EDL-derived and masseter-derived satellite cells from old mice, although clones were generally less proliferative. Satellite cells, therefore, are a functionally heterogeneous population, with many occupants of the niche exhibiting stem cell characteristics in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

  19. Trafficking to the Ciliary Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Nachury, Maxence V.; Seeley, E. Scott; Jin, Hua

    2010-01-01

    The primary cilium organizes numerous signal transduction cascades and an understanding of signaling receptors trafficking to cilia is now emerging. A defining feature of cilia is the periciliary diffusion barrier that separates the ciliary and plasma membranes despite the topological continuity between these two membranes. Although lateral transport through this barrier may take place, polarized exocytosis to the base of the cilium has been the prevailing model for delivering membrane proteins to cilia. Key players for this polarized exocytosis model include the GTPases Rab8 and Rab11, the exocyst and possibly the intraflagellar tranport machinery. Sorting membrane proteins to cilia critically relies on the recognition of ciliary targeting signals by sorting machines such as the BBSome coat complex or the GTPase Arf4. Finally, signaling at the cilium entails the bidirectional movement of proteins between cytoplasm and cilia and ubiquitination may promote exit from cilia. PMID:19575670

  20. Novel insight into stem cell trafficking in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Farini, Andrea; Villa, Chiara; Manescu, Adrian; Fiori, Fabrizio; Giuliani, Alessandra; Razini, Paola; Sitzia, Clementina; Del Fraro, Giulia; Belicchi, Marzia; Meregalli, Mirella; Rustichelli, Franco; Torrente, Yvan

    2012-01-01

    Recently published reports have described possible cellular therapy approaches to regenerate muscle tissues using arterial route delivery. However, the kinetic of distribution of these migratory stem cells within injected animal muscular dystrophy models is unknown. Using living X-ray computed microtomography, we established that intra-arterially injected stem cells traffic to multiple muscle tissues for several hours until their migration within dystrophic muscles. Injected stem cells express multiple traffic molecules, including VLA-4, LFA-1, CD44, and the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which are likely to direct these cells into dystrophic muscles. In fact, the majority of intra-arterially injected stem cells access the muscle tissues not immediately after the injection, but after several rounds of recirculation. We set up a new, living, 3D-imaging approach, which appears to be an important way to investigate the kinetic of distribution of systemically injected stem cells within dystrophic muscle tissues, thereby providing supportive data for future clinical applications.

  1. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  2. Role of muscle stem cells during skeletal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Lieu, Shirley; Julien, Anais; Perry, Jaselle; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph; Colnot, Céline

    2015-05-01

    Although the importance of muscle in skeletal regeneration is well recognized clinically, the mechanisms by which muscle supports bone repair have remained elusive. Muscle flaps are often used to cover the damaged bone after traumatic injury yet their contribution to bone healing is not known. Here, we show that direct bone-muscle interactions are required for periosteum activation and callus formation, and that muscle grafts provide a source of stem cells for skeletal regeneration. We investigated the role of satellite cells, the muscle stem cells. Satellite cells loss in Pax7(-/-) mice and satellite cell ablation in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice impaired bone regeneration. Although satellite cells did not contribute as a large source of cells endogenously, they exhibited a potential to contribute to bone repair after transplantation. The fracture healing phenotype in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice was associated with decreased bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), insulin-like growth factor 1, and fibroblast growth factor 2 expression that are normally upregulated in response to fracture in satellite cells. Exogenous rhBMP2 improved bone healing in Pax7(Cre) (ERT) (2/) (+) ;DTA(f/f) mice further supporting the role of satellite cells as a source of growth factors. These results provide the first functional evidence for a direct contribution of muscle to bone regeneration with important clinical implications as it may impact the use of muscle flaps, muscle stem cells, and growth factors in orthopedic applications.

  3. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function.

  4. Transcriptional networks that regulate muscle stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Punch, Vincent G; Jones, Andrew E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Muscle stem cells comprise different populations of stem and progenitor cells found in embryonic and adult tissues. A number of signaling and transcriptional networks are responsible for specification and survival of these cell populations and regulation of their behavior during growth and regeneration. Muscle progenitor cells are mostly derived from the somites of developing embryos, while satellite cells are the progenitor cells responsible for the majority of postnatal growth and adult muscle regeneration. In resting muscle, these stem cells are quiescent, but reenter the cell cycle during their activation, whereby they undergo decisions to self-renew, proliferate, or differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myofibers to repair damaged muscle. Regulation of muscle stem cell activity is under the precise control of a number of extrinsic signaling pathways and active transcriptional networks that dictate their behavior, fate, and regenerative potential. Here, we review the networks responsible for these different aspects of muscle stem cell biology and discuss prevalent parallels between mechanisms regulating the activity of embryonic muscle progenitor cells and adult satellite cells.

  5. Isolation and Culture of Satellite Cells from Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Musarò, Antonio; Carosio, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by a population of quiescent mononucleated myoblasts, localized between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers, known as satellite cells. Satellite cells play a pivotal role in muscle homeostasis and are the major source of myogenic precursors in mammalian muscle regeneration.This chapter describes protocols for isolation and culturing satellite cells isolated from mouse skeletal muscles. The classical procedure, which will be discussed extensively in this chapter, involves the enzymatic dissociation of skeletal muscles, while the alternative method involves isolation of satellite cells from isolated myofibers in which the satellite cells remain in their in situ position underneath the myofiber basal lamina.In particular, we discuss the technical aspect of satellite cell isolation, the methods necessary to enrich the satellite cell fraction and the culture conditions that optimize proliferation and myotube formation of mouse satellite cells.

  6. The muscle satellite cell at 50: the formative years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In February 1961, Alexander Mauro described a cell 'wedged' between the plasma membrane of the muscle fibre and the surrounding basement membrane. He postulated that it could be a dormant myoblast, poised to repair muscle when needed. In the same month, Bernard Katz also reported a cell in a similar location on muscle spindles, suggesting that it was associated with development and growth of intrafusal muscle fibres. Both Mauro and Katz used the term 'satellite cell' in relation to their discoveries. Today, the muscle satellite cell is widely accepted as the resident stem cell of skeletal muscle, supplying myoblasts for growth, homeostasis and repair. Since 2011 marks both the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the satellite cell, and the launch of Skeletal Muscle, it seems an opportune moment to summarise the seminal events in the history of research into muscle regeneration. We start with the 19th-century pioneers who showed that muscle had a regenerative capacity, through to the descriptions from the mid-20th century of the underlying cellular mechanisms. The journey of the satellite cell from electron microscope curio, to its gradual acceptance as a bona fide myoblast precursor, is then charted: work that provided the foundations for our understanding of the role of the satellite cell. Finally, the rapid progress in the age of molecular biology is briefly discussed, and some ongoing debates on satellite cell function highlighted. PMID:21849021

  7. Amino acid pools in cultured muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Low, R B; Stirewalt, W S; Rittling, S R; Woodworth, R C

    1984-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular amino acid pools occurs in cultures of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, but the factors involved in this are not clear. We have further defined this problem by analyzing the intracellular free leucine and the transfer-RNA-(tRNA)-bound leucine pool in cultures of skeletal and cardiac muscle incubated with 3H-leucine in the presence and absence of serum and amino acids. Withdrawal of nitrogen substrates caused substantial changes in leucine pool relationships--in particular, a change in the degree to which intracellular free leucine and tRNA-leucine were derived from the culture medium. In separate experiments, the validity of our tRNA measurements was confirmed by measurements of the specific activity of newly synthesized ferritin after iron induction. We discuss the implications of these findings with regard to factors involved in the control of amino acid flux through the cell, as well as with regard to design of experiments using isotopic amino acids to measure rates of amino acid utilization.

  8. Ciliary Extracellular Vesicles: Txt Msg Organelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M

    2016-04-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and Caenorhabditis elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. Caenorhabditis elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport-dependent manner. Caenorhabditis elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions. Until the 21st century, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies.

  9. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and C. elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. C. elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent manner. C. elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions, suggest the cilium may be an important organelle as an EV donor or as an EV target. Until the past few decades, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies. PMID:26983828

  10. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Somik; Yin, Hongshan; Nam, Deokhwa; Li, Yong; Ma, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  11. Ciliary microtubule capping structures contain a mammalian kinetochore antigen

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Structures that cap the plus ends of microtubules may be involved in the regulation of their assembly and disassembly. Growing and disassembling microtubules in the mitotic apparatus are capped by kinetochores and ciliary and flagellar microtubules are capped by the central microtubule cap and distal filaments. To compare the ciliary caps with kinetochores, isolated Tetrahymena cilia were stained with CREST (Calcinosis/phenomenon esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) antisera known to stain kinetochores. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that a CREST antiserum stained the distal tips of cilia that contained capping structures but did not stain axonemes that lacked capping structures. Both Coomassie blue- stained gels and Western blots probed with CREST antiserum revealed that a 97-kD antigen copurifies with the capping structures. Affinity- purified antibodies to the 97-kD ciliary protein stained the tips of cap-containing Tetrahymena cilia and the kinetochores in HeLa, Chinese hamster ovary, and Indian muntjak cells. These results suggest that at least one polypeptide found in the kinetochore is present in ciliary microtubule capping structures and that there may be a structural and/or functional homology between these structures that cap the plus ends of microtubules. PMID:2106524

  12. Dissemination of Walker 256 carcinoma cells to rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ueoka, H.; Hayashi, K.; Namba, T.; Grob, D.

    1986-03-05

    After injection of 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells labelled with /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine into the tail vein, peak concentration in skeletal muscle was 46 cells/g at 60 minutes, which was lower than 169202, 1665, 555, 198 and 133 cells/g, respectively, at 30 or 60 minutes in lung, liver, spleen, kidney and heart. Because skeletal muscle constitutes 37.4% of body weight, the total number of tumor cells was 2323 cells, which was much greater than in spleen, kidney and heart with 238, 271, and 85 cells, respectively, and only less than in lung and liver, at 222857 and 11700 cells, respectively. The total number in skeletal muscle became greater than in liver at 4 hours and than in lung at 24 hours. Ten minutes after injection of 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the abdominal aorta of rats, a mean of 31 colony-forming cells were recovered from the gastrocnemius, while 106 cells were recovered from the lung after injection into the tail vein. These results indicate that a large number of viable tumor cells can be arrested in skeletal muscle through circulation. The rare remote metastasis of malignancies into skeletal muscle despite constantly circulating tumor cells does not appear to be due to poor dissemination of tumor cells into muscle but due to unhospitable environment of skeletal muscle.

  13. Advancements in stem cells treatment of skeletal muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Torrente, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, in which progressive muscle wasting and weakness is often associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. Although physiological properties of skeletal muscle tissue are now well known, no treatments are effective for these diseases. Muscle regeneration was attempted by means transplantation of myogenic cells (from myoblast to embryonic stem cells) and also by interfering with the malignant processes that originate in pathological tissues, such as uncontrolled fibrosis and inflammation. Taking into account the advances in the isolation of new subpopulation of stem cells and in the creation of artificial stem cell niches, we discuss how these emerging technologies offer great promises for therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases and muscle wasting associated with aging. PMID:24575052

  14. PEDF-derived peptide promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through its mitogenic effect on muscle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chiang, Yi-Pin; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Chen, Show-Li; Hsieh, Jui-Wen; Lan, Yu-Wen; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2015-08-01

    In response injury, intrinsic repair mechanisms are activated in skeletal muscle to replace the damaged muscle fibers with new muscle fibers. The regeneration process starts with the proliferation of satellite cells to give rise to myoblasts, which subsequently differentiate terminally into myofibers. Here, we investigated the promotion effect of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) on muscle regeneration. We report that PEDF and a synthetic PEDF-derived short peptide (PSP; residues Ser(93)-Leu(112)) induce satellite cell proliferation in vitro and promote muscle regeneration in vivo. Extensively, soleus muscle necrosis was induced in rats by bupivacaine, and an injectable alginate gel was used to release the PSP in the injured muscle. PSP delivery was found to stimulate satellite cell proliferation in damaged muscle and enhance the growth of regenerating myofibers, with complete regeneration of normal muscle mass by 2 wk. In cell culture, PEDF/PSP stimulated C2C12 myoblast proliferation, together with a rise in cyclin D1 expression. PEDF induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 in C2C12 myoblasts. Blocking the activity of ERK, Akt, or STAT3 with pharmacological inhibitors attenuated the effects of PEDF/PSP on the induction of C2C12 cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine pulse-labeling demonstrated that PEDF/PSP stimulated primary rat satellite cell proliferation in myofibers in vitro. In summary, we report for the first time that PSP is capable of promoting the regeneration of skeletal muscle. The signaling mechanism involves the ERK, AKT, and STAT3 pathways. These results show the potential utility of this PEDF peptide for muscle regeneration.

  15. Aging, metabolism and stem cells: Spotlight on muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-04-15

    All tissues and organs undergo a progressive regenerative decline as they age. This decline has been mainly attributed to loss of stem cell number and/or function, and both stem cell-intrinsic changes and alterations in local niches and/or systemic environment over time are known to contribute to the stem cell aging phenotype. Advancing in the molecular understanding of the deterioration of stem cell cells with aging is key for targeting the specific causes of tissue regenerative dysfunction at advanced stages of life. Here, we revise exciting recent findings on why stem cells age and the consequences on tissue regeneration, with a special focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle. We also highlight newly identified common molecular pathways affecting diverse types of aging stem cells, such as altered proteostasis, metabolism, or senescence entry, and discuss the questions raised by these findings. Finally, we comment on emerging stem cell rejuvenation strategies, principally emanating from studies on muscle stem cells, which will surely burst tissue regeneration research for future benefit of the increasing human aging population.

  16. Action of obestatin in skeletal muscle repair: stem cell expansion, muscle growth, and microenvironment remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-06-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration.

  17. Action of Obestatin in Skeletal Muscle Repair: Stem Cell Expansion, Muscle Growth, and Microenvironment Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration. PMID:25762009

  18. Rejuvenating stem cells to restore muscle regeneration in aging

    PubMed Central

    Bengal, Eyal; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Serrano, Antonio L.; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2017-01-01

    Adult muscle stem cells, originally called satellite cells, are essential for muscle repair and regeneration throughout life. Besides a gradual loss of mass and function, muscle aging is characterized by a decline in the repair capacity, which blunts muscle recovery after injury in elderly individuals. A major effort has been dedicated in recent years to deciphering the causes of satellite cell dysfunction in aging animals, with the ultimate goal of rejuvenating old satellite cells and improving muscle function in elderly people. This review focuses on the recently identified network of cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors and processes contributing to the decline of satellite cells in old animals. Some studies suggest that aging-related satellite-cell decay is mostly caused by age-associated extrinsic environmental changes that could be reversed by a “youthful environment”. Others propose a central role for cell-intrinsic mechanisms, some of which are not reversed by environmental changes. We believe that these proposals, far from being antagonistic, are complementary and that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors contribute to muscle stem cell dysfunction during aging-related regenerative decline. The low regenerative potential of old satellite cells may reflect the accumulation of deleterious changes during the life of the cell; some of these changes may be inherent (intrinsic) while others result from the systemic and local environment (extrinsic). The present challenge is to rejuvenate aged satellite cells that have undergone reversible changes to provide a possible approach to improving muscle repair in the elderly. PMID:28163911

  19. 3D Cell Printing of Functional Skeletal Muscle Constructs Using Skeletal Muscle-Derived Bioink.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeong-Jin; Kim, Taek Gyoung; Jeong, Jonghyeon; Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Park, Ji Won; Hwang, Woonbong; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-10-01

    Engineered skeletal muscle tissues that mimic the structure and function of native muscle have been considered as an alternative strategy for the treatment of various muscular diseases and injuries. Here, it is demonstrated that 3D cell-printing of decellularized skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (mdECM)-based bioink facilitates the fabrication of functional skeletal muscle constructs. The cellular alignment and the shape of the tissue constructs are controlled by 3D cell-printing technology. mdECM bioink provides the 3D cell-printed muscle constructs with a myogenic environment that supports high viability and contractility as well as myotube formation, differentiation, and maturation. More interestingly, the preservation of agrin is confirmed in the mdECM, and significant increases in the formation of acetylcholine receptor clusters are exhibited in the 3D cell-printed muscle constructs. In conclusion, mdECM bioink and 3D cell-printing technology facilitate the mimicking of both the structural and functional properties of native muscle and hold great promise for producing clinically relevant engineered muscle for the treatment of muscular injuries.

  20. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  1. Progressive Muscle Cell Delivery as a Solution for Volumetric Muscle Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing functional volumetric tissue in vivo following implantation remains a critical challenge facing cell-based approaches. Several pre-vascularization approaches have been developed to increase cell viability following implantation. Structural and functional restoration was achieved in a preclinical rodent tissue defect; however, the approach used in this model fails to repair larger (>mm) defects as observed in a clinical setting. We propose an effective cell delivery system utilizing appropriate vascularization at the site of cell implantation that results in volumetric and functional tissue reconstruction. Our method of multiple cell injections in a progressive manner yielded improved cell survival and formed volumetric muscle tissues in an ectopic muscle site. In addition, this strategy supported the reconstruction of functional skeletal muscle tissue in a rodent volumetric muscle loss injury model. Results from our study suggest that our method may be used to repair volumetric tissue defects by overcoming diffusion limitations and facilitating adequate vascularization. PMID:27924941

  2. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John J; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S; Esser, Karyn A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2011-09-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca(2+) sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells.

  3. PRIMARY CILIARY DYSKINESIA: DIAGNOSTIC AND PHENOTYPIC FEATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease characterized by abnormalities in ciliary structure/function. We hypothesized that the major clinical and biologic phenotypic markers of the disease could be evaluated by studying a cohort of subjects suspected of having PCD. ...

  4. Molecular mechanisms of protein and lipid targeting to ciliary membranes

    PubMed Central

    Emmer, Brian T.; Maric, Danijela; Engman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Cilia are specialized surface regions of eukaryotic cells that serve a variety of functions, ranging from motility to sensation and to regulation of cell growth and differentiation. The discovery that a number of human diseases, collectively known as ciliopathies, result from defective cilium function has expanded interest in these structures. Among the many properties of cilia, motility and intraflagellar transport have been most extensively studied. The latter is the process by which multiprotein complexes associate with microtubule motors to transport structural subunits along the axoneme to and from the ciliary tip. By contrast, the mechanisms by which membrane proteins and lipids are specifically targeted to the cilium are still largely unknown. In this Commentary, we review the current knowledge of protein and lipid targeting to ciliary membranes and outline important issues for future study. We also integrate this information into a proposed model of how the cell specifically targets proteins and lipids to the specialized membrane of this unique organelle. PMID:20145001

  5. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  6. Cytoglobin modulates myogenic progenitor cell viability and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvjeet; Canseco, Diana C; Manda, Shilpa M; Shelton, John M; Chirumamilla, Rajendra R; Goetsch, Sean C; Ye, Qiu; Gerard, Robert D; Schneider, Jay W; Richardson, James A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Mammen, Pradeep P A

    2014-01-07

    Mammalian skeletal muscle can remodel, repair, and regenerate itself by mobilizing satellite cells, a resident population of myogenic progenitor cells. Muscle injury and subsequent activation of myogenic progenitor cells is associated with oxidative stress. Cytoglobin is a hemoprotein expressed in response to oxidative stress in a variety of tissues, including striated muscle. In this study, we demonstrate that cytoglobin is up-regulated in activated myogenic progenitor cells, where it localizes to the nucleus and contributes to cell viability. siRNA-mediated depletion of cytoglobin from C2C12 myoblasts increased levels of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic cell death both at baseline and in response to stress stimuli. Conversely, overexpression of cytoglobin reduced reactive oxygen species levels, caspase activity, and cell death. Mice in which cytoglobin was knocked out specifically in skeletal muscle were generated to examine the role of cytoglobin in vivo. Myogenic progenitor cells isolated from these mice were severely deficient in their ability to form myotubes as compared with myogenic progenitor cells from wild-type littermates. Consistent with this finding, the capacity for muscle regeneration was severely impaired in mice deficient for skeletal-muscle cytoglobin. Collectively, these data demonstrate that cytoglobin serves an important role in muscle repair and regeneration.

  7. Myogenic skeletal muscle satellite cells communicate by tunnelling nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tavi, Pasi; Korhonen, Topi; Hänninen, Sandra L; Bruton, Joseph D; Lööf, Sara; Simon, Andras; Westerblad, Håkan

    2010-05-01

    Quiescent satellite cells sit on the surface of the muscle fibres under the basal lamina and are activated by a variety of stimuli to disengage, divide and differentiate into myoblasts that can regenerate or repair muscle fibres. Satellite cells adopt their parent's fibre type and must have some means of communication with the parent fibre. The mechanisms behind this communication are not known. We show here that satellite cells form dynamic connections with muscle fibres and other satellite cells by F-actin based tunnelling nanotubes (TNTs). Our results show that TNTs readily develop between satellite cells and muscle fibres. Once developed, TNTs permit transport of intracellular material, and even cellular organelles such as mitochondria between the muscle fibre and satellite cells. The onset of satellite cell differentiation markers Pax-7 and MyoD expression was slower in satellite cells cultured in the absence than in the presence of muscle cells. Furthermore physical contact between myofibre and satellite cell progeny is required to maintain subtype identity. Our data establish that TNTs constitute an integral part of myogenic cell communication and that physical cellular interaction control myogenic cell fate determination.

  8. Effect of azelastine on sulphur dioxide induced impairment of ciliary motility in airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, J; Chiyotani, A; Sakai, N; Takeyama, K; Konno, K

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--The effect of azelastine on airway mucociliary transport function was studied by measuring ciliary motility of human bronchial epithelium in vitro with a photoelectric method. METHOD--Bronchial epithelial cells were obtained by fibreoptic bronchoscopy, mounted in a Rose chamber, and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. The preparations were placed on a microscope stage equipped with an illuminator, and the variations of light intensity caused by ciliary beating were detected by a photometer. RESULTS--The addition of azelastine to the perfusate increased ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in a dose dependent manner without ciliary discoordination. The mean (SE) maximal increase from the baseline value and the concentration required to produce a half maximal effect were 27.0 (4.2)% and 9.2 x 10(-6) mol/l, respectively. Exposure of the cells to the perfusate containing 3 ppm sulphur dioxide rapidly decreased CBF by 59.2 (5.0)%, and was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels from 38.1 (4.3) to 10.1 (2.4) pmol/mg protein. This effect was prevented by pretreatment of cells with azelastine in a dose dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS--Azelastine not only stimulates ciliary motility of airway epithelium and hence mucociliary transport function, but may also protect against sulphur dioxide induced ciliary dysfunction, probably by inhibiting intracellular cyclic AMP loss. PMID:8322244

  9. Selective Expansion of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells From Bulk Muscle Cells in Soft Three-Dimensional Fibrin Gel.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pei; Zhou, Yalu; Wu, Furen; Hong, Yuanfan; Wang, Xin; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Mosenson, Jeffrey; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2017-02-28

    Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) exhibit robust myogenic potential in vivo, thus providing a promising curative treatment for muscle disorders. Ex vivo expansion of adult MuSCs is highly desired to achieve a therapeutic cell dose because of their scarcity in limited muscle biopsies. Sorting of pure MuSCs is generally required for all the current culture systems. Here we developed a soft three-dimensional (3D) salmon fibrin gel culture system that can selectively expand mouse MuSCs from bulk skeletal muscle preparations without cell sorting and faithfully maintain their regenerative capacity in culture. Our study established a novel platform for convenient ex vivo expansion of MuSCs, thus greatly advancing stem cell-based therapies for various muscle disorders. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  10. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-08

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool.

  11. Cl− channels in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bulley, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In smooth muscle cells (SMCs), the intracellular chloride ion (Cl−) concentration is high due to accumulation by Cl−/HCO3− exchange and Na+, K+, Cl− cotransportation. The equilibrium potential for Cl− (ECl) is more positive than physiological membrane potentials (Em), with Cl− efflux inducing membrane depolarization. Early studies used electrophysiology and non-specific antagonists to study the physiological relevance of Cl− channels in SMCs. More recent reports have incorporated molecular biological approaches to identify and determine the functional significance of several different Cl− channels. Both “classic” and cGMP-dependent calcium (Ca2+)-activated (ClCa) channels and volume-sensitive Cl− channels are present, with TMEM16A/ANO1, bestrophins and ClC-3, respectively, proposed as molecular candidates for these channels. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has also been described in SMCs. This review will focus on discussing recent progress made in identifying each of these Cl− channels in SMCs, their physiological functions, and contribution to diseases that modify contraction, apoptosis and cell proliferation. PMID:24077695

  12. ARMC4 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia with randomization of left/right body asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Hjeij, Rim; Lindstrand, Anna; Francis, Richard; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Li, You; Damerla, Rama; Dougherty, Gerard W; Abouhamed, Marouan; Olbrich, Heike; Loges, Niki T; Pennekamp, Petra; Davis, Erica E; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Pehlivan, Davut; Werner, Claudius; Raidt, Johanna; Köhler, Gabriele; Häffner, Karsten; Reyes-Mugica, Miguel; Lupski, James R; Leigh, Margaret W; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Morgan, Lucy C; Knowles, Michael R; Lo, Cecilia W; Katsanis, Nicholas; Omran, Heymut

    2013-08-08

    The motive forces for ciliary movement are generated by large multiprotein complexes referred to as outer dynein arms (ODAs), which are preassembled in the cytoplasm prior to transport to the ciliary axonemal compartment. In humans, defects in structural components, docking complexes, or cytoplasmic assembly factors can cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a disorder characterized by chronic airway disease and defects in laterality. By using combined high resolution copy-number variant and mutation analysis, we identified ARMC4 mutations in twelve PCD individuals whose cells showed reduced numbers of ODAs and severely impaired ciliary beating. Transient suppression in zebrafish and analysis of an ENU mouse mutant confirmed in both model organisms that ARMC4 is critical for left-right patterning. We demonstrate that ARMC4 is an axonemal protein that is necessary for proper targeting and anchoring of ODAs.

  13. Skeletal muscle satellite cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Greg; Hartzell, Charles R.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cells are postnatal myoblasts responsible for providing additional nuclei to growing or regenerating muscle cells. Satellite cells retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro and therefore provide a useful model to study postnatal muscle development. Most culture systems used to study postnatal muscle development are limited by the two-dimensional (2-D) confines of the culture dish. Limiting proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in 2-D could potentially limit cell-cell contacts important for developing the level of organization in skeletal muscle obtained in vivo. Culturing satellite cells on microcarrier beads suspended in the High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) designed by NASA provides a low shear, three-dimensional (3-D) environment to study muscle development. Primary cultures established from anterior tibialis muscles of growing rats (approximately 200 gm) were used for all studies and were composed of greater than 75 % satellite cells. Different inoculation densities did not affect the proliferative potential of satellite cells in the HARV. Plating efficiency, proliferation, and glucose utilization were compared between 2-D flat culture and 3-D HARV culture. Plating efficiency (cells attached - cells plated x 100) was similar between the two culture systems. Proliferation was reduced in HARV cultures and this reduction was apparent for both satellite cells and non-satellite cells. Furthermore, reduction in proliferation within the HARV could not be attributed to reduced substrate availability since glucose levels in media from HARV and 2-D cell culture were similar. Morphologically, microcarrier beads within the HARVS were joined together by cells into three-dimensional aggregates composed of greater than 10 beads/aggregate. Aggregation of beads did not occur in the absence of cells. Myotubes were often seen on individual beads or spanning the surface of two beads. In summary, proliferation and differentiation of

  14. Connexins form functional hemichannels in porcine ciliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    The expression of connexins in the ciliary epithelium is consistent with gap junctions between the pigmented (PE) and nonpigmented ciliary epithelium (NPE) that form when connexon hemichannels from adjacent cells pair to form a channel. Here we present evidence that suggests undocked connexons may form functional hemichannels that permit exchange of substances between NPE and the aqueous humor. Intact porcine eyes were perfused via the ciliary artery and propidium iodide (PI) (MW 668) was added to the aqueous humor compartment as a tracer. After calcium-free solution containing PI was introduced into the aqueous humor compartment for 30 min, fluorescence microscopy revealed PI in the NPE cell layer. PI entry into the NPE was inhibited by calcium and by the connexin antagonist 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18-AGA). Studies also were carried out with cultured porcine NPE. Under normal conditions, little PI entered the cultured cells but calcium-free medium stimulated PI accumulation and the entry was inhibited by 18-AGA. In cells loaded with calcein (MW 622), calcium-free solution stimulated calcein exit. 18-AGA partially suppressed calcein exit in calcium-free medium. Connexin 43 and connexin 50 proteins were detected by western blot analysis in both native and cultured NPE. In the intact eye, immunolocalization studies revealed connexin 50 at the basolateral, aqueous humor-facing, margin of the NPE. In contrast, connexin 43 was observed at the junction of the PE and NPE layer and on the basolateral membrane of PE. The results point to functional hemichannels at the NPE basolateral surface. It is feasible that hemichannels might contribute to the transfer of substances between the ciliary epithelium cytoplasm and aqueous humor.

  15. Muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are hematopoietic in origin

    PubMed Central

    McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Jackson, Kathyjo A.; Camargo, Fernando D.; Ferrari, Giuliana; Mavilio, Fulvio; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been shown that mononuclear cells from murine skeletal muscle contain the potential to repopulate all major peripheral blood lineages in lethally irradiated mice, but the origin of this activity is unknown. We have fractionated muscle cells on the basis of hematopoietic markers to show that the active population exclusively expresses the hematopoietic stem cell antigens Sca-1 and CD45. Muscle cells obtained from 6- to 8-week-old C57BL/6-CD45.1 mice and enriched for cells expressing Sca-1 and CD45 were able to generate hematopoietic but not myogenic colonies in vitro and repopulated multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated C57BL/6-CD45.2 mice. These data show that muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells are likely derived from the hematopoietic system and are a result not of transdifferentiation of myogenic stem cells but instead of the presence of substantial numbers of hematopoietic stem cells in the muscle. Although CD45-negative cells were highly myogenic in vitro and in vivo, CD45-positive muscle-derived cells displayed only very limited myogenic activity and only in vivo. PMID:11830662

  16. Somitic origin of limb muscle satellite and side population cells

    PubMed Central

    Schienda, Jaclyn; Engleka, Kurt A.; Jun, Susan; Hansen, Mark S.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Tabin, Clifford J.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2006-01-01

    Repair of mature skeletal muscle is mediated by adult muscle progenitors. Satellite cells have long been recognized as playing a major role in muscle repair, whereas side population (SP) cells have more recently been identified as contributing to this process. The developmental source of these two progenitor populations has been considerably debated. We explicitly tested and quantified the contribution of embryonic somitic cells to these progenitor populations. Chick somitic cells were labeled by using replication-defective retroviruses or quail/chick chimeras, and mouse cells were labeled by crossing somite-specific, Pax3-derived Cre driver lines with a Cre-dependent reporter line. We show that the majority of, if not all, limb muscle satellite cells arise from cells expressing Pax3 specifically in the hypaxial somite and their migratory derivatives. We also find that a significant number of, but not all, limb muscle SP cells are derived from the hypaxial somite. Notably, the heterogeneity in the developmental origin of SP cells is reflected in their functional heterogeneity; somitically derived SP cells are intrinsically more myogenic than nonsomitically derived ones. Thus, we show that the somites, which supply embryonic and fetal myoblasts, are also an important source of highly myogenic adult muscle progenitors. PMID:16418263

  17. Skeletal Muscle Cell Behavior After Physical Agent Treatments.

    PubMed

    Battistelli, Michela; Salucci, Sara; Guescini, Michele; Curzi, Davide; Stocchi, Vilberto; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is essential for skeletal muscle development and homeostasis. It has been frequently involved in several muscle myopathies and sarcopenia, as well as in denervation, in disuse and acute strenuous or eccentric physical exercise. In this work skeletal muscle cell death, induced in vitro by a variety of physical triggers, has been investigated. C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes were exposed to UVB for 30 min, hyperthermia for 1 h at 43 °C, low pH for 3 h, hypothermia for 4h at 0 - 6°C, all followed by 2 - 4 h recovery. Their effects have been analysed by means of morpho- functional and molecular approaches. After UVB radiation, hyperthermia and acidosis, morphological apoptotic features and in situ DNA fragmentation appeared, more evident in myoblasts. Interestingly, apoptotic, non apoptotic and necrotic nuclei could be occasionally observed within the same myotube. Low pH induced apoptosis and necrosis, both characterized by swollen nuclei. In all these experimental conditions, the molecular investigations revealed a caspase pathway involvement in inducing cell death. Differently, hypothermia showed a scant and initial chromatin margination, in the presence of a diffused autophagic component. In this case, in situ DNA fragmentation and caspase activation have not been detected. Myoblasts and myotubes appeared sensitive to physical agents, some of which, induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, hypothermia exposure seemed to enhance autophagic response, thus representing a way to delay trauma-correlated muscle inflammation. This study permits to highlight skeletal muscle cell behavior in response to physical agents, by adding important information to muscle cell death knowledge. UVB radiation and hyperthermia, usually used in clinical therapy, have also adverse effects on skeletal muscle such as myonuclei loss and cell death, contributing to muscle mass decrease. Acidosis occurs physiologically in muscular fatigue, reducing not only the athlete performance, but

  18. Cyanide levels found in infected cystic fibrosis sputum inhibit airway ciliary function.

    PubMed

    Nair, Chandrika; Shoemark, Amelia; Chan, Mario; Ollosson, Sarah; Dixon, Mellissa; Hogg, Claire; Alton, Eric W F W; Davies, Jane C; Williams, Huw D

    2014-11-01

    We have previously reported cyanide at concentrations of up to 150 μM in the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a negative correlation with lung function. Our aim was to investigate possible mechanisms for this association, focusing on the effect of pathophysiologically relevant cyanide levels on human respiratory cell function. Ciliary beat frequency measurements were performed on nasal brushings and nasal air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures obtained from healthy volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients. Potassium cyanide decreased ciliary beat frequency in healthy nasal brushings (n = 6) after 60 min (150 μM: 47% fall, p<0.0012; 75 μM: 32% fall, p<0.0001). Samples from cystic fibrosis patients (n = 3) showed similar results (150 μM: 55% fall, p = 0.001). Ciliary beat frequency inhibition was not due to loss of cell viability and was reversible. The inhibitory mechanism was independent of ATP levels. KCN also significantly inhibited ciliary beat frequency in ALI cultures, albeit to a lesser extent. Ciliary beat frequency measurements on ALI cultures treated with culture supernatants from P. aeruginosa mutants defective in virulence factor production implicated cyanide as a key component inhibiting the ciliary beat frequency. If cyanide production similarly impairs mucocilliary clearance in vivo, it could explain the link with increased disease severity observed in cystic fibrosis patients with detectable cyanide in their airway.

  19. Establishment of bipotent progenitor cell clone from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Yada, Erica; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2011-12-01

    The present study describes the isolation, cloning and characterization of adipogenic progenitor cells from rat skeletal muscle. Among the obtained 10 clones, the most highly adipogenic progenitor, 2G11 cells, were further characterized. In addition to their adipogenicity, 2G11 cells retain myogenic potential as revealed by formation of multinucleated myotubes when co-cultured with myoblasts. 2G11 cells were resistant to an inhibitory effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on adipogenesis, while adipogenesis of widely used preadipogenic cell line, 3T3-L1 cells, was suppressed almost completely by the same treatment. In vivo transplantation experiments revealed that 2G11 cells are able to possess both adipogenicity and myogenicity in vivo. These results indicate the presence of bipotent progenitor cells in rat skeletal muscle, and suggest that such cells may contribute to ectopic fat formation in skeletal muscle.

  20. Human muscle precursor cells overexpressing PGC-1α enhance early skeletal muscle tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Haralampieva, Deana; Salemi, Souzan; Dinulovic, Ivana; Sulser, Tullio; M Ametamey, Simon; Handschin, Christoph; Eberli, Daniel

    2017-02-03

    Muscle precursor cells (MPCs) are activated satellite cells capable of muscle fiber reconstruction. Therefore, autologous MPC transplantation is envisioned for the treatment of muscle diseases. However, the density of MPCs, as well as their proliferation and differentiation potential gradually decline with age. The goal of this research was to genetically modify human MPCs (hMPCs) to overexpress the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α), a key regulator of exercise-mediated adaptation, and thereby to enhance early skeletal muscle formation and quality. We were able to confirm the sustained myogenic phenotype of the genetically modified hMPCs. While maintaining their viability and proliferation potential, PGC-1α modified hMPCs showed an enhanced myofiber formation capacity in vitro. Engineered muscle tissues were harvested 1, 2 and 4 weeks after subcutaneous injection of cell-collagen suspensions and histological analysis confirmed the earlier myotube formation in PGC-1α modified samples, predominantly of slow twitch myofibers. Increased contractile protein levels were detected by Western Blot. In summary, by genetically modifying hMPCs to overexpress PGC-1α we were able to promote early muscle fiber formation in vitro and in vivo, with an initial switch to slow type myofibers. Therefore, overexpressing PGC-1α is novel strategy to further enhance skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  1. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  2. Rejuvenation of the aged muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Llewellyn, Michael E.; Delp, Scott L.; Blau, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    The aged suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging due in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of aged MuSCs are intrinsically defective relative to young MuSCs, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation due to a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and that have elevated p38α/β MAPK activity. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the aged MuSC population to transient inhibition of p38α/β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional aged MuSC population, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration, serial transplantation, and strengthening damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy in aged individuals. PMID:24531378

  3. PPARδ regulates satellite cell proliferation and skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a class of nuclear receptors that play important roles in development and energy metabolism. Whereas PPARδ has been shown to regulate mitochondrial biosynthesis and slow-muscle fiber types, its function in skeletal muscle progenitors (satellite cells) is unknown. Since constitutive mutation of Pparδ leads to embryonic lethality, we sought to address this question by conditional knockout (cKO) of Pparδ using Myf5-Cre/Pparδflox/flox alleles to ablate PPARδ in myogenic progenitor cells. Although Pparδ-cKO mice were born normally and initially displayed no difference in body weight, muscle size or muscle composition, they later developed metabolic syndrome, which manifested as increased body weight and reduced response to glucose challenge at age nine months. Pparδ-cKO mice had 40% fewer satellite cells than their wild-type littermates, and these satellite cells exhibited reduced growth kinetics and proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, regeneration of Pparδ-cKO muscles was impaired after cardiotoxin-induced injury. Gene expression analysis showed reduced expression of the Forkhead box class O transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) gene in Pparδ-cKO muscles under both quiescent and regenerating conditions, suggesting that PPARδ acts through FoxO1 in regulating muscle progenitor cells. These results support a function of PPARδ in regulating skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and they establish a novel role of PPARδ in muscle progenitor cells and postnatal muscle regeneration. PMID:22040534

  4. Dystrophic muscle environment induces changes in cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Faralli, Herve; Dilworth, F Jeffrey

    2014-04-15

    Fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) reside in the muscle, where they facilitate myofiber regeneration. Under normal conditions, FAPs lack myogenic potential and thus do not directly contribute to regenerated myofibers. Surprisingly, Saccone and colleagues (pp. 841-857) demonstrated that the dystrophic muscle environment causes FAPs to adopt a chromatin state that imparts these cells with myogenic potential. In this context, treatment of muscle with deacetylase inhibitors activates a BAF60c-myomiR transcriptional network in FAPs, blocking adipogenesis and driving muscle differentiation.

  5. Regulation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Vogler, Thomas Orion; Gadek, Katherine; Olwin, Bradley B

    2017-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are essential for self-renewal of skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and required for maintenance and repair of skeletal muscle. Satellite cells express high levels of FGF receptors 1 and 4, low levels of FGF receptor 3, and little or no detectable FGF receptor 2. Of the multiple FGFs that influence satellite cell function in culture, FGF2 and FGF6 are the only members that regulate satellite cell function in vivo by activating ERK MAPK, p38α/β MAPKs, PI3 kinase, PLCγ and STATs. Regulation of FGF signaling is complex in satellite cells, requiring Syndecan-4, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, as well as ß1-integrin and fibronectin. During aging, reduced responsiveness to FGF diminishes satellite cell self-renewal, leading to impaired skeletal muscle regeneration and depletion of satellite cells. Mislocalization of ß1-integrin, reductions in fibronectin, and alterations in heparan sulfate content all contribute to reduced FGF responsiveness in satellite cells. How these cell surface proteins regulate satellite cell self-renewal is incompletely understood. Here we summarize the current knowledge, highlighting the role(s) for FGF signaling in skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite cell behavior, and age-induced muscle wasting. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Multiple muscle wasting-related transcription factors are acetylated in dexamethasone-treated muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Wei; Gonnella, Patricia; Alamdari, Nima; Aversa, Zaira; Hasselgren, Per-Olof

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that the expression and activity of the histone acetyltransferase p300 are upregulated in catabolic muscle allowing for acetylation of cellular proteins. The function of transcription factors is influenced by posttranslational modifications, including acetylation. It is not known if transcription factors involved in the regulation of muscle mass are acetylated in atrophying muscle. We determined cellular levels of acetylated C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ, FOXO1, FOXO3a, and NF-kB/p65 in dexamethasone-treated L6 muscle cells, a commonly used in vitro model of muscle wasting. The role of p300 in dexamethasone-induced transcription factor acetylation and myotube atrophy was examined by transfecting muscle cells with p300 siRNA. Treatment of L6 myotubes with dexamethasone resulted in increased cellular levels of acetylated C/EBPβ and δ, FOXO1 and 3a, and p65. Downregulation of p300 with p300 siRNA reduced acetylation of transcription factors and decreased dexamethasone-induced myotube atrophy and expression of the ubiquitin ligase MuRF1. The results suggest that several muscle wasting-related transcription factors are acetylated supporting the concept that posttranslational modifications of proteins regulating gene transcription may be involved in the loss of muscle mass. The results also suggest that acetylation of the transcription factors is at least in part regulated by p300 and plays a role in glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy. Targeting molecules that regulate acetylation of transcription factors may help reduce the impact of muscle wasting.

  7. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    PubMed Central

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength. PMID:24963862

  8. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    PubMed

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  9. Formation of the transition zone by Mks5/Rpgrip1L establishes a ciliary zone of exclusion (CIZE) that compartmentalises ciliary signalling proteins and controls PIP2 ciliary abundance

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Victor L; Li, Chunmei; Bowie, Rachel V; Clarke, Lara; Mohan, Swetha; Blacque, Oliver E; Leroux, Michel R

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are thought to harbour a membrane diffusion barrier within their transition zone (TZ) that compartmentalises signalling proteins. How this “ciliary gate” assembles and functions remains largely unknown. Contrary to current models, we present evidence that Caenorhabditis elegans MKS-5 (orthologue of mammalian Mks5/Rpgrip1L/Nphp8 and Rpgrip1) may not be a simple structural scaffold for anchoring > 10 different proteins at the TZ, but instead, functions as an assembly factor. This activity is needed to form TZ ultrastructure, which comprises Y-shaped axoneme-to-membrane connectors. Coiled-coil and C2 domains within MKS-5 enable TZ localisation and functional interactions with two TZ modules, consisting of Meckel syndrome (MKS) and nephronophthisis (NPHP) proteins. Discrete roles for these modules at basal body-associated transition fibres and TZ explain their redundant functions in making essential membrane connections and thus sealing the ciliary compartment. Furthermore, MKS-5 establishes a ciliary zone of exclusion (CIZE) at the TZ that confines signalling proteins, including GPCRs and NPHP-2/inversin, to distal ciliary subdomains. The TZ/CIZE, potentially acting as a lipid gate, limits the abundance of the phosphoinositide PIP2 within cilia and is required for cell signalling. Together, our findings suggest a new model for Mks5/Rpgrip1L in TZ assembly and function that is essential for establishing the ciliary signalling compartment. PMID:26392567

  10. Muscarinic receptors of the albino rabbit ciliary process.

    PubMed

    Mallorga, P; Babilon, R W; Buisson, S; Sugrue, M F

    1989-04-01

    Muscarinic receptor binding sites were identified in membranes prepared from albino rabbit ciliary processes, using the muscarinic antagonist [3H]L-quinuclidinyl benzylate as the radioligand. Analysis of saturation binding experiments demonstrated that [3H]L-quinuclidinyl benzylate bound to an apparent homogeneous population of binding sites with a Kd value of 6.4 pm and a Bmax value of 155 fmol mg-1 protein. Seventy percent (70%) of binding sites showed high affinity for pirenzepine, i.e. belonged to the M1 subtype. In contrast, AF-DX 116 was unable to discriminate between subtypes of muscarinic binding sites in this tissue. Carbachol caused a dose-dependent increase in phosphatidylinositol turnover (EC50 = 154 microM) in ciliary processes. A maximum stimulation of 652% of basal activity was obtained following a 45 min incubation with 10 mM carbachol. The potency of muscarinic antagonists to block the carbachol-induced response was comparable to that found for M1 receptors in other tissues. Oxotremorine and pilocarpine behaved like partial agonists in this assay. The carbachol-induced increase in phosphatidylinositol turnover was also observed in a suspension of epithelial cells from ciliary processes and it was blocked by atropine; thus, indicating the presence of muscarinic receptors functionally coupled to phosphatidylinositol turnover in these cells.

  11. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P. Daniel; Hoffman, William Y.; Pomerantz, Jason H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2–4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50–70 fiber-associated, or 1,000–5,000 FACS-enriched CD56+/CD29+ human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications. PMID:26352798

  12. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P Daniel; Hoffman, William Y; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-09-08

    Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2-4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50-70 fiber-associated, or 1,000-5,000 FACS-enriched CD56(+)/CD29(+) human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  13. Laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell stemness and muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H.; E. Mason, Christopher; Strickland, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-resident PDGFRβ+ cells, which include pericytes and PW1+ interstitial cells (PICs), play a dual role in muscular dystrophy. They can either undergo myogenesis to promote muscle regeneration or differentiate into adipocytes and other cells to compromise regeneration. How the differentiation and fate determination of PDGFRβ+ cells are regulated, however, remains unclear. Here, by utilizing a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that PDGFRβ+ cell-derived laminin inhibits their proliferation and adipogenesis, but is indispensable for their myogenesis. In addition, we show that laminin alone is able to partially reverse the muscle dystrophic phenotype in these mice at the molecular, structural and functional levels. Further RNAseq analysis reveals that laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell differentiation/fate determination via gpihbp1. These data support a critical role of laminin in the regulation of PDGFRβ+ cell stemness, identify an innovative target for future drug development and may provide an effective treatment for muscular dystrophy. PMID:27138650

  14. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell Activation Following Cutaneous Burn in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    mechanisms of long-term muscle atrophy. # 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved. * Corresponding author at: US Army Institute of Surgical...understanding of the impact of burn on satellite cell functionality will allow us to identify the cellular mechanisms of long-term muscle atrophy after...fibers. J Biophys Biochem Cytol 1961;9:493–5. [12] Hawke TJ, Garry DJ. Myogenic satellite cells: physiology to molecular biology. J Appl Physiol 2001;91

  15. Endothelial cells direct mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle cell fate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cho-Hao; Lilly, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms.

  16. Tobacco constituents are mitogenic for arterial smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Hefton, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP) purified from flue-cured tobacco leaves, tar-derived material (TAR), the water soluble, nondialyzable, delipidized extract of cigarette smoke condensate, rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, but not adventitial fibroblasts. The mitogenicity appears to depend on polyphenol epitopes on carrier molecules. Ellagic acid, another plant polyphenol, inhibited arterial smooth-muscle proliferation. These results suggest that a number of ubiquitous, plant-derived substances may influence smooth-muscle cell proliferation in the arterial wall.

  17. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  18. Muscle progenitor cell regenerative capacity in the torn rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gretchen A; Farris, Ashley L; Sato, Eugene; Gibbons, Michael; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R; Engler, Adam J

    2015-03-01

    Chronic rotator cuff (RC) tears affect a large portion of the population and result in substantial upper extremity impairment, shoulder weakness, pain, and limited range of motion. Regardless of surgical or conservative treatment, persistent atrophic muscle changes limit functional restoration and may contribute to surgical failure. We hypothesized that deficits in the skeletal muscle progenitor (SMP) cell pool could contribute to poor muscle recovery following tendon repair. Biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing arthroscopic RC surgery. The SMP population was quantified, isolated, and assayed in culture for its ability to proliferate and fuse in vitro and in vivo. The SMP population was larger in muscles from cuffs with partial tears compared with no tears or full thickness tears. However, SMPs from muscles in the partial tear group also exhibited reduced proliferative ability. Cells from all cuff states were able to fuse robustly in culture and engraft when injected into injured mouse muscle, suggesting that when given the correct signals, SMPs are capable of contributing to muscle hypertrophy and regeneration regardless of tear severity. The fact that this does not appear to happen in vivo helps focus future therapeutic targets for promoting muscle recovery following rotator cuff repairs and may help improve clinical outcomes.

  19. Molecular aging and rejuvenation of human muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Morgan E; Suetta, Charlotte; Conboy, Michael J; Aagaard, Per; Mackey, Abigail; Kjaer, Michael; Conboy, Irina

    2009-01-01

    Very little remains known about the regulation of human organ stem cells (in general, and during the aging process), and most previous data were collected in short-lived rodents. We examined whether stem cell aging in rodents could be extrapolated to genetically and environmentally variable humans. Our findings establish key evolutionarily conserved mechanisms of human stem cell aging. We find that satellite cells are maintained in aged human skeletal muscle, but fail to activate in response to muscle attrition, due to diminished activation of Notch compounded by elevated transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)/phospho Smad3 (pSmad3). Furthermore, this work reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/phosphate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) signalling declines in human muscle with age, and is important for activating Notch in human muscle stem cells. This molecular understanding, combined with data that human satellite cells remain intrinsically young, introduced novel therapeutic targets. Indeed, activation of MAPK/Notch restored ‘youthful’ myogenic responses to satellite cells from 70-year-old humans, rendering them similar to cells from 20-year-old humans. These findings strongly suggest that aging of human muscle maintenance and repair can be reversed by ‘youthful’ calibration of specific molecular pathways. PMID:20049743

  20. 3D timelapse analysis of muscle satellite cell motility.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, D D W

    2009-10-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin alpha 7 beta 1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of "pathfinding" cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues.

  1. Comparative analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from adult mouse adipose, muscle, and fetal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hulong; Yu, Bing; Huang, Zhiqing; Yang, Xuerong; Liu, Zehui; Mao, Xiangbing; Tian, Gang; He, Jun; Han, Guoquan; Chen, Hong; Mao, Qian; Chen, Daiwen

    2013-02-01

    Recently, increasing evidence supports that adult stem cells are the part of a natural system for tissue growth and repair. This study focused on the differences of mesenchymal stem cells from adult adipose (ADSCs), skeletal muscle (MDSCs) and fetal muscle (FMSCs) in biological characteristics, which is the key to cell therapy success. Stem cell antigen 1 (Sca-1) expression of MDSCs and FMSCs at passage 3 was two times more than that at passage 1 (P < 0.0001). After 28-day myogenic induction, higher expression levels of skeletal muscle-specific genes were observed in MDSCs than FMSCs (P < 0.01), and the lowest expression levels were demonstrated in ADSCs among three cells (P < 0.01). Besides, M-Cad and MyHC expressions in ADSCs were not detected by immunofluorescence or real-time quantitative PCR. Furthermore, after 14 days adipogenic induction, PPARγ2, LPL and aP2 mRNA expressions were higher in ADSCs vs. MDSCs (P < 0.01). Besides, MSCs from adult or fetal muscle expressed higher OCN and OPN than ADSCs after 28 days osteogenic induction (P < 0.01). Taken together, our results suggested that cell source and developmental stage had great impacts on biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells, and proper consideration of all the issues is necessary.

  2. Brief report: Blockade of Notch signaling in muscle stem cells causes muscular dystrophic phenotype and impaired muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuibin; Shen, Huangxuan; Jin, Baofeng; Gu, Yumei; Chen, Zirong; Cao, Chunxia; Hu, Chengbin; Keller, Charles; Pear, Warren S; Wu, Lizi

    2013-04-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating diseases characterized by progressive muscle weakness and degeneration, with etiologies including muscle gene mutations and regenerative defects of muscle stem cells. Notch signaling is critical for skeletal myogenesis and has important roles in maintaining the muscle stem cell pool and preventing premature muscle differentiation. To investigate the functional impact of Notch signaling blockade in muscle stem cells, we developed a conditional knock-in mouse model in which endogenous Notch signaling is specifically blocked in muscle stem cell compartment. Mice with Notch signaling inhibition in muscle stem cells showed several muscular dystrophic features and impaired muscle regeneration. Analyses of satellite cells and isolated primary myoblasts revealed that Notch signaling blockade in muscle stem cells caused reduced activation and proliferation of satellite cells but enhanced differentiation of myoblasts. Our data thus indicate that Notch signaling controls processes that are critical to regeneration in muscular dystrophy, suggesting that Notch inhibitor therapies could have potential side effects on muscle functions.

  3. ARSENIC INDUCES SUSTAINED IMPAIRMENT OF SKELETAL MUSCLE AND MUSCLE PROGENITOR CELL ULTRASTRUCTURE AND BIOENERGETICS

    PubMed Central

    Fabrisia, Ambrosio; Elke, Brown; Donna, Stolz; Ricardo, Ferrari; Bret, Goodpaster; Bridget, Deasy; Giovanna, Distefano; Alexandra, Roperti; Amin, Cheikhi; Yesica, Garciafigueroa; Aaron, Barchowsky

    2014-01-01

    Over 4 million individuals in the US, and over 140 million individuals worldwide, are exposed daily to arsenic-contaminated drinking water. Human exposures can range from below the current limit of 10 µg/L to over 1 mg/L, with 100 µg/L promoting disease in a large portion of those exposed. Although increased attention has recently been paid to myopathy following arsenic exposure, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying clinical symptoms remain poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that arsenic induces lasting muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and impairs metabolism. When compared to non-exposed controls, mice exposed to drinking water containing 100µg/L arsenite for 5 weeks demonstrated impaired muscle function, mitochondrial myopathy, and altered oxygen consumption that were concomitant with increased mitochondrial fusion gene transcription. There was no difference in levels of inorganic arsenic or its mononomethyl- and dimethyl- metabolites between controls and exposed muscles, confirming that arsenic does not accumulate in muscle. Nevertheless, muscle progenitor cells isolated from exposed mice recapitulated the aberrant myofiber phenotype and were more resistant to oxidative stress, generated more reactive oxygen species, and displayed autophagic mitochondrial morphology, as compared to cells isolated from non-exposed mice. These pathological changes from a possible maladaptive oxidative stress response provide insight into declines in muscle functioning caused by exposure to this common environmental contaminant. PMID:24960579

  4. Functional Overload Enhances Satellite Cell Properties in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Machida, Masanao; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle represents a plentiful and accessible source of adult stem cells. Skeletal-muscle-derived stem cells, termed satellite cells, play essential roles in postnatal growth, maintenance, repair, and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Although it is well known that the number of satellite cells increases following physical exercise, functional alterations in satellite cells such as proliferative capacity and differentiation efficiency following exercise and their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we found that functional overload, which is widely used to model resistance exercise, causes skeletal muscle hypertrophy and converts satellite cells from quiescent state to activated state. Our analysis showed that functional overload induces the expression of MyoD in satellite cells and enhances the proliferative capacity and differentiation potential of these cells. The changes in satellite cell properties coincided with the inactivation of Notch signaling and the activation of Wnt signaling and likely involve modulation by transcription factors of the Sox family. These results indicate the effects of resistance exercise on the regulation of satellite cells and provide insight into the molecular mechanism of satellite cell activation following physical exercise.

  5. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  6. Bone marrow-derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongxu; Martinez, Carlo O.; Ochoa, Oscar; Ruiz-Willhite, Lourdes; Bonilla, Jose R.; Centonze, Victoria E.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Michalek, Joel E.; McManus, Linda M.; Shireman, Paula K.

    2009-01-01

    Limb regeneration requires the coordination of multiple stem cell populations to recapitulate the process of tissue formation. Therefore, bone marrow (BM) -derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration was examined in mice lacking the CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Myofiber size, numbers of myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs), and recruitment of BM-derived cells and macrophages were assessed after cardiotoxin-induced injury of chimeric mice produced by transplanting BM from wild-type (WT) or CCR2−/− mice into irradiated WT or CCR2−/− host mice. Regardless of the host genotype, muscle regeneration and recruitment of BM-derived cells and macrophages were similar in mice replenished with WT BM, whereas BM-derived cells and macrophage accumulation were decreased and muscle regeneration was impaired in all animals receiving CCR2−/− BM. Furthermore, numbers of MPCs (CD34+/Sca-1−/CD45− cells) were significantly increased in mice receiving CCR2−/− BM despite the decreased size of regenerated myofibers. Thus, the expression of CCR2 on BM-derived cells regulated macrophage recruitment into injured muscle, numbers of MPC, and the extent of regenerated myofiber size, all of which were independent of CCR2 expression on host-derived cells. Future studies in regenerative medicine must include consideration of the role of BM-derived cells, possibly macrophages, in CCR2-dependent events that regulate effective skeletal muscle regeneration.—Sun, D., Martinez, C. O., Ochoa, O., Ruiz-Willhite, L., Bonilla, J. R., Centonze, V. E., Waite, L. L., Michalek, J. E., McManus, L. M., Shireman, P. K. Bone marrow-derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:18827026

  7. Complimentary endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell co-culture systems with alternate smooth muscle cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rose, Stacey L; Babensee, Julia E

    2007-08-01

    Development of in vitro models of native and injured vasculature is crucial for better understanding altered wound healing in disease, device implantation, or tissue engineering. Conditions were optimized using polyethyleneteraphalate transwell filters for human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC)/smooth muscle cell (HASMC) co-cultures with divergent HASMC phenotypes ('more or less secretory') while maintaining quiescent HAECs. Resulting HASMC phenotype was studied at 48 and 72 h following co-culture initiation, and compared to serum and growth factor starved monocultured 'forced contractile' HASMCs. Forced contractile HASMCs demonstrated organized alpha-smooth muscle actin filaments, minimal interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) secretion, and low intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and tissue factor expression. Organization of alpha-smooth muscle actin was lost in 'more secretory' HASMCs in co-culture with HAECs, and IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion, as well as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and tissue factor expression were significantly upregulated at both time points. Alternately, 'less secretory' HASMCs in co-culture with HAECs showed similar characteristics to forced contractile HASMCs at the 48 h time point, while by the 72 h time point they behaved similarly to 'more secretory' HASMCs. These co-culture systems could be useful in better understanding vascular healing, however there remain time constraint considerations for maintaining culture integrity/cell phenotype.

  8. The future of ciliary and flagellar membrane research

    PubMed Central

    Bloodgood, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    There has been a dramatic shift of attention from the ciliary axoneme to the ciliary membrane, much of this driven by the appreciation that cilia play a widespread role in sensory reception and cellular signaling. This Perspective focuses attention on some of the poorly understood aspects of ciliary membranes, including the establishment of ciliary and periciliary membrane domains, the trafficking of membrane components into and out of these membrane domains, the nonuniform distribution of ciliary membrane components, the regulation of membrane morphogenesis, functional collaboration between the axoneme and the membrane, and the evolving field of therapeutics targeted at the ciliary membrane. PMID:22745341

  9. Effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, A.C.; Chen, K.C.; Cheng, Mei General Motors Research Laboratories, Warren, MI )

    1988-09-01

    Embryonic rat cardiac muscle cells grown in the presence of various tensions of CO (5-95%) without the presence of O{sub 2} survived and exhibited reduced cell growth, which was concentration dependent. When cardiac muscle cells were grown in the presence of a mixture of CO (10-20%) and O{sub 2} (10-20%), the growth rate of these cells was comparable to that of the control cells. Cardiac myocytes continued to beat when exposed to varying tensions of CO, except in the case of 95% CO. The cells exposed to different concentrations of CO contained fewer myofibrils of different stages of differentiation compared with the control and the culture exposed to a mixture of 20% O{sub 2} and 20% CO, with cells that contained abundant, highly differentiated myofibrils. There was no significant difference in the structural organization of mitochondria between the control and the surviving experimental cells. It is evident from the present studies that O{sub 2} is required for the optimum in vitro cellular growth of cardiac muscle. Furthermore, CO in combination with O{sub 2} at a concentration of 10 or 20% can produce optimal growth of cardiac muscle cells in culture. To determine maximum labeling index during the labeling period, cells were continuously labeled with ({sup 3}H)thymidine for 24 h before the termination of cultures.

  10. Intestinal smooth muscle cell maintenance by basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M; Stelzner, Matthias; Reichardt, Holger M; Dunn, James C Y

    2008-08-01

    Intestinal tissue engineering is a potential therapy for patients with short bowel syndrome. Tissue engineering scaffolds that promote smooth muscle cell proliferation and angiogenesis are essential toward the regeneration of functional smooth muscles for peristalsis and motility. Since basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) can stimulate smooth muscle proliferation and angiogenesis, the delivery of bFGF was employed to stimulate proliferation and survival of primary intestinal smooth muscle cells. Two methods of local bFGF delivery were examined: the incorporation of bFGF into the collagen coating and the encapsulation of bFGF into poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. Cell-seeded scaffolds were implanted into the omentum and were retrieved after 4, 14, and 28 days. The seeded cells proliferated from day 4 to day 14 in all implants; however, at 28 days, significantly higher density of implanted cells and blood vessels was observed, when 10 microg of bFGF was incorporated into the collagen coating of scaffolds as compared to scaffolds with either no bFGF or 1 microg of bFGF in collagen. Microsphere encapsulation of 1 microg of bFGF produced similar effects as 10 microg of bFGF mixed in collagen and was more effective than the delivery of 1 microg of bFGF by collagen incorporation. The majority of the implanted cells also expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin. Scaffolds coated with microsphere-encapsulated bFGF and seeded with smooth muscle cells may be a useful platform for the regeneration of the intestinal smooth muscle.

  11. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  12. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  13. Distinct IFT mechanisms contribute to the generation of ciliary structural diversity in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lu, Yun; Qin, Hongmin; Lanjuin, Anne; Shaham, Shai; Sengupta, Piali

    2007-06-20

    Individual cell types can elaborate morphologically diverse cilia. Cilia are assembled via intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors; however, the mechanisms that generate ciliary diversity are unknown. Here, we examine IFT in the structurally distinct cilia of the ASH/ASI and the AWB chemosensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, enabling us to compare IFT in specific cilia types. We show that unlike in the ASH/ASI cilia, the OSM-3 kinesin moves independently of the kinesin-II motor in the AWB cilia. Although OSM-3 is essential to extend the distal segments of the ASH/ASI cilia, it is not required to build the AWB distal segments. Mutations in the fkh-2 forkhead domain gene result in AWB-specific defects in ciliary morphology, and FKH-2 regulates kinesin-II subunit gene expression specifically in AWB. Our results suggest that cell-specific regulation of IFT contributes to the generation of ciliary diversity, and provide insights into the networks coupling the acquisition of ciliary specializations with other aspects of cell fate.

  14. Osteogenic cell fractions isolated from mouse tongue muscle.

    PubMed

    Harada, Koji; Harada, Toyoko; Ferdous, Tarannum; Takenawa, Takanori; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2015-07-01

    The use of stem cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of bone defects. However, successful treatments rely upon the availability of cells that are easily obtained and that appropriately differentiate into osteoblasts. The tongue potentially represents a source of autologous cells for such purposes. In the present study, the ability of stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) positive cells derived from tongue muscle to differentiate into osteoblasts was investigated. The tongue muscles were excised from Jcl-ICR mice and tongue muscle-derived Sca-1-positive cells (TDSCs) were isolated from the tongue muscle using a magnetic cell separation system with microbeads. TDSCs were cultured in plastic dishes or gelatin sponges of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with bone differentiation-inducing medium. The expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, fibronectin, osteocalcin, osteonectin and osteopontin) was investigated in cultured TDSCs by western blot analysis. The formation of mineralized matrices was examined using alizarin red S and Von Kossa staining. Bone formation was investigated in cultured TDSCs by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the expression of Sca-1 in mouse tongue muscle was demonstrated and TDSCs were isolated at high purity. TDSCs differentiated into cells of osteoblast lineage, as demonstrated by the upregulation of osteoblastic marker expression. The formation of mineralized matrices was confirmed by alizarin red S or Von Kossa staining in vitro. Bone formation was observed in the gelatin sponges of β-TCP, which were subsequently implanted under the skin of the backs of nude mice. These results suggested that TDSCs retain their osteogenic differentiation potential and therefore the tongue muscle may be used as a source of stem cells for bone regeneration.

  15. Muscle Stem Cells: A Model System for Adult Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Ddw; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells, originally termed satellite cells for their position adjacent to differentiated muscle fibers, are absolutely required for the process of skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last decade, satellite cells have become one of the most studied adult stem cell systems and have emerged as a standard model not only in the field of stem cell-driven tissue regeneration but also in stem cell dysfunction and aging. Here, we provide background in the field and discuss recent advances in our understanding of muscle stem cell function and dysfunction, particularly in the case of aging, and the potential involvement of muscle stem cells in genetic diseases such as the muscular dystrophies.

  16. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  17. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Gene Therapy of Degenerative Muscle Diseases.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, Mariana; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a unique source for cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. The intrinsic features of these cells such as their easy accessibility and their capacity to be expanded indefinitely overcome some limitations of conventional adult stem cells. Furthermore, the possibility to derive patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in combination with the current development of gene modification methods could be used for autologous cell therapies of some genetic diseases. In particular, muscular dystrophies are considered to be a good candidate due to the lack of efficacious therapeutic treatments for patients to date, and in view of the encouraging results arising from recent preclinical studies. Some hurdles, including possible genetic instability and their efficient differentiation into muscle progenitors through vector/transgene-free methods have still to be overcome or need further optimization. Additionally, engraftment and functional contribution to muscle regeneration in pre-clinical models need to be carefully assessed before clinical translation. This review offers a summary of the advanced methods recently developed to derive muscle progenitors from pluripotent stem cells, as well as gene therapy by gene addition and gene editing methods using ZFNs, TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9. We have also discussed the main issues that need to be addressed for successful clinical translation of genetically corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cells in autologous transplantation trials for skeletal muscle disorders.

  18. Oral Gingival Cell Cigarette Smoke Exposure Induces Muscle Cell Metabolic Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Baeder, Andrea C.; Napa, Kiran; Richardson, Sarah T.; Taylor, Oliver J.; Andersen, Samantha G.; Wilcox, Shalene H.; Winden, Duane R.; Reynolds, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure compromises health through damaging multiple physiological systems, including disrupting metabolic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of oral gingiva in mediating the deleterious metabolic effects of cigarette smoke exposure on skeletal muscle metabolic function. Using an in vitro conditioned medium cell model, skeletal muscle cells were incubated with medium from gingival cells treated with normal medium or medium containing suspended cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Following incubation of muscle cells with gingival cell conditioned medium, muscle cell mitochondrial respiration and insulin signaling and action were determined as an indication of overall muscle metabolic health. Skeletal muscle cells incubated with conditioned medium of CSE-treated gingival cells had a profound reduction in mitochondrial respiration and respiratory control. Furthermore, skeletal muscle cells had a greatly reduced response in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Altogether, these results provide a novel perspective on the mechanism whereby cigarette smoke affects systemic metabolic function. In conclusion, we found that oral gingival cells treated with CSE create an altered milieu that is sufficient to both disrupted skeletal muscle cell mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27034671

  19. Oral Gingival Cell Cigarette Smoke Exposure Induces Muscle Cell Metabolic Disruption.

    PubMed

    Baeder, Andrea C; Napa, Kiran; Richardson, Sarah T; Taylor, Oliver J; Andersen, Samantha G; Wilcox, Shalene H; Winden, Duane R; Reynolds, Paul R; Bikman, Benjamin T

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure compromises health through damaging multiple physiological systems, including disrupting metabolic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of oral gingiva in mediating the deleterious metabolic effects of cigarette smoke exposure on skeletal muscle metabolic function. Using an in vitro conditioned medium cell model, skeletal muscle cells were incubated with medium from gingival cells treated with normal medium or medium containing suspended cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Following incubation of muscle cells with gingival cell conditioned medium, muscle cell mitochondrial respiration and insulin signaling and action were determined as an indication of overall muscle metabolic health. Skeletal muscle cells incubated with conditioned medium of CSE-treated gingival cells had a profound reduction in mitochondrial respiration and respiratory control. Furthermore, skeletal muscle cells had a greatly reduced response in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Altogether, these results provide a novel perspective on the mechanism whereby cigarette smoke affects systemic metabolic function. In conclusion, we found that oral gingival cells treated with CSE create an altered milieu that is sufficient to both disrupted skeletal muscle cell mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity.

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 influences cell cycle progression in muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Mathieu; Figeac, Nicolas; White, Robert B; Knopp, Paul; Zammit, Peter S

    2013-10-15

    Skeletal muscle retains a resident stem cell population called satellite cells, which are mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, but can be activated to produce myoblast progeny for muscle homeostasis, hypertrophy and repair. We have previously shown that satellite cell activation is partially controlled by the bioactive phospholipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and that S1P biosynthesis is required for muscle regeneration. Here we investigate the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) in regulating murine satellite cell function. S1PR3 levels were high in quiescent myogenic cells before falling during entry into cell cycle. Retrovirally-mediated constitutive expression of S1PR3 led to suppressed cell cycle progression in satellite cells, but did not overtly affect the myogenic program. Conversely, satellite cells isolated from S1PR3-null mice exhibited enhanced proliferation ex-vivo. In vivo, acute cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration was enhanced in S1PR3-null mice, with bigger muscle fibres compared to control mice. Importantly, genetically deleting S1PR3 in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy produced a less severe muscle dystrophic phenotype, than when signalling though S1PR3 was operational. In conclusion, signalling though S1PR3 suppresses cell cycle progression to regulate function in muscle satellite cells.

  1. Contractile proteins of endothelial cells, platelets and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Becker, C G; Nachman, R L

    1973-04-01

    In experiments described herein it was observed, by direct and indirect immunofluorescence technics, that rabbit antisera to human platelet actomyosin (thrombosthenin) stained mature megakaryocytes, blood platelets, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of arteries and veins, endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and certain capillaries, uterine smooth muscle cells, myoepithelial cells, perineurial cells of peripheral nerves and "fibroblastic" cells of granulation tissue. The specificity of immunohistologic staining was confirmed by appropriate absorption and blocking studies and immunodiffusional analysis in agarose gel. It was also observed by immunodiffusional analysis in agarose gel, electrophoresis of actomyosin fragments in polyacrylamide gels, immune inhibition of actomyosin ATPase activity and immune aggregation of platelets that uterine and platelet actomyosin are partially, but not completely, identical.

  2. Edinger-Westphal and pharmacologically stimulated accommodative refractive changes and lens and ciliary process movements in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ostrin, Lisa A; Glasser, Adrian

    2007-02-01

    During accommodation, the refractive changes occur when the ciliary muscle contracts, releasing resting zonular tension and allowing the lens capsule to mold the lens into an accommodated form. This results in centripetal movement of the ciliary processes and lens edge. The goal of this study was to understand the relationship between accommodative refractive changes, ciliary process movements and lens edge movements during Edinger-Westphal (EW) and pharmacologically stimulated accommodation in adolescent rhesus monkeys. Experiments were performed on one eye each of three rhesus monkeys with permanent indwelling electrodes in the EW nucleus of the midbrain. EW stimulated accommodative refractive changes were measured with infrared photorefraction, and ciliary process and lens edge movements were measured with slit-lamp goniovideography on the temporal aspect of the eye. Images were recorded on the nasal aspect for one eye during EW stimulation. Image analysis was performed off-line at 30 Hz to determine refractive changes and ciliary body and lens edge movements during EW stimulated accommodation and after carbachol iontophoresis to determine drug induced accommodative movements. Maximum EW stimulated accommodation was 7.36+/-0.49 D and pharmacologically stimulated accommodation was 14.44+/-1.21 D. During EW stimulated accommodation, the ciliary processes and lens edge moved centripetally linearly by 0.030+/-0.001 mm/D and 0.027+/-0.001 mm/D, with a total movement of 0.219+/-0.034 mm and 0.189+/-0.023 mm, respectively. There was no significant nasal/temporal difference in ciliary process or lens edge movements. 30-40 min after pharmacologically stimulated accommodation, the ciliary processes moved centripetally a total of 0.411+/-0.048 mm, or 0.030+/-0.005 mm/D, and the lens edge moved centripetally 0.258+/-0.014 mm, or 0.019+/-0.003 mm/D. The peaks and valleys of the ciliary processes moved by similar amounts during both supramaximal EW and pharmacologically

  3. Diffuse skeletal muscles uptake of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose on positron emission tomography in primary muscle peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuji; Hayashi, Yuichi; Kato, Jun'ichi; Yamada, Megumi; Koumura, Akihiro; Sakurai, Takeo; Kimura, Akio; Hozumi, Isao; Hatano, Yuichiro; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Takami, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Senji; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with weakness of neck extensor muscles. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging showed high-intensity areas in muscles of the left lateral cervical region on T2-weighted images. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan demonstrated striking fluorodeoxyglucose uptake by multiple skeletal muscles of the neck, chest, and abdominal region. Muscle biopsy demonstrated peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified. The diagnosis was primary skeletal muscle peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Primary skeletal muscle non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of T-cell immunophenotype is extremely rare and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography demonstrated striking fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in multiple skeletal muscles and served as a quite useful modality for the diagnosis of this patient.

  4. Glucose deprivation attenuates sortilin levels in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Miyako; Yoneyama, Yosuke; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Ishiuchi, Yuri; Ishii, Takayuki; Sato, Hitoshi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Nedachi, Taku; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-03-31

    In skeletal muscle, sortilin plays a predominant role in the sorting of glucose transporter 4 (Glut4), thereby controlling glucose uptake. Moreover, our previous study suggested that the sortilin expression levels are also implicated in myogenesis. Despite the importance of sortilin in skeletal muscle, however, the regulation of sortilin expression has not been completely understood. In the present study, we analyzed if the sortilin expression is regulated by glucose in C2C12 myocytes and rat skeletal muscles in vivo. Sortilin protein expression was elevated upon C2C12 cell differentiation and was further enhanced in the presence of a high concentration of glucose. The gene expression and protein degradation of sortilin were not affected by glucose. On the other hand, rapamycin partially reduced sortilin induction by a high concentration of glucose, which suggested that sortilin translation could be regulated by glucose, at least in part. We also examined if the sortilin regulation by glucose was also observed in skeletal muscles that were obtained from fed or fasted rats. Sortilin expression in both gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle was significantly decreased by 17-18h of starvation. On the other hand, pathological levels of high blood glucose did not alter the sortilin expression in rat skeletal muscle. Overall, the present study suggests that sortilin protein levels are reduced under hypoglycemic conditions by post-transcriptional control in skeletal muscles.

  5. Loss-of-Function GAS8 Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Disrupt the Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex

    PubMed Central

    Olbrich, Heike; Cremers, Carolin; Loges, Niki T.; Werner, Claudius; Nielsen, Kim G.; Marthin, June K.; Philipsen, Maria; Wallmeier, Julia; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Edelbusch, Christine; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Schwartz, Oliver; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Rommelmann, Frank; Omran, Heymut

    2015-01-01

    Multiciliated epithelial cells protect the upper and lower airways from chronic bacterial infections by moving mucus and debris outward. Congenital disorders of ciliary beating, referred to as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), are characterized by deficient mucociliary clearance and severe, recurrent respiratory infections. Numerous genetic defects, most of which can be detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are so far known to cause different abnormalities of the ciliary axoneme. However, some defects are not regularly discernable by TEM because the ciliary architecture of the axoneme remains preserved. This applies in particular to isolated defects of the nexin links, also known as the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), connecting the peripheral outer microtubular doublets. Immunofluorescence analyses of respiratory cells from PCD-affected individuals detected a N-DRC defect. Genome-wide exome sequence analyses identified recessive loss-of-function mutations in GAS8 encoding DRC4 in three independent PCD-affected families. PMID:26387594

  6. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion.

  7. Avalanche-like behavior in ciliary import

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, William B.; Wemmer, Kimberly A.; Lechtreck, Karl F.; Witman, George B.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are microtubule-based organelles that protrude from the cell body. Ciliary assembly requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a motile system that delivers cargo from the cell body to the flagellar tip for assembly. The process controlling injections of IFT proteins into the flagellar compartment is, therefore, crucial to ciliogenesis. Extensive biochemical and genetic analyses have determined the molecular machinery of IFT, but these studies do not explain what regulates IFT injection rate. Here, we provide evidence that IFT injections result from avalanche-like releases of accumulated IFT material at the flagellar base and that the key regulated feature of length control is the recruitment of IFT material to the flagellar base. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of IFT proteins in live cells to quantify the size and frequency of injections over time. The injection dynamics reveal a power-law tailed distribution of injection event sizes and a negative correlation between injection size and frequency, as well as rich behaviors such as quasiperiodicity, bursting, and long-memory effects tied to the size of the localized load of IFT material awaiting injection at the flagellar base, collectively indicating that IFT injection dynamics result from avalanche-like behavior. Computational models based on avalanching recapitulate observed IFT dynamics, and we further show that the flagellar Ras-related nuclear protein (Ran) guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) gradient can in theory act as a flagellar length sensor to regulate this localized accumulation of IFT. These results demonstrate that a self-organizing, physical mechanism can control a biochemically complex intracellular transport pathway. PMID:23431147

  8. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  9. Engraftment of FACS Isolated Muscle Stem Cells into Injured Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Matthew; Sacco, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cell (MuSC) isolation and transplantation are invaluable tools to assess their capacity for self-renewal and tissue repair. Significant technical advances in recent years have led to the optimization of these approaches, improving our ability to assess MuSC regenerative potential. Here, we describe the procedures for Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-based isolation of MuSC, their intramuscular transplantation, and analysis of their engraftment into host tissues.

  10. Direct Measurement of Directional Disorder for Ciliary Metachronal Wave

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    subjects [6]-[8]. Ciliary disorientation alone can lead to the clinical syndrome of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) [9]. The directions based on...Orientation of respiratory tract cilia in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia , bronchiectasis, and in normal subjects,” J. Clin. Pathol., vol. 42, pp...ciliary dyskinesia syndrome,” Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med., vol. 153, pp. 1123-1129, 1996. [10] L. Gheber and Z. Priel, “Metachronal activity of

  11. Intermediate filaments in muscle and epithelial cells of nematodes

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Current concepts of the developmentally controlled multigene family of intermediate filament (IF) proteins expect the origin of their complexity in evolutionary precursors preceding all vertebrate classes. Among invertebrates, however, firm ultrastructural as well as molecular documentation of IFs is restricted to some giant axons and to epithelia of a few molluscs and annelids. As Ascaris lumbricoides is easily dissected into clean tissues, IF expression in this large nematode was analyzed by electron microscopic and biochemical procedures and a monoclonal antibody reacting with all mammalian IF proteins. We document for the first time the presence of IFs in muscle cells of an invertebrate. They occur in three muscle types (irregular striated pharynx muscle, obliquely striated body muscle, uterus smooth muscle). IFs are also found in the epithelia studied (syncytial epidermis, intestine, ovary, testis). Immunoblots on muscles, pharynx, intestine, uterus, and epidermis identify a pair of polypeptides (with apparent molecular masses of 71 and 63 kD) as IF constituents. In vitro reconstitution of filaments was obtained with the proteins purified from body muscle. In the small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans IF proteins are so far found only in the massive desmosome-anchored tonofilament bundles which traverse a special epithelial cell type, the marginal cells of the pharynx. We speculate that IFs may occur in most but perhaps not all invertebrates and that they may not occur in all cells in large amounts. As electron micrographs of the epidermis of a planarian--a member of the Platyhelminthes--reveal IFs, the evolutionary origin of this cytoplasmic structure can be expected either among the lowest metazoa or already in some unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:3519620

  12. Muscle repair and regeneration: stem cells, scaffolds, and the contributions of skeletal muscle to amphibian limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Milner, Derek J; Cameron, Jo Ann

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses a robust innate capability for repair of tissue damage. Natural repair of muscle damage is a stepwise process that requires the coordinated activity of a number of cell types, including infiltrating macrophages, resident myogenic and non-myogenic stem cells, and connective tissue fibroblasts. Despite the proficiency of this intrinsic repair capability, severe injuries that result in significant loss of muscle tissue overwhelm the innate repair process and require intervention if muscle function is to be restored. Recent advances in stem cell biology, regenerative medicine, and materials science have led to attempts at developing tissue engineering-based methods for repairing severe muscle defects. Muscle tissue also plays a role in the ability of tailed amphibians to regenerate amputated limbs through epimorphic regeneration. Muscle contributes adult stem cells to the amphibian regeneration blastema, but it can also contribute blastemal cells through the dedifferentiation of multinucleate myofibers into mononuclear precursors. This fascinating plasticity and its contributions to limb regeneration have prompted researchers to investigate the potential for mammalian muscle to undergo dedifferentiation. Several works have shown that mammalian myotubes can be fragmented into mononuclear cells and induced to re-enter the cell cycle, but mature myofibers are resistant to fragmentation. However, recent works suggest that there may be a path to inducing fragmentation of mature myofibers into proliferative multipotent cells with the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies.

  13. Intestinal smooth muscle cells locally enhance stem cell factor (SCF) production against gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells can produce stem cell factor (SCF) in the normal state for the preservation of mast cells, but it is still unknown whether smooth muscle cells can enhance SCF production in response to the pathological stimuli. The present study showed that smooth muscle cells in mast cell-increased regions around worm cysts of intestinal nematodes significantly enhanced SCF gene expression compared with mast cell non-increased regions in same sample. SCF gene expression in mast cell non-increased regions in nematode-infected mice showed almost the same level as in non-infected control groups. These results indicate that smooth muscle cells can locally enhance SCF gene expression, and may have a role in local immunological reactions as growth factor-producing cells.

  14. [Primary ciliary dyskinesia: clinical and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    D'Auria, E; Palazzo, S; Argirò, S; El, Oksha S; Riva, E

    2012-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disease, characterized by ciliary disfunction and impaired mucociliary clearance, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, chronic otitis media, situs viscerum inversus in almost 40-50% of cases and male infertility. The triad situs viscerum inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis is known as Kartagener syndrome. Up to now little is known about genetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of primary motile ciliary diseases in children: for this reason, diagnosis is generally delayed and almost all treatments for PCD are not based on randomized studies but extrapolated from cystic fibrosis guidelines. The aim of this review is to propose to pediatricians a summary of current clinical and diagnostic evidence to obtain better knoledwge of this condition. The earlier diagnosis and the right treatment are both crucial to improve the prognosis of PCD.

  15. Isolation of Endothelial Cells and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Internal Mammary Artery Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Stephanie C.; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E.; Woods, T. Cooper

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell function through tissue culture techniques are often employed to investigate the underlying mechanisms regulating cardiovascular disease. As diseases such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease increase a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of methods for examining the effects of these diseases on vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells is needed. Commercial sources of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells generally provide minimal donor information and are in limited supply. This study was designed to determine if vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells could be isolated from human internal mammary arteries obtained from donors undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. As coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a commonly performed procedure, this method would provide a new source for these cells that when combined with the donor's medical history will greatly enhance our studies of the effects of complicating diseases on vascular biology. Internal mammary artery tissue was obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Through a simple method employing two separate tissue digestions, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were isolated and characterized. The isolated vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells exhibited the expected morphology and were able to be passaged for further analysis. The vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin and the endothelial cells exhibited positive staining for CD31. The overall purity of the isolations was > 95%. This method allows for the isolation of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells from internal mammary arteries, providing a new tool for investigations into the interplay of vascular diseases and complicating diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease. PMID:21603530

  16. BRAF activates PAX3 to control muscle precursor cell migration during forelimb muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeyoung; Watanabe, Shuichi; Hoelper, Soraya; Krüger, Marcus; Kostin, Sawa; Pöling, Jochen; Kubin, Thomas; Braun, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells is a key step during limb muscle development and depends on the activity of PAX3 and MET. Here, we demonstrate that BRAF serves a crucial function in formation of limb skeletal muscles during mouse embryogenesis downstream of MET and acts as a potent inducer of myoblast cell migration. We found that a fraction of BRAF accumulates in the nucleus after activation and endosomal transport to a perinuclear position. Mass spectrometry based screening for potential interaction partners revealed that BRAF interacts and phosphorylates PAX3. Mutation of BRAF dependent phosphorylation sites in PAX3 impaired the ability of PAX3 to promote migration of C2C12 myoblasts indicating that BRAF directly activates PAX3. Since PAX3 stimulates transcription of the Met gene we propose that MET signaling via BRAF fuels a positive feedback loop, which maintains high levels of PAX3 and MET activity required for limb muscle precursor cell migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18351.001 PMID:27906130

  17. Muscle Satellite Cells: Exploring the Basic Biology to Rule Them

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Camila F.; Fernandes, Stephanie A.; Ribeiro Junior, Antonio F.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle is a postmitotic tissue with an enormous capacity to regenerate upon injury. This is accomplished by resident stem cells, named satellite cells, which were identified more than 50 years ago. Since their discovery, many researchers have been concentrating efforts to answer questions about their origin and role in muscle development, the way they contribute to muscle regeneration, and their potential to cell-based therapies. Satellite cells are maintained in a quiescent state and upon requirement are activated, proliferating, and fusing with other cells to form or repair myofibers. In addition, they are able to self-renew and replenish the stem pool. Every phase of satellite cell activity is highly regulated and orchestrated by many molecules and signaling pathways; the elucidation of players and mechanisms involved in satellite cell biology is of extreme importance, being the first step to expose the crucial points that could be modulated to extract the optimal response from these cells in therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the basic aspects about satellite cells biology and briefly discuss recent findings about therapeutic attempts, trying to raise questions about how basic biology could provide a solid scaffold to more successful use of these cells in clinics. PMID:27042182

  18. Network interneurons underlying ciliary locomotion in Hermissenda.

    PubMed

    Crow, Terry; Jin, Nan Ge; Tian, Lian-Ming

    2013-02-01

    In the nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda, ciliary locomotion contributes to the generation of two tactic behaviors. Light elicits a positive phototaxis, and graviceptive stimulation evokes a negative gravitaxis. Two classes of light-responsive premotor interneurons in the network contributing to ciliary locomotion have been recently identified in the cerebropleural ganglia. Aggregates of type I interneurons receive monosynaptic excitatory (I(e)) or inhibitory (I(i)) input from identified photoreceptors. Type II interneurons receive polysynaptic excitatory (II(e)) or inhibitory (II(i)) input from photoreceptors. The ciliary network also includes type III inhibitory (III(i)) interneurons, which form monosynaptic inhibitory connections with ciliary efferent neurons (CENs). Illumination of the eyes evokes a complex inhibitory postsynaptic potential, a decrease of I(i) spike activity, a complex excitatory postsynaptic potential, and an increase of I(e) spike activity. Here, we characterized the contribution of identified I, II, and III(i) interneurons to the neural network supporting visually guided locomotion. In dark-adapted preparations, light elicited an increase in the tonic spike activity of II(e) interneurons and a decrease in the tonic spike activity of II(i) interneurons. Fluorescent dye-labeled type II interneurons exhibited diverse projections within the circumesophageal nervous system. However, a subclass of type II interneurons, II(e(cp)) and II(i(cp)) interneurons, were shown to terminate within the ipsilateral cerebropleural ganglia and indirectly modulate the activity of CENs. Type II interneurons form monosynaptic or polysynaptic connections with previously identified components of the ciliary network. The identification of a monosynaptic connection between I(e) and III(i) interneurons shown here suggest that they provide a major role in the light-dependent modulation of CEN spike activity underlying ciliary locomotion.

  19. Implantation of muscle satellite cells overexpressing myogenin improves denervated muscle atrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, H; Lv, Y; Shen, X Q; Xu, J H; Lu, H; Fu, L C; Duan, T

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) overexpressing myogenin (MyoG) on denervated muscle atrophy. Rat MSCs were isolated and transfected with the MyoG-EGFP plasmid vector GV143. MyoG-transfected MSCs (MTMs) were transplanted into rat gastrocnemius muscles at 1 week after surgical denervation. Controls included injections of untransfected MSCs or the vehicle only. Muscles were harvested and analyzed at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Immunofluorescence confirmed MyoG overexpression in MTMs. The muscle wet weight ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after MTM injection (67.17±6.79) compared with muscles injected with MSCs (58.83±5.31) or the vehicle (53.00±7.67; t=2.37, P=0.04 and t=3.39, P=0.007, respectively). The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was also larger at 2 weeks after MTM injection (2.63×10³±0.39×10³) compared with MSC injection (1.99×10³±0.58×10³) or the vehicle only (1.57×10³±0.47×10³; t=2.24, P=0.049 and t=4.22, P=0.002, respectively). At 4 and 24 weeks post-injection, the muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area were similar across all three experimental groups. Immunohistochemistry showed that the MTM group had larger MyoG-positive fibers. The MTM group (3.18±1.13) also had higher expression of MyoG mRNA than other groups (1.41±0.65 and 1.03±0.19) at 2 weeks after injection (t=2.72, P=0.04). Transplanted MTMs delayed short-term atrophy of denervated muscles. This approach can be optimized as a novel stand-alone therapy or as a bridge to surgical re-innervation of damaged muscles.

  20. Preparation of adult muscle fiber-associated stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Conboy, Michael J; Conboy, Irina M

    2010-01-01

    In our studies of muscle regeneration we have developed, modified, and optimized techniques to isolate and study the stem and precursor cells to muscle tissue. Our goals have been to obtain for study muscle fibers in bulk, or the fiber-associated cells, separately from the other cells found in muscle. Using these techniques, myofiber-associated cells may be isolated from neonatal through adult muscle, from resting or from regenerating muscle, thus allowing one to investigate the cellular populations participating during the time course of these events. The protocol is applicable to any age and condition of muscle and may be adapted for other tissues.

  1. Chromatin signaling in muscle stem cells: interpreting the regenerative microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Arianna; Palacios, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Muscle regeneration in the adult occurs in response to damage at expenses of a population of adult stem cells, the satellite cells. Upon injury, either physical or genetic, signals released within the satellite cell niche lead to the commitment, expansion and differentiation of the pool of muscle progenitors to repair damaged muscle. To achieve this goal satellite cells undergo a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming to coordinately activate and repress specific subset of genes. Although the epigenetics of muscle regeneration has been extensively discussed, less emphasis has been put on how extra-cellular cues are translated into the specific chromatin reorganization necessary for progression through the myogenic program. In this review we will focus on how satellite cells sense the regenerative microenvironment in physiological and pathological circumstances, paying particular attention to the mechanism through which the external stimuli are transduced to the nucleus to modulate chromatin structure and gene expression. We will discuss the pathways involved and how alterations in this chromatin signaling may contribute to satellite cells dysfunction during aging and disease. PMID:25904863

  2. Fractalkine-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, F; Dorfmüller, P; Souza, R; Durand-Gasselin, I; Godot, V; Capel, F; Adnot, S; Eddahibi, S; Mazmanian, M; Fadel, E; Hervé, P; Simonneau, G; Emilie, D; Humbert, M

    2007-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial resistance due to endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation resulting in chronic obstruction of small pulmonary arteries. There is evidence that inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of human and experimental pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the study was to address the role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in the inflammatory responses and pulmonary vascular remodelling of a monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension model. The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension by means of immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR on laser-captured microdissected pulmonary arteries. It was demonstrated that CX3CL1 was expressed by inflammatory cells surrounding pulmonary arterial lesions and that smooth muscle cells from these vessels had increased CX3CR1 expression. It was then shown that cultured rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressed CX3CR1 and that CX3CL1 induced proliferation but not migration of these cells. In conclusion, the current authors proposed that fractalkine may act as a growth factor for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Chemokines may thus play a role in pulmonary artery remodelling.

  3. The effect of temperature on proliferation and differentiation of chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells isolated from different muscle types.

    PubMed

    Harding, Rachel L; Halevy, Orna; Yahav, Shlomo; Velleman, Sandra G

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are a muscle stem cell population that mediate posthatch muscle growth and repair. Satellite cells respond differentially to environmental stimuli based upon their fiber-type of origin. The objective of this study was to determine how temperatures below and above the in vitro control of 38°C affected the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells isolated from the chicken anaerobic pectoralis major (p. major) or mixed fiber biceps femoris (b.femoris) muscles. The satellite cells isolated from the p. major muscle were more sensitive to both cold and hot temperatures compared to the b.femoris satellite cells during both proliferation and differentiation. The expressions of myogenic regulatory transcription factors were also different between satellite cells from different fiber types. MyoD expression, which partially regulates proliferation, was generally expressed at higher levels in p. major satellite cells compared to the b.femoris satellite cells from 33 to 43°C during proliferation and differentiation. Similarly, myogenin expression, which is required for differentiation, was also expressed at higher levels in p. major satellite cells in response to both cold and hot temperatures during proliferation and differentiation than b. femoris satellite cells. These data demonstrate that satellite cells from the anaerobic p. major muscle are more sensitive than satellite cells from the aerobic b. femoris muscle to both hot and cold thermal stress during myogenic proliferation and differentiation.

  4. Arginine Methylation by PRMT1 Regulates Muscle Stem Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Li, Xing; Yu, Zhenbao; Li, Shawn; Richard, Stéphane

    2017-02-01

    Quiescent muscle stem cells (MSCs) become activated in response to skeletal muscle injury to initiate regeneration. Activated MSCs proliferate and differentiate to repair damaged fibers or self-renew to maintain the pool and ensure future regeneration. The balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation is a tightly regulated process controlled by a genetic cascade involving determinant transcription factors such as Pax7, Myf5, MyoD, and MyoG. Recently, there have been several reports about the role of arginine methylation as a requirement for epigenetically mediated control of muscle regeneration. Here we report that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is expressed in MSCs and that conditional ablation of PRMT1 in MSCs using Pax7(CreERT2) causes impairment of muscle regeneration. Importantly, PRMT1-deficient MSCs have enhanced cell proliferation after injury but are unable to terminate the myogenic differentiation program, leading to regeneration failure. We identify the coactivator of Six1, Eya1, as a substrate of PRMT1. We show that PRMT1 methylates Eya1 in vitro and that loss of PRMT1 function in vivo prevents Eya1 methylation. Moreover, we observe that PRMT1-deficient MSCs have reduced expression of Eya1/Six1 target MyoD due to disruption of Eya1 recruitment at the MyoD promoter and subsequent Eya1-mediated coactivation. These findings suggest that arginine methylation by PRMT1 regulates muscle stem cell fate through the Eya1/Six1/MyoD axis.

  5. Beyond the mucus escalator: Complex ciliary hydrodynamics in disease and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; John, Dabiri; Kanso, Eva; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures lining external and internal body surfaces where they interact with fluids. The main function of motile cilia is often described as that of a ``mucus escalator'', i.e., a homogeneous ciliary carpet moving along layer of mucus along the surface to transport food, germ cells, debris, or pathogens. Accordingly, the performance of ciliary systems is usually measured in terms of a single metric, transport velocity, or its presumed proxy, ciliary beat frequency. We challenge this simple view through the observation that both healthy and diseased biological systems exhibit a variety of cilia morphologies, beat patterns, and arrangements, resulting in complex flow patterns and transport phenomena that cannot be reduced to a single parameter. Here we present two case studies. In one system, the ciliated surface creates two distinct flow regimes for first trapping and then sheltering potential symbiont bacteria for further biochemical screening. In the other system, chronic disease induces a misalignment of ciliary beat, leading to a pathological transition from uniform mucus transport to a pattern of stagnation and circulation. These studies suggest that (a), we need to develop a wider range of metrics for describing ciliary transport in biological and clinical contexts, and (b), engineered ciliated systems exploiting a variety of design parameters could provide novel ways of manipulating fluids at the microscale.

  6. [Primary ciliary dyskinesia, immotile cilia syndrome, and Kartagener syndrome: diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Dombi, V H; Walt, H

    1996-03-16

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is the generic term for a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases in which ciliary ultrastructure is defective and as a consequence ciliary motility is disturbed. An international consensus on the diagnostic criteria has not yet been reached. This paper reviews some recent findings which are useful in the diagnosis of the disease and attempts to establish the best diagnostic criteria. The marker symptoms are chronic bronchitis, otitis, and sinusitis since childhood. Additionally, one or more of the following criteria must be present: Kartagener syndrome, a dextrocardia situation, markedly reduced frequency in ciliary motility, or an essential ultrastructure deviation in more than 20% of the square cuts (e.g. reduced number of dynein arms). Biopsy of the ciliated mucosa is usually required for the above criteria and is studied by vital microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Primary and secondary ciliary dyskinesia can be distinguished by these methods and the rare case of PCD without ultrastructure deficiency ruled out. In special cases a cell culture is recommended for the diagnosis. Practical aspects of the sampling methods and diagnostic pitfalls are reviewed.

  7. Bmp signaling at the tips of skeletal muscles regulates the number of fetal muscle progenitors and satellite cells during development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Noulet, Fanny; Edom-Vovard, Frédérique; Tozer, Samuel; Le Grand, Fabien; Duprez, Delphine

    2010-04-20

    Muscle progenitors, labeled by the transcription factor Pax7, are responsible for muscle growth during development. The signals that regulate the muscle progenitor number during myogenesis are unknown. We show, through in vivo analysis, that Bmp signaling is involved in regulating fetal skeletal muscle growth. Ectopic activation of Bmp signaling in chick limbs increases the number of fetal muscle progenitors and fibers, while blocking Bmp signaling reduces their numbers, ultimately leading to small muscles. The Bmp effect that we observed during fetal myogenesis is diametrically opposed to that previously observed during embryonic myogenesis and that deduced from in vitro work. We also show that Bmp signaling regulates the number of satellite cells during development. Finally, we demonstrate that Bmp signaling is active in a subpopulation of fetal progenitors and satellite cells at the extremities of muscles. Overall, our results show that Bmp signaling plays differential roles in embryonic and fetal myogenesis.

  8. Smooth Muscle Enriched Long Noncoding RNA (SMILR) Regulates Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Margaret D.; Pinel, Karine; Dakin, Rachel; Vesey, Alex T.; Diver, Louise; Mackenzie, Ruth; Garcia, Raquel; Welsh, Paul; Sattar, Naveed; Hamilton, Graham; Joshi, Nikhil; Dweck, Marc R.; Miano, Joseph M.; McBride, Martin W.; Newby, David E.; McDonald, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Phenotypic switching of vascular smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state is implicated in diverse vascular pathologies, including atherogenesis, plaque stabilization, and neointimal hyperplasia. However, very little is known about the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during this process. Here, we investigated a role for lncRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cell biology and pathology. Methods and Results— Using RNA sequencing, we identified >300 lncRNAs whose expression was altered in human saphenous vein vascular smooth muscle cells following stimulation with interleukin-1α and platelet-derived growth factor. We focused on a novel lncRNA (Ensembl: RP11-94A24.1), which we termed smooth muscle–induced lncRNA enhances replication (SMILR). Following stimulation, SMILR expression was increased in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was detected in conditioned media. Furthermore, knockdown of SMILR markedly reduced cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we noted that expression of genes proximal to SMILR was also altered by interleukin-1α/platelet-derived growth factor treatment, and HAS2 expression was reduced by SMILR knockdown. In human samples, we observed increased expression of SMILR in unstable atherosclerotic plaques and detected increased levels in plasma from patients with high plasma C-reactive protein. Conclusions— These results identify SMILR as a driver of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suggest that modulation of SMILR may be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce vascular pathologies. PMID:27052414

  9. Synapse formation between clonal neuroblastoma X glioma hybrid cells and striated muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P; Christian, C; Nirenberg, M

    1976-01-01

    Clonal neuroblastoma X glioma hybrid cells were shown to form synapses with cultured, striated muscle cells. The properties of the synapses between hybrid and muscle cells were similar to those of the normal, neuromuscular synapse at an early stage of development. The number of synapses formed and the efficiency of transmission across synapses were found to be regulated, apparently independently, by components in the culture medium. Under appropriate conditions synapses were found with 20% of the hybrid-muscle cell pairs examined; thus, the hybrid cells form synapses with relatively high frequency. Images PMID:1061105

  10. Satellite cell activity in muscle regeneration after contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Pholpramool, Chumpol; Kitiyanant, Yindee; Yimlamai, Tossaporn

    2010-11-01

    1. The role of satellite cells in muscle growth during development is well documented, but the involvement of these cells in muscle repair after contusion is less well known. In the present study, we investigated the time-course of satellite cell activity (from 3h to 7days) after contusion of rat gastrocnemius muscle using specific molecular markers for immunofluorescence and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 2. Inflammation of the injured muscle occurred within 6h, followed by disintegration of the damaged myofibres within 12h. Newly formed myofibres appeared by Day 7. 3. The number of MyoD-positive nuclei (activated satellite cells) in the injured muscle was significantly increased by 6h, reaching a maximum by 12h after contusion. However, the number of MyoD-positive nuclei decreased towards control levels by Day 7. Changes in the number of bromodeoxyuridine-labelled nuclei (proliferating satellite cells) paralleled the changes seen in the number of MyoD-positive nuclei. Conversely, expression of myogenin protein was not apparent until Day 3 and increased further by Day 7. Colabelling of MyoD and myogenin was seen in only a few cells. 4. The time-course of MyoD mRNA expression corresponded with MyoD protein expression. However, there were two peaks in myogenin mRNA expression: 6h and Day 7 after contusion. The second peak coincided with upregulation of myostatin mRNA levels. 5. The results of the present study suggest that contusion activates a homogeneous population of satellite cells to proliferate within 3days, followed by differentiation to form new myofibres. The latter may be regulated, in part, by myostatin.

  11. Myristoylated CIL-7 regulates ciliary extracellular vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Julie E.; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C.Q.; Hellen, Elizabeth; Kern, Andrew D.; Hall, David H.; Barr, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    The cilium both releases and binds to extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs may be used by cells as a form of intercellular communication and mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. The mammalian polycystins (PCs) localize to cilia, as well as to urinary EVs released from renal epithelial cells. PC ciliary trafficking defects may be an underlying cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and ciliary–EV interactions have been proposed to play a central role in the biology of PKD. In Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals, PC1 and PC2 act in the same genetic pathway, act in a sensory capacity, localize to cilia, and are contained in secreted EVs, suggesting ancient conservation. However, the relationship between cilia and EVs and the mechanisms generating PC-containing EVs remain an enigma. In a forward genetic screen for regulators of C. elegans PKD-2 ciliary localization, we identified CIL-7, a myristoylated protein that regulates EV biogenesis. Loss of CIL-7 results in male mating behavioral defects, excessive accumulation of EVs in the lumen of the cephalic sensory organ, and failure to release PKD-2::GFP-containing EVs to the environment. Fatty acylation, such as myristoylation and palmitoylation, targets proteins to cilia and flagella. The CIL-7 myristoylation motif is essential for CIL-7 function and for targeting CIL-7 to EVs. C. elegans is a powerful model with which to study ciliary EV biogenesis in vivo and identify cis-targeting motifs such as myristoylation that are necessary for EV–cargo association and function. PMID:26041936

  12. Invited review: Stem cells and muscle diseases: advances in cell therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Elisa; Gidaro, Teresa; Bigot, Anne; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Mouly, Vincent; Trollet, Capucine

    2015-04-01

    Despite considerable progress to increase our understanding of muscle genetics, pathophysiology, molecular and cellular partners involved in muscular dystrophies and muscle ageing, there is still a crucial need for effective treatments to counteract muscle degeneration and muscle wasting in such conditions. This review focuses on cell-based therapy for muscle diseases. We give an overview of the different parameters that have to be taken into account in such a therapeutic strategy, including the influence of muscle ageing, cell proliferation and migration capacities, as well as the translation of preclinical results in rodent into human clinical approaches. We describe recent advances in different types of human myogenic stem cells, with a particular emphasis on myoblasts but also on other candidate cells described so far [CD133+ cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cells (ALDH+), muscle-derived stem cells (MuStem), embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS)]. Finally, we provide an update of ongoing clinical trials using cell therapy strategies.

  13. Aortic smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis in relation to atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are implicated in atherogenesis by their effects on tissue permeability and cell proliferation and their interaction with plasma low density lipoproteins. Using the pigeon model in which an atherosclerosis-susceptible (WC) and -resistant (SR) breed can be compared, PG synthesis by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells was examined by the use of ({sup 35}S)-sodium sulfate and ({sup 3}H)-serine or ({sup 3}H)-glucosamine as labeling precursors. In both SR and WC cells, the majority of newly synthesized PG were secreted into the media. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) PG and dermatan sulfate (DS) PG were the major PG produced. Total PG production was consistently lower in WC compared to SR cultures due in part to reduce PG synthesis but also to degradation of newly synthesized PG. Since increased DS-PG accompanines atherosclerosis progression, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that macrophages modulate smooth muscle cell metabolism to cause increase DS-PG production. Cultured WC aortic smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1 and the production of PG examined. Increasing concentration of conditioned media from both types of macrophages caused increased incorporation of {sup 35}S-sulfate into secreted PG, but no change in cell-associated PG. Lipopolysaccharide activation of P388D1 cells enhanced the effect.

  14. Biomechanical Origins of Muscle Stem Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James B; Cheng, Richard Y; Davoudi, Sadegh; Gilbert, Penney M

    2016-04-10

    Skeletal muscle, the most abundant and widespread tissue in the human body, contracts upon receiving electrochemical signals from the nervous system to support essential functions such as thermoregulation, limb movement, blinking, swallowing and breathing. Reconstruction of adult muscle tissue relies on a pool of mononucleate, resident muscle stem cells, known as "satellite cells", expressing the paired-box transcription factor Pax7 necessary for their specification during embryonic development and long-term maintenance during adult life. Satellite cells are located around the myofibres in a niche at the interface of the basal lamina and the host fibre plasma membrane (i.e., sarcolemma), at a very low frequency. Upon damage to the myofibres, quiescent satellite cells are activated and give rise to a population of transient amplifying myogenic progenitor cells, which eventually exit the cell cycle permanently and fuse to form new myofibres and regenerate the tissue. A subpopulation of satellite cells self-renew and repopulate the niche, poised to respond to future demands. Harnessing the potential of satellite cells relies on a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms guiding their regulation in vivo. Over the past several decades, studies revealed many signal transduction pathways responsible for satellite cell fate decisions, but the niche cues driving the activation and silencing of these pathways are less clear. Here we explore the scintillating possibility that considering the dynamic changes in the biophysical properties of the skeletal muscle, namely stiffness, and the stretch and shear forces to which a myofibre can be subjected to may provide missing information necessary to gain a full understanding of satellite cell niche regulation.

  15. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  16. Primary ciliary dyskinesia diagnosed by electron microscopy in one case of Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rugină, Aniela Luminiţa; Dimitriu, Alexandru Grigore; Nistor, Nicolai; Mihăilă, Doina

    2014-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is associated with abnormalities in the structure of a function of motile cilia, causing impairment of muco-ciliary clearence, with bacterial overinfection of the upper and lower respiratory tract (chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease), heterotaxia (situs abnormalities), with/without congenital heart disease, abnormal sperm motility with male infertility, higher frequency of ectopic pregnancy and female subfertility. The presence of recurrent respiratory tract infections in the pediatric age requires differentiation between primary immunodeficiency, diseases with abnormal mucus (e.g., cystic fibrosis) and abnormal ciliary diseases. This case was hospitalized for recurrent respiratory tract infections and total situs inversus at the age of five years, which has enabled the diagnosis of Kartagener syndrome. The PCD confirmation was performed by electron microscopy examination of nasal mucosa cells through which were confirmed dynein arms abnormalities. The diagnosis and early treatment of childhood PCD allows a positive development and a good prognosis, thus improving the quality of life.

  17. [The contribution of muscle progenitor cells to maintaining morphological characteristics of unweighted rat soleus muscle during passive stretch].

    PubMed

    Tarakina, M V; Turtikova, O V; Nemirovskaia, T L; Kokontsev, A A; Shenkman, B S

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle work hypertrophy is usually connected with muscle progenitor SC (satellite cells) activation with subsequent incorporation their nuclei into myofibers. Passive stretch of unloaded muscle was earlier established to prevent atrophic processes and be accompanied by enhanced protein synthesis. We hypothesized that elimination of SC proliferation capacity by gamma-irradiation would partly preavent stretched muscle fiber capability to maintain their size under condition of gravitational unloading. To assess the role of muscle progenitor (satellite) cells in development of passive stretch preventive effect SC proliferation was suppressed by local exposure to ionizing radiation (2500 Rad) and then subsequent hindlimb suspension or hindlimb suspension with concomitant passive stretch were carried out. Reduction of myofiber cross-sectional area and decrease in myo-nuclei number accompanying unloaded muscle atrophy were completely abolished by passive stretch both in irradiated and sham-treated animals. We concluded that satellite cells did not make essential contribution to passive stretch preventive action under condition of simulated weightlessness.

  18. Muscarinic receptor size on smooth muscle cells and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.M.; Jung, C.Y.; Grover, A.K.

    1986-08-01

    The loss of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) binding following high-energy radiation was used to compare the muscarinic receptor size on single smooth muscle cells isolated by collagenase digestion from the canine stomach and on plasma membranes derived from intact gastric smooth muscle without exposure to exogenous proteolysis. Radiation inactivation of galactose oxidase (68 kdaltons), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (160 kdaltons), and pyruvate kinase (224 kdaltons) activities were used as molecular-weight standards. Radiation inactivation of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding to rat brain membranes, which gave a target size of 86 kdaltons, served as an additional control. In isolated smooth muscle cells, the calculated size of the muscarinic receptor was 80 +/- 8 kdaltons. In contrast, in a smooth muscle enriched plasma membrane preparation, muscarinic receptor size was significantly smaller at 45 +/- 3 kdaltons. Larger molecular sizes were obtained either in the presence of protease inhibitors (62 +/- 4 kdaltons) or by using a crude membrane preparation of gastric smooth muscle 86 +/- 7 kdaltons).

  19. The role of taurine on skeletal muscle cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Teruo; Honda, Akira; Ikegami, Tadashi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Taurine abundantly contained in the skeletal muscle has been considered as one of essential factors for the differentiation and growth of skeletal muscles. The previous studies in the taurine transporter knockout mice showed that deficiency of taurine content in the skeletal muscle caused incomplete muscular developments, morphological abnormalities, and exercise abilities. In fetal and neonatal periods, taurine must be an essential amino acid due to no biosynthesis capacity, and therefore, taurine should be endogenously supplied through placenta and maternal milk. In general cell culture condition, taurine contained in the culture medium is absent or few, and therefore, most of cultured cells are in taurine-deficient condition. In the present study, we confirmed, in cultured mouse differentiable myoblast, taurine treatment significantly enhanced the differentiation to myotube in a dose-dependent manner, while these effects were abrogated by inhibitions of taurine transport and Ca(2+) signaling pathway.The present study suggested that exogenous taurine might play a key role on the mature differentiation/growth of the skeletal muscle during development period through Ca(2+) signaling pathway, and therefore, taurine would contribute the muscle recovery after damages.

  20. Ciliary kinematics of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in Complex Fluids: Role of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Qin, Boyang; Arratia, Paulo

    2014-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. Guided by our experiments on the swimming gait of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in viscoelastic fluids, we focus on ciliary waveforms in Newtonian fluids and systematically study the effect of increasing viscosity. We find that the beat frequency as well as the wave speed are both strongly influenced by fluid viscosity. Interestingly, ciliary waveforms at low viscosity show a larger influence of the cell body than waveforms at higher viscosity. We use slender body theory and principal component analysis to elucidate the role of fluid viscosity in regulating the kinematics of the swimming process.

  1. Satellite Cells Contribution to Exercise Mediated Muscle Hypertrophy and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bazgir, Behzad; Fathi, Rouhollah; Rezazadeh Valojerdi, Mojtaba; Mozdziak, Paul; Asgari, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are the most abundant skeletal muscle stem cells. They are widely recognized for their contributions to maintenance of muscle mass, regeneration and hypertrophy during the human life span. These cells are good candidates for cell therapy due to their self-renewal capabilities and presence in an undifferentiated form. Presently, a significant gap exists between our knowledge of SCs behavior and their application as a means for human skeletal muscle tissue repair and regeneration. Both physiological and pathological stimuli potentially affect SCs activation, proliferation, and terminal differentiation the former category being the focus of this article. Activation of SCs occurs following exercise, post-training micro-injuries, and electrical stimulation. Exercise, as a potent and natural stimulus, is at the center of numerous studies on SC activation and relevant fields. According to research, different exercise modalities end with various effects. This review article attempts to picture the state of the art of the SCs life span and their engagement in muscle regeneration and hypertrophy in exercise. PMID:28042532

  2. Calcium stone lithoptysis in promary ciliary dyskinesia

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: An association between lithoptysis and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) has not been previously reported. However, reports of lithoptysis from 2 older patients (>60 yr) prompted a study of this association. METHODS: We performed a prospective study of all PCD patients...

  3. Proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aimed to facilitate candidate biomarkers selection and improve network-based multi-target therapy, we perform comparative proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Laser capture microdissection was used to harvest purified muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells from 4 paired samples. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteome expression profile. The differential proteins were further analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared with the published literature. Results A total of 885/890 proteins commonly appeared in 4 paired samples. 295/337 of the 488/493 proteins that specific expressed in tumor/normal cells own gene ontology (GO) cellular component annotation. Compared with the entire list of the international protein index (IPI), there are 42/45 GO terms exhibited as enriched and 9/5 exhibited as depleted, respectively. Several pathways exhibit significantly changes between cancer and normal cells, mainly including spliceosome, endocytosis, oxidative phosphorylation, etc. Finally, descriptive statistics show that the PI Distribution of candidate biomarkers have certain regularity. Conclusions The present study identified the proteome expression profile of muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells, providing information for subcellular pattern research of cancer and offer candidate proteins for biomarker panel and network-based multi-target therapy. PMID:21645413

  4. Analysis of ciliary band formation in the mollusc Ilyanassa obsoleta.

    PubMed

    Gharbiah, Maey; Nakamoto, Ayaki; Nagy, Lisa M

    2013-07-01

    Two primary ciliary bands, the prototroch and metatroch, are required for locomotion and in the feeding larvae of many spiralians. The metatroch has been reported to have different cellular origins in the molluscs Crepidula fornicata and Ilyanassa obsoleta, as well as in the annelid Polygordius lacteus, consistent with multiple independent origins of the spiralian metatroch. Here, we describe in further detail the cell lineage of the ciliary bands in the gastropod mollusc I. obsoleta using intracellular lineage tracing and the expression of an acetylated tubulin antigen that serves as a marker for ciliated cells. We find that the I. obsoleta metatroch is formed primarily by third quartet derivatives as well as a small number of second quartet derivatives. These results differ from the described metatrochal lineage in the mollusc C. fornicata that derives solely from the second quartet or the metatrochal lineage in the annelid P. lacteus that derives solely from the third quartet. The present study adds to a growing body of literature concerning the evolution of the metatroch and the plasticity of cell fates in homologous micromeres in spiralian embryos.

  5. Automated identification of abnormal respiratory ciliary motion in nasal biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Shannon P.; Zahid, Maliha J.; Durkin, John R.; Francis, Richard J.; Lo, Cecilia W.; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra

    2016-01-01

    Motile cilia lining the nasal and bronchial passages beat synchronously to clear mucus and foreign matter from the respiratory tract. This mucociliary defense mechanism is essential for pulmonary health, because respiratory ciliary motion defects, such as those in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) or congenital heart disease, can cause severe sinopulmonary disease necessitating organ transplant. The visual examination of nasal or bronchial biopsies is critical for the diagnosis of ciliary motion defects, but these analyses are highly subjective and error-prone. Although ciliary beat frequency can be computed, this metric cannot sensitively characterize ciliary motion defects. Furthermore, PCD can present without any ultrastructural defects, limiting the use of other detection methods, such as electron microscopy. Therefore, an unbiased, computational method for analyzing ciliary motion is clinically compelling. We present a computational pipeline using algorithms from computer vision and machine learning to decompose ciliary motion into quantitative elemental components. Using this framework, we constructed digital signatures for ciliary motion recognition and quantified specific properties of the ciliary motion that allowed high-throughput classification of ciliary motion as normal or abnormal. We achieved >90% classification accuracy in two independent data cohorts composed of patients with congenital heart disease, PCD, or heterotaxy, as well as healthy controls. Clinicians without specialized knowledge in machine learning or computer vision can operate this pipeline as a “black box” toolkit to evaluate ciliary motion. PMID:26246169

  6. Intracerebral transplants of primary muscle cells: a potential 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, S.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    After the transplantation of rat primary muscle cells into the caudate or cortex of recipient rats, the muscle cells were able to persist for at least 6 months. Muscle cells transfected with expression plasmids prior to transplantation were able to express reporter genes in the brains for at least 2 months. These results suggest that muscle cells might be a useful 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain.

  7. Necdin enhances muscle reconstitution of dystrophic muscle by vessel-associated progenitors, by promoting cell survival and myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pessina, P; Conti, V; Tonlorenzi, R; Touvier, T; Meneveri, R; Cossu, G; Brunelli, S

    2012-05-01

    Improving stem cell therapy is a major goal for the treatment of muscle diseases, where physiological muscle regeneration is progressively exhausted. Vessel-associated stem cells, such as mesoangioblasts (MABs), appear to be the most promising cell type for the cell therapy for muscular dystrophies and have been shown to significantly contribute to restoration of muscle structure and function in different muscular dystrophy models. Here, we report that melanoma antigen-encoding gene (MAGE) protein necdin enhances muscle differentiation and regeneration by MABs. When necdin is constitutively overexpressed, it accelerates their differentiation and fusion in vitro and it increases their efficacy in reconstituting regenerating myofibres in the α-sarcoglycan dystrophic mouse. Moreover, necdin enhances survival when MABs are exposed to cytotoxic stimuli that mimic the inflammatory dystrophic environment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that overexpression of necdin may be a crucial tool to boost therapeutic applications of MABs in dystrophic muscle.

  8. Ciliary transcription factors and miRNAs precisely regulate Cp110 levels required for ciliary adhesions and ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Walentek, Peter; Quigley, Ian K; Sun, Dingyuan I; Sajjan, Umeet K; Kintner, Christopher; Harland, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Upon cell cycle exit, centriole-to-basal body transition facilitates cilia formation. The centriolar protein Cp110 is a regulator of this process and cilia inhibitor, but its positive roles in ciliogenesis remain poorly understood. Using Xenopus we show that Cp110 inhibits cilia formation at high levels, while optimal levels promote ciliogenesis. Cp110 localizes to cilia-forming basal bodies and rootlets, and is required for ciliary adhesion complexes that facilitate Actin interactions. The opposing roles of Cp110 in ciliation are generated in part by coiled-coil domains that mediate preferential binding to centrioles over rootlets. Because of its dual role in ciliogenesis, Cp110 levels must be precisely controlled. In multiciliated cells, this is achieved by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation through ciliary transcription factors and microRNAs, which activate and repress cp110 to produce optimal Cp110 levels during ciliogenesis. Our data provide novel insights into how Cp110 and its regulation contribute to development and cell function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17557.001 PMID:27623009

  9. Colonization of the satellite cell niche by skeletal muscle progenitor cells depends on Notch signals.

    PubMed

    Bröhl, Dominique; Vasyutina, Elena; Czajkowski, Maciej T; Griger, Joscha; Rassek, Claudia; Rahn, Hans-Peter; Purfürst, Bettina; Wende, Hagen; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2012-09-11

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration rely on myogenic progenitor and satellite cells, the stem cells of postnatal muscle. Elimination of Notch signals during mouse development results in premature differentiation of myogenic progenitors and formation of very small muscle groups. Here we show that this drastic effect is rescued by mutation of the muscle differentiation factor MyoD. However, rescued myogenic progenitors do not assume a satellite cell position and contribute poorly to myofiber growth. The disrupted homing is due to a deficit in basal lamina assembly around emerging satellite cells and to their impaired adhesion to myofibers. On a molecular level, emerging satellite cells deregulate the expression of basal lamina components and adhesion molecules like integrin α7, collagen XVIIIα1, Megf10, and Mcam. We conclude that Notch signals control homing of satellite cells, stimulating them to contribute to their own microenvironment and to adhere to myofibers.

  10. Muscle progenitor cells proliferation doesn't sufficiently contribute to maintaining stretched soleus muscle mass during gravitational unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarakina, M. V.; Turtikova, O. V.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.; Kokontcev, A. A.; Shenkman, B. S.

    Skeletal muscle work hypertrophy is usually connected with muscle progenitor satellite cells (SC) activation with subsequent incorporation of their nuclei into myofibers. Passive stretch of unloaded muscle was earlier established to prevent atrophic processes and is accompanied by enhanced protein synthesis. We hypothesized that elimination of SC proliferation capacity by γ-irradiation would partly avert stretched muscle fiber capability to maintain their size under the conditions of gravitational unloading. To assess the role of muscle progenitor (satellite) cells in development of passive stretch preventive effect SC proliferation was suppressed by local exposing to ionized radiation (2500 rad), subsequent hindlimb suspension or hindlimb suspension with concomitant passive stretch were carried out. Reduction of myofiber cross-sectional area and decrease in myonuclei number accompanying unloaded muscle atrophy were completely abolished by passive stretch both in irradiated and sham-treated animals. We conclude that SC did not make essential contribution to passive stretch preventive action under the conditions of simulated weightlessness.

  11. Myostatin inhibits cell proliferation and protein synthesis in C2C12 muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W E; Bhasin, S; Artaza, J; Byhower, F; Azam, M; Willard, D H; Kull, F C; Gonzalez-Cadavid, N

    2001-02-01

    Myostatin mutations in mice and cattle are associated with increased muscularity, suggesting that myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. To test the hypothesis that myostatin inhibits muscle cell growth, we examined the effects of recombinant myostatin in mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 cells. After verification of the expression of cDNA constructs in a cell-free system and in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, the human recombinant protein was expressed as the full-length (375-amino acid) myostatin in Drosophila cells (Mst375D), or the 110-amino acid carboxy-terminal protein in Escherichia coli (Mst110EC). These proteins were identified by immunoblotting and were purified. Both Mst375D and Mst110EC dose dependently inhibited cell proliferation (cell count and Formazan assay), DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation), and protein synthesis ([1-14C]leucine incorporation) in C2C12 cells. The inhibitory effects of both proteins were greater in myotubes than in myoblasts. Neither protein had any significant effects on protein degradation or apoptosis. In conclusion, recombinant myostatin proteins inhibit cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, and protein synthesis in C2C12 muscle cells, suggesting that myostatin may control muscle mass by inhibiting muscle growth or regeneration.

  12. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  13. Vascular Calcification: Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent and, when present, is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. Vascular smooth muscle cells play an integral role in mediating vessel calcification by undergoing differentiation to osteoblast-like cells and generating matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for calcium-phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Once believed to be a passive process, it is now recognized that vascular calcification is a complex and highly regulated process that involves activation of cellular signaling pathways, circulating inhibitors of calcification, genetic factors, and hormones. This review will examine several of the key mechanisms linking vascular smooth muscle cells to vessel calcification that may be targeted to reduce vessel wall mineralization and, thereby, reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:25435520

  14. Identification of lymphatics in the ciliary body of the human eye: a novel "uveolymphatic" outflow pathway.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Yeni H; Johnston, Miles G; Ly, Tina; Patel, Manoj; Drake, Brian; Gümüş, Ersin; Fraenkl, Stephan A; Moore, Sara; Tobbia, Dalia; Armstrong, Dianna; Horvath, Eva; Gupta, Neeru

    2009-11-01

    Impaired aqueous humor flow from the eye may lead to elevated intraocular pressure and glaucoma. Drainage of aqueous fluid from the eye occurs through established routes that include conventional outflow via the trabecular meshwork, and an unconventional or uveoscleral outflow pathway involving the ciliary body. Based on the assumption that the eye lacks a lymphatic circulation, the possible role of lymphatics in the less well defined uveoscleral pathway has been largely ignored. Advances in lymphatic research have identified specific lymphatic markers such as podoplanin, a transmembrane mucin-type glycoprotein, and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1). Lymphatic channels were identified in the human ciliary body using immunofluorescence with D2-40 antibody for podoplanin, and LYVE-1 antibody. In keeping with the criteria for lymphatic vessels in conjunctiva used as positive control, D2-40 and LYVE-1-positive lymphatic channels in the ciliary body had a distinct lumen, were negative for blood vessel endothelial cell marker CD34, and were surrounded by either discontinuous or no collagen IV-positive basement membrane. Cryo-immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the presence D2-40-immunoreactivity in lymphatic endothelium in the human ciliary body. Fluorescent nanospheres injected into the anterior chamber of the sheep eye were detected in LYVE-1-positive channels of the ciliary body 15, 30, and 45 min following injection. Four hours following intracameral injection, Iodine-125 radio-labeled human serum albumin injected into the sheep eye (n = 5) was drained preferentially into cervical, retropharyngeal, submandibular and preauricular lymph nodes in the head and neck region compared to reference popliteal lymph nodes (P < 0.05). These findings collectively indicate the presence of distinct lymphatic channels in the human ciliary body, and that fluid and solutes flow at least partially through this system. The discovery of a uveolymphatic

  15. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction.

  16. Expansion of revertant fibers in dystrophic mdx muscles reflects activity of muscle precursor cells and serves as an index of muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Toshifumi; Lu, Qi-Long; Morgan, Jennifer E; Davies, Kay E; Fisher, Rosie; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Partridge, Terence A

    2006-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse myopathies reflect a lack of dystrophin in muscles. However, both contain sporadic clusters of revertant fibers (RFs) that express dystrophin. RF clusters expand in size with age in mdx mice. To test the hypothesis that the expansion of clusters is achieved through the process of muscle degeneration and regeneration, we analyzed muscles of mdx mice in which degeneration and regeneration were inhibited by the expression of micro-dystrophins or utrophin transgenes. Postnatal RF expansion was diminished in direct correlation to the protective effect of the transgene expression. Similarly, expansion of RFs was inhibited when muscle regeneration was blocked by irradiation. However, in irradiated muscles, irradiation-tolerant quiescent muscle precursor cells reactivated by notexin effectively restored RF expansion. Our observations demonstrate that revertant events occur initially within a subset of muscle precursor cells. The proliferation of these cells, as part of the regeneration process, leads to the expansion of RF clusters within degenerating muscles. This expansion of revertant clusters depicts the cumulative history of regeneration, thus providing a useful index for functional evaluation of therapies that counteract muscle degeneration.

  17. Efficient single muscle fiber isolation from alcohol-fixed adult muscle following β-galactosidase staining for satellite cell detection.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mayank; Asakura, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Staining for β-galactosidase activity for whole tissues, sections, and cells is a common method to detect expression of β-galactosidase reporter transgene as well as senescence-dependent β-galactosidase activity. Choice of fixatives is a critical step for detection of β-galactosidase activity, subsequent immunostaining, and enzymatic digestion of tissue to dissociate cells. In this report, the authors examined several aldehyde and alcohol fixatives in mouse skeletal muscle tissues for their efficiency at improving detection of β-galactosidase activity as well as detection by immunostaining. In addition, fixatives were also analyzed for their efficiency for collagenase digestion to isolate single muscle fibers on postfixed β-galactosidase-stained whole skeletal muscle tissues. The results show that fixing cells with isopropanol yields the greatest reliability and intensity in both β-galactosidase staining as well as double staining for β-galactosidase activity and antibodies. In addition, isopropanol and ethanol, but not glutaraldehyde or paraformaldehyde, allow for the isolation of single muscle fibers from the diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles following postfixed β-galactosidase staining. Using this method, it is possible to identify the amount of cells that occupy the satellite cell compartment in single muscle fibers prepared from any muscle tissues, including tibialis anterior muscle and diaphragm.

  18. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  19. Regenerative potential of human muscle stem cells in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inflammation is a profound systemic modification of the cellular microenvironment which could affect survival, repair and maintenance of muscle stem cells. The aim of this study was to define the role of chronic inflammation on the regenerative potential of satellite cells in human muscle. Methods As a model for chronic inflammation, 11 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were included together with 16 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) as controls. The mean age of both groups was 64 years, with more females in the RA group compared to the OA group. During elective knee replacement surgery, a muscle biopsy was taken from the distal musculus vastus medialis. Cell populations from four RA and eight OA patients were used for extensive phenotyping because these cell populations showed no spontaneous differentiation and myogenic purity greater than 75% after explantation. Results After mononuclear cell explantation, myogenic purity, viability, proliferation index, number of colonies, myogenic colonies, growth speed, maximum number of population doublings and fusion index were not different between RA and OA patients. Furthermore, the expression of proteins involved in replicative and stress-induced premature senescence and apoptosis, including p16, p21, p53, hTERT and cleaved caspase-3, was not different between RA and OA patients. Mean telomere length was shorter in the RA group compared to the OA group. Conclusions In the present study we found evidence that chronic inflammation in RA does not affect the in vitro regenerative potential of human satellite cells. Identification of mechanisms influencing muscle regeneration by modulation of its microenvironment may, therefore, be more appropriate. PMID:22171690

  20. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  1. Smooth Muscle-Like Tissue Constructs with Circumferentially Oriented Cells Formed by the Cell Fiber Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Amy Y.; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  2. The contribution of Islet1-expressing splanchnic mesoderm cells to distinct branchiomeric muscles reveals significant heterogeneity in head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Elisha; Monovich, Amir; Tirosh-Finkel, Libbat; Harrelson, Zachary; Rousso, Tal; Rinon, Ariel; Harel, Itamar; Evans, Sylvia M; Tzahor, Eldad

    2008-02-01

    During embryogenesis, paraxial mesoderm cells contribute skeletal muscle progenitors, whereas cardiac progenitors originate in the lateral splanchnic mesoderm (SpM). Here we focus on a subset of the SpM that contributes to the anterior or secondary heart field (AHF/SHF), and lies adjacent to the cranial paraxial mesoderm (CPM), the precursors for the head musculature. Molecular analyses in chick embryos delineated the boundaries between the CPM, undifferentiated SpM progenitors of the AHF/SHF, and differentiating cardiac cells. We then revealed the regionalization of branchial arch mesoderm: CPM cells contribute to the proximal region of the myogenic core, which gives rise to the mandibular adductor muscle. SpM cells contribute to the myogenic cells in the distal region of the branchial arch that later form the intermandibular muscle. Gene expression analyses of these branchiomeric muscles in chick uncovered a distinct molecular signature for both CPM- and SpM-derived muscles. Islet1 (Isl1) is expressed in the SpM/AHF and branchial arch in both chick and mouse embryos. Lineage studies using Isl1-Cre mice revealed the significant contribution of Isl1(+) cells to ventral/distal branchiomeric (stylohyoid, mylohyoid and digastric) and laryngeal muscles. By contrast, the Isl1 lineage contributes to mastication muscles (masseter, pterygoid and temporalis) to a lesser extent, with virtually no contribution to intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles or extraocular muscles. In addition, in vivo activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in chick embryos resulted in marked inhibition of Isl1, whereas inhibition of this pathway increased Isl1 expression. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the contribution of Isl1(+) SpM cells to a subset of branchiomeric skeletal muscles.

  3. Functional pharmacological evidence for EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors in immortalized human trabecular meshwork and non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Crider, J Y; Sharif, N A

    2001-02-01

    The aim of these studies was to characterize the molecular pharmacology of the prostanoid receptors positively coupled to stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in immortalized human trabecular meshwork (TM-3) cells and to compare these results with that of the receptors in immortalized human nonpigmented epithelial (NPE) cells. In general, the TM-3 and NPE cells showed a similar profile with respect to their responses to various prostaglandin (PG) receptor agonists. The rank order of potency (EC50; means +/- SEM) for these compounds in the TM-3 cells was: PGE2 (124 +/- 21 nM) > 13,14-dihydro-PGE1 (430 +/- 110 nM) = PGE1 (522 +/- 345 nM) > 11-deoxy-PGE1 (1063 +/- 118 nM) = 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 (1776 +/- 460 nM) = butaprost (1920 +/- 527 nM) > PGD2 = PGI2 = PGF2alpha (n = 3 - 12). While the agonist profile indicated the presence of EP2 receptors, the effects of the EP4 receptor antagonists suggested the additional expression of EP4 receptors in both of these cells. Thus, the EP4 receptor antagonist, AH23848B, at a concentration of 30 microM, caused a dextral shift in the PGE2 concentration-response curves in both TM-3 and NPE cells coupled with a 20-28% decrease in the maximal response of PGE2, indicating apparent noncompetitive antagonism profiles. The antagonist potency of AH23848B in these cells was: Kb = 38.4 +/- 14.8 microM and 23.5 +/- 4.5 microM; -log Kb = 4.7. The other EP4 receptor antagonist, AH22921 (-log Kb = 4.1 - 4.7), was weaker than AH23848B. Taken together, these pharmacological studies have shown than TM-3 and NPE cells apparently contain functional EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase.

  4. Arginine Methylation by PRMT1 Regulates Muscle Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Li, Xing; Yu, Zhenbao; Li, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quiescent muscle stem cells (MSCs) become activated in response to skeletal muscle injury to initiate regeneration. Activated MSCs proliferate and differentiate to repair damaged fibers or self-renew to maintain the pool and ensure future regeneration. The balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation is a tightly regulated process controlled by a genetic cascade involving determinant transcription factors such as Pax7, Myf5, MyoD, and MyoG. Recently, there have been several reports about the role of arginine methylation as a requirement for epigenetically mediated control of muscle regeneration. Here we report that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is expressed in MSCs and that conditional ablation of PRMT1 in MSCs using Pax7CreERT2 causes impairment of muscle regeneration. Importantly, PRMT1-deficient MSCs have enhanced cell proliferation after injury but are unable to terminate the myogenic differentiation program, leading to regeneration failure. We identify the coactivator of Six1, Eya1, as a substrate of PRMT1. We show that PRMT1 methylates Eya1 in vitro and that loss of PRMT1 function in vivo prevents Eya1 methylation. Moreover, we observe that PRMT1-deficient MSCs have reduced expression of Eya1/Six1 target MyoD due to disruption of Eya1 recruitment at the MyoD promoter and subsequent Eya1-mediated coactivation. These findings suggest that arginine methylation by PRMT1 regulates muscle stem cell fate through the Eya1/Six1/MyoD axis. PMID:27849571

  5. Skeletal muscle satellite cells: mediators of muscle growth during development and implications for developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Lieber, Richard L

    2014-11-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are the muscle stem cells responsible for longitudinal and cross-sectional postnatal growth and repair after injury and which provide new myonuclei when needed. We review their morphology and contribution to development and their role in sarcomere and myonuclear addition. SCs, similar to other tissue stem cells, cycle through different states, such as quiescence, activation, and self-renewal, and thus we consider the signaling mechanisms involved in maintenance of these states. The role of the SC niche and their interactions with other cells, such as fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, are all emerging as major factors that affect aging and disease. Interestingly, children with cerebral palsy appear to have a reduced SC number, which could play a role in their reduced muscular development and even in muscular contracture formation. Finally, we review the current information on SC dysfunction in children with muscular dystrophy and emerging therapies that target promotion of myogenesis and reduction of fibrosis.

  6. A Role for Nitric Oxide in Muscle Repair: Nitric Oxide–mediated Activation of Muscle Satellite Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Judy E.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle satellite cells are quiescent precursors interposed between myofibers and a sheath of external lamina. Although their activation and recruitment to cycle enable muscle repair and adaptation, the activation signal is not known. Evidence is presented that nitric oxide (NO) mediates satellite cell activation, including morphological hypertrophy and decreased adhesion in the fiber-lamina complex. Activation in vivo occurred within 1 min after injury. Cell isolation and histology showed that pharmacological inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity prevented the immediate injury-induced myogenic cell release and delayed the hypertrophy of satellite cells in that muscle. Transient activation of satellite cells in contralateral muscles 10 min later suggested that a circulating factor may interact with NO-mediated signaling. Interestingly, satellite cell activation in muscles of mdx dystrophic mice and NOS-I knockout mice quantitatively resembled NOS-inhibited release of normal cells, in agreement with reports of displaced and reduced NOS expression in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscle and the complete loss of NOS-I expression in knockout mice. Brief NOS inhibition in normal and mdx mice during injury produced subtle alterations in subsequent repair, including apoptosis in myotube nuclei and myotube formation inside laminar sheaths. Longer NOS inhibition delayed and restricted the extent of repair and resulted in fiber branching. A model proposes the hypothesis that NO release mediates satellite cell activation, possibly via shear-induced rapid increases in NOS activity that produce “NO transients.” PMID:10793157

  7. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  8. Influence of micropattern width on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tomoko; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, various approaches have been taken to generate functional muscle tissue by tissue engineering. However, in vitro methods to generate smooth muscle with physiologically aligned structure remains limited. In order to mimic the in vivo highly organized structure of smooth muscle cells, we used micropatterning technology for engineering parallel aligned cells. In this study, a gradient micropattern of different width of cell-adhesive polystyrene stripes (5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000μm) was prepared and the effects of micropattern width on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation were investigated. The width of micropattern stripes showed obvious effect on cell orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation. The cells showed higher degree of orientation when the micropattern stripes became narrower. Higher expression of calponin and smooth muscle actin was observed among the narrow micropatterns ranging from 200μm to 20μm, compared to the non-patterned area and wide micropattern areas which showed similar levels of expression.

  9. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. The effects of exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy and satellite cells].

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Shin; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle has a high degree of plasticity. The mass of skeletal muscle maintains owing to muscle protein synthesis and the regeneration by satellite cells. Skeletal muscle atrophy with aging (sarcopenia) is developed by decline of muscle protein synthesis and dysfunction of satellite cells. It is urgently necessary for today's highly aged society to elucidate the mechanism of sarcopenia and to establish prevention measure. This review shows that the positive effects of "exercise" on muscle protein synthesis and satellite cell function including their main molecular mechanism.

  10. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina; Kaufmann, Andreas M.

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  11. Age-related impairment of T cell-induced skeletal muscle precursor cell function

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Breanna R.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. Recent evidence suggests that an age-associated loss of muscle precursor cell (MPC) functionality contributes to sarcopenia. The objectives of the present study were to examine the influence of activated T cells on MPCs and determine whether an age-related defect in this signaling occurs. MPCs were collected from the gastrocnemius and plantaris of 3-mo-old (young) and 32-mo-old (old) animals. Splenic T cells were harvested using anti-CD3 Dynabead isolation. T cells were activated for 48 h with costimulation of 100 IU/ml interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 5 μg/ml of anti-CD28. Costimulation increased 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation of T cells from 13.4 ± 4.6% in control to 64.8 ± 6.0% in costimulated cells. Additionally, T cell cytokines increased proliferation on MPCs isolated from young muscle by 24.0 ± 5.7%, whereas there was no effect on MPCs isolated from aged muscle. T cell cytokines were also found to be a chemoattractant. T cells were able to promote migration of MPCs isolated from young muscle; however, MPCs isolated from aged muscle did not respond to the T cell-released chemokines. Conversely, whereas T cell-released cytokines did not affect myogenesis of MPCs isolated from young animals, there was a decrease in MPCs isolated from old animals. These data suggest that T cells may play a critical role in mediating MPC function. Furthermore, aging may alter T cell-induced MPC function. These findings have implications for developing strategies aimed at increasing MPC migration and proliferation leading to an improved regenerative capacity of aged skeletal muscle. PMID:21325640

  12. [Molecular mechanism maintaining muscle satellite cells and the roles in sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Yusei; Fukada, So-Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has its stem cell named satellite cell. The absence of satellite cells does not allow muscle regeneration, it is unquestionable that satellite cell is indispensable for muscle regeneration processes. A certain number of satellite cells appear to be necessary for the successful muscle regeneration, meaning the maintenance of the satellite cells is essential for the functional homeostasis of skeletal muscle. Recent studies have revealed the molecular mechanism underlying satellite cell maintenance in a steady state. A loss of those molecules responsible for the maintenance often results in decreased satellite cell pool and reduced regeneration ability. On the other hand, the contribution of satellite cells to muscle hypertrophy or aged-related atrophy(sarcopenia)is controversial. In this review, we will introduce the molecules that regulate satellite cells homeostasis in the dormant state and then further discuss the recent results on the roles of satellite cell in sarcopenia.

  13. Application of cell co-culture system to study fat and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Hwang, Inho

    2014-09-01

    Animal cell culture is a highly complex process, in which cells are grown under specific conditions. The growth and development of these cells is a highly unnatural process in vitro condition. Cells are removed from animal tissues and artificially cultured in various culture vessels. Vitamins, minerals, and serum growth factors are supplied to maintain cell viability. Obtaining result homogeneity of in vitro and in vivo experiments is rare, because their structure and function are different. Living tissues have highly ordered complex architecture and are three-dimensional (3D) in structure. The interaction between adjacent cell types is quite distinct from the in vitro cell culture, which is usually two-dimensional (2D). Co-culture systems are studied to analyze the interactions between the two different cell types. The muscle and fat co-culture system is useful in addressing several questions related to muscle modeling, muscle degeneration, apoptosis, and muscle regeneration. Co-culture of C2C12 and 3T3-L1 cells could be a useful diagnostic tool to understand the muscle and fat formation in animals. Even though, co-culture systems have certain limitations, they provide a more realistic 3D view and information than the individual cell culture system. It is suggested that co-culture systems are useful in evaluating the intercellular communication and composition of two different cell types.

  14. Uniform sarcomere shortening behavior in isolated cardiac muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    We have observed the dynamics of sarcomere shortening and the diffracting action of single, functionally intact, unattached cardiac muscle cells enzymatically isolated from the ventricular tissue of adult rats. Sarcomere length was measured either (a) continuously by a light diffraction method or (b) by direct inspection of the cell's striated image as recorded on videotape or by cinemicroscopy (120--400 frames/s). At physiological levels of added CaCl2 (0.5--2.0 mM), many cells were quiescent (i.e., they did not beat spontaneously) and contracted in response to electrical stimulation (less than or equal to 1.0-ms pulse width). Sarcomere length in the quiescent, unstimulated cells (1.93 +/- 0.10 [SD] micrometers), at peak shortening (1.57 +/- 0.13 micrometers, n = 49), and the maximum velocity of sarcomere shortening and relengthening were comparable to previous observations in intact heart muscle preparations. The dispersion of light diffracted by the cell remained narrow, and individual striations remained distinct and laterally well registered throughout the shortening- relengthening cycle. In contrast, appreciable nonuniformity and internal buckling were seen at sarcomere lengths < 1.8 micrometers when the resting cell, embedded in gelatin, was longitudinally compressed These results indicate (a) that shortening and relengthening is characterized by uniform activation between myofibrils within the cardiac cell and (b) that physiologically significant relengthening forces in living heart muscle originate at the level of the cell rather than in extracellular connections. First-order diffracted light intensity, extremely variable during sarcomere shortening, was always greatest during midrelaxation preceding the onset of a very slow and uniform phase of sarcomere relengthening. PMID:7441197

  15. Replication of prions in differentiated muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that prions accumulate to high levels in non-proliferative C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 cells replicate as myoblasts but can be differentiated into myotubes. Earlier studies indicated that C2C12 myoblasts are not competent for prion replication. (1) We confirmed that observation and demonstrated, for the first time, that while replicative myoblasts do not accumulate PrP(Sc), differentiated post-mitotic myotube cultures replicate prions robustly. Here we extend our observations and describe the implication and utility of this system for replicating prions.

  16. A Novel Selectable Islet 1 Positive Progenitor Cell Reprogrammed to Expandable and Functional Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizabeth C; Huang, Chien-Ling; Sawhney, Neha; Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; Clover, Anthony J P; Martin, Kenneth; Browne, Tara C; Whelan, Derek; Kumar, Arun H S; Mackrill, John J; Wang, Shaohua; Schmeckpeper, Jeffrey; Stocca, Alessia; Pierce, William G; Leblond, Anne-Laure; Cai, Liquan; O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Buneker, Chirlei K; Choi, Janet; MacSharry, John; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Caplice, Noel M

    2016-05-01

    Disorders affecting smooth muscle structure/function may require technologies that can generate large scale, differentiated and contractile smooth muscle cells (SMC) suitable for cell therapy. To date no clonal precursor population that provides large numbers of differentiated SMC in culture has been identified in a rodent. Identification of such cells may also enhance insight into progenitor cell fate decisions and the relationship between smooth muscle precursors and disease states that implicate differentiated SMC.  In this study, we used classic clonal expansion techniques to identify novel self-renewing Islet 1 (Isl-1) positive primitive progenitor cells (PPC) within rat bone marrow that exhibited canonical stem cell markers and preferential differentiation towards a smooth muscle-like fate. We subsequently used molecular tagging to select Isl-1 positive clonal populations from expanded and de novo marrow cell populations. We refer to these previously undescribed cells as the PPC given its stem cell marker profile, and robust self-renewal capacity. PPC could be directly converted into induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) using single transcription factor (Kruppel-like factor 4) knockdown or transactivator (myocardin) overexpression in contrast to three control cells (HEK 293, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) where such induction was not possible. iSMC exhibited immuno- and cytoskeletal-phenotype, calcium signaling profile and contractile responses similar to bona fide SMC. Passaged iSMC could be expanded to a scale sufficient for large scale tissue replacement.  PPC and reprogramed iSMC so derived may offer future opportunities to investigate molecular, structure/function and cell-based replacement therapy approaches to diverse cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary diseases that have as their basis smooth muscle cell functional aberrancy or numerical loss. Stem Cells 2016;34:1354-1368.

  17. Human Skeletal Muscle-derived CD133(+) Cells Form Functional Satellite Cells After Intramuscular Transplantation in Immunodeficient Host Mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jinhong; Chun, Soyon; Asfahani, Rowan; Lochmüller, Hanns; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of muscular dystrophies. In addition to muscle fiber formation, reconstitution of functional stem cell pool by donor cells is vital for long-term treatment. We show here that some CD133(+) cells within human muscle are located underneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers, in the position of the muscle satellite cell. Cultured hCD133(+) cells are heterogeneous and multipotent, capable of forming myotubes and reserve satellite cells in vitro. They contribute to extensive muscle regeneration and satellite cell formation following intramuscular transplantation into irradiated and cryodamaged tibialis anterior muscles of immunodeficient Rag2-/γ chain-/C5-mice. Some donor-derived satellite cells expressed the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD, indicating that they were activated. In addition, when transplanted host muscles were reinjured, there was significantly more newly-regenerated muscle fibers of donor origin in treated than in control, nonreinjured muscles, indicating that hCD133(+) cells had given rise to functional muscle stem cells, which were able to activate in response to injury and contribute to a further round of muscle regeneration. Our findings provide new evidence for the location and characterization of hCD133(+) cells, and highlight that these cells are highly suitable for future clinical application.

  18. Human skeletal muscle-derived CD133(+) cells form functional satellite cells after intramuscular transplantation in immunodeficient host mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jinhong; Chun, Soyon; Asfahani, Rowan; Lochmüller, Hanns; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of muscular dystrophies. In addition to muscle fiber formation, reconstitution of functional stem cell pool by donor cells is vital for long-term treatment. We show here that some CD133(+) cells within human muscle are located underneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers, in the position of the muscle satellite cell. Cultured hCD133(+) cells are heterogeneous and multipotent, capable of forming myotubes and reserve satellite cells in vitro. They contribute to extensive muscle regeneration and satellite cell formation following intramuscular transplantation into irradiated and cryodamaged tibialis anterior muscles of immunodeficient Rag2-/γ chain-/C5-mice. Some donor-derived satellite cells expressed the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD, indicating that they were activated. In addition, when transplanted host muscles were reinjured, there was significantly more newly-regenerated muscle fibers of donor origin in treated than in control, nonreinjured muscles, indicating that hCD133(+) cells had given rise to functional muscle stem cells, which were able to activate in response to injury and contribute to a further round of muscle regeneration. Our findings provide new evidence for the location and characterization of hCD133(+) cells, and highlight that these cells are highly suitable for future clinical application.

  19. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, John J.; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p < 0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues. PMID:16095685

  20. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates pleiotropic responses in skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Baptiste, Gael; Yang Zhao; Khoury, Chamel; Greenwood, Michael T.; E-mail: michael.greenwood@mcgill.ca

    2005-10-07

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent modulator of growth, cell survival, and apoptosis. Although all four LPA receptors are expressed in skeletal muscle, very little is known regarding the role they play in this tissue. We used RT-PCR to demonstrate that cultured skeletal muscle C2C12 cells endogenously express multiple LPA receptor subtypes. The demonstration that LPA mediates the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase and Akt/PKB in C2C12 cells is consistent with the widely observed mitogenic properties of LPA. In spite of these observations, LPA did not induce proliferation in C2C12 cells. Paradoxically, we found that prolonged treatment of C2C12 cells with LPA led to caspase 3 and PARP cleavage as well as the activation of stress-associated MAP kinases JNK and p38. In spite of these typically pro-apoptotic responses, LPA did not induce cell death. Blocking ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB activation with specific pharmacological inhibitors, nevertheless, stimulated LPA-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that both mitogenic and apoptotic responses serve to counterbalance the effects of LPA in cultured C2C12 cells.

  1. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix.

    PubMed

    Stankus, John J; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R

    2006-02-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p<0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1,700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues.

  2. Microwave radiation effects on cardiac muscle cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; Hall, C.A.; McRee, D.I.

    1981-05-01

    Isolated cardiac muscle cells were exposed to microwave radiation in a temperature-controlled waveguide apparatus. Microwave radiation for 90 min at specific absorption rates (SAR) as low as 10 mW/g increases the permeability of cardiac cells to trypan blue. At 100 mW/g the inability of the cells to exclude trypan blue is concurrent with the release of lactic dehydrogenase into the suspending medium. However, when the SAR is decreased to 50 mW/g, trypan blue uptake is still elevated without the concomitant release of lactic dehydrogenase. Transmission electron micrographs of the exposed cells showed cellular damage only at the 100 mW/g exposure level. The microwave-reduced change in membrane permeability was unrelated to a macroscopic heating effect of microwave radiation on the cells, but appeared to be due to some other specific action of microwave radiation on isolated cardiac cells.

  3. Nuclear reprogramming and its role in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zaina, Silvio; del Pilar Valencia-Morales, Maria; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E; Lund, Gertrud

    2013-09-01

    In general terms, "nuclear reprogramming" refers to a change in gene expression profile that results in a significant switch in cellular phenotype. Nuclear reprogramming was first addressed by pioneering studies of cell differentiation during embryonic development. In recent years, nuclear reprogramming has been studied in great detail in the context of experimentally controlled dedifferentiation and transdifferentiation of mammalian cells for therapeutic purposes. In this review, we present a perspective on nuclear reprogramming in the context of spontaneous, pathophysiological phenotypic switch of vascular cells occurring in the atherosclerotic lesion. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of epigenetic mechanisms participating in the extraordinary flexibility of the gene expression profile of vascular smooth muscle cells and other cell types participating in atherogenesis. Understanding how epigenetic changes participate in vascular cell plasticity may lead to effective therapies based on the remodelling of the vascular architecture.

  4. Myf5 haploinsufficiency reveals distinct cell fate potentials for adult skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Chrétien, Fabrice; Jory, Aurélie; Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Negroni, Elisa; Flamant, Patricia; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Di Santo, James; Cumano, Ana; Mouly, Vincent; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-04-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cell fate in adult mice is regulated by crucial transcription factors, including the determination genes Myf5 and Myod. The precise role of Myf5 in regulating quiescent muscle stem cells has remained elusive. Here we show that most, but not all, quiescent satellite cells express Myf5 protein, but at varying levels, and that resident Myf5 heterozygous muscle stem cells are more primed for myogenic commitment compared with wild-type satellite cells. Paradoxically however, heterotypic transplantation of Myf5 heterozygous cells into regenerating muscles results in higher self-renewal capacity compared with wild-type stem cells, whereas myofibre regenerative capacity is not altered. By contrast, Pax7 haploinsufficiency does not show major modifications by transcriptome analysis. These observations provide a mechanism linking Myf5 levels to muscle stem cell heterogeneity and fate by exposing two distinct and opposing phenotypes associated with Myf5 haploinsufficiency. These findings have important implications for how stem cell fates can be modulated by crucial transcription factors while generating a pool of responsive heterogeneous cells.

  5. Acquired ciliary circumscribed grey hair (ACCG).

    PubMed

    Romero, A G; Calatayud, J C

    2001-12-01

    Grey-haired areas usually occur due to aging or inheritance. A case is described of abrupt occurrence of a focal circumscribed grey-hair in the eyebrow region (a single hair) in a 27-year-old woman. The phenomenon was named acquired ciliary circumscribed grey-hair (ACCG). Qualitative and semiquantitative findings were obtained by microanalytical studies. In addition to morphological differences from control hair, the ACCG hair showed a high percentage of sulfur (99.8%) and absence of oligoelements.

  6. Bug22 influences cilium morphology and the post-translational modification of ciliary microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Mendes Maia, Teresa; Gogendeau, Delphine; Pennetier, Carole; Janke, Carsten; Basto, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cilia and flagella are organelles essential for motility and sensing of environmental stimuli. Depending on the cell type, cilia acquire a defined set of functions and, accordingly, are built with an appropriate length and molecular composition. Several ciliary proteins display a high degree of conservation throughout evolution and mutations in ciliary genes are associated with various diseases such as ciliopathies and infertility. Here, we describe the role of the highly conserved ciliary protein, Bug22, in Drosophila. Previous studies in unicellular organisms have shown that Bug22 is required for proper cilia function, but its exact role in ciliogenesis has not been investigated yet. Null Bug22 mutant flies display cilia-associated phenotypes and nervous system defects. Furthermore, sperm differentiation is blocked at the individualization stage, due to impaired migration of the individualization machinery. Tubulin post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as polyglycylation, polyglutamylation or acetylation, are determinants of microtubule (MT) functions and stability in centrioles, cilia and neurons. We found defects in the timely incorporation of polyglycylation in sperm axonemal MTs of Bug22 mutants. In addition, we found that depletion of human Bug22 in RPE1 cells resulted in the appearance of longer cilia and reduced axonemal polyglutamylation. Our work identifies Bug22 as a protein that plays a conserved role in the regulation of PTMs of the ciliary axoneme. PMID:24414207

  7. Glucocorticoid actions on L6 muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Max, S.R.; Konagaya, M.; Konagaya, Y.

    1986-05-01

    Glucocorticoids exert striking catabolic effects on skeletal muscle. The mechanism of these effects remains poorly understood. They employed L6 muscle cells in culture to ascertain whether intracellular glucocorticoid receptors are involved. Studies in vitro permit exploration of glucocorticoid effects in the absence of other hormonal influences. L6 myoblasts were induced to form differentiated myotubes by growth in 1% serum. L6 myotubes were found to possess a high-affinity, limited capacity intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (apparent K/sub D/ = 5 x 10/sup -10/ M; B/sub max/ = 711 pmols/g protein) with ligand specificity similar to that of glucocorticoid receptors from classical glucocorticoid target tissues. Further, (/sup 3/H) triamcinolone acetonide specific binding to L6 cell homogenates was blocked by a glucocorticoid antagonist, RU38486 (11..beta..-(4-dimethyl-aminophenyl)-17..beta..-hydroxy-17..cap alpha..-(prop-l-ynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one). Dexamethasone (10/sup -5/M) caused a 10-fold increase in the activity of gluatmine synthetase in L6 myotubes; this increase was prevented by RU38486. Similarly, dexamethasone (10/sup -5/M) caused a 20% decrease in (/sup 12/C) leucine incorporation into protein. This effect also was blocked by RU38486. Thus, induction of glutamine synthetase and diminution of protein synthesis by dexamethasone require intracellular glucocorticoid receptors. L6 cells should prove particularly valuable for further studies of glucocorticoid actions on skeletal muscle.

  8. Genetics and Biology of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Ferkol, Thomas W; Dutcher, Susan K.; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ciliopathies are a growing class of disorders caused by abnormal ciliary axonemal structure and function. Our understanding of the complex genetic and functional phenotypes of these conditions has rapidly progressed. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) remains the sole genetic disorder of motile cilia dysfunction. However, unlike many Mendelian genetic disorders, PCD is not caused by mutations in a single gene or locus, but rather, autosomal recessive mutation in one of many genes that lead to a similar phenotype. The first reported PCD mutations, more than a decade ago, identified genes encoding known structural components of the ciliary axoneme. In recent years, mutations in genes encoding novel cytoplasmic and regulatory proteins have been discovered. These findings have provided new insights into the functions of the motile cilia, and a better understanding of motile cilia disease. Advances in genetic tools will soon allow more precise genetic testing, mandating that clinicians must understand the genetic basis of PCD. Here, we review genetic mutations, their biological impact on cilia structure and function, and the implication of emerging genetic diagnostic tools. PMID:26476603

  9. Secretome profiling of primary human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Sonja; Raschke, Silja; Knebel, Birgit; Scheler, Mika; Irmler, Martin; Passlack, Waltraud; Muller, Stefan; Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Franz, Thomas; Li, Xinping; Dicken, Hans-Dieter; Eckardt, Kristin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Weigert, Cora; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Ouwens, D Margriet; Eckel, Jürgen; Kotzka, Jorg; Lehr, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The skeletal muscle is a metabolically active tissue that secretes various proteins. These so-called myokines have been proposed to affect muscle physiology and to exert systemic effects on other tissues and organs. Yet, changes in the secretory profile may participate in the pathophysiology of metabolic diseases. The present study aimed at characterizing the secretome of differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSkMC) derived from healthy, adult donors combining three different mass spectrometry based non-targeted approaches as well as one antibody based method. This led to the identification of 548 non-redundant proteins in conditioned media from hSkmc. For 501 proteins, significant mRNA expression could be demonstrated. Applying stringent consecutive filtering using SignalP, SecretomeP and ER_retention signal databases, 305 proteins were assigned as potential myokines of which 12 proteins containing a secretory signal peptide were not previously described. This comprehensive profiling study of the human skeletal muscle secretome expands our knowledge of the composition of the human myokinome and may contribute to our understanding of the role of myokines in multiple biological processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  10. A functional role for the 'fibroblast-like cells' in gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Masaaki; Zheng, Haifeng; Dwyer, Laura; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2011-02-01

    Smooth muscles, as in the gastrointestinal tract, are composed of several types of cells. Gastrointestinal muscles contain smooth muscle cells, enteric neurons, glial cells, immune cells, and various classes of interstitial cells. One type of interstitial cell, referred to as 'fibroblast-like cells' by morphologists, are common, but their function is unknown. These cells are found near the terminals of enteric motor neurons, suggesting they could have a role in generating neural responses that help control gastrointestinal movements. We used a novel mouse with bright green fluorescent protein expressed specifically in the fibroblast-like cells to help us identify these cells in the mixture of cells obtained when whole muscles are dispersed with enzymes. We isolated these cells and found they respond to a major class of inhibitory neurotransmitters - purines. We characterized these responses, and our results provide a new hypothesis about the role of fibroblast-like cells in smooth muscle tissues.

  11. Flow Field Analysis of Micromixer Powered by Ciliary Motion of Vorticella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaka, Yo; Nagai, Moeto; Matsumoto, Nobuyoshi; Kawashima, Takahiro; Shibata, Takayuki

    We demonstrate the observation of a flow field generated by ciliary motion of Vorticella in a microfluidic chamber. We applied the property that Vorticella vibrates its cilia and create a flow field to a micromixer. The stability and mixing performance of Vorticella were measured by PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry). One cell of Vorticella mixed the half area of the microchamber. We revealed that the flow field of a single cell in a chamber was more stable than that of multiple cells.

  12. Paramecium swimming and ciliary beating patterns: a study on four RNA interference mutations.

    PubMed

    Funfak, Anette; Fisch, Cathy; Abdel Motaal, Hatem T; Diener, Julien; Combettes, Laurent; Baroud, Charles N; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium cells swim and feed by beating their thousands of cilia in coordinated patterns. The organization of these patterns and its relationship with cell motility has been the subject of a large body of work, particularly as a model for ciliary beating in human organs where similar organization is seen. However the rapid motion of the cells makes quantitative measurements very challenging. Here we provide detailed measurements of the swimming of Paramecium cells from high-speed video at high magnification, as they move in microfluidic channels. An image analysis protocol allows us to decouple the cell movement from the motion of the cilia, thus allowing us to measure the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and the spatio-temporal organization into metachronal waves along the cell periphery. Two distinct values of the CBF appear at different regions of the cell: most of the cilia beat in the range of 15 to 45 Hz, while the cilia in the peristomal region beat at almost double the frequency. The body and peristomal CBF display a nearly linear relation with the swimming velocity. Moreover the measurements do not display a measurable correlation between the swimming velocity and the metachronal wave velocity on the cell periphery. These measurements are repeated for four RNAi silenced mutants, where proteins specific to the cilia or to their connection to the cell base are depleted. We find that the mutants whose ciliary structure is affected display similar swimming to the control cells albeit with a reduced efficiency, while the mutations that affect the cilia's anchoring to the cell lead to strongly reduced ability to swim. This reduction in motility can be related to a loss of coordination between the ciliary beating in different parts of the cell.

  13. FACS-based Satellite Cell Isolation From Mouse Hind Limb Muscles.

    PubMed

    Gromova, Anastasia; Tierney, Matthew T; Sacco, Alessandra

    2015-08-20

    Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) is a sensitive and accurate method for purifying satellite cells, or muscle stem cells, from adult mouse skeletal muscle (Liu et al., 2013; Sacco et al., 2008; Tierney et al., 2014). Mechanical and enzymatic digestion of hind limb muscles releases mononuclear muscle cells into suspension. This protocol employs fractionation strategies to deplete cells expressing the cell surface markers CD45, CD31, CD11b and Ly-6A/E-Sca1, both by magnetic separation and FACS-based exclusion, and positively select for cells expressing a7-integrin and CD34. This enables the researcher to successfully enrich satellite cells that uniformly express the paired-box transcription factor Pax7 and are capable of long-term self-renewal, skeletal muscle repair and muscle stem cell pool repopulation.

  14. Molecular circuitry of stem cell fate in skeletal muscle regeneration, ageing, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Almada, Albert E.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite cells are adult myogenic stem cells that function to repair damaged muscle. The enduring capacity for muscle regeneration requires efficient satellite cell expansion after injury, differentiation to produce myoblasts that can reconstitute damaged fibers, and self-renewal to replenish the muscle stem cell pool for subsequent rounds of injury and repair. Emerging studies indicate that misregulations of satellite cell fate and function contribute to age-associated muscle dysfunction and influence the severity of muscle diseases, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). It has also become apparent that satellite cell fate during muscle regeneration, aging, and in the context of DMD is governed by an intricate network of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators. Targeted manipulation of this network may offer unique opportunities for muscle regenerative medicine. PMID:26956195

  15. Electrical stimulation as a biomimicry tool for regulating muscle cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ahadian, Samad; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ramalingam, Murugan; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need to understand muscle cell behaviors and to engineer muscle tissues to replace defective tissues in the body. Despite a long history of the clinical use of electric fields for muscle tissues in vivo, electrical stimulation (ES) has recently gained significant attention as a powerful tool for regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro. ES aims to mimic the electrical environment of electroactive muscle cells (e.g., cardiac or skeletal muscle cells) by helping to regulate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. As a result, it can be used to enhance the alignment and differentiation of skeletal or cardiac muscle cells and to aid in engineering of functional muscle tissues. Additionally, ES can be used to control and monitor force generation and electrophysiological activity of muscle tissues for bio-actuation and drug-screening applications in a simple, high-throughput, and reproducible manner. In this review paper, we briefly describe the importance of ES in regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro, as well as the major challenges and prospective potential associated with ES in the context of muscle tissue engineering. PMID:23823664

  16. Electrical stimulation as a biomimicry tool for regulating muscle cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ramalingam, Murugan; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need to understand muscle cell behaviors and to engineer muscle tissues to replace defective tissues in the body. Despite a long history of the clinical use of electric fields for muscle tissues in vivo, electrical stimulation (ES) has recently gained significant attention as a powerful tool for regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro. ES aims to mimic the electrical environment of electroactive muscle cells (e.g., cardiac or skeletal muscle cells) by helping to regulate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. As a result, it can be used to enhance the alignment and differentiation of skeletal or cardiac muscle cells and to aid in engineering of functional muscle tissues. Additionally, ES can be used to control and monitor force generation and electrophysiological activity of muscle tissues for bio-actuation and drug-screening applications in a simple, high-throughput, and reproducible manner. In this review paper, we briefly describe the importance of ES in regulating muscle cell behaviors in vitro, as well as the major challenges and prospective potential associated with ES in the context of muscle tissue engineering.

  17. Skeletal muscle perfusion and stem cell delivery in muscle disorders using intra-femoral artery canulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Nadine; Hunt, Samuel D; Wu, Jianbo; Darabi, Radbod

    2015-11-15

    Muscular dystrophies are among major inherited muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle damage and fibrosis with no definitive cure. Recently, gene or cell based therapies have been developed to restore the missing gene expression or replace the damaged tissues. In order to test the efficiency of these therapies in mice models of muscular dystrophies, the arterial route of delivery is very advantageous as it provides uniform muscle exposure to the therapeutic agents or cells. Although there are few reports of arterial delivery of the therapeutic agents or cells in mice, there is no in-depth description and evaluation of its efficacy in perfusion of downstream muscles. This study is aimed to develop a practical method for intra-femoral artery perfusion in mice and to evaluate perfusion efficiency using near-infrared-fluorescence (NIRF) imaging as well as histology following stem cell delivery. Our results provide a practical guide to perform this delicate method in mice. By using a sensitive fluorescent dye, different muscle groups of the hindlimb have been evaluated for proper perfusion. As the final step, we have validated the efficiency of arterial cell delivery into muscles using human iPS-derived myogenic cells in an immunodeficient mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (NSG-mdx(4cv)).

  18. Halofuginone improves muscle-cell survival in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Bodanovsky, Anna; Guttman, Noga; Barzilai-Tutsch, Hila; Genin, Ola; Levy, Oshrat; Pines, Mark; Halevy, Orna

    2014-07-01

    Halofuginone has been shown to prevent fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-β/Smad3 pathway in muscular dystrophies. We hypothesized that halofuginone would reduce apoptosis--the presumed cause of satellite-cell depletion during muscle degradation-in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Six-week-old mdx mouse diaphragm exhibited fourfold higher numbers of apoptotic nuclei compared with wild-type mice as determined by a TUNEL assay. Apoptotic nuclei were found in macrophages and in Pax7-expressing cells; some were located in centrally-nucleated regenerating myofibers. Halofuginone treatment of mdx mice reduced the apoptotic nuclei number in the diaphragm, together with reduction in Bax and induction in Bcl2 levels in myofibers isolated from these mice. A similar effect was observed when halofuginone was added to cultured myofibers. No apparent effect of halofuginone was observed in wild-type mice. Inhibition of apoptosis or staurosporine-induced apoptosis by halofuginone in mdx primary myoblasts and C2 myogenic cell line, respectively, was reflected by less pyknotic/apoptotic cells and reduced Bax expression. This reduction was reversed by a phosphinositide-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase inhibitors, suggesting involvement of these pathways in mediating halofuginone's effects on apoptosis. Halofuginone increased apoptosis in α smooth muscle actin- and prolyl 4-hydroxylase β-expressing cells in mdx diaphragm and in myofibroblasts, the major source of extracellular matrix. The data suggest an additional mechanism by which halofuginone improves muscle pathology and function in muscular dystrophies.

  19. Muscle and neuronal differentiation in primary cell culture of larval Mytilus trossulus (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav A; Nezlin, Leonid P

    2010-03-01

    Molluscan in vitro technology allows the study of the differentiation of isolated cells undergoing experimental manipulations. We have used the immunofluorescence technique and laser scanning microscopy to investigate the organization of muscle proteins (actin, myosin, paramyosin, and twitchin) and the localization of neurotransmitters (serotonin and FMRFamide) in cultured mussel larval cells. Differentiation into muscle and neuron-like cells occurs during the cultivation of mussel cells from premyogenic and prenervous larval stages. Muscle proteins are colocalized in contractile cells through all stages of cultivation. The cultivation of mussel cells on various substrates and the application of integrin receptor blockers suggest that an integrin-dependent mechanism is involved in cell adhesion and differentiation. Dissociated mussel cells aggregate and become self-organized in culture. After 20 days of cultivation, they form colonies in which serotonin- and FMRFamide-immunoreactive cells are located centrally, whereas muscle cells form a contractile network at the periphery. The pattern of thick and thin filaments in cultivated mussel cells changes according to the scenario of muscle arrangement in vivo: initially, a striated pattern of muscle filaments forms but is then replaced by a smooth muscle pattern with a diffuse distribution of muscle proteins, typical of muscles of adult molluscs. Myogenesis in molluscs thus seems to be a highly dynamic and potentially variable process. Such a "flexible" developmental program can be regarded as a prerequisite for the evolution of the wide variety of striated and smooth muscles in larval and adult molluscs.

  20. Discovery of Novel Small Molecules that Activate Satellite Cell Proliferation and Enhance Repair of Damaged Muscle.

    PubMed

    Billin, Andrew N; Bantscheff, Marcus; Drewes, Gerard; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Holt, Jason A; Kramer, Henning F; McDougal, Alan J; Smalley, Terry L; Wells, Carrow I; Zuercher, William J; Henke, Brad R

    2016-02-19

    Skeletal muscle progenitor stem cells (referred to as satellite cells) represent the primary pool of stem cells in adult skeletal muscle responsible for the generation of new skeletal muscle in response to injury. Satellite cells derived from aged muscle display a significant reduction in regenerative capacity to form functional muscle. This decrease in functional recovery has been attributed to a decrease in proliferative capacity of satellite cells. Hence, agents that enhance the proliferative abilities of satellite cells may hold promise as therapies for a variety of pathological settings, including repair of injured muscle and age- or disease-associated muscle wasting. Through phenotypic screening of isolated murine satellite cells, we identified a series of 2,4-diaminopyrimidines (e.g., 2) that increased satellite cell proliferation. Importantly, compound 2 was effective in accelerating repair of damaged skeletal muscle in an in vivo mouse model of skeletal muscle injury. While these compounds were originally prepared as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK-1) inhibitors, structure-activity analyses indicated JNK-1 inhibition does not correlate with satellite cell activity. Screening against a broad panel of kinases did not result in identification of an obvious molecular target, so we conducted cell-based proteomics experiments in an attempt to identify the molecular target(s) responsible for the potentiation of the satellite cell proliferation. These data provide the foundation for future efforts to design improved small molecules as potential therapeutics for muscle repair and regeneration.

  1. Isolation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Cheung, Tom H; Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-10-01

    The prospective isolation of purified stem cell populations has dramatically altered the field of stem cell biology, and it has been a major focus of research across tissues in different organisms. Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) are now among the most intensely studied stem cell populations in mammalian systems, and the prospective isolation of these cells has allowed cellular and molecular characterizations that were not dreamed of a decade ago. In this protocol, we describe how to isolate MuSCs from limb muscles of adult mice by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We provide a detailed description of the physical and enzymatic dissociation of mononucleated cells from limb muscles, a procedure that is essential in order to maximize cell yield. We also describe a FACS-based method that is used subsequently to obtain highly pure populations of either quiescent or activated MuSCs (VCAM(+)CD31(-)CD45(-)Sca1(-)). The isolation process takes ∼5-6 h to complete. The protocol also allows for the isolation of endothelial cells, hematopoietic cells and mesenchymal stem cells from muscle tissue.

  2. Regulation of Anterior Chamber Drainage by Bicarbonate-sensitive Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in the Ciliary Body*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong S.; Tresguerres, Martin; Hess, Kenneth; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Marmorstein, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP). IOP results from the resistance to drainage of aqueous humor (AH) produced by the ciliary body in a process requiring bicarbonate. Once secreted into the anterior chamber, AH drains from the eye via two pathways: uveoscleral and pressure-dependent or conventional outflow (Ct). Modulation of “inflow” and “outflow” pathways is thought to occur via distinct, local mechanisms. Mice deficient in the bicarbonate channel bestrophin-2 (Best2), however, exhibit a lower IOP despite an increase in AH production. Best2 is expressed uniquely in nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE) cells providing evidence for a bicarbonate-dependent communicative pathway linking inflow and outflow. Here, we show that bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is highly expressed in the ciliary body in NPE cells, but appears to be absent from drainage tissues. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC in mice causes a significant increase in IOP due to a decrease in Ct with no effect on inflow. In mice deficient in sAC IOP is elevated, and Ct is decreased relative to wild-type mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC did not alter IOP or Ct in sAC-deficient mice. Based on these data we propose that the ciliary body can regulate Ct and that sAC serves as a critical sensor of bicarbonate in the ciliary body regulating the secretion of substances into the AH that govern outflow facility independent of pressure. PMID:21994938

  3. Regulation of anterior chamber drainage by bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase in the ciliary body.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong S; Tresguerres, Martin; Hess, Kenneth; Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2011-12-02

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP). IOP results from the resistance to drainage of aqueous humor (AH) produced by the ciliary body in a process requiring bicarbonate. Once secreted into the anterior chamber, AH drains from the eye via two pathways: uveoscleral and pressure-dependent or conventional outflow (C(t)). Modulation of "inflow" and "outflow" pathways is thought to occur via distinct, local mechanisms. Mice deficient in the bicarbonate channel bestrophin-2 (Best2), however, exhibit a lower IOP despite an increase in AH production. Best2 is expressed uniquely in nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE) cells providing evidence for a bicarbonate-dependent communicative pathway linking inflow and outflow. Here, we show that bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is highly expressed in the ciliary body in NPE cells, but appears to be absent from drainage tissues. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC in mice causes a significant increase in IOP due to a decrease in C(t) with no effect on inflow. In mice deficient in sAC IOP is elevated, and C(t) is decreased relative to wild-type mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC did not alter IOP or C(t) in sAC-deficient mice. Based on these data we propose that the ciliary body can regulate C(t) and that sAC serves as a critical sensor of bicarbonate in the ciliary body regulating the secretion of substances into the AH that govern outflow facility independent of pressure.

  4. Skeletal muscle satellite cells: background and methods for isolation and analysis in a primary culture system.

    PubMed

    Danoviz, Maria Elena; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2012-01-01

    Repair of adult skeletal muscle depends on satellite cells, myogenic stem cells located between the basal lamina and the plasmalemma of the myofiber. Standardized protocols for the isolation and culture of satellite cells are key tools for understanding cell autonomous and extrinsic factors that regulate their performance. Knowledge gained from such studies can contribute important insights to developing strategies for the improvement of muscle repair following trauma and in muscle wasting disorders. This chapter provides an introduction to satellite cell biology and further describes the basic protocol used in our laboratory to isolate and culture satellite cells from adult skeletal muscle. The cell culture conditions detailed herein support proliferation and differentiation of satellite cell progeny and the development of reserve cells, which are thought to reflect the in vivo self-renewal ability of satellite cells. Additionally, this chapter describes our standard immunostaining protocol that allows the characterization of satellite cell progeny by the temporal expression of characteristic transcription factors and structural proteins associated with different stages of myogenic progression. Although emphasis is given here to the isolation and characterization of satellite cells from mouse hindlimb muscles, the protocols are suitable for other muscle types (such as diaphragm and extraocular muscles) and for muscles from other species, including chicken and rat. Altogether, the basic protocols described are straightforward and facilitate the study of diverse aspects of skeletal muscle stem cells.

  5. Pax7-expressing satellite cells are indispensable for adult skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Yao, Roseline; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Paldi, Andràs; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Guenou, Hind; Malissen, Bernard; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Galy, Anne

    2011-09-01

    Distinct cell populations with regenerative capacity have been reported to contribute to myofibres after skeletal muscle injury, including non-satellite cells as well as myogenic satellite cells. However, the relative contribution of these distinct cell types to skeletal muscle repair and homeostasis and the identity of adult muscle stem cells remain unknown. We generated a model for the conditional depletion of satellite cells by expressing a human diphtheria toxin receptor under control of the murine Pax7 locus. Intramuscular injection of diphtheria toxin during muscle homeostasis, or combined with muscle injury caused by myotoxins or exercise, led to a marked loss of muscle tissue and failure to regenerate skeletal muscle. Moreover, the muscle tissue became infiltrated by inflammatory cells and adipocytes. This localised loss of satellite cells was not compensated for endogenously by other cell types, but muscle regeneration was rescued after transplantation of adult Pax7(+) satellite cells alone. These findings indicate that other cell types with regenerative potential depend on the presence of the satellite cell population, and these observations have important implications for myopathic conditions and stem cell-based therapeutic approaches.

  6. Pharyngeal Satellite Cells Undergo Myogenesis Under Basal Conditions and Are Required for Pharyngeal Muscle Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Phillips, Brittany L; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Vest, Katherine E; Vera, Yandery; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-12-01

    The pharyngeal muscles of the nasal, oral, and laryngeal pharynxes are required for swallowing. Pharyngeal muscles are preferentially affected in some muscular dystrophies yet spared in others. Muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, may be critical factors in the development of pharyngeal muscle disorders; however, very little is known about pharyngeal satellite cells (PSC) and their role in pharyngeal muscles. We show that PSC are distinct from the commonly studied hindlimb satellite cells both transcriptionally and biologically. Under basal conditions PSC proliferate, progress through myogenesis, and fuse with pharyngeal myofibers. Furthermore, PSC exhibit biologic differences dependent on anatomic location in the pharynx. Importantly, PSC are required to maintain myofiber size and myonuclear number in pharyngeal myofibers. Together, these results demonstrate that PSC are critical for pharyngeal muscle maintenance and suggest that satellite cell impairment could contribute to pharyngeal muscle pathology associated with various muscular dystrophies and aging.

  7. Development and epithelial organisation of muscle cells in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nematostella vectensis, a member of the cnidarian class Anthozoa, has been established as a promising model system in developmental biology, but while information about the genetic regulation of embryonic development is rapidly increasing, little is known about the cellular organization of the various cell types in the adult. Here, we studied the anatomy and development of the muscular system of N. vectensis to obtain further insights into the evolution of muscle cells. Results The muscular system of N. vectensis is comprised of five distinct muscle groups, which are differentiated into a tentacle and a body column system. Both systems house longitudinal as well as circular portions. With the exception of the ectodermal tentacle longitudinal muscle, all muscle groups are of endodermal origin. The shape and epithelial organization of muscle cells vary considerably between different muscle groups. Ring muscle cells are formed as epitheliomuscular cells in which the myofilaments are housed in the basal part of the cell, while the apical part is connected to neighboring cells by apical cell-cell junctions. In the longitudinal muscles of the column, the muscular part at the basal side is connected to the apical part by a long and narrow cytoplasmic bridge. The organization of these cells, however, remains epitheliomuscular. A third type of muscle cell is represented in the longitudinal muscle of the tentacle. Using transgenic animals we show that the apical cell-cell junctions are lost during differentiation, resulting in a detachment of the muscle cells to a basiepithelial position. These muscle cells are still located within the epithelium and outside of the basal matrix, therefore constituting basiepithelial myocytes. We demonstrate that all muscle cells, including the longitudinal basiepithelial muscle cells of the tentacle, initially differentiate from regular epithelial cells before they alter their epithelial organisation. Conclusions A wide range of

  8. Muscle cell membranes from early degeneration muscle cell fibers in Solenopsis are leaky to lanthanum: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.

    1985-06-01

    Lanthanum infusion techniques, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis were utilized to compare the permeability of muscle cell membranes from normal and degenerating muscle fibers of Solenopsis spp. In normal fibers, the electron-dense tracer was limited to components of the sarcotubular system. However, the insemination-induced degeneration of muscle fibers was characterized by the presence of an electron-dense precipitate within the myofibrils and mitochondria as well as in the extramyofibrillar spaces. The electron-dense material was subsequently identified by elemental analysis to be lanthanum. Such data indicate that one of the earliest stages of muscle degeneration involves an alteration in cell membrane permeability.

  9. Various light source treatments affect body and skeletal muscle growth by affecting skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation in broilers.

    PubMed

    Halevy, O; Biran, I; Rozenboim, I

    1998-06-01

    In this study we addressed the effect of various monochromatic light treatments on muscle growth and satellite cell proliferation in broilers (Gallus domesticus). Broilers were reared under green (560 nm), blue (480 nm) and red (660 nm) monochromatic lights and white light as a control from day one until 35 days of age. At five days of age, satellite cells were prepared from the experimental chicks. The number of satellite cells per gram of breast muscle and total number of satellite cells derived from the experimental broilers was substantially higher in the groups reared under green and blue light, compared to the red and white light groups. Growth hormone receptor gene expression was also higher in the former groups. High correlation was found between the breast muscle weight observed on day 35 and the number of satellite cells per gram of breast muscle (r = 0.915) and total number of satellite cells (r = 0.833), derived from the experimental chicks as early as five days of age. In addition, the protein/DNA ratio found in breast muscle at 35 days of age was significantly lower in chicks that were reared under green and blue lights. The lowest ratio which was found in the green group and was twice as low as in the control group, indicates the highest number of nuclei in the former group. As satellite cells are the only source of additional nuclei in skeletal muscles of postnatal animals, our results suggest that the higher muscle weight found in the green and blue light groups was due to increased satellite cell proliferation during the first days of age.

  10. Cripto regulates skeletal muscle regeneration and modulates satellite cell determination by antagonizing myostatin.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Ombretta; Lafuste, Peggy; Brunelli, Silvia; Iaconis, Salvatore; Touvier, Thierry; Mourikis, Philippos; De Bock, Katrien; Lonardo, Enza; Andolfi, Gennaro; Bouché, Ann; Liguori, Giovanna L; Shen, Michael M; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Cossu, Giulio; Carmeliet, Peter; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2012-11-20

    Skeletal muscle regeneration mainly depends on satellite cells, a population of resident muscle stem cells. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying satellite cell activation is still largely undefined. Here, we show that Cripto, a regulator of early embryogenesis, is a novel regulator of muscle regeneration and satellite cell progression toward the myogenic lineage. Conditional inactivation of cripto in adult satellite cells compromises skeletal muscle regeneration, whereas gain of function of Cripto accelerates regeneration, leading to muscle hypertrophy. Moreover, we provide evidence that Cripto modulates myogenic cell determination and promotes proliferation by antagonizing the TGF-β ligand myostatin. Our data provide unique insights into the molecular and cellular basis of Cripto activity in skeletal muscle regeneration and raise previously undescribed implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

  11. CCDC151 Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia by Disruption of the Outer Dynein Arm Docking Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hjeij, Rim; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Watson, Christopher M.; Slagle, Christopher E.; Klena, Nikolai T.; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Kurkowiak, Małgorzata; Loges, Niki T.; Diggle, Christine P.; Morante, Nicholas F.C.; Gabriel, George C.; Lemke, Kristi L.; Li, You; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Konert, Franziska; Marthin, June Kehlet; Mans, Dorus A.; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Werner, Claudius; Burgoyne, Thomas; Westermann, Cordula; Rutman, Andrew; Carr, Ian M.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Moya, Eduardo; Chung, Eddie M.K.; Sheridan, Eamonn; Nielsen, Kim G.; Roepman, Ronald; Bartscherer, Kerstin; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Lo, Cecilia W.; Omran, Heymut; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2014-01-01

    A diverse family of cytoskeletal dynein motors powers various cellular transport systems, including axonemal dyneins generating the force for ciliary and flagellar beating essential to movement of extracellular fluids and of cells through fluid. Multisubunit outer dynein arm (ODA) motor complexes, produced and preassembled in the cytosol, are transported to the ciliary or flagellar compartment and anchored into the axonemal microtubular scaffold via the ODA docking complex (ODA-DC) system. In humans, defects in ODA assembly are the major cause of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), an inherited disorder of ciliary and flagellar dysmotility characterized by chronic upper and lower respiratory infections and defects in laterality. Here, by combined high-throughput mapping and sequencing, we identified CCDC151 loss-of-function mutations in five affected individuals from three independent families whose cilia showed a complete loss of ODAs and severely impaired ciliary beating. Consistent with the laterality defects observed in these individuals, we found Ccdc151 expressed in vertebrate left-right organizers. Homozygous zebrafish ccdc151ts272a and mouse Ccdc151Snbl mutants display a spectrum of situs defects associated with complex heart defects. We demonstrate that CCDC151 encodes an axonemal coiled coil protein, mutations in which abolish assembly of CCDC151 into respiratory cilia and cause a failure in axonemal assembly of the ODA component DNAH5 and the ODA-DC-associated components CCDC114 and ARMC4. CCDC151-deficient zebrafish, planaria, and mice also display ciliary dysmotility accompanied by ODA loss. Furthermore, CCDC151 coimmunoprecipitates CCDC114 and thus appears to be a highly evolutionarily conserved ODA-DC-related protein involved in mediating assembly of both ODAs and their axonemal docking machinery onto ciliary microtubules. PMID:25192045

  12. Satellite-like cells contribute to pax7-dependent skeletal muscle repair in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Berberoglu, Michael A; Gallagher, Thomas L; Morrow, Zachary T; Talbot, Jared C; Hromowyk, Kimberly J; Tenente, Inês M; Langenau, David M; Amacher, Sharon L

    2017-04-15

    Satellite cells, also known as muscle stem cells, are responsible for skeletal muscle growth and repair in mammals. Pax7 and Pax3 transcription factors are established satellite cell markers required for muscle development and regeneration, and there is great interest in identifying additional factors that regulate satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and/or skeletal muscle regeneration. Due to the powerful regenerative capacity of many zebrafish tissues, even in adults, we are exploring the regenerative potential of adult zebrafish skeletal muscle. Here, we show that adult zebrafish skeletal muscle contains cells similar to mammalian satellite cells. Adult zebrafish satellite-like cells have dense heterochromatin, express Pax7 and Pax3, proliferate in response to injury, and show peak myogenic responses 4-5 days post-injury (dpi). Furthermore, using a pax7a-driven GFP reporter, we present evidence implicating satellite-like cells as a possible source of new muscle. In lieu of central nucleation, which distinguishes regenerating myofibers in mammals, we describe several characteristics that robustly identify newly-forming myofibers from surrounding fibers in injured adult zebrafish muscle. These characteristics include partially overlapping expression in satellite-like cells and regenerating myofibers of two RNA-binding proteins Rbfox2 and Rbfoxl1, known to regulate embryonic muscle development and function. Finally, by analyzing pax7a; pax7b double mutant zebrafish, we show that Pax7 is required for adult skeletal muscle repair, as it is in the mouse.

  13. Generation of skeletal muscle from transplanted embryonic stem cells in dystrophic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagavati, Satyakam . E-mail: satyakamb@hotmail.com; Xu Weimin

    2005-07-29

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have great therapeutic potential because of their capacity to proliferate extensively and to form any fully differentiated cell of the body, including skeletal muscle cells. Successful generation of skeletal muscle in vivo, however, requires selective induction of the skeletal muscle lineage in cultures of ES cells and following transplantation, integration of appropriately differentiated skeletal muscle cells with recipient muscle. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe progressive muscle wasting disease due to a mutation in the dystrophin gene and the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD, are characterized by the absence of the muscle membrane associated protein, dystrophin. Here, we show that co-culturing mouse ES cells with a preparation from mouse muscle enriched for myogenic stem and precursor cells, followed by injection into mdx mice, results occasionally in the formation of normal, vascularized skeletal muscle derived from the transplanted ES cells. Study of this phenomenon should provide valuable insights into skeletal muscle development in vivo from transplanted ES cells.

  14. The role of donor age and gender in the success of human muscle precursor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stölting, Meline N L; Hefermehl, Lukas J; Tremp, Mathias; Azzabi, Fahd; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Autologous cell transplantation for the treatment of muscle damage is envisioned to involve the application of muscle precursor cells (MPCs) isolated from adult skeletal muscle. At the onset of trauma, these cells are recruited to proliferate and rebuild injured muscle fibres. However, a variety of donor-specific cues may directly influence the yield and quality of cells isolated from a muscle biopsy. In this study, we isolated human MPCs and assessed the role of donor gender and age on the ability of these MPCs to form functional bioengineered muscle. We analysed the cell yield, growth and molecular expression in vitro, and the muscle tissue formation and contractility of the bioengineered muscle, from cells isolated from men and women in three different age groups: young (20-39 years), adult (40-59 years) and elderly (60-80 years). Our results suggest that human MPCs can be successfully isolated and grown from patients of all ages and both genders. However, young female donors provide fast-growing cells in vitro with an optimum contractile output in vivo and are therefore an ideal cell source for muscle reconstruction. Taken together, these findings describe the donor-related limitations of MPC transplantation and provide insights for a straightforward and unbiased clinical application of these cells for muscle reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The Development of the Ciliary Epithelium in the Embryonic Chicken Eye

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-04

    remember. Thank you for your support, advice, and, more than anything your friendship during my time at USUHS. To Dr. Michael Sheridan. Even though we...from those of the pigmented layer of the ciliary epithelium because the RPE cells lacked I . p · ’ 27 extensive basolateral and lateral cell membrane...is hydrolyzed by AChE at a rate greater than that for ACh. It is believed that the sulfur linkage in acetylthiocholine is weaker than · the oxygen

  16. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  17. Aging of human muscle: understanding sarcopenia at the single muscle cell level.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Walter R; Zayas, Ana Rodriguez; Rodriguez, Natividad

    2012-02-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age, also known as sarcopenia, is a major scientific and public health problem. Muscle atrophy is associated with the loss of functional capacity and poor health outcomes in elderly men and women. A detailed understanding of this problem in humans can be enhanced by the use of experiments with single muscle fibers. It is likely that both muscle atrophy and a decrease in muscle-fiber quality contribute to muscle dysfunction among the elderly. A better understanding of sarcopenia at the single-fiber level may lead to the design of more effective rehabilitative interventions.

  18. A muscle resident cell population promotes fibrosis in hindlimb skeletal muscles of mdx mice through the Wnt canonical pathway.

    PubMed

    Trensz, Frédéric; Haroun, Sonia; Cloutier, Alexandre; Richter, Martin V; Grenier, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    Previous work has pointed to a role for the Wnt canonical pathway in fibrosis formation in aged skeletal muscles. In the present study, we studied the dystrophic mdx mouse, which displays skeletal muscle fibrosis. Our results indicated that the muscle resident stromal cell (mrSC) population in the muscles of dystrophic mice is higher than in the muscles of age-matched wild-type mice. Wnt3a promoted the proliferation of and collagen expression by cultured mrSCs but arrested the growth of and collagen expression by cultured myoblasts. Injections of Wnt3A in the tibialis anterior muscles of adult wild-type mice significantly enhanced the mrSC population and collagen deposition compared with the contralateral muscles. Conversely, an injection of the Wnt antagonist Dickkof protein (DKK1) into the skeletal muscles of mdx mice significantly reduced collagen deposition. These results suggested that the Wnt canonical pathway expands the population of mrSCs and stimulates their production of collagen as observed during aging and in various myopathies.

  19. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation as a method to maximize the beneficial effects of muscle stem cells transplanted into dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Distefano, Giovanna; Ferrari, Ricardo Jose; Weiss, Christopher; Deasy, Bridget M; Boninger, Michael L; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Huard, Johnny; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2013-01-01

    Cellular therapy is a potential approach to improve the regenerative capacity of damaged or diseased skeletal muscle. However, its clinical use has often been limited by impaired donor cell survival, proliferation and differentiation following transplantation. Additionally, functional improvements after transplantation are all-too-often negligible. Because the host microenvironment plays an important role in the fate of transplanted cells, methods to modulate the microenvironment and guide donor cell behavior are warranted. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for 1 or 4 weeks following muscle-derived stem cell (MDSC) transplantation into dystrophic skeletal muscle can modulate the fate of donor cells and enhance their contribution to muscle regeneration and functional improvements. Animals submitted to 4 weeks of NMES after transplantation demonstrated a 2-fold increase in the number of dystrophin+ myofibers as compared to control transplanted muscles. These findings were concomitant with an increased vascularity in the MDSC+NMES group when compared to non-stimulated counterparts. Additionally, animals subjected to NMES (with or without MDSC transplantation) presented an increased maximal specific tetanic force when compared to controls. Although cell transplantation and/or the use of NMES resulted in no changes in fatigue resistance, the combination of both MDSC transplantation and NMES resulted in a faster recovery from fatigue, when compared to non-injected and non-stimulated counterparts. We conclude that NMES is a viable method to improve MDSC engraftment, enhance dystrophic muscle strength, and, in combination with MDSC transplantation, improve recovery from fatigue. These findings suggest that NMES may be a clinically-relevant adjunct approach for cell transplantation into skeletal muscle.

  20. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  1. Ageing induced vascular smooth muscle cell senescence in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna K; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-04-15

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of ageing in that its incidence and prevalence increase with age. However, atherosclerosis is also associated with biological ageing, manifest by a number of typical hallmarks of ageing in the atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, accelerated biological ageing may be superimposed on the effects of chronological ageing in atherosclerosis. Tissue ageing is seen in all cells that comprise the plaque, but particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hallmarks of ageing include evidence of cell senescence, DNA damage (including telomere attrition), mitochondrial dysfunction, a pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype, defects in proteostasis, epigenetic changes, deregulated nutrient sensing, and exhaustion of progenitor cells. In this model, initial damage to DNA (genomic, telomeric, mitochondrial and epigenetic changes) results in a number of cellular responses (cellular senescence, deregulated nutrient sensing and defects in proteostasis). Ultimately, ongoing damage and attempts at repair by continued proliferation overwhelm reparative capacity, causing loss of specialised cell functions, cell death and inflammation. This review summarises the evidence for accelerated biological ageing in atherosclerosis, the functional consequences of cell ageing on cells comprising the plaque, and the causal role that VSMC senescence plays in atherogenesis.

  2. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Aisenberg, William H.; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K.; Liggett, Stephen B.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.; An, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma. PMID:27905542

  3. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, William H; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K; Liggett, Stephen B; Pluznick, Jennifer L; An, Steven S

    2016-12-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma.

  4. Calpeptin Attenuated Apoptosis and Intracellular Inflammatory Changes in Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Kenkichi; Das, Arabinda; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2011-01-01

    In idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs), extracellular inflammatory stimulation is considered to induce secondary intracellular inflammatory changes including expression of major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I) and to produce self-sustaining loop of inflammation. We hypothesize that activation of calpain, a Ca2+-sensitive protease, bridges between these extracellular inflammatory stress and intracellular secondary inflammatory changes in muscle cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment of rat L6 myoblast cells with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) caused expression of MHC-I and inflammation related transcription factors (phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and nuclear factor-kappa B). We also demonstrated that treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) induced apoptotic changes and activation of calpain and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, we found that post-treatment with calpeptin attenuated the intracellular changes induced by IFN-γ or TNF-α. Our results indicate that calpain inhibition attenuates apoptosis and secondary inflammatory changes induced by extracellular inflammatory stimulation in the muscle cells. These results suggest calpain as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of IIMs. PMID:21290412

  5. Biophysical Induction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Podosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Young; Kohn, Julie C.; Huynh, John; Carey, Shawn P.; Mason, Brooke N.; Vouyouka, Ageliki G.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and matrix degradation occurs with intimal hyperplasia associated with atherosclerosis, vascular injury, and restenosis. One proposed mechanism by which VSMCs degrade matrix is through the use of podosomes, transient actin-based structures that are thought to play a role in extracellular matrix degradation by creating localized sites of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion. To date, podosomes in VSMCs have largely been studied by stimulating cells with phorbol esters, such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), however little is known about the physiological cues that drive podosome formation. We present the first evidence that physiological, physical stimuli mimicking cues present within the microenvironment of diseased arteries can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. Both microtopographical cues and imposed pressure mimicking stage II hypertension induce podosome formation in A7R5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Moreover, wounding using a scratch assay induces podosomes at the leading edge of VSMCs. Notably the effect of each of these biophysical stimuli on podosome stimulation can be inhibited using a Src inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that physical cues can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. PMID:25785437

  6. Vascular smooth muscle cell culture in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Y. C.; Chen, F.; Zhang, T.; Chen, D. Y.; Jia, X.; Wang, J. B.; Guo, W.; Chen, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device enabling culture of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) where extracellular matrix coating, VSMC seeding, culture, and immunostaining are demonstrated in a tubing-free manner. By optimizing droplet volume differences between inlets and outlets of micro channels, VSMCs were evenly seeded into microfluidic devices. Furthermore, the effects of extracellular matrix (e.g., collagen, poly-l-Lysine (PLL), and fibronectin) on VSMC proliferation and phenotype expression were explored. As a platform technology, this microfluidic device may function as a new VSMC culture model enabling VSMC studies. PMID:25379109

  7. Treatment recommendations in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Polineni, Deepika; Davis, Stephanie D; Dell, Sharon D

    2016-03-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare heterogenic disorder leading to significant respiratory morbidity. Health-care providers who treat PCD must familiarize themselves with recommended treatment strategies. However, most of the treatments recommended in PCD have been extrapolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis literature. Mainstays of therapy are reviewed in detail, and should include at a minimum: regular airway clearance, routine microbiological surveillance, antibiotic treatment for pulmonary exacerbation, and health vaccinations. This review summarizes both medical and surgical pulmonary treatment considerations, as well as recommendations for the integration of non-pulmonary subspecialty care in the management of PCD.

  8. Isolation and characterization of primary skeletal muscle satellite cells from rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Sifan; Li, Wenxue; Du, Hongyan; Zhu, Wei

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize skeletal muscle satellite cells from rats using tissue block culture method. Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) level Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used to isolate skeletal muscle satellite cells. Morphology, expression and distribution of α-actin and Desmin within the cytoplasm of skeletal muscle satellite cells were compared with those of C2C12 myoblasts. The results showed that tissue block culturing method achieved robust proliferation and excellent differentiation of skeletal muscle satellite cells. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry results showed that α-actin and Desmin proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm of both skeletal muscle satellite cells and myoblasts. We concluded that tissue block culturing method can obtain highly purified skeletal muscle satellite cells with robust proliferation and excellent differentiation capabilities.

  9. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Vascular Progenitor Cells Capable of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34+ cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. MATERIALS AND METHODS hESCs are co-cultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1 expressing M2-10B4 for 13–15 days to generate a CD34+ cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24–48 hours. RESULTS CD34+ vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when co-cultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1 overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The step-wise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. PMID:20067819

  10. Satellite cell dysfunction and impaired IGF-1 signaling cause CKD-induced muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Xiaonan H; Wang, Huiling; Du, Jie; Mitch, William E

    2010-03-01

    Muscle wasting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) begins with impaired insulin/IGF-1 signaling, causing abnormal protein metabolism. In certain models of muscle atrophy, reduced satellite cell function contributes to atrophy, but how CKD affects satellite cell function is unknown. Here, we found that isolated satellite cells from mice with CKD had less MyoD, the master switch of satellite cell activation, and suppressed myotube formation compared with control mice. In vivo, CKD delayed the regeneration of injured muscle and decreased MyoD and myogenin expression, suggesting that CKD impairs proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. In isolated satellite cells from control mice, IGF-1 increased the expression of myogenic genes through an Akt-dependent pathway. CKD impaired Akt phosphorylation in satellite cells after muscle injury. To test whether impaired IGF-1 signaling could be responsible for decreased satellite cell function in CKD, we created an inducible IGF-1 receptor knockout mouse and found impaired satellite cell function and muscle regeneration. In addition, both CKD and IGF-1 receptor knockout mice developed fibrosis in regenerating muscles. Taken together, impaired IGF-1 signaling in CKD not only leads to abnormal protein metabolism in muscle but also impairs satellite cell function and promotes fibrosis in regenerating muscle. These signaling pathways may hold potential therapeutic targets to reduce CKD-related muscle wasting.

  11. NOV/CCN3 impairs muscle cell commitment and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Calhabeu, Frederico; Lafont, Jerome; Le Dreau, Gwenvael; Laurent, Maryvonne; Kazazian, Chantal; Schaeffer, Laurent; Dubois, Catherine . E-mail: dubois@st-antoine.inserm.frs

    2006-06-10

    NOV (nephroblastoma overexpressed) is a member of a family of proteins which encodes secreted matrix-associated proteins. NOV is expressed during development in dermomyotome and limb buds, but its functions are still poorly defined. In order to understand the role of NOV in myogenic differentiation, C2C12 cells overexpressing NOV (C2-NOV) were generated. These cells failed to engage into myogenic differentiation, whereas they retained the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts. In differentiating conditions, C2-NOV cells remained proliferative, failed to express differentiation markers and lost their ability to form myotubes. Inhibition of differentiation by NOV was also observed with human primary muscle cells. Further examination of C2-NOV cells revealed a strong downregulation of the myogenic determination genes MyoD and Myf5 and of IGF-II expression. MyoD forced expression in C2-NOV was sufficient to restore differentiation and IGF-II induction whereas 10{sup -6} M insulin treatment had no effects. NOV therefore acts upstream of MyoD and does not affect IGF-II induction and signaling. HES1, a target of Notch, previously proposed to mediate NOV action, was not implicated in the inhibition of differentiation. We propose that NOV is a specific cell fate regulator in the myogenic lineage, acting negatively on key myogenic genes thus controlling the transition from progenitor cells to myoblasts.

  12. PDT-induced apoptosis in arterial smooth muscles cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamekye, Isaac; Renick, R.; Gilbert, C.; McEwan, Jean R.; Evan, G.; Bishop, Christopher C. R.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    PDT kills smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vivo and thus prevents intimal hyperplasia after angioplasty. It causes little inflammation and structural integrity of the artery is not compromised. We have studied the process of the SMC death in vitro. Cultured rat SMC (cell line sv40 ATCC) were sensitized with aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc), and then irradiated with 675 nm laser light (2.5 J/cm2). Controls were studied using only sensitizer or laser for treatment. The cells were incubated and the dying process observed with a time lapse video and microscope system. PDT caused a characteristic pattern of death. Cells lost contact with neighbors, shrank, and showed hyperactivity and membrane ruffling. The cells imploded into active and condensed membrane bound vesicles which were terminally reduced to residual bodies. These are the morphological changes of apoptosis. The control cells which were given AlS2Pc alone or laser alone showed no death. PDT induced cultured arterial SMC death by apoptosis rather than necrosis. An apoptotic mechanism of cell death in vivo would explain the relative lack of inflammation and local tissue destruction in the face of massive death.

  13. Immunostaining of macrophages, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic mouse aorta

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Prashanthi; Fisher, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The atherosclerotic mouse aorta consists of a heterogeneous population of cells, including macrophages, endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC), that play critical roles in cardiovascular disease. Identification of these vascular cells in the vessel wall is important to understanding their function in pathological conditions. Immunohistochemistry is an invaluable technique used to detect the presence of cells in different tissues. Here, we describe immunohistochemical techniques commonly used for the detection of the vascular cells in the atherosclerotic mouse aorta using cell specific markers. PMID:26445786

  14. Ciliary abnormalities in senescent human fibroblasts impair proliferative capacity.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Loretta; Prosser, Suzanna L; Cuffe, Sandra; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells senesce in culture after a finite number of divisions indefinitely arresting their proliferation. DNA damage and senescence increase the cellular number of centrosomes, the 2 microtubule organizing centers that ensure bipolar mitotic spindles. Centrosomes also provide the basal body from which primary cilia extend to sense and transduce various extracellular signals, notably Hedgehog. Primary cilium formation is facilitated by cellular quiescence a temporary cell cycle exit, but the impact of senescence on cilia is unknown. We found that senescent human fibroblasts have increased frequency and length of primary cilia. Levels of the negative ciliary regulator CP110 were reduced in senescent cells, as were levels of key elements of the Hedgehog pathway. Hedgehog inhibition reduced proliferation in young cells with increased cilium length accompanying cell cycle arrest suggesting a regulatory function for Hedgehog in primary ciliation. Depletion of CP110 in young cell populations increased ciliation frequencies and reduced cell proliferation. These data suggest that primary cilia are potentially novel determinants of the reduced cellular proliferation that initiates senescence.

  15. Effects of lubiprostone on human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cuppoletti, John; Malinowska, Danuta H; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Ueno, Ryuji

    2008-06-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid derivative and member of a new class of compounds called prostones, locally activates ClC-2 Cl(-) channels without activation of prostaglandin receptors. The present study was specifically designed to test and compare lubiprostone and prostaglandin effects at the cellular level using human uterine smooth muscle cells. Effects on [Ca(2+)](i), membrane potential and [cAMP](i) in human uterine smooth muscle cells were measured. 10 nM lubiprostone significantly decreased [Ca(2+)](i) from 188 to 27 nM, which was unaffected by 100 nM SC-51322, a prostaglandin EP receptor antagonist. In contrast 10nM PGE(2) and PGE(1) both increased [Ca(2+)](i) 3-5-fold which was blocked by SC-51322. Similarly, lubiprostone and prostaglandins had opposite/different effects on membrane potential and [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone caused SC-51322-insensitive membrane hyperpolarization and no effect on [cAMP](i). PGE(2) and PGE(1) both caused SC-51322-sensitive membrane depolarization and increased [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone has fundamentally different cellular effects from prostaglandins that are not mediated by EP receptors.

  16. Recent advances in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kazuhiko; Kitano, Masako; Ishinaga, Hajime; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Ogawa, Satoru; Nakatani, Kaname; Masuda, Sawako; Nagao, Mizuho; Fujisawa, Takao

    2016-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The prevalence of PCD is estimated to be 1 in 20,000 live births. Congenital abnormality of the primary cilia results in situs inversus in 50% of patients. Decreased function of motile cilia causes chronic rhinosinusitis, otitis media with effusion, bronchiectasis and infertility. Cases with situs inversus are considered to show "Kartagener's syndrome", and diagnosis is not difficult. However, in cases without situs inversus, the diagnosis is much more troublesome. PCD without situs inversus is thus probably underdiagnosed. Prolonged chronic cough represents an important symptom that is seen in most patients. The diagnosis of PCD requires the presence of the characteristic clinical phenotypes and either: (1) specific ciliary ultrastructural defects identified by transmission electron microscopy in biopsy samples of respiratory epithelium; or (2) identification of mutation in one of the genes known to be associated with PCD. Nasal nitric oxide concentration is extremely low in PCD, and this could be useful for screening of the disease. At present, no fundamental therapies are available for PCD. Diagnosis in the early stages is important to prevent progression of bronchiectasis and deterioration of lung function by guidance for daily life, immunization, cessation of smoking and prompt therapy at the time of respiratory tract infection. Since PCD is inherited in an autosomal-recessive manner, genetic counseling is necessary after definite diagnosis.

  17. Primary ciliary dyskinesia in Newfoundland dogs.

    PubMed

    Watson, P J; Herrtage, M E; Peacock, M A; Sargan, D R

    1999-06-26

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia was diagnosed in three Newfoundland dogs with histories of chronic rhinitis and bronchopneumonia from an early age. Thoracic radiographs of two of them showed severe, dependent bronchopneumonia and right displacement of the cardiac apex but normal positioning of other organs. Histopathological examination of sections of lung from the other dog showed severe bronchopneumonia. A semen sample from one dog had a high percentage of spermatozoa with abnormal tails and poor progressive motility. Transmission electron microscopy of nasal brushings from all three dogs showed consistent ultrastructural defects in the cilia, including an absence of outer and inner dynein arms, disorganisation of peripheral doublets, occasional supernumerary doublets and singlets, and consistently disorganised basal bodies and foot processes; sections of trachea from one dog also had disorganised basal bodies. Pedigree analysis was consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance for the defect. One dog is still alive, one dog died aged five years two months, and one dog was euthanased aged nine months. This is the first time primary ciliary dyskinesia has been reported in Newfoundland dogs.

  18. Contraction of gut smooth muscle cells assessed by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Yohei; Akiho, Hirotada; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Here we discuss the development of a novel cell imaging system for the evaluation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. SMCs were isolated from the circular and longitudinal muscular layers of mouse small intestine by enzymatic digestion. SMCs were stimulated by test agents, thereafter fixed in acrolein. Actin in fixed SMCs was stained with phalloidin and cell length was determined by measuring diameter at the large end of phalloidin-stained strings within the cells. The contractile response was taken as the decrease in the average length of a population of stimulated-SMCs. Various mediators and chemically identified compounds of daikenchuto (DKT), pharmaceutical-grade traditional Japanese prokinetics, were examined. Verification of the integrity of SMC morphology by phalloidin and DAPI staining and semi-automatic measurement of cell length using an imaging analyzer was a reliable method by which to quantify the contractile response. Serotonin, substance P, prostaglandin E2 and histamine induced SMC contraction in concentration-dependent manner. Two components of DKT, hydroxy-α-sanshool and hydroxy-β-sanshool, induced contraction of SMCs. We established a novel cell imaging technique to evaluate SMC contractility. This method may facilitate investigation into SMC activity and its role in gastrointestinal motility, and may assist in the discovery of new prokinetic agents.

  19. In situ regeneration of skeletal muscle tissue through host cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Min; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J; Lee, Sang Jin

    2014-10-01

    Standard reconstructive procedures for restoring normal function after skeletal muscle defects involve the use of existing host tissues such as muscular flaps. In many instances, this approach is not feasible and delays the rehabilitation process and restoration of tissue function. Currently, cell-based tissue engineering strategies have been used for reconstruction; however, donor tissue biopsy and ex vivo cell manipulation are required prior to implantation. The present study aimed to overcome these limitations by demonstrating mobilization of muscle cells into a target-specific site for in situ muscle regeneration. First, we investigated whether host muscle cells could be mobilized into an implanted scaffold. Poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds were implanted in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats, and the retrieved scaffolds were characterized by examining host cell infiltration in the scaffolds. The host cell infiltrates, including Pax7+ cells, gradually increased with time. Second, we demonstrated that host muscle cells could be enriched by a myogenic factor released from the scaffolds. Gelatin-based scaffolds containing a myogenic factor were implanted in the TA muscle of rats, and the Pax7+ cell infiltration and newly formed muscle fibers were examined. By the second week after implantation, the Pax7+ cell infiltrates and muscle formation were significantly accelerated within the scaffolds containing insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Our data suggest an ability of host stem cells to be recruited into the scaffolds with the capability of differentiating to muscle cells. In addition, the myogenic factor effectively promoted host cell recruitment, which resulted in accelerating muscle regeneration in situ.

  20. Serum stimulation, cell-cell interactions, and extracellular matrix independently influence smooth muscle cell phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, S.; Shanley, J. R.; Fox, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular injury profoundly alters the vessel wall microenvironment, and smooth muscle cells respond with cell cycle re-entry, loss of contractile elements, extracellular matrix remodeling, and altered signaling by endogenous growth factors and their receptors. Environmental cues include stimulation by exogenous mitogens and both cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Modeling this process in smooth muscle cells in vitro, these environmental determinants were varied independently and the phenotypic consequences assessed. Mitogenic stimulation with serum promoted the synthesis of collagen and fibronectin and the expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 and suppressed the content of smooth muscle alpha-actin, myosin heavy chain, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Low cell density (reduced cell-cell contact) was also associated with enhanced extracellular matrix protein production, increased fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 expression, and reduced contractile protein and basic fibroblast growth factor content. The influence of serum stimulation and reduced cell-cell contact were independent and additive. Provision of a type I collagen matrix blunted the influence of serum and cell-cell contact on collagen synthesis but had minor effects on other measures of phenotype. Environmental factors thus independently influence smooth muscle cell phenotype, including endogenous growth factor expression and responsiveness, which can in turn influence the microenvironment of the vessel wall after injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8702006

  1. A novel mouse model of anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD): conditional deletion of Tsc1 disrupts ciliary body and iris development

    PubMed Central

    Hägglund, Anna-Carin; Jones, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of the cornea, lens, ciliary body and iris within the anterior segment of the eye involves coordinated interaction between cells originating from the ciliary margin of the optic cup, the overlying periocular mesenchyme and the lens epithelium. Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) encompasses a spectrum of developmental syndromes that affect these anterior segment tissues. ASD conditions arise as a result of dominantly inherited genetic mutations and result in both ocular-specific and systemic forms of dysgenesis that are best exemplified by aniridia and Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, respectively. Extensive clinical overlap in disease presentation amongst ASD syndromes creates challenges for correct diagnosis and classification. The use of animal models has therefore proved to be a robust approach for unravelling this complex genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. However, despite these successes, it is clear that additional genes that underlie several ASD syndromes remain unidentified. Here, we report the characterisation of a novel mouse model of ASD. Conditional deletion of Tsc1 during eye development leads to a premature upregulation of mTORC1 activity within the ciliary margin, periocular mesenchyme and lens epithelium. This aberrant mTORC1 signalling within the ciliary margin in particular leads to a reduction in the number of cells that express Pax6, Bmp4 and Msx1. Sustained mTORC1 signalling also induces a decrease in ciliary margin progenitor cell proliferation and a consequent failure of ciliary body and iris development in postnatal animals. Our study therefore identifies Tsc1 as a novel candidate ASD gene. Furthermore, the Tsc1-ablated mouse model also provides a valuable resource for future studies concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying ASD and acts as a platform for evaluating therapeutic approaches for the treatment of visual disorders. PMID:28250050

  2. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  3. Circovirus inclusion bodies in intestinal muscle cells of a canary.

    PubMed

    Rampin, T; Manarolla, G; Pisoni, G; Recordati, C; Sironi, G

    2006-08-01

    Multiple cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in the intestinal smooth muscle cells of an adult canary from an aviary with a history of high mortality (50%) both in adult and young birds. Grossly, a mild enteritis was the only lesion appreciable. Smears of the proventricular contents contained a few megabacteria (Macrorhabdus ornithogaster). The intestinal inclusions were found in very high numbers in all parts of the tract examined. They appeared round to oval, amphophilic and hyaline in sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and magenta with Feulgen stain. Inclusions of the same type were occasionally detectable in the wall of a few splenic and pancreatic arteries. No inclusions or lesions were seen in the other organs examined. Transmission electron microscopy of the intestinal wall revealed circovirus-like particles either in paracrystalline arrays or loose arrangements, mostly within the cytoplasm of the intestinal muscule cells. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis confirmed infection with canary circovirus.

  4. Barx2 is expressed in satellite cells and is required for normal muscle growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meech, Robyn; Gonzalez, Katie N; Barro, Marietta; Gromova, Anastasia; Zhuang, Lizhe; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Makarenkova, Helen P

    2012-02-01

    Muscle growth and regeneration are regulated through a series of spatiotemporally dependent signaling and transcriptional cascades. Although the transcriptional program controlling myogenesis has been extensively investigated, the full repertoire of transcriptional regulators involved in this process is far from defined. Various homeodomain transcription factors have been shown to play important roles in both muscle development and muscle satellite cell-dependent repair. Here, we show that the homeodomain factor Barx2 is a new marker for embryonic and adult myoblasts and is required for normal postnatal muscle growth and repair. Barx2 is coexpressed with Pax7, which is the canonical marker of satellite cells, and is upregulated in satellite cells after muscle injury. Mice lacking the Barx2 gene show reduced postnatal muscle growth, muscle atrophy, and defective muscle repair. Moreover, loss of Barx2 delays the expression of genes that control proliferation and differentiation in regenerating muscle. Consistent with the in vivo observations, satellite cell-derived myoblasts cultured from Barx2(-/-) mice show decreased proliferation and ability to differentiate relative to those from wild-type or Barx2(+/-) mice. Barx2(-/-) myoblasts show reduced expression of the differentiation-associated factor myogenin as well as cell adhesion and matrix molecules. Finally, we find that mice lacking both Barx2 and dystrophin gene expression have severe early onset myopathy. Together, these data indicate that Barx2 is an important regulator of muscle growth and repair that acts via the control of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation.

  5. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  6. A subpopulation of adult skeletal muscle stem cells retains all template DNA strands after cell division.

    PubMed

    Rocheteau, Pierre; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Siegl-Cachedenier, Irene; Blasco, Maria A; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-01-20

    Satellite cells are adult skeletal muscle stem cells that are quiescent and constitute a poorly defined heterogeneous population. Using transgenic Tg:Pax7-nGFP mice, we show that Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells are less primed for commitment and have a lower metabolic status and delayed first mitosis compared to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells. Pax7-nGFP(Hi) can give rise to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells after serial transplantations. Proliferating Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells exhibit lower metabolic activity, and the majority performs asymmetric DNA segregation during cell division, wherein daughter cells retaining template DNA strands express stem cell markers. Using chromosome orientation-fluorescence in situ hybridization, we demonstrate that all chromatids segregate asymmetrically, whereas Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells perform random DNA segregation. Therefore, quiescent Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells represent a reversible dormant stem cell state, and during muscle regeneration, Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells generate distinct daughter cell fates by asymmetrically segregating template DNA strands to the stem cell. These findings provide major insights into the biology of stem cells that segregate DNA asymmetrically.

  7. Imbalance between pSmad3 and Notch induces CDK inhibitors in old muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Morgan E; Hsu, Michael; Conboy, Irina M

    2008-07-24

    Adult skeletal muscle robustly regenerates throughout an organism's life, but as the muscle ages, its ability to repair diminishes and eventually fails. Previous work suggests that the regenerative potential of muscle stem cells (satellite cells) is not triggered in the old muscle because of a decline in Notch activation, and that it can be rejuvenated by forced local activation of Notch. Here we report that, in addition to the loss of Notch activation, old muscle produces excessive transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta (but not myostatin), which induces unusually high levels of TGF-beta pSmad3 in resident satellite cells and interferes with their regenerative capacity. Importantly, endogenous Notch and pSmad3 antagonize each other in the control of satellite-cell proliferation, such that activation of Notch blocks the TGF-beta-dependent upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p15, p16, p21 and p27, whereas inhibition of Notch induces them. Furthermore, in muscle stem cells, Notch activity determines the binding of pSmad3 to the promoters of these negative regulators of cell-cycle progression. Attenuation of TGF-beta/pSmad3 in old, injured muscle restores regeneration to satellite cells in vivo. Thus a balance between endogenous pSmad3 and active Notch controls the regenerative competence of muscle stem cells, and deregulation of this balance in the old muscle microniche interferes with regeneration.

  8. IFT27 links the BBSome to IFT for maintenance of the ciliary signaling compartment.

    PubMed

    Eguether, Thibaut; San Agustin, Jovenal T; Keady, Brian T; Jonassen, Julie A; Liang, Yinwen; Francis, Richard; Tobita, Kimimasa; Johnson, Colin A; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2014-11-10

    Vertebrate hedgehog signaling is coordinated by the differential localization of the receptors patched-1 and Smoothened in the primary cilium. Cilia assembly is mediated by intraflagellar transport (IFT), and cilia defects disrupt hedgehog signaling, causing many structural birth defects. We generated Ift25 and Ift27 knockout mice and show that they have structural birth defects indicative of hedgehog signaling dysfunction. Surprisingly, ciliary assembly is not affected, but abnormal hedgehog signaling is observed in conjunction with ciliary accumulation of patched-1 and Smoothened. Similarly, Smoothened accumulates in cilia on cells mutated for BBSome components or the BBS binding protein/regulator Lztfl1. Interestingly, the BBSome and Lztfl1 accumulate to high levels in Ift27 mutant cilia. Because Lztfl1 mutant cells accumulate BBSome but not IFT27, it is likely that Lztfl1 functions downstream of IFT27 to couple the BBSome to the IFT particle for coordinated removal of patched-1 and Smoothened from cilia during hedgehog signaling.

  9. Vessel-associated stem cells from skeletal muscle: From biology to future uses in cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Sancricca, Cristina; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Gliubizzi, Carla; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Gidaro, Teresa; Morosetti, Roberta

    2010-06-26

    Over the last years, the existence of different stem cells with myogenic potential has been widely investigated. Besides the classical skeletal muscle progenitors represented by satellite cells, numerous multipotent and embryologically unrelated progenitors with a potential role in muscle differentiation and repair have been identified. In order to conceive a therapeutic approach for degenerative muscle disorders, it is of primary importance to identify an ideal stem cell endowed with all the features for a possible use in vivo. Among all emerging populations, vessel-associated stem cells are a novel and promising class of multipotent progenitors of mesodermal origin and with high myogenic potential which seem to best fit all the requirements for a possible cell therapy. In vitro and in vivostudies have already tested the effectiveness and safety of vessel-associated stem cells in animal models. This leads to the concrete possibility in the future to start pilot human clinical trials, hopefully opening the way to a turning point in the treatment of genetic and acquired muscle disorders.

  10. Clonal multipotency of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells between mesodermal and ectodermal lineage.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-09-01

    The differentiation potential of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) after in vitro culture and in vivo transplantation has been extensively studied. However, the clonal multipotency of MDSCs has yet to be fully determined. Here, we show that single skeletal muscle-derived CD34-/CD45- (skeletal muscle-derived double negative [Sk-DN]) cells exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, vasculogenic, and neural cell lineages after in vivo single cell-derived single sphere implantation and in vitro clonal single cell culture. Muscles from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were enzymatically dissociated and sorted based on CD34 and CD45. Sk-DN cells were clone-sorted into a 96-well plate and were cultured in collagen-based medium with basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor for 14 days. Individual colony-forming units (CFUs) were then transplanted directly into severely damaged muscle together with 1 x 10(5) competitive carrier Sk-DN cells obtained from wild-type mice muscle expanded for 5 days under the same culture conditions using 35-mm culture dishes. Four weeks after transplantation, implanted GFP+ cells demonstrated differentiation into endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, skeletal muscle, and neural cell (Schwann cell) lineages. This multipotency was also confirmed by expression of mRNA markers for myogenic (MyoD, myf5), neural (Musashi-1, Nestin, neural cell adhesion molecule-1, peripheral myelin protein-22, Nucleostemin), and vascular (alpha-smooth muscle actin, smoothelin, vascular endothelial-cadherin, tyrosine kinase-endothelial) stem cells by clonal (single-cell derived) single-sphere reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Approximately 70% of clonal CFUs exhibited expression of all three cell lineages. These findings support the notion that Sk-DN cells are a useful tool for damaged muscle-related tissue reconstitution by synchronized vasculogenesis, myogenesis, and neurogenesis.

  11. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-09

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains.

  12. A Twist2-dependent progenitor cell contributes to adult skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Garry, Glynnis A; Li, Stephen; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Chen, Beibei; Shelton, John M; Jaichander, Priscilla; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses remarkable regenerative potential due to satellite cells, an injury-responsive stem cell population located beneath the muscle basal lamina that expresses Pax7. By lineage tracing of progenitor cells expressing the Twist2 (Tw2) transcription factor in mice, we discovered a myogenic lineage that resides outside the basal lamina of adult skeletal muscle. Tw2(+) progenitors are molecularly and anatomically distinct from satellite cells, are highly myogenic in vitro, and can fuse with themselves and with satellite cells. Tw2(+) progenitors contribute specifically to type IIb/x myofibres during adulthood and muscle regeneration, and their genetic ablation causes wasting of type IIb myofibres. We show that Tw2 expression maintains progenitor cells in an undifferentiated state that is poised to initiate myogenesis in response to appropriate cues that extinguish Tw2 expression. Tw2-expressing myogenic progenitors represent a previously unrecognized, fibre-type-specific stem cell involved in postnatal muscle growth and regeneration.

  13. Clones of ectopic stem cells in the regeneration of muscle defects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rujing; Chen, Mo; Lee, Chang Hun; Yoon, Richard; Lal, Shan; Mao, Jeremy J

    2010-10-20

    Little is known about whether clones of ectopic, non-muscle stem cells contribute to muscle regeneration. Stem/progenitor cells that are isolated for experimental research or therapeutics are typically heterogeneous. Non-myogenic lineages in a heterogeneous population conceptually may compromise tissue repair. In this study, we discovered that clones of mononucleated stem cells of human tooth pulp fused into multinucleated myotubes that robustly expressed myosin heavy chain in vitro with or without co-culture with mouse skeletal myoblasts (C2C12 cells). Cloned cells were sustainably Oct4+, Nanog+ and Stro1+. The fusion indices of myogenic clones were approximately 16-17 folds greater than their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. Upon infusion into cardio-toxin induced tibialis anterior muscle defects, undifferentiated clonal progenies not only engrafted and colonized host muscle, but also expressed human dystrophin and myosin heavy chain more efficaciously than their parent heterogeneous stem cell populations. Strikingly, clonal progenies yielded ∼9 times more human myosin heavy chain mRNA in regenerating muscles than those infused with their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. The number of human dystrophin positive cells in regenerating muscles infused with clonal progenies was more than ∼3 times greater than muscles infused with heterogeneous stem cells from which clonal progenies were derived. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of ectopic myogenic clones in muscle regeneration.

  14. Differentiation rather than aging of muscle stem cells abolishes their telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Matthew S.; Carlson, Morgan E.; Conboy, Irina M.

    2009-01-01

    A general feature of stem cells is the ability to routinely proliferate in order to build, maintain, and repair organ systems. Accordingly, embryonic and germline, as well as some adult stem cells, produce the telomerase enzyme at various levels of expression. Our results show that, while muscle is a largely post-mitotic tissue, the muscle stem cells (satellite cells) that maintain this biological system throughout adult life do indeed display robust telomerase activity. Conversely, primary myoblasts (the immediate progeny of satellite cells) quickly and dramatically down-regulate telomerase activity. This work thus suggests that satellite cells, and early transient myoblasts, may be more promising therapeutic candidates for regenerative medicine than traditionally utilized myoblast cultures. Muscle atrophy accompanies human aging, and satellite cells endogenous to aged muscle can be triggered to regenerate old tissue by exogenous molecular cues. Therefore, we also examined whether these aged muscle stem cells would produce tissue that is “young” with respect to telomere maintenance. Interestingly, this work shows that the telomerase activity in muscle stem cells is largely retained into old age wintin inbred “long” telomere mice and in wild-derived short telomere mouse strains, and that age-specific telomere shortening is undetectable in the old differentiated muscle fibers of either strain. Summarily, this work establishes that young and old muscle stem cells, but not necessarily their progeny, myoblasts, are likely to produce tissue with normal telomere maintenance when used in molecular and regenerative medicine approaches for tissue repair. PMID:19455648

  15. Fibronectin matrix polymerization regulates smooth muscle cell phenotype through a Rac1 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Long, Xiaochun; Hendershot, Allison; Miano, Joseph M; Sottile, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are maintained in a differentiated state in the vessel wall, but can be modulated to a synthetic phenotype following injury. Smooth muscle phenotypic modulation is thought to play an important role in the pathology of vascular occlusive diseases. Phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells exhibit increased proliferative and migratory properties that accompany the downregulation of smooth muscle cell marker proteins. Extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, can regulate the smooth muscle phenotype when used as adhesive substrates. However, cells produce and organize a 3-dimensional fibrillar extracellular matrix, which can affect cell behavior in distinct ways from the protomeric 2-dimensional matrix proteins that are used as adhesive substrates. We previously showed that the deposition/polymerization of fibronectin into the extracellular matrix can regulate the deposition and organization of other extracellular matrix molecules in vitro. Further, our published data show that the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor results in increased expression of smooth muscle cell differentiation proteins and inhibits vascular remodeling in vivo. In this manuscript, we used an in vitro cell culture system to determine the mechanism by which fibronectin polymerization affects smooth muscle phenotypic modulation. Our data show that fibronectin polymerization decreases the mRNA levels of multiple smooth muscle differentiation genes, and downregulates the levels of smooth muscle α-actin and calponin proteins by a Rac1-dependent mechanism. The expression of smooth muscle genes is transcriptionally regulated by fibronectin polymerization, as evidenced by the increased activity of luciferase reporter constructs in the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor. Fibronectin polymerization also promotes smooth muscle cell growth, and decreases the levels of actin stress fibers. These data define a Rac1-dependent pathway wherein

  16. Epigenetic Control of Smooth Muscle Cell Identity and Lineage Memory.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Delphine; Swiatlowska, Pamela; Owens, Gary K

    2015-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), like all cells, acquire a cell-specific epigenetic signature during development that includes acquisition of a unique repertoire of histone and DNA modifications. These changes are postulated to induce an open chromatin state (referred to as euchromatin) on the repertoire of genes that are expressed in differentiated SMC, including SMC-selective marker genes like Acta2 and Myh11, as well as housekeeping genes expressed by most cell types. In contrast, genes that are silenced in differentiated SMC acquire modifications associated with a closed chromatin state (ie, heterochromatin) and transcriptional silencing. Herein, we review mechanisms that regulate epigenetic control of the differentiated state of SMC. In addition, we identify some of the major limitations in the field and future challenges, including development of innovative new tools and approaches, for performing single-cell epigenetic assays and locus-selective editing of the epigenome that will allow direct studies of the functional role of specific epigenetic controls during development, injury repair, and disease, including major cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and microvascular disease, associated with diabetes mellitus.

  17. A solid-state control system for dynein-based ciliary/flagellar motility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary and flagellar beating requires the coordinated action of multiple dyneins with different enzymatic and motor properties. In this issue, Yamamoto et al. (2013. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201211048) identify the MIA (modifier of inner arms) complex within the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii axoneme that physically links to a known regulatory structure and provides a signaling conduit from the radial spokes to an inner arm dynein essential for waveform determination. PMID:23569213

  18. A renal-like organic anion transport system in the ciliary epithelium of the bovine and human eye.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwa; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Hotchkiss, Adam; Coca-Prados, Miguel; Delamere, Nicholas A; Pelis, Ryan M

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the direction of organic anion (OA) transport across the ciliary body and the transport proteins that may contribute. Transport of several OAs across the bovine ciliary body was examined using ciliary body sections mounted in Ussing chambers and a perfused eye preparation. Microarray, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to examine OA transporter expression in human ocular tissues. Microarray analysis showed that many OA transporters common to other barrier epithelia are expressed in ocular tissues. mRNA (RT-PCR) and protein (immunoblotting) for OAT1, OAT3, NaDC3, and MRP4 were detected in extracts of the human ciliary body from several donors. OAT1 and OAT3 localized to basolateral membranes of nonpigmented epithelial cells and MRP4 to basolateral membranes of pigmented cells in the human eye. Para-aminohippurate (PAH) and estrone-3-sulfate transport across the bovine ciliary body in the Ussing chambers was greater in the aqueous humor-to-blood direction than in the blood-to-aqueous humor direction, and active. There was little net directional movement of cidofovir. Probenecid (0.1 mM) or novobiocin (0.1 mM) added to the aqueous humor side of the tissue, or MK571 (5-(3-(2-(7-chloroquinolin-2-yl)ethenyl)phenyl)-8-dimethylcarbamyl-4,6-dithiaoctanoic acid; 0.1 mM) added to the blood side significantly reduced net active PAH transport. The rate of 6-carboxyfluorescein elimination from the aqueous humor of the perfused eye was reduced 80% when novobiocin (0.1 mM) was present in the aqueous humor. These data indicate that the ciliary body expresses a variety of OA transporters, including those common to the kidney. They are likely involved in clearing potentially harmful endobiotic and xenobiotic OAs from the eye.

  19. Synchronized reconstitution of muscle fibers, peripheral nerves and blood vessels by murine skeletal muscle-derived CD34(-)/45 (-) cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-10-01

    In order to establish the practical isolation and usage of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs), we determined reconstitution capacity of CD34(-)/CD45(-) (Sk-DN) cells as a candidate somatic stem cell source for transplantation. Sk-DN cells were enzymatically isolated from GFP transgenic mice (C57/BL6N) skeletal muscle and sorted using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and expanded by collagen gel-based cell culture with bFGF and EGF. The number of Sk-DN cells was small after sorting (2-8 x 10(4)); however, the number increased 10-20 fold (2-16 x 10(5)) after 6 days of expansion culture, and the cells maintained immature state and multipotency, expressing mRNAs for mesodermal and ectodermal cell lineages. Transplantation of expanded Sk-DN cells into the severe muscle damage model (C57/BL6N wild-type) resulted in the synchronized reconstitution of blood vessels, peripheral nerves and muscle fibers following significant recovery of total muscle mass (57%) and contractile function (55%), whereas the non-cell-transplanted control group showed around 20% recovery in both factors. These reconstitution capacities were supported by the intrinsic plasticity of Sk-DN cells that can differentiate into muscular (skeletal muscle), vascular (pericyte, endothelial cell and smooth muscle) and peripheral nerve (Schwann cells and perineurium) cell lineages that was revealed by transplantation to non-muscle tissue (beneath renal capsule) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis.

  20. Roles of adherent myogenic cells and dynamic culture in engineered muscle function and maintenance of satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mark; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-11-01

    Highly functional engineered skeletal muscle constructs could serve as physiological models of muscle function and regeneration and have utility in therapeutic replacement of damaged or diseased muscle tissue. In this study, we examined the roles of different myogenic cell fractions and culturing conditions in the generation of highly functional engineered muscle. Fibrin-based muscle bundles were fabricated using either freshly-isolated myogenic cells or their adherent fraction pre-cultured for 36 h. Muscle bundles made of these cells were cultured in both static and dynamic conditions and systematically characterized with respect to early myogenic events and contractile function. Following 2 weeks of culture, we observed both individual and synergistic benefits of using the adherent cell fraction and dynamic culture on muscle formation and function. In particular, optimal culture conditions resulted in significant increase in the total cross-sectional muscle area (- 3-fold), myofiber size (- 1.6-fold), myonuclei density (- 1.2-fold), and force generation (- 9-fold) compared to traditional use of freshly-isolated cells and static culture. Curiously, we observed that only a simultaneous use of the adherent cell fraction and dynamic culture resulted in accelerated formation of differentiated myofibers which were critical for providing a niche-like environment for maintenance of a satellite cell pool early during culture. Our study identifies key parameters for engineering large-size, highly functional skeletal muscle tissues with improved ability for retention of functional satellite cells.

  1. Vascular smooth muscle cell response on thin films of collagen.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John T; Woodward, John T; Langenbach, Kurt J; Tona, Alex; Jones, Peter L; Plant, Anne L

    2005-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) cultured on gels of fibrillar type I collagen or denatured collagen (gelatin) comprise a model system that has been widely used for studying the role of the extracellular matrix in vascular diseases such as hypertension, restenosis and athrosclerosis. Despite the wide use of this model system, there are several disadvantages to using collagen gels for cellular studies. These include poor optical characteristics for microscopy, difficulty in verifying that the properties of the preparations are identical from experiment to experiment, heterogeneity within the gels, and difficulty in handling the gels because they are fragile. Previously, we developed an alternative collagen matrix by forming thin films of native fibrillar collagen or denatured collagen on self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols [Elliott, J.T., Tona, A., Woodward, J., Jones,P., Plant, A., 2003a. Thin films of collagen affect smooth muscle cell morphology. Langmuir 19, 1506-1514.]. These substrates are robust and can be characterized by surface analytical techniques that allow both verification of the reproducibility of the preparation and high-resolution analysis of collagen structure. In addition, they have excellent optical properties that allow more details of the cell-matrix interactions to be observed by microscopy. In this study, we performed a side-by-side structural and functional comparison of collagen gels with thin films of collagen. Our results indicate that vSMC on thin films of collagen are nearly identical to vSMC on thick gels as determined by morphology, proliferation rate, integrin ligation, tenascin-C expression and intracellular signaling events. These results suggest that the features of collagen gels that direct the observed vSMC responses are adequately reconstituted in the thin films of collagen. These thin films will be useful for elucidating the features of the collagen matrix that regulate vSMC response and may be applicable to high

  2. Pericytes: multitasking cells in the regeneration of injured, diseased, and aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes' influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting.

  3. Original Research: Combined model of bladder detrusor smooth muscle and interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Josef; Byrtus, Miroslav; Stengl, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Although patients with lower urinary tract symptoms constitute a large and still growing population, understanding of bladder detrusor muscle physiology remains limited. Understanding the interactions between the detrusor smooth muscle cells and other bladder cell types (e.g. interstitial cells, IC) that may significantly contribute to coordinating and modulating detrusor contractions represents a considerable challenge. Computer modeling could help to elucidate some properties that are difficult to address experimentally; therefore, we developed in silico models of detrusor smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells, coupled through gap junctions. The models include all of the major ion conductances and transporters described in smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells in the literature. The model of normal detrusor muscle (smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells coupled through gap junctions) completely reproduced the experimental results obtained with detrusor strips in the presence of several pharmacological interventions (ryanodine, caffeine, nimodipine), whereas the model of smooth muscle cell alone (without interstitial cells) failed to reproduce the experimental results. Next, a model of overactive bladder, a highly prevalent clinical condition in both men and women with increasing incidence at older ages, was produced by modifying several processes as reported previously: a reduction of Ca(2+)-release through ryanodine receptors and a reduction of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-conductance with augmented gap junctional coupling. This model was also able to reproduce the pharmacological modulation of overactive bladder. In conclusion, a model of bladder detrusor muscle was developed that reproduced experimental results obtained in both normal and overactive bladder preparations. The results indicate that the non-smooth muscle cells of the detrusor (interstitial cells) contribute significantly to the contractile behavior of bladder detrusor muscle and should not be

  4. Fate of 3H-thymidine labelled myogenic cells in regeneration of muscle isografts.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, E; Mares, V; Stichová, J

    1976-03-05

    Intact and denervated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of 20-day-old inbred Lewis-Wistar rats were labelled with 3H-thymidine. Ninety minutes after the injection of the isotope 4.0% of the nuclei were labelled in the intact (i.e. innervated) and 9.6% in the muscles, denervated 3 days before administration of the isotope. The labelled EDL muscles were grafted into the bed of the previously removed EDL muscles of inbred animals and these isografts were studied 30 days later. In the EDL muscles, regenerated from innervated isografts only occasionally labelled endothelial cells were found whereas in the muscles regenerated from denervated isografts also parenchymal muscle nuclei were regularly labelled. The incidence of labelled nuclei in the regenerated EDL muscles was, however, about 20 times lower than in the donor EDL muscles. The presen experiments provide a direct proof of utilization of donor satelite cell nuclei for regeneration in grafted muscle tissue. With respect to the low incidence of labelled nuclei in regenerated EDL muscles, other sources of cells apparently also contribute to the regeneration process.

  5. Ciliary contact interactions dominate surface scattering of swimming eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jörn; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between swimming cells and surfaces are essential to many microbiological processes, from bacterial biofilm formation to human fertilization. However, despite their fundamental importance, relatively little is known about the physical mechanisms that govern the scattering of flagellated or ciliated cells from solid surfaces. A more detailed understanding of these interactions promises not only new biological insights into structure and dynamics of flagella and cilia but may also lead to new microfluidic techniques for controlling cell motility and microbial locomotion, with potential applications ranging from diagnostic tools to therapeutic protein synthesis and photosynthetic biofuel production. Due to fundamental differences in physiology and swimming strategies, it is an open question of whether microfluidic transport and rectification schemes that have recently been demonstrated for pusher-type microswimmers such as bacteria and sperm cells, can be transferred to puller-type algae and other motile eukaryotes, because it is not known whether long-range hydrodynamic or short-range mechanical forces dominate the surface interactions of these microorganisms. Here, using high-speed microscopic imaging, we present direct experimental evidence that the surface scattering of both mammalian sperm cells and unicellular green algae is primarily governed by direct ciliary contact interactions. Building on this insight, we predict and experimentally verify the existence of optimal microfluidic ratchets that maximize rectification of initially uniform Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suspensions. Because mechano-elastic properties of cilia are conserved across eukaryotic species, we expect that our results apply to a wide range of swimming microorganisms. PMID:23297240

  6. A home away from home: challenges and opportunities in engineering in vitro muscle satellite cell niches

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; Sacco, Alessandra; Gilbert, Penney M.; Blau, Helen M.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite cells are skeletal muscle stem cells with a principal role in postnatal skeletal muscle regeneration. Satellite cells, like many tissue-specific adult stem cells, reside in a quiescent state in an instructive, anatomically defined niche. The satellite cell niche constitutes a distinct membrane-enclosed compartment within the muscle fiber, containing a diversity of biochemical and biophysical signals that influence satellite cell function. A major limitation to the study and clinical utility of satellite cells is that upon removal from the muscle fiber and plating in traditional plastic tissue culture platforms, their muscle stem cell properties are rapidly lost. Clearly, the maintenance of stem cell function is critically dependent on in vivo niche signals, highlighting the need to create novel in vitro microenvironments that allow for the maintenance and propagation of satellite cells while retaining their potential to function as muscle stem cells. Here, we discuss how emerging biomaterials technologies offer great promise for engineering in vitro microenvironments to meet these challenges. In engineered biomaterials, signaling molecules can be presented in a manner that more closely mimics cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and matrices can be fabricated with diverse rigidities that approximate in vivo tissues. The development of in vitro microenvironments in which niche features can be systematically modulated will be instrumental not only to future insights into muscle stem cell biology and therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases and muscle wasting with aging, but also will provide a paradigm for the analysis of numerous adult tissue-specific stem cells. PMID:19751902

  7. Adipokines promote lipotoxicity in human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taube, Annika; Lambernd, Silja; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild; Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Juergen

    2012-07-01

    Studies have shown the implication of specific adipokines or fatty acids (FA) in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, the interplay of adipokines with FA remains poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the combined effects of adipokines and low concentrations of palmitic acid (PA, 100 µmol/l) on skeletal muscle metabolism. Human skeletal muscle cells were incubated with adipocyte-conditioned medium (CM), PA or PA+CM, and FA transporter and FA metabolism were analysed. CM-incubation increased CD36 level (1.8 fold) and PA-uptake (1.4 fold). However, only co-application of PA+CM resulted in profound lipid accumulation (5.3 fold), 60% reduction of PA-oxidation and 3.5 fold increased diacylglycerol content. Our results support a novel role for adipokines in the pathogenesis of T2D by increasing the lipotoxic potential of PA, notably of low concentrations. This implies an increased lipotoxic risk already at an early stage of weight gain, when lipolysis has not yet contributed to increased plasma free FA levels.

  8. MicroRNAs dynamically remodel gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanjae; Yan, Wei; Ward, Sean M; Hwang, Sung Jin; Wu, Qiuxia; Hatton, William J; Park, Jong Kun; Sanders, Kenton M; Ro, Seungil

    2011-04-14

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) express a unique set of microRNAs (miRNAs) which regulate and maintain the differentiation state of SMCs. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs during the development of gastrointestinal (GI) SMCs in a transgenic animal model. We generated SMC-specific Dicer null animals that express the reporter, green fluorescence protein, in a SMC-specific manner. SMC-specific knockout of Dicer prevented SMC miRNA biogenesis, causing dramatic changes in phenotype, function, and global gene expression in SMCs: the mutant mice developed severe dilation of the intestinal tract associated with the thinning and destruction of the smooth muscle (SM) layers; contractile motility in the mutant intestine was dramatically decreased; and SM contractile genes and transcriptional regulators were extensively down-regulated in the mutant SMCs. Profiling and bioinformatic analyses showed that SMC phenotype is regulated by a complex network of positive and negative feedback by SMC miRNAs, serum response factor (SRF), and other transcriptional factors. Taken together, our data suggest that SMC miRNAs are required for the development and survival of SMCs in the GI tract.

  9. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  10. Decorin binds myostatin and modulates its activity to muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Takayuki; Kishioka, Yasuhiro; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito; Hennebry, Alex; Berry, Carole J.; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi; Nishimura, Takanori . E-mail: nishi@anim.agr.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-02-10

    Myostatin, a member of TGF-{beta} superfamily of growth factors, acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. The mechanism whereby myostatin controls the proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells is mostly clarified. However, the regulation of myostatin activity to myogenic cells after its secretion in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is still unknown. Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan, binds TGF-{beta} and regulates its activity in the ECM. Thus, we hypothesized that decorin could also bind to myostatin and participate in modulation of its activity to myogenic cells. In order to test the hypothesis, we investigated the interaction between myostatin and decorin by surface plasmon assay. Decorin interacted with mature myostatin in the presence of concentrations of Zn{sup 2+} greater than 10 {mu}M, but not in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. Kinetic analysis with a 1:1 binding model resulted in dissociation constants (K {sub D}) of 2.02 x 10{sup -8} M and 9.36 x 10{sup -9} M for decorin and the core protein of decorin, respectively. Removal of the glycosaminoglycan chain by chondroitinase ABC digestion did not affect binding, suggesting that decorin could bind to myostatin with its core protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that immobilized decorin could rescue the inhibitory effect of myostatin on myoblast proliferation in vitro. These results suggest that decorin could trap myostatin and modulate its activity to myogenic cells in the ECM.

  11. Development, Composition, and Structural Arrangements of the Ciliary Zonule of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Tu, Yidong; De Maria, Alicia; Mecham, Robert P.; Bassnett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Here, we examined the development, composition, and structural organization of the ciliary zonule of the mouse. Fibrillin 1, a large glycoprotein enriched in force-bearing tissues, is a prominent constituent of the mouse zonule. In humans, mutations in the gene for fibrillin 1 (FBN1) underlie Marfan syndrome (MS), a disorder characterized by lens dislocation and other ocular symptoms. Methods. Fibrillin expression was analyzed by in situ hybridization. The organization of the zonule was visualized using antibodies to Fbn1, Fbn2, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (Magp1) in conjunction with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU), an S-phase marker. Results. Microfibrils, enriched in Fbn2 and Magp1, were prominent components of the temporary vascular tunic of the embryonic lens. Fbn2 expression by nonpigmented ciliary epithelial cells diminished postnatally and there was a concomitant increase in Fbn1 expression, especially in cells located in valleys between the ciliary folds. Zonular fibers projected from the posterior pars plicata to the lens in anterior, equatorial, and posterior groupings. The attachment point of the posterior zonular fibers consisted of a dense meshwork of radially oriented microfibrils that we termed the fibrillar girdle. The fibrillar girdle was located directly above the transition zone, a region of the lens epithelium in which cells commit to terminal differentiation. Conclusions. The development and arrangement of the murine ciliary zonule are similar to those of humans, and consequently the mouse eye may be a useful model in which to study ocular complications of MS. PMID:23493297

  12. Discovery and functional evaluation of ciliary proteins in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Gaertig, Jacek; Wloga, Dorota; Vasudevan, Krishna Kumar; Guha, Mayukh; Dentler, William

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is an excellent model system for the discovery and functional studies of ciliary proteins. The power of the model is based on the ease with which cilia can be purified in large quantities for fractionation and proteomic identification, and the ability to knock out any gene by homologous DNA recombination. Here, we include methods used by our laboratories for isolation and fractionation of cilia, in vivo tagging and localization of ciliary proteins and the evaluation of ciliary mutants. PMID:23522474

  13. Requirement of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion for skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Qingnian; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-02-10

    Fusion of skeletal muscle stem/progenitor cells is required for proper development and regeneration, however the significance of this process during adult muscle hypertrophy has not been explored. In response to muscle overload after synergist ablation in mice, we show that myomaker, a muscle specific membrane protein essential for myoblast fusion, is activated mainly in muscle progenitors and not myofibers. We rendered muscle progenitors fusion-incompetent through genetic deletion of myomaker in muscle stem cells and observed a complete reduction of overload-induced hypertrophy. This blunted hypertrophic response was associated with a reduction in Akt and p70s6k signaling and protein synthesis, suggesting a link between myonuclear accretion and activation of pro-hypertrophic pathways. Furthermore, fusion-incompetent muscle exhibited increased fibrosis after muscle overload, indicating a protective role for normal stem cell activity in reducing myofiber strain associated with hypertrophy. These findings reveal an essential contribution of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion during physiological adult muscle hypertrophy.

  14. Requirement of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion for skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Qingnian; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-01-01

    Fusion of skeletal muscle stem/progenitor cells is required for proper development and regeneration, however the significance of this process during adult muscle hypertrophy has not been explored. In response to muscle overload after synergist ablation in mice, we show that myomaker, a muscle specific membrane protein essential for myoblast fusion, is activated mainly in muscle progenitors and not myofibers. We rendered muscle progenitors fusion-incompetent through genetic deletion of myomaker in muscle stem cells and observed a complete reduction of overload-induced hypertrophy. This blunted hypertrophic response was associated with a reduction in Akt and p70s6k signaling and protein synthesis, suggesting a link between myonuclear accretion and activation of pro-hypertrophic pathways. Furthermore, fusion-incompetent muscle exhibited increased fibrosis after muscle overload, indicating a protective role for normal stem cell activity in reducing myofiber strain associated with hypertrophy. These findings reveal an essential contribution of myomaker-mediated stem cell fusion during physiological adult muscle hypertrophy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20007.001 PMID:28186492

  15. Satellite cell proliferation is reduced in muscles of obese Zucker rats but restored with loading.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jonathan M; Bryner, Randall W; Alway, Stephen E

    2008-08-01

    The obese Zucker rat (OZR) is a model of metabolic syndrome, which has lower skeletal muscle size than the lean Zucker rat (LZR). Because satellite cells are essential for postnatal muscle growth, this study was designed to determine whether reduced satellite cell proliferation contributes to reduced skeletal mass in OZR vs. LZR. Satellite cell proliferation was determined by a constant-release 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) pellet that was placed subcutaneously in each animal. Satellite cell proliferation, as determined by BrdU incorporation, was significantly attenuated in control soleus and plantaris muscles of the OZR compared with that shown in the LZR. To determine whether this attenuation of satellite cell activity could be rescued in OZR muscles, soleus and gastrocnemius muscles were denervated, placing a compensatory load on the plantaris muscle. In the LZR and the OZR after 21 days of loading, increases of approximately 25% and approximately 30%, respectively, were shown in plantaris muscle wet weight compared with that shown in the contralateral control muscle. The number of BrdU-positive nuclei increased similarly in loaded plantaris muscles from LZR and OZR. Myogenin, MyoD, and Akt protein expressions were lower in control muscles of OZR than in those of the LZR, but they were all elevated to similar levels in the loaded plantaris muscles of OZR and LZR. These data indicate that metabolic syndrome may reduce satellite cell proliferation, and this may be a factor that contributes to the reduced mass in control muscles of OZR; however, satellite cell proliferation can be restored with compensatory loading in OZR.

  16. Electrical stimulation by enzymatic biofuel cell to promote proliferation, migration and differentiation of muscle precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Ho; Jeon, Won-Yong; Kim, Hyug-Han; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is a very important biophysical cue for skeletal muscle maintenance and myotube formation. The absence of electrical signals from motor neurons causes denervated muscles to atrophy. Herein, we investigate for the first time the utility of an enzymatic biofuel cell (EBFC) as a promising means for mimicking native electrical stimulation. EBFC was set up using two different enzymes: one was glucose oxidase (GOX) used for the generation of anodic current followed by the oxidation of glucose; the other was Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) for the generation of cathodic current followed by the reduction of oxygen. We studied the behaviors of muscle precursor cells (MPCs) in terms of proliferation, migration and differentiation under different electrical conditions. The EBFC electrical stimulations significantly increased cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, the electrical stimulations promoted the differentiation of cells into myotube formation based on expressions at the gene and protein levels. The EBFC set up, with its free forms adjustable to any implant design, was subsequently applied to the nanofiber scaffolding system. The MPCs were demonstrated to be stimulated in a similar manner as the 2D culture conditions, suggesting potential applications of the EBFC system for muscle repair and regeneration.

  17. Primary ciliary dyskinesia and associated sensory ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease of motile cilia, which belongs to a group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of cilia, collectively known as ciliopathies. Insights into the genetics and phenotypes of PCD have grown over the last decade, in part propagated by the discovery of a number of novel cilia-related genes. These genes encode proteins that segregate into structural axonemal, regulatory, as well as cytoplasmic assembly proteins. Our understanding of primary (sensory) cilia has also expanded, and an ever-growing list of diverse conditions has been linked to defective function and signaling of the sensory cilium. Recent multicenter clinical and genetic studies have uncovered the heterogeneity of motile and sensory ciliopathies, and in some cases, the overlap between these conditions. In this review, we will describe the genetics and pathophysiology of ciliopathies in children, focusing on PCD, review emerging genotype-phenotype relationships, and diagnostic tools available for the clinician. PMID:26967669

  18. Diagnosis and management of primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jane S; Burgess, Andrea; Mitchison, Hannah M; Moya, Eduardo; Williamson, Michael; Hogg, Claire

    2014-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited autosomal-recessive disorder of motile cilia characterised by chronic lung disease, rhinosinusitis, hearing impairment and subfertility. Nasal symptoms and respiratory distress usually start soon after birth, and by adulthood bronchiectasis is invariable. Organ laterality defects, usually situs inversus, occur in ∼50% of cases. The estimated prevalence of PCD is up to ∼1 per 10,000 births, but it is more common in populations where consanguinity is common. This review examines who to refer for diagnostic testing. It describes the limitations surrounding diagnosis using currently available techniques and considers whether recent advances to genotype patients with PCD will lead to genetic testing and screening to aid diagnosis in the near future. It discusses the challenges of monitoring and treating respiratory and ENT disease in children with PCD.

  19. Injection of duck recombinant follistatin fusion protein into duck muscle tissues stimulates satellite cell proliferation and muscle fiber hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Liu, He-he; Wang, Ji-wen; Yu, Hai-yue; Zhang, Rong-ping; Chen, Xi; Jin, Hai-bo; Dai, Fei; Li, Liang; Xu, Feng

    2012-06-01

    Follistatin (FST) can inhibit the expression of myostatin, which is a predominant inhibitor of muscle development. The potential application of myostatin-based technology has been prompted in different ways in agriculture. We previously constructed an expression vector of duck FST and isolated the FST fusion protein. After the protein was purified and refolded, it was added to the medium of duck myoblasts cultured in vitro. The results show that the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide value of the myoblasts in the duck FST treatment group is higher than that in the control group, which indicates that the duck FST fusion protein exhibits the biological activities that can accelerate myoblast proliferation. To further investigate the roles of duck FST on muscle development, we injected the protein into the duck muscle tissues in vivo. The results show that both the duck muscle fiber cross-sectional area and the satellite cell activation frequency are influenced more in the FST treatment group than they are in the control group. In addition to these phenomena, expression of MyoD and Myf5 were increased, and the expression of myostatin was decreased. Together, these results suggest the potential for using duck FST fusion protein to inhibit myostatin activity and subsequently to enhance muscle growth in vivo. The mechanism by which FST regulates muscle development in the duck is similar to that in mammals and fishes.

  20. Isolation and Quantitative Immunocytochemical Characterization of Primary Myogenic Cells and Fibroblasts from Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Agley, Chibeza C.; Rowlerson, Anthea M.; Velloso, Cristiana P.; Lazarus, Norman L.; Harridge, Stephen D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The repair and regeneration of skeletal muscle requires the action of satellite cells, which are the resident muscle stem cells. These can be isolated from human muscle biopsy samples using enzymatic digestion and their myogenic properties studied in culture. Quantitatively, the two main adherent cell types obtained from enzymatic digestion are: (i) the satellite cells (termed myogenic cells or muscle precursor cells), identified initially as CD56+ and later as CD56+/desmin+ cells and (ii) muscle-derived fibroblasts, identified as CD56– and TE-7+. Fibroblasts proliferate very efficiently in culture and in mixed cell populations these cells may overrun myogenic cells to dominate the culture. The isolation and purification of different cell types from human muscle is thus an important methodological consideration when trying to investigate the innate behavior of either cell type in culture. Here we describe a system of sorting based on the gentle enzymatic digestion of cells using collagenase and dispase followed by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) which gives both a high purity (>95% myogenic cells) and good yield (~2.8 x 106 ± 8.87 x 105 cells/g tissue after 7 days in vitro) for experiments in culture. This approach is based on incubating the mixed muscle-derived cell population with magnetic microbeads beads conjugated to an antibody against CD56 and then passing cells though a magnetic field. CD56+ cells bound to microbeads are retained by the field whereas CD56– cells pass unimpeded through the column. Cell suspensions from any stage of the sorting process can be plated and cultured. Following a given intervention, cell morphology, and the expression and localization of proteins including nuclear transcription factors can be quantified using immunofluorescent labeling with specific antibodies and an image processing and analysis package. PMID:25650991

  1. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M.

    2017-01-01

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the “slow” and “fast” fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist. PMID:28071729

  2. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M

    2017-01-10

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the "slow" and "fast" fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist.

  3. Making Skeletal Muscle from Progenitor and Stem Cells: Development versus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lydia; Rozo, Michelle E.; Lepper, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    For locomotion, vertebrate animals use the force generated by contractile skeletal muscles. These muscles form an actin/myosin-based bio-machinery that is attached to skeletal elements to effect body movement and maintain posture. The mechanics, physiology, and homeostasis of skeletal muscles in normal and disease states are of significant clinical interest. How muscles originate from progenitors during embryogenesis has attracted considerable attention from developmental biologists. How skeletal muscles regenerate and repair themselves after injury by the use of stem cells is an important process to maintain muscle homeostasis throughout lifetime. In recent years, much progress has been made towards uncovering the origins of myogenic progenitors and stem cells as well as the regulation of these cells during development and regeneration. PMID:22737183

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Satellite Cells from Rat Head Branchiomeric Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis and defective muscle regeneration can hamper the functional recovery of the soft palate muscles after cleft palate repair. This causes persistent problems in speech, swallowing, and sucking. In vitro culture systems that allow the study of satellite cells (myogenic stem cells) from head muscles are crucial to develop new therapies based on tissue engineering to promote muscle regeneration after surgery. These systems will offer new perspectives for the treatment of cleft palate patients. A protocol for the isolation, culture and differentiation of satellite cells from head muscles is presented. The isolation is based on enzymatic digestion and trituration to release the satellite cells. In addition, this protocol comprises an innovative method using extracellular matrix gel coatings of millimeter size, which requires only low numbers of satellite cells for differentiation assays. PMID:26274878

  5. [Research progress of induced pluripotent stem cells in treatment of muscle atrophy].

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhongkai; Yang, Chensong; Sun, Guixin

    2016-03-01

    Muscle atrophy caused by nerve injury is a common and difficult clinical problem. The development of stem cell researches has opened up a new way for the treatment of nerve injury-induced muscle atrophy. The induced pluripotent stem cells(iPSCs)can differentiate into various types of cells and have more advantages than embryonic stem cells (ESCs). After being transplanted into the damaged area, iPSCs are guided by neurogenic signals to the lesion sites, to repair the damaged nerve, promote generation of axon myelination, rebuild neural circuits and restore physiological function. Meanwhile, iPSCs can also differentiate into muscle cells and promote muscle tissue regeneration. Therefore, it would be possible to attenuate muscle atrophy caused by nerve injury with iPSCs treatment.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Satellite Cells from Rat Head Branchiomeric Muscles.

    PubMed

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2015-07-20

    Fibrosis and defective muscle regeneration can hamper the functional recovery of the soft palate muscles after cleft palate repair. This causes persistent problems in speech, swallowing, and sucking. In vitro culture systems that allow the study of satellite cells (myogenic stem cells) from head muscles are crucial to develop new therapies based on tissue engineering to promote muscle regeneration after surgery. These systems will offer new perspectives for the treatment of cleft palate patients. A protocol for the isolation, culture and differentiation of satellite cells from head muscles is presented. The isolation is based on enzymatic digestion and trituration to release the satellite cells. In addition, this protocol comprises an innovative method using extracellular matrix gel coatings of millimeter size, which requires only low numbers of satellite cells for differentiation assays.

  7. Salamander limb regeneration involves the activation of a multipotent skeletal muscle satellite cell population.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jamie I; Lööf, Sara; He, Pingping; Simon, András

    2006-01-30

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders can regenerate complex structures after injury, including entire limbs. A central question is whether the generation of progenitor cells during limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair occur via separate or overlapping mechanisms. Limb regeneration depends on the formation of a blastema, from which the new appendage develops. Dedifferentiation of stump tissues, such as skeletal muscle, precedes blastema formation, but it was not known whether dedifferentiation involves stem cell activation. We describe a multipotent Pax7+ satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation involves satellite cell activation and that these cells can contribute to new limb tissues. Activation of salamander satellite cells occurs in an analogous manner to how the mammalian myofiber mobilizes stem cells during skeletal muscle tissue repair. Thus, limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair share common cellular and molecular programs. Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation.

  8. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Paoli, Frank de; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-10-15

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type-specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P < 0.01) and exhibited a group difference from Ecc (P < 0.05), which did not increase. Myonuclei content in type I fibers increased in all groups (P < 0.01), while a specific accretion of myonuclei in type II fibers was observed in the Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and Placebo-Ecc (P < 0.01) groups. Similarly, whereas type I fiber CSA increased independently of intervention (P < 0.001), type II fiber CSA increased exclusively with Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and type II fiber hypertrophy correlated with whole muscle hypertrophy exclusively following Conc training (P < 0.01). In conclusion, isolated concentric knee extensor resistance training appears to constitute a stronger driver of SC content than eccentric resistance training while type II fiber hypertrophy was accentuated when combining concentric resistance training with whey protein supplementation.

  9. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O2) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O2) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

  10. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  11. In vivo myogenic potential of human CD133+ muscle-derived stem cells: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Elisa; Riederer, Ingo; Chaouch, Soraya; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Di Santo, James; Torrente, Yvan; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Mouly, Vincent

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, numerous reports have identified in mouse different sources of myogenic cells distinct from satellite cells that exhibited a variable myogenic potential in vivo. Myogenic stem cells have also been described in humans, although their regenerative potential has rarely been quantified. In this study, we have investigated the myogenic potential of human muscle-derived cells based on the expression of the stem cell marker CD133 as compared to bona fide satellite cells already used in clinical trials. The efficiency of these cells to participate in muscle regeneration and contribute to the renewal of the satellite cell pool, when injected intramuscularly, has been evaluated in the Rag2(-/-) gammaC(-/-) C5(-/-) mouse in which muscle degeneration is induced by cryoinjury. We demonstrate that human muscle-derived CD133+ cells showed a much greater regenerative capacity when compared to human myoblasts. The number of fibers expressing human proteins and the number of human cells in a satellite cell position are all dramatically increased when compared to those observed after injection of human myoblasts. In addition, CD133+/CD34+ cells exhibited a better dispersion in the host muscle when compared to human myoblasts. We propose that muscle-derived CD133+ cells could be an attractive candidate for cellular therapy.

  12. Early posthatch starvation decreases satellite cell proliferation and skeletal muscle growth in chicks.

    PubMed

    Halevy, O; Geyra, A; Barak, M; Uni, Z; Sklan, D

    2000-04-01

    The effect of posthatch starvation on skeletal muscle growth and satellite cell proliferation was examined in chicks. Chicks were either fed or starved for 48 h posthatch (d 0-d 2, d 2-d 4 or d 4-d 6) and then refed for 41 d. Body and breast muscle weights were significantly lower in starved chicks than in fed controls throughout the experiment. Histochemical staining revealed that skeletal muscle fiber development in the starved group lagged behind that of the fed group. Starvation from d 2 to 4 and d 4 to 6 posthatch had a progressively lesser effect than did immediate posthatch starvation (P < 0.05). In vitro culturing of breast muscle satellite cells revealed that DNA synthesis and number of cells per gram of muscle in the fed chicks peaked on d 2 and d 3, and then declined. In contrast, DNA synthesis in the cells of starved chicks declined on d 2 and increased on d 3 when chicks were refed. A similar pattern was seen for the number of cells per gram muscle; however, in general cell numbers tended to be higher in the starved group than in controls (P < 0.1). The results obtained with cultured cells were parallel with in situ immunostaining with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in breast muscle from experimental chicks, and with growth hormone receptor expression. These results suggest that satellite cell cultures are a reliable tool for evaluating muscle growth in postnatal chickens. We conclude that sufficient feed in the immediate postnatal period is critical for satellite cell proliferation and skeletal muscle development and is thus important for optimal muscle growth.

  13. Magnetic targeting of human peripheral blood CD133+ cells for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Shingo; Kamei, Naosuke; Kamei, Goki; Shi, Ming; Adachi, Nobuo; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2013-08-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries often leave lasting functional damage or pain. Muscle injuries are routinely treated conservatively, but the most effective treatment to promote the repair of injured muscles has not yet been established. Our previous report demonstrated that human peripheral blood-derived CD133(+) cell transplantation to rat skeletal muscle injury models inhibited fibrosis and enhanced myogenesis after injury. However, the acquisition of a sufficient number of cells remains the limitation for clinical application, as the CD133(+) population is rare in human blood. In this study, we applied a magnetic cell targeting system to accumulate transplanted cells in the muscle injury site and to enhance the regenerative effects of CD133(+) cell transplantation, focusing on the fact that CD133(+) cells are labeled with a magnetic bead for isolation. For the magnetic cell targeting, the magnet field generator was set up to adjust the peak of the magnetic gradient to the injury site of the tibialis anterior muscle, and 1×10(4) human peripheral blood CD133(+) cells were locally injected into the injury site. This cell number is 10% of that used in the previous study. In another group, the same number of CD133(+) cells was injected without magnetic force. The CD133(+) cells transplanted with the magnetic force were more accumulated in the muscle injury site compared with the CD133(+) cells transplanted without the magnetic force. In addition, the transplantation of CD133(+) cells under the magnetic control inhibited fibrous scar formation and promoted angiogenesis and myogenesis, and also upregulated the mRNA expression of myogenic transcription factors, including Pax7, MyoD1 and Myogenin. However, the transplantation of CD133(+) cells without the magnetic force failed to demonstrate these effects. Thus, our magnetic cell targeting system enables transplantation of a limited number of CD133(+) cells to promote the repair of skeletal muscle injury.

  14. Components of Torpedo electric organ and muscle that cause aggregation of acetylcholine receptors on cultured muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The synaptic portion of a muscle fiber's basal lamina sheath has molecules tightly bound to it that cause aggregation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on regenerating myofibers. Since basal lamina and other extracellular matrix constituents are insoluble in isotonic saline and detergent solutions, insoluble detergent-extracted fractions of tissues receiving cholinergic input may provide an enriched source of the AChR-aggregating molecules for detailed characterization. Here we demonstrate that such an insoluble fraction from Torpedo electric organ, a tissue with a high concentration of cholinergic synapses, causes AChRs on cultured chick muscle cells to aggregate. We have partially characterized the insoluble fraction, examined the response of muscle cells to it, and devised ways of extracting the active components with a view toward purifying them and learning whether they are similar to those in the basal lamina at the neuromuscular junction. The insoluble fraction from the electric organ was rich in extracellular matrix constituents; it contained structures resembling basal lamina sheaths and had a high density of collagen fibrils. It caused a 3- to 20-fold increase in the number of AChR clusters on cultured myotubes without significantly affecting the number or size of the myotubes. The increase was first seen 2-4 h after the fraction was added to cultures and it was maximal by 24 h. The AChR-aggregating effect was dose dependent and was due, at least in part, to lateral migration of AChRs present in the muscle cell plasma membrane at the time the fraction was applied. Activity was destroyed by heat and by trypsin. The active component(s) was extracted from the insoluble fraction with high ionic strength or pH 5.5 buffers. The extracts increased the number of AChR clusters on cultured myotubes without affecting the number or degradation rate of surface AChRs. Antiserum against the solubilized material blocked its effect on AChR distribution and bound to the

  15. Comparison and analysis of Wuding and avian chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, H Q; Jiang, Z Q; Dou, T F; Li, Q H; Xu, Z Q; Liu, L X; Gu, D H; Rong, H; Huang, Y; Chen, X B; Jois, M; Te Pas, M F W; Ge, C R; Jia, J J

    2016-10-05

    Chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells are located between the basement membrane and the sarcolemma of mature muscle fibers. Avian broilers have been genetically selected based on their high growth velocity and large muscle mass. The Wuding chicken is a famous local chicken in Yunnan Province that undergoes non-selection breeding and is slow growing. In this study, we aimed to explore differences in the proliferation and differentiation properties of satellite cells isolated from the two chicken breeds. Using immunofluorescence, hematoxylin-eosin staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, we analyzed the in vitro characteristics of proliferating and differentiating satellite cells isolated from the two chicken breeds. The growth curve of satellite cells was S-shaped, and cells from Wuding chickens entered the logarithmic phase and plateau phase 1 day later than those from Avian chicken. The results also showed that the two skeletal muscle satellite cell lines were positive for Pax7, MyoD and IGF-1. The expression of Pax7 followed a downward trend, whereas that of MyoD and IGF-1 first increased and subsequently decreased in cells isolated from the two chickens. These data indicated that the skeletal muscle satellite cells of Avian chicken grow and differentiate faster than did those of Wuding chickens. We suggest that the methods of breeding selection applied to these breeds regulate the characteristics of skeletal muscle satellite cells to influence muscle growth.

  16. Synergist Ablation as a Rodent Model to Study Satellite Cell Dynamics in Adult Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Tyler J; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A; Fry, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    In adult skeletal muscles, satellite cells are the primary myogenic stem cells involved in myogenesis. Normally, they remain in a quiescent state until activated by a stimulus, after which they proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into an existing myofiber or form a de novo myofiber. To study satellite cell dynamics in adult murine models, most studies utilize regeneration models in which the muscle is severely damaged and requires the participation from satellite cells in order to repair. Here, we describe a model to study satellite cell behavior in muscle hypertrophy that is independent of muscle regeneration.Synergist ablation surgery involves the surgical removal of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles resulting in functional overload of the remaining plantaris muscle. This functional overload results in myofiber hypertrophy, as well as the activation, proliferation, and fusion of satellite cells into the myofibers. Within 2 weeks of functional overload, satellite cell content increases approximately 275 %, an increase that is accompanied with a ~60 % increase in the number of myonuclei. Therefore, this can be used as an alternative model to study satellite cell behavior in adulthood that is different from regeneration, and capable of revealing new satellite cell functions in regulating muscle adaptation.

  17. Calcium-dependent deceleration of the cell cycle in muscle cells by simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Benavides Damm, Tatiana; Richard, Stéphane; Tanner, Samuel; Wyss, Fabienne; Egli, Marcel; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo

    2013-05-01

    Of all our mechanosensitive tissues, skeletal muscle is the most developmentally responsive to physical activity. Conversely, restricted mobility due to injury or disease results in muscle atrophy. Gravitational force is another form of mechanical input with profound developmental consequences. The mechanical unloading resulting from the reduced gravitational force experienced during spaceflight results in oxidative muscle loss. We examined the early stages of myogenesis under conditions of simulated microgravity (SM). C2C12 mouse myoblasts in SM proliferated more slowly (2.23× less) as a result of their being retained longer within the G2/M phase of the cell cycle (2.10× more) relative to control myoblasts at terrestrial gravity. Blocking calcium entry via TRP channels with SKF-96365 (10-20 μM) accumulated myoblasts within the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and retarded their proliferation. On the genetic level, SM resulted in the reduced expression of TRPC1 and IGF-1 isoforms, transcriptional events regulated by calcium downstream of mechanical input. A decrease in TRPC1-mediated calcium entry thus appears to be a pivotal event in the muscle atrophy brought on by gravitational mechanical unloading. Hence, relieving the constant force of gravity on cells might prove one valid experimental approach to expose the underlying mechanisms modulating mechanically regulated developmental programs.

  18. Regulation of protein phosphorylation of the intermediate-sized filament vimentin in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye

    SciTech Connect

    Coca-Prados, M.

    1985-08-25

    The intermediate-sized filaments of vimentin-type (Mr = 57,000) have been identified biochemically and immunochemically as a major cytoskeleton component in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye. When human or rabbit ciliary processes, or cultured ciliary epithelial-derived cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing (TSP)orthophosphate and any of the following agents: 1) beta-adrenergic agonists (isoproterenol or epinephrine), 2) direct activators of adenylate cyclase (cholera toxin or forskolin), 3) analogs of cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP), or 4) prostaglandin E1, the phosphorylation of vimentin was significantly enhanced. The maximal enhancement ranged, in vivo and in vitro, from about 3-fold in human to 5-fold in rabbit, with either 1 mM 8-Br-cAMP or 0.1 microM forskolin. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-vimentin, allowed the localization of vimentin filaments in cultured ciliary epithelial cells. Treatment of these cells in culture with the catecholamine hormone, isoproterenol (1 microM), resulted in a profound reorganization of vimentin filaments. This may be correlated with the enhanced levels of phosphorylated vimentin observed upon increasing cellular cyclic AMP.

  19. Gene mutations in primary ciliary dyskinesia related to otitis media.

    PubMed

    Mata, Manuel; Milian, Lara; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in children and is strongly associated with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Approximately half of the children with PCD require otolaryngology care, posing a major problem in this population. Early diagnosis of PCD is critical in these patients to minimise the collateral damage related to OME. The current gold standard for PCD diagnosis requires determining ciliary structure defects by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or clearly documenting ciliary dysfunction via digital high-speed video microscopy (DHSV). Although both techniques are useful for PCD diagnosis, they have limitations and need to be supported by new methodologies, including genetic analysis of genes related to PCD. In this article, we review classical and recently associated mutations related to ciliary alterations leading to PCD, which can be useful for early diagnosis of the disease and subsequent early management of OME.

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of taurine in different muscle cell types of the dog and rat.

    PubMed

    Lobo, M V; Alonso, F J; Martin del Rio, R

    2000-01-01

    The presence and distribution of the amino acid taurine in different muscle cell types of the dog and rat was examined by immunocytochemical methods. The light microscope study revealed that smooth muscle cells were similarly immunoreactive for taurine, whereas skeletal muscle fibres showed wide differences in taurine immunoreactivity among individual cells. Some skeletal fibres were strongly immunoreactive whereas others did not display immunolabelling. Mononucleated satellite cells, found adjacent to skeletal fibres in a quiescent stage, were also immunostained. Other myoid cells, such as testicular peritubular cells showed a cytoplasmic and a nuclear pool of taurine. By means of electron microscope immunolabelling, the subcellular localization of taurine was studied in vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells. Taurine was present in most subcellular compartments and frequently appeared randomly distributed. Taurine was localized on myofilaments, dense bodies, mitochondria, the plasma membrane and the cell nucleus. Moreover, the labelling density within individual smooth muscle cells was variable and depended on the state of contraction of each single fibre. Contracted cells showed a higher density of gold particles than relaxed cells. Unmyelinated nerve fibres, found adjacent to smooth muscle cells from the muscularis mucosae and the lamina propria of the stomach, were unstained or poorly stained.

  1. Transplantation of Embryonic Spinal Cord Derived Cells Helps to Prevent Muscle Atrophy after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ruven, Carolin; Li, Wen; Li, Heng; Wong, Wai-Man; Wu, Wutian

    2017-01-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are frequent in serious traumas and spinal cord injuries. In addition to surgical approaches, other interventions, such as cell transplantation, should be considered to keep the muscles in good condition until the axons regenerate. In this study, E14.5 rat embryonic spinal cord fetal cells and cultured neural progenitor cells from different spinal cord segments were injected into transected musculocutaneous nerve of 200–300 g female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and atrophy in biceps brachii was assessed. Both kinds of cells were able to survive, extend their axons towards the muscle and form neuromuscular junctions that were functional in electromyographic studies. As a result, muscle endplates were preserved and atrophy was reduced. Furthermore, we observed that the fetal cells had a better effect in reducing the muscle atrophy compared to the pure neural progenitor cells, whereas lumbar cells were more beneficial compared to thoracic and cervical cells. In addition, fetal lumbar cells were used to supplement six weeks delayed surgical repair after the nerve transection. Cell transplantation helped to preserve the muscle endplates, which in turn lead to earlier functional recovery seen in behavioral test and electromyography. In conclusion, we were able to show that embryonic spinal cord derived cells, especially the lumbar fetal cells, are beneficial in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries due to their ability to prevent the muscle atrophy. PMID:28264437

  2. Transplantation of Embryonic Spinal Cord Derived Cells Helps to Prevent Muscle Atrophy after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ruven, Carolin; Li, Wen; Li, Heng; Wong, Wai-Man; Wu, Wutian

    2017-02-27

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are frequent in serious traumas and spinal cord injuries. In addition to surgical approaches, other interventions, such as cell transplantation, should be considered to keep the muscles in good condition until the axons regenerate. In this study, E14.5 rat embryonic spinal cord fetal cells and cultured neural progenitor cells from different spinal cord segments were injected into transected musculocutaneous nerve of 200-300 g female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and atrophy in biceps brachii was assessed. Both kinds of cells were able to survive, extend their axons towards the muscle and form neuromuscular junctions that were functional in electromyographic studies. As a result, muscle endplates were preserved and atrophy was reduced. Furthermore, we observed that the fetal cells had a better effect in reducing the muscle atrophy compared to the pure neural progenitor cells, whereas lumbar cells were more beneficial compared to thoracic and cervical cells. In addition, fetal lumbar cells were used to supplement six weeks delayed surgical repair after the nerve transection. Cell transplantation helped to preserve the muscle endplates, which in turn lead to earlier functional recovery seen in behavioral test and electromyography. In conclusion, we were able to show that embryonic spinal cord derived cells, especially the lumbar fetal cells, are beneficial in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries due to their ability to prevent the muscle atrophy.

  3. Ciliary neurotrophic factor is not required for terminal sprouting and compensatory reinnervation of neuromuscular synapses: Re-evaluation of CNTF null mice

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Megan C.; Son, Young-Jin

    2007-01-01

    Loss of synaptic activity or innervation induces sprouting of intact motor nerve terminals that adds or restores nerve-muscle connectivity. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and terminal Schwann cells (tSCs) have been implicated as molecular and cellular mediators of the compensatory process. We wondered if the previously reported lack of terminal sprouting in CNTF null mice was due to abnormal reactivity of tSCs. To this end, we examined nerve terminal and tSC responses in CNTF null mice using experimental systems that elicited extensive sprouting in wildtype mice. Contrary to the previous report, we found that motor nerve terminals in the null mice sprout extensively in response to major sprouting-stimuli such as exogenously applied CNTF per se, botulinum toxin-elicited paralysis, and partial denervation by L4 spinal root transection. In addition, the number, length and growth patterns of terminal sprouts, and the extent of reinnervation by terminal or nodal sprouts, were similar in wildtype and null mice. tSCs in the null mice were also reactive to the sprouting-stimuli, elaborating cellular processes that accompanied terminal sprouts or guided reinnervation of denervated muscle fibers. Lastly, CNTF was absent in quiescent tSCs in intact, wildtype muscles and little if any was detected in reactive tSCs in denervated muscles. Thus, CNTF is not required for induction of nerve terminal sprouting, for reactivation of tSCs, and for compensatory reinnervation after nerve injury. We interpret these results to support the notion that compensatory sprouting in adult muscles is induced primarily by contact-mediated mechanisms, rather than by diffusible factors. PMID:17445802

  4. Satellite Cells CD44 Positive Drive Muscle Regeneration in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Scimeca, Manuel; Bonanno, Elena; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Baldi, Jacopo; Mauriello, Alessandro; Orlandi, Augusto; Tancredi, Virginia; Gasbarra, Elena; Tarantino, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Age-related bone diseases, such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis, are strongly associated with sarcopenia and muscle fiber atrophy. In this study, we analyzed muscle biopsies in order to demonstrate that, in osteoarthritis patients, both osteophytes formation and regenerative properties of muscle stem cells are related to the same factors. In particular, thanks to immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and immunogold labeling we investigated the role of BMP-2 in muscle stem cells activity. In patients with osteoarthritis both immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to note a higher number of CD44 positive satellite muscle cells forming syncytium. Moreover, the perinuclear and cytoplasmic expression of BMP-2 assessed by in situ molecular characterization of satellite cells syncytia suggest a very strict correlation between BMP-2 expression and muscle regeneration capability. Summing up, the higher BMP-2 expression in osteoarthritic patients could explain the increased bone mineral density as well as decreased muscle atrophy in osteoarthrosic patients. In conclusion, our results suggest that the control of physiological BMP-2 balance between bone and muscle tissues may be considered as a potential pharmacological target in bone-muscle related pathology.

  5. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  6. A cell-autonomous defect in skeletal muscle satellite cells expressing low levels of survival of motor neuron protein.

    PubMed

    Hayhurst, Monica; Wagner, Amanda K; Cerletti, Massimiliano; Wagers, Amy J; Rubin, Lee L

    2012-08-15

    Mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) gene underlie the development of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), which currently represents the leading genetic cause of mortality in infants and toddlers. SMA is characterized by degeneration of spinal cord motor neurons and muscle atrophy. Although SMA is often considered to be a motor neuron disease, accumulating evidence suggests that muscle cells themselves may be affected by low levels of SMN. Here, we examine satellite cells, tissue-resident stem cells that play an essential role in the growth and repair of skeletal muscle, isolated from a severe SMA mouse model (Smn(-/-); SMN2(+/+)). We found similar numbers of satellite cells in the muscles of SMA and wild-type (Smn(+/+); SMN2(+/+)) mice at postnatal day 2 (P2), and, when isolated from skeletal muscle using cell surface marker expression, these cells showed comparable survival and proliferative potential. However, SMA satellite cells differentiate abnormally, revealed by the premature expression of muscle differentiation markers, and, especially, by a reduced efficiency in forming myotubes. These phenotypes suggest a critical role of SMN protein in the intrinsic regulation of muscle differentiation and suggest that abnormal muscle development contributes to the manifestation of SMA symptoms.

  7. Cell type specific targeted intracellular delivery into muscle of a monoclonal antibody that binds myosin IIb.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, Richard H; Yang, Fusheng; Chan, Grace; Wakelin, Rika; Ferreri, Kevin; Zack, Debra J; Harrison, Brooke; Leinwand, Leslie A; Cole, Greg M

    2003-03-01

    Methods for cell type specific targeted intracellular delivery of proteins in vivo remain limited. A murine monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibody, mAb 3E10, was selectively transported into skeletal muscle cells in vivo. The antibody bound a 200 kDa protein only found in lysates of skeletal muscle by Western blotting. The 200 kDa protein was purified from muscle lysate by antibody affinity chromatography and identified as the skeletal muscle specific heavy chain of myosin IIb by electrospray mass spectrometry. Antibody binding specificity for myosin IIb was demonstrated in Western blots by binding myosin in skeletal muscle lysates from mice null for myosin IId but not in mice null for myosin IIb. Myosin IIb is implicated in the specific targeting of mAb 3E10 to skeletal muscle.

  8. Six family genes control the proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Motohashi, Norio; Ono, Yusuke; Sato, Shigeru; Ikeda, Keiko; Masuda, Satoru; Yada, Erica; Kanesaki, Hironori; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2010-10-15

    Muscle satellite cells are essential for muscle growth and regeneration and their morphology, behavior and gene expression have been extensively studied. However, the mechanisms involved in their proliferation and differentiation remain elusive. Six1 and Six4 proteins were expressed in the nuclei of myofibers of adult mice and the numbers of myoblasts positive for Six1 and Six4 increased during regeneration of skeletal muscles. Six1 and Six4 were expressed in quiescent, activated and differentiated muscle satellite cells isolated from adult skeletal muscle. Overexpression of Six4 and Six5 repressed the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Conversely, knockdown of Six5 resulted in augmented proliferation, and that of Six4 inhibited differentiation. Muscle satellite cells isolated from Six4{sup +/-}Six5{sup -/-} mice proliferated to higher cell density though their differentiation was not altered. Meanwhile, overproduction of Six1 repressed proliferation and promoted differentiation of satellite cells. In addition, Six4 and Six5 repressed, while Six1 activated myogenin expression, suggesting that the differential regulation of myogenin expression is responsible for the differential effects of Six genes. The results indicated the involvement of Six genes in the behavior of satellite cells and identified Six genes as potential target for manipulation of proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells for therapeutic applications.

  9. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  10. A coculture system of cavernous endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, H; Lin, G; Lue, T F; Lin, C-S

    2013-01-01

    In erectile dysfunction (ED) research, monocultures of cavernous endothelial cells (CECs) and smooth muscle cells (CSMCs) have been reported, but a CEC-CSMC coculture system is still lacking. In the present study, we wished to investigate the feasibility of setting up such a system and test whether it can be used for diabetic ED research. Cavernous tissues were obtained from patients undergoing surgery for penile prosthesis. CSMCs were isolated by explant culture and verified by calponin staining. CECs were isolated by binding to CD31 antibody, followed by magnetic capture. These CECs were nearly 100% pure endothelial cells as determined by flow cytometric analysis for endothelial markers CD31, vWF and eNOS. Functional analyses, that is, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake and capillary tube formation, also confirmed their endothelial phenotype. When cocultured with CSMCs, CECs formed capillary-like structures, and based on the extent of this capillary-like network, it was determined that a ratio of 1:4 in cell number between CECs and CSMCs was better than ratios of 1:1 and 1:9. It was also found that direct contact between CECs and CSMCs was necessary and a coculture period of 3 weeks was optimal. Autologous CSMCs were better than allogeneic CSMCs, and fibroblasts were completely incompetent. When treated with high glucose (25 mM), the CEC-CSMC coculture expressed significantly lower level of CD31 but significantly higher level of collagen-IV (Col-IV), and the diameter of the capillaries increased significantly, when compared with normal glucose (5 mM)-treated cocultures. These data are consistent with previously observed changes in the cavernous tissues of diabetic patients and thus suggest that the coculture system could be utilized for diabetic ED research.

  11. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac