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Sample records for cim centrum delft

  1. Distributed job scheduling in MetaCentrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Šimon; Ruda, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    MetaCentrum - The Czech National Grid provides access to various resources across the Czech Republic. The utilized resource management and scheduling system is based on a heavily modified version of the Torque Batch System. This open source resource manager is maintained in a local fork and was extended to facilitate the requirements of such a large installation. This paper provides an overview of unique features deployed in MetaCentrum. Notably, we describe our distributed setup that encompasses several standalone independent servers while still maintaining full cooperative scheduling across the grid. We also present the benefits of our virtualized infrastructure that enables our schedulers to dynamically request ondemand virtual machines, that are then used to facilitate the varied requirements of users in our system, as well as enabling support for user requested virtual clusters that can be further interconnected using a private VLAN.

  2. Use of the CIM Ontology

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, Scott; Britton, Jay; Devos, Arnold N.; Widergren, Steven E.

    2006-02-08

    There are many uses for the Common Information Model (CIM), an ontology that is being standardized through Technical Committee 57 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC TC57). The most common uses to date have included application modeling, information exchanges, information management and systems integration. As one should expect, there are many issues that become apparent when the CIM ontology is applied to any one use. Some of these issues are shortcomings within the current draft of the CIM, and others are a consequence of the different ways in which the CIM can be applied using different technologies. As the CIM ontology will and should evolve, there are several dangers that need to be recognized. One is overall consistency and impact upon applications when extending the CIM for a specific need. Another is that a tight coupling of the CIM to specific technologies could limit the value of the CIM in the longer term as an ontology, which becomes a larger issue over time as new technologies emerge. The integration of systems is one specific area of interest for application of the CIM ontology. This is an area dominated by the use of XML for the definition of messages. While this is certainly true when using Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) products, it is even more true with the movement towards the use of Web Services (WS), Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA) and Enterprise Service Buses (ESB) for integration. This general IT industry trend is consistent with trends seen within the IEC TC57 scope of power system management and associated information exchange. The challenge for TC57 is how to best leverage the CIM ontology using the various XML technologies and standards for integration. This paper will provide examples of how the CIM ontology is used and describe some specific issues that should be addressed within the CIM in order to increase its usefulness as an ontology. It will also describe some of the issues and challenges that will

  3. 28 CFR 524.76 - Appeals of CIM classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appeals of CIM classification. 524.76..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Central Inmate Monitoring (CIM) System § 524.76 Appeals of CIM classification. An inmate may at any time appeal (through the Administrative Remedy Program)...

  4. Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, Pavel; Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin; Sun, Yu; Riva, Ricardo; Ran, Jiangjun

    2013-04-01

    Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has enormously extended our knowledge of the Earth's system by allowing natural mass transport of various origin to be quantified. This concerns, in particular, the depletion and replenishment of continental water stocks; shrinking of polar ice sheets; deformation of the Earth's crust triggered by large earthquakes, and isostatic adjustment processes. A number of research centers compute models of temporal gravity field variations and mass transport, using GRACE data as input. One of such models - Delft Mass Transport model - is being produced at the Delft University of Technology in collaboration with the GNSS Research Center of Wuhan University. A new release of this model, DMT-2, has been produced on the basis of a new (second) release of GRACE level-1b data. This model consists of a time-series of monthly solutions spanning a time interval of more than 8 years, starting from Feb. 2003. Each solution consists of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 120. Both unconstrained and optimally filtered solutions are obtained. The most essential improvements of the DMT-2 model, as compared to its predecessors (DMT-1 and DMT-1b), are as follows: (i) improved estimation and elimination of low-frequency noise in GRACE data, so that strong mass transport signals are not damped; (ii) computation of accurate stochastic models of data noise for each month individually with a subsequent application of frequency-dependent data weighting, which allows statistically optimal solutions to be compiled even if data noise is colored and gradually changes in time; (iii) optimized estimation of accelerometer calibration parameters; (iv) incorporation of degree 1 coefficients estimated with independent techniques; (v) usage of state-of-the-art background models to de-alias GRACE data from rapid mass transport signals (this includes the EOT11a model of ocean tides and the latest release of the AOD1B product describing

  5. CIM-EARTH : Framework and case study.

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    General equilibrium models have been used for decades to obtain insights into the economic implications of policies and decisions. Despite successes, however, these economic models have substantive limitations. Many of these limitations are due to computational and methodological constraints that can be overcome by leveraging recent advances in computer architecture, numerical methods, and economics research. Motivated by these considerations, we are developing a new modeling framework: the Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH). In this paper, we describe the key features of the CIM-EARTH framework and initial implementation, detail the model instance we use for studying the impacts of a carbon tax on international trade and the sensitivity of these impacts to assumptions on the rate of change in energy efficiency and labor productivity, and present results on the extent to which carbon leakage limits global reductions in emissions for some policy scenarios.

  6. Delft testbed interferometer: layout design and research goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Brug, Hedser H.; van den Dool, Teun; Gielesen, Wim; Giesen, Peter; Oostdijck, Bastiaan; d'Arcio, Luigi

    2003-02-01

    The Delft Testbed Interferometer (DTI) will be presented. The main purpose for the DTI is to demonstrate the feasibility of homothetic mapping, both fixed and under scanning conditions. The driving design issues behind the DTI will be presented together with a list of experiments to be conducted with the DTI system in the field of wide field imaging.

  7. Comparison. US P-61 and Delft sediment samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beverage, Joseph P.; Williams, David T.

    1990-01-01

    The Delft Bottle (DB) is a flow-through device designed by the Delft Hydraulic Laboratory (DHL), The Netherlands, to sample sand-sized sediment suspended in streams. The US P-61 sampler was designed by the Federal Interagency Sedimentation Project (FISP) at the St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic Laboratory, Minneapolis, Minnesota, to collect suspended sediment from deep, swift rivers. The results of two point-sampling tests in the United States, the Mississippi River near Vicksburg, Mississippi, in 1983 and the Colorado River near Blythe, California, in 1984, are provided in this report. These studies compare sand-transport rates, rather than total sediment-transport rates, because fine material washes through the DB sampler. In the United States, the commonly used limits for sand-sized material are 0.062 mm to 2.00 mm (Vanoni 1975).

  8. Delft testbed interferometer: a homothetic mapping test setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Brug, Hedser; Oostdijck, Bastiaan; van den Dool, Teun; Giesen, Peter; Gielesen, Wim

    2004-02-01

    The Delft Testbed Interferometer (DTI) will be presented. The basics of homothetic mapping will be explained together with the method of fulfilling the requirements as chosen in the DTI setup. The optical layout incorporates a novel tracking concept enabling the use of homothetic mapping in real telescope systems for observations on the sky. The requirements for homothetic mapping and the choices made in the DTI setup will be discussed. Finally the planned experiments will be discussed.

  9. CIM5 Phase III base process development results

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, D.C.

    2000-01-06

    Integrated Demonstration Runs for the Am/Cm vitrification process were initiated in the Coupled 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) on 11/30/98 and completed on 12/9/98. Four successful runs at 60 wt% lanthanide loading were completed which met or exceeded all established criteria. The operating parameters used in these runs established the base conditions for the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) process and were summarized in the 5-inch CIM design basis, SRT-AMC-99-OO01. (1) In subsequent tests, a total of fourteen CIM5 runs were performed using various power inputs, ramp rates and target temperatures to define the preferred processing conditions (2) Process stability and process flexibility were the key criteria used in assessing the results for each run. A preferred set of operating parameters was defined for the CIM5 batch process and these conditions were used to generate a pre-programmed, automatic processing cycle that was used for the last six CIM.5 runs (3) These operational tests were successfully completed in the January-February time frame and were summarized in SRT-AMC-99-00584. The recommended set of operating conditions defined in Runs No.1 through No.14 was used as the starting point for further pilot system runs to determine the robustness of the process, evaluate a bubbler, and investigate off-normal conditions. CIM5 Phase III Runs No.15 through No.60 were conducted utilizing the pre-programmed, automatic processing cycle to investigate system performance. This report summarizes the results of these tests and provides a recommendation for the base process as well as a processing modification for minimizing volume expansions if americium and/or curium are subject to a thermal reduction reaction like cerium. This document summarizes the results of the base process development tests conducted in the Am/Cm Pilot Facility located in Building 672-T.

  10. Evaluation of the Sustainable Development Graduation Track at Delft University of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Werk, G.; Kamp, L. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the sustainable development graduation track at TU Delft. This track can be followed by all students of TU Delft. It consists of an interdisciplinary colloquium "Technology in Sustainable Development", 300 h of self-chosen courses on sustainable development and a graduation project in which sustainable development is…

  11. 'Most rare workmen': optical practitioners in early seventeenth-century Delft.

    PubMed

    Zuidervaart, Huib J; Rijks, Marlise

    2015-03-01

    A special interest in optics among various seventeenth-century painters living in the Dutch city of Delft has intrigued historians, including art historians, for a long time. Equally, the impressive career of the Delft microscopist Antoni van Leeuwenhoek has been studied by many historians of science. However, it has never been investigated who, at that time, had access to the mathematical and optical knowledge necessary for the impressive achievements of these Delft practitioners. We have tried to gain insight into Delft as a 'node' of optical knowledge by following the careers of three minor local figures in early seventeenth-century Delft. We argue that through their work, products, discussions in the vernacular and exchange of skills, rather than via learned publications, these practitioners constituted a foundation on which the later scientific and artistic achievements of other Delft citizens were built. Our Delft case demonstrates that these practitioners were not simple and isolated craftsmen; rather they were crucial components in a network of scholars, savants, painters and rich virtuosi. Decades before Vermeer made his masterworks, or Van Leeuwenhoek started his famous microscopic investigations, the intellectual atmosphere and artisanal knowledge in this city centred on optical topics. PMID:25833798

  12. Structure of CIMS in large-scale continuous manufacturing industry and its optimization strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianchu; Wang, Gaofeng; Wang, Boxing; Zhou, Ji; Yu, Jun

    1995-08-01

    This paper focuses on the large scale petroleum refinery manufacturing industry and has analyzed the characteristics and functional requirements of CIMS in continuous process industries. Then it compares the continuous manufacturing industry with the discrete manufacturing industry on CIMS conceptual model, and presents the functional model frame and key technologies of CIPS. The paper also proposes the optimization model and solution strategy for the CIMS in continuous industry.

  13. Updated Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2: computation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Ditmar, Pavel; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Guo, Jing; Guo, Xiang; Liu, Xianglin; Zhao, Qile; Didova, Olga; Ran, Jiangjun; Sun, Yu; Tangdamrongsub, Natthachet; Gunter, Brian; Riva, Ricardo; Steele-Dunne, Susan

    2014-05-01

    A number of research centers compute models of mass transport in the Earth's system using primarily K-Band Ranging (KBR) data from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. These models typically consist of a time series of monthly solutions, each of which is defined in terms of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 60-120. One of such models, the Delft Mass Transport, release 2 (DMT-2), is computed at the Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) in collaboration with Wuhan University. An updated variant of this model has been produced recently. A unique feature of the computational scheme designed to compute DMT-2 is the preparation of an accurate stochastic description of data noise in the frequency domain using an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) model, which is derived for each particular month. The benefits of such an approach are a proper frequency-dependent data weighting in the data inversion and an accurate variance-covariance matrix of noise in the estimated spherical harmonic coefficients. Furthermore, the data prior to the inversion are subject to an advanced high-pass filtering, which makes use of a spatially-dependent weighting scheme, so that noise is primarily estimated on the basis of data collected over areas with minor mass transport signals (e.g., oceans). On the one hand, this procedure efficiently suppresses noise, which are caused by inaccuracies in satellite orbits and, on the other hand, preserves mass transport signals in the data. Finally, the unconstrained monthly solutions are filtered using a Wiener filter, which is based on estimates of the signal and noise variance-covariance matrices. In combination with a proper data weighting, this noticeably improves the spatial resolution of the monthly gravity models and the associated mass transport models.. For instance, the computed solutions allow long-term negative trends to be clearly seen in sufficiently small regions notorious

  14. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  15. Predicting longshore gradients in longshore transport: the CERC formula compared to Delft3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    List, Jeffrey H.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Ruggiero, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The prediction of longshore transport gradients is critical for forecasting shoreline change. We employ simple test cases consisting of shoreface pits at varying distances from the shoreline to compare the longshore transport gradients predicted by the CERC formula against results derived from the process-based model Delft3D. Results show that while in some cases the two approaches give very similar results, in many cases the results diverge greatly. Although neither approach is validated with field data here, the Delft3D-based transport gradients provide much more consistent predictions of erosional and accretionary zones as the pit location varies across the shoreface.

  16. Teaching Sustainable Entrepreneurship to Engineering Students: The Case of Delft University of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Hans; Quist, Jaco; Hoogwater, Daan; Spaans, Johan; Wehrmann, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    Sustainability, enhancement of personal skills, social aspects of technology, management and entrepreneurship are of increasing concern for engineers and therefore for engineering education. In 1996 at Delft University of Technology this led to the introduction of a subject on sustainable entrepreneurship and technology in the course programmes of…

  17. Engineering Curricula in Sustainable Development. An Evaluation of Changes at Delft University of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Karel F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will first sketch some basic features of the engineering profession, and the need for change. It will analyse the political process that resulted in the decision at Delft University of Technology (DUT) to emphasise Sustainable Development (SD) in its curricula. The main goal of this education is to show that SD is not a burden, but a…

  18. Study on the integration approaches to CAD/CAPP/FMS in garment CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiankui; Tian, Wensheng; Liu, Chengying; Li, Zhizhong

    1995-08-01

    Computer integrated manufacturing system (CIMS), as an advanced methodology, has been applied in many industry fields. There is, however, little research on the application of CIMS in the garment industry, especially on the integrated approach to CAD, CAPP, and FMS in garment CIMS. In this paper, the current situations of CAD, CAPP, and FMS in the garment industry are discussed, and information requirements between them as well as the integrated approaches are also investigated. The representation of the garments' product data by the group technology coding is proposed. Based on the group technology, a shared data base as an integration element can be constructed, which leads to the integration of CAD/CAPP/FMS in garment CIMS.

  19. Delft FEWS: an open interface that connects models and data streams for operational forecasting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rooij, Erik; Werner, Micha

    2010-05-01

    Many of the operational forecasting systems that are in use today are centred around a single modelling suite. Over the years these systems and the required data streams have been tailored to provide a closed-knit interaction with their underlying modelling components. However, as time progresses it becomes a challenge to integrate new technologies into these model centric operational systems. Often the software used to develop these systems is out of date, or the original designers of these systems are no longer available. Additionally, the changing of the underlying models may requiring the complete system to be changed. This then becomes an extensive effort, not only from a software engineering point of view, but also from a training point of view. Due to significant time and resources being committed to re-training the forecasting teams that interact with the system on a daily basis. One approach to reducing the effort required in integrating new models and data is through an open interface architecture, and through the use of defined interfaces and standards in data exchange. This approach is taken by the Delft-FEWS operational forecasting shell, which has now been applied in some 40 operational forecasting centres across the world. The Delft-FEWS framework provides several interfaces that allow models and data in differing formats to be flexibly integrated with the system. The most common approach to the integration of modes is through the Delft-FEWS Published Interface. This is an XML based data exchange format that supports the exchange of time series data, as well as vector and gridded data formats. The Published Interface supports standardised data formats such as GRIB and the NetCDF-CF standard. A wide range of models has been integrated with the system through this approach, and these are used operationally across the forecasting centres using Delft FEWS. Models can communicate directly with the interface of Delft-FEWS, or through a SOAP service. This

  20. Homothetic mapping as means to obtain a wide field of view: the Delft Testbed Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Brug, Hedser; Oostdijck, Bastiaan; Snijders, Bart; van der Avoort, Casper; Gori, Pierre-Marie

    2004-10-01

    The Delft Testbed Interferometer (DTI) will be presented. The basics of homothetic mapping will be explained together with the method of fulfilling the requirements as chosen in the DTI setup. The optical layout incorporates a novel tracking concept enabling the use of homothetic mapping in real telescope systems for observations on the sky. The requirements for homothetic mapping and the choices made in the DTI setup will be discussed. Finally the first results and the planned experiments will be presented.

  1. Delft3D-FLOW on PRACE infrastructures for real life hydrodynamic applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donners, John; Genseberger, Menno; Jagers, Bert; de Goede, Erik; Mourits, Adri

    2013-04-01

    PRACE, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, offers access to the largest high-performance computing systems in Europe. PRACE invites and helps industry to increase their innovative potential through the use of the PRACE infrastructure. This poster describes different efforts to assist Deltares with porting the open-source simulation software Delft3D-FLOW to PRACE infrastructures. Analysis of the performance on these infrastructures has been done for real life flow applications. Delft3D-FLOW is a 2D and 3D shallow water solver which calculates non-steady flow and transport phenomena resulting from tidal and meteorological forcing on a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid in Cartesian or spherical coordinates. It also includes a module which sediment transport (both suspended and bed total load) and morphological changes for an arbitrary number of cohesive and non-cohesive fractions. As Delft3D-FLOW has been developed over several decades, with a variety of functionality and over 350k lines of source code, porting to PRACE infrastructures needs some effort. At the moment Delft3D-FLOW uses MPI with domain decomposition in one direction as its parallellisation approach. Because it is hard to identify scaling issues if one immediately starts with a complex case with many features enabled, different cases with increasing complexity have been used to investigate scaling of this parallellisation approach on several PRACE platforms. As a base reference case we started with a schematic high-resolution 2D hydrodynamic model of the river Waal that turned out to be surprisingly well-suited to the highly-parallel PRACE machines. Although Delft3D-FLOW employs a sophisticated build system, several modifications were required to port it to most PRACE systems due to the use of specific, highly-tuned compilers and MPI-libraries. After this we moved to a 3D hydrodynamic model of Rotterdam harbour that includes sections of the rivers Rhine and Meuse and a part of the North

  2. Characterization of the mass dependent transmission efficiency of a CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Steiner, G.; Wagner, A. C.; Kürten, A.; Hansel, A.; Curtius, J.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge about mass discrimination effects in a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) is crucial for quantifying e.g. the recently discovered Extremely Low Volatile Organic Compounds (ELVOCs) and other compounds for which no calibration standard exists so far. Here, we present a simple way of estimating mass discrimination effects of a nitrate based Chemical Ionization Atmospheric Pressure interface Time of Flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. Characterization of the mass discrimination is achieved by adding different perfluorinated acids to the mass spectrometer in amounts sufficient to deplete the primary ions significantly. The relative transmission efficiency can then be determined by comparing the decrease of signals from the primary ions and the increase of signals from the perfluorinated acids at higher masses. This method is in use already for PTR-MS, however its application to a CI-APi-TOF brings additional difficulties, namely clustering and fragmentation of the measured compounds, which can be treated with statistical analysis of the measured data, leading to self-consistent results. We also compare this method to a transmission estimation obtained with a setup using an Electrospray Ion source, a High Resolution Differential Mobility Analyzer and an electrometer, which estimates the transmission of the instrument without the CI source. Both methods give different transmission curves, indicating non-negligible mass discrimination effects of the CI source. The absolute transmission of the instrument without the CI source was estimated with the HR-DMA method to plateau between the m / z range of 127 and 568 Th at around 1.5 %, however for the CI source included, the depletion method showed a steady increase in relative transmission efficiency from the m / z range of the primary ion (mainly at 62 Th) to around 550 Th by a factor of around 5. The main advantages of the depletion method are that the instrument is used in the same operation mode as

  3. The Effect of Nutritional Status in the Pathogenesis of Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM)

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Larsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The muscle wasting and loss of specific force associated with Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM) is, at least in part, due to a preferential loss of the molecular motor protein myosin. This acquired myopathy is common in critically ill immobilized and mechanically ventilated intensive care patients (ICU). There is a growing understanding of the mechanisms underlying CIM, but the role of nutritional factors triggering this serious complication of modern intensive care remains unknown. This study aims at establishing the effect of nutritional status in the pathogenesis of CIM. An experimental ICU model was used where animals are mechanically ventilated, pharmacologically paralysed post-synaptically and extensively monitored for up to 14 days. Due to the complexity of the experimental model, the number of animals included is small. After exposure to this ICU condition, animals develop a phenotype similar to patients with CIM. The results from this study show that the preferential myosin loss, decline in specific force and muscle fiber atrophy did not differ between low vs. eucaloric animals. In both experimental groups, passive mechanical loading had a sparing effect of muscle weight independent on nutritional status. Thus, this study confirms the strong impact of the mechanical silencing associated with the ICU condition in triggering CIM, overriding any potential effects of caloric intake in triggering CIM. In addition, the positive effects of passive mechanical loading on muscle fiber size and force generating capacity was not affected by the nutritional status in this study. However, due to the small sample size these pilot results need to be validated in a larger cohort. PMID:24887774

  4. Characterization of the replacement Am/Cm melter vessel - CIM5A

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, D.C.

    2000-07-25

    To enable continued testing and completion of the TTR program, the failed CIM5 melter vessel was replaced with a new Pt/Rh melter, denoted as CIM5A. The existing induction coils and support structures were reused. To accommodate larger thermocouple weld beads on the cone section of the melter, a 3/16 inch thick insulation blanket was added between the cone and Zircar insulation, causing the vessel to be positioned higher relative to the induction coils than the failed CIM5. Subsequent characterization testing revealed a hot bottom and an increase in the severity of bed volume expansions. Raising the side wall induction coils together with modifying the power input control program alleviated the hot bottom condition and actually improved process performance by reducing the magnitude of the volume expansion when compared with the original CIM5 system. This work emphasizes the need for each MPPF melter assembly to be constructed to be as identical as possible and then fully characterized prior to installation in MPPF.

  5. [R]MIT Research Centre at Delft University of Technology: A Bridge between Research, Education, Society and Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, Hielkje

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, we launched the [R]MIT Research Centre (Modification, Intervention Transformation) at the Faculty of Architecture at Delft University of Technology. [R]MIT was founded to respond to the need for an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to the transformation of the built environment. [R]MIT aims to bring momentum to the renewal of…

  6. Rice Seed Priming with Picomolar Rutin Enhances Rhizospheric Bacillus subtilis CIM Colonization and Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Akanksha; Gupta, Rupali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    The effect of rutin, a bioflavonoid on the growth and biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis strain CIM was investigated. In addition to swimming, swarming, and twitching potentials of B. subtilis CIM (BS), one picomolar (1 pM) of rutin was also observed to boost the biofilm forming ability of the bacterium. Bio-priming of rice seeds with BS and rutin not only augmented root and shoot lengths but also the photosynthetic pigments like chlorophyll and carotenoid. Similarly, high accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid contents was observed in the leaves. Fluorescent microscopic images revealed that BS plus rutin enhanced callose deposition in the leaves. It was also established that the least formation of reactive oxygen species in BS plus rutin treated rice plants was due to higher free radicals scavenging activity and total antioxidant potential. The results highlight chemo attractant nature of BS towards rutin, which by enhancing biofilm formation and root colonization indirectly strengthened the plants’ defensive state. PMID:26742102

  7. CIM's bridge from CADD to CAM: Data management requirements for manufacturing engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Manufacturing engineering represents the crossroads of technical data management in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) environment. Process planning, numerical control programming and tool design are the key functions which translate information from as engineered to as assembled. In order to transition data from engineering to manufacturing, it is necessary to introduce a series of product interpretations which contain an interim introduction of technical parameters. The current automation of the product definition and the production process places manufacturing engineering in the center of CAD/CAM with the responsibility of communicating design data to the factory floor via a manufacturing model of the data. A close look at data management requirements for manufacturing engineering is necessary in order to establish the overall specifications for CADD output, CAM input, and CIM integration. The functions and issues associated with the orderly evolution of computer aided engineering and manufacturing are examined.

  8. Rice Seed Priming with Picomolar Rutin Enhances Rhizospheric Bacillus subtilis CIM Colonization and Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akanksha; Gupta, Rupali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    The effect of rutin, a bioflavonoid on the growth and biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis strain CIM was investigated. In addition to swimming, swarming, and twitching potentials of B. subtilis CIM (BS), one picomolar (1 pM) of rutin was also observed to boost the biofilm forming ability of the bacterium. Bio-priming of rice seeds with BS and rutin not only augmented root and shoot lengths but also the photosynthetic pigments like chlorophyll and carotenoid. Similarly, high accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid contents was observed in the leaves. Fluorescent microscopic images revealed that BS plus rutin enhanced callose deposition in the leaves. It was also established that the least formation of reactive oxygen species in BS plus rutin treated rice plants was due to higher free radicals scavenging activity and total antioxidant potential. The results highlight chemo attractant nature of BS towards rutin, which by enhancing biofilm formation and root colonization indirectly strengthened the plants' defensive state.

  9. Graphical interface between the CIRSSE testbed and CimStation software with MCS/CTOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hron, Anna B.

    1992-01-01

    This research is concerned with developing a graphical simulation of the testbed at the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE) and the interface which allows for communication between the two. Such an interface is useful in telerobotic operations, and as a functional interaction tool for testbed users. Creating a simulated model of a real world system, generates inevitable calibration discrepancies between them. This thesis gives a brief overview of the work done to date in the area of workcell representation and communication, describes the development of the CIRSSE interface, and gives a direction for future work in the area of system calibration. The CimStation software used for development of this interface, is a highly versatile robotic workcell simulation package which has been programmed for this application with a scale graphical model of the testbed, and supporting interface menu code. A need for this tool has been identified for the reasons of path previewing, as a window on teleoperation and for calibration of simulated vs. real world models. The interface allows information (i.e., joint angles) generated by CimStation to be sent as motion goal positions to the testbed robots. An option of the interface has been established such that joint angle information generated by supporting testbed algorithms (i.e., TG, collision avoidance) can be piped through CimStation as a visual preview of the path.

  10. Simulation of water temperature in two reservoirs with Delft3d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. Y.; Zhou, L. Y.

    2016-08-01

    The proposeled Guanjingkou and Fengdou reservoir will be constructed at Chongqing city and Muling city in China respectively. The water temperature in the reservoir, in the downstream, and the aquatic ecosystem would be altered by the construction of the reservoirs. This paper simulates the water temperature in the two reservoirs by using the Delft3d z-layer model, which uses the fixed elevation for layers. According to the simulation results, the temperature profile in the reservoirs can be divided into three layers: the upmost epilimnion layer, the beneathed thermocline layer, and the constant tepmerature layer at bottom. The temperature effects can be reduced by measurements of stoplogs gates and mutiple gates, respectively. Based on the simulation results in the wet, nomal, and dry year, the temperature of water released from the stoplogs gates at Guanjingkou reservior can be respectively increased by 5.7°C, 6.8°C, 9.6°C, and 5.5°C in the irrigation season from May to August. The temperature of water released from the mutiple gates at Fengdou reservior can be respectively increased by 7.7 °C, 1.9 °C, 9.5 °C, and 10.1 °C from May to August. The negative impacts from the water with lower temperature on the related ecosystem can be significently alleviated.

  11. Further development around the Hoger Onderwijs reactor of IRI in Delft

    SciTech Connect

    Bruin, M. de )

    1992-01-01

    The Interfacultair Reactor Instituut (IRI) was founded in 1958, and its reactor first reached criticality in 1963. Until 1987, IRI was an interuniversity institute, owned and directed by the combined universities. Since then it constitutes part of the Delft University of Technology but continues its role as an interuniversity institute. The main facility is the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2-MW swimming-pool reactor operated 24 h/day, 5 day/week. In the 5-yr working plan of 1988-1993, much attention is being paid to development and construction of new experimental facilities connected to the reactor. A double-stacked mirror neutron guide, a reactor coupled source of variable energy positrons, and an irradiation facility for activation analysis of large samples have been installed. Completion of a neutron reflectometer suitable for application to solids as well as liquids is foreseen for 1993. Further plans for facility development will focus on the construction of a small beam hall and a three- or fourfold stacked mirror neutron guide to provide neutron beams to that hall. The IRI research program will be continued along the lines discussed on earlier occasions but with increasing emphasis on research using neutron beams and positron techniques and nuclear technology. Major new research activities are focused on plant uptake of long-lived fission products and on the behavior of natural nuclides in large-scale industrial processes.

  12. Johannes Vermeer of Delft [1632-1675] and vision in neuroendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Waleed A.; Prevedello, Daniel M.; Carrau, Ricardo L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Johannes Vermeer of Delft [1632-1675] was one of the greatest Masters of the Dutch Golden Age who was intensely preoccupied with the behavior of light and other optical effects and was entitled “The Master of Light”. He fastidiously attended to the subtleties of visual expression through geometry, composition, and precise mastery of the rules of perspective. It has been our impression that some visual similarity does exist between neuroendoscopic images and some of Vermeer's paintings. Such a relation could be explained by the fact that optical devices are utilized in producing both types of display. Methods: We reviewed the pertinent medical and art literature, observed some video clips of our endoscopy cases, and inspected digital high resolution images of Vermeer's paintings in order to elaborate on shared optical phenomena between neuroendoscopic views and Vermeer's paintings. Results: Specific optical phenomena are indeed shared by Johannes Vermeer's works and neuroendoscopic vision, namely light and color effects as well as the rules of perspective. Conclusion: From the physical point of view, the possibility that a camera obscura inspired Vermeer's artistic creation makes the existence of a visual link between his paintings and the endoscopic views of the intracranial cavity comprehensible. PMID:25140282

  13. Antony van Leeuwenhoek's microscopes and other scientific instruments: new information from the Delft archives.

    PubMed

    Zuidervaart, Huib J; Anderson, Douglas

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses the scientific instruments made and used by the microscopist Antony van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723). The immediate cause of our study was the discovery of an overlooked document from the Delft archive: an inventory of the possessions that were left in 1745 after the death of Leeuwenhoek's daughter Maria. This list sums up which tools and scientific instruments Leeuwenhoek possessed at the end of his life, including his famous microscopes. This information, combined with the results of earlier historical research, gives us new insights about the way Leeuwenhoek began his lens grinding and how eventually he made his best lenses. It also teaches us more about Leeuwenhoek's work as a surveyor and a wine gauger. A further investigation of the 1747 sale of Leeuwenhoek's 531 single lens microscopes has not only led us to the identification of nearly all buyers, but also has provided us with some explanation about why only a dozen of this large number of microscopes has survived.

  14. Impact of marketing, information system, modularity, and low-cost solution on the implementation of CIM in SMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marri, Hussain B.; McGaughey, Ronald; Gunasekaran, Angappa

    2000-10-01

    Globalization can have a dramatic impact on manufacturing sector due to the fact that the majority of establishments in this industry are small to medium manufacturing companies. The role of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the national economy has been emphasized all over the world, considering their contribution to the total manufacturing output and employment opportunities. The lack of marketing forces to regulate the operation of SMEs has been a fundamental cause of low efficiency for a long time. Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) is emerging as one of the most promising opportunities for shrinking the time delays in information transfer and reducing manufacturing costs. CIM is the architecture for integrating the engineering, marketing and manufacturing functions through information system technologies. SMEs in general have not made full use of new technologies although their investments in CIM technology tended to be wider in scale and scope. Most of the SMEs only focus on the short-term benefit, but overlook a long- term and fundamental development on applications of new technologies. With the help of suitable information systems, modularity and low cost solutions, SMEs can compete in the global market. Considering the importance of marketing, information system, modularity and low cost solutions in the implementation of CIM in SMEs, a model has been developed and studied with the help of an empirical study conducted with British SMEs to facilitate the adoption of CIM. Finally, a summary of findings and recommendations are presented.

  15. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  16. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  17. Decreased choline and creatine concentrations in centrum semiovale in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: relationship to IQ and early trauma.

    PubMed

    Coplan, Jeremy D; Mathew, Sanjay J; Mao, Xiangling; Smith, Eric L P; Hof, Patrick R; Coplan, Paul M; Rosenblum, Leonard A; Gorman, Jack M; Shungu, Dikoma C

    2006-06-30

    We have demonstrated, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging ((1)H-MRSI), elevations of N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine (NAA/CR) in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in comparison to healthy volunteers. A recent study indicates that the volume of prefrontal cortical white matter may be disproportionately increased in man in comparison to other primate species, with evolutionary implications. We therefore re-analyzed the identical scans with a specific focus on the centrum semiovale (CSO) as a representative region of interest of cerebral white matter. The central hypothesis was, in accordance with our gray matter findings, that patients with GAD, in comparison to healthy controls, would exhibit either an increase in NAA in CSO, or alternatively demonstrate reductions in concentrations of choline (CHO)-containing compounds and/or creatine+phosphocreatine (CR). MRSI scans that were obtained from an earlier [Mathew, S.J., Mao, X., Coplan, J.D., Smith, E.L., Sackeim, H.A., Gorman, J.M., Shungu, D.C., 2004. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortical pathology in generalized anxiety disorder: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study. American Journal of Psychiatry 161, 1119-1121] sample of 15 patients with GAD [6 with early trauma (ET)] and 15 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers were analyzed further for CSO metabolite alterations. Self-reported worry was scored using the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) and intelligence was assessed using the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI). Serial multislice/multivoxel MRSI scans had been performed on a 1.5-T MRI. Using absolute quantification methods for metabolite concentrations, we examined NAA, CHO and CR. GAD patients without ET exhibited bilaterally decreased concentrations of CHO and CR in CSO in comparison to healthy volunteers, whereas GAD patients with ET were indistinguishable from controls. In patients with GAD, high IQ

  18. CIM5 bubbler: Effect of sparge rate and duration on homogeneity to Am/Cm glass

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. E.

    2000-01-20

    The current flowsheet for the Am/Cm program requires that the glass pool be sparged with argon during the soaking period immediately prior to draining the melter. The effect of varying sparge rate and duration on the homogeneity of the final glass product was evaluated using the full scale 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) pilot facility. The tests showed that the homogeneity of the glass product is maintained provided the sparge rate is at least 1.5 scfh and the sparge duration is at least 45 minutes or the flowrate is at least 1.0 scfh and the sparge duration is 60 minutes. SRTC recommends that the melt pool be sparged for 75 minutes with an argon flowrate of 1.5 scfh and a sparge dip tube located 1-inch from the melter bottom. In addition, pour flowrate was found to be a reliable indication of glass homogeneity.

  19. Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Ammonia from an Airborne Miniature Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (miniCIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casados, K.; Schill, S.; Freeman, S.; Zoerb, M.; Bertram, T. H.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia is emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources such as trees, ocean, diary fields, biomass burning, and fuel emissions. Previous studies have investigated the environmental impacts of atmospheric ammonia which can include chemical reactivity, nucleation of fine particulate matter 2.5 (PM 2.5 ), and implications for human health, but its chemical nature and relatively short lifetime make direct measurement of atmospheric ammonia difficult. During the 2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) an airborne miniature Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (miniCIMS) was deployed on the NASA DC-8 flying laboratory in the Southern California region. The spatial and temporal variability of measured atmospheric ammonia concentrations will be discussed.

  20. CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Univ. of Chicago; Hoover Inst.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.

  1. CIM-EARTH: Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, I.; Elliott, J.; Munson, T.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E. J.; Sanstad, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    We report here on the development of an open source software framework termed CIM-EARTH that is intended to aid decision-making in climate and energy policy. Numerical modeling in support of evaluating policies to address climate change is difficult not only because of inherent uncertainties but because of the differences in scale and modeling approach required for various subcomponents of the system. Economic and climate models are structured quite differently, and while climate forcing can be assumed to be roughly global, climate impacts and the human response to them occur on small spatial scales. Mitigation policies likewise can be applied on scales ranging from the better part of a continent (e.g. a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S.) to a few hundred km (e.g. statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes). Both spatial and time resolution requirements can be challenging for global economic models. CIM-EARTH is a modular framework based around dynamic general equilibrium models. It is designed as a community tool that will enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of both mitigation policies and unchecked climate change. Modularity enables both integration of highly resolved component sub-models for energy and other key systems and also user-directed choice of tradeoffs between e.g. spatial, sectoral, and time resolution. This poster describes the framework architecture, the current realized version, and plans for future releases. As with other open-source models familiar to the climate community (e.g. CCSM), deliverables will be made publicly available on a regular schedule, and community input is solicited for development of new features and modules.

  2. Elimination of Chromosomal Island SpyCIM1 from Streptococcus pyogenes Strain SF370 Reverses the Mutator Phenotype and Alters Global Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Rahman, Maliha; McCullor, Kimberly A.; King, Catherine J.; Fischetti, Vincent A.; McShan, W. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes chromosomal island M1 (SpyCIM1) integrates by site-specific recombination into the 5’ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL in strain SF370SmR, blocking transcription of it and the downstream operon genes. During exponential growth, SpyCIM1 excises from the chromosome and replicates as an episome, restoring mutL transcription. This process is reversed in stationary phase with SpyCIM1 re-integrating into mutL, returning the cells to a mutator phenotype. Here we show that elimination of SpyCIM1 relieves this mutator phenotype. The downstream MMR operon genes, multidrug efflux pump lmrP, Holliday junction resolution helicase ruvA, and DNA base excision repair glycosylase tag, are also restored to constitutive expression by elimination of SpyCIM1. The presence of SpyCIM1 alters global transcription patterns in SF370SmR. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) demonstrated that loss of SpyCIM1 in the SpyCIM1 deletion mutant, CEM1Δ4, impacted the expression of over 100 genes involved in virulence and metabolism both in early exponential phase, when the SpyCIM1 is episomal, as well as at the onset of stationary phase, when SpyCIM1 has reintegrated into mutL. Among these changes, the up-regulation of the genes for the antiphagocytic M protein (emm1), streptolysin O (slo), capsule operon (hasABC), and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (speB), are particularly notable. The expression pattern of the MMR operon confirmed our earlier observations that these genes are transcribed in early exponential phase but silenced as stationary phase is approached. Thus, the direct role of SpyCIM1 in causing the mutator phenotype is confirmed, and further, its influence upon the biology of S. pyogenes was found to impact multiple genes in addition to the MMR operon, which is a novel function for a mobile genetic element. We suggest that such chromosomal islands are a remarkable evolutionary adaptation to promote the survival of its S. pyogenes host cell in changing

  3. Elimination of Chromosomal Island SpyCIM1 from Streptococcus pyogenes Strain SF370 Reverses the Mutator Phenotype and Alters Global Transcription.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Christina; Euler, Chad W; Nguyen, Scott V; Rahman, Maliha; McCullor, Kimberly A; King, Catherine J; Fischetti, Vincent A; McShan, W Michael

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes chromosomal island M1 (SpyCIM1) integrates by site-specific recombination into the 5' end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL in strain SF370SmR, blocking transcription of it and the downstream operon genes. During exponential growth, SpyCIM1 excises from the chromosome and replicates as an episome, restoring mutL transcription. This process is reversed in stationary phase with SpyCIM1 re-integrating into mutL, returning the cells to a mutator phenotype. Here we show that elimination of SpyCIM1 relieves this mutator phenotype. The downstream MMR operon genes, multidrug efflux pump lmrP, Holliday junction resolution helicase ruvA, and DNA base excision repair glycosylase tag, are also restored to constitutive expression by elimination of SpyCIM1. The presence of SpyCIM1 alters global transcription patterns in SF370SmR. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) demonstrated that loss of SpyCIM1 in the SpyCIM1 deletion mutant, CEM1Δ4, impacted the expression of over 100 genes involved in virulence and metabolism both in early exponential phase, when the SpyCIM1 is episomal, as well as at the onset of stationary phase, when SpyCIM1 has reintegrated into mutL. Among these changes, the up-regulation of the genes for the antiphagocytic M protein (emm1), streptolysin O (slo), capsule operon (hasABC), and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (speB), are particularly notable. The expression pattern of the MMR operon confirmed our earlier observations that these genes are transcribed in early exponential phase but silenced as stationary phase is approached. Thus, the direct role of SpyCIM1 in causing the mutator phenotype is confirmed, and further, its influence upon the biology of S. pyogenes was found to impact multiple genes in addition to the MMR operon, which is a novel function for a mobile genetic element. We suggest that such chromosomal islands are a remarkable evolutionary adaptation to promote the survival of its S. pyogenes host cell in changing environments.

  4. Am/Cm TTR testing -- 3/8-inch glass beads evaluation in CIM5[Technical Task Request

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, D. C.

    2000-01-20

    To facilitate the procurement and handling of the glass former for Am/Cm vitrification in the F-Canyon MPPF, 1/4 inch and 3/8 inch diameter glass beads were purchased from Corning for evaluation in the 5 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5). Prior to evaluating the beads in the CIM5, tests were conducted in the Drain Tube Test Stand (DTTS) with 1/4 inch beads, 3/8 inch beads, and a 50/50 mixture to identify any process concerns. Results of the DTTS tests are summarized in Attachment 1. A somewhat larger volume expansion was experienced in all three DTTS runs as compared to a standard run using cullet. Further testing of the use of glass beads in the CIM5 was requested by the Design Authority as Task 1.02 of Technical Task Request 99-MNSS/SE-006. Since the Technical Task Plan was not yet approved, the completion of this task was conducted under an authorization request approved by the SRTC Laboratory Director, S. Wood. This request is included as Attachment 2.

  5. Atmospheric Amines and Ammonia Measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    You, Y.; Kanawade, V. P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Madronich, Sasha; Sierra-Hernandez, M. R.; Lawler, M.; Smith, James N.; Takahama, S.; Ruggeri, G.; Koss, A.; Olson, K.; Baumann, K.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Guo, H.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Porcelli, L.; Brune, W. H.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Lee, S.-H

    2014-11-19

    We report ambient measurements of amines and ammonia with a fast response chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) in a Southeastern U.S. forest in Alabama and a moderately polluted Midwestern site during the summer. In the Alabama forest, mostly C3-amines (from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 2 ppbv) were detected on a daily basis. C3-amines and ammonia showed similar diurnal trends and temperature and wind direction dependences, and were not associated with transported CO and SO2 plumes. Consistent with temperature dependences, amine and ammonia in the gas and aerosol phases showed opposite diurnal trends, indicating gas-to-particle partitioning of amines and ammonia. Temperature dependences also imply reversible processes of amines and ammonia evaporation from soil surfaces in daytime and deposition of amines and ammonia to soil surfaces at nighttime. Various amines (C1-C6) at the pptv level were observed in the transported biomass burning plumes, showing that biomass burning can be a substantial source of amines in the Southeast U.S. At the moderately polluted Kent site, higher concentrations of amines (C1-C6, from pptv to tens of pptv) and ammonia (up to 6 ppbv) were detected. Diurnal variations of C1- to C3-amines and ammonia were correlated with the ambient temperature. C4- to C6-amines showed abrupt increases during the nighttime, suggesting that they were emitted from local sources. These abundant amines and ammonia may in part explain the frequent new particle formation events reported from Kent. Lower amine concentrations at the rural forested site highlight the importance of constraining anthropogenic sources of amines.

  6. Design of a microprocessor-based Control, Interface and Monitoring (CIM unit for turbine engine controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaat, J. C.; Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    High speed minicomputers were used in the past to implement advanced digital control algorithms for turbine engines. These minicomputers are typically large and expensive. It is desirable for a number of reasons to use microprocessor-based systems for future controls research. They are relatively compact, inexpensive, and are representative of the hardware that would be used for actual engine-mounted controls. The Control, Interface, and Monitoring Unit (CIM) contains a microprocessor-based controls computer, necessary interface hardware and a system to monitor while it is running an engine. It is presently being used to evaluate an advanced turbofan engine control algorithm.

  7. Modeling alongshore propagating tides and currents around West Maui, Hawaii and implications for transport using Delft3D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitousek, S.; Fletcher, C. H.; Storlazzi, C. D.

    2006-12-01

    Nearshore currents are driven by a number of components including tides, waves winds and even internal tides. To adequately simulate transport of sand and other constituents, the realistic behavior of the dominant current-generating phenomena should be resolved. This often requires sufficient observations and calibration/validation efforts to achieve realistic modeling results. The work explores the capabilities of modeling the currents along West Maui. The West Maui coast has a propagating tide where the observed peak tidal currents, which are directed parallel to the coast, occur very closely to the peak tidal water levels. In 2003, the USGS collected an extensive set of current observations along West Maui, Hawaii, with the goal of better understanding transport mechanisms of sediment, larvae, pollutants and other particles in coral reef settings. The observations included vessel mounted ADCP surveys and an array seafloor instruments at the 10m isobath along the coast. A simple 2DH model of West Maui using Delft3D shows good comparison of the modeled and observed currents. Nearshore currents driven by waves and winds are also considered. During the data collection period a significant erosion event occurred within the study domain at Kaanapali Beach. This event undermined several trees on the shoreline and threatened resort infrastructure. In modeling the nearshore currents of this region we hope to determine the potential for sand transport and shoreline change to hindcast this event.

  8. Characterization of the mass-dependent transmission efficiency of a CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Steiner, Gerhard; Wagner, Andrea C.; Kürten, Andreas; Hansel, Armin; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about mass discrimination effects in a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) is crucial for quantifying, e.g., the recently discovered extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOCs) and other compounds for which no calibration standard exists so far. Here, we present a simple way of estimating mass discrimination effects of a nitrate-based chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. Characterization of the mass discrimination is achieved by adding different perfluorinated acids to the mass spectrometer in amounts sufficient to deplete the primary ions significantly. The relative transmission efficiency can then be determined by comparing the decrease of signals from the primary ions and the increase of signals from the perfluorinated acids at higher masses. This method is in use already for PTR-MS; however, its application to a CI-APi-TOF brings additional difficulties, namely clustering and fragmentation of the measured compounds, which can be treated with statistical analysis of the measured data, leading to self-consistent results. We also compare this method to a transmission estimation obtained with a setup using an electrospray ion source, a high-resolution differential mobility analyzer and an electrometer, which estimates the transmission of the instrument without the CI source. Both methods give different transmission curves, indicating non-negligible mass discrimination effects of the CI source. The absolute transmission of the instrument without the CI source was estimated with the HR-DMA method to plateau between the m/z range of 127 and 568 Th at around 1.5 %; however, for the CI source included, the depletion method showed a steady increase in relative transmission efficiency from the m/z range of the primary ion (mainly at 62 Th) to around 550 Th by a factor of around 5. The main advantages of the depletion method are that the instrument is used in the same operation mode as

  9. The major histocompatibility complex class II-linked cim locus controls the kinetics of intracellular transport of a classical class I molecule

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The dominant trans-acting major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked class I modifier (cim) locus, previously recognized through its ability to determine altered alloantigenicity of a rat class I molecule, RT1.A3, is shown here to influence class I intracellular transport. The MHC recombinant laboratory rat strains PVG.R1 and PVG.R8 display unusually long retention of RT1.Aa within the endoplasmic reticulum or cis-Golgi. In appropriate F1 hybrid cells heterozygous for RT1.Aa and another class I MHC allele, RT1.Ac, only the RT1.Aa protein is subject to slow transport. The cim gene product therefore shows class I allele specificity in its action, cim appears to be a polymorphic locus whose product is directly involved in the processes of class I MHC assembly and/or intracellular transport. PMID:2007857

  10. Studies of current-perpendicular-to-plane magnetoresistance (CPP-MR) and current-induced magnetization switching (CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Huseyin

    2005-08-01

    We present two CPP-MR studies of spin-valves based upon ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic (F/N/F) trilayers. We measure the spin-diffusion lengths of N = Pd, Pt, and Au at 4.2K, and both the specific resistances (sample area A times resistance R) and spin-memory-loss of N/Cu interfaces. Pd, Pt and Au are of special device interest because they give perpendicular anisotropy when sandwiching very thin Co layers. Comparing our spin-memory-loss data at Pd/Cu and Pt/Cu interfaces with older data for Nb/Cu and W/Cu gives insight into the importance of spin-orbit coupling in producing such loss. We reproduce and extend prior studies by Eid of 'magnetic activity' at the interface of Co and N-metals (or combinations of N-metals), when the other side of the N-metal contacts a superconductor (S). Our data suggest that magnetic activity may require strong spin-flipping at the N/S interface. We present five studies of a new phenomenon, CIMS, in F1/N/F2 trilayers, with F1 a thick 'polarizing' layer and F2 a thin 'switching' layer. In all prior studies of CIMS, positive current caused the magnetization of F2 to switch from parallel (P) to anti-parallel (AP) to that of F1- 'normal' switching. By judicious addition of impurities to F-metals, we are able to controllably produce both 'normal' and 'inverse' switching- where positive current switches the magnetization of F2 from AP to P to that of F1. In the samples studied, whether the switching is normal or inverse is set by the 'net polarization' produced by F1 and is independent of the properties of F2. As scattering in the bulk of F1 and F2 is essential to producing our results, these results cannot be described by ballistic models, which allow scattering only at interfaces. Most CIMS experiments use Cu as the N-layer due to its low resistivity and long spin-diffusion length. We show that Ag and Au have low enough resistivities and long enough spin-diffusion lengths to be useful alternatives to Cu for some devices. While

  11. Development of Inundation Map for Bantayan Island, Cebu Using Delft3D-Flow Storm Surge Simulations of Typhoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadra, Camille; Suarez, John Kenneth; Biton, Nophi Ian; Cabacaba, Krichi May; Lapidez, John Phillip; Santiago, Joy; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Malano, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    On average, 20 typhoons enter the Philippine area of responsibility annually, making it vulnerable to different storm hazards. Apart from the frequency of tropical cyclones, the archipelagic nature of the country makes it particularly prone to storm surges. On 08 November 2013, Haiyan, a Category 5 Typhoon with maximum one-minute sustained wind speed of 315 kph, hit the central region of the Philippines. In its path, the howler devastated Bantayan Island, a popular tourist destination. The island is located north of Cebu City, the second largest metropolis of the Philippines in terms of populace. Having been directly hit by Typhoon Haiyan, Bantayan Island was severely damaged by strong winds and storm surges, with more than 11,000 houses totally destroyed while 5,000 more suffered minor damage. The adverse impacts of possible future storm surge events in the island can only be mitigated if hazard maps that depict inundation of the coastal areas of Bantayan are generated. To create such maps, Delft3D-Flow, a hydrodynamic model was used to simulate storm surges. These simulations were made over a 10-m per pixel resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) bathymetry. The results of the coastal inundation model for Typhoon Haiyan's storm surges were validated using data collected from field work and local government reports. The hydrodynamic model of Bantayan was then calibrated using the field data and further simulations were made with varying typhoon tracks. This was done to generate scenarios on the farthest possible inland incursion of storm surges. The output of the study is a detailed storm surge inundation map that depicts safe zones for development of infrastructure near coastal areas and for construction of coastal protection structures. The storm surge inundation map can also be used as basis for disaster preparedness plans of coastal communities threatened by approaching typhoons.

  12. Delft3D Storm Surge Simulation of Typhoon Haiyan for Projection of Coastal Inundation in the Visayas Islands, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, J. K. B.; Cabacaba, K. M.; Biton, N. I.; Cuadra, C.; Santiago, J. T.; Mendoza, J.; Lagmay, A. M. F. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Philippines is geographically prone to tropical cyclones with an annual average of 20 typhoons entering the country's area of responsibility. On 08 November 2013, a Category 5 Typhoon Haiyan with maximum one-minute sustained wind speed of 315 kph, hit the central area of the archipelago. The damage from the typhoon reached two billion US dollars with 6,300 reported casualties. The adverse impacts of possible future storm surge events in the Philippine archipelago specifically in the Visayan region can only be mitigated if a storm surge model that will include the inundation of the coastal areas is generated. The hydrodynamic modeling software, Delft3D, was used in the storm surge simulation of the Visayas Islands. An overall model of the Visayas with a coarse grid cell size was nested to a detailed model on hardly stricken populated areas with a 10-m per pixel resolution Digital Elevation Model and General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans bathymetry. Due to lack of observed water level data during the onslaught of Typhoon Haiyan, the overall Visayas model was calibrated by simulating previous typhoons with recorded data acquired from tide stations. Several simulations were carried out to generate farthest possible inland incursion of storm surges. This was done by translating the actual typhoon track vertically and horizontally with a specified increment. The output of the study is a storm surge inundation map that can be used to determine safe zones for development of infrastructure near coastal areas. The storm surge inundation map can also be used as basis for disaster preparedness plans of coastal communities threatened by approaching typhoons.

  13. Delft3D Storm Surge Simulation of Typhoon Haiyan for Projection of Coastal Inundation in the Visayas Islands, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, John Kenneth; Cabacaba, Krichi May; Biton, Nophi Ian; Cuadra, Camille; Santiago, Joy; Mendoza, Jerico; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    The Philippines is geographically prone to tropical cyclones with an annual average of 20 typhoons entering the country's area of responsibility. Majority of these typhoons pass through the central part of the archipelago in the Visayas Region. On 08 November 2013, a Category 5 Typhoon Haiyan with maximum ten-minute sustained wind speed of 230 kph hit the Visayas region causing damage amounting to two billion US dollars with 6,300 reported casualties. The adverse impacts of future storm surge events in the Philippine archipelago, specifically in the Visayan region, can be mitigated if a storm surge model that will include the inundation of coastal areas is generated. The hydrodynamic modeling software, Delft3D, was used in creating hydrodynamic models for areas in the Visayas Islands. High resolution hydrodynamic models of the hardly stricken areas with 10-m per pixel resolution Digital Elevation Model and General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans bathymetry were nested to an overall model of Visayas with a coarse grid cell size. Due to the lack of observed water level data during the onslaught of Typhoon Haiyan, the overall Visayas model was calibrated by creating hydrodynamic models for the same Haiyan-affected areas using previous typhoons with recorded data acquired from tide stations as wind forcing. Several simulations were carried out to generate the farthest possible inland incursion of storm surges. This was done by translating the actual typhoon track vertically and horizontally with a specified increment. The output of the study is a storm surge inundation map showing the worst case scenario of inundation for a Category 5 typhoon. This storm surge inundation map can be used to determine safe zones for development of infrastructure near coastal areas. The storm surge inundation map can also be used as basis for disaster preparedness plans of coastal communities threatened by approaching typhoons.

  14. Assessment Of Mold-Design Dependent Textures In CIM-Components By Polarized Light Optical Texture Analysis (PLOTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, Frank; Rauch, Johannes; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-07

    By thermoplastic ceramic injection moulding (CIM) ceramic components of high complexity can be produced in a large number of items at low dimensional tolerances. The cost advantage by the high degree of automation leads to an economical mass-production. The structure of injection-moulded components is determined by the form filling behaviour and viscosity of the feedstock, the machine parameters, the design of the mold and the gate design. With an adapted mold- and gate-design CIM-components without textures are possible. The ''Polarized Light Optical Texture analysis'' (PLOTA) makes it possible to inspect the components and detect and quantify the textures produced by a new mold. Based on the work of R. Fischer (2004) the PLOTA procedure was improved by including the possibility to measure the inclination angle and thus describe the orientation of the grains in three dimensions. Sampled thin sections of ceramic components are analysed under the polarization microscope and are brought in diagonal position. Pictures are taken with a digital camera. The pictures are converted in the L*a*b*- colour space and the crystals color values a* and b* in the picture are measured. The color values are compared with the values of a quartz wedge, which serves as universal standard. From the received values the inclination angle can be calculated relative to the microscope axis. It is possible to use the received data quantitatively e.g. for the FEM supported simulation of texture-conditioned divergences of mechanical values. Thus the injection molding parameters can be optimized to obtain improved mechanical properties.

  15. Assessment Of Mold-Design Dependent Textures In CIM-Components By Polarized Light Optical Texture Analysis (PLOTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Frank; Rauch, Johannes; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    By thermoplastic ceramic injection moulding (CIM) ceramic components of high complexity can be produced in a large number of items at low dimensional tolerances. The cost advantage by the high degree of automation leads to an economical mass-production. The structure of injection-moulded components is determined by the form filling behaviour and viscosity of the feedstock, the machine parameters, the design of the mold and the gate design. With an adapted mold- and gate-design CIM-components without textures are possible. The "Polarized Light Optical Texture analysis" (PLOTA) makes it possible to inspect the components and detect and quantify the textures produced by a new mold. Based on the work of R. Fischer (2004) the PLOTA procedure was improved by including the possibility to measure the inclination angle and thus describe the orientation of the grains in three dimensions. Sampled thin sections of ceramic components are analysed under the polarization microscope and are brought in diagonal position. Pictures are taken with a digital camera. The pictures are converted in the L*a*b*- colour space and the crystals color values a* and b* in the picture are measured. The color values are compared with the values of a quartz wedge, which serves as universal standard. From the received values the inclination angle can be calculated relative to the microscope axis. It is possible to use the received data quantitatively e.g. for the FEM supported simulation of texture-conditioned divergences of mechanical values. Thus the injection molding parameters can be optimized to obtain improved mechanical properties.

  16. Cross-institutional Flood Forecasting in Regional Water Systems;Innovative application of Delft-FEWS in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heeringen, Klaas-Jan; Douben, Klaas-Jan; van de Wouw, Mark; IJpelaar, Ruben; van Loenen, Arnejan

    2015-04-01

    The regional water system in the North-Brabant province in The Netherlands is (operationally) managed by four different Water Authorities: Rijkswaterstaat Southern-Netherlands, and the three Regional Water Authorities (RWA's) Aa & Maas, De Dommel and Brabantse Delta. The water systems basically consist of mid-sized (navigable) canals, semi-natural brook valleys in mildly sloping sandy soils, and man-made watercourses in clayey polder areas. The management areas of the De Dommel and Brabantse Delta RWA's are bordering Belgium over a total length of approx. 185 km, and are prone to transboundary flood flows. The current project 'Dynamic Water Management' intends to improve the mutual cooperation and communication between the RWA's and Rijkswaterstaat during periods of both high and low water stages. The project deals with governance issues such as water agreements and water systems analyses. A powerful product of the project is a DSS for flood forecasting ('DSS Brabant'). One of the main benefits of cooperation between the RWA's and Rijkswaterstaat is to enable assistance during peak flows and flood events and to try to optimise operational water systems management by deploying drainage and storage facilities by using the connecting (navigable) canals. A set of hydraulic structures like pumps, weirs and sluices facilitate the control and routing of the water flows. Especially during peak flow and flood events, these canals allow to deviate excess flow to neighbours who suffer less from flooding. During regular conditions the water systems are fully independent, but during floods connections are made by using the canal system. The heart of DSS Brabant consists of a Delft-FEWS application, containing several RTC (1st) and hydrodynamic Sobek (2nd order) models FEWS is receiving a variety of data on hourly or six-hourly basis, consisting of measured and forecasted meteorological input (radar-precipitation/HIRLAM, evaporation and wind), water levels and discharges at

  17. Field Measurements Of Ammonia Fluxes Above A Douglas-fir Forest In Speuld, Holland Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, M. R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Flynn, M. J.; Percival, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is an important component of the atmospheric nitrogenous species on regional scales and is a major contributor to the nitrogen budget across the UK and Western Europe. It represents the major atmospheric alkaline gas and in its interaction with acidic gases such as nitric acid, leads to the formation of particulate matter (e.g., Asman, 1998). As sulphur emissions decline across Western Europe, regions of excess ammonia are becoming more widespread and ammonium nitrate aerosol is becoming a significant component of atmospheric nitrogen . NH3 is efficiently lost to the semi-natural vegetation, typical of many natural ecosystems prevalent in Western Europe. Deposition of atmospheric NH3 to ecosystems can lead to deleterious effects such as eutrophication and acidification of soils, contributing to forest decline and a decrease in biological diversity (e.g., Fangmeier et al., 1994). Ammonia measurements were performed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) utilizing the protonated acetone dimer as the precursor ion. NH3 flux measurements were evaluated using the eddy covariance technique at a height of 46m above ground at Speuld forest. The Speuld fieldsite is a mature plantation of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), located in the centre of the Netherlands (52°13'N, 5 ° 39'E). Data was collected over a two week period (June 25th - July 8th 2009), and fluxes will be determined using the eddy covariance technique. To the authors’ knowledge, these measurements represent the only NH3 flux measurements using CIMS, indeed few studies exist that directly determine fluxes using the this technique. Eddy covariance flux measurements are the most direct way to estimate NH3 removal near the surface. Preliminary data will be presented and compared with the GRadient Ammonia High Accuracy Monitor (GRAHAM) method. References: Asman, W. A. H., Sutton, M. A., and Schjorring, J. K.: Ammonia: emission, atmospheric transport and deposition, New Phytol., 139

  18. Investigations of Acetate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (NIPT-CIMS): Underlying Chemistry, Calibrations, and Operational Considerations for the Detection of Carboxylic Acids and Other Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, P.; Farmer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The growing use of high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (HR-TOF-CIMS) as applied to gas and particle measurements requires a thorough understanding of the underlying chemistry to ensure accurate molecular identification. These systems are deployed using a number of reagent ion chemistries in both the positive and negative mode. Moreover, high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometers make it possible to detect and (potentially) quantify species without the use of authentic standards. Acetate CIMS (or negative-ion proton-transfer CIMS) detects species by abstracting a proton from carboxylic acids, nitrated phenols, and other species with acidic protons. Clustering reactions are also known to occur, complicating analysis. proper interpretation of the mass spectra requires understanding these mechanisms and controlling for unwanted ionization processes. We investigate the ability to control for clustering reactions using authentic standards under various clustering regimes while maintaining ion transmission efficiency in simple and complex matrices. The feasibility of using isotopically labeled acetate to unambiguously identify clusters is also investigated. Bulk metrics for describing the spectra (oxygen:carbon, oxidation state, average carbon number, etc) are also investigated to understand their susceptibility to experimental configuration.

  19. Mapping Argonaute and conventional RNA-binding protein interactions with RNA at single-nucleotide resolution using HITS-CLIP and CIMS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Zhang, Chaolin; Gantman, Emily Conn; Mele, Aldo; Darnell, Jennifer C.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Identifying sites where RNA binding proteins (RNABPs) interact with target RNAs opens the door to understanding the vast complexity of RNA regulation. UV-crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) is a transformative technology in which RNAs purified from in vivo cross-linked RNA-protein complexes are sequenced to reveal footprints of RNABP:RNA contacts. CLIP combined with high throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP) is a generalizable strategy to produce transcriptome-wide RNA binding maps with higher accuracy and resolution than standard RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) profiling or purely computational approaches. Applying CLIP to Argonaute proteins has expanded the utility of this approach to mapping binding sites for microRNAs and other small regulatory RNAs. Finally, recent advances in data analysis take advantage of crosslinked-induced mutation sites (CIMS) to refine RNA-binding maps to single-nucleotide resolution. Once IP conditions are established, HITS-CLIP takes approximately eight days to prepare RNA for sequencing. Established pipelines for data analysis, including for CIMS, take 3-4 days. PMID:24407355

  20. A new technique for the direct detection of HO2 radicals using bromide chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Br-CIMS): initial characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Javier; Tanner, David J.; Chen, Dexian; Huey, L. Gregory; Ng, Nga L.

    2016-08-01

    Hydroperoxy radicals (HO2) play an important part in tropospheric photochemistry, yet photochemical models do not capture ambient HO2 mixing ratios consistently. This is likely due to a combination of uncharacterized chemical pathways and measurement limitations. The indirect nature of current HO2 measurements introduces challenges in accurately measuring HO2; therefore a direct technique would help constrain HOx chemistry in the atmosphere. In this work we evaluate the feasibility of using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and propose a direct HO2 detection scheme using bromide as a reagent ion. Ambient observations were made with a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) in Atlanta over the month of June 2015 to demonstrate the capability of this direct measurement technique. Observations displayed expected diurnal profiles, reaching daytime median values of ˜ 5 ppt between 2 and 3 p.m. local time. The HO2 diurnal profile was found to be influenced by morning-time vehicular NOx emissions and shows a slow decrease into the evening, likely from non-photolytic production, among other factors. Measurement sensitivities of approximately 5.1 ± 1.0 cps ppt-1 for a bromide ion (79Br-) count rate of 106 cps were observed. The relatively low instrument background allowed for a 3σ lower detection limit of 0.7 ppt for a 1 min integration time. Mass spectra of ambient measurements showed the 79BrHO2- peak was the major component of the signal at nominal mass-to-charge 112, suggesting high selectivity for HO2 at this mass-to-charge. More importantly, this demonstrates that these measurements can be achieved using instruments with only unit mass resolution capability.

  1. Applications of online high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HRToF-CIMS): opportunities and challenges for aircraft measurements, atmosphere-ecosystem exchange, and organic aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; D'Ambro, E.; Mohr, C.; Gaston, C.; Schobesberger, S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past five years, field deployable high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (HRToF-CIMS) have been developed and deployed for a range of problems relevant to atmospheric chemistry. The inherent duty cycle, dynamic range, mass accuracy, and resolving power of these instruments provide transformative capabilities for deriving new insights into atmospheric composition. We present examples of these capabilities from the deployments of the University of Washington HRToF-CIMS aboard research aircraft, an eddy flux tower in a boreal forest, and to measure organic aerosol composition upon temperature-programmed thermal desorption in field and chamber experiments. Specific examples include measurements of reactive halogens with all relevant isotopes simultaneously resolved from potential interferences, the opportunity for discovery, after the fact, of previously unmeasured or unexpected compounds with acquisition of the full mass spectrum, and providing a broad survey of the 100s of organic compounds that desorb from complex isoprene and monoterpene derived secondary organic aerosol matrices. While there are unique opportunities, there are also significant technical challenges to realizing the full analytical potential these instruments can provide. Many of these challenges are common to any analytical technique, but perhaps seemingly more demanding for HRToF-CIMS, such as the presumed need to calibrate 100s of molecular ion signals routinely detected in each spectrum. We detail some of the more pressing challenges and our approach towards addressing them.

  2. Measurement of HONO, HNCO, and Other Inorganic Acids by Negative-ion Proton-Transfer Chemical-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS):Application to Biomass Burning Emissions.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, James M.; Veres, Patrick; Warneke, Carsten; Neuman, Andrew; Washenfelder, Rebecca; Brown, Steven; Baasandroj, Munkhbayar; Burkholder, James; Burling, Ian; Johnson, Timothy J.; Yokelson, Robert L.; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2010-07-23

    A negative-ion proton transfer chemical ionization mass spectrometric technique (NI-PT-CIMS), using acetate as the reagent ion, was applied to the measurement of volatile inorganic acids of atmospheric interest: hydrochloric (HCl), nitrous (HONO) nitric (HNO3), and isocyanic (HNCO) acids. Gas phase calibrations through the sampling inlet showed the method to be intrinsically sensitive (6-16 cts/pptv), but prone to inlet effects for HNO3 and HCl. The ion chemistry was found to be insensitive to water vapor concentrations, in agreement with previous studies of carboxylic acids. The inlet equilibration times for HNCO and HONO were 2 to 4 seconds, allowing for measurement in biomass burning studies. Several potential interferences in HONO measurements were examined: decomposition of HNO3•NO3- clusters within the CIMS, and NO2-water production on inlet surfaces, and were quite minor (>_1%, 3.3%, respectively). The detection limits of the method were limited by the instrument backgrounds in the ion source and flow tube, and were estimated to range between 16 and 50 pptv (parts per trillion by volume). The comparison of HONO measured by CIMS and by in situ FTIR showed good correlation and agreement to within 17%. The method provided rapid and accurate measurements of HNCO and HONO in controlled biomass burning studies, and suggest both as products of biomass burning.

  3. Measurement of pernitric acid (HO2NO2) using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) with I-·H2O as the reagent ions: instrumentation and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Ng, N. L.; Li, J.; Dibb, J. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) is formed by the association reaction of HO2 and NO2, which couples both the HOx (HO2+OH) and NOx (=NO2+NO) families. The thermal decomposition at higher temperatures is sufficiently fast that HO2NO2 is in steady state with HO2 and NO2. This allows HO2 levels to be inferred from HO2NO2 observations. In Polar Regions and higher altitudes, significant levels of HO2NO2 can build up and influences local HOx and NOx photochemistry. Here, we present an in situ measurement technique of HO2NO2 based on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) using the reagent ion I- and its hydrated form I-·H2O, together with our calibration technique for HO2NO2 measurements. We will also present observations of HO2NO2: (1) in a polar boundary layer on top of the Greenland Ice Sheet during summer 2011, and (2) in an urban boundary layer in metropolitan Atlanta during winter 2014. The local chemistry of HO2NO2 at Summit will be evaluated. The local HO2 in Atlanta will be inferred and assessed with models.

  4. Deployment of a ground-based CIMS apparatus for the detection of organic gases in the boreal forest during the QUEST campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellegri, K.; Umann, B.; Hanke, M.; Arnold, F.

    2005-02-01

    Measurements of atmospheric volatile organic compounds were performed in the Finnish Boreal forest atmosphere during spring 2003, as part of the project QUEST (Quantification of Aerosol Nucleation in the European Boundary Layer), using a ground-based Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) instrument. Based on the study of their hydrate distribution, methanol, acetonitrile, acetaldehyde, dimethyl amine (DMA), ethanol/formic acid, acetone, trimethyl amine (TMA), propanol/acetic acid, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and metacrolein (MaCR), monoterpenes and monoterpene oxidation product (MTOP) are proposed as candidates for masses 32, 41, 44, 45, 46, 58, 59, 60, 68, 70, 136, and 168amu, respectively. It would be, to our knowledge, the first time DMA, TMA and MTOP are measured with this method. Most compounds show a clear diurnal variation with a maximum in the early night, corresponding to the onset of the noctural inversion and in agreement with independant measurements of CO. Biogenic compounds are highly correlated with each other and the ratio monoterpene/oxidation product shows a typical daily pattern of nightime maxima. However, because isoprene mixing ratios are also maximum during the early night, it is likely that it suffers of the interference from another unidentified biogenic compound. Hence mass 68amu is identified as isoprene+compound X.

  5. Deployment of a ground-based CIMS apparatus for the detection of organic gases in the boreal forest during the QUEST campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellegri, K.; Umann, B.; Hanke, M.; Arnold, F.

    2004-07-01

    Measurements of atmospheric volatile organic compounds were performed in the Finnish Boreal forest atmosphere during spring 2003, as part of the project QUEST (Quantification of Aerosol Nucleation in the European Boundary Layer), using a ground-based Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) instrument. Based on the study of their hydrate distribution, Methanol, Acetonitrile, Acetaldehyde, Dimethyl Amine (DMA), Ethanol/Formic Acid, Acetone, Trimethyl Amine TMA, Propanol/Acetic Acid, Methyl Vinyl Ketone (MVK) and Metacrolein (MaCR), Monoterpenes, Cis-3-hexenyl Acetate and Monoterpene Oxidation Products (MTOP) are proposed as candidates for masses 33, 41, 44, 45, 46, 58, 59, 60, 70, 136, 142 and 168 amu, respectively. It would be, to our knowledge, the first time DMA, TMA, MTOP and Cis-3-hexenyl Acetate are measured with this method. A compound with mass 68 amu, which could be Isoprene has also been identified. Most compounds show a clear diurnal variation with higher concentrations at night, starting at the onset of the nocturnal inversion and in agreement with independent measurements of CO. Biogenic compounds are highly correlated with each other and the ratio monoterpene/oxidation product shows a typical daily pattern of nighttime maxima. Cis-3-hexenyl Acetate has a diurnal variation similar to the ones of Isoprene and Monoterpenes, and especially close to the diurnal variation of their oxidation products.

  6. A high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer utilizing hydronium ions (H3O+ ToF-CIMS) for measurements of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bin; Koss, Abigail; Warneke, Carsten; Gilman, Jessica B.; Lerner, Brian M.; Stark, Harald; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2016-07-01

    Proton transfer reactions between hydronium ions (H3O+) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) provide a fast and highly sensitive technique for VOC measurements, leading to extensive use of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in atmospheric research. Based on the same ionization approach, we describe the development of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) utilizing H3O+ as the reagent ion. The new H3O+ ToF-CIMS has sensitivities of 100-1000 cps ppb-1 (ion counts per second per part-per-billion mixing ratio of VOC) and detection limits of 20-600 ppt at 3σ for a 1 s integration time for simultaneous measurements of many VOC species of atmospheric relevance. The ToF analyzer with mass resolution (m/Δm) of up to 6000 allows the separation of isobaric masses, as shown in previous studies using similar ToF-MS. While radio frequency (RF)-only quadrupole ion guides provide better overall ion transmission than ion lens system, low-mass cutoff of RF-only quadrupole causes H3O+ ions to be transmitted less efficiently than heavier masses, which leads to unusual humidity dependence of reagent ions and difficulty obtaining a humidity-independent parameter for normalization. The humidity dependence of the instrument was characterized for various VOC species and the behaviors for different species can be explained by compound-specific properties that affect the ion chemistry (e.g., proton affinity and dipole moment). The new H3O+ ToF-CIMS was successfully deployed on the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft for the SONGNEX campaign in spring of 2015. The measured mixing ratios of several aromatics from the H3O+ ToF-CIMS agreed within ±10 % with independent gas chromatography measurements from whole air samples. Initial results from the SONGNEX measurements demonstrate that the H3O+ ToF-CIMS data set will be valuable for the identification and characterization of emissions from various sources, investigation of secondary

  7. Measurement of Organic Acids Produced By The Gas-Phase Ozonolysis of Simple Olefins Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) as a Function of Temperature And Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, C. J.; Bacak, A.; Leather, K. E.; McGillen, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) form an important trace component of the atmosphere and are of particular environmental interest because of their deleterious effects on air quality, their numerous (and potentially counteractive) effects on Earth’s climate system and their sophisticated semiochemical roles in the world’s ecosystems. NMHCs are also important precursors to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (e.g. Pandis et al., 1991; Kavouras et al., 1999). The ozonolysis reactions of olefins result in complex menageries of products, of which the acids are ubiquitous. Although the gas phase acid concentrations are small, they are thought to be key species in SOA formation as a result of their low volatility (e.g., Ma et al., 2009). Despite this, the factors that control acid formation are not well understood, especially with regards to humidity and temperature. Acid yields will be measured using the newly commissioned EXTreme RAnge (EXTRA) chamber (Leather et al., 2009). EXTRA is a 125 L stainless steel chamber, which can be temperature controlled using a commercial chest freezer unit (for T ≤ -20 °C) or a purpose built oven for T > 25 °C. The EXTRA chamber can be operated at pressures from 10-3800 Torr and at temperatures from 180-473 K. The stainless steel chamber walls have been coated with PFA to minimize wall loss of radicals. Fans, located at both ends of the cylinder, promote rapid mixing of reactants. Six sample ports are located at either end of the chamber for connection to ADS-GC-ECD, CIMS and commercial sensors such as a Thermo Electron Corporation 49i Ozone Analyzer, an Edinburgh Instruments Gascard CO2 sensor and a Trace Analytical inc. RGA3 CO analyzer. Experiments will be performed as a function of atmospherically relevant temperatures (T= 180-300 K). The field CIMS has sub ppt(v) L.O.D.s with a sub 1 Hz time response so will enable products to be quantified at very low concentrations in real time. Acid products will be detected

  8. FA-SIFT study of reactions of protonated water and ethanol clusters with [alpha]-pinene and linalool in view of their selective detection by CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhooghe, F.; Amelynck, C.; Rimetz-Planchon, J.; Schoon, N.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2010-02-01

    The use of protonated water clusters and protonated ethanol clusters as reagent ions has been evaluated for the resolution of an interference encountered in CIMS when measuring monoterpenes (C10H16) and linalool (C10H18O) simultaneously. To this end, the reactions of H3O+.(H2O)n (n = 1-3), (C2H5OH)mH+ (m = 1-3) and (C2H5OH.H2O)H+ with [alpha]-pinene and linalool have been characterized in a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) instrument at a SIFT He buffer gas pressure of 1.43 hPa and a temperature of 298 K. All reactions with linalool were found to occur at the collision limit. The reaction of (C2H5OH)2H+ with [alpha]-pinene proceeds at half the collision rate and both the reactions of (C2H5OH)3H+ and H3O+.(H2O)3 with [alpha]-pinene have a very low rate constant. All other reactions involving [alpha]-pinene proceed at the collision rate. The reactions of H3O+.H2O, H3O+.(H2O)2, C2H5OH2+, (C2H5OH.H2O)H+ and (C2H5OH)2H+ with [alpha]-pinene mainly proceed by proton transfer. Additionally, ligand switching channels have been observed for the reactions of (C2H5OH)2H+ and H3O+.(H2O)2 with [alpha]-pinene. Protonated linalool was observed as a minor product for the reactions of (C2H5OH.H2O)H+ and H3O+.(H2O)n (n = 1-3) with linalool. For all linalool reactions, a contribution of the dissociative proton transfer product at m/z 137 was found and this ion was the main product ion for the reactions with H3O+.H2O, C2H5OH2+ and (C2H5OH.H2O)H+. For the (C2H5OH.H2O)H+/linalool reaction, ligand switching with both water and ethanol has been observed. Major ligand switching channels were observed for the reactions of (C2H5OH)2H+, (C2H5OH)3H+ and H3O+.(H2O)2 with linalool. Also, for the H3O+.(H2O)3/linalool reaction, several ligand switching channels have been observed. These results are discussed in view of their applicability for the selective detection of monoterpenes and linalool with CIMS instrumentation such as SIFT-MS, PTR-MS and APCI-MS.

  9. Methods Of Testing And Assessing The Technical Condition Of Chosen Building Structures Located In The Area Of The Auschwitz-Birkenau National Museum In Oświęcim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kańka, Stanisław; Stryszewska, Teresa; Tracz, Tomasz; Karczmarczyk, Stanisław; Paruch, Roman

    2015-12-01

    The results presented in this article consider the means of assessing the technical condition of two selected buildings, i.e. prisoner barracks number 123 and 124, located at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oświęcim. The work was carried out within the framework of a research project involving the development of methods for preserving, securing and strengthening the structure of buildings, along with their substrate and finishes. The aim of the project was to gain a knowledge base reflecting the actual state of the existing facilities and, on that basis, develop preservation methods and ways to protect the existing facilities against further damage, while maintaining the current character.

  10. Career Information in the mathematical sciences (CIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sterrett, A.

    1993-05-01

    In November of 1992, a CBMS Steering Committee for Career Information was appointed by the CBMS Council. An informal meeting of those members in attendance at the Annual Meeting of the MAA and the AMS was held in January, 1993. The first meeting was held on May 1, 2 in Washington, DC in conjunction with CBMS Council meeting. Information on existing career materials was provided to the Council at that time and Council reactions were obtained. These reactions, along with reviews of material by students, faculty members and counselors, were used by the Steering Committee to plan specific activities for the next 6--18 months. Three initiatives were given high priority: To produce and widely disseminate an annotated bibliography of career information relevant to the mathematical sciences; to remedy the lack of messages to junior high school students, parents, teachers and counselors on the importance of mathematics in finding good jobs in a technological society; and to encourage women and minorities to take all the mathematics that they can and to consider careers in which mathematics plays an important role.

  11. 28 CFR 524.72 - CIM assignment categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (authorized by the Attorney General under title V of Public Law 91-452, 84 Stat. 933); and Bureau of Prisons... or federal penal (which includes correctional and detention facilities) institutions. This...

  12. 28 CFR 524.72 - CIM assignment categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 524.72 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION... safety of these individuals. There are two types of Witness Security cases: Department of Justice... publicity. Inmates who have received widespread publicity as a result of their criminal activity...

  13. 28 CFR 524.72 - CIM assignment categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 524.72 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION... safety of these individuals. There are two types of Witness Security cases: Department of Justice... publicity. Inmates who have received widespread publicity as a result of their criminal activity...

  14. 28 CFR 524.72 - CIM assignment categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 524.72 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION... safety of these individuals. There are two types of Witness Security cases: Department of Justice... publicity. Inmates who have received widespread publicity as a result of their criminal activity...

  15. CIMS: A FRAMEWORK FOR INFRASTRUCTURE INTERDEPENDENCY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Milos Manic

    2006-12-01

    Today’s society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, utilities, telecommunication, and even financial networks. While modeling and simulation tools have provided insight into the behavior of individual infrastructure networks, a far less understood area is that of the interrelationships among multiple infrastructure networks including the potential cascading effects that may result due to these interdependencies. This paper first describes infrastructure interdependencies as well as presenting a formalization of interdependency types. Next the paper describes a modeling and simulation framework called CIMS© and the work that is being conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to model and simulate infrastructure interdependencies and the complex behaviors that can result.

  16. 28 CFR 524.72 - CIM assignment categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... identified, in writing, by the United States Secret Service as requiring special surveillance. (c) Broad... groups (e.g., prison gangs), which have a history of disrupting operations and security in either state... also includes those persons who may require separation from a specific disruptive group. (e)...

  17. Explaining student success in engineering education at Delft University of Technology: a literature synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bogaard, M.

    2012-03-01

    Student success is among the most widely researched areas in tertiary education. Generalisability of research in this field is problematic due to cultural and structural differences between countries, institutions and programmes where the research is done. Engineering education in the Netherlands has not been studied in depth. In this paper, outcomes of studies done outside and inside engineering and outside and inside the Netherlands are discussed to help understand the complexity of student retention issues. Although generalisation is an issue, there are a number of concepts and variables that surface in many of these studies, including students' background and disposition variables, education attributes, variables concerning educational climate and student behaviour. How these variables are related and how a university can apply the outcomes of research in this field of study are discussed in this paper.

  18. Explaining Student Success in Engineering Education at Delft University of Technology: A Literature Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bogaard, M.

    2012-01-01

    Student success is among the most widely researched areas in tertiary education. Generalisability of research in this field is problematic due to cultural and structural differences between countries, institutions and programmes where the research is done. Engineering education in the Netherlands has not been studied in depth. In this paper,…

  19. Design in Industrial Design Engineering: Teaching Design at the School of IDE at the TU Delft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schierbeek, Bernd B.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an industrial design course in the Netherlands. Includes a discussion of the school history, integration of various courses, implications from the experience, design process as decision-making, basic design cycle derived from the general problem-solving process, design methodology, creativity, and conclusions. (YP)

  20. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 1. Experimental. Level 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Joan; And Others

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System in mathematics for Level 3, Part 1, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. Over 80 performance…

  1. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 2. Experimental. Level 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Joan; And Others

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System in mathematics for Level 3, Part 2, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. Over 80 performance…

  2. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 2. Experimental. Level 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Joan; And Others

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System in mathematics for Level 4, Part 2, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. Over 80 performance…

  3. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 1. Experimental. Level 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Joan; And Others

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System in mathematics for Level 4, Part 1, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. Over 85 performance…

  4. Career Information in the mathematical sciences (CIMS). Technical progress report, November 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sterrett, A.

    1993-05-01

    In November of 1992, a CBMS Steering Committee for Career Information was appointed by the CBMS Council. An informal meeting of those members in attendance at the Annual Meeting of the MAA and the AMS was held in January, 1993. The first meeting was held on May 1, 2 in Washington, DC in conjunction with CBMS Council meeting. Information on existing career materials was provided to the Council at that time and Council reactions were obtained. These reactions, along with reviews of material by students, faculty members and counselors, were used by the Steering Committee to plan specific activities for the next 6--18 months. Three initiatives were given high priority: To produce and widely disseminate an annotated bibliography of career information relevant to the mathematical sciences; to remedy the lack of messages to junior high school students, parents, teachers and counselors on the importance of mathematics in finding good jobs in a technological society; and to encourage women and minorities to take all the mathematics that they can and to consider careers in which mathematics plays an important role.

  5. Participation of HNO3 CIMS Instrument in the Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, F. L.

    2001-01-01

    This project was part of a larger SOLVE project led by Paul Wennberg at California Institute of Technology. The work completed on this project included participating in the installation and preflight testing of a new chemical ionization mass spectrometer for measuring gas and particle phase nitric acid on the ER-2. The investigators subsequently participated in SOLVE where additional instrument improvements were made and a substantial data set was generated. The two Georgia Tech investigators that participated in this work (Fred Eisele and Dave Tanner) had previously been responsible for much of the design and construction of the ion source and mass spectrometer which would be used to measure HNO3 in SOLVE, with Caltech focusing on inlets, calibration, gas supplies/pumping computer control, and overall integration. Thus, a similar focus remained during the SOLVE measurements though all investigators worked on most if not all aspects of the instrument at some point in the mission. Some of the more interesting results from the study included measurements of nitric acid on what are thought to be 5-20 microns diameter individual particles which could supply a local mechanism for HNO3 removal, Nitric acid measurements on SOLVE were completed as a collaborative effort with a great deal of overlap between this project and the larger parent project led by Paul Wennberg. As such, the instrumentation used, its operation, and the resulting measurements are far more fully discussed in the attached report (appendix A) which describes the joint SOLVE nitric acid measurement effort.

  6. Career information in the mathematical sciences (CIMS). Final report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sterrett, A.

    1996-01-29

    This report documents the preparation and distribution of materials designed to aid students is assessing their interests in and prospects for a career in the mathematical sciences. Activities included the preparation of two books, two videos, a world wide web home page, and a workshop meeting on ``Math in Careers`` held at the University of California at Berkeley in January, 1995.

  7. First quantification of calcium intake from calcium-dense dairy products in Dutch fracture patients (the Delft cohort study).

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Peter; van Haard, Paul M M; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Niesten, Dieu Donné; van der Elst, Maarten; Schweitzer, Dave H

    2014-06-23

    Recommendations for daily calcium intake from dairy products are variable and based on local consensus. To investigate whether patients with a recent fracture complied with these recommendations, we quantified the daily dairy calcium intake including milk, milk drinks, pudding, yoghurt, and cheese in a Dutch cohort of fracture patients and compared outcomes with recent data of a healthy U.S. cohort (80% Caucasians). An observational study analyzed dairy calcium intakes of 1526 female and 372 male Dutch fracture patients older than 50. On average, participants reported three dairy servings per day, independently of age, gender or population density. Median calcium intake from dairy was 790 mg/day in females and males. Based on dairy products alone, 11.3% of women and 14.2% of men complied with Dutch recommendations for calcium intake (adults ≤ 70 years: 1100 mg/day and >70 years: 1200 mg/day). After including 450 mg calcium from basic nutrition, compliance raised to 60.5% and 59.1%, respectively, compared to 53.2% in the U.S. cohort. Daily dairy calcium intake is not associated with femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores or WHO Fracture Assessment Tool (FRAX) risk scores for major fracture or hip fracture. However, when sub analyzing the male cohort, these associations were weakly negative. The prevalence of maternal hip fracture was a factor for current fracture risks, both in women and men. While daily dairy calcium intake of Dutch fracture patients was well below the recommended dietary intake, it was comparable to intakes in a healthy U.S. cohort. This questions recommendations for adding more additional dairy products to preserve adult skeletal health, particularly when sufficient additional calcium is derived from adequate non-dairy nutrition.

  8. User Education in the Online Age II. IATUL International Seminar Proceedings, (2nd, Delft, The Netherlands, July 30-August 2, 1984). Vol. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjallbrant, Nancy, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Papers presented at an August 1984 international seminar on online user education include "Library Policies and Strategies in The Netherlands" (Chris J. van Wijk, The Netherlands); "Promotion and Marketing of Library Services" (Nancy Fjallbrant, Sweden); "Library Promotion by Computer" (Ian Malley, United Kingdom); "Library User Education and…

  9. Identification of oxidized organic atmospheric species during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) using a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (IMS-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Surratt, J. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the field deployment of a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). IMS-TOF is a 2-dimensional analysis method, which separates gas-phase ions by mobility prior to determination of mass-to-charge ratio by mass spectrometry. Ion mobility is a unique physical property that is determined by the collisional cross section of an ion. Because mobility depends on size and shape, the IMS measurement is able to resolve isomers and isobaric compounds. Additionally, trends in IMS-TOF data space can be used to identify relationships between ions, such as common functionality or polymeric series. During SOAS we interfaced the IMS-TOF to a nitrate ion (NO3-) chemical ionization source that enables the selective ionization of highly oxidized gas phase species (those having a high O:C ratio) through clustering with the reagent ion. Highly oxidized products of terpenes and isoprene are important secondary organic aerosol precursors (SOA) that play an uncertain but important role in particle-phase chemistry. We present several case studies of atmospheric events during SOAS that exhibited elevated concentrations of sulfuric acid and/or organics. These events exhibited a rise in particle number and provide an opportunity to examine the role that organic species may have in local atmospheric new particle formation events. We also present the results from the field deployment and subsequent laboratory studies utilizing a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor as the inlet for the CI-IMS-TOF. The reactor draws in ambient air and exposes it to high concentrations of the OH radical, created by photolysis O3 in the presence of water. The highly oxidized products are then sampled directly by the CI-IMS-TOF. We performed several experiments including placing pine and deciduous plants directly in front of the reactor opening and observed large increases in the number and concentration of oxidized gas-phase species. Finally, we present preliminary results of atmospheric filter analysis using an Electrospray Ionization (ESI) source interfaced to the IMS-TOF.

  10. Toward the Factory of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazony, Yehonathan

    1983-01-01

    Computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) involves use of data processing technology as the vehicle for full integration of the total manufacturing process. A prototype research and educational facility for CIM developed with industrial sponsorship at Princeton University is described. (JN)

  11. Complementary and integrative medicine for breast cancer patients - Evidence based practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Witt, C M; Cardoso, M J

    2016-08-01

    On average half of the breast cancer patients' population uses complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) therapies and many of them would like to receive information on CIM from their conventional treatment team. However, often they don't feel comfortable in discussing CIM related questions, with their conventional treatment team, because they think they don't have enough expertise and available time to deal with this topic. Furthermore, information on the evidence of CIM is not easily accessible and the available information is not always reliable. The purpose of the current paper is to provide: 1) an overview about the CIM interventions that have shown positive effects in breast cancer patients and might be useful in supportive cancer care, 2) practical guidance on how to choose and find a qualified referral to a CIM treatment: 3) recommendations on how these interventions could be integrated into Breast Cancer Centers and which factors should be taken into consideration in this setting. This paper takes available CIM practice guidelines for cancer patients and previous research on CIM implementation models into account. There are CIM interventions that have shown a potential to reduce symptoms of cancer or cancer treatments in breast cancer patients and the vast majority uses a non-pharmacological approach and have a good potential for implementation. Nevertheless, further and more rigorous research is still needed.

  12. Translation and Initial Validation of the Chinese (Cantonese) Version of Community Integration Measure for Use in Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Ng, Gabriel Y. F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) translate and culturally adapt the English version Community Integration Measure into Chinese (Cantonese), (2) report the results of initial validation of the Chinese (Cantonese) version of CIM (CIM-C) including the content validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and factor structure of CIM-C for use in stroke survivors in a Chinese community setting, and (3) investigate the level of community integration of stroke survivors living in Hong Kong. Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. University-based rehabilitation centre. Participants. 62 (n = 62) subjects with chronic stroke. Methods. The CIM-C was produced after forward-backward translation, expert panel review, and pretesting. 25 (n = 25) of the same subjects were reassessed after a 1-week interval. Results. The items of the CIM-C demonstrated high internal consistency with a Cronbach's α of 0.84. The CIM-C showed good test-retest reliability with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.64–0.93). A 3-factor structure of the CIM-C including “relationship and engagement,” “sense of knowing,” and “independent living,” was consistent with the original theoretical model. Hong Kong stroke survivors revealed a high level of community integration as measured by the CIM-C (mean (SD): 43.48 (5.79)). Conclusions. The CIM-C is a valid and reliable measure for clinical use. PMID:24995317

  13. An exploratory typology of provider responses that encourage and discourage conversation about complementary and integrative medicine during routine oncology visits

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Christopher J.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Trupin, Laura; Dohan, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize how providers respond to patient mentions of complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) during routine oncology visits. METHODS Ethnographic methods were used over a two and a half year period with 82 advanced cancer patients and their providers across four oncology clinics. Participant observation fieldnotes were analyzed using Discourse Analysis. RESULTS CIM was mentioned in 78/229 (34%) of the total observed visits. Patients initiated talk about CIM (76%) more than providers (24%). Patients mentioning CIM may indicate a preference for or interest in non-pharmacological adjunctive treatment options. Providers’ responses inhibited further talk in 44% of observations and promoted talk in 56% of observations. CONCLUSION How providers respond may indicate their willingness to discuss a range of treatment options and to collaboratively engage in treatment decision-making. Provider responses that inhibited CIM conversation passed on the opportunity to discuss patient interests, and responses that promoted further conversation helped counsel patients about appropriate CIM use. Promoting discussion did not require additional time or extensive knowledge about CIM. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS Providers can facilitate high quality communication without endorsing CIM to help patients make treatment decisions and to evaluate CIM appropriateness and safety in ways that are responsive to patient preferences and values. An exploratory typology of provider responses that encourage and discourage conversation about complementary and integrative medicine during routine oncology visits PMID:25865412

  14. Complementary and integrative medicine for breast cancer patients - Evidence based practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Witt, C M; Cardoso, M J

    2016-08-01

    On average half of the breast cancer patients' population uses complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) therapies and many of them would like to receive information on CIM from their conventional treatment team. However, often they don't feel comfortable in discussing CIM related questions, with their conventional treatment team, because they think they don't have enough expertise and available time to deal with this topic. Furthermore, information on the evidence of CIM is not easily accessible and the available information is not always reliable. The purpose of the current paper is to provide: 1) an overview about the CIM interventions that have shown positive effects in breast cancer patients and might be useful in supportive cancer care, 2) practical guidance on how to choose and find a qualified referral to a CIM treatment: 3) recommendations on how these interventions could be integrated into Breast Cancer Centers and which factors should be taken into consideration in this setting. This paper takes available CIM practice guidelines for cancer patients and previous research on CIM implementation models into account. There are CIM interventions that have shown a potential to reduce symptoms of cancer or cancer treatments in breast cancer patients and the vast majority uses a non-pharmacological approach and have a good potential for implementation. Nevertheless, further and more rigorous research is still needed. PMID:27203402

  15. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  16. Prevalence and incidence of cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis: a population-based survey in Catania, Sicily.

    PubMed

    Patti, Francesco; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Messina, Silvia; Bruno, Elisa; Fermo, Salvatore Lo; Quattrocchi, Graziella; Chisari, Clara Grazia; Maimone, Davide; Cilia, Sabina; Zappia, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment (CIm) is a frequent finding in multiple sclerosis (MS) affecting up to 65% of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of CIm in a population-based cohort of MS patients identified in the city of Catania from 1995 to 2004. One-hundred and twenty-five patients experiencing the onset of MS during 1995-2004 were enrolled. Cognitive performance was assessed through the Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB) of neuropsychological tests and the Stroop word-color task (ST). CIm was defined as the failure on at least three tests involving at least two different domains. Patients without CIm at baseline were followed up after over 3 years. The most impaired tests were the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (36%) and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test 3 (35%). At baseline the prevalence of CIm was 44% (95% CI 35.2-53.1). An almost sixfold increased risk of developing CIm was found among MS patients aged 40 and above at the time of the NPS examination (OR 5.84; 95% CI 2.57-13.2; p value <0.0001) and a threefold increased risk for patients with an EDSS score >3 (OR 3.51; 95% CI 1.30-9.46, p value 0.01). At the follow-up out of the 70 MS patients without CIm at baseline evaluation, 26 (37.1 %) developed CIm. The total person-years at risk was 269 person-years giving an incidence rate of CIm of 96.6/1,000 person-year (95% CI 57.3-128.7). The overall prevalence of CIm in MS is 44% and the incidence after 4 years is 37.1%. CIm affects more frequently patients older than 40 years and with a higher EDSS score.

  17. Space charge limited release of charged inverse micelles in non-polar liquids.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manoj; Strubbe, Filip; Beunis, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2016-07-28

    Charged inverse micelles (CIMs) generated during a continuous polarizing voltage between electrodes in the model system of polyisobutylene succinimide in dodecane do not populate a diffuse double layer like CIMs present in equilibrium (regular CIMs), but instead end up in interface layers. When the applied voltage is reversed abruptly after a continuous polarizing voltage step, two peaks are observed in the transient current. The first peak is due to the release of regular CIMs from the diffuse double layers formed during the polarizing voltage step, which is understood on the basis of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. The second peak is due to the release of a small fraction of generated negative CIMs from the interface layer. A model based on space charge limited release of the generated negative CIMs from the interface layer is presented and the results of the model are compared with several types of measurements. For the situation in which the bulk is deprived of regular CIMs and neutral inverse micelles, the results of the model are in agreement with the experimental results. However, for the situation in which regular CIMs and neutral inverse micelles are present, the model shows discrepancies with the experiment for high voltages and high charge contents. These discrepancies are attributed to electrohydrodynamic flow caused by local variations in the electric field at the vicinity of the electrodes, which occur during the reversal voltage. Also the long term decrease of the amount of released generated CIMs is studied and it is found that the presence of regular CIMs and neutral inverse micelles speeds up the decrease. This study provides a deeper insight in the electrodynamics of CIMs and is relevant for various applications in non-polar liquids. PMID:27374418

  18. Identification of 9(E),11(E)-18:2 fatty acid methyl ester at trace level in thermal stressed olive oils by GC coupled to acetonitrile CI-MS and CI-MS/MS, a possible marker for adulteration by addition of deodorized olive oil.

    PubMed

    Saba, Alessandro; Mazzini, Francesco; Raffaelli, Andrea; Mattei, Alissa; Salvadori, Piero

    2005-06-15

    The olive oil market is suffering from sophisticated illegal treatments. One common adulteration process consists of the addition to virgin olive oil of lower quality oils, such as "lampante" oil, an inexpensive oil and with some organoleptic defects, which is then submitted to thermal deodorization under vacuum processes for removal of the undesired flavor components. Such a blending may not have a huge influence on the chemical composition and may not significantly affect the parameters usually checked as quality indicators, although the organoleptic properties may change. As a consequence, a major effort is being devoted to find reliable markers able to unmask such adulterations. We report here the complete characterization of a compound, detected at trace levels exclusively in thermal stressed oils, which could be a candidate marker for adulteration. The investigation, carried out by GC-MS and GC-MS/MS, provided its complete structure, including the stereochemistry, shown to be a 9(E),11(E)-18:2 fatty acid methyl ester. Experimental data also confirmed the influence of both temperature and heating time on formation and concentration of this compound. PMID:15941328

  19. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 14: Automated Equipment Technician (CIM), of a 15-Volume Set of Skill Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    This document is intended to help education and training institutions deliver the Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) curriculum to a variety of individuals and organizations. MAST consists of industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for 15 occupational specialty areas within the U.S. machine tool and metals-related…

  20. The Social Dimension of Computer-Integrated Manufacturing: An Extended Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badham, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) on working conditions depends on the way in which the technologies are designed to fit operator requirements, work organization, and organizational objectives. Recent attempts to promote skill-based human-centered approaches to CIM design are aimed at introducing humane working conditions…

  1. Different Types of Charged-Inverse Micelles in Nonpolar Media.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manoj; Strubbe, Filip; Beunis, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2016-06-14

    Over the last few years, the electrodynamics of charged inverse micelles (CIMs) in nonpolar liquids and the generation mechanism and properties of newly generated CIMs have been studied extensively for the model system of polyisobutylene succinimide in dodecane. However, the newly generated CIMs, which accumulate at the electrodes when a continuous voltage is applied, behave differently compared to the regular CIMs present in equilibrium in the absence of a field. In this work, we use transient current measurements to investigate the behavior of the newly generated CIMs when the field is reduced to zero or reversed. We demonstrate that the newly generated CIMs do not participate in the diffuse double layer near the electrode formed by the regular CIMs but form an interface layer at the electrode surface. A fraction of the newly generated negative CIMs can be released from this interface layer when the field there becomes zero. The findings of this study provide a better understanding of fundamental processes in nonpolar liquids and are relevant for applications such as electronic ink displays and liquid toner printing.

  2. 28 CFR 524.75 - Periodic review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Periodic review. 524.75 Section 524.75... TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Central Inmate Monitoring (CIM) System § 524.75 Periodic review. The Warden shall ensure that the status of an inmate's CIM assignment is considered at each program...

  3. 28 CFR 524.75 - Periodic review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Periodic review. 524.75 Section 524.75... TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Central Inmate Monitoring (CIM) System § 524.75 Periodic review. The Warden shall ensure that the status of an inmate's CIM assignment is considered at each program...

  4. Different Types of Charged-Inverse Micelles in Nonpolar Media.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manoj; Strubbe, Filip; Beunis, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2016-06-14

    Over the last few years, the electrodynamics of charged inverse micelles (CIMs) in nonpolar liquids and the generation mechanism and properties of newly generated CIMs have been studied extensively for the model system of polyisobutylene succinimide in dodecane. However, the newly generated CIMs, which accumulate at the electrodes when a continuous voltage is applied, behave differently compared to the regular CIMs present in equilibrium in the absence of a field. In this work, we use transient current measurements to investigate the behavior of the newly generated CIMs when the field is reduced to zero or reversed. We demonstrate that the newly generated CIMs do not participate in the diffuse double layer near the electrode formed by the regular CIMs but form an interface layer at the electrode surface. A fraction of the newly generated negative CIMs can be released from this interface layer when the field there becomes zero. The findings of this study provide a better understanding of fundamental processes in nonpolar liquids and are relevant for applications such as electronic ink displays and liquid toner printing. PMID:27231768

  5. Comparison of negative-ion proton-transfer with iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry for quantification of isocyanic acid in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward-Massey, Robert; Taha, Youssef M.; Moussa, Samar G.; Osthoff, Hans D.

    2014-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a trace gas pollutant of potential importance to human health whose measurement has recently become possible through the development of negative-ion proton-transfer chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS) with acetate reagent ion. In this manuscript, an alternative ionization and detection scheme, in which HNCO is quantified by iodide CIMS (iCIMS) as a cluster ion at m/z 170, is described. The sensitivity was inversely proportional to water vapor concentration but could be made independent of humidity changes in the sampled air by humidifying the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) region of the CIMS. The performance of the two ionization schemes was compared and contrasted using ambient air measurements of HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary, AB, Canada, by NI-PT-CIMS with acetate reagent ion from Dec 16 to 20, 2013, and by the same CIMS operated in iCIMS mode from Feb 3 to 7, 2014. The iCIMS exhibited a greater signal-to-noise ratio than the NI-PT-CIMS, not because of its sensitivity, which was lower (˜0.083 normalized counts per second (NCPS) per parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv) compared to ˜9.7 NCPS pptv-1), but because of a much lower and more stable background (3 ± 4 compared to a range of ˜2 × 103 to ˜6 × 103 NCPS). For the Feb 2014 data set, the HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary air ranged from <12 to 94 pptv (median 34 pptv), were marginally higher at night than during day, and correlated with nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2) mixing ratios and submicron particle volume. The ratios of HNCO to NOx observed are within the range of emission ratios reported for gasoline-powered motor vehicles.

  6. Evaluating the economics of complementary and integrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Herman, Patricia M

    2013-03-01

    Healthcare in the United States is expensive and becoming more so every year. Policy and decision makers increasingly need information on costs, as well as effectiveness and safety, in order to formulate health-care strategies that are both clinically effective and financially responsible. Many people believe the benefits of complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) exceed its costs. Surveys have shown that a substantial portion of the US population uses CIM and pays directly for that use.(1) (-) (4) The most recent estimates show that total US out-of-pocket expenditures for CIM were $34 billion-11% of all US out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures.(1) However, if CIM is to be considered in broader healthcare strategies, its economic impact must be determined. Theoretically, CIM seems a good candidate for cost-effectiveness, and even cost savings, because it avoids high technology, offers inexpensive and noninvasive remedies, encourages healthy lifestyle change, and focuses on the whole person, all of which may improve health beyond the targeted disease or condition. However, to many in the conventional health-care system, CIM is seen only as an "add on" expense. What must be demonstrated via economic evaluation are the healthcare costs that can be avoided through the use of CIM. CIM offers the potential for several avenues of cost reduction. The first is as a direct replacement for the usual conventional therapy for a condition. The second is in terms of lower future healthcare utilization both in general (through treating the whole person) and for the targeted disease or condition. A third avenue to cost reduction is through reducing productivity loss for employers. A reduction in costs to employers does not directly reduce healthcare costs (unless the employer is itself a health-care facility); however, both are costs to society. Productivity losses can be reduced through improved employee health, and potentially through the improved employee well-being and

  7. Evaluating the economics of complementary and integrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Herman, Patricia M

    2013-03-01

    Healthcare in the United States is expensive and becoming more so every year. Policy and decision makers increasingly need information on costs, as well as effectiveness and safety, in order to formulate health-care strategies that are both clinically effective and financially responsible. Many people believe the benefits of complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) exceed its costs. Surveys have shown that a substantial portion of the US population uses CIM and pays directly for that use.(1) (-) (4) The most recent estimates show that total US out-of-pocket expenditures for CIM were $34 billion-11% of all US out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures.(1) However, if CIM is to be considered in broader healthcare strategies, its economic impact must be determined. Theoretically, CIM seems a good candidate for cost-effectiveness, and even cost savings, because it avoids high technology, offers inexpensive and noninvasive remedies, encourages healthy lifestyle change, and focuses on the whole person, all of which may improve health beyond the targeted disease or condition. However, to many in the conventional health-care system, CIM is seen only as an "add on" expense. What must be demonstrated via economic evaluation are the healthcare costs that can be avoided through the use of CIM. CIM offers the potential for several avenues of cost reduction. The first is as a direct replacement for the usual conventional therapy for a condition. The second is in terms of lower future healthcare utilization both in general (through treating the whole person) and for the targeted disease or condition. A third avenue to cost reduction is through reducing productivity loss for employers. A reduction in costs to employers does not directly reduce healthcare costs (unless the employer is itself a health-care facility); however, both are costs to society. Productivity losses can be reduced through improved employee health, and potentially through the improved employee well-being and

  8. Purification of Vero cell derived live replication deficient influenza A and B virus by ion exchange monolith chromatography.

    PubMed

    Banjac, Marko; Roethl, Elisabeth; Gelhart, Franz; Kramberger, Petra; Jarc, Barbara Lah; Jarc, Marko; Strancar, Aleš; Muster, Thomas; Peterka, Matjaž

    2014-05-01

    We explored the possibilities for purification of various ΔNS1 live, replication deficient influenza viruses on ion exchange methacrylate monoliths. Influenza A ΔNS1-H1N1, ΔNS1-H3N2, ΔNS1-H5N1 and ΔNS1-influenza B viruses were propagated in Vero cells and concentrated by tangential flow filtration. All four virus strains adsorbed well to CIM QA and CIM DEAE anion exchangers, with CIM QA producing higher recoveries than CIM DEAE. ΔNS1-influenza A viruses adsorbed well also to CIM SO3 cation exchanger at the same pH, while ΔNS1-influenza B virus adsorption to CIM SO3 was not complete. Dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for CIM QA, DEAE and SO3 methacrylate monoliths for influenza A ΔNS1-H1N1 virus were 1.9E+10 TCID50/ml, 1.0E+10 TCID50/ml and 8.9E+08 TCID50/ml, respectively. Purification of ΔNS1 viruses on CIM QA was scaled up and reproducibility was confirmed. Yields of infectious virus on CIM QA were between 70.8±32.3% and 87±30.8%. Total protein removal varied from 93.3±0.4% to 98.6±0.2% and host cell DNA removal efficiency was ranging from 76.4% to 99.9% and strongly depended on pretreatment with deoxyribonuclease.

  9. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rohde, Steven B.

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  10. Information Interaction Study for DER and DMS Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Lu, Yiming; Lv, Guangxian; Liu, Peng; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Xinhui

    The Common Information Model (CIM) is an abstract data model that can be used to represent the major objects in Distribution Management System (DMS) applications. Because the Common Information Model (CIM) doesn't modeling the Distributed Energy Resources (DERs), it can't meet the requirements of DER operation and management for Distribution Management System (DMS) advanced applications. Modeling of DER were studied based on a system point of view, the article initially proposed a CIM extended information model. By analysis the basic structure of the message interaction between DMS and DER, a bidirectional messaging mapping method based on data exchange was proposed.

  11. Development and characterization of methacrylate-based hydrazide monoliths for oriented immobilization of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brne, P; Lim, Y-P; Podgornik, A; Barut, M; Pihlar, B; Strancar, A

    2009-03-27

    Convective interaction media (CIM; BIA Separations) monoliths are attractive stationary phases for use in affinity chromatography because they enable fast affinity binding, which is a consequence of convectively enhanced mass transport. This work focuses on the development of novel CIM hydrazide (HZ) monoliths for the oriented immobilization of antibodies. Adipic acid dihydrazide (AADH) was covalently bound to CIM epoxy monoliths to gain hydrazide groups on the monolith surface. Two different antibodies were afterwards immobilized to hydrazide functionalized monolithic columns and prepared columns were tested for their selectivity. One column was further tested for the dynamic binding capacity. PMID:19203754

  12. A pterodactyloid pterosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Lapurr sandstone, West Turkana, Kenya.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patrick M; Sertich, Joseph J W; Manthi, Fredrick K

    2011-03-01

    An isolated pterosaurian caudal cervical (~ postcervical) vertebra was recovered from the Upper Cretaceous Lapurr sandstone of West Turkana, northwestern Kenya. The vertebral centrum is short, wide, and dorsoventrally compressed. Although the specimen is lightly built similar to most pterosaurs, it is here referred to Pterodactyloidea and tentatively to the Azhdarchidae in that it lacks pneumatic features on both the centrum and neural arch. This represents one of the few pterosaurs recovered from the entirety of Afro-Arabia, the first pterosaur recovered from the Cretaceous of East Africa, and, significantly, a specimen that was recovered from fluvial deposits rather than the near-shore marine setting typical of most pterosaur discoveries.

  13. Photoacoustic infrared analysis of nickel catalysts precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasieczna, S.; Ryczkowski, J.

    2006-11-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (FT-IR/PAS) has been used for identification of different forms of nickel precursors formed during CIM (classical impregnation method) and DIM (double impregnation method) process and different pH of the solution containing nickel ions.

  14. Section of the filum terminale: is it worthwhile in Chiari type I malformation?

    PubMed

    Massimi, Luca; Peraio, Simone; Peppucci, Elisabetta; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2011-12-01

    A section of the filum terminale (SFT) is used for the surgical treatment of isolated tethered cord or that resulting from neurulation disorders. More recently, it has been proposed for the management of the occult tethered cord syndrome (OTCS), though it is still under debate. Even more controversial appears to be the use of SFT in patients with Chiari type I malformation (CIM), which is based on the possible presence of OTCS. This review shows that: (1) there are issues both in favor and against the occurrence of OTCS, (2) there is no significant correlation between CIM and tethered cord, the old "caudal traction theory" being not supported by clinical or experimental evidences. On these grounds, a relationship between CIM and OTCS is hard to be demonstrated, (3) a subgroup of patients with CIM suffering from OTCS may exist and benefit from SFT.

  15. Interlock recovery during the drying, calcination and vitrification phase of Am/Cm processing

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, T.K.

    2000-01-20

    This document summarizes the results of five CIM5 [5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter] runs designed to demonstrate power interlock recovery methods during the drying, calcination and vitrification phases of the Am/Cm melter cycle.

  16. 76 FR 42590 - Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563; Improving Common Acreage Reporting Processes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... information multiple times; and (3) Acreage reporting is inefficient and does not use Geographic Information... Comprehensive Information Management System (CIMS), which compiles common producer, program, and land... information from their farm management and precision agriculture systems for reporting production, planted...

  17. 28 CFR 524.73 - Classification procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inmate understands the conditions of confinement within the Bureau of Prisons. Central Office... 524.73 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION... Prisons, does not require additional review, and overrides any other CIM assignment. (2) State...

  18. 28 CFR 524.73 - Classification procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... inmate understands the conditions of confinement within the Bureau of Prisons. Central Office... 524.73 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION... Prisons, does not require additional review, and overrides any other CIM assignment. (2) State...

  19. 28 CFR 524.73 - Classification procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inmate understands the conditions of confinement within the Bureau of Prisons. Central Office... 524.73 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION... Prisons, does not require additional review, and overrides any other CIM assignment. (2) State...

  20. 28 CFR 524.73 - Classification procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inmate understands the conditions of confinement within the Bureau of Prisons. Central Office... 524.73 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION... Prisons, does not require additional review, and overrides any other CIM assignment. (2) State...

  1. All-solid-state reference electrodes based on colloid-imprinted mesoporous carbon and their application in disposable paper-based potentiometric sensing devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinbo; Ho, Kieu T; Zou, Xu U; Smyrl, William H; Stein, Andreas; Bühlmann, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Reference electrodes are used in almost every electroanalytical measurement. Here, all-solid-state reference electrodes are described that employ colloid-imprinted mesoporous (CIM) carbon as solid contact and a poly(vinyl chloride) reference membrane to contact the sample. Such a reference membrane is doped with a moderately hydrophilic ionic liquid and a hydrophobic redox couple, leading to well-defined constant potentials at the interfaces of this membrane to the sample and to the solid contact, respectively. Due to the intrinsic properties of CIM carbon, reference electrodes with a CIM carbon solid contact exhibit excellent resistance to common interfering agents such as light and O2, with outstanding potential stability in continuous potentiometric measurements. The potential drift of CIM carbon-based reference electrodes without redox couple is as low as 1.7 μV/h over 110 h, making them the most stable all-solid-state reference electrodes reported so far. To demonstrate the compatibility of CIM carbon-based reference electrodes with miniaturized potentiometric systems, these reference electrodes were integrated into paper-based potentiometric sensing devices, successfully replacing the conventional reference electrode with its reference electrolyte solution. As a proof of concept, disposable paper-based Cl(-) sensing devices that contain stencil-printed Ag/AgCl-based Cl(-) selective electrodes and CIM carbon-based reference electrodes were constructed. These sensing devices are inexpensive, easy to use, and offer highly reproducible Cl(-) measurements with sample volumes as low as 10 μL. PMID:25630744

  2. Pure agraphia after deep left hemisphere haematoma.

    PubMed Central

    Croisile, B; Laurent, B; Michel, D; Trillet, M

    1990-01-01

    Pure agraphia is reported following haematoma in the left centrum semiovale sparing both parietal and frontal cortices. There was total inability to produce graphemes in the absence of limb apraxia. The lesion is assumed to have prevented linguistic and graphemic systems from gaining access to the frontal motor programme. Images PMID:2324759

  3. Researching the Relationship between the Influence of Games on Elementary School Students, Their Gender and Lesson Success Variables and Their Game Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepe, Kadir

    2011-01-01

    This research is a descriptive research with scanning method. It aims to define the relationship between the gender and academic success of secondary school students and their play preferences. The population of the research is composed of the secondary schools of Burdur city centrum and the sample group is composed of the students who are…

  4. Experiential Education, Outdoor Adventure As a Modality in Residential Treatment. A Survey of Programs, Principles, Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duindam, Ton

    Orthopedagogisch Centrum (OC) Michiel is a multifunctional regional institution in the Netherlands that serves troubled families and youth at risk. Outdoor programs are used as a treatment modality for adolescents with behavior disorders, drug addictions, or criminal records. Outward Bound was the first experiential outdoor program in the…

  5. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    C-500® Chewable Tablet ... C-Time® ... Centrum® Singles-Vitamin C ... Sunkist® Vitamin C ... Vicks® Vitamin C Drops ... a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in the body.This medication is sometimes prescribed ...

  6. Experiential Education, Outdoor Adventure As a Modality in Youth Care and Residential Treatment. A Survey of Programs, Principles, Research and Practice on the European Continent, Especially the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duindam, Ton

    Orthopedagogisch Centrum Michiel is a multifunctional institution in the eastern Netherlands for youth with emotional problems. The staff of the institution's residential treatment center has gradually become involved with outdoor experiential education through training programs, conferences, special projects, and supervised programs. Activities…

  7. Comparison of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen–Based 18F-DCFBC PET/CT to Conventional Imaging Modalities for Detection of Hormone-Naïve and Castration-Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Ciarallo, Anthony; Mena, Esther; Blackford, Amanda; Nadal, Rosa; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Carducci, Michael A.; Ross, Ashley E.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Holt, Daniel P.; Dannals, Robert F.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.; Cho, Steve Y.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities (CIMs) have limited sensitivity and specificity for detection of metastatic prostate cancer. We examined the potential of a first-in-class radiofluorinated small-molecule inhibitor of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-18F-fluorobenzyl-l-cysteine (18F-DCFBC), to detect metastatic hormone-naïve (HNPC) and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods Seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled (9 HNPC and 8 CRPC); 16 had CIM evidence of new or progressive metastatic prostate cancer and 1 had high clinical suspicion of metastatic disease. 18F-DCFBC PET/CT imaging was obtained with 2 successive PET scans starting at 2 h after injection. Patients were imaged with CIM at approximately the time of PET. A lesion-by-lesion analysis of PET to CIM was performed in the context of either HNPC or CRPC. The patients were followed with available clinical imaging as a reference standard to determine the true nature of identified lesions on PET and CIM. Results On the lesion-by-lesion analysis, 18F-DCFBC PET was able to detect a larger number of lesions (592 positive with 63 equivocal) than CIM (520 positive with 61 equivocal) overall, in both HNPC and CRPC patients. 18F-DCFBC PET detection of lymph nodes, bone lesions, and visceral lesions was superior to CIM. When intrapatient clustering effects were considered, 18F-DCFBC PET was estimated to be positive in a large proportion of lesions that would be negative or equivocal on CIM (0.45). On follow-up, the sensitivity of 18F-DCFBC PET (0.92) was superior to CIM (0.71). 18F-DCFBC tumor uptake was increased at the later PET time point (∼2.5 h after injection), with background uptake showing a decreasing trend on later PET. Conclusion PET imaging with 18F-DCFBC, a small-molecule PSMA-targeted radiotracer, detected more lesions than CIM and promises to diagnose and stage patients with metastatic prostate cancer more accurately than current

  8. Are complementary therapies and integrative care cost-effective? A systematic review of economic evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Patricia M; Poindexter, Beth L; Witt, Claudia M; Eisenberg, David M

    2012-01-01

    Objective A comprehensive systematic review of economic evaluations of complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) to establish the value of these therapies to health reform efforts. Data sources PubMed, CINAHL, AMED, PsychInfo, Web of Science and EMBASE were searched from inception through 2010. In addition, bibliographies of found articles and reviews were searched, and key researchers were contacted. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Studies of CIM were identified using criteria based on those of the Cochrane complementary and alternative medicine group. All studies of CIM reporting economic outcomes were included. Study appraisal methods All recent (and likely most cost-relevant) full economic evaluations published 2001–2010 were subjected to several measures of quality. Detailed results of higher-quality studies are reported. Results A total of 338 economic evaluations of CIM were identified, of which 204, covering a wide variety of CIM for different populations, were published 2001–2010. A total of 114 of these were full economic evaluations. And 90% of these articles covered studies of single CIM therapies and only one compared usual care to usual care plus access to multiple licensed CIM practitioners. Of the recent full evaluations, 31 (27%) met five study-quality criteria, and 22 of these also met the minimum criterion for study transferability (‘generalisability’). Of the 56 comparisons made in the higher-quality studies, 16 (29%) show a health improvement with cost savings for the CIM therapy versus usual care. Study quality of the cost-utility analyses (CUAs) of CIM was generally comparable to that seen in CUAs across all medicine according to several measures, and the quality of the cost-saving studies was slightly, but not significantly, lower than those showing cost increases (85% vs 88%, p=0.460). Conclusions This comprehensive review identified many CIM economic evaluations missed by previous reviews and emerging evidence of cost

  9. NCPP's Use of Standard Metadata to Promote Open and Transparent Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treshansky, A.; Barsugli, J. J.; Guentchev, G.; Rood, R. B.; DeLuca, C.

    2012-12-01

    The National Climate Predictions and Projections (NCPP) Platform is developing comprehensive regional and local information about the evolving climate to inform decision making and adaptation planning. This includes both creating and providing tools to create metadata about the models and processes used to create its derived data products. NCPP is using the Common Information Model (CIM), an ontology developed by a broad set of international partners in climate research, as its metadata language. This use of a standard ensures interoperability within the climate community as well as permitting access to the ecosystem of tools and services emerging alongside the CIM. The CIM itself is divided into a general-purpose (UML & XML) schema which structures metadata documents, and a project or community-specific (XML) Controlled Vocabulary (CV) which constraints the content of metadata documents. NCPP has already modified the CIM Schema to accommodate downscaling models, simulations, and experiments. NCPP is currently developing a CV for use by the downscaling community. Incorporating downscaling into the CIM will lead to several benefits: easy access to the existing CIM Documents describing CMIP5 models and simulations that are being downscaled, access to software tools that have been developed in order to search, manipulate, and visualize CIM metadata, and coordination with national and international efforts such as ES-DOC that are working to make climate model descriptions and datasets interoperable. Providing detailed metadata descriptions which include the full provenance of derived data products will contribute to making that data (and, the models and processes which generated that data) more open and transparent to the user community.

  10. Cimetidine synergizes with Praziquantel to enhance the immune response of HBV DNA vaccine via activating cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoping; Geng, Shuang; Liu, Hu; Li, Chaofan; Yang, Yuqin; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that either CIM or PZQ, 2 clinical drugs, could be used to develop as adjuvants on HBV DNA vaccine to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that combinations of CIM and PZQ as adjuvants for a HBV DNA vaccine, could induce much stronger antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses compared either with CIM or PZQ alone. The synergistic effects of CIM plus PZQ to HBV DNA vaccine were observed on a higher IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, an increase of HBsAg-specific CD4(+) T cells capable of producing IFN-γ or IL-17A and a robust IFN-γ-, IL-17A-, or TNF-α-producing CD8(+) T cells to HBsAg. Most importantly, the antigen-specific CTL response was also elevated significantly, which is critical for the eradication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected cells. Using an HBsAg transgenic mouse model, the expression of HBsAg in the hepatic cells was also significantly reduced after immunized with pCD-S 2 in the presence of 0.5% CIM and 0.25% PZQ. Further investigations demonstrated that the synergistic effects of combination of CIM and PZQ were dependent on enhanced cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which was correlated with impaired activities of regulatory T cells. Therefore, combinations of CIM and PZQ have great potential to be used as effective adjuvants on DNA-based vaccinations for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. PMID:24643207

  11. Molecular evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei genotypes based on geographical distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zulkefli, Noorfatin Jihan; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Chong, Chun Wie; Thong, Kwai Lin; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central intermediary metabolism (CIM) in bacteria is defined as a set of metabolic biochemical reactions within a cell, which is essential for the cell to survive in response to environmental perturbations. The genes associated with CIM are commonly found in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. As these genes are involved in vital metabolic processes of bacteria, we explored the efficiency of the genes in genotypic characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates, compared with the established pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes. Methods. Nine previously sequenced B. pseudomallei isolates from Malaysia were characterized by PFGE, MLST and CIM genes. The isolates were later compared to the other 39 B. pseudomallei strains, retrieved from GenBank using both MLST and sequence analysis of CIM genes. UniFrac and hierachical clustering analyses were performed using the results generated by both MLST and sequence analysis of CIM genes. Results. Genetic relatedness of nine Malaysian B. pseudomallei isolates and the other 39 strains was investigated. The nine Malaysian isolates were subtyped into six PFGE profiles, four MLST profiles and five sequence types based on CIM genes alignment. All methods demonstrated the clonality of OB and CB as well as CMS and THE. However, PFGE showed less than 70% similarity between a pair of morphology variants, OS and OB. In contrast, OS was identical to the soil isolate, MARAN. To have a better understanding of the genetic diversity of B. pseudomallei worldwide, we further aligned the sequences of genes used in MLST and genes associated with CIM for the nine Malaysian isolates and 39 B. pseudomallei strains from NCBI database. Overall, based on the CIM genes, the strains were subtyped into 33 profiles where majority of the strains from Asian countries were clustered together. On the other hand, MLST resolved the isolates into 31 profiles which formed three clusters

  12. Understanding pattern collapse in photolithography process due to capillary forces.

    PubMed

    Chini, S Farshid; Amirfazli, A

    2010-08-17

    Photolithography is the most widely used mass nanoproduction process. Technology requirements demand smaller nanodevices. However, smaller features risk collapse during the drying of rinse liquid because of capillary forces. In the present study, progress is made on two fronts: (i) The importance of surface tension force (STF) on three-phase line on the pattern collapse is investigated. The STF was ignored in previous pattern collapse studies. It is found that inclusion of STF increases the pattern deformation. The calculated deformation error from neglecting STF increases by increasing contact angle, pattern height to width ratio, and trough to width ratio. The deformation error decreases with an increase in elasticity module of pattern. (ii) A more accurate representation for the interface curvature (and related Laplace pressure), that is, using Surface Evolver (SE) simulation rather than cylindrical interface model (CIM), is presented. Curvature values of two-line parallel and box-shaped patterns are derived from SE and compared with the curvature values from CIM. It was found that CIM for the case of two-line parallel overestimates the curvature value and for the case of box-shaped underestimates it. SE simulations also showed that the error of calculating curvature values using CIM for both shapes is only a function of LAR (ratio of pattern length to trough width). For LAR values less than 20, the curvature values from CIM are not accurate for calculating pattern deformation.

  13. Effective Communication About the Use of Complementary and Integrative Medicine in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) is becoming an increasingly popular and visible component of oncology care. Many patients affected by cancer and their family members are looking for informed advice and desire communication with their physicians about CIM use. Patients affected by cancer come to discuss CIM use with intense emotions and are experiencing an existential crisis that cannot be ignored. Effective communication is crucial in establishing trust with these patients and their families. Communication is now recognized as a core clinical skill in medicine, including cancer care, and is important to the delivery of high-quality care. The quality of communication affects patient satisfaction, decision-making, patient distress and well-being, compliance, and even malpractice litigation. The communication process about CIM use requires a very sensitive approach that depends on effective communication skills, such as experience in listening, encouraging hope, and ability to convey empathy and compassion. This process can be divided into two parts: the “how” and the “what”. The “how” relates to the change in clinician attitude, the process of gathering information, addressing patients' unmet needs and emotions, and dealing with uncertainty. The “what” relates to the process of information exchange while assisting patients in decisions about CIM use by using reliable information sources, leading to informed decision-making. PMID:23863085

  14. Technical note: Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Heinritzi, M.; Herzog, S.; Leiminger, M.; Bianchi, F.; Praplan, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Kürten, A.

    2015-12-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation and therefore the demand for highly sensitive gas phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas phase-sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, Extremely Low Volatile Organic Compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine ((CH3)2NH, DMA) using the NO3-(HNO3)1-2(DMA) cluster ion signals. This observation was made at the CLOUD aerosol chamber, which was also used for calibration measurements. Good linearity between 0 and ~120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  15. Demonstration of real-time monitoring of a photolithographic exposure process using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, C.D.

    1998-02-01

    Silicon wafers are coated with photoresist and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light in a laboratory to simulate typical conditions expected in an actual semiconductor manufacturing process tool. Air is drawn through the exposure chamber and analyzed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI/MS). Species that evaporate or outgas from the wafer are thus detected. The purpose of such analyses is to determine the potential of CI/MS as a real-time process monitoring tool. Results demonstrate that CI/MS can remotely detect the products evolved before, during, and after wafer UV exposure; and that the quantity and type of products vary with the photoresist coated on the wafer. Such monitoring could provide semiconductor manufacturers benefits in quality control and process analysis. Tool and photoresist manufacturers could also realize benefits from this measurement technique with respect to new tool, method, or photoresist development. The benefits realized can lead to improved device yields and reduced product and development costs.

  16. Integrative physicians and an herbal cancer "cure".

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Rosenberg, Shoshana Keren; Samuels, Noah

    2016-08-01

    Oncologists are frequently asked about herbal remedies claiming to "cure" cancer, or at least delay its progression. While complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) should be aimed primarily at improving quality-of-life (QOL) related concerns, "wonder cures" are part of an alternative health belief model providing hope for a "miracle" where conventional treatment has failed. We describe a physician with extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) undergoing chemotherapy, with significant toxicities and impaired daily function. He had come for an integrative physician (IP) consultation, provided by a medical doctor dually trained in CIM and supportive cancer care, taking place in a conventional supportive cancer care service. We describe the IP consultation in general and regarding an herbal remedy which was being promoted as a "cure" for cancer. The subsequent patient-tailored CIM treatment process, in which patients receive evidence-based guidance on treatments which address QOL-related concerns, are presented. PMID:27652207

  17. A 'Common Information Model' for the climate modelling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treshansky, Allyn; Devine, Gerard

    2010-05-01

    The Common Information Model (CIM), developed by the EU-funded METAFOR project (http://metaforclimate.eu), is a formal model of the climate modeling process. It provides a rich structured description of not only climate data but also the "provenance" of that data: the software models and tools used to generate that data, the simulations those models implement, the experiments those simulations conform to, etc.. This formal metadata model is expected to add value to those datasets by firstly codifying what is currently found only in the heads of climate experts (the aforementioned provenance of climate datasets), and secondly by allowing tools to be developed that make searching for and analysing climate datasets a much more intuitive process than it has been in the past. This paper will describe the structure of the CIM, concentrating on how it works with and what it adds to other metadata standards. As alluded to above, current metadata standards concentrate on the contents of a climate dataset. Scientific detail and relevance of the model components that generated that data as well as the context for why it was run are missing. The CIM addresses this gap. However, it does not aim to replace existing standards. Rather, wherever possible it re-uses them. It also attempts to standardise our understanding of climate modeling at a very high level, at a conceptual level. This results in a UML description of climate modeling, the CONCIM. METAFOR extracts from this high-level UML the bits of the CIM that we want to use in our applications; These bits get converted into a set of XSD application schemas, the APPCIM. Other user groups may derive a different APPCIM (in a different format) that suits them from the same CONCIM. Thus there is a common understanding of the concepts used in climate modeling even if the implementation differs. In certain key places the CIM describes a general structure over which a specific Controlled Vocabulary (CV) can be applied. For example

  18. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method ofmore » Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.« less

  19. Estimated Probabililty of Chest Injury During an International Space Station Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Milo, Eric A.; Brooker, John E.; Weaver, Aaron S.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to spaceflight mission planners and medical system designers when assessing risks and optimizing medical systems. The IMM project maintains a database of medical conditions that could occur during a spaceflight. The IMM project is in the process of assigning an incidence rate, the associated functional impairment, and a best and a worst case end state for each condition. The purpose of this work was to develop the IMM Chest Injury Module (CIM). The CIM calculates the incidence rate of chest injury per person-year of spaceflight on the International Space Station (ISS). The CIM was built so that the probability of chest injury during one year on ISS could be predicted. These results will be incorporated into the IMM Chest Injury Clinical Finding Form and used within the parent IMM model.

  20. Integrative physicians and an herbal cancer "cure".

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Rosenberg, Shoshana Keren; Samuels, Noah

    2016-08-01

    Oncologists are frequently asked about herbal remedies claiming to "cure" cancer, or at least delay its progression. While complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) should be aimed primarily at improving quality-of-life (QOL) related concerns, "wonder cures" are part of an alternative health belief model providing hope for a "miracle" where conventional treatment has failed. We describe a physician with extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) undergoing chemotherapy, with significant toxicities and impaired daily function. He had come for an integrative physician (IP) consultation, provided by a medical doctor dually trained in CIM and supportive cancer care, taking place in a conventional supportive cancer care service. We describe the IP consultation in general and regarding an herbal remedy which was being promoted as a "cure" for cancer. The subsequent patient-tailored CIM treatment process, in which patients receive evidence-based guidance on treatments which address QOL-related concerns, are presented.

  1. Computer integration of engineering design and production: A national opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), as a purchaser of a variety of manufactured products, including complex space vehicles and systems, clearly has a stake in the advantages of computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM). Two major NASA objectives are to launch a Manned Space Station by 1992 with a budget of $8 billion, and to be a leader in the development and application of productivity-enhancing technology. At the request of NASA, a National Research Council committee visited five companies that have been leaders in using CIM. Based on these case studies, technical, organizational, and financial issues that influence computer integration are described, guidelines for its implementation in industry are offered, and the use of CIM to manage the space station program is recommended.

  2. Integrative physicians and an herbal cancer “cure”

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Shoshana Keren; Samuels, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Oncologists are frequently asked about herbal remedies claiming to “cure” cancer, or at least delay its progression. While complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) should be aimed primarily at improving quality-of-life (QOL) related concerns, “wonder cures” are part of an alternative health belief model providing hope for a “miracle” where conventional treatment has failed. We describe a physician with extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) undergoing chemotherapy, with significant toxicities and impaired daily function. He had come for an integrative physician (IP) consultation, provided by a medical doctor dually trained in CIM and supportive cancer care, taking place in a conventional supportive cancer care service. We describe the IP consultation in general and regarding an herbal remedy which was being promoted as a “cure” for cancer. The subsequent patient-tailored CIM treatment process, in which patients receive evidence-based guidance on treatments which address QOL-related concerns, are presented.

  3. Application of high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements to estimate volatility distributions of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products

    DOE PAGES

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-05

    Recent developments in high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made it possible to directly detect atmospheric organic compounds in real time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low-volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, using ions identified by high-resolution spectra from an HR-ToF-CIMS with acetate reagent ion chemistry, we develop an algorithm to estimate the vapor pressures of measured organic acids. The algorithm uses identified ion formulas and calculated double bond equivalencies, information unavailable in quadrupole CIMS technology, as constraints for the number of possible oxygen-containing functionalmore » groups. The algorithm is tested with acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (acetate-CIMS) spectra of O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in a flow reactor with integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec s cm−3, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. The predicted condensed-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous chamber and flow reactor measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  4. [Hemiplegic forms of human African trypanosomiasis].

    PubMed

    Sonan, T; Giordano, C; Boa, F; Dumas, M

    1988-01-01

    Hemiplegic forms of human African trypanosomiasis are unusual. From 1963 to 1987, 14 cases have been reported in the literature. One may be mistakenly led to look for a space-occupying lesion when clinical features include hemiplegia, vascular shift from median line during arteriography, focal EEG anomalies and intracranial hypertension. The discussion on diagnosis also covers subacute or chronic meningo encephalitis (tuberculosis syphilis or fungal infection). CT scanner findings suggest the association of a massive demyelination of centrum semiovale, with cerebral oedema.

  5. Developmental dynamics of radial vulnerability in the cerebral compartments in preterm infants and neonates.

    PubMed

    Kostović, Ivica; Kostović-Srzentić, Mirna; Benjak, Vesna; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Radoš, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The developmental vulnerability of different classes of axonal pathways in preterm white matter is not known. We propose that laminar compartments of the developing cerebral wall serve as spatial framework for axonal growth and evaluate potential of anatomical landmarks for understanding reorganization of the cerebral wall after perinatal lesions. The 3-T MRI (in vivo) and histological analysis were performed in a series of cases ranging from 22 postconceptional weeks to 3 years. For the follow-up scans, three groups of children (control, normotypic, and preterms with lesions) were examined at the term equivalent age and after the first year of life. MRI and histological abnormalities were analyzed in the following compartments: (a) periventricular, with periventricular fiber system; (b) intermediate, with periventricular crossroads, sagittal strata, and centrum semiovale; (c) superficial, composed of gyral white matter, subplate, and cortical plate. Vulnerability of thalamocortical pathways within the crossroads and sagittal strata seems to be characteristic for early preterms, while vulnerability of long association pathways in the centrum semiovale seems to be predominant feature of late preterms. The structural indicator of the lesion of the long association pathways is the loss of delineation between centrum semiovale and subplate remnant, which is possible substrate of the diffuse periventricular leukomalacia. The enhanced difference in MR signal intensity of centrum semiovale and subplate remnant, observed in damaged children after first year, we interpret as structural plasticity of intact short cortico-cortical fibers, which grow postnatally through U-zones and enter the cortex through the subplate remnant. Our findings indicate that radial distribution of MRI signal abnormalities in the cerebral compartments may be related to lesion of different classes of axonal pathways and have prognostic value for predicting the likely outcome of prenatal and

  6. Fracture Control in Engineering Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherly, G. C.

    1980-07-01

    The three-day meeting "Fracture Control in Engineering Structures" was held at the 1979 C.I.M. Annual Conference of Metallurgists in Sudbury, Ontario, August 19-21, 1979. The meeting was organized by the Materials Engineering Section of C.I.M. and the Canadian Fracture Research Committee (CFRC), a non-profit organization and the national arm of the International Congress on Fracture. The objectives of CFRC are to promote research and conferences in Canada on the Strength & Fracture of Materials. To this end, CFRC holds (sometimes jointly) conferences every year.

  7. Evaluation of a Collaborative Care Model for Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    McKay, Cheryl; Wieck, K Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The current lack of collaborative care is contributing to higher mortality rates and longer hospital stays in the United States. A method for improving collaboration among health professionals for patients with congestive heart failure, the Clinical Integration Model (CIM), was implemented. The CIM utilized a process tool called the CareGraph to prioritize care for the interdisciplinary team. The CareGraph was used to focus communication and treatment strategies of health professionals on the patient rather than the discipline or specific task. Hospitals who used the collaborative model demonstrated shorter lengths of stay and cost per case.

  8. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Mao, J.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Hornbrook, R. S.; Kosciuch, E.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Chen, G.; Singh, H. B.

    2012-03-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS), in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS) for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS) for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ) for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ) for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ) for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 105 cm-3 with a correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.72 for OH and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol-1) with a correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some similarities for both

  9. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Mao, J.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Hornbrook, R. S.; Kosciuch, E.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Chen, G.; Singh, H. B.

    2012-08-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS) for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS) for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by ultraviolet (UV) light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ) for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ) for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ) for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 104 cm-3 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for OH, and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol-1) with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  10. Aerospace firms realizing payoffs from advanced production investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, William B.

    1988-10-01

    The U.S. DOD's Industrial Modernization Incentives Program encourages industrial contractors to develop high-risk computer-aided manufacturing (CIM) technologies at their own expense, while sharing the cost savings realized from the contractor's innovations. A similar DOD-managed effort, the Manufacturing Resource Planning-2 program, focuses on the development of systems that schedule, track, and report on material and factory-floor processes involved in manufacturing operations. Attention is presently given to the application of these CIM techniques to the inspection and analysis processes employed by a major contractor in fighter aircraft radar production.

  11. Raymond de Vieussens and his contribution to the study of white matter anatomy: historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Vergani, Francesco; Morris, Christopher M; Mitchell, Patrick; Duffau, Hugues

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the study of white matter anatomy, both with the use of postmortem dissections and diffusion tensor imaging tractography. One of the precursors in the study of white matter anatomy was Raymond de Vieussens (1641-1716), a French anatomist born in Le Vigan. He studied medicine at the University of Montpellier in southern France, one of the most ancient and lively schools of medicine in Europe. In 1684 Vieussens published his masterpiece, the Neurographia Universalis, which is still considered one of the most complete and accurate descriptions of the nervous system provided in the 17th century. He described the white matter of the centrum ovale and was the first to demonstrate the continuity of the white matter fibers from the centrum ovale to the brainstem. He also described the dentate nuclei, the pyramids, and the olivary nuclei. According to the theory of Galen, Vieussens considered that the function of the white matter was to convey the "animal spirit" from the centrum ovale to the spinal cord. Although neglected, Vieussens' contribution to the study of white matter is relevant. His pioneering work showed that the white matter is not a homogeneous substance, but rather a complex structure rich in fibers that are interconnected with different parts of the brain. These initial results paved the way to advancements observed in later centuries that eventually led to modern hodology.

  12. Vertebral pathology in an ornithopod dinosaur: a hemivertebra in Dysalotosaurus lettowvorbecki from the Jurassic of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Witzmann, Florian; Asbach, Patrick; Remes, Kristian; Hampe, Oliver; Hilger, André; Paulke, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    A vertebral fragment of the Late Jurassic ornithopod dinosaur Dysalotosaurus lettowvorbecki from Tanzania is described. It consists of a hemivertebra that is co-ossified with a complete vertebral centrum. The hemivertebra causes a hyperkyphotic posture of the vertebral column with an angle of approximately 35 degrees between the end plates of the vertebra, that is, a dorsal bending of the vertebral column. Associated with this is a 15 degrees lateral bending, which suggests a scoliosis. Micro-CT scans reveal thickening of the cortical bone in the hemivertebra and the complete vertebral centrum as compared to a "normal" vertebra. This can be interpreted as a reaction of the bone to the abnormal direction of forces arising from the defective configuration of the vertebral column. No signs of vertebral fracture are present. The arrangement of the Foramina venosa and the trapezoidal outline of the complete centrum that is co-ossified with the hemivertebra indicate that the hemivertebra in Dysalotosaurus developed early in embryogenesis probably by "hemimetameric segmental shift", that is, a defect of the fusion of the paired vertebral anlagen. This finding illustrates that hemivertebrae represent a fundamental defect of the vertebrate ontogenetic program.

  13. Strengthening the Link between Theory and Practice in Teaching Design Engineering: An Empirical Study on a New Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempelman, E.; Pilot, A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering of the Delft University of Technology introduced a new bachelor program. Based on theories of learning and instruction three design principles were used to develop an approach that aims to make it easier for students to bridge the gap between theoretical design engineering courses and practical…

  14. Makin' Stories: From New York to Monterey and Now to D.C., Dutch Crew Documents Best "2.0" Practices in U.S. Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Computers in Libraries, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Jaap van de Geer, Erik Boekesteijn, Michael Stephens, and Geert van den Boogaard toured the U.S. last fall and interviewed librarians about how they are revitalizing their libraries. These four Dutch men are representatives of the Delft (the Netherlands) Public Library Concept Center and they came to the U.S. for their "Shanachie Tour." Their trip…

  15. The Use of Video-Taped Lectures and Web-Based Communications in Teaching: A Distance-Teaching and Cross-Atlantic Collaboration Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herder, P. M.; Subrahmanian, E.; Talukdar, S.; Turk, A. L.; Westerberg, A. W.

    2002-01-01

    Explains distance education approach applied to the 'Engineering Design Problem Formulation' course simultaneously at the Delft University of Technology (the Netherlands) and at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU, Pittsburgh, USA). Uses video taped lessons, video conferencing, electronic mails and web-accessible document management system LIRE in the…

  16. Going Dutch: Higher Education in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, David

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines some of the policy issues currently faced by research-based universities in the Netherlands. The focus is on four leading universities (University of Amsterdam: UvA; Free University of Amsterdam: VU; Leiden University; and Delft University of Technology: TUD). The author visited these institutions as part of a Study Tour…

  17. Bottom-Up: Teachers' Contribution in Developing Uniform Criteria to Assess Design Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lans, Wendelien; Verkroost, Marie-Jose

    2004-01-01

    The Faculty of Architecture of Delft University of Technology considers valid and reliable assessment of designing an important issue. A project called Bottom-up was started to address this issue, using the experiences and practice of design teachers as a starting point. The goals of this project were to enlarge inter-subjective reliability and to…

  18. The New Library, A Hybrid Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waaijers, Leo

    This paper discusses changes in technology in libraries over the last decade, beginning with an overview of the impact of databases, the Internet, and the World Wide Web on libraries. The integration of technology at Delft University of Technology (Netherlands) is described, including use of scanning technology, fax, and e-mail for document…

  19. Guidelines for Engineering Teachers Concerning Educating the Engineer for Innovative and Entrepreneurial Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eekels, J.

    1987-01-01

    Emphasizes that the concept of design is fundamental in innovation. Outlines the work of the European Society for Engineering Education-Working group on Innovation. Describes the innovation-management stream in the curriculum of the faculty of Industrial Design Engineering at Delft University of Technology, Netherlands. (CW)

  20. A Joint Venture Model for Teaching Required Courses in "Ethics and Engineering" to Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandvoort, H.; Van Hasselt, G. J.; Bonnet, J. A. B. A. F.

    2008-01-01

    We present our experience, spanning more than 10 years of teaching a course on "ethics and engineering" for a group of MSc programmes in applied sciences at Delft University of Technology. The course is taught by a team of teachers from the faculty of Applied Sciences and from the department of Philosophy of the Faculty of Technology, Policy and…

  1. What's Your Story?: Dutch Library DOK's New Cutting-Edge Community Tech Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekesteijn, Erik

    2010-01-01

    DOK, the cutting-edge library center in Delft, the Netherlands, has been finding new ways to elaborate on the social networking impulse. A good library unites people from all levels of society, and DOK's unique innovation department focuses specifically on how media can bring people together. It's doing so using technology to inspire and connect…

  2. Midlands Teaching Factory, LTD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midlands Technical Coll., Columbia, SC.

    In 1987, Midlands Technical College (MTC), in Columbia, South Carolina, initiated a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) project, the Midlands Teaching Factory, LTD, which integrated various college departments with the goal of manufacturing a high quality, saleable product. The faculty developed a teaching factory model which was designed to…

  3. Mapping small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci for complex traits in backcross or DH populations via a multi-locus GWAS methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Wen, Yang-Jun; Ren, Wen-Long; Ni, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Composite interval mapping (CIM) is the most widely-used method in linkage analysis. Its main feature is the ability to control genomic background effects via inclusion of co-factors in its genetic model. However, the result often depends on how the co-factors are selected, especially for small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). To address this issue, here we proposed a new method under the framework of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). First, a single-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model method for GWAS was used to scan each putative QTL on the genome in backcross or doubled haploid populations. Here, controlling background via selecting markers in the CIM was replaced by estimating polygenic variance. Then, all the peaks in the negative logarithm P-value curve were selected as the positions of multiple putative QTL to be included in a multi-locus genetic model, and true QTL were automatically identified by empirical Bayes. This called genome-wide CIM (GCIM). A series of simulated and real datasets was used to validate the new method. As a result, the new method had higher power in QTL detection, greater accuracy in QTL effect estimation, and stronger robustness under various backgrounds as compared with the CIM and empirical Bayes methods.

  4. Implementing Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technician Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Roger

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) technician program was developed to provide training and technical assistance to meet the needs of business and industry in the face of the demands of high technology. The Computer and Automated Systems Association (CASA) of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers provided the incentive and guidelines…

  5. 28 CFR 524.71 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Responsibility. 524.71 Section 524.71... TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Central Inmate Monitoring (CIM) System § 524.71 Responsibility... institutional level, and the Community Corrections Manager shall assume these responsibilities for...

  6. Skill-Biased Technological Change. Evidence from a Firm-Level Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Donald S.

    A study addressed the effects of technological change using a new, rich source of firm-level data on technology usage and labor force composition. The empirical investigation is based on a survey of Long Island manufacturers' usage of computer-integrated manufacturing systems (CIMS) or advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs). The study also…

  7. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Steinkamp, F. Lucus; Giordano, Braden C.

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane ( i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance.

  8. Disposable terbium (III) salicylate complex imprinted membrane using solid phase surface fluorescence method for fast separation and detection of salicylic acid in pharmaceuticals and human urine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianxiang; Hu, Yufei; Hu, Yuling; Li, Gongke

    2013-03-30

    In this work, a simple, low cost, selective and sensitive complex imprinted membrane (CIM) for solid-phase fluorescent detection was developed with terbium (III) salicylate as complex template. Terbium-sensitized luminescence was employed for monitoring salicylic acid (SA) based on the fluorescence enhancement effect of benzoic acid derivatives on lanthanide ion Tb (III). The resulting CIM showed good fluorescent response and high selectivity towards SA with Tb as pivot in protic solvents, while demonstrating better analytical performance than the controlled membranes. The optimized adsorption time was 10 min, indicating rapid kinetics of the imprinted membrane. The linear response of CIM to SA was from 0.20 to 10mg/L with limit of detection (LOD) of 0.040 mg/L. The prepared CIM was successfully applied to the analysis of salicylic acid in pharmaceuticals and spiked human urine with recoveries of 80.6%-88.1%. The analytical results of the proposed method were in good agreement with those obtained by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, indicating that the developed membrane has acceptable practicability for fast determination of SA in real samples.

  9. Careers in medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine: an innovative approach to specialty exploration and selection.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Kyle R; Fritz, Ryan A; Rodgers, Scott M

    2012-07-01

    Research on resident attrition rates suggests that medical students would benefit from more comprehensive career advising programs during medical school. Responding to this need, students and administrators at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (Vanderbilt) introduced a broad Careers in Medicine (CiM) program in 2005 to complement the CiM resources offered by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). In this article, the authors detail the Vanderbilt CiM program's four core components: career-related events, an elective course, specialty interest groups, and career advising. The authors discuss the program's implementation and its student-led organizational structure, and they provide a critical assessment of important lessons learned. Using data from internal satisfaction surveys and the AAMC's Medical School Graduation Questionnaire (GQ), they demonstrate the success of Vanderbilt's career counseling efforts. According to recent GQ data, Vanderbilt ranks above the U.S. medical school average on graduating students' ratings of overall satisfaction with career services and of the usefulness of key programming. The authors present this description of the Vanderbilt CiM model as a framework for other medical schools to consider adopting or adapting as they explore options for expanding their own career counseling services.

  10. Mapping small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci for complex traits in backcross or DH populations via a multi-locus GWAS methodology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Wen, Yang-Jun; Ren, Wen-Long; Ni, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Composite interval mapping (CIM) is the most widely-used method in linkage analysis. Its main feature is the ability to control genomic background effects via inclusion of co-factors in its genetic model. However, the result often depends on how the co-factors are selected, especially for small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). To address this issue, here we proposed a new method under the framework of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). First, a single-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model method for GWAS was used to scan each putative QTL on the genome in backcross or doubled haploid populations. Here, controlling background via selecting markers in the CIM was replaced by estimating polygenic variance. Then, all the peaks in the negative logarithm P-value curve were selected as the positions of multiple putative QTL to be included in a multi-locus genetic model, and true QTL were automatically identified by empirical Bayes. This called genome-wide CIM (GCIM). A series of simulated and real datasets was used to validate the new method. As a result, the new method had higher power in QTL detection, greater accuracy in QTL effect estimation, and stronger robustness under various backgrounds as compared with the CIM and empirical Bayes methods. PMID:27435756

  11. 78 FR 72088 - Statement of Organization, Functions, and Delegations of Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ..., Functions, and Delegations of Authority of the Department of Health and Human Services (45 FR 67772-76, dated October 14, 1980, and corrected at 45 FR 69296, October 20, 1980, as amended most recently at 78 FR 58309, dated September 23, 2013) is amended to reflect the title change for the CIMS...

  12. TESL Reporter, Vol. 11, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pack, Alice C., Ed.

    This issue of a publication devoted to providing ideas and guidance for teachers of English as a second language includes the following articles and features: (1) "2LL + CIM = TLP: An Equation That Can [Mean] Total Success for Language Teaching," (2) "Improving Reading Comprehension through Peer Persuasion and Competitions," (3) "ESL…

  13. CIMFUELS: Commercial practice--tools vs. solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Latour, P.R.

    1997-03-01

    Continuing the them of CIMFUELS` recent editorials on good management practice, the nature of commercial offerings and practices between CIM providers and their fuel and petrochemical operating company customers and clients also warrants discussion. The commercial practices of the CIMFUELS business in this unstructured, fast changing, high technology global business has suffered unduly from inadequate distinction between tools and solutions.

  14. Trigonocranus emmeae Fieber, 1876 (Hemiptera, Fulgoromorpha, Cixiidae) - a new species for Poland.

    PubMed

    Musik, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marcin; Depa, Lukasz; Lukasz Junkiert; Anna Jedynowicz

    2013-01-01

    Single macropterous female of Trigonocranus emmeae Fieber, 1876 has been found during the faunistic studies in semi-natural plant communities of Oświęcim city in southern Poland. It is the first record of this species in Poland. Trigonocranus emmeae is rarely collected within the wide range of its distribution, mostly due to its hidden life mode.

  15. A computational intelligibility model for assessment and compression of American sign language video.

    PubMed

    Ciaramello, Frank M; Hemami, Sheila S

    2011-11-01

    Real-time, two-way transmission of American Sign Language (ASL) video over cellular networks provides natural communication among members of the Deaf community. As a communication tool, compressed ASL video must be evaluated according to the intelligibility of the conversation, not according to conventional definitions of video quality. Guided by linguistic principles and human perception of ASL, this paper proposes a full-reference computational model of intelligibility for ASL (CIM-ASL) that is suitable for evaluating compressed ASL video. The CIM-ASL measures distortions only in regions relevant for ASL communication, using spatial and temporal pooling mechanisms that vary the contribution of distortions according to their relative impact on the intelligibility of the compressed video. The model is trained and evaluating using ground truth experimental data collected in three separate studies. The CIM-ASL provides accurate estimates of subjective intelligibility and demonstrates statistically significant improvements over computational models traditionally used to estimate video quality. The CIM-ASL is incorporated into an H.264 compliant video coding framework, creating a closed-loop encoding system optimized explicitly for ASL intelligibility. The ASL-optimized encoder achieves bitrate reductions between 10% and 42%, without reducing intelligibility, when compared to a general purpose H.264 encoder. PMID:21435973

  16. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Steinkamp, F. Lucus; Giordano, Braden C.

    2016-08-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane (i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance.

  17. Isolation and purification of blood group antigens using immuno-affinity chromatography on short monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Mönster, Andrea; Hiller, Oliver; Grüger, Daniela; Blasczyk, Rainer; Kasper, Cornelia

    2011-02-01

    Monolithic columns have gained increasing attention as stationary phases for the separation of biomolecules and biopharmaceuticals. In the present work the performance of monolithic convective interaction media (CIM(®)) chromatography for the purification of blood group antigens was established. The proteins employed in this study are derived from blood group antigens Knops, JMH and Scianna, equipped both with a His-tag and with a V5-tag by which they can be purified. In a first step a monoclonal antibody directed against the V5-tag was immobilized on a CIM(®) Disk with epoxy chemistry. After this, the immobilized CIM(®) Disk was used in immuno-affinity chromatography to purify the three blood group antigens from cell culture supernatant. Up-scaling of the applied technology was carried out using CIM(®) Tubes. In comparison to conventional affinity chromatography, blood group antigens were also purified via His-tag using a HiTrap(®) metal-affinity column. The two purifications have been compared regarding purity, yield and purification speed. Using the monolithic support, it was possible to isolate the blood group antigens with a higher flow rate than using the conventional bed-packed column.

  18. CAD/CAM Program Development Study Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Program Management Associates, Springfield, IL.

    Predictions are made based on a study of developments in computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) regarding how they will have an impact on employment, skills needed by Illinois aspirants to manufacturing employment, and the training modes that can be employed most effectively. The report first discusses economic benefits in terms of cost and time…

  19. Quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Clair, J. M.; Spencer, K. M.; Beaver, M. R.; Crounse, J. D.; Paulot, F.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2014-04-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) enables online, rapid, in situ detection and quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. Two different CIMS approaches are demonstrated employing the strengths of single quadrupole mass spectrometry and triple quadrupole (tandem) mass spectrometry. Both methods are generally capable of the measurement of hydroxyacetone, an analyte with known but minimal isobaric interferences. Tandem mass spectrometry provides direct separation of the isobaric compounds glycolaldehyde and acetic acid using distinct, collision-induced dissociation daughter ions. The single quadrupole CIMS measurement of glycolaldehyde was demonstrated during the ARCTAS-CARB (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites - California Air Resources Board) 2008 campaign, while triple quadrupole CIMS measurements of glycolaldehyde and hydroxyacetone were demonstrated during the BEARPEX (Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment) 2009 campaign. Enhancement ratios of glycolaldehyde in ambient biomass-burning plumes are reported for the ARCTAS-CARB campaign. BEARPEX observations are compared to simple photochemical box model predictions of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation at the site.

  20. Spatial-temporal variation of precipitation concentration and structure in the Wei River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shengzhi; Huang, Qiang; Chen, Yutong; Xing, Li; Leng, Guoyong

    2016-07-01

    It is of significant importance to investigate precipitation structure and precipitation concentration due to their great impact on droughts, floods, soil erosion, as well as water resources management. A complete investigation of precipitation structure and its distribution pattern in the Wei River Basin was performed based on recorded daily precipitation data in this study. Two indicators were used: concentration index based on daily precipitation (CID), to assess the distribution of rainy days, and concentration index based on monthly precipitation (CIM), to estimate the seasonality of the precipitation. Besides, the modified Mann-Kendall trend test method was employed to capture the variation trends of CID and CIM. The results indicate that: (1) the 1-3-day events are the predominant precipitation events in terms of the occurrence and fractional contribution; (2) the obvious differences in the CID of various areas are found in the Wei River Basin, and the high CID values mainly concentrate in the northern basin, conversely, the southern basin has a relatively low CID value; (3) high CIM values are primarily in the western and northern basin, reflecting a remarkable seasonality of precipitation in these regions; and (4) all of the stations show a downward trend of CIM, which indicates that the monthly precipitation distribution tends to be more uniform.

  1. Computer Integrated Manufacturing: Physical Modelling Systems Design. A Personal View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) Physical Modeling Systems Design project was undertaken in a time of rapid change in the industrial, business, technological, training, and educational areas in Australia. A specification of a manufacturing physical modeling system was drawn up. Physical modeling provides a flexibility and configurability…

  2. Trigonocranus emmeae Fieber, 1876 (Hemiptera, Fulgoromorpha, Cixiidae) – a new species for Poland

    PubMed Central

    Musik, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marcin; Depa, Łukasz; Łukasz Junkiert; Anna Jedynowicz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Single macropterous female of Trigonocranus emmeae Fieber, 1876 has been found during the faunistic studies in semi-natural plant communities of Oświęcim city in southern Poland. It is the first record of this species in Poland. Trigonocranus emmeae is rarely collected within the wide range of its distribution, mostly due to its hidden life mode. PMID:24039522

  3. Non-verbal development of children with deafness with and without cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Schlumberger, Emilie; Narbona, Juan; Manrique, Manuel

    2004-09-01

    Deprivation of sensory input affects neurological development. Our objective was to explore clinically the role of hearing in development of sensorimotor integration and non-verbal cognition. The study involved 54 children (15 males, 839 females; 5 to 9 years old) with severe or profound bilateral prelocutive deafness but without neurological or cognitive impairment. Of these, 25 had received an early cochlear implant (CIm). Patients were compared with 40 children with normal hearing. All were given a battery of non-verbal neuropsychological tests and a balance test, and were timed for simple and complex movement of limbs. Deafness, whether treated by CIm or not, resulted in a delay in development of complex motor sequences and balance. Lack of auditory input was also associated with lower, but non-pathological, scores in visual gnoso-praxic tasks and sustained attention. Such differences were not observed in children with CIm. Hearing contributes to clinical development of spatial integration, motor control, and attention. An early CIm enables good verbal development and might also improve non-verbal capacities.

  4. The Continuous Improvement Model: A K-12 Literacy Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jennifer V.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if the eight steps of the Continuous Improvement Model (CIM) provided a framework to raise achievement and to focus educators in identifying high-yield literacy strategies. This study sought to determine if an examination of the assessment data in reading revealed differences among schools that fully,…

  5. Exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the parametric two-electron reduced-density-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePrince, A. Eugene; Mazziotti, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The parametric variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) method is applied to computing electronic correlation energies of medium-to-large molecular systems by exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the framework of the cluster-in-molecule (CIM) approximation [S. Li et al., J. Comput. Chem. 23, 238 (2002); J. Chem. Phys. 125, 074109 (2006)]. The 2-RDMs of individual molecular fragments within a molecule are determined, and selected portions of these 2-RDMs are recombined to yield an accurate approximation to the correlation energy of the entire molecule. In addition to extending CIM to the parametric 2-RDM method, we (i) suggest a more systematic selection of atomic-orbital domains than that presented in previous CIM studies and (ii) generalize the CIM method for open-shell quantum systems. The resulting method is tested with a series of polyacetylene molecules, water clusters, and diazobenzene derivatives in minimal and nonminimal basis sets. Calculations show that the computational cost of the method scales linearly with system size. We also compute hydrogen-abstraction energies for a series of hydroxyurea derivatives. Abstraction of hydrogen from hydroxyurea is thought to be a key step in its treatment of sickle cell anemia; the design of hydroxyurea derivatives that oxidize more rapidly is one approach to devising more effective treatments.

  6. A Phenomenological Study of a Collaborative Inquiry Model for Teaching Educators Using Geographic Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Lara M. P.

    2010-01-01

    Geographic inquiry increases higher-order thinking skills which can be supported through the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The purpose of this research project examines the effect of using a Collaborative Inquiry Model (CIM) model during professional development on the rate of effective GIS implementation in K-12 classrooms. The…

  7. Mapping small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci for complex traits in backcross or DH populations via a multi-locus GWAS methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Bo; Wen, Yang-Jun; Ren, Wen-Long; Ni, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Composite interval mapping (CIM) is the most widely-used method in linkage analysis. Its main feature is the ability to control genomic background effects via inclusion of co-factors in its genetic model. However, the result often depends on how the co-factors are selected, especially for small-effect and linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). To address this issue, here we proposed a new method under the framework of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). First, a single-locus random-SNP-effect mixed linear model method for GWAS was used to scan each putative QTL on the genome in backcross or doubled haploid populations. Here, controlling background via selecting markers in the CIM was replaced by estimating polygenic variance. Then, all the peaks in the negative logarithm P-value curve were selected as the positions of multiple putative QTL to be included in a multi-locus genetic model, and true QTL were automatically identified by empirical Bayes. This called genome-wide CIM (GCIM). A series of simulated and real datasets was used to validate the new method. As a result, the new method had higher power in QTL detection, greater accuracy in QTL effect estimation, and stronger robustness under various backgrounds as compared with the CIM and empirical Bayes methods. PMID:27435756

  8. 28 CFR 524.73 - Classification procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification procedures. 524.73 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER CLASSIFICATION OF INMATES Central Inmate Monitoring (CIM) System § 524.73 Classification procedures. (a) Initial assignment. Except as provided for in paragraphs (a) (1) through (4)...

  9. Cassini Information Management System in Distributed Operations Collaboration and Cassini Science Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Equils, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    Launched on October 15, 1997, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft began its ambitious journey to the Saturnian system with a complex suite of 12 scientific instruments, and another 6 instruments aboard the European Space Agencies Huygens Probe. Over the next 6 1/2 years, Cassini would continue its relatively simplistic cruise phase operations, flying past Venus, Earth, and Jupiter. However, following Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI), Cassini would become involved in a complex series of tasks that required detailed resource management, distributed operations collaboration, and a data base for capturing science objectives. Collectively, these needs were met through a web-based software tool designed to help with the Cassini uplink process and ultimately used to generate more robust sequences for spacecraft operations. In 2001, in conjunction with the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and later Venustar Software and Engineering Inc., the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) was released which enabled the Cassini spacecraft and science planning teams to perform complex information management and team collaboration between scientists and engineers in 17 countries. Originally tailored to help manage the science planning uplink process, CIMS has been actively evolving since its inception to meet the changing and growing needs of the Cassini uplink team and effectively reduce mission risk through a series of resource management validation algorithms. These algorithms have been implemented in the web-based software tool to identify potential sequence conflicts early in the science planning process. CIMS mitigates these sequence conflicts through identification of timing incongruities, pointing inconsistencies, flight rule violations, data volume issues, and by assisting in Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage analysis. In preparation for extended mission operations, CIMS has also evolved further to assist in the planning and coordination of the dual playback redundancy of

  10. Cimetidine inhibits nitric oxide associated nitrate production in a soft-tissue inflammation model in the horse.

    PubMed

    Hunter, R P; Short, C R; McClure, J R; Koch, C E; Keowen, M L; VanSteenhouse, J L; Dees, A A

    1999-04-01

    Cimetidine (CIM) is an H2-receptor antagonist that has been used in racehorses in an attempt to reduce the occurrence of stress-related gastric ulceration. It has also been shown to produce several useful effects other than its gastric acid suppression properties. Further, it is a well documented antagonist of cytochrome P-450 (CYP) mediated oxygenation reactions. Nitric oxide (NO), a recently discovered mediator or modifier of numerous physiological functions, is generated by several forms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), one of which is inducible (iNOS). Inducible NOS, expressed in neutrophils and macrophages as part of the inflammatory response to noxious stimuli, contains both a CYP and a CYP reductase domain. Because of the similarity of structure of iNOS and CYP, it was decided to determine whether CIM could reduce NO production, using a carrageenan inflammation model in the horse. Two experiments were conducted. In Trial 1, six female Thoroughbred horses each had three tissue chambers inserted subcutaneously on the sides of the neck. The study was divided into three treatments: 0.9% NaCl (NaCI), CIM (3 mg/kg), and aminoguanidine (AG; 25 mg/kg), an inhibitor of iNOS. Each mare received three i.v. injections 12 h apart prior to instillation of 1 mL of carrageenan into the test chamber. Blood and tissue chamber fluid (TCF) were collected serially. Concentrations of NO3- (the major metabolite of NO), albumin, total protein, CIM and AG were measured and complete cell counts and differentials were conducted. Trial 2 also used six female Thoroughbred horses implanted with at least two tissue chambers inserted subcutaneously on the sides of the neck. The study was divided into two treatments: NaCl (0.9%) and CIM (6 mg/kg). Each mare received seven i.v. injections of either NaCl or CIM 8 h apart prior to instillation of 1 mL of carrageenan into the test chamber. Blood and TCF were collected serially as before, and analysed for NO3- and CIM content. Areas under the

  11. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.

  12. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 daysmore » of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  13. Developing a Common Information Model for climate models and data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valcke, S.; Balaji, V.; Bentley, P.; Guilyardi, E.; Lawrence, B.; Pascoe, C.; Steenman-Clark, L.; Toussaint, F.; Treshansky, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Metafor project, funded under the EU Framework Programme 7, proposes a Common Information Model (CIM) to describe in a standard way climate data and the models and modelling environments that produced this data. To establish the CIM, Metafor first considered the metadata models developed by other groups engaged in similar efforts in Europe and worlwide, such as the US Earth System Curator, explored fragmentation and gaps as well as duplication of information present in these metadata models, and reviewed current problems in identifying, accessing or using climate data present in existing repositories. Based on this analysis and on different use cases, the first version of the CIM is composed of 5 packages. The "data" package is used to describe the data objects that can be collected and stored in any number of ways; the "activity" package details the simulations and experiments and related requirements that were performed with numerical (possibly coupled) models described with the "software" packages. Both data and models can be associated with numerical grids represented by the "grid" package and finally the "shared" package gathers concepts shared among the other packages. The CIM is defined and implemented in the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and application schema have been generated in XML schema. Aiming at a wide adoption of the CIM, Metafor will optimize the way climate data infrastructures are used to store knowledge, thereby adding value to primary research data and information, and providing an essential asset for the numerous stakeholders actively engaged in climate change issues (policy, research, impacts, mitigation, private sector).

  14. SU-D-BRD-04: A Logical Organizational Approach to Clinical Information Management

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, W; Kupelian, P; Wang, J; Low, D; Ruan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinical information management system (CIMS) that collects, organizes physician inputs logically and supports analysis functionality. Methods: In a conventional electronic medical record system (EMR), the document manager component stores data in a pool of standalone .docx or .pdf files. The lack of a content-based logical organization makes cross-checking, reference or automatic inheritance of information challenging. We have developed an information-oriented clinical record system that addresses this shortcoming. In CIMS, a parent library predefines a set of available questions along with the data types of their expected answers. The creation of a questionnaire template is achieved by selecting questions from this parent library to form a virtual group. Instances of the same data field in different documents are linked by their question identifier. This design allows for flexible data sharing and inheritance among various forms using a longitudinal lineage of data indexed according to the modification time stamps of the documents. CIMS is designed with a web portal to facilitate querying, data entry and modification, aggregate report generation, and data adjudication. The current implementation addresses diagnostic data, medical history, vital signs, and various quantities in consult note and treatment summaries. Results: CIMS is currently storing treatment summary information of over 1,000 patients who have received treatment at UCLA Radiation Oncology between March 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014. We are in the process of incorporating a DICOM-RT dosimetry parser and patient reporting applications into CIMS, as well as continuing to define document templates to support additional forms. Conclusion: We are able to devise an alternative storage paradigm which results in an improvement in the accuracy and organizational structure of clinical information.

  15. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  16. Laboratory and Ambient Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds in the Gas Phase Using Nitrate Ion Chemical Ionization Coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Lambe, A. T.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Kimmel, J.; Kroll, J. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) is a widely used technique for molecular level characterization of inorganic and organic gas phase species. Here we present laboratory and ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry, which recently has proven capable of selectively detecting oxidized organic molecules in the gas-phase via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. Such low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOC, ELVOC) have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest site in Centreville, AL (June 1 - July 15, 2013), where emissions were dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), occasionally mixing with anthropogenic emissions. During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected oxidation products of both isoprene (typically C5 LVOC) and terpenes (typically C10 ELVOC). The isoprene-related LVOC showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, while two groups of terpene ELVOC were identified, one peaking at night and one peaking during the day. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analyses are applied to the dataset to further interpret these observations. The effect of anthropogenic pollution on the biogenic-dominated environment was also investigated during periods of elevated nitrous and sulfur dioxide levels. To further aid in interpretation of the SOAS dataset, oxidized organic molecules were produced via OH and O3 initiated oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors in targeted laboratory studies and detected using the HR-ToF-CIMS. Spectra were obtained in these studies over a range of simulated atmospheric conditions.

  17. Quantifying consistency and biases between aircraft, balloon and remote sensing measurements of UT/LS water vapor during the WB-57 NASA MACPEX mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Rollins, A.; Thornberry, T. D.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Hurst, D. F.; Smith, J. B.; Sargent, M. R.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Mixing ratios of water vapor in Earth's upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) are low (< 10 ppmv), yet water in this region is a significant driver of climate. Significant discrepancies have repeatedly been observed between multiple high precision measurements of water vapor at these low values in the UT/LS, leading to uncertainty in the absolute value of the direct radiative forcing from stratospheric water vapor. During the NASA Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) mission in March and April of 2011, measurements of water vapor in the UT/LS were made using the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) and Harvard Lyman-α water vapor (HWV) instruments integrated on the NASA WB-57 based out of Ellington Field, TX. This was the first aircraft deployment of the CIMS instrument configured to measure water vapor. The CIMS carried a novel in situ calibration system using two independent water vapor standards that were in excellent agreement throughout the campaign. CIMS was also in excellent agreement with HWV, which operates and is calibrated using fundamentally different principles. The redundant and independent calibration systems of CIMS and HWV afford new confidence in the accuracy of these aircraft measurements. We compare these aircraft measurements of water vapor to those made with the MLS instrument on the AURA satellite, and to frost point balloon borne (NOAA FPH and CFH) measurements coordinated with the WB-57 descents from the LS. A persistent bias of 0.7 ppmv is observed between the frost point and aircraft measurements in the 3 to 10 ppmv range, with frost point being lower. The MLS measurements are less precise, but generally fall between the balloon and aircraft measurements in the LS. These measurements renew interest in comparisons in the tropics where even lower mixing ratios and higher saturations with respect to ice are encountered.

  18. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  19. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  20. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Eberhard

    2016-06-01

    This Special Section of Acta Astronautica is a collection of selected peer reviewed papers presented at the eighth International Workshop on Satellite Constellations and Formation Flying (IWSCFF). The event was, as its predecessors, organized by the Astrodynamics Committee of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) with the objective to bring together specialists in the area of astrodynamics and space mission analysis and design and to promote discussions on lessons from past missions, to present recent results, and to address challenges for future space missions. The Workshop was held at the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering of the Delft University of Technology from June 8-10, 2015. The Workshop was coordinated by its Chairs Eberhard Gill (The Netherlands) and Alfred Ng (Canada) with support from the recently established TU Delft Space Institute, an extended International Program Committee, a Local Organizing Committee and a variety of industrial and institutional sponsors.

  1. Wind Tunnel Tests of Wind Turbine Airfoils at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorente, E.; Gorostidi, A.; Jacobs, M.; Timmer, W. A.; Munduate, X.; Pires, O.

    2014-06-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been performed to measure the two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of two different airfoil families at high Reynolds numbers (from 3 to 12 millions) in the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. Also, tests at a Reynolds number of 3 millions have been performed in the Low-Speed Low- Turbulence Wind Tunnel of Delft University, The Netherlands. The airfoils tested belong to two wind turbine dedicated families: the TU-Delft DU family and the ACCIONA Windpower AWA family that was designed in collaboration with CENER. Reynolds number effects on airfoil performance have been obtained in the range of 3 to 12 millions. The availability of data from two different wind tunnels has brought the opportunity to cross compare the results from the two facilities.

  2. Still going strong: Leeuwenhoek at eighty.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas

    2014-07-01

    At age 80, Antony van Leeuwenhoek was a world-famous scientist who came from a prosperous Delft family with a heritage of public service. He continued that tradition by serving in paid municipal offices. Self-taught, he began his scientific career in his 40s, when he began making hundreds of tiny single-lens microscopes. Pioneering the use of now-common microscopic techniques, he was the first human to see microbes and microscopic structures in animals, plants, and minerals. Over 50 years, he wrote only letters, more than 300 of them, and published half of them himself. More than a hundred were published in translation in the Royal Society's Philosophical Transactions. Today, Leeuwenhoek is considered in the lesser rank of scientists and is not well known outside of his homeland. Recent archival research in Delft has contributed new information about his life that helps to contextualize his science, but much remains to be learned. PMID:24682589

  3. Still going strong: Leeuwenhoek at eighty.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas

    2014-07-01

    At age 80, Antony van Leeuwenhoek was a world-famous scientist who came from a prosperous Delft family with a heritage of public service. He continued that tradition by serving in paid municipal offices. Self-taught, he began his scientific career in his 40s, when he began making hundreds of tiny single-lens microscopes. Pioneering the use of now-common microscopic techniques, he was the first human to see microbes and microscopic structures in animals, plants, and minerals. Over 50 years, he wrote only letters, more than 300 of them, and published half of them himself. More than a hundred were published in translation in the Royal Society's Philosophical Transactions. Today, Leeuwenhoek is considered in the lesser rank of scientists and is not well known outside of his homeland. Recent archival research in Delft has contributed new information about his life that helps to contextualize his science, but much remains to be learned.

  4. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Scalars Correlate with Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Markers of Cerebrovascular Autoregulation in Neonates Cooled for Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tekes, A.; Poretti, A.; Scheurkogel, M.M.; Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Howlett, J.A.; Alqahtani, E.; Lee, J.-H.; Parkinson, C.; Shapiro, K.; Chung, S.-E.; Jennings, J.M.; Gilmore, M.M.; Hogue, C.W.; Martin, L.J.; Koehler, R.C.; Northington, F.J.; Lee, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUNDANDPURPOSE Neurologic morbidity remains high in neonates with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury despite therapeutic hypothermia. DTI provides qualitative and quantitative information about the microstructure of the brain, and a near-infrared spectroscopy index can assess cerebrovascular autoregulation. We hypothesized that lower ADC values would correlate with worse autoregulatory function. MATERIALSANDMETHODS Thirty-one neonates with hypoxic-ischemic injury were enrolled. ADC scalars were measured in 27 neonates (age range, 4–15 days) in the anterior and posterior centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, thalamus, posterior limb of the internal capsule, pons, and middle cerebellar peduncle on MRI obtained after completion of therapeutic hypothermia. The blood pressure range of each neonate with the most robust autoregulation was identified by using a near-infrared spectroscopy index. Autoregulatory function was measured by blood pressure deviation below the range with optimal autoregulation. RESULTS In neonates who had MRI on day of life ≥10, lower ADC scalars in the posterior centrum semiovale (r = −0.87, P = .003, n = 9) and the posterior limb of the internal capsule (r = −0.68, P = .04, n = 9) correlated with blood pressure deviation below the range with optimal autoregulation during hypothermia. Lower ADC scalars in the basal ganglia correlated with worse autoregulation during rewarming (r = −0.71, P = .05, n = 8). CONCLUSIONS Blood pressure deviation from the optimal autoregulatory range may be an early biomarker of injury in the posterior centrum semiovale, posterior limb of the internal capsule, and basal ganglia. Optimizing blood pressure to support autoregulation may decrease the risk of brain injury in cooled neonates with hypoxic-ischemic injury. PMID:25169927

  5. Vertebral Development in Paleozoic and Mesozoic Tetrapods Revealed by Paleohistological Data

    PubMed Central

    Danto, Marylène; Witzmann, Florian; Fröbisch, Nadia B.

    2016-01-01

    Basal tetrapods display a wide spectrum of vertebral centrum morphologies that can be used to distinguish different tetrapod groups. The vertebral types range from multipartite centra in stem-tetrapods, temnospondyls, and seymouriamorphs up to monospondylous centra in lepospondyls and have been drawn upon for reconstructing major evolutionary trends in tetrapods that are now considered textbook knowledge. Two modes of vertebral formation have been postulated: the multipartite vertebrae formed first as cartilaginous elements with subsequent ossification. The monospondylous centrum, in contrast, was formed by direct ossification without a cartilaginous precursor. This study describes centrum morphogenesis in basal tetrapods for the first time, based on bone histology. Our results show that the intercentra of the investigated stem-tetrapods consist of a small band of periosteal bone and a dense network of endochondral bone. In stereospondyl temnospondyls, high amounts of calcified cartilage are preserved in the endochondral trabeculae. Notably, the periosteal region is thickened and highly vascularized in the plagiosaurid stereospondyls. Among “microsaur” lepospondyls, the thickened periosteal region is composed of compact bone and the notochordal canal is surrounded by large cell lacunae. In nectridean lepospondyls, the periosteal region has a spongy structure with large intertrabecular spaces, whereas the endochondral region has a highly cancellous structure. Our observations indicate that regardless of whether multipartite or monospondylous, the centra of basal tetrapods display first endochondral and subsequently periosteal ossification. A high interspecific variability is observed in growth rate, organization, and initiation of periosteal ossification. Moreover, vertebral development and structure reflect different lifestyles. The bottom-dwelling Plagiosauridae increase their skeletal mass by hyperplasy of the periosteal region. In nectrideans, the skeletal

  6. [Evaluation of carbapenem inactivation method for the identification of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains].

    PubMed

    Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Uluçam, Gülşen; Gençoğlu Özgür, Çiğdem

    2016-07-01

    The rapid and accurate identification of carbapenemases is of crucial importance in terms of infection control. Methods employed in the determination of carbapenemases should be constantly updated in the light of technical advances and newly emerging carbapenemase variants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the newly developed carbapenem inactivation method (CIM) for the identification of carbapenemases defined in the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Enterobacteriaceae isolates with resistance to at least one of the carbapenems (ertapenem, imipenem or meropenem) were included in the study. The study isolates were obtained from various clinical specimens between 2008-2014 and consisted of 56 Enterobacteriaceae strains (12 Escherichia coli, 32 Klebsiella spp., and 12 Enterobacter spp.) in which the presence of the 38 blaOXA-48, 8 blaVIM, 7 blaIMP, 1 blaNDM-1, 1 blaKPC-2 and 1 blaOXA-48+blaVIM genes had been previously determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 78 in which no carbapenemase gene were detected. For the performance of the CIM, the test bacteria were suspended in sterile water and then a 10 μg meropenem disc was immersed in the suspension and incubated for 2 hours. This meropenem disc was then removed and subsequently placed on a Mueller-Hinton agar plate inoculated with E. coli ATCC 29522 and incubated at 35°C. The results were assessed after 6 hours and after overnight incubation. Development of an inhibition zone around the meropenem disk was interpreted as the absence of carbapenemase and the lack of an inhibition zone as the presence of carbapenemase. The results of the CIM were obtained after 8 hours. With the CIM, all isolates with previously determined carbapenemase genes were found to be positive and the isolates with no genes revealed to be negative. The sensitivity and specificity of CIM were estimated as 100%. The high sensitivity and specificity, ease of application and interpretation, rapid

  7. Patient-Provider Interactions Affect Symptoms in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dossett, Michelle L.; Mu, Lin; Davis, Roger B.; Bell, Iris R.; Lembo, Anthony J.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Yeh, Gloria Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether the benefits that some patients derive from complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) are related to the therapies recommended or to the consultation process as some CIM provider visits are more involved than conventional medical visits. Many patients with gastrointestinal conditions seek out CIM therapies, and prior work has demonstrated that the quality of the patient-provider interaction can improve health outcomes in irritable bowel syndrome, however, the impact of this interaction on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is unknown. We aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of conducting a 2x2 factorial design study preliminarily exploring the impact of the patient-provider interaction, and the effect of an over-the-counter homeopathic product, Acidil, on symptoms and health-related quality of life in subjects with GERD. Methods 24 subjects with GERD-related symptoms were randomized in a 2x2 factorial design to receive 1) either a standard visit based on an empathic conventional primary care evaluation or an expanded visit with questions modeled after a CIM consultation and 2) either Acidil or placebo for two weeks. Subjects completed a daily GERD symptom diary and additional measures of symptom severity and health-related quality of life. Results There was no significant difference in GERD symptom severity between the Acidil and placebo groups from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.41), however, subjects who received the expanded visit were significantly more likely to report a 50% or greater improvement in symptom severity compared to subjects who received the standard visit (p = 0.01). Total consultation length, perceived empathy, and baseline beliefs in CIM were not associated with treatment outcomes. Conclusion An expanded patient-provider visit resulted in greater GERD symptom improvement than a standard empathic medical visit. CIM consultations may have enhanced placebo effects, and further studies to assess the

  8. [Evaluation of carbapenem inactivation method for the identification of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains].

    PubMed

    Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Uluçam, Gülşen; Gençoğlu Özgür, Çiğdem

    2016-07-01

    The rapid and accurate identification of carbapenemases is of crucial importance in terms of infection control. Methods employed in the determination of carbapenemases should be constantly updated in the light of technical advances and newly emerging carbapenemase variants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the newly developed carbapenem inactivation method (CIM) for the identification of carbapenemases defined in the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Enterobacteriaceae isolates with resistance to at least one of the carbapenems (ertapenem, imipenem or meropenem) were included in the study. The study isolates were obtained from various clinical specimens between 2008-2014 and consisted of 56 Enterobacteriaceae strains (12 Escherichia coli, 32 Klebsiella spp., and 12 Enterobacter spp.) in which the presence of the 38 blaOXA-48, 8 blaVIM, 7 blaIMP, 1 blaNDM-1, 1 blaKPC-2 and 1 blaOXA-48+blaVIM genes had been previously determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 78 in which no carbapenemase gene were detected. For the performance of the CIM, the test bacteria were suspended in sterile water and then a 10 μg meropenem disc was immersed in the suspension and incubated for 2 hours. This meropenem disc was then removed and subsequently placed on a Mueller-Hinton agar plate inoculated with E. coli ATCC 29522 and incubated at 35°C. The results were assessed after 6 hours and after overnight incubation. Development of an inhibition zone around the meropenem disk was interpreted as the absence of carbapenemase and the lack of an inhibition zone as the presence of carbapenemase. The results of the CIM were obtained after 8 hours. With the CIM, all isolates with previously determined carbapenemase genes were found to be positive and the isolates with no genes revealed to be negative. The sensitivity and specificity of CIM were estimated as 100%. The high sensitivity and specificity, ease of application and interpretation, rapid

  9. Coastal mapping and modelling of Tuktoyaktuk Harbour, Western Arctic, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manson, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Climate models suggest that sea ice in the Arctic is expected to decrease and that the frequency of storms bringing high waves and storm surges is expected to increase. Reduced sea ice, higher waves, and higher storm surge water levels have implications for coastal infrastructure, nearshore sediment transport, and rates of coastal change. Tuktoyaktuk is an important shipping terminal servicing the petroleum industry and Inuvialuit communities in the western Canadian Arctic. The hydrodynamic model Delft3D is used to model sediment transport in Tuktoyaktuk Harbour and the approaches. For nearshore applications, Delft3D works best with a seamless coastal digital elevation model (DEM). A DEM was constructed from a variety of sources. Terrestrial LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) uses an infrared laser to construct a detailed elevation model of the terrestrial coastal zone. Multibeam bathymetry uses arrays of acoustic signals to collect detailed of the subaqueous coastal zone. Bathymetry data, and charts from the Canadian Hydrographic Service supplement the offshore bathymetry. The shoreline is derived from CanCoast, a nationally consistent geospatial database of Canada's marine coasts. The Coastal Information System (CIS) supplements CanCoast and describes coastal geomorphology in local areas. With these data, Delft3D delivered wave, current, and sediment transport data in a common reference frame. When compared to measurements, the model successfully simulates waves and currents. Output from Delft3D was mapped into a Geographic Information System, and combined with other data to help an Arctic community and industries adapt to potential climate-related hazards .

  10. Earth Rotation Parameters Derived from SLR Data on LAGEOS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Kuyper, D. C.; Leenman, H.; Mets, G. J.; Noomen, R.; Wakker, K. F.

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes the computation of ERP(DUT) 93L05A, the contribution of Delft University of Technology to the SEARCH'92 Campaign. The analysis is based on satcllite lascr ränge observations to LAGEOS-1. The resulting 5-daily Solutions for x, y and UT1 agree with IERS EOP90C04 at a level of 0.4 and 0.8 maresee and 0.045 ms, respectively.

  11. [Prostate cancer research. Biomarkers as promising options for optimized diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Ellinger, J; von Rücker, A; Wernert, N; Büttner, R; Bastian, P J; Müller, S C

    2008-09-01

    A better understanding of signal transduction and gene regulation during prostate carcinogenesis will allow the development of novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and a better prediction of the individual course of prostate cancer disease. It will also enhance the design and development of specific small molecular components aiming for specific therapies. The research groups in Bonn succeeded in the competition for an endowed professorship supported by the Rudolf Becker Stiftung (German Science Endowment Fund) settled in the"Centrum für integrierte Onkologie" funded by the German Cancer Aid. This should be the perfect breeding ground for future research in the field of prostate cancer. PMID:18651121

  12. Fahr's Disease Presenting with Dementia at Onset: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Spadaro, Letteria; Marra, Angela; Bramanti, Placido

    2014-01-01

    Fahr's disease (FD) is characterized by sporadic or familiar idiopathic calcification of the basal ganglia, dentate nuclei of the cerebellum, and centrum semiovale, mainly presenting with movement disorder, dementia, and behavioral abnormalities. We described a rare case of Fahr's disease presenting at onset only with behavioral and neuropsychological alterations, whose diagnosis was supposed only after a brain CT, which showed extensive bilateral calcifications in the dentate nuclei of the cerebellum and basal ganglia. Since the onset of Fahr's disease may be a dysexecutive syndrome with behavioral abnormalities, the clinical and radiological features are really important to do the appropriate diagnosis. PMID:24803731

  13. [Little animals observed by Antony van Leeuwenhoek].

    PubMed

    Amako, Kazunobu

    2014-01-01

    Antony van Leeuwenhoek is the discoverer of bacteria and other microorganisms. However, his name is currently not as well-known as those of Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch or Shibasaburo Kitasato. Why not? To answer this question I read a book published in 1932 by Clifford Dobell, an English protozoologist, and found some answers. First, Leeuwenhoek was not a professional scientist in any university or scientific institute, but merely an average citizen in Delft, Holland, working as a merchant in his own shop, and later he also served as an office-holder in Delft city hall. Second, he made and invented his own microscopes but never made his work on microscopes and observation techniques widely known to the public. Accordingly, after his death, his excellent techniques for observing microorganisms were not handed down to the next generation and eventually became forgotten by the scientific community. Although he did not write any scientific paper, he did write about his observations in many letters addressed to the Royal Society of London. Dr. Dobell had translated most of them into English and included them in his book. I picked up and translated several of these letters into Japanese and have included them in this review to show how he described his observations and also what he thought about the presence of such small animals invisible to the naked eye. By reading this review I hope you will come to understand the efforts and abilities of a citizen in Delft about 340 years ago.

  14. In-orbit results of Delfi-n3Xt: Lessons learned and move forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian; Bouwmeester, Jasper; Gill, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    This paper provides an update of the Delfi nanosatellite programme of the Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), with a focus on the recent in-orbit results of the second TU Delft satellite Delfi-n3Xt. In addition to the educational objective that has been reached with more than 80 students involved in the project, most of the technological objectives of Delfi-n3Xt have also been fulfilled with successful in-orbit demonstrations of payloads and platform. Among these demonstrations, four are highlighted in this paper, including a solid cool gas micropropulsion system, a new type of solar cell, a more robust Command and Data Handling Subsystem (CDHS), and a highly integrated Attitude Determination and Control Subsystem (ADCS) that performs three-axis active control using reaction wheels. Through the development of Delfi-n3Xt, significant experiences and lessons have been learned, which motivated a further step towards DelFFi, the third Delfi CubeSat mission, to demonstrate autonomous formation flying using two CubeSats named Delta and Phi. A brief update of the DelFFi mission is also provided.

  15. [Little animals observed by Antony van Leeuwenhoek].

    PubMed

    Amako, Kazunobu

    2014-01-01

    Antony van Leeuwenhoek is the discoverer of bacteria and other microorganisms. However, his name is currently not as well-known as those of Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch or Shibasaburo Kitasato. Why not? To answer this question I read a book published in 1932 by Clifford Dobell, an English protozoologist, and found some answers. First, Leeuwenhoek was not a professional scientist in any university or scientific institute, but merely an average citizen in Delft, Holland, working as a merchant in his own shop, and later he also served as an office-holder in Delft city hall. Second, he made and invented his own microscopes but never made his work on microscopes and observation techniques widely known to the public. Accordingly, after his death, his excellent techniques for observing microorganisms were not handed down to the next generation and eventually became forgotten by the scientific community. Although he did not write any scientific paper, he did write about his observations in many letters addressed to the Royal Society of London. Dr. Dobell had translated most of them into English and included them in his book. I picked up and translated several of these letters into Japanese and have included them in this review to show how he described his observations and also what he thought about the presence of such small animals invisible to the naked eye. By reading this review I hope you will come to understand the efforts and abilities of a citizen in Delft about 340 years ago. PMID:24681990

  16. Backhopping in magnetic tunnel junctions: Micromagnetic approach and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Skowroński, Witold; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Micromagnetic simulations of Current Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS) loops in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB exchange-biased Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJ) are discussed. Our model uses the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with the Slonczewski's Spin-Transfer-Torque (STT) component. The current density for STT is calculated from the applied bias voltage and tunnel magnetoresistance which depends on the local magnetization vectors arrangement. We take into account the change in the anti-parallel state resistance with increasing bias voltage. Using such model we investigate influence of the interlayer exchange coupling, between free and reference layers across the barrier, on the backhopping effect in anti-parallel to parallel switching. We compare our simulated CIMS loops with the experimental data obtained from MTJs with different MgO barrier thicknesses.

  17. From Ambient Sensing to IoT-based Context Computing: An Open Framework for End to End QoC Management †

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Pierrick; Desprats, Thierry; Chabridon, Sophie; Sibilla, Michelle; Taconet, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Quality of Context (QoC) awareness is recognized as a key point for the success of context-aware computing. At the time where the combination of the Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, and Ambient Intelligence paradigms offer together new opportunities for managing richer context data, the next generation of Distributed Context Managers (DCM) is facing new challenges concerning QoC management. This paper presents our model-driven QoCIM framework. QoCIM is the acronym for Quality of Context Information Model. We show how it can help application developers to manage the whole QoC life-cycle by providing genericity, openness and uniformity. Its usages are illustrated, both at design time and at runtime, in the case of an urban pollution context- and QoC-aware scenario. PMID:26087372

  18. Application of vibrational spectroscopy, thermal analyses and X-ray diffraction in the rapid evaluation of the stability in solid-state of ranitidine, famotidine and cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Jamrógiewicz, Marzena; Ciesielski, Aleksander

    2015-03-25

    This paper reports the study on applicability of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for the estimation of the chemical stability and photostability of histamine H2-receptor antagonist substances. Ranitidine hydrochloride (RAN), famotidine (FAM) and cimetidine (CIM) were tested and differences in sensitivity were measured via soft independence modeling of class analogies (Simca) model. The low values of variations for FAM and CIM and high variations obtained for RAN using FTIR and NIR techniques indicated that these methods were suitable and applicable to classify the degradation of RAN. Examined methods are recommendable in the first technological stage of drug production, and the preclinical and clinical development of pharmaceuticals or their quality control.

  19. From Ambient Sensing to IoT-based Context Computing: An Open Framework for End to End QoC Management.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pierrick; Desprats, Thierry; Chabridon, Sophie; Sibilla, Michelle; Taconet, Chantal

    2015-06-16

    Quality of Context (QoC) awareness is recognized as a key point for the success of context-aware computing. At the time where the combination of the Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, and Ambient Intelligence paradigms offer together new opportunities for managing richer context data, the next generation of Distributed Context Managers (DCM) is facing new challenges concerning QoC management. This paper presents our model-driven QoCIM framework. QoCIM is the acronym for Quality of Context Information Model. We show how it can help application developers to manage the whole QoC life-cycle by providing genericity, openness and uniformity. Its usages are illustrated, both at design time and at runtime, in the case of an urban pollution context- and QoC-aware scenario.

  20. Normal and inverse current-induced magnetization switching in a single nanopillar

    SciTech Connect

    Dassow, H.; Lehndorff, R.; Buergler, D. E.; Buchmeier, M.; Gruenberg, P. A.; Schneider, C. M.; Hart, A. van der

    2006-11-27

    The authors report on current-induced magnetization switching (CIMS) in single-crystalline nanopillars. Fe(14 nm)/Cr(0.9 nm)/Fe(10 nm)/Ag(6 nm)/Fe(2 nm) multilayers are deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. The central Fe layer is coupled to the thick one by interlayer exchange coupling over Cr, while the topmost Fe layer is decoupled. Nanopillars with 150 nm diameter are prepared by optical and e-beam lithographies. The opposite spin scattering asymmetries of the Fe/Cr and Fe/Ag interfaces enabled the authors to observe normal and inverse CIMS for the two subsystems, which are combined in a single device. At high magnetic fields, steplike resistance changes are measured at positive currents and are attributed to current-driven magnetic excitations.

  1. Pain as a Barrier to Human Performance: A Focus on Function for Self-Reporting Pain With the Defense Veterans Pain Rating Scale.

    PubMed

    Buckenmaier, Chester C; Galloway, Kevin T; Polomano, Rosemary C; Deuster, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    The intense physical demands and dangerous operational environments common to Special Operations Forces (SOF) result in a variety of painful conditions, including musculoskeletal pain, headaches, and acute and chronic pain from combat injuries. Pain is a wellaccepted barrier to human performance. The Pain Management Task Force and the development of the Defense Veterans Pain Rating Scale (DVPRS) are discussed to provide a framework for changing the culture of pain management away from intensity of pain to interference with function and performance. The emergence of complementary and integrative pain management (CIM) practices is briefly reviewed as viable alternatives to the traditional reliance on opioids and other prescription medications. The SOF community can be the change agent for the DVPRS and CIM approaches to pain management, which will in the end serve to accelerate recovery and return SOF operators to duty faster and with an enhanced ability to perform with less pain. PMID:27450608

  2. Quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K. M.; Beaver, M. R.; St. Clair, J. M.; Crounse, J. D.; Paulot, F.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2011-08-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) enables online, fast, in situ detection and quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. Two different CIMS approaches are demonstrated employing the strengths of single quadrupole mass spectrometry and triple quadrupole (tandem) mass spectrometry. Both methods are capable of the measurement of hydroxyacetone, an analyte with minimal isobaric interferences. Tandem mass spectrometry provides direct separation of the isobaric compounds glycolaldehyde and acetic acid using distinct, collision-induced dissociation daughter ions. Measurement of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde by these methods was demonstrated during the ARCTAS-CARB 2008 campaign and the BEARPEX 2009 campaign. Enhancement ratios of these compounds in ambient biomass burning plumes are reported for the ARCTAS-CARB campaign. BEARPEX observations are compared to simple photochemical box model predictions of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation at the site.

  3. From Ambient Sensing to IoT-based Context Computing: An Open Framework for End to End QoC Management.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pierrick; Desprats, Thierry; Chabridon, Sophie; Sibilla, Michelle; Taconet, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Quality of Context (QoC) awareness is recognized as a key point for the success of context-aware computing. At the time where the combination of the Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, and Ambient Intelligence paradigms offer together new opportunities for managing richer context data, the next generation of Distributed Context Managers (DCM) is facing new challenges concerning QoC management. This paper presents our model-driven QoCIM framework. QoCIM is the acronym for Quality of Context Information Model. We show how it can help application developers to manage the whole QoC life-cycle by providing genericity, openness and uniformity. Its usages are illustrated, both at design time and at runtime, in the case of an urban pollution context- and QoC-aware scenario. PMID:26087372

  4. Continuous Underway Seawater Measurements of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in the Western Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoerb, M.; Kim, M.; Bertram, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The products of isoprene and terpene oxidation have been shown to contribute significantly to secondary aerosol production rates over continental regions, where the emission rates have been well characterized. Significantly less is known about the emission of isoprene and monoterpenes from marine sources. We discuss the development of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) employing benzene reagent ion chemistry for the selective detection of biogenic volatile organic compounds. The CIMS was coupled to a seawater equilibrator for the measurement of dissolved gases in surface seawater. This system was deployed aboard the R/V Knorr during the Western Atlantic Climate Study II in Spring 2014. Here, we report surface seawater (5 m depth) concentrations of dimethyl sulfide, isoprene, and alpha-pinene. The concentration measurements are discussed in terms of surface seawater temperature, nutrient availability, and primary productivity.

  5. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of cimetidine and its metallocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barańska, M.; Proniewicz, L. M.

    1999-11-01

    We present vibrational spectra of three stable, well-reproducible, polymorphic forms of cimetidine ( cim), a drug which is a powerful histamine H 2-receptor antagonist used in the treatment of peptic ulcer and the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Assignments of Raman and IR bands are made using semiempirical methods: MNDO, AM1 and PM3. We also describe the synthesis of Me( cim) 2(ClO 4) 2, where Me=Cu(II), Cd(II), Co(II) and Ni(II), and present their vibrational data. We show that the obtained complexes are isostructural, however a metal ion that occupies a center of octahedral unit introduces some distortions that can be seen in the spectra. We also make tentative assignment of metal-ligand stretching modes observed in low frequency range.

  6. A benzoquinone and flavonoids from Cyperus alopecuroides.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mahmoud I; Abdel-Razik, Ayman F; El-Khrisy, Ezz El-Din A M; Dawidar, Abdel-Aziz M; Bystrom, Amy; Mabry, Tom J

    2002-06-01

    A benzoquinone, named alopecuquinone, was isolated from the ethanol extract of the inflorescences of Cyperus alopecuroides. Its structure was primarily elucidated by spectroscopic analysis including 1H, 13C NMR, APT, HMQC, 1H-1H COSY and CIMS. The known flavonoids, vicenin 2, orientin, diosmetin, quercetin 3,3'-dimethyl ether and its 3,4'-dimethyl ether, were also isolated and characterized. The ethanol extract of the plant material showed moderate estrogenic activity using a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  7. A Cosmological Model with Negative Constant Deceleration Parameter in a General Scalar-Tensor Theory of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. U. M.; Sree Devi Kumari, G.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially homogeneous and anisotropic LRS Bianchi type-I metric is considered in the framework of Nordtvedt-Barker's general scalar-tensor theory of gravitation when the source for the energy momentum tensor is a perfect fluid. With the help of a special law of variation for Hubble's parameter proposed by Berman (Nuovo Cim. B. 74:182, 1983) a cosmological model with negative constant deceleration parameter is obtained. Some physical and kinematical properties of the model are also discussed.

  8. The CMIP5 Model Documentation Questionnaire: Development of a Metadata Retrieval System for the METAFOR Common Information Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, Charlotte; Lawrence, Bryan; Moine, Marie-Pierre; Ford, Rupert; Devine, Gerry

    2010-05-01

    The EU METAFOR Project (http://metaforclimate.eu) has created a web-based model documentation questionnaire to collect metadata from the modelling groups that are running simulations in support of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project - 5 (CMIP5). The CMIP5 model documentation questionnaire will retrieve information about the details of the models used, how the simulations were carried out, how the simulations conformed to the CMIP5 experiment requirements and details of the hardware used to perform the simulations. The metadata collected by the CMIP5 questionnaire will allow CMIP5 data to be compared in a scientifically meaningful way. This paper describes the life-cycle of the CMIP5 questionnaire development which starts with relatively unstructured input from domain specialists and ends with formal XML documents that comply with the METAFOR Common Information Model (CIM). Each development step is associated with a specific tool. (1) Mind maps are used to capture information requirements from domain experts and build a controlled vocabulary, (2) a python parser processes the XML files generated by the mind maps, (3) Django (python) is used to generate the dynamic structure and content of the web based questionnaire from processed xml and the METAFOR CIM, (4) Python parsers ensure that information entered into the CMIP5 questionnaire is output as CIM compliant xml, (5) CIM compliant output allows automatic information capture tools to harvest questionnaire content into databases such as the Earth System Grid (ESG) metadata catalogue. This paper will focus on how Django (python) and XML input files are used to generate the structure and content of the CMIP5 questionnaire. It will also address how the choice of development tools listed above provided a framework that enabled working scientists (who we would never ordinarily get to interact with UML and XML) to be part the iterative development process and ensure that the CMIP5 model documentation questionnaire

  9. QTL mapping of slow-rusting, adult plant resistance to race Ug99 of stem rust fungus in PBW343/Muu RIL population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Singh, Ravi P; Bhavani, Sridhar; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Eugenio, Lopez-Vera Eric

    2013-05-01

    Races of stem rust fungus pose a major threat to wheat production worldwide. We mapped adult plant resistance (APR) to Ug99 in 141 lines of a PBW343/Muu recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population by phenotyping them for three seasons at Njoro, Kenya in field trials and genotyping them with Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers. Moderately susceptible parent PBW343 and APR parent Muu displayed mean stem rust severities of 66.6 and 5 %, respectively. The mean disease severity of RILs ranged from 1 to 100 %, with an average of 23.3 %. Variance components for stem rust severity were highly significant (p < 0.001) for RILs and seasons and the heritability (h (2)) for the disease ranged between 0.78 and 0.89. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis identified four consistent genomic regions on chromosomes 2BS, 3BS, 5BL, and 7AS; three contributed by Muu (QSr.cim-2BS, QSr.cim-3BS and QSr.cim-7AS) and one (QSr.cim-5BL) derived from PBW343. RILs with flanking markers for these QTLs had significantly lower severities than those lacking the markers, and combinations of QTLs had an additive effect, significantly enhancing APR. The QTL identified on chromosome 3BS mapped to the matching region as the known APR gene Sr2. Four additional QTLs on chromosomes 1D, 3A, 4B, and 6A reduced disease severity significantly at least once in three seasons. Our results show a complex nature of APR to stem rust where Sr2 and other minor slow rusting resistance genes can confer a higher level of resistance when present together.

  10. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types in a rat model of critical illness myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Benjamin T; Confides, Amy L; Rich, Mark M; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2015-06-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40-60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and -8 activities, but not caspase-9 and -12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, -27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types.

  11. Deconstructing Spatial Working Memory and Attention Deficits in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gmeindl, Leon; Courtney, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether spatial working memory (WM) is impaired in multiple sclerosis (MS), and, if it is, to localize impairment to specific cognitive subprocess(es). Method In Experiment 1, MS and control participants performed computerized memory-span and visuomotor tasks. WM subprocesses were taxed by manipulating (1) the requirement to remember serial order, (2) delay duration, and (3) the presence of irrelevant stimuli during target presentation. In Experiment 2, recall and recognition tests varied the difficulty of WM retrieval. In Experiment 3, an attention-cueing task tested the ability to voluntarily and rapidly reorient attention. Results Performance was worse for MS than for control participants in both spatial recall (Exp. 1 span: 95% CIMS = [5.11, 5.57], 95% CIControls = [5.58, 6.03], p = 0.003, 1-tailed; Exp. 2 span: 95% CIMS = [4.44, 5.54], 95% CIControls = [5.47, 6.57], p = 0.006, 1-tailed) and recognition (accuracy: 95% CIMS = [0.71, 0.81], 95% CIControls = [0.79, 0.88], p = 0.01, 1-tailed) tests. However, there was no evidence for deficits in spatiotemporal binding, maintenance, retrieval, distractor suppression, or visuomotor processing. In contrast, MS participants were abnormally slow to reorient attention (cueing effect (ms): 95% CIMS: [90, 169], 95% CIControls: [29, 107], p = 0.015, 1-tailed). Conclusions Results suggest that, whereas spatial WM is impaired in MS, once spatial information has been adequately encoded into WM, individuals with MS are, on average, able to maintain and retrieve this information. Impoverished encoding of spatial information, however, may be due to inefficient voluntary orienting of attention. PMID:22059650

  12. Computer aided production engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the following contents: CIM in avionics; computer analysis of product designs for robot assembly; a simulation decision mould for manpower forecast and its application; development of flexible manufacturing system; advances in microcomputer applications in CAD/CAM; an automated interface between CAD and process planning; CAM and computer vision; low friction pneumatic actuators for accurate robot control; robot assembly of printed circuit boards; information systems design for computer integrated manufacture; and a CAD engineering language to aid manufacture.

  13. Exogenous IL-1Ra attenuates intestinal mucositis induced by oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil through suppression of p53-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Gao, Jin; Qian, Lan; Gao, Jing; Zhu, Shunying; Wu, Mingyuan; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Wen; Ye, Hao; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis (CIM) is a major dose-limiting side effect of many chemoagents, resulting in weight loss, diarrhea, and even death. The current treatments for CIM are palliative and have limited benefit. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist is a natural antagonist of interleukin-1. Our previous studies showed the protective effect of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1Ra) on the intestine in mice after 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. In this study, we further evaluated rhIL-1Ra in the treatment of CIM induced by different chemoagents and their combination. Normal as well as tumor-bearing mice were administered oxaliplatin (L-OHP), 5-fluorouracil, or their combination to induce intestinal mucositis and mortality. rhIL-1Ra administered after the chemotherapy, but not after the onset of diarrhea, significantly improved mouse survival, attenuated body weight loss, and reduced the incidence, severity, and duration of diarrhea. Histological examination showed that rhIL-1Ra-treated mice had a relatively intact mucosa structure, more proliferating crypt cells, and higher acid mucin content than the vehicle-treated mice. rhIL-1Ra suppressed crypt apoptosis by reducing the levels of proapoptotic proteins in wild-type, but not in IL-1RI or p53 mice. In addition, rhIL-1Ra was as effective as octreotide acetate in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea, but with the advantage of reducing the epithelial apoptosis, the major cause of CIM. Importantly, the tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy was not affected by rhIL-1Ra. Thus, our data strongly suggest that rhIL-1Ra may be useful for the treatment of intestinal mucositis and improving the quality of life for cancer patients on chemotherapy.

  14. The Sick and the Weak: Neuropathies/Myopathies in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, O.; Reid, M. B.; Van den Berghe, G.; Vanhorebeek, I.; Hermans, G.; Rich, M. M.; Larsson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathies (CIP) and myopathies (CIM) are common complications of critical illness. Several weakness syndromes are summarized under the term intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW). We propose a classification of different ICUAW forms (CIM, CIP, sepsis-induced, steroid-denervation myopathy) and pathophysiological mechanisms from clinical and animal model data. Triggers include sepsis, mechanical ventilation, muscle unloading, steroid treatment, or denervation. Some ICUAW forms require stringent diagnostic features; CIM is marked by membrane hypoexcitability, severe atrophy, preferential myosin loss, ultrastructural alterations, and inadequate autophagy activation while myopathies in pure sepsis do not reproduce marked myosin loss. Reduced membrane excitability results from depolarization and ion channel dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to energy-dependent processes. Ubiquitin proteasome and calpain activation trigger muscle proteolysis and atrophy while protein synthesis is impaired. Myosin loss is more pronounced than actin loss in CIM. Protein quality control is altered by inadequate autophagy. Ca2+ dysregulation is present through altered Ca2+ homeostasis. We highlight clinical hallmarks, trigger factors, and potential mechanisms from human studies and animal models that allow separation of risk factors that may trigger distinct mechanisms contributing to weakness. During critical illness, altered inflammatory (cytokines) and metabolic pathways deteriorate muscle function. ICUAW prevention/treatment is limited, e.g., tight glycemic control, delaying nutrition, and early mobilization. Future challenges include identification of primary/secondary events during the time course of critical illness, the interplay between membrane excitability, bioenergetic failure and differential proteolysis, and finding new therapeutic targets by help of tailored animal models. PMID:26133937

  15. Integrated Computer System of Management in Logistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwesiuk, Krzysztof

    2011-06-01

    This paper aims at presenting a concept of an integrated computer system of management in logistics, particularly in supply and distribution chains. Consequently, the paper includes the basic idea of the concept of computer-based management in logistics and components of the system, such as CAM and CIM systems in production processes, and management systems for storage, materials flow, and for managing transport, forwarding and logistics companies. The platform which integrates computer-aided management systems is that of electronic data interchange.

  16. The behavior of fibroblasts from the developing avian cornea. Morphology and movement in situ and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bard, J. B.; Hay, E. D.

    1975-01-01

    The early chick cornea is composed of an acellular collagenous stroma lined with an anterior epithelium and a posterior endothelium. At stage 27-28 of development (5 1/2 days), this stroma swells so that the cornea is 75-120 mum thick. At the same time, fibroblasts that originate from the neural crest begin to invade this stroma. Using Nomarski light microscopy, we have compared the behavior of moving cells in isolated corneas with the migratory activities of the same cells in artificial collagen lattices and on glass. In situ, fibroblasts have cyclindrical bodies from which extend several thick pseudopodia and/or finer filopodia. Movement is accompanied by activity in these cytoplasmic processes. The flat ruffling lamelli-podia that characterize these cells on glass are not seen in situ, but the general mechanism of cell movement seems to be the same as that observed in vitro: either gross contraction or recoil of the cell body (now pear shaped) into the forward cell process, or more subtle "flowing" of cytoplasm into the forward cell process without immediate loss of the trailing cell process. We filmed collisions between cells in situ and in three-dimensional collagen lattices. These fibroblasts show, in their pair-wise collisions, the classical contact inhibition of movement (CIM) exhibited in vitro even though they lack ruffled borders. On glass these cells multi-layer, showing that, while CIM affects cell movement, fibroblasts can use one another as a substratum. Postmitotic cells show CIM in moving away from each other. Interestingly, dividing cells in situ do not exhibit surface blebbing, but do extend filopodia at telophase. The role of CIM in controlling cell movement in vivo and in vitro is stressed in the discussion. PMID:1194354

  17. [Misuse of tianeptine: five cases of abuse].

    PubMed

    Leterme, Loïc; Singlan, Yves-Stéphane; Auclair, Valérie; Le Boisselier, Reynald; Frimas, Vincent

    2003-11-01

    Five cases of excessive consumption of tianeptine suggest possible drug-abuse of this substance. This side effect is unknown in animals and humans. According to DSM IV, CIM 10 criteria and the French public health code, these five patients had pathological profiles of psychoactive drug abusers. Tianeptine dosage was always used higher than recommended and the drug was taken in association with other psychotropes. Withdrawal was difficult and induced anxiety and other disorders which led to relapse in most of the patients.

  18. Hybrid Simulation Modeling to Estimate U.S. Energy Elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin-Stern, Adam C.

    This paper demonstrates how an U.S. application of CIMS, a technologically explicit and behaviourally realistic energy-economy simulation model which includes macro-economic feedbacks, can be used to derive estimates of elasticity of substitution (ESUB) and autonomous energy efficiency index (AEEI) parameters. The ability of economies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions depends on the potential for households and industry to decrease overall energy usage, and move from higher to lower emissions fuels. Energy economists commonly refer to ESUB estimates to understand the degree of responsiveness of various sectors of an economy, and use estimates to inform computable general equilibrium models used to study climate policies. Using CIMS, I have generated a set of future, 'pseudo-data' based on a series of simulations in which I vary energy and capital input prices over a wide range. I then used this data set to estimate the parameters for transcendental logarithmic production functions using regression techniques. From the production function parameter estimates, I calculated an array of elasticity of substitution values between input pairs. Additionally, this paper demonstrates how CIMS can be used to calculate price-independent changes in energy-efficiency in the form of the AEEI, by comparing energy consumption between technologically frozen and 'business as usual' simulations. The paper concludes with some ideas for model and methodological improvement, and how these might figure into future work in the estimation of ESUBs from CIMS. Keywords: Elasticity of substitution; hybrid energy-economy model; translog; autonomous energy efficiency index; rebound effect; fuel switching.

  19. A study of the abilities in oral language comprehension of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination -- Portuguese version: a reference guide for the Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Mansur, L L; Radanovic, M; Taquemori, L; Greco, L; Araújo, G C

    2005-02-01

    We analyzed the performance of 162 normal subjects, subdivided into groups according to age and schooling, in the oral comprehension tasks of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination translated and adapted to Brazilian Portuguese to obtain a profile of performance for the Brazilian population, as well as cut-off scores for each task, and to determine the best combination of tasks that distinguish normal from aphasic subjects, as a guide for clinicians. The normal subjects were compared to 69 aphasics. Age alone influenced the performance in the designation of actions (subjects above 70 years showing the worst performance); schooling alone influenced the comprehension of forms, colors and numbers (subjects with less than four years of education showing a poorer performance). Both age and schooling influenced the performance in Body Part Identification (BPI) and Complex Ideational Material (CIM) with mean values of 70.5 +/- 3.3 (Word Discrimination, WD), 18.9 +/- 1.4 (BPI), 14.7 +/- 0.9 (Commands), and 10.3 +/- 1.7 (CIM) for the whole sample; the cut-off scores obtained were 65 (WD), 17.5 (BPI), 14 (Commands), and 9.5 (CIM) for the whole sample. Logistic regression showed that the combination of BPI + Commands + CIM was the most efficient in differentiating normal subjects from aphasics, with 72.5% sensitivity and 97.6% specificity. However, for low-education subjects, BPI and Commands were sufficient for this differentiation (75.7% sensitivity and 84.7% specificity). The main contribution of this study was to provide reference values that are far more representative of our population to be used by health professionals in Brazil, taking into account cultural differences.

  20. The First Simultaneous Airborne Measurements of BrO, BrCl HOBr in the Tropics: An Assessment on the HOx Budget and O3 Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, M. R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Shallcross, D. E.; Evans, M. J.; Carpenter, L.; Andrews, S.; Lidster, R. T.; Harris, N. R. P.; Percival, C.

    2014-12-01

    This study represents the first simultaneous airborne measurements of BrO, BrCl, Br2 and HOBr in the tropics using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS). The results suggest that inorganic halogen chemistry has a more significant impact on O3 depletion and oxidising capacity of the troposphere than previously thought. The CIMS instrument was operated on-board the BAe-146 FAAM research aircraft across 20 flights, as part of the CAST (Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics) campaign based on Guam, Micronesia and was supported by measurements of O3 and NOx from core instruments and bromocarbons from Whole Air Samples (WAS). The mean tropospheric BrO concentration over 20 flights was calculated to be 0.69 ppt; a factor of 4 times greater than that predicted by GEOS-Chem running with a tropospheric bromine simulation. An underestimation of HOBr, Br2 and BrCl in the model, when compared to the CIMS data, will contribute to this discrepancy, thus increasing the availability of atomic Br through photolysis, however this does not compensate for the bias currently observed. The magnitude of this discrepancy and subsequent effect on O3 depletion in the tropics is assessed and possible mechanisms are proposed. The measurements of these halogenated species are further used to assess their impact on the HOx budget in the tropics via steady state estimations.

  1. Relationship between male sterility and β-1,3-glucanase activity and callose deposition-related gene expression in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, H Z; Zhang, G S; Zhu, W W; Ba, Q S; Niu, N; Wang, J W; Ma, S C; Wang, J S

    2015-01-26

    In previous studies, we first isolated one different protein β-1,3-glucanase using two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry from normal wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and chemical hybridization agent-induced male sterility (CIMS) wheat. In this experiment, β-1,3-glucanase activity and the expression of a callose deposition-related gene, UDP-glucose phosphorylase (UGPase), were determinate in normal, CIMS, and genetic male sterility (GS) wheat. β-1,3-glucanase activity was significantly different between the fertile and sterile lines during callose synthesis and degradation, but there was no difference between CIMS and GS wheat. The UGPase gene of callose deposition was highly expressed in the meiophase and sharply decreased in the tetrad stage. However, the expression of the UGPase gene was significantly different between the fertile and sterile lines. These data indicated that β-1,3-glucanase activity and the expression of the UGPase gene play important roles in the male sterility of wheat. Consequently, pollen mother cells (PMCs) might degenerate at the early meiosis stage, and differences in UGPase gene expression and β-1,3-glucanase activity might eventually result in complete pollen collapse. In addition, the critical period of anther abortion might be the meiosis stage to the tetrad stage rather than what we previously thought, the mononuclear period.

  2. Integrative physicians and an herbal cancer “cure”

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Shoshana Keren; Samuels, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Oncologists are frequently asked about herbal remedies claiming to “cure” cancer, or at least delay its progression. While complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) should be aimed primarily at improving quality-of-life (QOL) related concerns, “wonder cures” are part of an alternative health belief model providing hope for a “miracle” where conventional treatment has failed. We describe a physician with extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) undergoing chemotherapy, with significant toxicities and impaired daily function. He had come for an integrative physician (IP) consultation, provided by a medical doctor dually trained in CIM and supportive cancer care, taking place in a conventional supportive cancer care service. We describe the IP consultation in general and regarding an herbal remedy which was being promoted as a “cure” for cancer. The subsequent patient-tailored CIM treatment process, in which patients receive evidence-based guidance on treatments which address QOL-related concerns, are presented. PMID:27652207

  3. Intensive care unit acquired weakness in children: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, Vinay; Shamim, Mosharraf; Khilnani, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intensive care unit acquired weakness (ICUAW) is a common occurrence in patients who are critically ill. It is most often due to critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) or to critical illness myopathy (CIM). ICUAW is increasingly being recognized partly as a consequence of improved survival in patients with severe sepsis and multi-organ failure, partly related to commonly used agents such as steroids and muscle relaxants. There have been occasional reports of CIP and CIM in children, but little is known about their prevalence or clinical impact in the pediatric population. This review summarizes the current understanding of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CIP and CIM in general with special reference to published literature in the pediatric age group. Subjects and Methods: Studies were identified through MedLine and Embase using relevant MeSH and Key words. Both adult and pediatric studies were included. Results: ICUAW in children is a poorly described entity with unknown incidence, etiology and unclear long-term prognosis. Conclusions: Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy is relatively rare, but clinically significant sequelae of multifactorial origin affecting morbidity, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and possibly mortality in critically ill children admitted to pediatric ICU. PMID:24678152

  4. Comparison of injection molding and injection/compression molding for the replication of microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokkwan; Hwang, Jeongho; Kang, Jeongjin; Yoon, Kyunghwan

    2015-11-01

    Because of increasing interest in the functional surfaces including micro- or nano-patterns, the mass production of such surfaces has been actively researched. Both conventional injection molding (CIM) and injection/compression molding (ICM) of micro-patterns were investigated in the present study. The molding subject is a multi-scale structure that consists of a macro-scale thin plate and micro-scale patterns formed regularly on its surface. The transcription ratios of micro pattern made by CIM and ICM for different flow length were experimentally measured, and the origin of the obtained results was identified through numerical analysis. It was found that the cavity pressure and polymer temperature are the most important factors for micro-pattern filling; in particular, the polymer temperature is the key factor determining the transcription ratio. It was also found that the difference in CIM and ICM micro-pattern transcription ratios originates from the differences in the cavity pressure history if other molding conditions are the same.

  5. Testicular function and prolactin responsiveness to TRH and cimetidine after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Besi, L; Serafini, E; Gasparotto, M L; Mastrogiacomo, I

    1988-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis and the regulation of prolactin secretion were investigated in eleven male renal transplant recipients. Mean serum levels of testosterone and estrone were normal, whereas those of androstenedione and estradiol were low. Mean basal luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were slightly elevated, but the peak responses to 50 micrograms i.v. gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were not dissimilar from controls. Both basal and GnRH-stimulated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were elevated (p less than 0.02-0.05) and also positively correlated with the time spent on hemodialysis (p less than 0.005-0.002). Basal prolactin (PRL) levels were normal, in all subjects. Nine out of 11 patients had a normal PRL response to Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone (TRH). However only six out of 11 had a normal response to 200 mg i.v. Cimetidine (Cim). Three subjects normally responding to TRH failed to respond to Cim. Uremic primary hypogonadism is not fully reversed by renal transplantation: a slight defect in the pituitary LH release may persist and the impairment of the tubular testicular function is left unchanged. While uremic hyperprolactinemia is corrected, the responsiveness to PRL-stimulating agents, particularly Cim, is not restored to normal, reflecting a derangement at the pituitary as well as the hypothalamic level.

  6. Detection of dimethylamine in the low pptv range using nitrate chemical ionization atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Mario; Heinritzi, Martin; Herzog, Stephan; Leiminger, Markus; Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud; Dommen, Josef; Curtius, Joachim; Kürten, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Amines are potentially important for atmospheric new particle formation, but their concentrations are usually low with typical mixing ratios in the pptv range or even smaller. Therefore, the demand for highly sensitive gas-phase amine measurements has emerged in the last several years. Nitrate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is routinely used for the measurement of gas-phase sulfuric acid in the sub-pptv range. Furthermore, extremely low volatile organic compounds (ELVOCs) can be detected with a nitrate CIMS. In this study we demonstrate that a nitrate CIMS can also be used for the sensitive measurement of dimethylamine (DMA, (CH3)2NH) using the NO3-•(HNO3)1 - 2• (DMA) cluster ion signal. Calibration measurements were made at the CLOUD chamber during two different measurement campaigns. Good linearity between 0 and ˜ 120 pptv of DMA as well as a sub-pptv detection limit of 0.7 pptv for a 10 min integration time are demonstrated at 278 K and 38 % RH.

  7. Measurements of gas-phase inorganic and organic acids from biomass fires by negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Burling, Ian R.; Warneke, Carsten; de Gouw, Joost; Yokelson, Robert J.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions from 34 laboratory biomass fires were investigated at the combustion facility of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. Gas-phase organic and inorganic acids were quantified using negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR), and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). NI-PT-CIMS is a novel technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of ions generated from reactions of acetate (CH3C(O)O-) ions with inorganic and organic acids. The emission ratios for various important reactive acids with respect to CO were determined. Emission ratios for isocyanic acid (HNCO), 1,2 and 1,3-benzenediols (catechol, resorcinol), nitrous acid (HONO), acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, propionic acid, formic acid, pyruvic acid, and glycolic acid were measured from biomass burning. Our measurements show that there is a significant amount of HONO in fresh smoke. The NI-PT-CIMS measurements were validated by comparison with OP-FTIR measurements of HONO and formic acid (HCOOH) and with PTR-MS measurements of HCOOH.

  8. Mechanical Signaling in the Pathophysiology of Critical Illness Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kalamgi, Rebeca C.; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The complete loss of mechanical stimuli of skeletal muscles, i.e., the loss of external strain, related to weight bearing, and internal strain, related to the contraction of muscle cells, is uniquely observed in pharmacologically paralyzed or deeply sedated mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The preferential loss of myosin and myosin associated proteins in limb and trunk muscles is a significant characteristic of critical illness myopathy (CIM) which separates CIM from other types of acquired muscle weaknesses in ICU patients. Mechanical silencing is an important factor triggering CIM. Microgravity or ground based microgravity models form the basis of research on the effect of muscle unloading-reloading, but the mechanisms and effects may differ from the ICU conditions. In order to understand how mechanical tension regulates muscle mass, it is critical to know how muscles sense mechanical information and convert stimulus to intracellular biochemical actions and changes in gene expression, a process called cellular mechanotransduction. In adult skeletal muscles and muscle fibers, this process may differ, the same stimulus can cause divergent response and the same fiber type may undergo opposite changes in different muscles. Skeletal muscle contains multiple types of mechano-sensors and numerous structures that can be affected differently and hence respond differently in distinct muscles. PMID:26869939

  9. OH observations in a tropical rain forest environment using a chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique during GOAmazon intensive campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Seco, R.; Park, J. H.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Guenther, A. B.; Smith, J. N.; Liu, Y.; Bustillos, J. O. V.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Tota, J.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    We will present observed OH in the Amazon rain forest using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). The observation was conducted at the T3 site in Manacapuru, Amazonas Brazil. It had been accepted almost as an axiom that very low OH is expected in low NO environments such as a pristine rain forest. However, recent studies in the pristine rain forest environments consistently reported significantly higher than expected OH levels. This sparked extensive and intensive studies to explore any possibility of OH regeneration from isoprene photo-oxidation processes in the low NO condition. Four OH regeneration processes related with isoprene photochemistry have been proposed since 2008. However, the levels of the expected OH enhancement vary greatly among the proposed OH regeneration processes mediated by the isoprene oxidation processes. As all enhanced OH observations from the pristine areas with high isoprene conditions have used the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique, the possibilities of potential positive artifacts have also been explored. In this context, the first tropical forest CIMS OH dataset will be discussed in the context of 1) comparisons with previously reported OH using the LIF technique, 2) comparisons with box model calculated OH with different isoprene oxidation scenarios to reconcile measured and calculated OH, and 3) comparisons with regional model calculated OH. The CIMS observational dataset along with a comprehensive trace gas dataset provides a constraint to assess current uncertainty in oxidation capacity of the pristine forested region, which has tremendous implications towards global fates of short lived climate forcers.

  10. Thermally induced solid-state transformation of cimetidine. A multi-spectroscopic/chemometrics determination of the kinetics of the process and structural elucidation of one of the products as a stable N3-enamino tautomer.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Natalia L; Simonetti, Sebastian O; Maggio, Rubén M; Kaufman, Teodoro S

    2015-05-22

    Exposure of cimetidine (CIM) to dry heat (160-180°C) afforded, upon cooling, a glassy solid containing new and hitherto unknown products. The kinetics of this process was studied by a second order chemometrics-assisted multi-spectroscopic approach. Proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopic data were jointly used, whereas multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was employed as the chemometrics method to extract process information. It was established that drug degradation follows a first order kinetics. One of the products was structurally characterized by mono- and bi-dimensional NMR experiments. It was found to be the N3-enamino tautomer (TAU) of CIM, resulting from the thermal isomerization of the double bond of the cyanoguanidine moiety of the drug, from the imine form to its N3-enamine state. The thus generated tautomer demonstrated to be stable for months in the glassy solid and in methanolic solutions. A theoretical study of CIM and TAU revealed that the latter is less stable; however, the energy barrier for tautomer interconversion is high enough, precluding the process to proceed rapidly at room temperature.

  11. Adrenal catecholamine synthesis rate changes induced by combined thermal and immobilization stress in fed and 24 hour fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Bargiel, Z; Nowicka, H

    1989-01-01

    The combined stress of acute immobilization (IM) at high and low ambient temperature has been used to determine its influence on adrenal catecholamine (CA) content assassed histofluorimetrically in fed and 24 hour fasted rats. The general course of changes obtained after the arrangement of adrenal strips deriving from the adrenals of rats exposed to cold and IM stress (CIMS) at +10 degrees C to -25 degrees C during the different time fragments presented the adrenal CA depletion events followed sometimes by the adrenal CA content increase after the longer stress exposure or/and stronger CIMS and WIMS conditions. It was found that this depletion-stimulated increase of adrenal Ca synthesis rate had been accelerated in 24 h fasted rats compared to satiated ones exposed to the same stress conditions, especially after the CIMS exposure. Moreover the survival time duration at first lethal temperature (-5 degrees C and +45 degrees C) was significantly higher in fasted rats. The possible hypothalamic regulation of adrenal CA synthesis rate accordingly to the actual metabolism needs and beta-adrenoceptor sensitivity changes depending on satiety state have been discussed and the necessity of further investigations concerning the specificity of stress-induced metabolism changes in 24 h starved rats has been suggested.

  12. The evolution of integrative medical education: the influence of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Maizes, Victoria; Horwitz, Randy; Lebensohn, Patricia; McClafferty, Hilary; Dalen, James; Weil, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine (AzCIM) was founded in 1994 with a primary focus of educating physicians in integrative medicine (IM). Twenty years later, IM has become an internationally recognized movement in medicine. With 40% of United States' medical schools having membership in the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health it is foreseeable that all medical students and residents will soon receive training in the principles and practices of IM. The AzCIM has the broadest range and depth of IM educational programs and has had a major influence on integrative medical education in the United States. This review describes the fellowship, residency and medical student programs at AzCIM as well as other significant national drivers of IM education; it also points out the challenges faced in developing IM initiatives. The field of IM has matured with new national board certification in IM requiring fellowship training. Allied health professional IM educational courses, as well as integrative health coaching, assure that all members of the health care team can receive training. This review describes the evolution of IM education and will be helpful to academic centers, health care institutions, and countries seeking to introduce IM initiatives.

  13. Arsenic in drinking water wells on the Bolivian high plain: Field monitoring and effect of salinity on removal efficiency of iron-oxides-containing filters.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bergh, K; Du Laing, G; Montoya, Juan Carlos; De Deckere, E; Tack, F M G

    2010-11-01

    In the rural areas around Oruro (Bolivia), untreated groundwater is used directly as drinking water. This research aimed to evaluate the general drinking water quality, with focus on arsenic (As) concentrations, based on analysis of 67 samples from about 16 communities of the Oruro district. Subsequently a filter using Iron Oxide Coated Sand (IOCS) and a filter using a Composite Iron Matrix (CIM) were tested for their arsenic removal capacity using synthetic water mimicking real groundwater. Heavy metal concentrations in the sampled drinking water barely exceeded WHO guidelines. Arsenic concentrations reached values up to 964 μ g L⁻¹ and exceeded the current WHO provisional guideline value of 10 μ g L⁻¹ in more than 50% of the sampled wells. The WHO guideline of 250 mg L⁻¹ for chloride and sulphate was also exceeded in more than a third of the samples, indicating high salinity in the drinking waters. Synthetic drinking water could be treated effectively by the IOCS- and CIM-based filters reducing As to concentrations lower than 10 μ g L⁻¹. High levels of chloride and sulphate did not influence As removal efficiency. However, phosphate concentrations in the range from 4 to 24 mg L⁻¹ drastically decreased removal efficiency of the IOCS-based filter but had no effects on removal efficiency of the CIM-based filter. Results of this study can be used as a base for further testing and practical implementation of drinking water purification in the Oruro region.

  14. Evaluation of NO+ reagent ion chemistry for online measurements of atmospheric volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, Abigail R.; Warneke, Carsten; Yuan, Bin; Coggon, Matthew M.; Veres, Patrick R.; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2016-07-01

    NO+ chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NO+ CIMS) can achieve fast (1 Hz and faster) online measurement of trace atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that cannot be ionized with H3O+ ions (e.g., in a PTR-MS or H3O+ CIMS instrument). Here we describe the adaptation of a high-resolution time-of-flight H3O+ CIMS instrument to use NO+ primary ion chemistry. We evaluate the NO+ technique with respect to compound specificity, sensitivity, and VOC species measured compared to H3O+. The evaluation is established by a series of experiments including laboratory investigation using a gas-chromatography (GC) interface, in situ measurement of urban air using a GC interface, and direct in situ measurement of urban air. The main findings are that (1) NO+ is useful for isomerically resolved measurements of carbonyl species; (2) NO+ can achieve sensitive detection of small (C4-C8) branched alkanes but is not unambiguous for most; and (3) compound-specific measurement of some alkanes, especially isopentane, methylpentane, and high-mass (C12-C15) n-alkanes, is possible with NO+. We also demonstrate fast in situ chemically specific measurements of C12 to C15 alkanes in ambient air.

  15. Evaluation of the occlusal contact of crowns fabricated with the bite impression method.

    PubMed

    Makino, Sachi; Okada, Daizo; Shin, Chiharu; Ogura, Reiko; Ikeda, Masaomi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-30

    In prosthodontic treatment, reconstruction of a proper occlusal contact relationship is very important as well as reconstruction of a proper interproximal relationship and marginal fitness. Unfortunately, occlusal relationships are sometimes lost in the process of occlusal adjustment of crowns. The purpose of this study was to compare the occlusal contacts of single crown fabricated by two different types of impression techniques. Nine subjects, whose molars required treatment with crown restoration, were enrolled in this study. Full cast crowns were fabricated using two types of impression techniques: the conventional impression method (CIM) and the bite impression method (BIM). The occlusal contacts of crowns were precisely evaluated at the following stages: after occlusal adjustment on the articulator (Step 0), before occlusal adjustment in the mouth (Step 1), after occlusal adjustment at the intercuspal position (Step 2), and after occlusal adjustment during lateral and protrusive excursions (Step 3). The number of occlusal contacts of the crowns on the functional cusps fabricated with BIM was significantly greater than that with CIM after occlusal adjustment. For this reason, the crowns fabricated with BIM might have a more functionally desirable occlusal surface compared to the crowns fabricated with CIM.

  16. High-throughput purification of double-stranded RNA molecules using convective interaction media monolithic anion exchange columns.

    PubMed

    Romanovskaya, Alesia; Sarin, L Peter; Bamford, Dennis H; Poranen, Minna M

    2013-02-22

    Recent advances in the field of RNA interference and new cost-effective approaches for large-scale double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) synthesis have fuelled the demand for robust high-performance purification techniques suitable for dsRNA molecules of various lengths. To address this issue, we developed an improved dsRNA purification method based on anion exchange chromatography utilizing convective interaction media (CIM) monolithic columns. To evaluate column performance we synthesized a selection of dsRNA molecules (58-1810 bp) in a one-step enzymatic reaction involving bacteriophage T7 DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and phi6 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In addition, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of 25-27 bp were generated by Dicer digestion of the genomic dsRNA of bacteriophage phi6. We demonstrated that linearly scalable CIM monolithic quaternary amine (QA) columns can be used as a fast and superior alternative to standard purification methods (e.g. LiCl precipitation) to obtain highly pure dsRNA preparations. The impurities following Dicer treatment were quickly and efficiently removed with the QA CIM monolithic column, yielding siRNA molecules of high purity suitable for potential therapeutic applications. Moreover, baseline separation of dsRNA molecules up to 1 kb in non-denaturing conditions was achieved.

  17. Computer integrated manufacturing/processing in the HPI. [Hydrocarbon Processing Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, J.S. )

    1993-05-01

    Hydrocarbon Processing and Systemhouse Inc., developed a comprehensive survey on the status of computer integrated manufacturing/processing (CIM/CIP) targeted specifically to the unique requirements of the hydrocarbon processing industry. These types of surveys and other benchmarking techniques can be invaluable in assisting companies to maximize business benefits from technology investments. The survey was organized into 5 major areas: CIM/CIP planning, management perspective, functional applications, integration and technology infrastructure and trends. The CIM/CIP planning area dealt with the use and type of planning methods to plan, justify implement information technology projects. The management perspective section addressed management priorities, expenditure levels and implementation barriers. The functional application area covered virtually all functional areas of organization and focused on the specific solutions and benefits in each of the functional areas. The integration section addressed the needs and integration status of the organization's functional areas. Finally, the technology infrastructure and trends section dealt with specific technologies in use as well as trends over the next three years. In February 1993, summary areas from preliminary results were presented at the 2nd International Conference on Productivity and Quality in the Hydrocarbon Processing Industry.

  18. A trans-acting major histocompatibility complex-linked gene whose alleles determine gain and loss changes in the antigenic structure of a classical class I molecule

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The RT1.A locus of the rat MHC encodes the H chain of the single classical class I molecule of this species. One of the alleles of this polymorphic locus, RT1.Aa, is present in several laboratory inbred, congenic, and MHC recombinant rat strains. Studies of the RT1.Aa class I molecule from a number of these strains as a target for CTL show that its antigenicity, both as an alloantigen and a restricting element, is subject to gain and loss alterations by the action of a gene mapping in the MHC to the right of RT1.A. This locus is apparently present in two allelic forms (one possibly a null allele) corresponding to the presence or absence of a dominant transacting modifier, and has been named class I modification, or cim. The antigenic change brought about by cim is scarcely detectable serologically but highly immunogenic for CTL. Biochemical investigations show that cim affects the post- translational modification of RT1.Aa. PMID:2475574

  19. High speed immuno-affinity chromatography on supports with gigapores and porous glass.

    PubMed

    Schuste, M; Wasserbauer, E; Neubauer, A; Jungbauer, A

    2000-01-01

    Immuno-affinity chromatography exploiting the Ca2+ dependent interaction of the anti-Flag antibody and Flag-tagged proteins has been investigated. The antibody has been immobilized on porous glass beads (Prosep) containing gigapores and on a monolith, the polymethacrylate based Convective Interactive Media (CIM) column at a ligand density of 2 mg/g and 10 mg/ml respectively. The performance of the columns was assessed by applying clarified yeast culture supernatant containing overexpressed Flag-human serum albumin. Dynamic binding capacity and purity was checked at various flow rates ranging from 100 cm/h to 800 cm/h. 95% purity could be obtained. Anti Flag-CIM columns showed a higher unspecific adsorption, requiring a longer wash cycle to obtain the same purity compared to the Prosep column. Anti Flag-CIM columns showed a flow independent performance, which is explained by its monolithic structure. A decreasing dynamic binding capacity with flow was observed with anti-Flag-Prosep columns. Both columns are suited to purify milligrams of protein out of a yeast culture supernatant within a few minutes. We considered them as promising candidates for high throughput screening, where fast purification is a necessity.

  20. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type V.

    PubMed

    Brizola, Evelise; Mattos, Eduardo P; Ferrari, Jessica; Freire, Patricia O A; Germer, Raquel; Llerena, Juan C; Félix, Têmis M

    2015-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V) has a wide clinical variability, with distinct clinical/radiological features, such as calcification of the interosseous membrane (CIM) between the radius-ulna and/or tibia-fibula, hyperplastic callus (HPC) formation, dislocation of the radial head (DRH), and absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI). Recently, a single heterozygous mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5'UTR of the IFITM5 gene was identified to be causative for OI-V. Here, we describe 7 individuals from 5 unrelated families that carry the c.-14C>T IFITM5 mutation. The clinical findings in these cases are: absence of DI in all patients, presence of blue sclera in 2 cases, and 4 patients with DRH. Radiographic findings revealed HPC in 3 cases. All patients presented CIM between the radius and ulna, while 4 patients presented additional CIM between the tibia and fibula. Spinal fractures by vertebral compression were observed in all individuals. The proportion of cases identified with this mutation represents 4% of OI cases at our institution. The clinical identification of OI-V is crucial, as this mutation has an autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expressivity.

  1. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type V

    PubMed Central

    Brizola, Evelise; Mattos, Eduardo P.; Ferrari, Jessica; Freire, Patricia O.A.; Germer, Raquel; Llerena Jr, Juan C.; Félix, Têmis M.

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V) has a wide clinical variability, with distinct clinical/radiological features, such as calcification of the interosseous membrane (CIM) between the radius-ulna and/or tibia-fibula, hyperplastic callus (HPC) formation, dislocation of the radial head (DRH), and absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI). Recently, a single heterozygous mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5′UTR of the IFITM5 gene was identified to be causative for OI-V. Here, we describe 7 individuals from 5 unrelated families that carry the c.-14C>T IFITM5 mutation. The clinical findings in these cases are: absence of DI in all patients, presence of blue sclera in 2 cases, and 4 patients with DRH. Radiographic findings revealed HPC in 3 cases. All patients presented CIM between the radius and ulna, while 4 patients presented additional CIM between the tibia and fibula. Spinal fractures by vertebral compression were observed in all individuals. The proportion of cases identified with this mutation represents 4% of OI cases at our institution. The clinical identification of OI-V is crucial, as this mutation has an autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expressivity. PMID:26648832

  2. Mixed culture biofilms of Salmonella Typhimurium and cultivable indigenous microorganisms on lettuce show enhanced resistance of their sessile cells to cold oxygen plasma.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Han, Noori; Zhang, Cheng-Yi; Ha, Sang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Control of foodborne pathogens in fresh produce is crucial for food safety, and numerous Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) outbreaks have been reported already. The present study was done to assess effectiveness of cold oxygen plasma (COP) against biofilms of ST mixed with cultivable indigenous microorganisms (CIM). ST and CIM were grown at 15 °C as monocultures and mixed cultures for planktonic state, biofilm on stainless steel, and lettuce leaves. Thereafter, the samples were treated with COP and surviving populations were counted using plate counting methods. Biofilms and stomatal colonization were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and food quality was assessed after treatment. Mixed cultures of ST and CIM showed an antagonistic interaction on lettuce but not on SS or in planktonic state. Mixed cultures showed significantly (p < 0.05) greater resistance to COP compared to monoculture biofilms on lettuce but not on SS or planktonic state. Shift from smooth to rugose colony type was found for planktonic and for biofilms on SS but not on lettuce for ST. Mixed culture biofilms colonized stomata on the inside as demonstrated by FESEM. Although, lettuce quality was not affected by COP, this technology has to be optimized for further development of the successful inactivation of complex multispecies biofilm structures presented by real food environment.

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging suggests extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Bell, W. Robert; Kern, Jason; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Mhlanga, Joyce; Carson, Kathryn A.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To apply DTI to detect early extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma along the corticospinal tracts. Methods In children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, low-grade brainstem glioma, and age-matched controls, DTI metrics were measured in the posterior limb of the internal capsule and posterior centrum semiovale. Histological examination was available in one patient. Results 6 diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, 8 low-grade brainstem glioma, and two groups of 25 controls were included. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to controls, fractional anisotropy was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior centrum semiovale and posterior limb of the internal capsule, while radial diffusivity was higher in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. No significant differences were found between low-grade brainstem glioma and controls. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to low-grade brainstem glioma, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. Histological examination in one child showed tumor cells in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Conclusion Reduction in fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity and increase in radial diffusivity in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma may reflect tumor extension along the corticospinal tracts as shown by histology. DTI may detect early extrapontine tumor extension in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma before it becomes apparent on conventional MRI sequences. PMID:26971411

  4. Indoor and outdoor Radon concentration measurements in Sivas, Turkey, in comparison with geological setting.

    PubMed

    Mihci, Metin; Buyuksarac, Aydin; Aydemir, Attila; Celebi, Nilgun

    2010-11-01

    Indoor and soil gas Radon ((222)Rn) concentration measurements were accomplished in two stages in Sivas, a central eastern city in Turkey. In the first stage, CR-39 passive nuclear track detectors supplied by the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) were placed in the selected houses throughout Sivas centrum in two seasons; summer and winter. Before the setup of detectors, a detailed questionnaire form was distributed to the inhabitants of selected houses to investigate construction parameters and properties of the houses, and living conditions of inhabitants. Detectors were collected back two months later and analysed at TAEA laboratories to obtain indoor (222)Rn gas concentration values. In the second stage, soil gas (222)Rn measurements were performed using an alphameter near the selected houses for the indoor measurements. Although (222)Rn concentrations in Sivas were quite low in relation with the allowable limits, they are higher than the average of Turkey. Indoor and soil gas (222)Rn concentration distribution maps were prepared seperately and these maps were applied onto the surface geological map. In this way, both surveys were correlated with the each other and they were interpreted in comparison with the answers of questionnaire and the geological setting of the Sivas centrum and the vicinity.

  5. Osteology of Huabeisaurus allocotus (Sauropoda: Titanosauriformes) from the Upper Cretaceous of China

    PubMed Central

    D'Emic, Michael D.; Mannion, Philip D.; Upchurch, Paul; Benson, Roger B. J.; Pang, Qiqing; Zhengwu, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The Late Cretaceous titanosauriform sauropod Huabeisaurus allocotus Pang and Cheng is known from teeth and much of the postcranial skeleton. Its completeness makes it an important taxon for integrating and interpreting anatomical observations from more fragmentary Cretaceous East Asian sauropods and for understanding titanosauriform evolution in general. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a detailed redescription of Huabeisaurus allocotus and a suite of anatomical comparisons with other titanosauriforms that demonstrate its validity via autapomorphies (e.g., division of some presacral vertebral laminae, reduced development of caudal ribs, the development of fossae relative to one another in caudal vertebral neural arches, high tibia-to-femur ratio). Huabeisaurus shares many features with other Cretaceous East Asian sauropods (e.g., pendant cervical ribs, anterior-middle caudal vertebrae with a nearly flat anterior centrum face and a concave posterior centrum face) that are absent in sauropods from other landmasses and strata, suggesting a close relationship among many of these forms within the clade Somphospondyli. Conclusions/Significance Restudy of Huabeisaurus provides further evidence for the existence of a clade of somphospondylans – Euhelopodidae – mainly found in the Cretaceous of East Asia. Euhelopodidae represents a fourth example of the evolution of narrow crowns within Sauropoda, along with diplodocoids, brachiosaurids, and advanced titanosaurs (lithostrotians). Despite being known from fewer species than Diplodocoidea, Brachiosauridae, or Lithostrotia, euhelopodids possessed a broader range of tooth shapes than any of these clades, suggesting that euhelopodids exemplified a comparably broad range of feeding strategies and perhaps diets. PMID:23936326

  6. Brain Swelling and Loss of Gray and White Matter Differentiation in Human Postmortem Cases by Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shirota, Go; Gonoi, Wataru; Ishida, Masanori; Okuma, Hidemi; Shintani, Yukako; Abe, Hiroyuki; Takazawa, Yutaka; Ikemura, Masako; Fukayama, Masashi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the brain by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) versus antemortem computed tomography (AMCT) using brains from the same patients. We studied 36 nontraumatic subjects who underwent AMCT, PMCT, and pathological autopsy in our hospital between April 2009 and December 2013. PMCT was performed within 20 h after death, followed by pathological autopsy including the brain. Autopsy confirmed the absence of intracranial disorders that might be related to the cause of death or might affect measurements in our study. Width of the third ventricle, width of the central sulcus, and attenuation in gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) from the same area of the basal ganglia, centrum semiovale, and high convexity were statistically compared between AMCT and PMCT. Both the width of the third ventricle and the central sulcus were significantly shorter in PMCT than in AMCT (P < 0.0001). GM attenuation increased after death at the level of the centrum semiovale and high convexity, but the differences were not statistically significant considering the differences in attenuation among the different computed tomography scanners. WM attenuation significantly increased after death at all levels (P<0.0001). The differences were larger than the differences in scanners. GM/WM ratio of attenuation was significantly lower by PMCT than by AMCT at all levels (P<0.0001). PMCT showed an increase in WM attenuation, loss of GM–WM differentiation, and brain swelling, evidenced by a decrease in the size of ventricles and sulci. PMID:26618492

  7. Physical rehabilitation for critical illness myopathy and neuropathy: an abridged version of Cochrane Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mehrholz, J; Pohl, M; Kugler, J; Burridge, J; Mückel, S; Elsner, B

    2015-10-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) acquired or generalised weakness due to critical illness myopathy (CIM) and polyneuropathy (CIP) are major causes of chronically impaired motor function that can affect activities of daily living and quality of life. Physical rehabilitation of those affected might help to improve activities of daily living. Our primary objective was to assess the effects of physical rehabilitation therapies and interventions for people with CIP and CIM in improving activities of daily living such as walking, bathing, dressing and eating. Secondary objectives were to assess effects on muscle strength and quality of life, and to assess adverse effects of physical rehabilitation. On 16 July 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register and on 14 July 2014 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL Plus. In July 2014, we searched the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and three trials registries for ongoing trials and further data about included studies with no language restrictions. We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings and screened reference lists to identify further trials. We planned to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and randomised controlled cross-over trials of any rehabilitation intervention in people with acquired weakness syndrome due to CIP/CIM. We would have extracted data, assessed the risk of bias and classified the quality of evidence for outcomes in duplicate, according to the standard procedures of The Cochrane Collaboration. Outcome data collection would have been for activities of daily living (for example, mobility, walking, transfers and self care). Secondary outcomes included muscle strength, quality of life and adverse events. The search strategy retrieved 3587 references. After examination of titles and abstracts, we retrieved the full text of 24 potentially relevant studies. None of these studies met the inclusion criteria of our review. No data were

  8. Development of a new corona discharge based ion source for high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to measure gaseous H2SO4 and aerosol sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Yang, Dongsen; Ma, Yan; Chen, Mindong; Cheng, Jin; Li, Shizheng; Wang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    A new corona discharge (CD) based ion source was developed for a commercial high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) (Aerodyne Research Inc.) to measure both gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and aerosol sulfate after thermal desorption. Nitrate core ions (NO3-) were used as reagent ions and were generated by a negative discharge in zero air followed by addition of excess nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to convert primary ions and hydroxyl radicals (OH) into NO3- ions and nitric acid (HNO3). The CD-HRToF-CIMS showed no detectable interference from hundreds parts per billion by volume (ppbv) of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Unlike the atmospheric pressure ionization (API) ToF-CIMS, the CD ion source was integrated onto the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) chamber and which made it possible to measure aerosol sulfate by coupling to a filter inlet for gases and aerosols (FIGAERO). Moreover, compared with a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer, the desired HSO4- signal was detected by its exact mass of m/z 96.960, which was well resolved from the potential interferences of HCO3-ṡ(H2O)2 (m/z 97.014) and O-ṡH2OṡHNO3 (m/z 97.002). In this work, using laboratory-generated standards the CD-HRToF-CIMS was demonstrated to be able to detect as low as 3.1 × 105 molecules cm-3 gaseous H2SO4 and 0.5 μg m-3 ammonium sulfate based on 10-s integration time and two times of the baseline noise. The CD ion source had the advantages of low cost and a simple but robust structure. Since the system was non-radioactive and did not require corrosive HNO3 gas, it can be readily field deployed. The CD-HRToF-CIMS can be a powerful tool for both field and laboratory studies of aerosol formation mechanism and the chemical processes that were critical to understand the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  9. Explorative analyses on the value of interim PET for prediction of response in pediatric and adolescent non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study is to evaluate the predictive value of FDG-PET (PET) in pediatric and adolescent patients suffering from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (pNHL) in comparison to information provided by conventional imaging methods (CIM). Methods Imaging was performed at baseline and at interim (after 2 cycles of chemotherapy). The response assessment in PET was carried out visually and semi-quantitatively, the latter one by use of percentage decrease in SUVmax from baseline to interim (ΔSUVmax). The PET-based results were compared to the findings by CIM. Progression-free survival (PFS) was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves (KM) and log-rank test. Results The final study included 16 patients (mean follow-up time, 60.2 months (range, 4.0 to 85.7 months)). Relapse occurred in four patients. Visual PET compared to CIM revealed higher sensitivity (3/4 vs 1/4) and NPV (6/7 vs 10/13), and equal PPV (3/9 vs 1/3), but lower specificity (6/12 vs 10/12) and accuracy (9/16 vs 11/16). False-positive findings in PET at interim were predominantly observed in patients presenting bulky disease (5/6), whereas CIM was true-negative in all of these cases. KM analyses revealed no significant differences in 5-year PFS neither for CIM (76.9% vs 66.7%; p = 0.67) nor for visual PET (85.7% vs 66.7%; p = 0.34) nor for ΔSUVmax (88.9% vs 57.1%; p = 0.12). Conclusions The predictive value of iPET in pediatric patients suffering from NHL was limited due to considerably high amount of false-positive findings, especially in patients suffering from bulky disease. However, due to our limited sample size, final conclusions cannot be drawn and, thus, call for further evaluation of PET in pNHL in larger and more homogenous patient series. PMID:24139528

  10. The origin of Cenozoic basalts from central Inner Mongolia, East China: The consequence of recent mantle metasomatism genetically associated with seismically observed paleo-Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Pengyuan; Niu, Yaoling; Sun, Pu; Ye, Lei; Liu, Jinju; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Yue-xing; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-01-01

    We present new major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope data on Cenozoic basalts from central Inner Mongolia (CIM) in eastern China to study the origin of the incompatible-element enriched component in these basalts by testing whether or not the paleo-Pacific plate lying in the mantle transition zone beneath eastern China is the immediate cause. The Cenozoic CIM basalts have a large variation in major element, trace element and isotope compositions. Fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene can readily explain much of the major element compositional variation, while trace element and isotope ratio variation largely reflect source heterogeneities and source histories. The variably low 87Sr/86Sr, high εNd, high εHf and elevated ratios of high field strength element over large ion lithophile element (HFSE/LILE, e.g., Nb/U, Nb/La) indicate that the CIM basalts are of asthenospheric origin, which is characterized by mixing between DMM and EM1. However, the CIM basalts are enriched in incompatible elements and enriched in the progressively more incompatible elements (e.g., variably high [La/Sm]N = 1.66-3.38), suggesting that the magma source(s) must have been enriched prior to the major episode of the magmatism. Participation of subducted ocean crust in the mantle source region of these basalts is recognized, but cannot be the major source material because the subducted ocean crust is expectedly too depleted in incompatible elements (e.g., [La/Sm]N ≪ 1) to produce magmas highly enriched in incompatible elements with [La/Sm]N ≫ 1. With the new data, we consider that low mass fraction (low-F) melt metasomatism in the seismic low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath eastern China as the most likely process to generate incompatible-element enriched source(s) for mantle melts parental to the Cenozoic CIM basalts. The low-F metasomatic agent most likely resulted from dehydration melting of the transition-zone paleo-Pacific slab, which has been taking place

  11. Towards Better Coupling of Hydrological Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penton, D.; Stenson, M.; Leighton, B.; Bridgart, R.

    2012-12-01

    Standards for model interoperability and scientific workflow software provide techniques and tools for coupling hydrological simulation models. However, model builders are yet to realize the benefits of these and continue to write ad hoc implementations and scripts. Three case studies demonstrate different approaches to coupling models, the first using tight interfaces (OpenMI), the second using a scientific workflow system (Trident) and the third using a tailored execution engine (Delft Flood Early Warning System - Delft-FEWS). No approach was objectively better than any other approach. The foremost standard for coupling hydrological models is the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI), which defines interfaces for models to interact. An implementation of the OpenMI standard involves defining interchange terms and writing a .NET/Java wrapper around the model. An execution wrapper such as OatC.GUI or Pipistrelle executes the models. The team built two OpenMI implementations for eWater Source river system models. Once built, it was easy to swap river system models. The team encountered technical challenges with versions of the .Net framework (3.5 calling 4.0) and with the performance of the execution wrappers when running daily simulations. By design, the OpenMI interfaces are general, leaving significant decisions around the semantics of the interfaces to the implementer. Increasingly, scientific workflow tools such as Kepler, Taverna and Trident are able to replace custom scripts. These tools aim to improve the provenance and reproducibility of processing tasks. In particular, Taverna and the myExperiment website have had success making many bioinformatics workflows reusable and sharable. The team constructed Trident activities for hydrological software including IQQM, REALM and eWater Source. They built an activity generator for model builders to build activities for particular river systems. The models were linked at a simulation level, without any daily time

  12. Flexible DM-NRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeza, Örs; Moca, Pascu; Tóth, Anna; Weymann, Ireneusz; Zaránd, Gergely

    2011-07-01

    This code combines the spectral sum-conserving methods of Weichselbaum and von Delft and of Peters, Pruschke and Anders (both relying upon the complete basis set construction of Anders and Schiller) with the use of non-Abelian symmetries in a flexible manner: Essentially any non-Abelian symmetry can be taught to the code, and any number of such symmetries can be used throughout the computation for any density of states, and to compute any local operators' correlation function's real and imaginary parts or any thermodynamical expectation value. The code works both at zero and finite temperatures.

  13. Design and experimental results for the S805 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, the S805, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  14. Design and experimental results for the S809 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D M

    1997-01-01

    A 21-percent-thick, laminar-flow airfoil, the S809, for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  15. River basin administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Management of international rivers and their basins is the focus of the Centre for Comparative Studies on (International) River Basin Administration, recently established at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Water pollution, sludge, and conflicting interests in the use of water in upstream and downstream parts of a river basin will be addressed by studying groundwater and consumption of water in the whole catchment area of a river.Important aspects of river management are administrative and policy aspects. The Centre will focus on policy, law, planning, and organization, including transboundary cooperation, posing standards, integrated environmental planning on regional scale and environmental impact assessments.

  16. Residential segregation from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century: evidence from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Lesger, Clé; Van Leeuwen, Marco H D

    2012-01-01

    A case study of three early modern Dutch cities (Alkmaar, Delft, and Amsterdam) using geographical information systems and confronting earlier historical, sociological, and geographical models finds clear patterns of segregation below the level of the city block, thus necessitating block-face mapping. The remarkable continuity in patterns of residential segregation is best explained by the workings of the real-estate market, allowing the well-to-do and middle classes to realize their preferences. In Amsterdam, the merchant elites were able to use their political dominance to plan a scenic and expansive residential environment free from noisy and odorous activities.

  17. [The symbol of the three reigns of nature on the pharmacy China vases in "porcelaine de Paris"].

    PubMed

    Bourrinet, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    The use by the apotharies of the symbol of three reigns of nature: the snake, the palm-tree and the rocks, together with the motto "In his tribus versantur" was fort them away to illustrate their scope of competence. This symbol cannot be seen on many delft-wan, but it illustrates many China-vases, made of "porcelaine de Paris" during the XIXth century. Palm-tree, snake and rocks constitute the main kind of adornment on the pots made by the various manufacturers.

  18. Quantitative characterization of metastatic disease in the spine. Part I. Semiautomated segmentation using atlas-based deformable registration and the level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Hardisty, M.; Gordon, L.; Agarwal, P.; Skrinskas, T.; Whyne, C.

    2007-08-15

    Quantitative assessment of metastatic disease in bone is often considered immeasurable and, as such, patients with skeletal metastases are often excluded from clinical trials. In order to effectively quantify the impact of metastatic tumor involvement in the spine, accurate segmentation of the vertebra is required. Manual segmentation can be accurate but involves extensive and time-consuming user interaction. Potential solutions to automating segmentation of metastatically involved vertebrae are demons deformable image registration and level set methods. The purpose of this study was to develop a semiautomated method to accurately segment tumor-bearing vertebrae using the aforementioned techniques. By maintaining morphology of an atlas, the demons-level set composite algorithm was able to accurately differentiate between trans-cortical tumors and surrounding soft tissue of identical intensity. The algorithm successfully segmented both the vertebral body and trabecular centrum of tumor-involved and healthy vertebrae. This work validates our approach as equivalent in accuracy to an experienced user.

  19. Two new dwarfgobies from the Indian and Western Pacific Oceans (Teleostei: Gobiidae: Eviota).

    PubMed

    Greenfield, David W; Jewett, Susan L

    2016-06-13

    Two new species of dwarfgobies are described, Eviota asymbasia from the Sulu Sea, Philippine Islands, south to Java and west to Damar, and E. bipunctata occurring from the Indian Ocean eastward into the western Pacific Ocean. Eviota asymbasia lacks the IT pore of the cephalic sensory-pore system and usually also the POP, has a dorsal/anal-fin formula of 8/8, has some pectoral-fin rays branched and usually 15 rays, two spots on the pectoral-fin base, no dark spot over the preural centrum, first dorsal fin may be filamentous, six ventral postanal spots, and the male genital papilla is not fimbriate. Eviota bipunctata belongs to the group with cephalic sensory-pore system pattern 2 (lacking only the IT pore), some pectoral-fin rays branched, pectoral-fin base with 1 or 2 prominent dark spots, dorsal/anal-fin formula usually 8/8, and no occipital spots.

  20. Pre-critical MRI findings of an Alzheimer's disease patient with pathologically proven cerebral amyloid angiopathy related lobar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Toshihiro; Yakushiji, Yusuke; Ide, Toshihiro; Ito, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideo

    2016-05-31

    An 85-year-old woman with untreated hypertension was admitted with a disturbance of consciousness. On admission, brain CT revealed a lobar intracerebral hemorrhage with a midline shift. An intracranial hematoma was evacuated via a life-saving craniotomy. Definite pathological findings of amyloid-β deposition in the excised hematoma (strong in anti-amyloid β40 immunostain, but weak in anti- amyloid β42) indicated cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). She had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease at a regional memory clinic one month before symptom onset based on MRI findings of medial temporal lobe atrophy as well as CAA-related features of multiple strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds in the occipital lobe, cortical superficial siderosis and >20 enlarged perivascular spaces in the centrum semiovale. This experience suggests that comprehensive interpretation of such CAA-related findings on MRI might help to improve the management of cardiovascular risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27151228

  1. Noninvasive Oxygen Monitoring in Three-Dimensional Tissue Cultures Under Static and Dynamic Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Birgit; Nöhre, Mariel; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Stolz, Marvin; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herb P; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for noninvasive real-time oxygen measurement inside three-dimensional tissue-engineered cell constructs in static and dynamic culture settings in a laminar flow bioreactor. The OPAL system (optical oxygen measurement system) determines the oxygen-dependent phosphorescence lifetime of spherical microprobes and uses a two-frequency phase-modulation technique, which fades out the interference of background fluorescence from the cell carrier and culture medium. Higher cell densities in the centrum of the scaffolds correlated with lower values of oxygen concentration obtained with the OPAL system. When scaffolds were placed in the bioreactor, higher oxygen values were measured compared to statically cultured scaffolds in a Petri dish, which were significantly different at day 1-3 of culture. This technique allows the use of signal-weak microprobes in biological environments and monitors the culture process inside a bioreactor.

  2. Building the backbone: the development and evolution of vertebral patterning.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Angeleen; Kishida, Marcia G; Kimmel, Charles B; Keynes, Roger J

    2015-05-15

    The segmented vertebral column comprises a repeat series of vertebrae, each consisting of two key components: the vertebral body (or centrum) and the vertebral arches. Despite being a defining feature of the vertebrates, much remains to be understood about vertebral development and evolution. Particular controversy surrounds whether vertebral component structures are homologous across vertebrates, how somite and vertebral patterning are connected, and the developmental origin of vertebral bone-mineralizing cells. Here, we assemble evidence from ichthyologists, palaeontologists and developmental biologists to consider these issues. Vertebral arch elements were present in early stem vertebrates, whereas centra arose later. We argue that centra are homologous among jawed vertebrates, and review evidence in teleosts that the notochord plays an instructive role in segmental patterning, alongside the somites, and contributes to mineralization. By clarifying the evolutionary relationship between centra and arches, and their varying modes of skeletal mineralization, we can better appreciate the detailed mechanisms that regulate and diversify vertebral patterning.

  3. Multiple cerebral lesions complicating therapy with interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Karp, B I; Yang, J C; Khorsand, M; Wood, R; Merigan, T C

    1996-08-01

    We reviewed the records and radiologic studies of eight patients who developed new focal neurologic abnormalities while receiving interleukin-2 (IL2)-based immunotherapy for malignancy or HIV infection. Initial confusion and delirium in the patients evolved into coma, ataxia, hemiparesis, seizures, and cortical syndromes including aphasia, apraxia, and cortical blindness. Imaging studies showed multiple white and gray matter lesions with a predilection for the occipital poles, centrum semiovale, and cerebellum. After cessation of IL2 treatment, seven patients improved to normal or near-normal neurologic function paralleled by resolution of the lesions on scans. One patient improved only minimally. Possible etiologies for the lesions include an IL2-induced cerebral vasculopathy, a direct toxic effect of IL2, or immunologically mediated damage.

  4. A hidden pygmy devil from the Philippines: Arulenus miae sp. nov.-a new species serendipitously discovered in an amateur Facebook post
    (Tetrigidae: Discotettiginae).

    PubMed

    Skejo, Josip; Caballero, Joy Honezza S

    2016-01-01

    Arulenus miae Skejo & Caballero sp. nov. is described from Buknidon and Davao, Mindanao, the Philippines. The species was serendipitously found in an amateur photo posted in Orthoptera Facebook group by Leif Gabrielsen. Holotype and paratype are deposited in Nederlands Centrum voor Biodiversiteit in Leiden, the Netherlands. Detailed comparison with Arulenus validispinus Stål, 1877 is given. A new diagnosis of the genus and A. validispinus is given. The paper is part of the revision of the subfamily Discotettiginae. This study provides a good example of how social networks can be used as a modern tool of discovering biodiversity if the regulations of the International Code of the Zoological Nomenclature are followed. A brief insight into habitat and ecology of this rainforest and mountainous species is presented. PMID:27395882

  5. Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    DePalma, Robert A; Burnham, David A; Martin, Larry D; Rothschild, Bruce M; Larson, Peter L

    2013-07-30

    Feeding strategies of the large theropod, Tyrannosaurus rex, either as a predator or a scavenger, have been a topic of debate previously compromised by lack of definitive physical evidence. Tooth drag and bone puncture marks have been documented on suggested prey items, but are often difficult to attribute to a specific theropod. Further, postmortem damage cannot be distinguished from intravital occurrences, unless evidence of healing is present. Here we report definitive evidence of predation by T. rex: a tooth crown embedded in a hadrosaurid caudal centrum, surrounded by healed bone growth. This indicates that the prey escaped and lived for some time after the injury, providing direct evidence of predatory behavior by T. rex. The two traumatically fused hadrosaur vertebrae partially enclosing a T. rex tooth were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota.

  6. Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePalma, Robert A., II; Burnham, David A.; Martin, Larry D.; Rothschild, Bruce M.; Larson, Peter L.

    2013-07-01

    Feeding strategies of the large theropod, Tyrannosaurus rex, either as a predator or a scavenger, have been a topic of debate previously compromised by lack of definitive physical evidence. Tooth drag and bone puncture marks have been documented on suggested prey items, but are often difficult to attribute to a specific theropod. Further, postmortem damage cannot be distinguished from intravital occurrences, unless evidence of healing is present. Here we report definitive evidence of predation by T. rex: a tooth crown embedded in a hadrosaurid caudal centrum, surrounded by healed bone growth. This indicates that the prey escaped and lived for some time after the injury, providing direct evidence of predatory behavior by T. rex. The two traumatically fused hadrosaur vertebrae partially enclosing a T. rex tooth were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota.

  7. First sauropod (Dinosauria: Saurischia) remains from the Guichón Formation, Late Cretaceous of Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Matías; Perea, Daniel; Cambiaso, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    We report the first sauropod remains recorded in the Guichón Formation, western Uruguay. The materials belong to a middle-sized sauropod represented by more than one individual, and among other remains include more than fifty caudal centra. Close to the bones, several eggshell fragments resembling Sphaerovum erbeniMones, 1980 were found. We discuss the biostratigraphic implications of these findings, which for the first time allow us to confidently refer the Guichón Formation to the Late Cretaceous. The combination of several synapomorphies such as a biconvex first caudal centrum, strongly procoelous middle and distal caudal centra, and a pyramidal astragalus suggests that the sauropod remains belong to a derived lithostrotian, probably related to Pellegrinisaurus powelli, Baurutitan britoi and Alamosaurus sanjuanensis. A few isolated teeth (now lost) referred by Frederich von Huene in 1934 to ornithomimid theropods and ornithischians are herein reinterpreted as belonging to indeterminate theropods and basal iguanodontians.

  8. Noninvasive Oxygen Monitoring in Three-Dimensional Tissue Cultures Under Static and Dynamic Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Birgit; Nöhre, Mariel; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Stolz, Marvin; Israelowitz, Meir; Gille, Christoph; von Schroeder, Herb P.; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a new method for noninvasive real-time oxygen measurement inside three-dimensional tissue-engineered cell constructs in static and dynamic culture settings in a laminar flow bioreactor. The OPAL system (optical oxygen measurement system) determines the oxygen-dependent phosphorescence lifetime of spherical microprobes and uses a two-frequency phase-modulation technique, which fades out the interference of background fluorescence from the cell carrier and culture medium. Higher cell densities in the centrum of the scaffolds correlated with lower values of oxygen concentration obtained with the OPAL system. When scaffolds were placed in the bioreactor, higher oxygen values were measured compared to statically cultured scaffolds in a Petri dish, which were significantly different at day 1–3 of culture. This technique allows the use of signal-weak microprobes in biological environments and monitors the culture process inside a bioreactor. PMID:26309802

  9. Myelin imaging with C-11 labeled diphenylmethanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Herscovitch, P.; Dischino, D.D.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.; Raichle, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have recently studied several C-11-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for their suitability as myelin imaging agents with positron emission tomography (PET). C-11 diphenylmethanol (DPM) was selected on the basis of its in vivo metabolic stability and high extraction and lipophilicity. PET studies were performed in three normal subjects and in one patient with multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin distribution was imaged following the bolus intravenous administration of 25-30 mCi of C-11 DPM. Sequential scans were obtained after radiotracer administration to measure the DPM distribution as a function of time. In addition, regional cerebral blood flow was measured after the bolus intravenous injection of 0-15 water. A tomographic slice through the centrum semiovale was used to obtain regional data for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM).

  10. Conventional and advanced MR imaging in infantile Refsum disease.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Mustafa; Karlı-Oğuz, Kader; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Topçu, Meral; Wanders, Ronald James; Coşkun, Turgay

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings in a patient with infantile Refsum disease. The initial diagnosis was made on the basis of history, clinical findings and biochemical studies. Bilateral and symmetrical involvement of the peritrigonal white matter, centrum semiovale, thalami, corpus callosum and corticospinal tracts as assessed by increased T2 signal was highly suggestive of a peroxisomal disorder. Facilitated diffusion was observed in diseased parenchyma. Long echo-time (TE: 270 ms) MRS showed decreased N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine and elevated choline/creatine and lactate; short echo-time MRS (TE: 30 ms) revealed increased myoinositol at 3.56 ppm and lipid peaks at 0.9 and 1.3 ppm. A major contribution to the differential diagnosis came from MR imaging and proton MRS, as discussed in this report.

  11. Reversible restricted-diffusion lesion representing transient intramyelinic cytotoxic edema in a patient with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Al Brashdi, Yahya H; Albayram, Mehmet S

    2015-08-01

    We report this case to increase the awareness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of reversible white matter abnormalities in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps in a patient with traumatic brain injury (TBI). An eight-year-old girl, who was hit by a truck, was brought to the emergency department by the emergency medical service (EMS). Eleven days later, she experienced cognitive impairment requiring MRI evaluation. DWI and ADC maps showed restricted diffusion in the white matter of the corpus callosum, peri-atrial white matter, and in the right centrum semiovale. There were no significant hemorrhagic foci in these regions, which showed complete resolution on follow up DWI MRI 13 days later. This reported case revealed TBI-related transient reversible intramyelinic cytotoxic edema. PMID:26306930

  12. A New Sauropod Dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Phillip L.

    2015-01-01

    A new record of a sauropodomorph dinosaur is here described from the Middle Jurassic (Aalenian) Saltwick Formation of Whitby (Yorkshire), UK. A single caudal vertebra represents an early sauropodomorph and signifies the earliest recognised eusauropod dinosaur from the United Kingdom. The absence of pleurocoels and a narrow, dorsoventrally deep, but craniocaudally short centrum, suggests a primitive sauropodomorph. Distinct spinopostzygopophyseal laminae rise from the lateral margins of the postzygapophyses and pass caudally along what remains of the neural spine, a character unique to a subgroup of sauropods that includes Barapasaurus, Omeisaurus and other neosauropods and eusauropods. The lack of phylogenetically robust characters in sauropod caudal vertebrae usually makes it difficult to establish affinities, but the absence of mild procoely excludes this specimen from both Diplodocoidea and Lithostrotia. The vertebra cannot be further distinguished from those of a wide range of basal sauropods, cetiosaurids and basal macronarians. However, this plesiomorphic vertebra still signifies the earliest stratigraphic occurrence for a British sauropod dinosaur. PMID:26030865

  13. A problematic early tetrapod from the Mississippian of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomson, K.S.; Shubin, N.S.; Poole, F.G.

    1998-01-01

    We report here the discovery of a new taxon of Paleozoic tetrapod from the Late Mississippian of Nevada (330-340 Ma). It has a unique vertebral column with principal centra having vertical anterior and posterior faces, ventrally incomplete accessory centra located antero-dorsally in each centrum, and enlarged presacral/sacral vertebrae. The head and pectoral girdle were not preserved but the large femur, robust pelvic girdle and enlarged sacral vertebrae possibly indicate a terrestrial mode of life. This new form significantly extends the western geographic range of known Mississippian tetrapods. It presents a mosaic of primitive and derived features, indicating that continued revision of traditional accounts of vertebral homology and the early diversifications of Paleozoic tetrapods will be necessary.

  14. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Manning, Phillip L; Egerton, Victoria M; Romano, Mike

    2015-01-01

    A new record of a sauropodomorph dinosaur is here described from the Middle Jurassic (Aalenian) Saltwick Formation of Whitby (Yorkshire), UK. A single caudal vertebra represents an early sauropodomorph and signifies the earliest recognised eusauropod dinosaur from the United Kingdom. The absence of pleurocoels and a narrow, dorsoventrally deep, but craniocaudally short centrum, suggests a primitive sauropodomorph. Distinct spinopostzygopophyseal laminae rise from the lateral margins of the postzygapophyses and pass caudally along what remains of the neural spine, a character unique to a subgroup of sauropods that includes Barapasaurus, Omeisaurus and other neosauropods and eusauropods. The lack of phylogenetically robust characters in sauropod caudal vertebrae usually makes it difficult to establish affinities, but the absence of mild procoely excludes this specimen from both Diplodocoidea and Lithostrotia. The vertebra cannot be further distinguished from those of a wide range of basal sauropods, cetiosaurids and basal macronarians. However, this plesiomorphic vertebra still signifies the earliest stratigraphic occurrence for a British sauropod dinosaur.

  15. Building the backbone: the development and evolution of vertebral patterning.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Angeleen; Kishida, Marcia G; Kimmel, Charles B; Keynes, Roger J

    2015-05-15

    The segmented vertebral column comprises a repeat series of vertebrae, each consisting of two key components: the vertebral body (or centrum) and the vertebral arches. Despite being a defining feature of the vertebrates, much remains to be understood about vertebral development and evolution. Particular controversy surrounds whether vertebral component structures are homologous across vertebrates, how somite and vertebral patterning are connected, and the developmental origin of vertebral bone-mineralizing cells. Here, we assemble evidence from ichthyologists, palaeontologists and developmental biologists to consider these issues. Vertebral arch elements were present in early stem vertebrates, whereas centra arose later. We argue that centra are homologous among jawed vertebrates, and review evidence in teleosts that the notochord plays an instructive role in segmental patterning, alongside the somites, and contributes to mineralization. By clarifying the evolutionary relationship between centra and arches, and their varying modes of skeletal mineralization, we can better appreciate the detailed mechanisms that regulate and diversify vertebral patterning. PMID:25968309

  16. Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex

    PubMed Central

    DePalma, Robert A.; Burnham, David A.; Martin, Larry D.; Rothschild, Bruce M.; Larson, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Feeding strategies of the large theropod, Tyrannosaurus rex, either as a predator or a scavenger, have been a topic of debate previously compromised by lack of definitive physical evidence. Tooth drag and bone puncture marks have been documented on suggested prey items, but are often difficult to attribute to a specific theropod. Further, postmortem damage cannot be distinguished from intravital occurrences, unless evidence of healing is present. Here we report definitive evidence of predation by T. rex: a tooth crown embedded in a hadrosaurid caudal centrum, surrounded by healed bone growth. This indicates that the prey escaped and lived for some time after the injury, providing direct evidence of predatory behavior by T. rex. The two traumatically fused hadrosaur vertebrae partially enclosing a T. rex tooth were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota. PMID:23858435

  17. [Angiodysplasia of moya-moya type disclosed by choreic unvoluntary abnormal movements during oral contraception. Apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J; Cabanot, C; Lévrier, O; Thuillier, J N; Chérif, A A

    1997-07-01

    Two seventeen year-old women, developed acute onset left choreic movements following two months and two weeks use of oral contraceptives. Left hemiparesia appeared a few days later, while involuntary movements discontinued. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed bilateral ischemic lesion in the frontal region for the first case and isolated lesion in the right centrum ovale for the second. Angiography showed nearly complete obstruction of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery with an outline Moya-Moya network. After discontinuing oral contraceptives, there has been no relapse of neurologic dysfunction for more than three years for the first case and twelve months for the second one. The role of perfusion insufficiency in limb-shaking carotid transient ischemic attack is discussed and the possible relations between oral contraceptives, chorea and angiographic features resembling Moya-Moya disease are evaluated. PMID:9684005

  18. Two new dwarfgobies from the Indian and Western Pacific Oceans (Teleostei: Gobiidae: Eviota).

    PubMed

    Greenfield, David W; Jewett, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of dwarfgobies are described, Eviota asymbasia from the Sulu Sea, Philippine Islands, south to Java and west to Damar, and E. bipunctata occurring from the Indian Ocean eastward into the western Pacific Ocean. Eviota asymbasia lacks the IT pore of the cephalic sensory-pore system and usually also the POP, has a dorsal/anal-fin formula of 8/8, has some pectoral-fin rays branched and usually 15 rays, two spots on the pectoral-fin base, no dark spot over the preural centrum, first dorsal fin may be filamentous, six ventral postanal spots, and the male genital papilla is not fimbriate. Eviota bipunctata belongs to the group with cephalic sensory-pore system pattern 2 (lacking only the IT pore), some pectoral-fin rays branched, pectoral-fin base with 1 or 2 prominent dark spots, dorsal/anal-fin formula usually 8/8, and no occipital spots. PMID:27395247

  19. Fahr syndrome unknown complication: overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Tuglu, Devrim; Yuvanç, Ercan; Bal, Fatih; Türkel, Yakup; Dağ, Ersel; Yılmaz, Erdal; Batislam, Ertan

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient's medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome.

  20. Fahr Syndrome Unknown Complication: Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tuglu, Devrim; Yuvanç, Ercan; Bal, Fatih; Türkel, Yakup; Dağ, Ersel; Yılmaz, Erdal; Batislam, Ertan

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department because of frequency and urgency incontinence. During evaluation it was detected that the patient was suffering from frequency which was progressive for one year, feeling of incontinence, and urgency incontinence. There was no urologic pathology detected in patient's medical and family history. Neurologic consultation was requested due to his history of boredom, reluctance to do business, balance disorders, and recession for about 3 years. Brain computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed that amorphous calcifications were detected in the bilaterally centrum semiovale, basal ganglia, capsula interna, thalami, mesencephalon, pons and bulbus, and the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres. We have detected spontaneous neurogenic detrusor overactivity without sphincter dyssynergia after evaluating the voiding diary, cystometry, and pressure flow study. We consider the detrusor overactivity which occurred one year after the start of the neurological symptoms as the suprapontine inhibition and damage in the axonal pathways in the Fahr syndrome. PMID:25140274

  1. Endovascular management of six simultaneous intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas in a single patient

    PubMed Central

    Gist, Taylor L; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Krishna, Chandan; Roman, Gustavo C; Cech, David A; Diaz, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with a history of traumatic brain injury 4 years previously presented with progressive cognitive decline and gait abnormality. MRI revealed diffusion restriction in the bilateral centrum semiovale and multiple serpiginous flow voids. Cerebral angiogram revealed a total of six intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas with separate fistulas of the right and left sphenoid bones, left clival plexus, right transverse sinus, right sigmoid sinus, and superior sagittal sinus. A diffuse pseudophlebitic pattern of venous drainage indicating severe venous hypertension was also observed. The patient underwent a series of endovascular treatments over the next 10 months to achieve resolution of all arteriovenous shunting. Repeat MRI showed resolution of the diffusion restriction and marked reduction in T2 vascular flow voids. The patient's clinical status improved significantly over the course of treatment, paralleling the improvement in venous hypertension. PMID:23475992

  2. The effect of enzyme inhibition on the metabolism and activation of tacrine by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Spaldin, V; Madden, S; Pool, W F; Woolf, T F; Park, B K

    1994-01-01

    1. Tacrine (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-9-aminoacridine-hydrochloride: THA) underwent metabolism in vitro by a panel (n = 12) of human liver microsomes genotyped for CYP2D6, in the presence of NADPH, to both protein-reactive and stable metabolites. 2. There was considerable variation in the extent of THA metabolism amongst human livers. Protein-reactive metabolite formation showed a 10-fold variation (0.6 +/- 0.1%-5.2 +/- 0.8% of incubated radioactivity mg-1 protein) whilst stable metabolites showed a 3-fold variation (24.3 +/- 1.7%-78.6 +/- 2.6% of incubated radioactivity). 3. Using cytochrome P450 isoform specific inhibitors CYP1A2 was identified as the major enzyme involved in all routes of THA metabolism. 4. There was a high correlation between aromatic and alicyclic hydroxylation (r = 0.92, P < 0.0001) consistent with these biotransformations being catalysed by the same enzymes. 5. Enoxacin (ENOX), cimetidine (CIM) and chloroquine (CQ) inhibited THA metabolism by a preferential decrease in the bioactivation to protein-reactive, and hence potentially toxic, species. The inhibitory potency of ENOX and CIM was increased significantly upon pre-incubation with microsomes and NADPH. 6. Covalent binding correlated with 7-OH-THA formation before (r = 0.792, P < 0.0001) and after (r = 0.73, P < 0.0001) inhibition by CIM, consistent with a two-step mechanism in the formation of protein-reactive metabolite(s) via a 7-OH intermediate. 7. The use of enzyme inhibitors may provide a useful tool for examining the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of THA in vivo. PMID:7946932

  3. A Field Measurement of Isocyanic Acid (HNCO): Evidence of a Secondary Source and Presence in Cloud Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Liggio, G.; Wentzell, J. J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Modini, R. L.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Schroder, J.; Bertram, A. K.; Hawkins, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been shown to cause a variety of adverse health effects via protein carbamylation reactions. It is proposed as a key compound in smoke related health issues due to its well-known sources, biomass burning and cigarette smoke. In spite of this, our understanding of the atmospheric fate of this toxic compound is incomplete. More ambient measurements are needed to elucidate additional sources and to better characterize the sinks of HNCO in the atmosphere. The recent development of the Acetate Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Acid-CIMS) has enabled on-line measurement of HNCO at ambient mixing ratios. Ambient measurements of HNCO were performed in La Jolla, CA during the spring/summer of 2012, using the Acid-CIMS. HNCO mixing ratios were found to be approximately 150 pptv during the night, but typically increased to over 300 pptv in the early afternoon. From the observed diurnal profile and the correlation of HNCO with temperature and other secondary compounds (e.g. nitric acid), we report evidence of a secondary, photochemical source of HNCO. The observed HNCO likely arose as a combination of primary and secondary sources. We have also detected HNCO in cloudwater by coupling the Acid-CIMS to a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first field evidence of cloud scavenging of HNCO. Our result show that the cloud scavenging of HNCO may be more efficient than predicted from its effective Henry's law constant. Campaign-averaged diurnal profiles of Black Carbon (BC), isocyanic acid (HNCO) and nitric acid (HNO3). Dotted lines show the averaged time of sunrise and sunset during the campaign.

  4. Characterization of the tRNA ligases of pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Coccidioides immitis.

    PubMed

    Remus, Barbara S; Schwer, Beate; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-10-01

    Yeast tRNA ligase (Trl1) is an essential trifunctional enzyme that repairs RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic-PO4 and 5'-OH ends. Trl1 is composed of C-terminal cyclic phosphodiesterase and central polynucleotide kinase domains that heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO4, and 5'-PO4 termini required for sealing by an N-terminal ligase domain. Trl1 enzymes are found in all human fungal pathogens and they are promising targets for antifungal drug discovery because: (i) their domain structures and biochemical mechanisms are unique compared to the mammalian RtcB-type tRNA splicing enzyme; and (ii) there are no obvious homologs of the Trl1 ligase domain in mammalian proteomes. Here we characterize the tRNA ligases of two human fungal pathogens: Coccidioides immitis and Aspergillus fumigatus The biological activity of CimTrl1 and AfuTrl1 was verified by showing that their expression complements a Saccharomyces cerevisiae trl1Δ mutant. Purified recombinant AfuTrl1 and CimTrl1 proteins were catalytically active in joining 2',3'-cyclic-PO4 and 5'-OH ends in vitro, either as full-length proteins or as a mixture of separately produced healing and sealing domains. The biochemical properties of CimTrl1 and AfuTrl1 are similar to those of budding yeast Trl1, particularly with respect to their preferential use of GTP as the phosphate donor for the polynucleotide kinase reaction. Our findings provide genetic and biochemical tools to screen for inhibitors of tRNA ligases from pathogenic fungi.

  5. Effect of ions on the measurement of sulphuric acid in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Kürten, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2014-07-01

    Ternary aerosol nucleation experiments were conducted in the CLOUD chamber at CERN in order to investigate the influence of ions on new particle formation. Neutral and ion-induced nucleation experiments, i.e., with and without the presence of ions, were carried out under precisely controlled conditions. The sulphuric acid concentration was measured with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) during the new particle formation experiments. The added ternary trace gases were ammonia (NH3), dimethylamine (DMA, C2H7N) or oxidised products of pinanediol (PD, C10H18O2). When pinanediol was introduced into the chamber, an increase in the mass spectrometric signal used to determine the sulphuric acid concentration (m/z 97, i.e., HSO4-) was observed due to ions from the CLOUD chamber. The enhancement was only observed during ion-induced nucleation measurements by using either galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or the proton synchrotron (PS) pion beam for the ion generation, respectively. The ion effect typically involved an increase in the apparent sulphuric acid concentration by a factor of ~2 to 3 and was qualitatively verified by the ion measurements by an Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. By applying a high voltage (HV) clearing field inside the CLOUD chamber the ion effect on the CIMS measurement was completely eliminated since, under these conditions, small ions are swept from the chamber in about one second. In order to exclude the ion effect and to provide corrected sulphuric acid concentrations during the GCR and PS beam nucleation experiments, a parameterisation was derived that utilizes the trace gas concentrations and the UV light intensity as input parameters. Atmospheric sulphuric acid measurements with a CIMS showed an insignificant ion effect.

  6. Effect of ions on the measurement of sulfuric acid in the CLOUD experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Kürten, A.; Ehrhart, S.; Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2014-11-01

    Ternary aerosol nucleation experiments were conducted in the CLOUD chamber at CERN in order to investigate the influence of ions on new particle formation. Neutral and ion-induced nucleation experiments, i.e. without and with the presence of ions, respectively, were carried out under precisely controlled conditions. The sulfuric acid concentration was measured with a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the new particle formation experiments. The added ternary trace gases were ammonia (NH3), dimethylamine (DMA, C2H7N) or oxidised products of pinanediol (PD, C10H18O2). When pinanediol was introduced into the chamber, an increase in the mass spectrometric signal used to determine the sulfuric acid concentration (m/z 97, i.e. HSO4-) was observed due to ions from the CLOUD chamber. The enhancement was only observed during ion-induced nucleation measurements by using either galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) or the proton synchrotron (PS) pion beam for the ion generation, respectively. The ion effect typically involved an increase in the apparent sulfuric acid concentration by a factor of ~ 2 to 3 and was qualitatively verified by the ion measurements with an atmospheric-pressure interface-time of flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. By applying a high-voltage (HV) clearing field inside the CLOUD chamber, the ion effect on the CIMS measurement was completely eliminated since, under these conditions, small ions are swept from the chamber in about 1 s. In order to exclude the ion effect and to provide corrected sulfuric acid concentrations during the GCR and PS beam nucleation experiments, a parameterisation was derived that utilises the trace gas concentrations and the UV light intensity as input parameters. Atmospheric sulfuric acid measurements with a CIMS showed an insignificant ion effect.

  7. A centrifugal ice microtome for measurements of atmospheric CO2 on air trapped in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2012-10-01

    For atmospheric CO2 reconstructions using ice cores, the technique to release the trapped air from the ice samples is crucial for the precision and accuracy of the measurements. We present here a new dry extraction technique in combination with a new gas analytical system that together show significant improvements with respect to current systems. Ice samples (3-15 g) are pulverized using a novel Centrifugal Ice Microtome (CIM) by shaving the ice in a cooled vacuum chamber (-27 °C) in which no friction occurs due to the use of magnetic bearings. Both, the shaving principle of the CIM and the use of magnetic bearings have not been applied so far in this field. Shaving the ice samples produces finer ice powder and releases a minimum of 90% of the trapped air compared to 50%-70% when needle crushing is employed. In addition, the friction-free motion with an optimized design to reduce contaminations of the inner surfaces of the device result in a reduced system offset of about 2.0 ppmv compared to 4.9ppmv. The gas analytical part shows a factor two higher precision than our corresponding part of the previous system and all processes except the loading and cleaning of the CIM now run automatically. Compared to our previous system the new system shows a 3 times better measurement reproducibility of about 1.1 ppmv (1σ) which is similar to the best reproducibility of other systems applied in this field. With this high reproducibility, replicate measurements are not required anymore for most prospective measurement campaigns resulting in a possible output of 12-20 measurements per day compared to a maximum of 6 with other systems.

  8. A centrifugal ice microtome for measurements of atmospheric CO2 on air trapped in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, B.; Stocker, T. F.; Fischer, H.

    2013-02-01

    For atmospheric CO2 reconstructions using ice cores, the technique to release the trapped air from the ice samples is essential for the precision and accuracy of the measurements. We present here a new dry extraction technique in combination with a new gas analytical system that together show significant improvements with respect to current systems. Ice samples (3-15 g) are pulverised using a novel centrifugal ice microtome (CIM) by shaving the ice in a cooled vacuum chamber (-27 °C) in which no friction occurs due to the use of magnetic bearings. Both, the shaving principle of the CIM and the use of magnetic bearings have not been applied so far in this field. Shaving the ice samples produces finer ice powder and releases a minimum of 90% of the trapped air compared to 50%-70% when needle crushing is employed. In addition, the friction-free motion with an optimized design to reduce contaminations of the inner surfaces of the device result in a reduced system offset of about 2.0 ppmv compared to 4.9 ppmv. The gas analytical part shows a higher precision than the corresponding part of our previous system by a factor of two, and all processes except the loading and cleaning of the CIM now run automatically. Compared to our previous system, the complete system shows a 3 times better measurement reproducibility of about 1.1 ppmv (1 σ) which is similar to the best reproducibility of other systems applied in this field. With this high reproducibility, no replicate measurements are required anymore for most future measurement campaigns resulting in a possible output of 12-20 measurements per day compared to a maximum of 6 with other systems.

  9. Intercomparison of field measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) during the SHARP campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, J. P.; Dibb, J.; Lee, B. H.; Rappenglück, B.; Wood, E. C.; Levy, M.; Zhang, R.-Y.; Lefer, B.; Ren, X.-R.; Stutz, J.; Tsai, C.; Ackermann, L.; Golovko, J.; Herndon, S. C.; Oakes, M.; Meng, Q.-Y.; Munger, J. W.; Zahniser, M.; Zheng, J.

    2014-05-01

    Because of the importance of HONO as a radical reservoir, consistent and accurate measurements of its concentration are needed. As part of SHARP (Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors), time series of HONO were obtained by six different measurement techniques on the roof of the Moody Tower at the University of Houston. Techniques used were long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), stripping coil-visible absorption photometry (SC-AP), long path absorption photometry (LOPAP®), mist chamber/ion chromatography (MC-IC), quantum cascade-tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (QC-TILDAS), and ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (ID-CIMS). Various combinations of techniques were in operation from 15 April through 31 May 2009. All instruments recorded a similar diurnal pattern of HONO concentrations with higher median and mean values during the night than during the day. Highest values were observed in the final 2 weeks of the campaign. Inlets for the MC-IC, SC-AP, and QC-TILDAS were collocated and agreed most closely with each other based on several measures. Largest differences between pairs of measurements were evident during the day for concentrations < ~100 parts per trillion (ppt). Above ~ 200 ppt, concentrations from the SC-AP, MC-IC, and QC-TILDAS converged to within about 20%, with slightly larger discrepancies when DOAS was considered. During the first 2 weeks, HONO measured by ID-CIMS agreed with these techniques, but ID-CIMS reported higher values during the afternoon and evening of the final 4 weeks, possibly from interference from unknown sources. A number of factors, including building related sources, likely affected measured concentrations.

  10. Planning for the semiconductor manufacturer of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargher, Hugh E.; Smith, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    Texas Instruments (TI) is currently contracted by the Air Force Wright Laboratory and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop the next generation flexible semiconductor wafer fabrication system called Microelectronics Manufacturing Science & Technology (MMST). Several revolutionary concepts are being pioneered on MMST, including the following: new single-wafer rapid thermal processes, in-situ sensors, cluster equipment, and advanced Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) software. The objective of the project is to develop a manufacturing system capable of achieving an order of magnitude improvement in almost all aspects of wafer fabrication. TI was awarded the contract in Oct., 1988, and will complete development with a fabrication facility demonstration in April, 1993. An important part of MMST is development of the CIM environment responsible for coordinating all parts of the system. The CIM architecture being developed is based on a distributed object oriented framework made of several cooperating subsystems. The software subsystems include the following: process control for dynamic control of factory processes; modular processing system for controlling the processing equipment; generic equipment model which provides an interface between processing equipment and the rest of the factory; specification system which maintains factory documents and product specifications; simulator for modelling the factory for analysis purposes; scheduler for scheduling work on the factory floor; and the planner for planning and monitoring of orders within the factory. This paper first outlines the division of responsibility between the planner, scheduler, and simulator subsystems. It then describes the approach to incremental planning and the way in which uncertainty is modelled within the plan representation. Finally, current status and initial results are described.

  11. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Hunter, J. F.; et al

    2015-07-16

    We measured a large suite of gas- and particle-phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas andmore » particle phases, the latter being detected by temperature-programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO–HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50 % of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from high molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e., multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50 % of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle-phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption-temperature-based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the

  12. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A.; Daumit, K.; Hunter, J.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gasmore » and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas–particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the

  13. Gas-particle partitioning of organic acids during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS): measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. A. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-Particle partitioning measurements of organic acids were carried out during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS, June-July 2013) at the Centerville, AL Supersite in the Southeast US, a region with significant isoprene and terpene emissions. Organic acid measurements were made with a Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) and acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion. We investigate both individual species and bulk organic acids and partitioning to organic and water phases in the aerosol. Measured partitioning is compared to data from three other instruments that can also quantify gas-particle partitioning with high time resolution: another HRToF-CIMS using iodide (I-) as the reagent ion to ionize acids and other highly oxidized compounds, a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG), and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS The partitioning measurements for three of the instruments are generally consistent, with results in the same range for most species and following similar temporal trends and diurnal cycles. The TD-PTRMS measures on average ½ the partitioning to the particle phase of the acetate CIMS. Both the measurements and the model of partitioning to the organic phase respond quickly to temperature, and the model agrees with the measured partitioning within the error of the measurement for multiple compounds, although many compounds do not match the modeled partitioning, especially at lower m/z. This discrepancy may be due to thermal decomposition of larger molecules into smaller ones when heated.

  14. Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds during SOAS 2013 using nitrate ion chemical ionization coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Cnagaratna, M.; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J. P.; Mauldin, R.; Ehn, M.; Sipila, M.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry. This technique allows to selectively detect oxidized gas-phase species, e.g., oxidized organic molecules and sulfuric acid via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. The capability of making such measurements is important because both sulfuric acid and organic gas molecules have a recognized key role in new particle formation (NPF) processes and likely have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest supersite in Centreville, AL, from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The main goal of the SOAS campaign was to investigate the composition and sources of SOA in the Southeast US, where emissions are mainly represented by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emissions and in less extent by anthropogenic emissions (AVOC). During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected a range of organic ions that based on previous literature could be identified as oxidation products of both isoprene and terpenes. The isoprene products were 5 to 10 times more abundant than the terpene products. The isoprene-related molecules showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, typically after 1500 local time, while the terpene products were higher at night (between 2000 and 0600 local time). These results are consistent with the diurnal trends of primary BVOC emissions from other co-located instruments. The ambient data are also compared to laboratory measurements where oxidized organic vapors are produced using a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor by the OH oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors (isoprene, a-pinene) over multiple days of equivalent atmospheric exposure.

  15. Purification of monoclonal antibodies, IgG1, from cell culture supernatant by use of metal chelate convective interaction media monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Rajak, Poonam; Vijayalakshmi, M A; Jayaprakash, N S

    2012-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have diverse applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. The recent advancement in hybridoma technology for large-scale production of MAbs in bioreactors demands rapid and efficient purification methods. Conventional affinity purification systems have drawbacks of low flow rates and denaturation of antibodies owing to harsh elution conditions. Here, we attempted purification of MAbs by use of a high-throughput metal-chelate methacrylate monolithic system. Monolithic macroporous convective interaction media-iminodiacetate (CIM-IDA) disks immobilized with four different metal ions (Cu²⁺, Ni²⁺, Zn²⁺ and Co²⁺) were used and evaluated for purification of anti-human serum albumin IgG1 mouse MAbs from cell culture supernatant after precipitation with 50% ammonium sulfate. Elution with 10 mM imidazole in the equilibration buffer (25 mM MMA = MOPS (Morpholino propane sulfonic acid) + MES (Morpholino ethane sulfonic acid) + Acetate + 0.5 M NaCl, pH 7.4) resulted in a purification of 25.7 ± 2.9-fold and 32.5 ± 2.6-fold in experiments done using Zn²⁺ and Co²⁺ metal ions, respectively. The highest recovery of 85.4 ± 1.0% was obtained with a CIM-IDA-Zn(II) column. SDS-PAGE, ELISA and immuno-blot showed that the antibodies recovered were pure, with high antigen-binding efficiency. Thus, metal chelate CIM monoliths could be a potential alternative to conventional systems for fast and efficient purification of MAbs from the complex cell culture supernatant. PMID:22362585

  16. Specific cerebral heat shock proteins and histamine receptor cross-talking mechanisms promote distinct lead-dependent neurotoxic responses in teleosts

    SciTech Connect

    Giusi, Giuseppina; Alo, Raffaella; Crudo, Michele; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Canonaco, Marcello

    2008-03-01

    Recent interests are beginning to be directed towards toxic neurobiological dysfunctions caused by lead (Pb) in aquatic vertebrates. In the present work, treatment with a maximum acceptable toxic concentration of this heavy metal was responsible for highly significant (p < 0.01) abnormal motor behaviors such as hyperactive movements in the teleost Thalassoma pavo and the same treatment accounted for significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced hyperventilating states. On the other hand, greater abnormal motor behaviors were detected in the presence of the histamine (HA) receptor subtype 2 (H{sub 2}R) antagonist cimetidine (Cim), as shown by the very robust (p < 0.001) increases of the two behavioral states. Interestingly, elevated expression levels of stress-related factors, i.e. heat shock protein70/90 (HSP90/70) orthologs were reported for the first time in hypothalamic and mesencephalic areas of Pb-treated teleosts. In particular, an up-regulation of HSP70 was readily detected when this heavy metal was given concomitantly with Cim, while the histamine subtype 3 antagonist (H{sub 3}R) thioperamide (Thio), instead, blocked Pb-dependent up-regulatory trends of both chaperones in mostly hypothalamic areas. Moreover, intense neuronal damages of the above brain regions coincided with altered expressions of HSP70 and HSP90 when treated only with Cim. Overall these first results show that distinct H{sub n}R are able to exert a net neuroprotective role arising from their interaction with chaperones in fish exposed to Pb-dependent stressful conditions making this a potentially key interaction especially for T. pavo, aquatic species which plays an important ecological role towards the survival of other commercially vital fishes.

  17. A dynamic thermal ATR-FTIR/chemometric approach to the analysis of polymorphic interconversions. Cimetidine as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Natalia L; Maggio, Rubén M; Kaufman, Teodoro S

    2014-04-01

    Crystal polymorphism of active ingredients is relevant to the pharmaceutical industry, since polymorphic changes taking place during manufacture or storage of pharmaceutical formulations can affect critical properties of the products. Cimetidine (CIM) has several relevant solid state forms, including four polymorphs (A, B, C and D), an amorphous form (AM) and a monohydrate (M1). Dehydration of M1 has been reported to yield mixtures of polymorphs A, B and C or just a single form. Standards of the solid forms of CIM were prepared and unequivocally characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, digital microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and solid state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was coupled to variable temperature attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to dynamically characterize the behavior of form M1 of CIM over a temperature range from ambient to 160°C, without sample pretreatment. MCR-ALS analysis of ATR-FTIR spectra obtained from the tested solid under variable temperature conditions unveiled the pure spectra of the species involved in the polymorphic transitions. This allowed the simultaneous observation of thermochemical and thermophysical events associated to the changes involved in the solid forms, enabling their unequivocal identification and improving the understanding of their thermal behavior. It was demonstrated that under the experimental conditions, dehydration of M1 initially results in the formation of polymorph B; after melting and upon cooling, the latter yields an amorphous solid (AM). It was concluded that the ATR-FTIR/MCR association is a promising and useful technique for monitoring solid-state phase transformations.

  18. Comparative morphometric study of the australopithecine vertebral series Stw-H8/H41.

    PubMed

    Sanders, W J

    1998-03-01

    Lower spinal structure correlates well with positional behavior among mammals. Nonetheless, the functional morphology of the axial post-crania of australopithecines has received less attention than their appendicular skeletons. This paper presents a detailed description and comparative morphometric analysis of the australopithecine thoracolumbar vertebral series Stw-H8/H41, and examines spinal mechanics in early hominids. Stw-H8/H41 is an important specimen, as the australopithecine vertebral sample is small, and vertebral series are more useful than isolated elements for the interpretation of spinal function. Results of the study support the interpretation that australopithecine species are highly sexually dimorphic. The study also reveals a considerable amount of morphometric variation other than size among australopithecine vertebrae, though the sample is too small and incomplete to ascertain whether this indicates significant interspecific differences in spinal function. Most importantly, structural and metric observations confirm that the morphology of the lower spine in australopithecines has no modern analogue in its entirety. Aspects of zygapophyseal structure, numerical composition of the lumbar region, and centrum wedging suggest that the australopithecine vertebral column was adapted to human-like intrinsic lumbar lordosis and stable balance of the trunk over the pelvis in sustained bipedal locomotion. However, relative centrum size in australopithecines indicates that either they had a different mechanism for channeling vertical forces through the vertebral column than humans, or differed behaviorally from humans in ways that produced smaller increments of compression across their centra. These findings have important implications for hypotheses of australopithecine positional behavior, and demonstrate that larger samples and more complete vertebral series are needed to improve our understanding of australopithecine spinal function. PMID:9547457

  19. Projections of brainstem core cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons of cat to intralaminar and reticular thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Paré, D; Smith, Y; Parent, A; Steriade, M

    1988-04-01

    We combined the retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated with horseradish peroxidase with choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry to study the projections of cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons of the upper brainstem core to rostral and caudal intralaminar thalamic nuclei, reticular thalamic complex and zona incerta in the cat. After wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase injections in the rostral pole of the reticular thalamic nucleus, the distribution and amount of retrogradely labeled brainstem neurons were similar to those found after tracer injection in thalamic relay nuclei (see preceding paper). After wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase injections in the caudal intralaminar centrum medianum-parafascicular complex, rostral intralaminar central lateral-paracentral wing, and zona incerta, the numbers of retrogradely labeled brainstem neurons were more than three times higher than those found after injections in thalamic relay nuclei. The larger numbers of horseradish peroxidase-positive brainstem reticular neurons after tracer injections in intralaminar or zona incerta injections results from a more substantial proportion of labeled neurons in the central tegmental field at rostral midbrain (perirubral) levels and in the ventromedial part of the pontine reticular formation, ipsi- and contralaterally to the injection site. Of all retrogradely labeled neurons in the caudal midbrain core at the level of the cholinergic peribrachial area and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, 45-50% were also choline acetyltransferase-positive after the injections into central lateral-paracentral and reticular nuclei, while only 25% were also choline acetyltransferase-positive after the injection into the centrum medianum-parafascicular complex. These findings are discussed in the light of physiological evidence of brainstem cholinergic mechanisms involved in the blockade of synchronized oscillations and in activation processes of

  20. Peer-to-peer Cooperative Scheduling Architecture for National Grid Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyska, Ludek; Ruda, Miroslav; Toth, Simon

    For some ten years, the Czech National Grid Infrastructure MetaCentrum uses a single central PBSPro installation to schedule jobs across the country. This centralized approach keeps a full track about all the clusters, providing support for jobs spanning several sites, implementation for the fair-share policy and better overall control of the grid environment. Despite a steady progress in the increased stability and resilience to intermittent very short network failures, growing number of sites and processors makes this architecture, with a single point of failure and scalability limits, obsolete. As a result, a new scheduling architecture is proposed, which relies on higher autonomy of clusters. It is based on a peer to peer network of semi-independent schedulers for each site or even cluster. Each scheduler accepts jobs for the whole infrastructure, cooperating with other schedulers on implementation of global policies like central job accounting, fair-share, or submission of jobs across several sites. The scheduling system is integrated with the Magrathea system to support scheduling of virtual clusters, including the setup of their internal network, again eventually spanning several sites. On the other hand, each scheduler is local to one of several clusters and is able to directly control and submit jobs to them even if the connection of other scheduling peers is lost. In parallel to the change of the overall architecture, the scheduling system itself is being replaced. Instead of PBSPro, chosen originally for its declared support of large scale distributed environment, the new scheduling architecture is based on the open-source Torque system. The implementation and support for the most desired properties in PBSPro and Torque are discussed and the necessary modifications to Torque to support the MetaCentrum scheduling architecture are presented, too.

  1. Methotrexate-induced acute toxic leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Salkade, Parag R; Lim, Teh Aun

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common malignancies of childhood, which is treated with high doses of methotrexate (MTX), as it crosses the blood-brain barrier and can be administered intravenously and via intrathecal route to eradicate leukemic cells from central nervous system (CNS). Additionally, high doses of MTX not only prevent CNS recurrence but also hematologic relapses. Although, standard treatment protocol for ALL includes multimodality therapy, MTX is usually associated with neurotoxicity and affects periventricular deep white matter region. Methotrexate-induced 'acute toxic leukoencephalopathy' has varying clinical manifestations ranging from acute neurological deficit to seizures or encephalopathy. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is widely available and routinely used in clinical practice to identify acute stroke and also to distinguish acute stroke from non-stroke like conditions. We report a local teenage Chinese girl who developed 2 discrete episodes of left upper and lower limb weakness with left facial nerve paresis after receiving the 2 nd and 3 rd cycle of high dose of intravenous and intrathecal methotrexate, without having cranial irradiation. After each episode of her neurological deficit, the DW-MRI scan showed focal restricted diffusion in right centrum semiovale. Her left sided focal neurological deficit and facial nerve paresis almost completely subsided on both these occasions within 3 days of symptom onset. Follow-up DW-MRI, after her neurological recovery, revealed almost complete resolution of previously noted restricted diffusion in right centrum semiovale, while the lesion was not evident on concurrent T2W (T2-weighted) and FLAIR (Fluid-Attenuated Inversion recovery) sequences, nor showed any post contrast enhancement on post gadolinium enhanced T1W (T1-weighted) sequences. No residual neurological deficit or intellectual impairment was identified on clinical follow up over a 2 year

  2. Creatine, Glutamine plus Glutamate, and Macromolecules Are Decreased in the Central White Matter of Premature Neonates around Term.

    PubMed

    Koob, Meriam; Viola, Angèle; Le Fur, Yann; Viout, Patrick; Ratiney, Hélène; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Cozzone, Patrick J; Girard, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth represents a high risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities when associated with white-matter damage. Recent studies have reported cognitive deficits in children born preterm without brain injury on MRI at term-equivalent age. Understanding the microstructural and metabolic underpinnings of these deficits is essential for their early detection. Here, we used diffusion-weighted imaging and single-voxel 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to compare brain maturation at term-equivalent age in premature neonates with no evidence of white matter injury on conventional MRI except diffuse excessive high-signal intensity, and normal term neonates. Thirty-two infants, 16 term neonates (mean post-conceptional age at scan: 39.8±1 weeks) and 16 premature neonates (mean gestational age at birth: 29.1±2 weeks, mean post-conceptional age at scan: 39.2±1 weeks) were investigated. The MRI/MRS protocol performed at 1.5T involved diffusion-weighted MRI and localized 1H-MRS with the Point RESolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Preterm neonates showed significantly higher ADC values in the temporal white matter (P<0.05), the occipital white matter (P<0.005) and the thalamus (P<0.05). The proton spectrum of the centrum semiovale was characterized by significantly lower taurine/H2O and macromolecules/H2O ratios (P<0.05) at a TE of 30 ms, and reduced (creatine+phosphocreatine)/H2O and (glutamine+glutamate)/H2O ratios (P<0.05) at a TE of 135 ms in the preterm neonates than in full-term neonates. Our findings indicate that premature neonates with normal conventional MRI present a delay in brain maturation affecting the white matter and the thalamus. Their brain metabolic profile is characterized by lower levels of creatine, glutamine plus glutamate, and macromolecules in the centrum semiovale, a finding suggesting altered energy metabolism and protein synthesis.

  3. Comparative morphometric study of the australopithecine vertebral series Stw-H8/H41.

    PubMed

    Sanders, W J

    1998-03-01

    Lower spinal structure correlates well with positional behavior among mammals. Nonetheless, the functional morphology of the axial post-crania of australopithecines has received less attention than their appendicular skeletons. This paper presents a detailed description and comparative morphometric analysis of the australopithecine thoracolumbar vertebral series Stw-H8/H41, and examines spinal mechanics in early hominids. Stw-H8/H41 is an important specimen, as the australopithecine vertebral sample is small, and vertebral series are more useful than isolated elements for the interpretation of spinal function. Results of the study support the interpretation that australopithecine species are highly sexually dimorphic. The study also reveals a considerable amount of morphometric variation other than size among australopithecine vertebrae, though the sample is too small and incomplete to ascertain whether this indicates significant interspecific differences in spinal function. Most importantly, structural and metric observations confirm that the morphology of the lower spine in australopithecines has no modern analogue in its entirety. Aspects of zygapophyseal structure, numerical composition of the lumbar region, and centrum wedging suggest that the australopithecine vertebral column was adapted to human-like intrinsic lumbar lordosis and stable balance of the trunk over the pelvis in sustained bipedal locomotion. However, relative centrum size in australopithecines indicates that either they had a different mechanism for channeling vertical forces through the vertebral column than humans, or differed behaviorally from humans in ways that produced smaller increments of compression across their centra. These findings have important implications for hypotheses of australopithecine positional behavior, and demonstrate that larger samples and more complete vertebral series are needed to improve our understanding of australopithecine spinal function.

  4. A comparison of location of acute symptomatic vs. ‘silent’ small vessel lesions

    PubMed Central

    Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Maconick, Lucy C.; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Wang, Xin; Wiseman, Stewart; Armitage, Paul A.; Doubal, Fergus N.; Makin, Stephen; Sudlow, Cathie L. M.; Dennis, Martin S.; Deary, Ian J.; Bastin, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lacunar ischaemic stroke, white matter hyperintensities, and lacunes are all features of cerebral small vessel disease. It is unclear why some small vessel disease lesions present with acute stroke symptoms, whereas others typically do not. Aim To test if lesion location could be one reason why some small vessel disease lesions present with acute stroke, whereas others accumulate covertly. Methods We identified prospectively patients who presented with acute lacunar stroke symptoms with a recent small subcortical infarct confirmed on magnetic resonance diffusion imaging. We compared the distribution of the acute infarcts with that of white matter hyperintensity and lacunes using computational image mapping methods. Results In 188 patients, mean age 67 ± standard deviation 12 years, the lesions that presented with acute lacunar ischaemic stroke were located in or near the main motor and sensory tracts in (descending order): posterior limb of the internal capsule (probability density 0·2/mm3), centrum semiovale (probability density = 0·15/mm3), medial lentiform nucleus/lateral thalamus (probability density = 0·09/mm3), and pons (probability density = 0·02/mm3). Most lacunes were in the lentiform nucleus (probability density = 0·01–0·04/mm3) or external capsule (probability density = 0·05/mm3). Most white matter hyperintensities were in centrum semiovale (except for the area affected by the acute symptomatic infarcts), external capsules, basal ganglia, and brainstem, with little overlap with the acute symptomatic infarcts (analysis of variance, P < 0·01). Conclusions Lesions that present with acute lacunar ischaemic stroke symptoms may be more likely noticed by the patient through affecting the main motor and sensory tracts, whereas white matter hyperintensity and asymptomatic lacunes mainly affect other areas. Brain location could at least partly explain the symptomatic vs. covert development of small vessel

  5. Detection of chronic brain damage by diffusion-weighted imaging with multiple b values in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tieli; Han, Yunpeng; Tang, Lemei; Wu, Jianlin; Miao, Yanwei; Gao, Bingbing; Shang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of parameters obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with multiple b values in the detection of chronic brain damage in patients with type 2 diabetes. We enrolled 30 patients with or without abnormalities on brain magnetic resonance imaging (lacunar infarction, leukoaraiosis, and/or brain atrophy) and 15 nondiabetic controls; obtained DWI parameters that included apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fast ADC (ADCfast), slow ADC (ADCslow), fraction of fast ADC (f), distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC), and stretched exponential (α); and performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the performance of parameters for the detection of chronic brain damage. The parameters ADC, ADCslow, f, and DDC were increased, whereas parameters ADCfast and α were decreased in type 2 diabetes patients compared with controls without diabetes. The centrum semiovale showed the most significant change in the evaluated parameters, and the changes in parameters ADCslow, f, and DDC were greater than the changes in other parameters. There was no significance between parameters of the biexponential model (ADCfast, ADCslow, f) and parameters of the stretched model (DDC, α), but parameters of both these models were superior to the parameter of monoexponential model (ADC). Moreover, ROC analysis showed that ADCslow of the centrum semiovale supplied by the anterior cerebral artery had the highest performance for detection of chronic brain damage (area under the ROC curve of 0.987, 93.3% sensitivity, and 100% specificity). Our study shows that DWI with multiple b values can quantitatively access chronic brain damage and may be used for detection and monitoring in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27583912

  6. Detection of chronic brain damage by diffusion-weighted imaging with multiple b values in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tieli; Han, Yunpeng; Tang, Lemei; Wu, Jianlin; Miao, Yanwei; Gao, Bingbing; Shang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of parameters obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with multiple b values in the detection of chronic brain damage in patients with type 2 diabetes.We enrolled 30 patients with or without abnormalities on brain magnetic resonance imaging (lacunar infarction, leukoaraiosis, and/or brain atrophy) and 15 nondiabetic controls; obtained DWI parameters that included apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fast ADC (ADCfast), slow ADC (ADCslow), fraction of fast ADC (f), distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC), and stretched exponential (α); and performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the performance of parameters for the detection of chronic brain damage.The parameters ADC, ADCslow, f, and DDC were increased, whereas parameters ADCfast and α were decreased in type 2 diabetes patients compared with controls without diabetes. The centrum semiovale showed the most significant change in the evaluated parameters, and the changes in parameters ADCslow, f, and DDC were greater than the changes in other parameters. There was no significance between parameters of the biexponential model (ADCfast, ADCslow, f) and parameters of the stretched model (DDC, α), but parameters of both these models were superior to the parameter of monoexponential model (ADC). Moreover, ROC analysis showed that ADCslow of the centrum semiovale supplied by the anterior cerebral artery had the highest performance for detection of chronic brain damage (area under the ROC curve of 0.987, 93.3% sensitivity, and 100% specificity).Our study shows that DWI with multiple b values can quantitatively access chronic brain damage and may be used for detection and monitoring in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27583912

  7. Socio-Spatial Intelligence: social media and spatial cognition for territorial behavioral analysis.

    PubMed

    Luini, Lorenzo P; Cardellicchio, Davide; Felletti, Fulvia; Marucci, Francesco S

    2015-09-01

    Investigative analysts gather data from different sources, especially from social media (SM), in order to shed light on cognitive factors that may explain criminal spatial behavior. A former research shows how tweets can be used to estimate private points of interest. Authors' aim was to demonstrate, as they extend the analysis to a wider statistical base, how social maps and Web applications could be used in investigative analysis and spatial cognition research. A total of 100 Twitter accounts with approximately 250 tweets each were submitted to common geographical techniques (measures such as Convex-Hull, Mean-Center, Median-Center, Standard-Deviation-Ellipse) in order to test the hypothesis that user areas of activity are predictable. Predictions were tested through a set of specific information: clear reference to areas of activity and clear reference about user's residence. Simple algorithms and procedures demonstrated that they could be used to predict where SM users live, giving positive results in about 4/5 cases and giving indications about their home location. In fact, all home positions were found in the Convex-Hull and most of them in the Standard-Deviation-Ellipse. Furthermore, in up to 80% of cases, houses were found within a buffer zone of 1.500 m with Median-Center as centrum (70% using Median-Center as centrum) with a minimum effectiveness threshold of 12-13 tweets. SM may help in studying people mobility and their cognition of space and, moreover, where they live, or their traveling behavior. The processing of geographical data in conjunction with the SM analysis may facilitate the construction of models describing specific behavior of people. The use of geographical information system tools and SM analysis represents an effective approach in order to acquire spatial and territorial information, referred to social relationship. The results may be used successfully in the understanding of social dynamics and for the prevention of criminal behavior.

  8. The application of finance and accounting theory to the valuation of new energy and efficiency options

    SciTech Connect

    Awerbuch, S.

    1995-12-31

    New, renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies are often passive and capital intensive-attributes they share with computer-integrated-manufacturing (CIM), robotics, computer-aided-design (CAD) and similar manufacturing process technologies. The experience in manufacturing over the last two decades indicates that traditional accounting-based procedures for valuing such new technologies significantly understate their benefits. This paper highlights recent research which extends project valuation principles and illustrates how reliance on the engineering oriented levelized energy cost distorst benefit/cost streams.

  9. Cullet Manufacture Using the Cylindrical Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.

    2000-01-20

    The base process for vitrification of the Am/Cm solution stored in F-canyon uses 25SrABS cullet as the glass former. A small portion of the cullet used in the SRTC development work was purchased from Corning while the majority was made in the 5 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5). Task 1.01 of TTR-NMSS/SE-006, Additional Am-Cm Process Development Studies, requested that a process for the glass former (cullet) fabrication be specified. This report provides the process details for 25SrAB cullet production thereby satisfying Task 1.01.

  10. Turnkey offering a claimed sector 'first'.

    PubMed

    Law, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturer and supplier of LED theatre lights, HD camera systems, video integration technologies, and ceiling support units, Trumpf Medical Systems UK, and "logistical services" company Canute International Medical Services (CIMS), one of whose specialities is providing mobile medical units for diagnostic imaging, have entered into a partnership that will see the two companies offer fully fitted out modular operating theatres and other medical/clinical buildings incorporating the latest technology and equipment, on a fully project-managed, "turnkey" basis. Oliver Law, Trumpf Medical Systems UK managing director, explains the background, and the new service's anticipated customer benefits. PMID:22049623

  11. Spectroscopic studies of alumina-supported nickel catalysts precursors. Part I. Catalysts prepared from acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasieczna-Patkowska, S.; Ryczkowski, J.

    2007-04-01

    Nickel alumina-supported catalysts were prepared from acidic solutions of nickel nitrate by the CIM and DIM methods (classical and double impregnation, respectively). The catalysts exhibited different nickel species due to the existence of various metal-support interaction strengths. As a consequence, the reducibility and other surface properties changed as a function of the preparation method. The aim of this work was to study the interaction between the metal precursor and the alumina surface by means of FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) and FT-IR/PAS (FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy).

  12. A novel method for speciation of Pt in human serum incubated with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin by conjoint liquid chromatography on monolithic disks with UV and ICP-MS detection.

    PubMed

    Martinčič, Anže; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Kovač, Viljem; Milačič, Radmila; Ščančar, Janez

    2013-11-15

    Conjoint liquid chromatography (CLC) on monolithic convective interaction media (CIM) disks coupled on-line to UV and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detectors was used for the first time in speciation analysis of Pt in human serum spiked with Pt-based chemotherapeutics. CIM Protein G and CIM DEAE disks were assembled together in a single housing forming a CLC monolithic column. Such a set-up allows rapid two-dimensional separation by affinity and ion-exchange (IE) modes to be carried out in a single chromatographic run. By applying isocratic elution with Tris-HCl-NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7.4) in the first minute, followed by gradient elution with 1 mol L(-1) NH4Cl (pH 7.4) in the next 9 min, immunoglobulins (IgG) were retained by the Protein G disk enabling subsequent separation of unbound Pt from Pt bound to transferrin (Tf) and albumin (HSA) on the CIM DEAE disk. Further elution with acetic acid (AcOH) in the next 3 min allowed separation of Pt associated with IgG. Separated Pt species were quantified by post-column isotope dilution-ICP-MS. Pt recovery on the CLC column was close to 100%. In comparison to commonly applied procedures that involve separation of protein peaks by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) followed by IE separation of metal-based chemotherapeutic fractions bound to serum proteins, the CLC method developed is much faster and simpler. Its sensitivity (LOQs adequate for quantification of all separated Pt species, lower than 2.4 ng Pt mL(-1)), good selectivity and method repeatability (RSD±3%) enabled investigation of the kinetics of interaction of Pt-based chemotherapeutics with serum proteins and the distribution of Pt species in spiked human serum. Pt species present in spiked serum were bound preferentially to HSA. The proportion of Pt associated with IgG and Tf was lower than 13%. Cisplatin and especially oxaliplatin react rapidly with serum proteins, while carboplatin much less. The method developed may be reliably applied

  13. Development of a High-Resolution H3O+ Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Gas-phase Hydrocarbons and its Application During the 2015 SONGNEX Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Stark, H.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (ToF-CIMS) using H3O+ reagent ion chemistry (PTR-MS) are a relatively new technique in detection of gas-phase hydrocarbons, and recent improvements in instrument sensitivity, mass resolution, and ease of field deployment have expanded their use in atmospheric chemistry. The comparatively low-energy H3O+ ionization technique is ideal for measuring complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, and, compared to conventional quadrupole PTRMS, the newest generation of ToF-CIMS measure many more species simultaneously and with a sensitivity that is as high as a quadrupole PTR-MS. We describe here the development of a commercially available ToF CIMS into an H3O+CIMS suitable for deployment on aircraft, and its application during an aircraft campaign studying emissions from oil and natural gas extraction industry. We provide an overview of instrument development and specifications, including design, characterization, and field operation. We then discuss data processing and interpretation. First, we investigate determination of intensities of poorly resolved peaks. The mass resolution of the present instrument (m/Δm ~4500) enables separate analysis of many isobaric peaks, but peaks are also frequently not fully resolved. Using results from laboratory tests, we quantify how the accuracy can be limited by the overlap in neighboring peaks, and compare to theoretical predictions from literature. We then briefly describe our method for quality assurance of reported compounds, and correction for background and humidity effects. Finally, we present preliminary results from the first field deployment of this instrument during the Spring 2015 SONGNEX aircraft campaign. This campaign sampled emissions from oil and natural gas extraction regions and associated infrastructure in the Western and Central United States. We will highlight results that illustrate (1) new scientific capability from improved mass resolution, which

  14. Metamaterial features for a pure dielectric fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Cervantes, Adrian; Mendoza, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    We consider a solid cylindrical dielectric waveguide with an extremely thin coaxial cylindrical shell of higher refraction index inserted on it. We calculate the propagation parameters and the band structure of this fiber as function of the contrast index, and show that there exist propagating modes whose transverse distribution of amplitudes are both oscillating and evanescent. The oscillating modes exhibit the usual dispersion relation of a standard wave guide, whereas the evanescent modes gives rise to regions for which the group velocity almost vanishes and with propagation direction opposed to the Poynting vector, as seen in metamaterials. CIM and JAR acknowledge support from grants Dgapa IN115010 and IN110012, respectively.

  15. Detection and modeling of rough component envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Matthew; Dluzniak, Richard; Thompson, William

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes an imaging technique for the determination of rough component envelopes of cast and forged components. The paper includes several image acquisition methods currently used in this area but concentrates in detail on the method known as the light stripe method. Results presented show the advantages of the light stripe method to obtain a fast and accurate 3D description of the cast and forged components. The research is part of a larger project on intelligent manufacturing systems and is being conducted at the CIM Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia.

  16. Intelligent machining of rough components from optimized CAD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Geoff; Thompson, William

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a technique for automatically generating NC machine programs from CAD images of a rough work piece and an optimally positioned component. The paper briefly compares the generative and variant methods of automatic machine program development and then presents a technique based on the variant method where a reference machine program is transformed to machine the optimized component. The transformed machine program is examined to remove any redundant cutter motions and correct any invalid cutter motions. The research is part of a larger project on intelligent manufacturing systems and is being conducted at the CIM Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia.

  17. Amines and Ammonia Measured in the Southeastern U.S. Forest during the 2013 SOAS Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; You, Y.; Sierra-Hernández, M.; Baumann, K.; Fry, J.; Allen, H.; Draper, D. C.; Edgerton, E.

    2013-12-01

    Amines and ammonia play critical roles in new particle formation, via acid-base reactions at the initial stage of aerosol nucleation. Nitrogen base compounds are important for SOA formation, via formation of salts and condensation of amine photo-oxidation products; they also contribute to the formation of brown organic aerosols. Amines and ammonia can change the acidity and physical state of aerosols to further affect SOA yields. During the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in Centerville, Alabama from June 1 to July 15, 2013, amines and ammonia were simultaneously measured with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) by Kent State University [Yu and Lee, 2012: Environ. Chem. 9, 190-201]. The sensitivity of the CIMS was in the range of 5-10 Hz ion signals for 1 pptv of a base compound, which ultimately allows for the fast-time response detection (less than 1 minute) of ammonia and amines at the pptv level. Additionally, ammonia was also detected with another two independent methods, MARGA (Measuring AeRosols and Gases) by Reed College, and chemiluminescence by ARA. Ammonia concentrations measured by CIMS, MARGA and chemiluminescence were at the ppbv and sub-ppbv level. Over the 6 weeks of the SOAS field study, these three ammonia instruments consistently showed very similar time variations and agreed reasonably well. The CIMS also detected various C1 through C6 amines at the pptv and tens pptv level. Trimethylamine (C3 amine) and ammonia showed similar diurnal trends, temperature and wind direction dependences for most days, implying common natural emission sources of these two base compounds at this forest site. On the other hand, methylamine (C1) and dimethylamine (C2) were much lower than trimethylamine and they did not show clear diurnal variations and temperature dependences. During the brief episode of local biomass burning, concentrations of C3 through C6 amines and ammonia increased rapidly, while methylamine and dimethylamine were

  18. Spatial Distribution of -Crystals in Metallocene-Made Isotactic Polypropylene Crystallized under Combined Thermal and Flow Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Pan, J; Mao, Y; Li, Z; Li, L; Hsiao, B

    2010-01-01

    The present Article reports the relationships between molecular orientation, formation, and spatial distribution of {gamma}-crystals in metallocene-made isotactic polypropylene (m-iPP) samples prepared by two industrial processes: conventional injection molding (CIM) and oscillatory shear injection molding (OSIM), in which combined thermal and flow fields typically exist. In particular, spatial distributions of crystallinity, fraction of {gamma}-crystal (f{gamma}) with respect to {alpha}-crystal, and lamella-branched shish-kebab structure in the shaped samples were characterized by synchrotron two-dimensional (2D) wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The results showed that the crystallinity in any given region of OSIM samples was always higher than that of CIM samples. The value of f{gamma} increased monotonously from skin to core in CIM samples, whereas the corresponding f{gamma} increased nonmonotonically in OSIM samples. The spatial distribution of {gamma}-crystal in OSIM samples can be explained by the epitaxial arrangement between {gamma}- and {alpha}-crystal in a lamella-branched shish-kebab structure. In the proposed model, the parent lamellae of {alpha}-crystal provide secondary nucleation sites for daughter lamellae of {alpha}-crystal and {gamma}-crystal, and the different content of parent lamellae results in varying amounts of {gamma}-crystal. In OSIM samples, the smallest parent-daughter ratio ([R] = 1.38) in the core region led to the lowest fraction of {gamma}-crystal (0.57), but relatively higher {gamma}-crystal content (0.69) at 600 and 1200 {micro}m depth of the samples (corresponding to [R] of 4.5 and 5.8, respectively). This is consistent with the proposed model where more parent lamellae provide more nucleation sites for crystallization, thus resulting in higher content of {gamma}-crystal. The melting behavior of CIM and OSIM samples was studied by differential scanning calorimetery (DSC). The

  19. Integrating Systematic Chronic Care for Diabetes into an Academic General Internal Medicine Resident-Faculty Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Kelso, Christine; Bowen, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The quality of care for diabetes continues to fall short of recommended guidelines and results. Models for improving the care of chronic illnesses advocate a multidisciplinary team approach. Yet little is known about the effectiveness of such models in an academic setting with a diverse patient population and resident physicians participating in clinical care. Objective To implement a chronic illness management (CIM) practice within an academic setting with part-time providers, and evaluate its impact on the completion of diabetes-specific care processes and on the achievement of recommended outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus. Design Retrospective cohort study Subjects Patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who receive their primary care in an academic general internal medicine resident-faculty practice. Measurements Process and outcomes measures in patients exposed to the CIM practice were compared with non-exposed patients receiving usual care. Main Results Five hundred and sixty-five patients met inclusion criteria. Patients in the CIM practice experienced a significant increase in completion of care processes compared to control patients for measurement of annual low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7–5.7), urine microalbumin (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.1–5.5), blood pressure (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–2.8), retinal examination (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3–2.7), foot monofilament examination (OR 4.2, 95% CI 3.0–6.1) and administration of pneumococcal vaccination (OR 5.2, 95% CI 3.0–9.3). CIM-exposed patients were also more likely to achieve improvements in clinical outcomes of glycemic and blood pressure control reflected by hemoglobin A1c less than 7.0% (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.02–3) and blood pressure less than 130/80 (OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1–4.5) compared to controls. Conclusions A systematic chronic care model can be successfully integrated into an academic general internal medicine practice and may result in improved

  20. Novel mineral contrast agent for magnetic resonance studies of bone implants grown on a chick chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Chesnick, Ingrid E; Fowler, Carol B; Mason, Jeffrey T; Potter, Kimberlee

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of tissue engineered constructs prior to implantation clearly demonstrate the utility of the MRI technique for studying the bone formation process. To test the utility of our MRI protocols for explant studies, we present a novel test platform in which osteoblast-seeded scaffolds were implanted on the chorioallantoic membrane of a chick embryo. Scaffolds from the following experimental groups were examined by high-resolution MRI: (a) cell-seeded implanted scaffolds (CIM), (b) unseeded implanted scaffolds (UCIM), (c) cell-seeded scaffolds in static culture (CIV) and (d) unseeded scaffolds in static culture (UCIV). The reduction in water proton transverse relaxation times and the concomitant increase in water proton magnetization transfer ratios for CIM and CIV scaffolds, compared to UCIV scaffolds, were consistent with the formation of a bone-like tissue within the polymer scaffold, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. However, the presence of angiogenic vessels and fibrotic adhesions around UCIM scaffolds can confound MRI findings of bone deposition. Consequently, to improve the specificity of the MRI technique for detecting mineralized deposits within explanted tissue engineered bone constructs, we introduce a novel contrast agent that uses alendronate to target a Food and Drug Administration-approved MRI contrast agent (Gd-DOTA) to bone mineral. Our contrast agent termed GdALN was used to uniquely identify mineralized deposits in representative samples from our four experimental groups. After GdALN treatment, both CIM and CIV scaffolds, containing mineralized deposits, showed marked signal enhancement on longitudinal relaxation time-weighted (T1W) images compared to UCIV scaffolds. Relative to UCIV scaffolds, some enhancement was observed in T1W images of GdALN-treated UCIM scaffolds, subjacent to the dark adhesions at the scaffold surface, possibly from dystrophic mineral formed in the

  1. [Depression and personality disorders: mutual influences].

    PubMed

    Rimlinger, B

    2010-12-01

    The first disposition described as having an influence on mood date back to ancient Greece. The current modeling of personality disorders is organized essentially in a category-specific logic (DSMIV, CIM-10) and dimensional logic ("big five", Eysenck model, Cloninger model, etc.). The heterogeneity of these evaluation tools affects the readability of the studies concerning the effects of comorbidity on depressive disorders. The frequency of the coexistence of personality disorders/depression (≥50%) which is associated with the severity of the depressive episodes, with pejorative evolutionary prognosis and resistance in treatments, appears to justify a reorganization of classifications in the future DSM-V.

  2. Prostheses and orthoses in the collections of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.

    PubMed

    Przeździak, Bogumił; Lutomirski, Adam; Kulczyk, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The authors described 424 orthopaedic appliances left by the prisoners of the Nazi Concentration Camp in Oświęcim. A collection of prostheses and orthoses, which is currently a part of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum's exhibition, is extraordinary as it illustrates the fate of innocent, crippled people, who were incarcerated and murdered. Another point of value of the collection is its technical aspect, as it provides a clear picture of construction of prostheses and orthoses at the beginning of the 20th century.

  3. Corrigendum to "High-ohmic resistors fabricated by PureB layer for silicon drift detectors applications" [Solid State Electron. 105 (2015) 6-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, Negin; Derakhshandeh, Jaber; Beenakker, C. I. M.; Ishihara, R.

    2016-05-01

    In a journal publication "High-ohmic resistors fabricated by PureB layer for silicon drift detectors applications" by Negin Golshani; Jaber Derakhshandeh; C.I.M. Beenakker; R. Ishihara; published in Solid State Electronics, vol. 105, pp. 6-11, in 2015, an error occurred in the references by omitting the paper published by N. Golshani, et al., in the Proceedings of European Solid-State Device Research Conference (ESSDERC) in 2013 [1]. We apologize for any inconvenience caused. We also apologize for not properly acknowledging the contributions of Drs. L.K. Nanver, V. Mohammadi, and S. Ramesh to the first part of this research.

  4. Hydrologic Forecasting at the US National Weather Service in the 21st Century: Transition from the NWS River Forecast System (NWSRFS) to the Community Hydrologic Prediction System (CHPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Pedro; Roe, Jon; Dietz, Christine; Werner, Micha; Gijsbers, Peter; Hartman, Robert; Opitz, Harold; Olsen, Billy; Halquist, John; Shedd, Robert

    2010-05-01

    The US National Weather Service developed the River Forecast System (NWSRFS) since the 1970s as the platform for performing hydrologic forecasts. The system, originally developed for the computers of that era, was optimized for speed of execution and compact and fast data storage and retrieval. However, with modern computers those features became less of a driver, and, instead, the ability to maintain and transition of new developments in data and modeling research into operations have become the top system priorities for hydrologic forecasting software applications. To address those two new priorities, and to allow the hydrologic research community at large to be able to contribute models and forecasting techniques, the National Weather Service proposed the development of the Community Hydrologic Prediction System (CHPS). CHPS must be sufficiently flexible not only to ensure current operational models and data remain available, but also to integrate readily modeling approaches and data from the wider community of practitioners and scientists involved in hydro-meteorological forecasting. Portability considerations require the computational infrastructure to be programmed in a language such as Java, and data formats conform to open standards such as XML. After examining a number of potential candidates, the NWS settled on the Delft Flood Early Warning System (Delft FEWS) from Deltares as the basis for CHPS, since it shares the basic design characteristics, the underlying community philosophy and was being successfully used in operations in several countries. This paper describes the characteristics of CHPS and the transition path to make it operational and available to the community.

  5. Painting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  6. Three Giants in the Cradle of Reproductive Medicine; Reproduction Theories of the Seventeenth Century as Discerned by Pregnancy Portraiture in the Oeuvre of Jan Vermeer.

    PubMed

    Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Spitz, Irving M

    2016-01-01

    Portraits of pregnant women are rare in Catholic Renaissance art. In seventeenth-century Holland, the Catholic rule of Spain had been thrown off and a Protestant Calvinistic republic emerged, freeing Dutch artists to choose an unorthodox subject matter for their paintings. The Golden Age of Holland was characterized by extreme wealth, originating from overseas trade, which fostered a marked interest in philosophy, science, medicine, as well as art. Despite this, portraiture of pregnancy remained uncommon. An exception to this rule was Jan Vermeer of Delft, who lived during the zenith of this era. Jan Vermeer painted fewer than 40 pictures, fathered 15 children, and died bankrupt and little appreciated at the age of 43. Vermeer confined himself almost entirely to images of women in various domestic situations, including three figures of pregnant women. In this framework, pregnancy could be viewed as an icon for fidelity and conformism to social expectations. In this paper we investigate the roots of this unusual icon in Vermeer's oeuvre, and suggest that the use of pregnancy in his paintings could have been inspired by his Delft-resident contemporaries Antony van Leeuwenhoek and Reinier de Graaf, fathers of well-known and opposing theories of reproduction. These eminent scientists and Vermeer's pregnant wife, who frequently served as his model, might have made pregnancy less mysterious and more realistic to the painter. PMID:27101220

  7. Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loenen, A.; van Dijk, M.; van Verseveld, W.; Berger, H.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the Dutch large rivers, canals and lakes are controlled by the Dutch water authorities. The main reasons concern safety, navigation and fresh water supply. Historically the separate water bodies have been controlled locally. For optimizating management of these water systems an integrated approach was required. Presented is a platform which integrates data from all control objects for monitoring and control purposes. The Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems (IWP) is an implementation of Delft-FEWS which supports operational control of water systems and actively gives advice. One of the main characteristics of IWP is that is real-time collects, transforms and presents different types of data, which all add to the operational water management. Next to that, hydrodynamic models and intelligent decision support tools are added to support the water managers during their daily control activities. An important advantage of IWP is that it uses the Delft-FEWS framework, therefore processes like central data collection, transformations, data processing and presentation are simply configured. At all control locations the same information is readily available. The operational water management itself gains from this information, but it can also contribute to cost efficiency (no unnecessary pumping), better use of available storage and advise during (water polution) calamities.

  8. A loophole-free Bell test with spin quits in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreau, Anais; Hensen, Bas; Bernien, Hannes; Reiserer, Andreas; Ruitenberg, Just; Blok, Machiel; Markham, Matthew; Twitchen, Daniel; Wehner, Stephanie; Hanson, Ronald; Element 6 Team

    2015-03-01

    One of the most intriguing phenomena in quantum physics is the entanglement of spatially separated objects. The benchmark to prove the fundamental non-locality of remote entanglement is provided by the famous Bell's theorem. Nevertheless, all its experimental implementations to date open the door to loopholes that restrict the practical validity of this theorem., we present our latest experimental results towards the realization of a Bell test, aimed to close the detection loophole and address the locality and free-will loopholes in a single experiment. Our qubits consist of the electronic spin associated with single NV center defects in diamond. An efficient remote entanglement protocol allows us to generate entangled qubit pairs between two labs separated by 1.3 km on the TU Delft campus. The moderate time (<3.5 us) required for high fidelity (>99%) qubit rotations and efficient (>97%) readout make our setup a good candidate to allow the experimental violation of Bell's inequalities between two space-like separated entangled spins without relying on the fair sampling assumption. FOM, NWO, ERC, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft, QUTech, STW.

  9. Analysis of 1993-1995 Borowiec SLR data: station positioning and range bias computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowska, M.; Zieliński, J. B.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Borowiec station takes part in international geodetic and geodynamics research programmes such as IERS, WEGENER, IGS, BSL, EUREF etc. The main purpose of this activity is the establishment of a well-defined reference point within Poland, which may be used to connect local geodetic networks to the global network. This is only possible by virtue of the fact that Borowiec is equipped with modern measurement facilities: a third generation SLR system and a new GPS receiver. This paper briefly describes the computation of four station coordinate solutions, based on SLR data. The solutions 1 and 2 are computed at the Space Research Centre in Warsaw using tracking data from the satellite Lageos-1 only over five periods (August-December 1993, January-February 1994, July-November 1994, January-February 1995 and May-July 1995) produced by 17 ``good'' stations (given in section 2). The solutions 3 and 4 are computed at Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, using tracking data from both Lageos-1 and Lageos-2 produced by 56 stations covering the period 1993-1995 entirely. The solutions 2 and 4 consider the estimation of range biases simultaneously with the station position for Borowiec only and for all stations, respectively. The solution of the range bias amounts to approximately -30mm on average, which has an effect of about 20mm on the solution for the station position. The position solutions computed in Warsaw and Delft are consistent to about 20mm.

  10. Three Giants in the Cradle of Reproductive Medicine; Reproduction Theories of the Seventeenth Century as Discerned by Pregnancy Portraiture in the Oeuvre of Jan Vermeer

    PubMed Central

    Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Spitz, Irving M.

    2016-01-01

    Portraits of pregnant women are rare in Catholic Renaissance art. In seventeenth-century Holland, the Catholic rule of Spain had been thrown off and a Protestant Calvinistic republic emerged, freeing Dutch artists to choose an unorthodox subject matter for their paintings. The Golden Age of Holland was characterized by extreme wealth, originating from overseas trade, which fostered a marked interest in philosophy, science, medicine, as well as art. Despite this, portraiture of pregnancy remained uncommon. An exception to this rule was Jan Vermeer of Delft, who lived during the zenith of this era. Jan Vermeer painted fewer than 40 pictures, fathered 15 children, and died bankrupt and little appreciated at the age of 43. Vermeer confined himself almost entirely to images of women in various domestic situations, including three figures of pregnant women. In this framework, pregnancy could be viewed as an icon for fidelity and conformism to social expectations. In this paper we investigate the roots of this unusual icon in Vermeer’s oeuvre, and suggest that the use of pregnancy in his paintings could have been inspired by his Delft-resident contemporaries Antony van Leeuwenhoek and Reinier de Graaf, fathers of well-known and opposing theories of reproduction. These eminent scientists and Vermeer’s pregnant wife, who frequently served as his model, might have made pregnancy less mysterious and more realistic to the painter. PMID:27101220

  11. Sensitivity studies of the new Coastal Surge and Inundation Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, A. J.; Veeramony, J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper details the sensitivity studies involved in the validation of a coastal storm surge and inundation prediction system for operational use by the United States Navy. The system consists of the Delft3D-FLOW model coupled with the Delft3D-WAVE model. This dynamically coupled system will replace the current operational system, PC-Tides which does not include waves or other global ocean circulation. The Delft3D modeling system uses multiple nests to capture large, basin-scale circulation as well as coastal circulation and tightly couples waves and circulation at all scales. An additional benefit in using the presented system is that the Delft Dashboard, a graphical user interface product, can be used to simplify the set-up of Delft3D features such as the grid, elevation data, boundary forcing, and nesting. In this way less man-hours and training will be needed to perform inundation forecasts. The new coupled system is used to model storm surge and inundation produced by Hurricane Ike (2008) along the Gulf of Mexico coast. Due to the time constraints in an operational forecasting environment, storm simulations must be as streamlined as possible. Many factors such as model resolution, elevation data sets, parametrization of bottom friction, frequency of coupling between hydrodynamic and wave components, and atmospheric forcing among others can influence the run times and results of the simulations. To assess the sensitivity of the modeling system to these various components a "best" simulation was first developed. The best simulation consists of reanalysis atmospheric forcing in the form of Oceanweather wind and pressure fields. Further the wind field is modified by applying a directional land-masking to account for changes in land-roughness in the coastal zone. A number of air-sea drag coefficient formulations were tested to find the best match with observed results. An analysis of sea-level trends for the region reveals a seasonal trend of elevated sea level

  12. Secondary formation of nitrated phenols: insights from observations during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Liggio, J.; Wentzell, J.; Li, S.-M.; Stark, H.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B.; Warneke, C.; Li, R.; Leithead, A.; Osthoff, H. D.; Wild, R.; Brown, S. S.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the results from online measurements of nitrated phenols using a time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) with acetate as reagent ion in an oil and gas production region in January and February of 2014. Strong diurnal profiles were observed for nitrated phenols, with concentration maxima at night. Based on known markers (CH4, NOx, CO2), primary emissions of nitrated phenols were not important in this study. A box model was used to simulate secondary formation of phenol, nitrophenol (NP) and dinitrophenols (DNP). The box model results indicate that oxidation of aromatics in the gas phase can explain the observed concentrations of NP and DNP in this study. Photolysis was the most efficient loss pathway for NP in the gas phase. We show that aqueous-phase reactions and heterogeneous reactions were minor sources of nitrated phenols in our study. This study demonstrates that the emergence of new ToF-CIMS (including PTR-TOF) techniques allows for the measurement of intermediate oxygenates at low levels and these measurements improve our understanding of the evolution of primary VOCs in the atmosphere.

  13. Secondary formation of nitrated phenols: insights from observations during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bin; Liggio, John; Wentzell, Jeremy; Li, Shao-Meng; Stark, Harald; Roberts, James M.; Gilman, Jessica; Lerner, Brian; Warneke, Carsten; Li, Rui; Leithead, Amy; Osthoff, Hans D.; Wild, Robert; Brown, Steven S.; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the results from online measurements of nitrated phenols using a time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) with acetate as reagent ion in an oil and gas production region in January and February of 2014. Strong diurnal profiles were observed for nitrated phenols, with concentration maxima at night. Based on known markers (CH4, NOx, CO2), primary emissions of nitrated phenols were not important in this study. A box model was used to simulate secondary formation of phenol, nitrophenol (NP), and dinitrophenols (DNP). The box model results indicate that oxidation of aromatics in the gas phase can explain the observed concentrations of NP and DNP in this study. Photolysis was the most efficient loss pathway for NP in the gas phase. We show that aqueous-phase reactions and heterogeneous reactions were minor sources of nitrated phenols in our study. This study demonstrates that the emergence of new ToF-CIMS (including PTR-TOF) techniques allows for the measurement of intermediate oxygenates at low levels and these measurements improve our understanding on the evolution of primary VOCs in the atmosphere.

  14. In situ measurements of atmospheric nitrous acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry using chloride ion transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Jun; Kato, Takehiro; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2009-10-15

    Recently, chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been widely applied to the in situ measurements of atmospheric trace species. In this article, we propose a new chemical ionization scheme using a chloride ion transfer reaction from SO(2)Cl(-) as the reagent ion and discuss the applicability of this technique to the detection of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere. From laboratory investigations, the detection sensitivity was found to depend on the flow rate of SO(2) introduced into the ion source region and the pressure inside the chemical ionization region, which suggests that the chemical ionization reaction is reversible. The detection sensitivity was well described in terms of the forward and backward rates. The present limit of detection is estimated to be 60 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) for an integration time of 1 min. Improvement of the CIMS instrument would enable the measurements of the daytime level of HONO, which might be less than 50 pptv. In addition, the possibility of the interference is discussed from thermodynamic considerations based on ab initio calculations, and the effects of the sampling artifacts are experimentally quantified.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of 1-propanol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Jun; Park, Jin Hwan; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-09-01

    An engineered Escherichia coli strain that produces 1-propanol under aerobic condition was developed based on an L-threonine-overproducing E. coli strain. First, a feedback resistant ilvA gene encoding threonine dehydratase was introduced and the competing metabolic pathway genes were deleted. Further engineering was performed by overexpressing the cimA gene encoding citramalate synthase and the ackA gene encoding acetate kinase A/propionate kinase II, introducing a modified adhE gene encoding an aerobically functional AdhE, and by deleting the rpoS gene encoding the stationary phase sigma factor. Fed-batch culture of the final engineered strain harboring pBRthrABC-tac-cimA-tac-ackA and pTacDA-tac-adhE(mut) allowed production of 10.8 g L(-1) of 1-propanol with the yield and productivity of 0.107 g g(-1) and 0.144 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively, from 100 g L(-1) of glucose, and 10.3 g L(-1) of 1-propanol with the yield and productivity of 0.259 g g(-1) and 0.083 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively, from 40 g L(-1) glycerol. PMID:22871504

  16. Dielectric relaxations on erythrocyte membrane as revealed by spectrin denaturation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, I T; Paarvanova, B

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effect of spectrin denaturation at 49.5°C (TA) on the dielectric relaxations and related changes in the complex impedance, Z*, complex capacitance, C*, and dielectric loss curve of suspensions containing human erythrocytes, erythrocyte ghost membranes (EMs) and Triton-X-100 residues of EMs. The loss curve prior to, minus the loss curve after TA, resulted in a bell-shaped peak at 1.5MHz. The changes in the real and imaginary components of Z* and C* at TA, i.e., ΔZre, ΔZim, ΔCre and ΔCim, calculated in the same way, strongly varied with frequency. Between 1.0 and 12MHz the -ΔZim vs ΔZre, and ΔCim vs ΔCre plots depicted semicircles with critical frequencies, fcr, at 2.5MHz expressing recently reported relaxation of spectrin dipoles. Between 0.02 and 1.0MHz the -ΔZim vs ΔZre plot exhibited another relaxation whose fcr mirrored that of beta relaxation. This relaxation was absent on Triton-X-shells, while on erythrocytes and EMs it was inhibited by selective dissociation of either attachment sites between spectrin and bilayer. Considering above findings and inaccessibility of cytosole to outside field at such frequencies, the latter relaxation was assumed originating from a piezoelectric effect on the highly deformable spectrin filaments.

  17. National Implementation of an Evidence-Based HIV Prevention and Reproductive Health Program for Bahamian Youth

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Valerie; Kaljee, Linda; Deveaux, Lynette; Lunn, Sonja; Rolle, Glenda; Stanton, Bonita

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of behavioral prevention interventions have been demonstrated through longitudinal, randomized controlled trials to reduce sexual risk behaviors. Many of these interventions have been made available at little cost for implementation on a public health scale. However, efforts to utilize such programs typically have been met with a range of problems to be addressed, leading to the recognition that new processes must be identified and integrated into the emerging field of implementation science. A randomized, controlled trial conducted among Bahamian grade six students attending fifteen elementary schools found the sexual risk-reduction intervention “Focus on Youth in the Caribbean (FOYC) and Caribbean Informed Parents and Children Together (CImPACT)” to be effective through three years of follow-up. Based on these results, the Bahamian Ministry of Education decided to implement FOYC-CImPACT throughout all government grade six classes in The Bahamas. This manuscript describes the considerations, approaches, and actions taken regarding national implementation of this evidence-based intervention. The implementation process included active data-gathering, observation and feedback components to inform subsequent intervention phases. This manuscript reviewed the success and challenges to date within this framework and described changes made to enable next stages of the national implementation effort. PMID:25197265

  18. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate. PMID:25940850

  19. High wind speed measurements of dimethylsulfide air/sea gas transfer by eddy correlation in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. G.; De Bruyn, W. J.; Miller, S. D.; Saltzman, E. S.; Slawksy, L.; Stacy, B.; Callaghan, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Air/sea dimethylsulphide (DMS) fluxes and gas transfer coefficients (kDMS) were measured by eddy correlation over the western North Atlantic Ocean during June/July 2011 aboard the R/V Knorr. Atmospheric and seawater DMS were measured using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (API-CIMS). Seawater DMS was measured continuously from the ship's underway system using a porous membrane equilibrator and API-CIMS. The cruise included regions of high biological productivity, wind speeds from 0-18 m/sec and whitecap areas of 0-5%. Four stations were occupied during the cruise for periods of 24-36 hours. In general, the stations exhibited a linear relationship between kDMS and wind speed, although there were significant variations in the slope of this relationship. One of the stations showed kDMS increasing with wind speed to 10 m/sec and then levelling off at higher wind speeds. The data from this cruise suggest that gas transfer can vary substantially due to parameters other than wind speed, most likely sea state and surfactants.

  20. Constraining the sensitivity of iodide adduct chemical ionization mass spectrometry to multifunctional organic molecules using the collision limit and thermodynamic stability of iodide ion adducts

    DOE PAGES

    Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Iyer, Siddarth; Mohr, Claudia; Lee, Ben H.; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Kurtén, Theo; Thornton, Joel A.

    2016-04-06

    The sensitivity of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ions formed per number density of analytes) is fundamentally limited by the collision frequency between reagent ions and analytes, known as the collision limit, the ion–molecule reaction time, and the transmission efficiency of product ions to the detector. We use the response of a time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) to N2O5, known to react with iodide at the collision limit, to constrain the combined effects of ion–molecule reaction time, which is strongly influenced by mixing and ion losses in the ion–molecule reaction drift tube. A mass spectrometric voltage scanning procedure elucidatesmore » the relative binding energies of the ion adducts, which influence the transmission efficiency of molecular ions through the electric fields within the vacuum chamber. Together, this information provides a critical constraint on the sensitivity of a ToF-CIMS towards a wide suite of routinely detected multifunctional organic molecules for which no calibration standards exist. We describe the scanning procedure and collision limit determination, and we show results from the application of these constraints to the measurement of organic aerosol composition at two different field locations.« less

  1. CAD-CAM at Bendix Kansas city: the BICAM system

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Bendix Kansas City Division (BEKC) has been involved in Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) technology since the late 1950's when the numerical control (N/C) analysts installed computers to aid in N/C tape preparation for numerically controlled machines. Computer Aided Design (CAD) technology was introduced in 1976, when a number of 2D turnkey drafting stations were procured for printed wiring board (PWB) drawing definition and maintenance. In June, 1980, CAD-CAM Operations was formed to incorporate an integrated CAD-CAM capability into Bendix operations. In March 1982, a ninth division was added to the existing eight divisions at Bendix. Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) is a small organization, reporting directly to the general manager, who has responsibility to coordinate the overall integration of computer aided systems at Bendix. As a long range plan, CIM has adopted a National Bureau of Standards (NBS) architecture titled Factory of the Future. Conceptually, the Bendix CAD-CAM system has a centrally located data base which can be accessed by both CAD and CAM tools, processes, and personnel thus forming an integrated Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) System. This is a key requirement of the Bendix CAD-CAM system that will be presented in more detail.

  2. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  3. Intercomparison of Chemically Independent Peroxide Observations During INTEX-NA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, D. W.; Shen, H.; Heikes, B. G.; Crounse, J. D.; Kwan, A. J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Pippin, M. R.; Crawford, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Gas phase peroxide measurements were preformed with two analytical techniques during the INTEX-NA field project. In the first method peroxides were partitioned into an aqueous phase in cyclone separators, the aqueous collection solution was injected on to an HPLC to separate hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides. Separated peroxides were quantified by a post column derivatization reaction with p-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid and horse radish peroxidase forming a fluorescent dimer. This method is capable of identification and quantification of C1 and C2 organic peroxides. With the dual HPLC system a 30 sec integrated sample was analyzed every 90 sec. The second method employed chemical ionization mass spectrometry to quantify the peroxides via a direct gas phase ion-molecule reaction between the peroxide and a CFO3- ion. The Caltech CIMS technique makes a 0.5 sec measurement every 5 sec. Comparison of the observations of hydrogen peroxide by both techniques on the same time base results in nearly a 90% correspondence between the techniques. Both systems also quantified peroxyacetic acid (PAA) with a 72% correspondence between observations. The majority of discrepancies between the techniques occur for observations approaching the respective detection limits. The PAA observations are the first measurements for this compound in the troposphere. The specificity of the enzyme catalyzed technique for the peroxide moiety and the characteristic retention time, coupled to the unique mass number identification using CIMS lends confidence to the correct identification and quantification of PAA.

  4. Arf6 controls retromer traffic and intracellular cholesterol distribution via a phosphoinositide-based mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Marquer, Catherine; Tian, Huasong; Yi, Julie; Bastien, Jayson; Dall'Armi, Claudia; Yang-Klingler, YoungJoo; Zhou, Bowen; Chan, Robin Barry; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Small GTPases play a critical role in membrane traffic. Among them, Arf6 mediates transport to and from the plasma membrane, as well as phosphoinositide signalling and cholesterol homeostasis. Here we delineate the molecular basis for the link between Arf6 and cholesterol homeostasis using an inducible knockout (KO) model of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We find that accumulation of free cholesterol in the late endosomes/lysosomes of Arf6 KO MEFs results from mistrafficking of Niemann–Pick type C protein NPC2, a cargo of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-M6PR). This is caused by a selective increase in an endosomal pool of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P) and a perturbation of retromer, which controls the retrograde transport of CI-M6PR via sorting nexins, including the PI4P effector SNX6. Finally, reducing PI4P levels in KO MEFs through independent mechanisms rescues aberrant retromer tubulation and cholesterol mistrafficking. Our study highlights a phosphoinositide-based mechanism for control of cholesterol distribution via retromer. PMID:27336679

  5. Skin capacitance imaging and corneosurfametry. A comparative assessment of the impact of surfactants on stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Xhauflaire-Uhoda, Emmanuelle; Loussouarn, Geneviève; Haubrechts, Christelle; Léger, Didier Saint; Piérard, Gérald E

    2006-05-01

    Silicon image sensor (SIS) technology was recently introduced as an innovative tool (SkinChip, L'Oréal) providing sensitive imaging of the skin capacitance. This method can detect discrete focal variations in skin surface hydration, and thus early discrete manifestations of skin irritation induced by surfactants. In the present in vivo study, 2 neat and diluted shampoos, and 5% and 10% sodium laurylsulfate solutions were tested on human skin. Each surfactant solution was gently rubbed on the skin using wet hair wicks mimicking the casual use of a shampoo on the scalp. Clinical and SIS evaluations were carried out. In addition, the same products were tested using the ex vivo corneosurfametry bioassay performed on human stratum corneum (SC) harvested by cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings. The colourimetric index of mildness (CIM) was measured on these samples. The product reactivity with the SC was recognized by darker skin capacitance images, and by both lowered SkinChip-generated values and lowered CIM values. The extent in changes varied according to the nature of the test products and their concentrations. The SkinChip image changes likely corresponded to the acute surfactant-induced water swelling of the corneocytes. Skin capacitance imaging and corneosurfametry allow to disclose discrete surfactant-induced alterations of corneocytes. PMID:16689808

  6. Clustering, methodology, and mechanistic insights into acetate chemical ionization using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, Patrick; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of cluster control and transmission through the Tofwerk atmospheric pressure interface installed on various chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometers using authentic standards. This characterization of the atmospheric pressure interface allows for a detailed investigation of the acetate chemical ionization mechanisms and the impact of controlling these mechanisms on sensitivity, selectivity, and mass spectral ambiguity with the aim of non-targeted analysis. Chemical ionization with acetate reagent ions is controlled by a distribution of reagent ion-neutral clusters that vary with relative humidity and the concentration of the acetic anhydride precursor. Deprotonated carboxylic acids are primarily detected only if sufficient declustering is employed inside the atmospheric pressure interface. The configuration of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) using an acetate chemical ionization source for non-targeted analysis is discussed. Recent approaches and studies characterizing acetate chemical ionization as it applies to the HR-TOF-CIMS are evaluated in light of the work presented herein.

  7. Design and implementation of a Windows NT network to support CNC activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearrow, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The Manufacturing, Materials, & Processes Technology Division is undergoing dramatic changes to bring it's manufacturing practices current with today's technological revolution. The Division is developing Computer Automated Design and Computer Automated Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) abilities. The development of resource tracking is underway in the form of an accounting software package called Infisy. These two efforts will bring the division into the 1980's in relationship to manufacturing processes. Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) is the final phase of change to be implemented. This document is a qualitative study and application of a CIM application capable of finishing the changes necessary to bring the manufacturing practices into the 1990's. The documentation provided in this qualitative research effort includes discovery of the current status of manufacturing in the Manufacturing, Materials, & Processes Technology Division including the software, hardware, network and mode of operation. The proposed direction of research included a network design, computers to be used, software to be used, machine to computer connections, estimate a timeline for implementation, and a cost estimate. Recommendation for the division's improvement include action to be taken, software to utilize, and computer configurations.

  8. Quasi-Liquid Layer Formation on Ice under Stratospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, V. Faye; Loerting, Thomas; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of the interaction of hydrogen chloride (HCl) with ice is essential to understanding at a molecular level the processes responsible for ozone depletion involving polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. To explain the catalytic role PSC particle surfaces play during chlorine activation, we proposed previously that HCl induces the formation of a disordered region on the ice surface, a quasi-liquid layer (QLL), at stratospheric conditions. The QLL is known to exist in pure ice crystals at temperatures near the melting point, but its existence at stratospheric temperatures (-85 C to -70 C) had not been reported yet. We studied the interaction of HCl with ice under stratospheric conditions using the complementary approach of a) ellipsometry to directly monitor the ice surface, using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to monitor the gas phase species present in the ellipsometry experiments, and b) flow-tube experiments with CIMS detection. Here we show that trace amounts of HCl induce QLL formation at stratospheric temperatures, and that the QLL enhances the chlorine-activation reaction of HCl with chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), and also enhances acetic acid (CH3COOH) adsorption.

  9. Skin capacitance imaging and corneosurfametry. A comparative assessment of the impact of surfactants on stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Xhauflaire-Uhoda, Emmanuelle; Loussouarn, Geneviève; Haubrechts, Christelle; Léger, Didier Saint; Piérard, Gérald E

    2006-05-01

    Silicon image sensor (SIS) technology was recently introduced as an innovative tool (SkinChip, L'Oréal) providing sensitive imaging of the skin capacitance. This method can detect discrete focal variations in skin surface hydration, and thus early discrete manifestations of skin irritation induced by surfactants. In the present in vivo study, 2 neat and diluted shampoos, and 5% and 10% sodium laurylsulfate solutions were tested on human skin. Each surfactant solution was gently rubbed on the skin using wet hair wicks mimicking the casual use of a shampoo on the scalp. Clinical and SIS evaluations were carried out. In addition, the same products were tested using the ex vivo corneosurfametry bioassay performed on human stratum corneum (SC) harvested by cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings. The colourimetric index of mildness (CIM) was measured on these samples. The product reactivity with the SC was recognized by darker skin capacitance images, and by both lowered SkinChip-generated values and lowered CIM values. The extent in changes varied according to the nature of the test products and their concentrations. The SkinChip image changes likely corresponded to the acute surfactant-induced water swelling of the corneocytes. Skin capacitance imaging and corneosurfametry allow to disclose discrete surfactant-induced alterations of corneocytes.

  10. Quantification of Gas-Wall Partitioning in Teflon Environmental Chambers Using Rapid Bursts of Low-Volatility Oxidized Species Generated in Situ.

    PubMed

    Krechmer, Jordan E; Pagonis, Demetrios; Ziemann, Paul J; Jimenez, Jose L

    2016-06-01

    Partitioning of gas-phase organic compounds to the walls of Teflon environmental chambers is a recently reported phenomenon than can affect the yields of reaction products and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) measured in laboratory experiments. Reported time scales for reaching gas-wall partitioning (GWP) equilibrium (τGWE) differ by up to 3 orders of magnitude, however, leading to predicted effects that vary from substantial to negligible. A new technique is demonstrated here in which semi- and low-volatility oxidized organic compounds (saturation concentration c* < 100 μg m(-3)) were photochemically generated in rapid bursts in situ in an 8 m(3) environmental chamber, and then their decay in the absence of aerosol was measured using a high-resolution chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) equipped with an "inlet-less" NO3(-) ion source. Measured τGWE were 7-13 min (rel. std. dev. 33%) for all compounds. The fraction of each compound that partitioned to the walls at equilibrium follows absorptive partitioning theory with an equivalent wall mass concentration in the range 0.3-10 mg m(-3). Measurements using a CIMS equipped with a standard ion-molecule reaction region showed large biases due to the contact of compounds with walls. On the basis of these results, a set of parameters is proposed for modeling GWP in chamber experiments. PMID:27138683

  11. Critical illness myopathy and polyneuropathy - A challenge for physiotherapists in the intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Pattanshetty, Renu B; Gaude, Gajanan S

    2011-04-01

    The development of critical patient related generalized neuromuscular weakness, referred to as critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and critical illness myopathy (CIM), is a major complication in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Both CIP and CIM cause muscle weakness and paresis in critically ill patients during their ICU stay. Early mobilization or kinesiotherapy have shown muscle weakness reversion in critically ill patients providing faster return to function, reducing weaning time, and length of hospitalization. Exercises in the form of passive, active, and resisted forms have proved to improve strength and psychological well being. Clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation to increase muscle mass, muscle strength and improve blood circulation to the surrounding tissue have proved beneficial. The role of electrical stimulation is unproven as yet. Recent evidence indicates no difference between treated and untreated muscles. Future research is recommended to conduct clinical trials using neuromuscular electrical stimulation, exercises, and early mobilization as a treatment protocol in larger populations of patients in ICU. PMID:21814370

  12. MAPPING OF QTLs FOR ORAL ALCOHOL SELF-ADMINISTRATION IN B6.C AND B6.I QUASI-CONGENIC RQI STRAINS

    PubMed Central

    Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mariko; Gyetvai, Beatrix M.; Oros, Melinda; Szakall, Istvan; Kovacs, Krisztina M.; Prasad, Vidudala V.T.S.; Morahan, Grant; Toth, Reka

    2008-01-01

    One strategy to identify neurochemical pathways of addiction is to map the relevant genes. In the present study we used 43 B6.C and 35 B6.I inbred RQI mouse strains, carrying <3% donor genome on C57BL/6ByJ background, for gene mapping. The strains were phenotyped for consumption of alcohol (12% v/v) in a two-bottle-choice paradigm, and genotyped for 396 microsatellite markers. The current mapping study extends our earlier experiment scanning five mouse chromosomes (1) to a whole-genome study, and discusses the differences and limitations. Data were analyzed with composite interval (CIM) and multiple interval (MIM) QTL mapping methods. CIM of B6.C strains detected significant QTLs on chrs. 6 and 12. A suggestive, but not significant, locus was detected in the B6.I strains on chr. 12. The best MIM model for B6.C strains confirmed one QTL on chr. 6 and one QTL on chr. 12., while the MIM model for the B6.I strains confirmed the suggestive locus on chr. 12. Some of the QTLs for alcohol consumption are new, while others confirm previously reported QTLs for alcohol preference, and alcohol acceptance. PMID:17273929

  13. Measurements of nitrous acid (HONO) in urban area of Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Bernard, François; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Grosselin, Benoît; Zhou, Bin; Zheng, Jun; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Yujie; Ye, Xingnan; Daële, Véronique; Mu, Yujing; Zhang, Renyi; Chen, Jianmin; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2016-03-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO), as a precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH), plays an important role in the photochemistry of the troposphere, especially in the polluted urban atmosphere. A field campaign was conducted to measure atmospheric HONO concentration and that of other pollutants (such as NO2 and particle mass concentration) in the autumn of 2009 at Shanghai urban areas. HONO mixing ratios were simultaneously measured by three different techniques: long path absorption photometer (LOPAP), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). The measurements showed that the mixing ratios of HONO were highly variable and depended strongly on meteorological parameters. The HONO levels ranged from 0.5 to 7 ppb with maximum values during early morning and minimum levels during late afternoon. The three instruments reproduced consistent diurnal pattern of HONO concentrations with higher concentration during the night compared to the daylight hours. Comparison of HONOLOPAP/HONOCIMS ratios during daytime and nighttime periods exhibited a non-systematic disagreement of 0.93 and 1.16, respectively. This would indicate different chemical compositions of sampled air for the LOPAP and the CIMS instruments during daytime and nighttime periods, which have possibly affected measurements. Mean HONO concentration reported by LOPAP was 33 % higher than by DOAS on the whole period with no significant difference between daytime and nighttime periods. This revealed a systematic deviation from both instruments. The present data provides complementary information of HONO ambient levels in the atmosphere of Shanghai urban areas. PMID:26590058

  14. Metabolic engineering of a synergistic pathway for n-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuobo; Si, Tong; Liu, Zihe; Zhang, Hongfang; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    n-Butanol has several favourable properties as an advanced fuel or a platform chemical. Bio-based production of n-butanol is becoming increasingly important for sustainable chemical industry. Synthesis of n-butanol can be achieved via more than one metabolic pathway. Here we report the metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce n-butanol through a synergistic pathway: the endogenous threonine pathway and the introduced citramalate pathway. Firstly, we characterized and optimized the endogenous threonine pathway; then, a citramalate synthase (CimA) mediated pathway was introduced to construct the synergistic pathway; next, the synergistic pathway was optimized by additional overexpression of relevant genes identified previously; meanwhile, the n-butanol production was also improved by overexpression of keto-acid decarboxylases (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). After combining these strategies with co-expression of LEU1 (two copies), LEU4, LEU2 (two copies), LEU5, CimA, NFS1, ADH7 and ARO10*, we achieved an n-butanol production of 835 mg/L in the final engineered strain, which is almost 7-fold increase compared to the initial strain. Furthermore, the production showed a 3-fold of the highest titer ever reported in yeast. Therefore, the engineered yeast strain represents a promising alternative platform for n-butanol production. PMID:27161023

  15. Ground-based intercomparison of nitric acid measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Huey, L. Greg; Sueper, Donna T.; Norton, Richard B.; Williams, Eric J.; Eisele, Fred L.; Mauldin, R. Lee; Tanner, David J.

    1998-02-01

    An informal intercomparison of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) measuring techniques was carried out. The intercomparison involved two new chemical ionization mass spectrometers (CIMSs) that have been developed for the measurement of HNO3 along with an older, more established filter pack (FP) technique. The filter pack was composed of a teflon prefilter which collected aerosols followed by a nylon filter which collected the gas-phase HNO3. The study was carried out during the late winter and early spring of 1996 at a site located on the western edge of the Denver metropolitan area. Throughout the study the two CIMS techniques were in general agreement. However, under certain conditions the HNO3 levels obtained from the nylon filter of the FP gave values for the gas-phase concentration of HNO3 that were somewhat higher than that recorded by the two CIMS systems. The formation of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) containing aerosols is common during the colder months in this area. An analysis of these results suggests that the HNO3 collected by the nylon filter in the FP suffers an interference associated with the disproportionation of NH4NO3 from aerosols containing that compound that were initially collected on the teflon prefilter. This problem with the FP technique has been suggested from results obtained in previous intercomparisons.

  16. Constraining the sensitivity of iodide adduct chemical ionization mass spectrometry to multifunctional organic molecules using the collision limit and thermodynamic stability of iodide ion adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Iyer, Siddarth; Mohr, Claudia; Lee, Ben H.; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Kurtén, Theo; Thornton, Joel A.

    2016-04-01

    The sensitivity of a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ions formed per number density of analytes) is fundamentally limited by the collision frequency between reagent ions and analytes, known as the collision limit, the ion-molecule reaction time, and the transmission efficiency of product ions to the detector. We use the response of a time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ToF-CIMS) to N2O5, known to react with iodide at the collision limit, to constrain the combined effects of ion-molecule reaction time, which is strongly influenced by mixing and ion losses in the ion-molecule reaction drift tube. A mass spectrometric voltage scanning procedure elucidates the relative binding energies of the ion adducts, which influence the transmission efficiency of molecular ions through the electric fields within the vacuum chamber. Together, this information provides a critical constraint on the sensitivity of a ToF-CIMS towards a wide suite of routinely detected multifunctional organic molecules for which no calibration standards exist. We describe the scanning procedure and collision limit determination, and we show results from the application of these constraints to the measurement of organic aerosol composition at two different field locations.

  17. Degradation of Saccharomyces cervisiae Rck2 upon exposure of cells to high levels of zinc is dependent on Pep4.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swarna; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2005-06-01

    In undisturbed cells, the MAPK-activated protein kinase Rck2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a stable protein with a turnover time exceeding 60 min. However, we have found that Rck2 is subject to intracellular degradation after exposure of cells to Zn2+ concentrations of 5 mM or more. In high-zinc medium, most of the Rck2 pool is degraded within 5 min. This degradation is blocked by inhibiting the vacuolar proteolytic pathway with the protease inhibitor phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride or by mutation of the PEP4 gene. By contrast, blocking the proteasomal pathway with the inhibitor MG132 does not prevent Rck2 degradation upon addition of Zn2+, nor is degradation inhibited in the proteasomal mutations pre1 pre2, cim3, or cim5. The stability of Rck2 is not affected by any of the other stress conditions examined, or by growth rate. Possible mechanisms of the degradation of Rck2 under high zinc conditions, and its physiological significance, are discussed. PMID:15887030

  18. Metabolic engineering of a synergistic pathway for n-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Si, Tong; Liu, Zihe; Zhang, Hongfang; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    n-Butanol has several favourable properties as an advanced fuel or a platform chemical. Bio-based production of n-butanol is becoming increasingly important for sustainable chemical industry. Synthesis of n-butanol can be achieved via more than one metabolic pathway. Here we report the metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce n-butanol through a synergistic pathway: the endogenous threonine pathway and the introduced citramalate pathway. Firstly, we characterized and optimized the endogenous threonine pathway; then, a citramalate synthase (CimA) mediated pathway was introduced to construct the synergistic pathway; next, the synergistic pathway was optimized by additional overexpression of relevant genes identified previously; meanwhile, the n-butanol production was also improved by overexpression of keto-acid decarboxylases (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). After combining these strategies with co-expression of LEU1 (two copies), LEU4, LEU2 (two copies), LEU5, CimA, NFS1, ADH7 and ARO10(*), we achieved an n-butanol production of 835 mg/L in the final engineered strain, which is almost 7-fold increase compared to the initial strain. Furthermore, the production showed a 3-fold of the highest titer ever reported in yeast. Therefore, the engineered yeast strain represents a promising alternative platform for n-butanol production. PMID:27161023

  19. Rheological and thermal performance of newly developed binder systems for ceramic injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausnerova, Berenika; Kasparkova, Vera; Hnatkova, Eva

    2016-05-01

    In a novel binder system, carnauba wax was considered to replace the synthetic backbone polymers (polyolefins) enhancing the environmental sustainability of Ceramic Injection Molding (CIM) technology. The paper presents comparison of the rheological performance and thermal behavior of the aluminum oxide CIM feedstocks based on a binder containing carnauba wax with those consisting of a commercial binder. Further, acrawax (N, N'-Ethylene Bis-stearamide) has been considered as another possible substitute of polyolefins. For both proposed substitutes there is a significant reduction in viscosity, and in case of carnauba wax based feedstock also in processing temperature, which is essential for injection molding of reactive powders. Thermal characterization comprised analyses of single neat binders, their mixtures and mixtures with aluminum oxide. The presence of powder lowered melting temperatures of all tested binders except of polyolefin. Further depression in melting point of poly(ethylene glycol) is observed in combination with polyolefin in the presence of powder, and it is related to changes in size of the crystalline domains.

  20. Dielectric relaxations on erythrocyte membrane as revealed by spectrin denaturation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, I T; Paarvanova, B

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effect of spectrin denaturation at 49.5°C (TA) on the dielectric relaxations and related changes in the complex impedance, Z*, complex capacitance, C*, and dielectric loss curve of suspensions containing human erythrocytes, erythrocyte ghost membranes (EMs) and Triton-X-100 residues of EMs. The loss curve prior to, minus the loss curve after TA, resulted in a bell-shaped peak at 1.5MHz. The changes in the real and imaginary components of Z* and C* at TA, i.e., ΔZre, ΔZim, ΔCre and ΔCim, calculated in the same way, strongly varied with frequency. Between 1.0 and 12MHz the -ΔZim vs ΔZre, and ΔCim vs ΔCre plots depicted semicircles with critical frequencies, fcr, at 2.5MHz expressing recently reported relaxation of spectrin dipoles. Between 0.02 and 1.0MHz the -ΔZim vs ΔZre plot exhibited another relaxation whose fcr mirrored that of beta relaxation. This relaxation was absent on Triton-X-shells, while on erythrocytes and EMs it was inhibited by selective dissociation of either attachment sites between spectrin and bilayer. Considering above findings and inaccessibility of cytosole to outside field at such frequencies, the latter relaxation was assumed originating from a piezoelectric effect on the highly deformable spectrin filaments. PMID:27071054

  1. In situ measurements of atmospheric nitrous acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry using chloride ion transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Jun; Kato, Takehiro; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2009-10-15

    Recently, chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been widely applied to the in situ measurements of atmospheric trace species. In this article, we propose a new chemical ionization scheme using a chloride ion transfer reaction from SO(2)Cl(-) as the reagent ion and discuss the applicability of this technique to the detection of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere. From laboratory investigations, the detection sensitivity was found to depend on the flow rate of SO(2) introduced into the ion source region and the pressure inside the chemical ionization region, which suggests that the chemical ionization reaction is reversible. The detection sensitivity was well described in terms of the forward and backward rates. The present limit of detection is estimated to be 60 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) for an integration time of 1 min. Improvement of the CIMS instrument would enable the measurements of the daytime level of HONO, which might be less than 50 pptv. In addition, the possibility of the interference is discussed from thermodynamic considerations based on ab initio calculations, and the effects of the sampling artifacts are experimentally quantified. PMID:19746928

  2. Towards intraoperative surgical margin assessment and visualization using bioimpedance properties of the tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shadab; Mahara, Aditya; Hyams, Elias S.; Schned, Alan; Halter, Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) has a high 10-year recurrence rate, making PCa the second leading cause of cancer-specific mortality among men in the USA. PCa recurrences are often predicted by assessing the status of surgical margins (SM) with positive surgical margins (PSM) increasing the chances of biochemical recurrence by 2-4 times. To this end, an SM assessment system using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was developed with a microendoscopic probe. This system measures the tissue bioimpedance over a range of frequencies (1 kHz to 1MHz), and computes a Composite Impedance Metric (CIM). CIM can be used to classify tissue as benign or cancerous. The system was used to collect the impedance spectra from excised prostates, which were obtained from men undergoing radical prostatectomy. The data revealed statistically significant (p<0.05) differences in the impedance properties of the benign and tumorous tissues, and between different tissue morphologies. To visualize the results of SM-assessment, a visualization tool using da Vinci stereo laparoscope is being developed. Together with the visualization tool, the EIS-based SM assessment system can be potentially used to intraoperatively classify tissues and display the results on the surgical console with a video feed of the surgical site, thereby augmenting a surgeon's view of the site and providing a potential solution to the intraoperative SM assessment needs.

  3. Interval and composite interval mapping of somatic cell score, yield, and components of milk in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Zas, S L; Southey, B R; Heyen, D W; Lewin, H A

    2002-11-01

    Single-marker, interval-mapping (IM) and composite interval mapping (CIM) were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling milk, fat and protein yields, and somatic cell score (SCS). A granddaughter design was used to combine molecular genetic information with predicted transmitting abilities (PTA) and estimated daughter yield deviations (DYD) from eight Dairy Bull DNA Repository Holstein families. Models that included and excluded weights accounting for the uncertainty of the response variable were evaluated in each trait, family and phenotype (DYD and PTA) combination. The genotypic information consisted of 174 microsatellite markers along 29 Bos taurus autosomes. The average number of informative markers per autosome was three and the number of informative sons per family and marker varied between 21 and 173. Within-family results from the least squares single-marker analyses were used in expectation-maximization likelihood IM and CIM implemented with QTL Cartographer. Different CIM model specifications, offering complementary control on the background QTL outside the interval under study, were evaluated. Permutation techniques were used to calculate the genome-wide threshold test statistic values based on 1,000 samples. Results from the DYD and PTA analyses were highly consistent across traits and families. The minor differences in the estimates from the models that accounted for or ignored the uncertainty of the DYD (variance) and PTA (inverse of reliability) may be associated to the elevated and consistent precision of the DYD and PTA among sons. The CIM model best supported by the data had 10 markers controlling for background effects. On autosome (BTA) three, a QTL at 32 cM influencing protein yield was located in family five and a QTL at 74 cM for fat yield was located in family eight. Two map positions associated with SCS were detected on BTA 21, one at 33 cM in family one and the other at 84 cM in family three. A QTL for protein yield was

  4. Development of an Advanced Technique to Correct Along-Track InSAR-Derived Surface Current Fields for Contributions of Wave Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C.; Romeiser, R.; Reniers, A.; MacMahan, J.

    2014-12-01

    The feasibility of surface current measurements by airborne and spaceborne along-track interferometric synthetic aperture radar (along-track InSAR) has been demonstrated on a number of occasions. Since the Doppler shifts detected by the radar include contributions of surface wave motions, a correction for these contributions has to be applied, which is often estimated as a mean correction for the entire current field on the basis of a simple theoretical model. In coastal areas and river estuaries with complex current and wave patterns, this approach is not adequate because one has to account for spatial variations in the wave field and in the corresponding corrections for the current field, which can be on the same order of magnitude as the actual surface currents of interest. Here we test the ability of a numerical near-shore hindcast model (Delft3D) to produce a wave field to be used for more appropriate computations of corrections for the along-track InSAR data. Our study was conducted at the mouth of the Columbia River on the West Coast of the U.S. during the spring of 2013. Over the course of the experiment, seven TerraSAR-X along-track InSAR images were acquired as well as a variety of in-situ data sets, such as trajectories of GPS-equipped Lagrangian drifters and velocity profiles from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP). We use the in-situ data to validate our Delft3D model results, and we try to relate spatially varying differences between the measured and simulated surface currents and the TerraSAR-X derived Doppler velocities to the wave spectra obtained from Delft3D and to wave patterns observed in the SAR images. The long-term objective of this work is to derive the wave information and the corresponding velocity corrections from signatures contained in the along-track InSAR data set itself, such that a completely self-consistent correction of along-track InSAR-derived surface current fields for the contributions of spatially varying wave motions

  5. Dealing with the safety paradox of delta-branches closure; a geomorphology study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloff, C.; Tromp, R.; Sieben, A.

    2013-12-01

    Closing off estuaries by dams is a conventional solution to reduce flood risks and salt intrusion in river deltas. However, if not all branches are closed, residual tidal currents develop or increase in connecting channels between the closed and open branches. These channels start to erode, causing bank instability and possible failure of levees. Hence, paradoxically, the intended increase in safety by this closure creates a new threat with increased flood risks. We illustrate this for existing channel erosion and dike stability problems in the Dutch Rhine River delta in the Netherlands, as well as for proposed future closure works in the Mekong River in Vietnam. Crucial for assessing and dealing with the erosion problems, is a proper prediction of flow conditions and of bed erodibility. The channels incise ancient deltaic deposits, consisting of diverse sections and layers of sand, clay and peat with diverse states of compaction. In the presented studies we show how we applied Delft3D to model the full delta, with all relevant dynamics and complex interactions between tidal flow and river discharges. For the Dutch situation, we simulated the long-term fate of the eroding interconnecting channels, applying a detailed description of subsurface heterogeneous erodibility (space and depth varying). Since these rivers are incising slowly in clay and peat beds covering highly-erodible sand layers, alternate sections occur of undersupplied ';fixed' beds, and of very deep scour holes. For the Vietnam case, we show how the location of a barrier and operation of gates, can be used to control both the salinity intrusion and channel erosion for the Mekong delta. Although the morphology studies for the Dutch delta with high-density data availability obviously justify a detailed Delft3D approach, it is shown that even in the Mekong delta with poor data quality, a coarse-grid large-scale Delft3D model can provide the answers necessary for planning the closure works and potential

  6. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzo, Philippe; Haenen, Ken; Nebel, Christoph; Nesládek, Milo; Vanek, Milan

    2004-09-01

    The present issue of physica status solidi (a) contains a collection of 24 papers presented at the 9th International Workshop on Surface and Bulk Defects in CVD Diamond Films held in Diepen- beek-Hasselt, Belgium, 18-20 February 2004. The concept of this workshop originated in 1996 with the idea of bringing together scientists who are active and innovative in the field of electronic and optical properties of thin film diamond. Since then, this meeting have grown up to a regular conference devoted to new issues in CVD diamond research and related to diamond as a material for electronics and nanobioelectronics. This year the programme was spread over two and a half days, including 8 invited lectures from a total of 39 talks, and a poster session featuring 15 posters. In addition we were able to connect this meeting with a workshop on Defects and Impurities in Crystalline Boron Nitride Compounds, scientifically organized from the University of Antwerp and leading finally to a joint meeting lasting four days. The papers from the BN workshop are joining this proceeding issue on pages 2559-2598.At SBDD IX, topics ranged from homo- and heteroepitaxial growth, doping, hydrogen induced surface conductivity, defects and their characterization, to devices including bio-sensing applications. As usual, very intense and lively discussions took place among participants, from young students to established scientists, after talks, during breaks and in the evenings while enjoying the hospitality of the Limburgs Universitair Centrum and especially the city of Hasselt. The number of participants reached a record breaking 96 this year, with participants coming from fifteen different countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Romania, Russia, Sweden, UK, USA). This yearly increasing number indicates that this workshop is continuing to be very attractive to a large scientific community, as it summarizes the up-to-date research

  7. [Discovery of blood cells in the 17th century].

    PubMed

    Doubek, M

    2001-07-01

    Landmark works of the 17th century concerning observations of blood cells are quoted in the article. "Simple" and successively "compound" microscopes made their appearance in the late 16th century and early 17th century. In 1656, Frenchman Pierre Borel, physician-in-ordinary to the King Louis XIV, who first applied the microscope to medicine described a type of "worn" found in human blood. In 1657, Athanasius Kircher, a Jesuit priest and scientist from Germany, examined blood from plague victims, and described "worms" of plague. In 1661, 1664 and 1665, the blood cells were discerned by Marcello Malpighi. In 1678, the red blood corpuscles was described by Jan Swammerdam of Amsterdam, a Dutch naturalist and physician. The first complete account of the red cells was made by Anthony van Leeuwenhoek of Delft in the last quarter of the 17th century.

  8. [Elementary precautions necessary for the validity of ventilatory function measurements with electronic spirometers].

    PubMed

    Clauzel, A M; Michel, F B; Chrétien, J

    1978-01-01

    The increase of morbidity rate of chronic bronchitis demonstrates the interest of an early check-up, in the free symptom phase of illness, because obstruction of small bronchii may be reversible, as it has been pointed out by previous longitudinal studies. These finding involve the use of simple devices, easy to manage and rebrabld. The three apparatus have been tested : Ohio 842 spirograph, Oude Delft expirometer and Chemetron Corporation P.F.I., in 165 patients. All of them have been compared to Jaeger spirometer. No good agreement has been found between expirometer, P.F.I. and Jaeger spirometer. But Ohio 842 spirograph values were quiet close to those observed with Jaeger spirometer. Electronic spirometers present a digital display without graphic recording or calibration. It has been difficult to detect errors at a first glance. Mostly they came from non linearity of response of thermistance, irregular expiratory flow, insufficient cooperation of patients.

  9. Teaching nanoscience across scientific and geographical borders A European Master programme in nanoscience and nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, A.; Groeseneken, G.; Heremans, P.; Rep, D.; Rudquist, P.; Schwille, P.; Sluijter, B.; Wendin, G.

    2008-03-01

    Within the Erasmus Mundus Master (EMM) Programme, five European Universities (KU Leuven, Belgium, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, Delft University of Technology and Leiden University, the Netherlands, and the University of Dresden, Germany) have joined forces to offer a unique master programme in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 'EMM-nano', at the cutting edge of state-of-the-art research. The students design and build their individual area of specialisation within nanophysics, nanotechnology, biophysics, biotechnology through their choice of trajectory between the partners. We discuss some of the challenges related to the crossdisciplinary nature of the field, educational activities in cleanrooms, and issues related to the integration of teaching programmes across the borders within Europe.

  10. Experimental performance of homothetic mapping for wide-field interferometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Avoort, Casper; van Brug, Hedser; den Herder, Jan-Willem; D'Arcio, Luigi L.; Le Poole, Rudolf S.; Braat, Joseph J.

    2004-10-01

    Homothetic mapping is an aperture synthesis technique that allows interferometric imaging over a wide field-of-view. A laboratory experiment was set up to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique. Here, we present the first static experiments on homothetic mapping that have been done on the Delft Testbed for Interferometry (DTI). Before a changeable telescope configuration is provided, we first took a fixed telescope configuration and tested the algorithms for their ability to provide an exit pupil configuration before beam combination, that was an exact copy of this telescope configuration. By doing so, we created a homothetic imaging system. This is an imaging system that acts as a masked aperture monolithic telescope, but consists of (in our case) three telescopes of which the light follow their own optical trains.

  11. Design and experimental results for the S814 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    A 24-percent-thick airfoil, the S814, for the root region of a horizontal-axis wind-turbine blade has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement with the exception of maximum lift which is overpredicted. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the higher maximum lift and the lower profile drag of the S814 airfoil, thus confirming the achievement of the objectives.

  12. Does littoral sand bypass the head of Mugu Submarine Canyon? - a modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Jingping; Elias, Edwin; Kinsman, Nicole; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    A newly developed sand-tracer code for the process-based model Delft3D (Deltares, The Netherlands) was used to simulate the littoral transport near the head of the Mugu Submarine Canyon in California, USA. For westerly swells, which account for more than 90% of the wave conditions in the region, the sand tracers in the downcoast littoral drift were unable to bypass the canyon head. A flow convergence near the upcoast rim of the canyon intercepts the tracers and moves them either offshore onto the shelf just west of the canyon rim (low wave height conditions) or into the canyon head (storm wave conditions). This finding supports the notion that Mugu Canyon is the true terminus of the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell.

  13. The effect of initial imperfections on shell stability: An updated review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbocz, J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the Delft Interactive Shell Design Code (DISDECO) is described. The purpose is to make the accumulated theoretical, numerical, and practical knowledge of the last years readily accessible to users interested in the analysis of buckling sensitive structures. With this open ended, hierarchical, interactive computer code, the user can access workstation programs of increasing complexity. As a first update of DISDECO, the computational modules of the initial level were modified so as to handle combined loads consisting of axial compression, internal and external pressure, and clockwise or counter clockwise torque. The applied load is assumed to have a uniform spatial distribution and is divided into a fixed and a variable part. The magnitude of the variable part is allowed to vary in proportion to a load parameter Lambda. This leads to an eigenvalue problem for the critical lambda sub C.

  14. Sensing Human Activity: GPS Tracking

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Stefan; van Schaick, Jeroen; de Bois, Peter; de Haan, Remco

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement of GPS technology enables the use of GPS devices not only as navigation and orientation tools, but also as instruments used to capture travelled routes: as sensors that measure activity on a city scale or the regional scale. TU Delft developed a process and database architecture for collecting data on pedestrian movement in three European city centres, Norwich, Rouen and Koblenz, and in another experiment for collecting activity data of 13 families in Almere (The Netherlands) for one week. The question posed in this paper is: what is the value of GPS as ‘sensor technology’ measuring activities of people? The conclusion is that GPS offers a widely useable instrument to collect invaluable spatial-temporal data on different scales and in different settings adding new layers of knowledge to urban studies, but the use of GPS-technology and deployment of GPS-devices still offers significant challenges for future research. PMID:22574061

  15. Centrifuge modeling of LNAPL transport in partially saturated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, G.; Allersma, H.G.B.; Selvadurai, A.P.S.

    1999-12-01

    Model tests were performed at the Geotechnical Centrifuge Facility of Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, to examine the mechanics of light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) movement in a partially saturated porous granular medium. The experiment simulated a 2D spill of LNAPL in an unsaturated sand prepared at two values of porosity. The duration of the centrifuge model tests corresponded to a prototype equivalent of 110 days. The choice of modeling a 2D flow together with the use of a transparent container enabled direct visual observation of the experiments. Scaling laws developed in connection with other centrifuge modeling studies were used to support the test results. Tests were conducted at two different centrifuge accelerations to verify, by means of the modeling of models technique, the similitude between the different experiments. The paper presents details of the experimental methodologies and the measuring techniques used to evaluate the final distribution of water and LNAPL content in the soils.

  16. Tsunami inundation and sediment transport in vicinity of coastal mangrove forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelfenbaum, G.; Vatvani, D.; Jaffe, B.; Dekker, F.

    2007-01-01

    Field measurements from Sumatra of tsunami wave height, erosion and deposition form a comprehensive data set that is tested against the Delft3D tsunami inundation and sediment transport model. Relative agreement between measured and modeled maximum water levels and sediment erosion and accumulation provides confidence that the model is reasonably characterizing the important processes of tsunami inundation. Adding a component to account for vegetation, the model is used to explore the effects of fringing mangrove forests on tsunami inundation and sedimentation. In model experiments, mangrove forests modify the water levels and flow speeds reached during tsunami inundation. Simulations with a mangrove forest result in sedimentation in the forest and not erosion, as occurs in the base case with no forest. This difference in sedimentation is important because the change in profile shape increases wave energy reflection off the beach and decreases wave energy penetration onto land.

  17. Model scenarios of shoreline change at Kaanapali Beach, Maui, Hawaii: seasonal and extreme events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vitousek, Sean; Fletcher, Charles H.; Merrifield, Mark A.; Pawlak, Geno; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2007-01-01

    Kaanapali beach is a well-defined littoral cell of carbonate sand extending 2 km south from Black Rock (a basalt headland) to Hanakao'o Point. The beach experiences dynamic seasonal shoreline change forced by longshore transport from two dominant swell regimes. In summer, south swells (Hs = 1–2 m Tp = 14–25 s) drive sand to the north, while in winter, north swells (Hs = 5–8 m Tp = 14–20 s) drive sand to the south where it accumulates on a submerged fossil reef. The Delft3D modeling system accurately predicts directly observed tidal currents and wave heights around West Maui, and is applied to simulate shoreline change. Morphologic simulations qualitatively resolve the observed seasonal behavior.

  18. CFD calculations of S809 aerodynamic characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.P.; Ochs, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    Steady-state, two-dimensional CFD calculations were made for the S809 laminar-flow, wind-turbine airfoil using the commercial code CFD-ACE. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data from the Delft University 1.8 m x 1.25 m low-turbulence wind tunnel. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to-turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-{epsilon} model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation.

  19. Flow field computation of the NREL S809 airfoil using various turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.L.; Yang, S.L.; Arici, O.

    1996-10-01

    Performance comparison of three popular turbulence models, namely Baldwin-Lomas algebraic model, Chien`s Low-Reynolds-Number {kappa}-{epsilon} model, and Wilcox`s Low-Reynolds-Number {kappa}-{omega} model, is given. These models were applied to calculate the flow field around the National Renewable Energy Laboratory S809 airfoil using Total Variational Diminishing scheme. Numerical results of C{sub P}, C{sub L}, and C{sub D} are presented along with the Delft experimental data. It is shown that all three models perform well for attached flow, i.e., no flow separation at low angles of attack. However, at high angles of attack with flow separation, convergence characteristics show Wilcox`s model outperforms the other models. Results of this study will be used to guide the authors in their dynamic stall research.

  20. Quantifying the signature of sediment composition on the topologic and dynamic complexity of river delta channel networks and inferences toward delta classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Longjas, Anthony; Caldwell, Rebecca; Edmonds, Douglas A.; Zaliapin, Ilya; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2016-04-01

    Deltas contain complex self-organizing channel networks that nourish the surface with sediment and nutrients. Developing a quantitative understanding of how controlling physical mechanisms of delta formation relate to the channel networks they imprint on the landscape remains an open problem, hindering further progress on quantitative delta classification and understanding process from form. Here we isolate the effect of sediment composition on network structure by analyzing Delft3D river-dominated deltas within the recently introduced graph-theoretic framework for quantifying complexity of delta channel networks. We demonstrate that deltas with coarser incoming sediment tend to be more complex topologically (increased number of pathways) but simpler dynamically (reduced flux exchange between subnetworks) and that once a morphodynamic steady state is reached, complexity also achieves a steady state. By positioning simulated deltas on the so-called TopoDynamic complexity space and comparing with field deltas, we propose a quantitative framework for exploring complexity toward systematic inference and classification.

  1. Relationship between gas exchange, wind speed, and radar backscatter in a large wind-wave tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Richard H.; Bliven, L. F.

    1991-01-01

    The relationships between the gas exchange, wind speed, friction velocity, and radar backscatter from the water surface was investigated using data obtained in a large water tank in the Delft (Netherlands) wind-wave tunnel, filled with water supersaturated with SF6, N2O, and CH4. Results indicate that the gas-transfer velocities of these substances were related to the wind speed with a power law dependence. Microwave backscatter from water surface was found to be related to gas transfer velocities by a relationship in the form k(gas) = a 10 exp (b A0), where k is the gas transfer velocity for the particular gas, the values of a and b are obtained from a least squares fit of the average backscatter cross section and gas transfer at 80 m, and A0 is the directional (azimuthal) averaged return.

  2. Nebulous Art of Using Wind-Tunnel Airfoil Data for Predicting Rotor Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was threefold: to evaluate different two-dimensional S809 airfoil data sets in the prediction of rotor performance; to compare blade-element momentum rotor predicted results to lifting-surface, prescribed-wake results; and to compare the NASA Ames combined experiment rotor measured data with the two different performance prediction methods. The S809 airfoil data sets evaluated included those from Delft University of Technology, Ohio State University, and Colorado State University. The performance prediction comparison with NASA Ames data documents shortcomings of these performance prediction methods and recommends the use of the lifting-surface, prescribed-wake method over blade-element momentum theory for future analytical improvements.

  3. Hydrodynamic and Salinity Intrusion Model in Selangor River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, N. F.; Tahir, W.

    2016-07-01

    A multi-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport model has been used to develop the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion model for Selangor River Estuary. Delft3D-FLOW was applied to the study area using a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid. External boundary forces included ocean water level, salinity, and stream flow. The hydrodynamic and salinity transport used for the simulation was calibrated and confirmed using data on November 2005 and from May to June 2014. A 13-day period for November 2005 data and a 6-day period of May to June 2014 data were chosen as the calibration and confirmation period because of the availability of data from the field-monitoring program conducted. From the calibration results, it shows that the model was well suited to predict the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion characteristics of the study area.

  4. Hydrodynamic evaluation of long term impacts of climate change and coastal effluents in the Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Elhakeem, Abubaker; Elshorbagy, Walid

    2015-12-30

    A comprehensive basin wide hydrodynamic evaluation has been carried out to assess the long term impacts of climate change and coastal effluents on the salinity and seawater temperature of the Arabian Gulf (AG) using Delft3D-Flow model. The long term impacts of climate change scenarios A2 and B1 of the IPCC-AR4 on the AG hydrodynamics were evaluated. Using the current capacity and production rates of coastal desalination, power, and refinery plants, two projection scenarios until the year 2080 with 30 year intervals were developed namely the realistic and the optimistic discharge scenarios. Simulations of the individual climate change scenarios ascertained overall increase of the AG salinity and temperature and decrease of precipitation. The changes varied spatially with different scenarios as per the depth, proximity to exchange with ocean water, flushing, vertical mixing, and flow restriction. The individual tested scenarios of coastal projected discharges showed significant effects but within 10-20 km from the outfalls.

  5. A numerical model investigation of the formation and persistence of an erosion hotspot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin; List, Jeffrey H.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    A Delft3D-SWAN coupled flow and wave model was constructed for the San Francisco Bight with high-resolution at 7 km-long Ocean Beach, a high-energy beach located immediately south of the Golden Gate, the sole entrance to San Francisco Bay. The model was used to investigate tidal and wave-induced flows, basic forcing terms, and potential sediment transport in an area in the southern portion of Ocean Beach that has eroded significantly over the last several decades. The model predicted flow patterns that were favorable for sediment removal from the area and net erosion from the surf-zone. Analysis of the forcing terms driving surf-zone flows revealed that wave refraction over an exposed wastewater outfall pipe between the 12 and 15 m isobaths introduces a perturbation in the wave field that results in erosion-causing flows. Modeled erosion agreed well with five years of topographic survey data from the area.

  6. The influence of wave energy and sediment transport on seagrass distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Lacy, Jessica R.

    2012-01-01

    A coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport model (Delft3D) was used to simulate the water levels, waves, and currents associated with a seagrass (Zostera marina) landscape along a 4-km stretch of coast in Puget Sound, WA, USA. A hydroacoustic survey of seagrass percent cover and nearshore bathymetry was conducted, and sediment grain size was sampled at 53 locations. Wave energy is a primary factor controlling seagrass distribution at the site, accounting for 73% of the variability in seagrass minimum depth and 86% of the variability in percent cover along the shallow, sandy portions of the coast. A combination of numerical simulations and a conceptual model of the effect of sea-level rise on the cross-shore distribution of seagrass indicates that the area of seagrass habitat may initially increase and that wave dynamics are an important factor to consider in predicting the effect of sea-level rise on seagrass distributions in wave-exposed areas.

  7. Identification of flow patterns by neutron noise analysis during actual coolant boiling in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, R.; van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E. )

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to introduce results of coolant boiling experiments in a simulated materials test reactor-type fuel assembly with plate fuel in an actual reactor environment. The experiments have been performed in the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) research reactor at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft, The Netherlands. In the analysis, noise signals of self-powered neutron detectors located in the neighborhood of the boiling region and thermocouple in the channel wall and in the coolant are used. Flow patterns in the boiling coolant have been identified by means of analysis of probability density functions and power spectral densities of neutron noise. It is shown that boiling has an oscillating character due to partial channel blockage caused by steam slugs generated periodically between the plates. The observed phenomenon can serve as a basis for a boiling detection method in reactors with plate-type fuels.

  8. Long-term hydrodynamic modeling of the Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Elhakeem, Abubaker; Elshorbagy, Walid; Bleninger, Tobias

    2015-05-15

    A 3-D prognostic baroclinic hydrodynamic model of the Arabian Gulf (AG) was developed using Delft3D-FLOW. The model was forced with long-term time averaged climatological data over the computational domain and long-term salinity and temperature boundary conditions applied at its tidal open boundary. The model simulation results were thoroughly validated against measured tides from 5 stations and measured currents at 4 locations in the central and southern parts. Water salinity and temperature were validated in space and time using observations spanning over 73 years from 1923 to 1996 for the AG, the Strait of Hormuz and the Gulf of Oman. The bottom flow of the AG basin at the vicinity of the Strait of Hormuz was also validated against the available measurements. Seasonal evaporation and surface density spatial distribution maps were produced and compared with available records. The developed model setup successfully generated the AG seasonal stratification and hydrographic conditions. PMID:25819446

  9. ExoFly: a flapping wing aerobot for planetary survey and exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, T. E.; Mulder, J. A.; Remes, B.; Berkouwer, W.; Peeters, B.; Lentink, D.; Passchier, C.

    2008-09-01

    ExoFly is a light-weight (20 to 200 g.) flappingwing robotic fly, capable of exploration and scientific observations of the surface and lower atmosphere of planets. It is only in the last years that flapping wing insect flight is fully understood, and the step to robotic flapping-wing concept is very recent [1,2,3]. The concept of ExoFly is based on the DelFly, which has successfully been developed in the last years by the Technical University Delft, Wageningen University and TNO. Flapping winged flight is well suited to the low density and highly viscous Martian atmosphere, but may also be used in a denser atmosphere such as Titan. In any planetary mission, ExoFly would be a highly innovative mission element, technically part of the mission infrastructure, but enabling scientific breakthrough observations with the imaging system and micro-payload.

  10. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verelst, D. R. S.; Larsen, T. J.; van Wingerden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is given as well as a brief summary of the design process. The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy's aeroelastic simulation program HAWC2.

  11. A New Open-Source Tool For Education of SAR Interferometry: ADORE-DORIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, B.

    2012-12-01

    Delft Object-oRiented Interferometry Software (DORIS) is an open source and actively developed package empowering students and scientists from all over the world with means to carry out high quality synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry. Automated DORIS Environment (ADORE) attempts to automate the processing steps involved in generating interferograms using DORIS. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) is an imported tool for earth scientists in a wide spectrum of applications. The complexity involved with the generation of interferograms from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data limits InSAR's wide-use by scientists, and it's education in undergraduate classes. ADORE attempts to soften the learning curve for generating interferograms using DORIS. In this presentation the founding idea and practical benefits of ADORE is outlined and main processing steps are highlighted using an example data set.

  12. Dense network of disdrometers in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, S. A. P.; Hut, R. W.; Bagree, R.; van de Giesen, N. C.

    2012-04-01

    Dense networks of rain gauges in urban areas are scarce. The standard recommendation for the placement of a rain gauge is that the gauge is positioned at a distance corresponding to two to four times the height of any nearby obstruction to obtain a measurement that is representative for the surrounding area. In an urban area it is almost impossible to find a location that suits this recommendation. Rain measurements with a high spatial resolution are needed in urban areas to obtain a better understanding of urban hydrology. However, the costs of such a network may be prohibitive. In recent years a low-cost disdrometer (below 200,-) has been developed at Delft University of Technology. On the campus of the University, a dense network of these disdrometers is under construction. We will show the layout of the network, its boundary conditions and the first results.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA analysis on remains of a putative son of Louis XVI, King of France and Marie-Antoinette.

    PubMed

    Jehaes, E; Decorte, R; Peneau, A; Petrie, J H; Boiry, P A; Gilissen, A; Moisan, J P; Van den Berghe, H; Pascal, O; Cassiman, J J

    1998-01-01

    Carl Wilhelm Naundorff was buried in 1845 in Delft as Louis Charles, Duc de Normandie, 'Louis XVII'. However, the son of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette-Louis XVII--officially died in the Temple of Paris in 1795. In order to resolve the identity of Naundorff, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop sequences of his remains were compared with the sequences obtained from the hairs of two sisters of Marie-Antoinette, Marie-Antoinette herself, and with the sequences obtained from DNA samples of two living maternal relatives. The mtDNA sequence of a bone sample from Naundorff showed two nucleotide differences from the sequences of the three sisters and four differences from the sequences of living maternal relatives. Based on this evidence it becomes very unlikely that Naundroff is the son of Marie-Antoinette. PMID:9781047

  14. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  15. Chenier plain development: feedbacks between waves, mud and sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardin, W.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Cheniers are sandy ridges parallel to the coast established by high energy waves. Here we discuss Chenier plains ontogeny through dimensional analysis and numerical results from the morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. Our results show that wave energy and shelf slope play an important role in the formation of Chenier plains. In our numerical experiments waves affect Chenier plain development in three ways: by winnowing sediment from the mudflat, by eroding mud and accumulating sand over the beach during extreme wave events. We further show that different sediment characteristics and wave climates can lead to three alternative coastal landscapes: strand plains, mudflats, or the more complex Chenier plains. Low inner-shelf slopes are the most favorable for strand plain and Chenier plain formation, while high slopes decrease the likelihood of mudflat development and preservation.

  16. An Historic Overview of the Development of Fibre Metal Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeeren, C. A. J. R.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper a brief overview of the history of Fibre Metal Laminates Arall and Glare is given as background information for the other, technical articles in this journal. The story of the development of Fibre Metal Laminates is rather a unique story in the history of aircraft materials: A university laboratory invented, developed and certified an aircraft material. Many parties were involved naturally, yet the very heart of the activity was the Structures and Materials Laboratory of the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering of Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands. At the break of the world's largest passenger transport aircraft, the Airbus A380, in which a substantial part of the fuselage will be made of Glare, the glass fibre-aluminium version of Fibre Metal Laminates, it is a good moment to tell some of its history.

  17. New market, new challenge, new opportunity (1)--overview of China rural healthcare & design methodology.

    PubMed

    Jiehui, Jiang; Kandachar, Prabhu

    2008-01-01

    China has a largest population in the world (1.3Billion) and 0.9 Billion is rural population. Most of rural people earn less than US$3/day, and they are called 'Base of the economic pyramid (BoP)'. Compared with high level market, BoP is a new market, which means a low individual profit, but a large population. This paper discusses the healthcare issues in rural China (BoP) and study their healthcare needs through field study and case studies. This research is carried out within the framework of 'Design for Sustainability at Base-of-the-Pyramid (BoP)' programme of the School of Industrial Design Engineering at Delft University of Technology. And the aim of this research is to provide a low cost advanced healthcare product design, which will meet poor's needs and create a business case for commercial partners.

  18. Wind tunnel experiments to prove a hydraulic passive torque control concept for variable speed wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diepeveen, N. F. B.; Jarquin-Laguna, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the results are presented of experiments to prove an innovative concept for passive torque control of variable speed wind turbines using fluid power technology. It is demonstrated that by correctly configuring the hydraulic drive train, the wind turbine rotor operates at or near maximum aerodynamic efficiency for below rated wind speeds. The experiments with a small horizontal-axis wind turbine rotor, coupled to a hydraulic circuit, were conducted at the Open Jet Facility of the Delft University of Technology. In theory, the placement of a nozzle at the end of the hydraulic circuit causes the pressure and hence the rotor torque to increase quadratically with flow speed and hence rotation speed. The rotor torque is limited by a pressure relief valve. Results from the experiments proved the functionality of this passive speed control concept. By selecting the correct nozzle outlet area the rotor operates at or near the optimum tip speed ratio.

  19. Model scenerios of shoreline change at kaanapali beach, maui, hawaii: Seasonal and extreme events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vitousek, S.; Fletcher, C.H.; Merrifield, M.A.; Pawlak, G.; Storlazzi, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    Kaanapali beach is a well-defined littoral cell of carbonate sand extending 2 km south from Black Rock (a basalt headland) to Hanakao'o Point. The beach experiences dynamic seasonal shoreline change forced by longshore transport from two dominant swell regimes. In summer, south swells (Hs=1-2mT p=14-25s) drive sand to the north, while in winter, north swells (Hs=5-8mTp=14-20s) drive sand to the south where it accumulates on a submerged fossil reef. The Delft3D modeling system accurately predicts directly observed tidal currents and wave heights around West Maui, and is applied to simulate shoreline change. Morphologic simulations qualitatively resolve the observed seasonal behavior.

  20. Turning the Tide: Estuaries Shaped by Channel-Shoal Interactions, Eco-engineers and Inherited Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, M. G.; Braat, L.; Leuven, J.; Baar, A. W.; van der Vegt, M.; Van Maarseveen, M. C. G.; Markies, H.; Roosendaal, C.; van Eijk, A.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries exhibit correlations between inlet dimensions, tidal prism and intertidal area, but to what extent estuary planform shape and shoal patterns resulted from biomorphological processes or from inherited conditions such as coastal plain and drowned valley dimensions remains unclear. We explore the hypothesis that mud flats and vegetation as a self-formed lateral confinement have effects analogous to that of river floodplain on braided versus meandering river patterns. Here we use the Delft3D numerical model and a novel tidal flume setup, the Metronome, to create estuaries from idealized initial conditions, with and without mud supply at the fluvial boundary. Experimental mud was simulated by crushed nutshell. Both the numerical and experimental estuaries were narrower with increasing mud, and had a lower degree of channel braiding. The experimental estuaries developed meanders at the river boundary with floodplain developing on the pointbar whereas cohesionless cases were more dynamic.

  1. Methods for defect characterisation in thin film materials by depth-selective 2D-ACAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eijt, S. W. H.; Falub, C. V.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Mijnarends, P. E.

    2002-06-01

    The advent of intense positron beams makes it possible to perform depth-selective 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation) studies. The Delft POSH-ACAR setup employs a strong permanent magnet for focusing of the POSH beam on the sample, which leads to a ˜15% spread in implantation energy. The effects of this spread on positron depth-profiling data are discussed, and are shown to be consistent with Doppler experiments on Si(1 0 0) with a subsurface layer of nanocavities. A method is presented to decompose depth-selective 2D-ACAR spectra reliably into their various (layer) components. This is used to reveal strong positron trapping in the nanocavities in Si(1 0 0).

  2. [Use and reliability of the Delvo-P-test].

    PubMed

    Hässig, M

    2003-02-01

    The Delvo-P-test (Gist-brocades nr, Delft, The Netherlands) is based on biological detection of antibiotics in the milk. According to the procedure of the manufacture the test is suited for bulk milk processing factories. Problems arise when the test is used on milk samples of a single cow. Buffers, cells, bacteria, cell contents, and desinfection without using antibiotics may give false positive and false negative results. An error up to 44.8% was detected on single cow milk samples. The test is well suited for bulk milk, where the processing of milk follows a biological procedure as for cheese. The use on single cow milk samples to prove absence of antibiotics is not recommended.

  3. Federated Quality Control Procedure for CMIP5 / IPCC-AR5 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhause, M.; Höck, H.; Kurtz, M.; Lautenschlager, M.; Toussaint, F.

    2012-04-01

    The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) aims to advance the knowledge of climate change and climate variability. The results collected within the Climate Model Intercomparison Project No. 5 (CMIP5) are intended to underlie the coming fifth assessment report (IPCC-AR5). In comparison with the CMIP3 (IPCC-AR4) three main improvements have been implemented in the data infrastructure: Decentral data storage on local data nodes of the Earth System Grid (ESG, http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov/esgcet) and replication of the most important data (relevant for IPCC-AR5) among the three primary CMIP5 archive centers, PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison), BADC (British Atmospheric Data Centre), and WDCC (World Data Center for Climate) at DKRZ. Detailed descriptions of numerical climate models and the simulations using the CIM (Common Information Model) developed by METAFOR (http://metaforclimate.eu). Data curation was improved by introducing a versioning concept and a quality assessment process providing a uniform identification of datasets as well as a persistent identifier DOI (Digital Object Identifier) for data citation in scientific publications (http://cmip5qc.wdc-climate.de). The quality control (QC) concept was developed on the background of the existing federated data infrastructure of the ESG and the external metadata source. For this reason as well as for sharing the work load of the quality checks a federated / distributed quality control procedure was developed, consisting of: a QC repository for QC result and information storage and exchange within the QC process, a QC checker tool, and a QC service package to support QC repository storage, QC result analyses, QC information access for QC managers as well as for data users. For CMIP5 the quality control procedure consists of three quality levels. With increasing quality level the checks are performed more centralized: QC level 1 Separate technical QC checks on data (CMOR2, ESG conformance

  4. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells.

    PubMed

    Whisenant, Thomas C; Peralta, Eigen R; Aarreberg, Lauren D; Gao, Nina J; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R; Salomon, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as "central" interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, "peripheral" interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly of RNA

  5. PU IMMOBILIZATION - INDUCTION MELTING ND OFFGAS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2006-11-28

    The Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) has been operated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support the Pu Disposition Conceptual Design (CD-0) development effort. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities. In addition, this report describes several initial tests of the CIM for the vitrification of LaBS Frit X with HfO{sub 2}. The activities required to produce Frit X from batch chemical oxides for subsequent milling to yield glass frit of nominally 20 micron particle size are also discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Based on a material balance, approximately 83% of F fed was retained in the glass at about 0.09 wt % (F could not be measured directly at this concentration). Transition metals (Ni, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr) were also volatilized to varying extents. A very small amount (<0.1 g) of nickel compounds and KCl were found in crystals deposited on the melter offgas line. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {micro}m filter. The particulate evolution rate ranged from 2-8 g/kg glass/h. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {micro}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {micro}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. Further runs without washable salts are recommended. Measurements of particle size distribution for use in

  6. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aarreberg, Lauren D.; Gao, Nina J.; Head, Steven R.; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as “central” interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, “peripheral” interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly

  7. High-Resolution Analysis of Atmospheric Mass Spectra: Identification, Resolution, Assignment of complex mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Thompson, S.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Kimmel, J.; Cubison, M.; Day, D. A.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Chhabra, P. S.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The troposphere can contain thousands of organic molecules with widely varying carbon numbers and levels of oxidation. Unraveling this complex molecular mixture gives new insights into key processes such as atmospheric processing, secondary aerosol formation, radiative properties as well as implications for human health. High-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HRToF-CIMS) is a powerful technique with the potential to provide many insights into this complex mix of molecules. We have developed new data analysis techniques to identify the most likely ions present in complex mass spectra in which individual peaks strongly overlap. New ancillary algorithms will also be presented to first develop a list of all possible formulas for this particular ion chemistry and then to automatically assign possible ions to the likely peak positions. Spectral simulation experiments confirm that bulk elemental properties such as oxidation state and carbon number can be reliably extracted from this method. Comparison of results from a CIMS operated during the 2011 BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign in the Colorado Rocky Mountains to electrospray-ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry data from compounds measured in another forest in the Rockies allows a comparison of the compounds and compound classes measured by both techniques. We will also address the problem of quantifying ion signals from the organic molecule mix encountered in this study by a new method to calculate approximate sensitivities for acetate ionization chemistry to help quantifying concentrations of atmospheric compounds. We applied the above methods to a dataset from the micro-orifice volatilization impactor (MOVI)-CIMS collected during August 2011 as part of the BEACHON campaign. Calculated atmospheric bulk elemental parameters such as diurnal cycles of carbon number and oxidation state from both gas phase and aerosols from a pine forest environment will be presented and compared to data from

  8. Persistent disparities in stratospheric water vapor measurements drive large uncertainties in the radiative forcing by lower stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, D. F.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Portmann, R. W.; Voemel, H.; Schiller, C.; Smith, J. B.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Lower stratospheric water vapor is a powerful attenuator of outgoing long wave radiation, hence its strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. The radiative forcing by lower stratospheric water vapor is, however, quite uncertain because of significant disparities in lower stratospheric water vapor measurements by different instruments. Specifically, measurement discrepancies of 0.5 to 2 ppmv H2O (15 to 60%) between several well-established aircraft- and balloon-borne instruments have now persisted for almost two decades. The Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) in April 2011 provided not only a fresh opportunity to reexamine and reevaluate these persistent measurement discrepancies, but also to compare water vapor measurements by additional aircraft-based instrumentation. Here we compare the in situ measurements of lower stratospheric water vapor by five different instruments during MACPEX. Three of these instruments (Harvard water, FISH, and NOAA CIMS) were aboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft, while two (CFH and NOAA FPH) were launched on balloons. Substantial efforts were made to coordinate aircraft and balloon measurements in space and time, such that the aircraft would reach maximum altitude en route to the balloon rendezvous point, then both aircraft and balloon would descend together. Lower stratospheric water vapor measurements during MACPEX generally fall into two groups: CFH, NOAA FPH and FISH are in good agreement, while Harvard water and NOAA CIMS agree with each other but are significantly different than the other group. Differences between the two groups range from 0.5 to 1.0 ppmv (15 to 30%), with Harvard and NOAA CIMS mixing ratios consistently higher. Though these differences seem relatively large, they are smaller than some previously observed differences between the FPH/CFH and Harvard water. For example, Harvard stratospheric water vapor measurements during the 1993 CEPEX and 2006 CR-AVE campaigns were 1.5 and 2 ppmv

  9. Measurements of HNO3 and N2O5 using ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometry during the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Fortner, E. C.; Volkamer, R. M.; Molina, L.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gaeggeler, K.; Dommen, J.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Tie, X.

    2008-11-01

    An ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS) was deployed in Mexico City between 7 and 31 March to measure gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5 during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA)-2006 field campaign. The observation site was located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo in the northern part of Mexico City urban area with major emissions of pollutants from residential, vehicular and industrial sources. Diurnally, HNO3 was less than 200 parts per trillion (ppt) during the night and early morning. The concentration of HNO3 increased steadily from around 09:00 a.m. central standard time (CST), reached a peak value of 0.5 to 3 parts per billion (ppb) in the early afternoon, and then declined sharply to less than half of the peak value near 05:00 p.m. CST. An inter-comparison between the ID-CIMS and an ion chromatograph/mass spectrometer (ICMS) showed a good agreement between the two HNO3 measurements (R2=0.75). The HNO3 mixing ratio was found to anti-correlate with submicron-sized aerosol nitrate, suggesting that the gas-particle partitioning process was a major factor in determining the gaseous HNO3 concentration. Losses by irreversible reactions with mineral dust and via dry deposition also could be important at this site. Most of the times during the MCMA 2006 field campaign, N2O5 was found to be below the detection limit (about 30 ppt for a 10 s integration time) of the ID-CIMS, because of high NO mixing ratio at the surface (>100 ppb) during the night. An exception occurred on 26 March 2006, when about 40 ppt N2O5 was observed during the late afternoon and early evening hours under cloudy conditions before the build-up of NO at the surface site. The results revealed that during the MCMA-2006 field campaign HNO3 was primarily produced from the reaction of OH with NO2 and regulated by gas/particle transfer and dry deposition. The production of HNO3 from N2O5 hydrolysis during the nighttime was small because of

  10. Measurements of HNO3 and N2O5 using Ion drift - Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry during the MCMA - 2006 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Fortner, E. C.; Molina, L.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gäggeler, K.; Dommen, J.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Tie, X.

    2008-03-01

    An ion drift - chemical ionization mass spectrometry (ID-CIMS) was deployed in Mexico City between 5 and 31 March to measure HNO3 and N2O5 during the 2006 Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) field campaign. The observation site, T0, was located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo at the center of the Mexico City Basin with major emissions of pollutants from both domestic and industrial sources. Diurnally, HNO3 was less than 200 parts per trillion (ppt) during the night and in the early morning, increased steadily from around 09:00 a.m. central standard time (CST), reached a peak value of 0.5 to 3 parts per billion (ppb) in the early afternoon, and declined sharply to less than half of the peak value near 05:00 p.m. CST. An inter-comparison between the ID-CIMS and an ion chromatograph/mass spectrometer (ICMS) showed a good correlation in the HNO3 measurements (R2=0.75). The HNO3 mixing ratio was found to anti-correlate with aerosol nitrate, suggesting that the gaseous HNO3 concentration was controlled by the gas-particle partitioning process. During most times of the MCMA 2006 field campaign, N2O5 was found to be under the detection limit (about 20 ppt for a 10 s integration time) of the ID-CIMS, because of high NO mixing ratio (>100 ppb) during the night. With one exception on 26 March 2006, about 40 ppt N2O5 was observed during the late afternoon and early evening hours under a cloudy condition, before NO built up at the surface site. The results revealed that during the 2006 MCMA field campaign HNO3 was primarily produced by the reaction of OH with NO2 and regulated by gas/particle partitioning, and HNO3 production from N2O5 hydrolysis during the nighttime was small because of high NO and low O3 concentrations near the surface.

  11. Effect of mineral and organic fertilization on grey water footprint in a fertirrigated crop under semiarid conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos Serrano, María Teresa; Requejo Mariscal, María Isabel; Cartagena Causapé, María Carmen; Arce Martínez, Augusto; Ribas Elcorobarrutia, Francisco; Jesús Cabello Cabello, María; María Tarquis Alfonso, Ana

    2016-04-01

    The concept of "water footprint" (WF) was introduced as an indicator for the total volume of direct and indirect freshwater used, consumed and/or polluted [1]. The WF distinguishes between blue water (volume of surface and groundwater consumed), green water (rain-water consumed), and grey water (volume of freshwater that is required to assimilate the load of pollutants based on existing ambient water quality standards). In semiarid scenarios with low water quality, where the irrigation is necessary to maintain production, green WF is zero because the effective rainfall is negligible. As well as blue WF includes: i) extra consumption or irrigation water that the farmer has to apply to compensate the fail of uniformity on discharge of drips, ii) percolation out of control or salts leaching, which depends on the salt tolerance of the crop, soil and quality of irrigation water, to ensure the fruit yield. The major concern is grey WF, because the irrigation and nitrogen dose have to be adjusted to the crop needs in order to minimize nitrate pollution. This study is focused in assessment mineral and organic fertilization on grey WF in a fertirrigated melon crop under semiarid conditions, which is principally cultivated in the centre of Spain declared vulnerable zone to nitrate pollution by applying the Directive 91/676/CEE. During successive years, a melon crop (Cucumis melo L.) was grown under field conditions. Different doses of ammonium nitrate were used as well as compost derived from the wine-distillery industry which is relevant in this area. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA04-111-C3 and INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03. Keywords: Water footprint, nitrogen, fertirrigation, inorganic fertilizers, organic amendments, semiarid conditions. [1] Hoekstra, A.Y. 2003. Virtual water trade. Proceedings of the International Expert Meeting on Virtual Water Trade, Delft, The Netherlands, 12-13 December 2002. Value of Water Research Report Series No. 12

  12. Deimos Methane-Oxygen Rocket Engine Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, S.; Souverein, L. J.; Twigt, D. J.

    This paper presents the results of the first DEIMOS Liquid Methane/Oxygen rocket engine test campaign. DEIMOS is an acronym for `Delft Experimental Methane Oxygen propulsion System'. It is a project performed by students under the auspices of DARE (Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering). The engine provides a theoretical design thrust of 1800 N and specific impulse of 287 s at a chamber pressure of 40 bar with a total mass flow of 637 g/s. It has links to sustainable development, as the propellants used are one of the most promising so-called `green propellants'-combinations, currently under scrutiny by the industry, and the engine is designed to be reusable. This paper reports results from the provisional tests, which had the aim of verifying the engine's ability to fire, and confirming some of the design assumptions to give confidence for further engine designs. Measurements before and after the tests are used to determine first estimates on feed pressures, propellant mass flows and achieved thrust. These results were rather disappointing from a performance point of view, with an average thrust of a mere 3.8% of the design thrust, but nonetheless were very helpful. The reliability of ignition and stability of combustion are discussed as well. An initial assessment as to the reusability, the flexibility and the adaptability of the engine was made. The data provides insight into (methane/oxygen) engine designs, leading to new ideas for a subsequent design. The ultimate goal of this project is to have an operational rocket and to attempt to set an amateur altitude record.

  13. Application of water footprint in a fertirrigated melon crop under semiarid conditions: A review.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos Serrano, María Teresa; Requejo Mariscal, María Isabel; Villena Gordo, Raquel; Cartagena Causapé, María Carmen; Arce Martínez, Augusto; Ribas Elcorobarrutia, Francisco; Jesús Cabello Cabello, María; María Tarquis Alfonso, Ana

    2015-04-01

    In recent times, there has been a major increase in the use of water and fertilizers in order to increase agricultural production, while at the same time there has increased evidence that aquifers are reducing their water level, enriched by nutrient and degraded as a result of pollution. So best management practices are needed for much of cropped, irrigated and fertirrigated land, to avoid contamination of fresh water and groundwater. The concept of "water footprint" (WF) was introduced as an indicator for the total volume of direct and indirect freshwater used, consumed and/or polluted [1]. The WF distinguishes between blue water (volume of surface and groundwater consumed), green water (rain-water consumed), and grey water (volume of freshwater that is required to assimilate the load of pollutants based on existing ambient water quality standards). This study is focused in calculating the crops WF using a real case of study in a fertirrigated melon crop under semiarid conditions which is principally cultivated in the centre of Spain declared vulnerable zone to nitrate pollution by applying the Directive 91/676/CEE. During successive years, a melon crop (Cucumis melo L.) was grown under field conditions applying mineral and organic fertilizers. Different doses of ammonium nitrate were used as well as compost derived from the wine-distillery industry which is relevant in this area. This application help us to review the different concepts in which is based WF. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA04-111-C3 and INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01. Keywords: Water footprint, nitrogen, fertirrigation, inorganic fertilizers, organic amendments, winery waste, semiarid conditions. [1] Hoekstra, A.Y. 2003. Virtual water trade. Proceedings of the International Expert Meeting on Virtual Water Trade, Delft, The Netherlands, 12-13 December 2002. Value of Water Research Report Series No. 12, UNESCO-IHE, Delft, The Netherlands.

  14. Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter Estimation For Nearshore Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardani, S.; Kaihatu, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models represent deterministic approaches used for the relevant physical processes in the nearshore. Complexity of the physics of the model and uncertainty involved in the model inputs compel us to apply a stochastic approach to analyze the robustness of the model. The Bayesian inverse problem is one powerful way to estimate the important input model parameters (determined by apriori sensitivity analysis) and can be used for uncertainty analysis of the outputs. Bayesian techniques can be used to find the range of most probable parameters based on the probability of the observed data and the residual errors. In this study, the effect of input data involving lateral (Neumann) boundary conditions, bathymetry and off-shore wave conditions on nearshore numerical models are considered. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to a deterministic numerical model (the Delft3D modeling suite for coupled waves and flow) for the resulting uncertainty analysis of the outputs (wave height, flow velocity, mean sea level and etc.). Uncertainty analysis of outputs is performed by random sampling from the input probability distribution functions and running the model as required until convergence to the consistent results is achieved. The case study used in this analysis is the Duck94 experiment, which was conducted at the U.S. Army Field Research Facility at Duck, North Carolina, USA in the fall of 1994. The joint probability of model parameters relevant for the Duck94 experiments will be found using the Bayesian approach. We will further show that, by using Bayesian techniques to estimate the optimized model parameters as inputs and applying them for uncertainty analysis, we can obtain more consistent results than using the prior information for input data which means that the variation of the uncertain parameter will be decreased and the probability of the observed data will improve as well. Keywords: Monte Carlo Simulation, Delft3D, uncertainty analysis, Bayesian techniques

  15. Feedbacks Between Wave Energy And Declining Coral Reef Structure: Implications For Coastal Morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, A. E.; Jenkins, C. J.; Moore, L. J.; Potts, D. C.; Burgess, P. M.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Elias, E.; Reidenbach, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The incident wave energy dissipated by the structural complexity and bottom roughness of coral reef ecosystems, and the carbonate sediment produced by framework-building corals, provide natural shoreline protection and nourishment, respectively. Globally, coral reef ecosystems are in decline as a result of ocean warming and acidification, which is exacerbated by chronic regional stressors such as pollution and disease. As a consequence of declining reef health, many reef ecosystems are experiencing reduced coral cover and shifts to dominance by macroalgae, resulting in a loss of rugosity and thus hydrodynamic roughness. As coral reef architecture is compromised and carbonate skeletons are eroded, wave energy dissipation and sediment transport patterns--along with the carbonate sediment budget of the coastal environment--may be altered. Using a Delft3D numerical model of the south-central Molokai, Hawaii, fringing reef, we simulate the effects of changing reef states on wave energy and sediment transport. To determine the temporally-varying effects of biotic and abiotic stressors such as storms and bleaching on the reef structure and carbonate production, we couple Delft3D with CarboLOT, a model that simulates growth and competition of carbonate-producing organisms. CarboLOT is driven by the Lotka-Volterra population ecology equations and niche suitability principles, and accesses the CarboKB database for region-specific, carbonate-producing species information on growth rates, reproduction patterns, habitat suitability, as well as organism geometries. Simulations assess how changing reef states--which alter carbonate sediment production and reef morphology and thus hydrodynamic roughness--impact wave attenuation and sediment transport gradients along reef-fronted beaches. Initial results suggest that along fringing reefs having characteristics similar to the Molokai fringing reef, projected sea level rise will likely outpace coral reef accretion, and the increased

  16. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event‐scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river

    PubMed Central

    Measures, R.; Hicks, D. M.; Brasington, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics‐based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth‐averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high‐flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high‐resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach‐scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers.

  17. The effect of tidal exchange on residence time in a coastal embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynne, Patrick; Reniers, Ad; van de Kreeke, Jacobus; MacMahan, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of an idealized lagoon that is connected to the ocean via a tidal inlet show that the mean residence time is inversely proportional to tidal exchange. In the Delft3D model the tidal exchange is controlled by varying the inlet length, width and depth. These changes in the inlet geometry affect the tidal prism and the ebb/flood flow structure, which are shown to control the exchange of lagoon water with seawater. To map residence time within the lagoon, a new method that implements dye tracer is developed and shows that the tidally averaged residence time exhibits significant spatial variability. For inlet systems in which, as a first approximation, the lagoon can be described by a uniformly fluctuating water level, a simple transport model is developed to elucidate the specific processes that control tidal exchange and their effect on residence time. In this transport model tidal exchange is decomposed into two fractions, an ocean exchange fraction and a lagoon exchange fraction. It is shown that both fractions need to be included to better describe tidal exchange. Specifically, inclusion of a lagoon exchange fraction improves previous tidal prism models that assume complete mixing in the lagoon. The assumption of complete mixing results in an under-prediction of residence time. Relating the spatially averaged residence time results to the exchange fractions for each inlet geometry show that the residence time is inversely proportional to the product of the tidal exchange fractions. For these single inlet systems, Keulegan's 0-D hydrodynamic model shows good agreement with Delft3D in predicting the tidal prism, maximum flow velocity, and exchange fractions. With these parameters, estimates of the mean residence time can be reached through a relationship derived from the simple transport model.

  18. Development of the Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) for predicting the impact of storms on high-energy, active-margin coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick; Maarten van Ormondt,; Erikson, Li H.; Jodi Eshleman,; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Peter Ruggiero,; Peter Adams,; Foxgrover, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) applies a predominantly deterministic framework to make detailed predictions (meter scale) of storm-induced coastal flooding, erosion, and cliff failures over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers). CoSMoS was developed for hindcast studies, operational applications (i.e., nowcasts and multiday forecasts), and future climate scenarios (i.e., sea-level rise + storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm hazards information that may be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. The prototype system, developed for the California coast, uses the global WAVEWATCH III wave model, the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimetry-based global tide model, and atmospheric-forcing data from either the US National Weather Service (operational mode) or Global Climate Models (future climate mode), to determine regional wave and water-level boundary conditions. These physical processes are dynamically downscaled using a series of nested Delft3D-WAVE (SWAN) and Delft3D-FLOW (FLOW) models and linked at the coast to tightly spaced XBeach (eXtreme Beach) cross-shore profile models and a Bayesian probabilistic cliff failure model. Hindcast testing demonstrates that, despite uncertainties in preexisting beach morphology over the ~500 km alongshore extent of the pilot study area, CoSMoS effectively identifies discrete sections of the coast (100s of meters) that are vulnerable to coastal hazards under a range of current and future oceanographic forcing conditions, and is therefore an effective tool for operational and future climate scenario planning.

  19. High resolution rainfall measurements around a high rise building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Stijn; van de Giesen, Nick; Hut, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    A number of disdrometers (acoustic rain gauge) has been placed around a high rise building on a place where variation in spatial distribution of precipitation is expected, to show the advantage of high resolution rainfall measurements in a urban area. The standard recommendation for the placement of a rain gauge is that the gauge is positioned at a distance corresponding to two to four times the height of any nearby obstruction to obtain a measurement that is representative for the surrounding area. In an urban area it is almost impossible to find a location that suits this recommendation. Rain measurements in urban area with a high spatial resolution are desired, to obtain a better understanding of urban hydrology, but costs may be prohibitive. A low cost disdrometer has been developed to make it affordable to perform rain measurements with a very high spatial and temporal resolution. The disdrometer is tested around a high rise building on the Delft University of Technology campus. The faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science (EWI) on the campus of Delft University of Technology consists of a high rise building of 90 meters and a low rise building of 15 meters. Sensors are placed on the low rise building to measure the impact of the high rise building on the spatial distribution of precipitation. In addition to the disdrometer, two other methods are used to measure precipitation differences around the high rise building. Tipping bucket rain gauges have been placed on two elevator shaft housings on the low rise building, of which one is situated in the shadow of the high rise building. Simultaneously, runoff from the elevator shafts is measured. A comparison of the different methods will be presented.

  20. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event‐scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river

    PubMed Central

    Measures, R.; Hicks, D. M.; Brasington, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics‐based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth‐averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high‐flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high‐resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach‐scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers. PMID:27708477

  1. Wave-driven tidal inlet migration: mechanics and effects on barrier morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, J.; Ashton, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Littoral sediment transport on barrier island coasts can cause tidal inlets to migrate alongshore up to hundreds of meters per year and pose significant hazards and challenges to coastal communities, infrastructure, and ecosystems. Surprisingly little is known about either the mechanisms or the expected rates of tidal inlet migration. Here we propose and test a simple framework of inlet migration that allows us to investigate the movement of sediment around tidal inlets and predict the corresponding migration rates. We test this framework using a combination of observed migration rates and idealized inlet simulations from the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. In the Delft3D experiments, the tidal inlets quickly reach a dynamic state where the inlet cross-sectional area, the tidal prism and the migration rate, all of which are emergent characteristics of the experiment, remain constant through time. Tracking the sources of sediments deposited around the tidal inlet, we find that the eroded downdrift barrier is a significant source of sediment to both the flood tidal delta and the newly constructed barrier updrift of the inlet. The alongshore sediment bypassing volumes and pathways affecting inlet migration depend strongly on wave and tidal conditions. Furthermore, we find that migrating flood tidal deltas can act as a net sink of up to 80% of the littoral sediment flux. This sink reduces alongshore sediment bypassing of tidal inlets and thins the barrier downdrift. These modeled tidal inlets can therefore act as a migrating "buzzsaw" across barrier coasts that leave a zone of flood tidal delta deposits in their wake, an efficacious sediment mover that contributes significantly to the long-term landward migration of barrier islands with or without sea level rise.

  2. Advanced Water Quality Modelling in Marine Systems: Application to the Wadden Sea, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, J.; Smits, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    There is an increasing demand for knowledge and models that arise from water management in relation to water quality, sediment quality (ecology) and sediment accumulation (ecomorphology). Recently, models for sediment diagenesis and erosion developed or incorporated by Delft Hydraulics integrates the relevant physical, (bio)chemical and biological processes for the sediment-water exchange of substances. The aim of the diagenesis models is the prediction of both sediment quality and the return fluxes of substances such as nutrients and micropollutants to the overlying water. The resulting so-called DELWAQ-G model is a new, generic version of the water and sediment quality model of the DELFT3D framework. One set of generic water quality process formulations is used to calculate process rates in both water and sediment compartments. DELWAQ-G involves the explicit simulation of sediment layers in the water quality model with state-of-the-art process kinetics. The local conditions in a water layer or sediment layer such as the dissolved oxygen concentration determine if and how individual processes come to expression. New processes were added for sulphate, sulphide, methane and the distribution of the electron-acceptor demand over dissolved oxygen, nitrate, sulphate and carbon dioxide. DELWAQ-G also includes the dispersive and advective transport processes in the sediment and across the sediment-water interface. DELWAQ-G has been applied for the Wadden Sea. A very dynamic tidal and ecologically active estuary with a complex hydrodynamic behaviour located at the north of the Netherlands. The predicted profiles in the sediment reflect the typical interactions of diagenesis processes.

  3. Comparison between physical variables acquired by a new multiparametric platform, ELFO, and data calculated by a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model in different weather conditions at Tiber River mouth (Latium coast, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonamano, Simone; Piermattei, Viviana; Marcelli, Marco; Peviani, Maximo

    2010-05-01

    The coastal ecosystem is characterized by high variability physical processes, which are strongly influenced by sudden changes in weather conditions. For this reason instruments able to collect data in a short time or mathematical models able to simulate the same phenomena from experimental data are basic. In this study in situ data are compared with data calculated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The multiparametric platform was developed ad hoc by Laboratory of Experimental Oceanology and Marine Ecology (DECOS, Tuscia University) for coastal monitoring by small vessels (ELFO), and integrates temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and suspended solids measures with bio-optical measures like fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and PAR. The hydrodynamic model is the three-dimensional coastal hydrodynamic DELFT3D-FLOW simulating processes of temperature and salinity diffusion and the transport of suspended sediment (cohesive and non cohesive) in the water column. This study analyses the area at mouth of Tiber river investigated by two surveys wiht different weather conditions. Data collected during the first survey were used to calibrate the DELFT3D-FLOW model which computational domain extends from the Argentario headland to Capo Anzio. A microscale wind field (resolution of about 7 km), provided by the atmospheric model COSMO-ME (developed by CNMCA of Aeronautica Militare, Italy), was used to reproduce the hydrodynamic field and the distribution of the physical variables of the whole period. In this way the data calculated by the model can be compared with those collected in situ during the second survey. Moreover dynamic phenomena existed between the two monitoring periods can be investigated.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging of the brainstem in children with achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    BOSEMANI, THANGAMADHAN; ORMAN, GUNES; CARSON, KATHRYN A; MEODED, AVNER; HUISMAN, THIERRY A G M; PORETTI, ANDREA

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aims of this study were to compare, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brainstem, microstructural integrity of the white matter in children with achondroplasia and age-matched participants and to correlate the severity of craniocervical junction (CCJ) narrowing and neurological findings with DTI scalars in children with achondroplasia. This study also aimed to assess the potential role of fibroblast growth factor receptor type 3 on white matter microstructure. Method Diffusion tensor imaging was performed using a 1.5T magnetic resonance scanner and balanced pairs of diffusion gradients along 20 non-collinear directions. Measurements were obtained from regions of interest, sampled in each pontine corticospinal tract (CST), medial lemniscus, and middle cerebellar peduncle, as well as in the lower brainstem and centrum semiovale, for fractional anisotropy and for mean, axial and radial diffusivity. In addition, a severity score for achondroplasia was assessed by measuring CCJ narrowing. Result Eight patients with achondroplasia (seven males, one female; mean age 5y 6mo, range 1y 1mo–15y 1mo) and eight age- and sex-matched comparison participants (mean age 5y 2mo, range 1y 1mo–14y 11mo) were included in this study. Fractional anisotropy was lower and mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were higher in the lower brainstem of patients with achondroplasia than in age-matched comparison participants. The CST and middle cerebellar peduncle of the participants showed increases in mean, axial, and radial diffusivity. Fractional anisotropy in the lower brainstem was negatively correlated with the degree of CCJ narrowing. No differences in the DTI metrics of the centrum semiovale were observed between the two groups. Interpretation The reduction in fractional anisotropy and increase in diffusivities in the lower brainstem of participants with achondroplasia may reflect secondary encephalomalacic degeneration and cavitation of the affected white matter

  5. Postcranial skeletal pneumaticity: a case study in the use of quantitative microCT to assess vertebral structure in birds.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, R J; Hernandez, E; O'Connor, P M

    2007-07-01

    Limb elements in birds have been characterized as exhibiting a reduction in trabecular bone, thinner cortices and decreased bending strength when pneumatized, yet it is unclear if these characteristics generalize to the axial skeleton. Thin section techniques, the traditional gold standard for bone structure studies, have most commonly been applied to the study of avian bone. This destructive technique, however, makes it subsequently impossible to use the same samples in experimental testing systems that allow researchers to correlate structure with the mechanical properties of the bone. Micro-computed tomography (microCT), a non-destructive X-ray imaging technique, can be used to assess the effect of pneumatization on vertebral cortical and trabecular bone through virtual extraction and structural quantification of each tissue type. We conducted a preliminary investigation of the application of microCT methods to the study of cortical and trabecular bone structure in a small sample of pneumatic and apneumatic thoracic vertebrae. The sample consisted of two similar-sized anatids, Aix sponsa (n = 7) and Oxyura jamaicensis (n = 5). Volumes of interest were created that contoured (outlined) the boundaries of the ventral cortical bone shell, the trabecular compartment and the whole centrum (cortical bone + trabecular bone), and allowed independent structural analysis of each volume of interest. Results indicated that bone volume fraction of the whole centrum was significantly higher in the apneumatic O. jamaicensis than in the pneumatized A. sponsa (A. sponsa = 36%, O. jamaicensis = 48%, P < 0.05). In contrast, trabecular bone volume fraction was similar between the two species. The ventral cortical bone shell was approximately 23% thinner (P < 0.05) in A. sponsa (0.133 mm) compared with apneumatic O. jamaicensis (0.172 mm). This case study demonstrates that microCT is a powerful non-destructive imaging technique that may be applied to the three-dimensional study of

  6. Postcranial skeletal pneumaticity: a case study in the use of quantitative microCT to assess vertebral structure in birds

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, R J; Hernandez, E; O’Connor, P M

    2007-01-01

    Limb elements in birds have been characterized as exhibiting a reduction in trabecular bone, thinner cortices and decreased bending strength when pneumatized, yet it is unclear if these characteristics generalize to the axial skeleton. Thin section techniques, the traditional gold standard for bone structure studies, have most commonly been applied to the study of avian bone. This destructive technique, however, makes it subsequently impossible to use the same samples in experimental testing systems that allow researchers to correlate structure with the mechanical properties of the bone. Micro-computed tomography (µCT), a non-destructive X-ray imaging technique, can be used to assess the effect of pneumatization on vertebral cortical and trabecular bone through virtual extraction and structural quantification of each tissue type. We conducted a preliminary investigation of the application of µCT methods to the study of cortical and trabecular bone structure in a small sample of pneumatic and apneumatic thoracic vertebrae. The sample consisted of two similar-sized anatids, Aix sponsa (n = 7) and Oxyura jamaicensis (n = 5). Volumes of interest were created that contoured (outlined) the boundaries of the ventral cortical bone shell, the trabecular compartment and the whole centrum (cortical bone + trabecular bone), and allowed independent structural analysis of each volume of interest. Results indicated that bone volume fraction of the whole centrum was significantly higher in the apneumatic O. jamaicensis than in the pneumatized A. sponsa (A. sponsa = 36%, O. jamaicensis = 48%, P < 0.05). In contrast, trabecular bone volume fraction was similar between the two species. The ventral cortical bone shell was approximately 23% thinner (P < 0.05) in A. sponsa (0.133 mm) compared with apneumatic O. jamaicensis (0.172 mm). This case study demonstrates that µCT is a powerful non-destructive imaging technique that may be applied to the three-dimensional study of avian bone

  7. Creatine, Glutamine plus Glutamate, and Macromolecules Are Decreased in the Central White Matter of Premature Neonates around Term.

    PubMed

    Koob, Meriam; Viola, Angèle; Le Fur, Yann; Viout, Patrick; Ratiney, Hélène; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Cozzone, Patrick J; Girard, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth represents a high risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities when associated with white-matter damage. Recent studies have reported cognitive deficits in children born preterm without brain injury on MRI at term-equivalent age. Understanding the microstructural and metabolic underpinnings of these deficits is essential for their early detection. Here, we used diffusion-weighted imaging and single-voxel 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to compare brain maturation at term-equivalent age in premature neonates with no evidence of white matter injury on conventional MRI except diffuse excessive high-signal intensity, and normal term neonates. Thirty-two infants, 16 term neonates (mean post-conceptional age at scan: 39.8±1 weeks) and 16 premature neonates (mean gestational age at birth: 29.1±2 weeks, mean post-conceptional age at scan: 39.2±1 weeks) were investigated. The MRI/MRS protocol performed at 1.5T involved diffusion-weighted MRI and localized 1H-MRS with the Point RESolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Preterm neonates showed significantly higher ADC values in the temporal white matter (P<0.05), the occipital white matter (P<0.005) and the thalamus (P<0.05). The proton spectrum of the centrum semiovale was characterized by significantly lower taurine/H2O and macromolecules/H2O ratios (P<0.05) at a TE of 30 ms, and reduced (creatine+phosphocreatine)/H2O and (glutamine+glutamate)/H2O ratios (P<0.05) at a TE of 135 ms in the preterm neonates than in full-term neonates. Our findings indicate that premature neonates with normal conventional MRI present a delay in brain maturation affecting the white matter and the thalamus. Their brain metabolic profile is characterized by lower levels of creatine, glutamine plus glutamate, and macromolecules in the centrum semiovale, a finding suggesting altered energy metabolism and protein synthesis. PMID:27547969

  8. Creatine, Glutamine plus Glutamate, and Macromolecules Are Decreased in the Central White Matter of Premature Neonates around Term

    PubMed Central

    Le Fur, Yann; Viout, Patrick; Ratiney, Hélène; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Girard, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth represents a high risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities when associated with white-matter damage. Recent studies have reported cognitive deficits in children born preterm without brain injury on MRI at term-equivalent age. Understanding the microstructural and metabolic underpinnings of these deficits is essential for their early detection. Here, we used diffusion-weighted imaging and single-voxel 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to compare brain maturation at term-equivalent age in premature neonates with no evidence of white matter injury on conventional MRI except diffuse excessive high-signal intensity, and normal term neonates. Thirty-two infants, 16 term neonates (mean post-conceptional age at scan: 39.8±1 weeks) and 16 premature neonates (mean gestational age at birth: 29.1±2 weeks, mean post-conceptional age at scan: 39.2±1 weeks) were investigated. The MRI/MRS protocol performed at 1.5T involved diffusion-weighted MRI and localized 1H-MRS with the Point RESolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Preterm neonates showed significantly higher ADC values in the temporal white matter (P<0.05), the occipital white matter (P<0.005) and the thalamus (P<0.05). The proton spectrum of the centrum semiovale was characterized by significantly lower taurine/H2O and macromolecules/H2O ratios (P<0.05) at a TE of 30 ms, and reduced (creatine+phosphocreatine)/H2O and (glutamine+glutamate)/H2O ratios (P<0.05) at a TE of 135 ms in the preterm neonates than in full-term neonates. Our findings indicate that premature neonates with normal conventional MRI present a delay in brain maturation affecting the white matter and the thalamus. Their brain metabolic profile is characterized by lower levels of creatine, glutamine plus glutamate, and macromolecules in the centrum semiovale, a finding suggesting altered energy metabolism and protein synthesis. PMID:27547969

  9. [AERA. Dream machines and computing practices at the Mathematical Center].

    PubMed

    Alberts, Gerard; De Beer, Huub T

    2008-01-01

    Dream machines may be just as effective as the ones materialised. Their symbolic thrust can be quite powerful. The Amsterdam 'Mathematisch Centrum' (Mathematical Center), founded February 11, 1946, created a Computing Department in an effort to realise its goal of serving society. When Aad van Wijngaarden was appointed as head of the Computing Department, however, he claimed space for scientific research and computer construction, next to computing as a service. Still, the computing service following the five stage style of Hartree's numerical analysis remained a dominant characteristic of the work of the Computing Department. The high level of ambition held by Aad van Wijngaarden lead to ever renewed projections of big automatic computers, symbolised by the never-built AERA. Even a machine that was actually constructed, the ARRA which followed A.D. Booth's design of the ARC, never made it into real operation. It did serve Van Wijngaarden to bluff his way into the computer age by midsummer 1952. Not until January 1954 did the computing department have a working stored program computer, which for reasons of policy went under the same name: ARRA. After just one other machine, the ARMAC, had been produced, a separate company, Electrologica, was set up for the manufacture of computers, which produced the rather successful X1 computer. The combination of ambition and absence of a working machine lead to a high level of work on programming, way beyond the usual ideas of libraries of subroutines. Edsger W. Dijkstra in particular led the way to an emphasis on the duties of the programmer within the pattern of numerical analysis. Programs generating programs, known elsewhere as autocoding systems, were at the 'Mathematisch Centrum' called 'superprograms'. Practical examples were usually called a 'complex', in Dutch, where in English one might say 'system'. Historically, this is where software begins. Dekker's matrix complex, Dijkstra's interrupt system, Dijkstra and

  10. Healthcare, molecular tools and applied genome research.

    PubMed

    Groves, M

    2000-11-01

    Biotechnology 2000 offered a rare opportunity for scientists from academia and industry to present and discuss data in fields as diverse as environmental biotechnology and applied genome research. The healthcare section of the meeting encompassed a number of gene therapy delivery systems that are successfully treating genetic disorders. Beta-thalassemia is being corrected in mice by continous erythropoeitin delivery from engineered muscles cells, and from naked DNA electrotransfer into muscles, as described by Dr JM Heard (Institut Pasteur, Paris, France). Dr Reszka (Max-Delbrueck-Centrum fuer Molekulare Medizin, Berlin, Germany), meanwhile, described a treatment for liver metastasis in the form of a drug carrier emolization system, DCES (Max-Delbrueck-Centrum fuer Molekulare Medizin), composed of surface modified liposomes and a substance for chemo-occlusion, which drastically reduces the blood supply to the tumor and promotes apoptosis, necrosis and antiangiogenesis. In the molecular tools section, Willem Stemmer (Maxygen Inc, Redwood City, CA, USA) gave an insight into the importance that techniques, such as molecular breeding (DNA shuffling), have in the evolution of molecules with improved function, over a range of fields including pharmaceuticals, vaccines, agriculture and chemicals. Technologies, such as ribosome display, which can incorporate the evolution and the specific enrichment of proteins/peptides in cycles of selection, could play an enormous role in the production of novel therapeutics and diagnostics in future years, as explained by Andreas Plückthun (Institute of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Switzerland). Applied genome research offered technologies, such as the 'in vitro expression cloning', described by Dr Zwick (Promega Corp, Madison, WI, USA), are providing a functional analysis for the overwhelming flow of data emerging from high-throughput sequencing of genomes and from high-density gene expression microarrays (DNA chips). The

  11. The Association of Dietary Lutein/Zeaxanthin and B Vitamins with Cataracts in the Age- Related Eye Disease Study AREDS Report No. 37

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Tanya S.; Doss, Lauren E.; Shih, Grace; Nigam, Divya; Sperduto, Robert D.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Agrón, Elvira; Clemons, Traci E; Chew, Emily Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether dietary intake of lutein/zeaxanthin and B vitamins is associated with cataract prevalence and incidence. Design Clinic-based, baseline cross-sectional and prospective cohort study designs. Participants 3115 (6129 eyes) persons enrolled in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study, aged 55 to 80 years, followed for mean of 9.6 years. Methods Participants completed baseline food frequency questionnaires. Baseline and annual lens photographs were graded centrally. Multivariable models controlling for previously identified risk factors for cataracts were used to measure the association of cataracts with reported dietary intake, using the lowest quintile as reference. Main Outcome Measures Cataract surgery, cataract status (type and severity) at baseline, development of cataracts. Results At baseline, increased dietary riboflavin and B12 were inversely associated with nuclear and cortical lens opacities. In comparisons of persons with and without cataract, persons with the highest riboflavin intake vs. those with the lowest intake had the following associations: odds ratio (OR): 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63–0.97 for mild nuclear, OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.43–0.90 for moderate nuclear, and OR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.65–0.99 for mild cortical cataracts. For B12, the results were: OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.63–0.96 for mild nuclear, OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.43–0.88 for moderate nuclear, and OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.63–0.95 for mild cortical cataracts. Highest dietary B6 intake was associated with a decreased risk of developing moderate nuclear lens opacity compared with the lowest quintile, OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.45–0.99. Highest dietary intake levels of niacin and B12 were associated with a decreased risk of development of mild nuclear or mild cortical cataracts in participants not taking Centrum® multivitamin. For participants taking Centrum® during the study, highest intake of dietary folate was associated with an increased risk of development of mild

  12. Recording Earthen Architecture at the Peruvian Andes: the Case of KUÑO Tambo CHURCH'S Historic Wall Paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, K.; Hanley, C.; Santana Quintero, M.; Fai, S.; Ouimet, C.; Cancino, C.; Rainer, L.; Villacorta-Santamato, L.

    2013-07-01

    According to UNESCO "Earthen architecture is one of the most original and powerful expressions of our ability to create a built environment with readily available resources. It includes a great variety of structures, ranging from mosques, palaces and granaries, to historic city centres, cultural landscapes and archaeological sites" (WHEAP, 2007). This contribution looks at developing effective methods for recording earthen historic structures for their rehabilitation and preservation using the Kuño Tambo church in Peru, which is a Peruvian national historic site that requires serious rehabilitation work, as a case study. This project describes the compilation of an effective metric record of the "state-of-conservation" - "as found" of wall paintings in this important and remote building using a toolbox of different "off-the-shelf" heritage recording techniques. This approach was applied by Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), as part of the Earthen Architecture Initiative of the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI).

  13. Identification by CI-mass spectrometry of an unexpected benzodiazepine degradation product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buret, D.; Breton, D.; Clair, P.; Lafosse, M.

    2006-01-01

    The French Military Health Service (SSA) has developed an innovative drug product, as a treatment against neurotoxic organophosphate poisoning (NOP). It contains three drug substances: an anticholinergic, an anticonvulsant and a cholinesterase reactivator. Testing stability study, in normal conditions, over 18 months, for this speciality, has given unexpected results. Indeed, one of the drug substances, avizafone (pro-drug of diazepam), breaks down partially into a compound which migrates into the plastic container where this degradation product is demethylated after absorption. Mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionisation (negative CI-MS) was used, to monitor decomposition of the drug substance. This method first showed migration of the degradation product and has been used to monitor its evolution during the stability testing study. The demethylation seems to be due to an additive product present in the plastic. The degradation products remain trapped in the container holding the pharmaceutical formulation.

  14. Improvement in the yield and quality of kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees) under the sustainable production system.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh Kumar; Verma, Sanjeet K; Pankaj, Umesh; Gupta, Anand K; Khan, Khushboo; Shankar, Karuna

    2015-02-01

    Andrographis paniculata Nees is an annual erect herb with wide medicinal and pharmacological applications due to the presence of andrographolide and other active chemical constituents. The large-scale cultivation of the kalmegh is not in practice. The aim of this study was to establish sustainable production systems of A. paniculata cv CIM-Megha with the application of different bioinoculants and chemical fertilisers. A. paniculata herb and andrographolide yield in the dried leaves was found to be highest (218% and 61.3%, respectively) in treatment T3 (NPK+Bacillus sp.) compared with T1 (control). The soil organic carbon, soil microbial respiration, soil enzymes activity and available nutrients improved significantly with combined application of bioinoculants and chemical fertilisers. PMID:25348874

  15. Digitally-Assisted Stone Carving of a Relief Sculpture for the Parliament Buildings National Historic Site of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, J.; Fai, S.; Kretz, S.; Ouimet, C.; White, P.

    2015-08-01

    The emerging field of digital fabrication is a process where three-dimensional datasets can be directly transferred to fabrication equipment to create models or even 1:1 building elements. In this paper, we will discuss the results of a collaboration between the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), the Dominion Sculptor of Canada, and the Heritage Conservation Directorate (HCD) of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), that utilizes digital fabrication technologies in the development of a digitally-assisted stone carving process. The collaboration couples the distinguished skill of the Dominion Sculptor with the latest digital acquisition and digital fabrication technologies for the reconstruction of a deteriorated stone bas-relief on the façade of the East Block building of the Parliament Buildings National Historic Site of Canada. The intention of the research is to establish a workflow of hybrid digital/analogue methodologies from acquisition through rehabilitation and ultimately to the fabrication of stone elements.

  16. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  17. Chemical, Electrical and Thermal Characterization of Nanoceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Hervie; Abunaemeh, Malek; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu; Budak, Satilmish; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a lightweight high bandgap semiconductor material that can maintain dimensional and chemical stability in adverse environments and very high temperatures. These properties make it suitable for high temperature thermoelectric converters. At the Center for Irradiaton of Materials (CIM) we design, manufacture and fabricate nanoceramic SiC, and perform electrical, thermal and chemical characterization of the material using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity measurements to calculate its efficiency as a thermoelectric generator. We are looking to compare the electrical and thermal properties of SiC ceramics with some other materials used for the same purposes.

  18. A Sensor Failure Simulator for Control System Reliability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, K. J.; Delaat, J. C.; Merrill, W. C.; Oberle, L. G.; Sadler, G. G.; Schaefer, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    A real-time Sensor Failure Simulator (SFS) was designed and assembled for the Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation (ADIA) program. Various designs were considered. The design chosen features an IBM-PC/XT. The PC is used to drive analog circuitry for simulating sensor failures in real-time. A user defined scenario describes the failure simulation for each of the five incoming sensor signals. Capabilities exist for editing, saving, and retrieving the failure scenarios. The SFS has been tested closed-loop with the Controls Interface and Monitoring (CIM) unit, the ADIA control, and a real-time F100 hybrid simulation. From a productivity viewpoint, the menu driven user interface has proven to be efficient and easy to use. From a real-time viewpoint, the software controlling the simulation loop executes at greater than 100 cycles/sec.

  19. Control chart pattern recognition using a back propagation neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerre, Julie K.; Perry, Marcus B.

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, control chart pattern recognition using artificial neural networks is presented. An important motivation of this research is the growing interest in intelligent manufacturing systems, specifically in the area of Statistical Process Control (SPC). On-line automated process analysis is an important area of research since it allows the interfacing of process control with Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) techniques. A back propagation artificial neural network is used to model X-bar quality control charts and identify process instability situations as specified by the Western Electric Statistical Quality Control handbook. Results indicate that the performance of the back propagation neural network is very accurate in identifying these control chart patterns. This work is significant in that the neural network output can serve as a link to process parameters in a closed-loop control system. In this way, adjustments to the process can be made on-line and quality problems averted.

  20. Photooxidation of Ammonia on TiO2 Surfaces as a Source of Nitrogen Oxides in the Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raff, J.; Kebede, M. A.; Scharko, N. K.; Donaldson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia is an important air pollutant in urban and rural areas alike, whose main fate is dry and wet deposition to surfaces. While reactions with OH radical in the gas phase are slow, our work shows that photochemical uptake of ammonia onto surfaces containing semiconductor minerals such as TiO2 is efficient and yields significant amounts of gas phase NO2, NO, and HONO. A coated wall flow tube coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) and a chemiluminescence analyzer was used to study the product yields of HONO and NOx under atmospherically relevant conditions, while diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to elucidate the mechanism of ammonia photooxidation on anatase surfaces. Our results show that photochemical processing of ammonia is likely a source of reactive oxides of nitrogen in urban areas where surfaces commonly contain TiO2, and in areas impacted by mineral dust and ammonia emissions.

  1. Decentralized Monitoring and Control of Electric Power Distribution System with a use case of Community Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, Kazi Mohammad Moyeenull

    This work focuses on the platform and framework required for developing decentralized monitoring and control applications for a distribution system. Decentralized control of Community Energy Storage (CES) devices has been considered as a use case. The first chapter gives an overview of energy management system and applications. Then the development of centralized and decentralized CES control applications are discussed. The next chapters discusses the software architecture of a typical centralized SCADAEMS platform and outlines the architecture required for a decentralized platform. Then, suitability of IEC 61850 standard for decentralized monitoring and control is investigated and an approach to developing decentralized applications in IEC 61850 enabled environment is proposed and demonstrated. Finally, CIM standard is reviewed for exchanging power system topology information for distributed control.

  2. Characterization of Au Irradiated Glassy Polymeric Carbon at 2,000°C for Nuclear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abunaemeh, M.; Seif, M.; Batra, A.; Elsamadicy, A.; Yang, Y.; Wang, L.; Muntele, C.; Ila, D.

    The TRISO fuel has been used in some of the Generation IV nuclear reactor designs [1]. It consists of a fuel kernel of UOx coated with several layers of materials with different functions. Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the materials in the layers. In this study we investigate the possibility of using Glassy Polymeric Carbon (GPC) as an alternative to PyC. In this work, we are comparing the changes in physical and microstructure properties of GPC after exposure to irradiation fluence of 5 MeV Au equivalent to a 1 displacement per atom (dpa) for GPC prepared at 2,000°C. The GPC material is manufactured and tested at the Center for Irradiation Materials (CIM) at Alabama A&M University using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and stopping range of ions in matter (SRIM) software.

  3. The ergonomics of computer aided design within advanced manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    John, P A

    1988-03-01

    Many manufacturing companies have now awakened to the significance of computer aided design (CAD), although the majority of them have only been able to purchase computerised draughting systems of which only a subset produce direct manufacturing data. Such companies are moving steadily towards the concept of computer integrated manufacture (CIM), and this demands CAD to address more than draughting. CAD architects are thus having to rethink the basic specification of such systems, although they typically suffer from an insufficient understanding of the design task and have consequently been working with inadequate specifications. It is at this fundamental level that ergonomics has much to offer, making its contribution by encouraging user-centred design. The discussion considers the relationships between CAD and: the design task; the organisation and people; creativity; and artificial intelligence. It finishes with a summary of the contribution of ergonomics.

  4. Investigation of sample preparation on the moldability of ceramic injection molding feedstocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Jared

    Ceramic injection molding is a desirable option for those who are looking to make ceramic parts with complex geometries. Formulating the feedstock needed to produce ideal parts is a difficult process. In this research a series of feedstock blends will be evaluated for moldability. This was done by investigating their viscosity, and how certain components affect the overall ability to flow. These feedstocks varied waxes, surfactants, and solids loading. A capillary rheometer was used to characterize some of the materials, which led to one batch being selected for molding trials. The parts were sintered and further refinements were made to the feedstock. Solids loading was increased from 77.5% to 82%, which required different ratios of organics to flow. Finally, the ceramic powders were treated to lower their specific surface area before being compounded, which resulted in materials that would process easily through an extruder and exhibit properties suitable for CIM.

  5. Sesquiterpenes and flavonoid aglycones from a Hungarian taxon of the Achillea millefolium group.

    PubMed

    Glasl, Sabine; Mucaji, Pavel; Werner, Ingrid; Presser, Armin; Jurenitsch, Johann

    2002-01-01

    The investigation of a dichloromethane extract of flower heads of a Hungarian taxon of the Achillea millefolium group led to the isolation of three flavonoid aglycones, one triterpene, one germacranolide and five guaianolides. Their structures were elucidated by UV-VIS, EI- and CI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic methods as well as by 2D-NMR studies and by selective 1D-NOE experiments. Besides apigenin, luteolin and centaureidin, beta-sitosterol, 3beta-hydroxy-11alpha,13-dihydro-costunolide, desacetylmatricarin, leucodin, achillin, 8alpha-angeloxy-leucodin and 8alpha-angeloxy-achillin were isolated. Both latter substances are reported here for the first time. Their NMR data were compared with those of the other guaianolides. The stereochemistry of 3beta-hydroxy-11alpha,13-dihydro-costunolide was discussed and compared with data of the literature.

  6. Proceedings of the International Conference on industrial electronics, control, and instrumentation, IECON '90

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on technical aspects of design, implementation and testing of hardware and software systems for manufacturing, process control, energy systems, data engineering and other industrial control and/or instrumentation applications. Topics include: control theory and applications, motion control, instrumentation and testing, optoelectronics, signal processing, vision systems, sensors and transducers, distributed and/or parallel computer control, software design and tools, human interface, computer communication networks, steel production systems, neural networks/computer applications, A1 applications and/or expert systems, fuzzy control and diagnosis, DSP applications, robotics, CAD/CIM/factory automation, automotive electronics, medical electronics and/or devices, power electronics; energy and power systems, process control, transportation systems.

  7. Monitoring receptor trafficking following retromer and WASH deregulation.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Douglas G; Phillips-Krawczak, Christine A; Billadeau, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface receptors that have been internalized and enter the endocytic pathway have multiple fates including entrance into the multivesicular body pathway on their way to lysosomal degradation, recycling back to the cell surface, or retrograde trafficking out of the endolysosomal system back to the Golgi apparatus. Two ubiquitously expressed protein complexes, WASH and the endosomal coat complex retromer, function together to play a central role in directing the fate of receptors into the latter two pathways. In this chapter, we describe fluorescent- and flow cytometry-based methods for analyzing the recycling and retrograde trafficking of two receptors, α5β1 and CI-M6PR, whose intracellular fates are regulated by WASH and retromer activity. The guidelines presented in this chapter can be applied to the analysis of any cell surface or intracellular membrane protein to determine the impact of WASH or retromer deregulation on its intracellular trafficking route. PMID:26360036

  8. Antifungal activity and isomerization of octadecyl p-coumarates from Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa.

    PubMed

    Nidiry, Eugene Sebastian J; Ganeshan, Girija; Lokesha, Ankanahalli N

    2011-12-01

    Bioassay monitored HPLC assisted isolation and purification of the chief antifungal fraction of the leaves of Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa (Convulvulaceae) were achieved using Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Cladosporium cucumerinum as test organisms. The activity of the purified fraction was further confirmed by the dose dependent inhibition of the spore germination of Alternaria alternata and A. porri. The active fraction was identified as a mixture of (E)-octadecyl p-coumarate and (Z)-octadecyl p-coumarate. The two isomers were detected on an HPLC column with substantially different retention times, but once eluted from the column, one form was partly converted to the other in daylight. Conclusive evidence for the structures and their isomerization were obtained from the HPLC behavior, IR, UV, HRESIMS, CIMS and and NMR spectral data. Important 1H NMR and 13C NMR signals could be separately assigned for the isomers using 2D NMR techniques. PMID:22312731

  9. Itch in Atopic Dermatitis Management.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Yayoi; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Takamori, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) suffer from chronic inflammatory dermatitis and antihistamine-resistant itch. The management of intractable pruritus in AD is important, requiring the development of new therapeutic approaches. At present, the standard treatments for AD include topical anti-inflammatory drugs such as calcineurin inhibitors and corticosteroids. Topical emollient treatment is recommended to moisten the skin and to restore and maintain barrier function. Phototherapy is also effective in reducing the number of epidermal nerve fibers, normalizing imbalances in the levels of expression of axon guidance molecules, and inhibiting pruritus. Systemic treatments such as cyclosporine A and aprepitant are used to treat severe and intractable pruritus in AD. Clinical trials of dupilumab and CIM331 have displayed a significant reduction of pruritus in patients with AD. New antipruritic approaches are targeted to the central nervous system such as spinal interneurons and glial cells. This chapter describes therapeutic approaches for attenuating intractable itch in AD. PMID:27578076

  10. Integrated Digital Technologies for the Architectural Rehabilitation & Conservation of Beinn Bhreagh Hall & Surrounding Site, Nova Scotia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, K.; Ward, S.; Santana Quintero, M.; Morrison, T.

    2015-08-01

    This contribution summarizes the collaboration between Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) and Heritage Standing in the use of digital technologies to document the Beinn Bhreagh Hall historic site (house and immediate surroundings) in Baddeck, Nova Scotia for its rehabilitation and protection. The project objectives were to develop a prototype for research and training using 3D scanning, and Building Information Modelling (BIM), as well as other emerging surveying tools to understand the state of conservation of Historic Places in Canada, providing relevant and appropriate information for their rehabilitation and maintenance. The vehicle of this research was the documentation and modelling of this important landmark, the summer home of Dr. Alexander Graham Bell in Victoria County, Nova Scotia. This unique 19thC building, currently under review for designated as a national historic site.

  11. Dimethylsulfide air/sea gas transfer in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bruyn, W. J.; Bell, T. G.; Marandino, C.; Saltzman, E. S.; Miller, S. D.; Law, C. S.; Smith, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Air/sea dimethylsulfide (DMS) fluxes were measured by eddy correlation over the Southern Ocean (Feb/March 2012) aboard the R/V Tangaroa during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) study. Atmospheric and seawater DMS were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (API-CIMS). Seawater DMS was measured continuously from the ship underway system using a porous membrane equilibrator. The study included measurements inside and outside a dinoflagellate bloom of large areal extent, with seawater DMS levels ranging up to 20 nM. Horizontal wind speeds of up to 20 m/sec were encountered. Gas transfer coefficients were calculated from eddy covariance DMS flux measurements and the air-sea concentration gradient. This study represents a significant addition to the limited database of direct gas transfer measurements in the Southern Ocean.

  12. Uncertainty management by relaxation of conflicting constraints in production process scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Juergen; Slany, Wolfgang; Stary, Christian

    1992-01-01

    Mathematical-analytical methods as used in Operations Research approaches are often insufficient for scheduling problems. This is due to three reasons: the combinatorial complexity of the search space, conflicting objectives for production optimization, and the uncertainty in the production process. Knowledge-based techniques, especially approximate reasoning and constraint relaxation, are promising ways to overcome these problems. A case study from an industrial CIM environment, namely high-grade steel production, is presented to demonstrate how knowledge-based scheduling with the desired capabilities could work. By using fuzzy set theory, the applied knowledge representation technique covers the uncertainty inherent in the problem domain. Based on this knowledge representation, a classification of jobs according to their importance is defined which is then used for the straightforward generation of a schedule. A control strategy which comprises organizational, spatial, temporal, and chemical constraints is introduced. The strategy supports the dynamic relaxation of conflicting constraints in order to improve tentative schedules.

  13. Controlling multisupplier operations by intelligent EDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, Juha; Kovanen, Jyrki; Linna, Miika; Mononen, Tero; Sulonen, Reijo

    In modern CIM (Computer Integrated Manufacturing) environment, problems that can affect production should be discovered as soon as possible. This can be very difficult in multisupplier operations where problems outside one organization can remain undetected until they already have effects inside that organization. If Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) is used to control intercompany operations there is a better possibility to detect problems on logistic chain. Because these problems usually have some effects in the flow of EDI messages, they can be detected by controlling this flow. A Forget-Me-Not (FMN) system, which is a programmable message management system that can control the flow of EDI messages and detect exceptional situations is discussed.

  14. Quantifying Stratospheric Ozone in the Upper Troposphere Using in situ Measurements of HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C S; Bergmann, D J; Marcy, T P; Fahey, D W; Gao, R S; Popp, P J; Richard, E C; Thompson, T L; Rosenlof, K H; Ray, E A; Salawitch, R J; Ridley, B A; . Weinheimer, A J; Loewenstein, M; Weinstock, E M; Mahoney, M J

    2004-03-08

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) technique has been developed for precise in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) from a high-altitude aircraft. In measurements at subtropical latitudes, minimum HCl values found in the upper troposphere (UT) are often near or below the 0.005-ppbv detection limit of the measurements, indicating that background HCl values are much lower than a global mean estimate. However, significant abundances of HCl were observed in many UT air parcels as a result of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport events. A method for diagnosing the amount of stratospheric ozone in these UT parcels was developed using the compact linear correlation of HCl with ozone found throughout the lower stratosphere (LS). Expanded use of this method will lead to improved quantification of cross-tropopause transport events and validation of global chemical transport models.

  15. The complex stoichiometry of ternary alloys: What lies beyond the canonical Bernoulli distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robouch, B. V.; Marcelli, A.; Cordeiro Raposo, F.; Robouch, P.; Kisiel, A.; Di Giambattista, L.

    2014-08-01

    Structural properties of ternary alloys (C1-xC‧x)Im depend on relative configuration probabilities that change with the relative content x. Relative configuration probabilities depend on the intensity of site occupation preferences. Several ternary systems show ideal quasi-canonical Bernoulli distributions of their configuration, while others are characterized by extreme preferences in which one, several or even all configurations are depressed or even lacking. In cases with extreme preferences, only two binary configurations (CIm and C‧Im) occur, with no ternary configuration formed. We discuss here in a statistical framework the site occupation preferences of 16 ternary alloys with B3, B4, L12 and C15 crystallographic structures pointing out the observed deviations from the ideal Bernoulli distribution.

  16. OVOC Sources and Sinks over North America: New Constraints from Recent Aircraft Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Millet, D. B.; Singh, H. B.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Müller, M.

    2015-12-01

    Aircraft campaigns (e.g. DISCOVER-AQ, SENEX, SEAC4RS, DC3, CalNex) conducted over North America in the past 5 years provide new constraints on the sources and sinks of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC). Over that same time period, analytical advances (e.g. PTR-TOF-MS and other CIMS techniques) have substantially widened the array of atmospheric OVOC that can be detected and quantified, and thus provide rich new information for testing present understanding. Here, we apply a nested version of the GEOS-Chem CTM run with a new and expanded chemical mechanism to interpret these data. We use model-measurement comparisons of mixing ratios and species-species correlations to test current budget estimates for key individual OVOCs, while also testing the model ability to capture the overall chemical tendencies across the ensemble of detected organic compounds.

  17. Rapid Intelligent Inspection Process Definition for dimensional measurement in advanced manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.W.

    1993-03-01

    The Rapid Intelligent Inspection Process Definition (RIIPD) project is an industry-led effort to advance computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems for the creation and modification of inspection process definitions. The RIIPD project will define, design, develop, and demonstrate an automated tool (i.e., software) to generate inspection process plans and coordinate measuring machine (CMM) inspection programs, as well as produce support information for the dimensional measurement of piece parts. The goal of this project is to make the inspection and part verification function, specifically CMM measurements, a more effective production support tool by reducing inspection process definition flowtime, creating consistent and standard inspections, increasing confidence of measurement results, and capturing inspection expertise. This objective is accomplished through importing STEP geometry definitions, applying solid modeling, incorporating explicit tolerance representations, establishing dimensional inspection,techniques, embedding artificial intelligence techniques, and adhering to the Dimensional Measuring Interface Standard (DMIS) national standard.

  18. Improvement in the yield and quality of kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees) under the sustainable production system.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh Kumar; Verma, Sanjeet K; Pankaj, Umesh; Gupta, Anand K; Khan, Khushboo; Shankar, Karuna

    2015-02-01

    Andrographis paniculata Nees is an annual erect herb with wide medicinal and pharmacological applications due to the presence of andrographolide and other active chemical constituents. The large-scale cultivation of the kalmegh is not in practice. The aim of this study was to establish sustainable production systems of A. paniculata cv CIM-Megha with the application of different bioinoculants and chemical fertilisers. A. paniculata herb and andrographolide yield in the dried leaves was found to be highest (218% and 61.3%, respectively) in treatment T3 (NPK+Bacillus sp.) compared with T1 (control). The soil organic carbon, soil microbial respiration, soil enzymes activity and available nutrients improved significantly with combined application of bioinoculants and chemical fertilisers.

  19. Three metabolites from the mangrove endophytic fungus Sporothrix sp. (#4335) from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lu; Cai, Xiaoling; Xu, Fang; She, Zhigang; Chan, Wing Lai; Vrijmoed, L L P; Jones, E B G; Lin, Yongcheng

    2009-02-01

    Three metabolites, sporothrins A, B, and C (1-3), were isolated from the mangrove endophytic fungus Sporothrix sp. (#4335). Their structures were identified by the spectral data and X-ray diffractive techniques, with compound 1 showing strong inhibition of acetylcholine esterase. 1,3,6,8-Tetrahydroxynaphthalene (T4HN) was deduced as one of the precursors in the biosynthesis of 1 and 2. In a primary biosynthesis gene study, the partial gene fragment obtained with the LC1-Im/2c-Im primer pair was shown to be closely related to genes encoding T4HN synthase. The deduced protein sequences were highly homologous to the ketosynthase domains of other fungal PKS genes involved in T4HN biosynthesis.

  20. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C.

    2009-07-15

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  1. A Cationic-Independent Mannose 6-Phosphate Receptor Inhibitor (PXS64) Ameliorates Kidney Fibrosis by Inhibiting Activation of Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Wong, Muh Geot; Wong, May; Gross, Simon; Chen, Jason; Pollock, Carol; Saad, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The activity of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is regulated by its conversion from the latent to the active form. We have previously shown that the conversion is at least in part mediated by the cationic-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-M6PR), as the CI-M6PR inhibitor, PXS-25 has anti-fibrotic properties in human kidney tubular (HK-2) cells under high glucose conditions. However, its clinical use is limited by low bioavailability. Our aim was to determine the effects of PXS64, a pro-drug of PXS25, in in vitro and in vivo models of renal fibrosis. HK-2 cells were exposed to latent TGFβ1+/- PXS64 for 48 hours. The mRNA and protein levels of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory markers were determined. A 7 day unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) model was used and the following experimental groups were studied: (i) Sham operated, (ii) UUO, (iii) UUO + telmisartan (iv) UUO + PSX64. HK-2 cells exposed to PXS64 reduced TGFβ mediated effects on collagen IV, fibronectin, macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and phospho-smad2 protein expression, consistent with inhibition of the conversion of latent to active TGF-β1. PXS 64 treated UUO mice had a lower tubulointerstitial fibrosis index, collagen IV and fibronectin protein and mRNA expression when compared to untreated UUO mice. In addition, these animals had lower MCP-1 mRNA expression, reduced inflammarory cell infiltrate, as indicated by fewer CD45, F4/80 positive cells, and reduced phospho-Smad2 protein expression when compared to untreated UUO animals. Our data demonstrates that PSX64 is an effective anti-fibrotic agent by inhibiting the activation of latent TGF-β1. PMID:25658916

  2. Implementation of a Dual Containment/Surveillance System utilizing scene-change detection and radio frequency technology

    SciTech Connect

    FITZGERALD, ERIC; KOENIG, RICHARD

    2005-06-27

    This paper will examine the implementation of scene-change detection and radio frequency technology within a Dual Containment/Surveillance (C/S) System. Additionally, this paper will examine the human performance factors in the operation of these systems. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company utilizes the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System (CIMS) in the performance of Dual C/S to monitor special nuclear materials within International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards and Domestic Safeguards. CIMS is comprised of the Material Monitoring System (MMS) (R), a multi-media electronic surveillance system developed by Sandia National Laboratory which incorporates the use of active seals commonly called Radio Frequency Tamper Indicating Devices (RFTIDs), NT Vision (R) as developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Microsoft Windows NT (R) based operating system providing for domestic scene-change detection and the Digital Multi-Camera Optical Surveillance System (DMOS) (R) which provides scene-change detection for IAEA. Although this paper will focus on the implementation of Dual C/S utilizing the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System, the necessity for a thorough review of Safeguards and Security requirements with organizations and personnel having minimal to no prior MPC&A training will also be covered. Successful Dual C/S implementation plans must consider not only system design and failure modes, but must also be accompanied with the appropriate ''mind shift'' within operations and technical personnel. This is required to ensure completion of both physical and electronic activities, and system design changes are performed conscientiously and with full awareness of MPC&A requirements.

  3. A Case Study of the Neti Pot's Rise, Americanization, and Rupture as Integrative Medicine in U.S. Media Discourse.

    PubMed

    Ho, Evelyn Y; Cady, Kathryn A; Robles, Jessica S

    2016-10-01

    In a period of only one decade in the United States, the neti pot shifted from obscure Ayurvedic health device to mainstream complementary and integrative medicine (CIM), touted by celebrities and sold widely in drug stores. We examine the neti pot as a case study for understanding how a foreign health practice became mainstreamed, and what that process reveals about more general discourses of health in the United States. Using discourse analysis of U.S. popular press and new media news (1999-2012) about the neti pot, we trace the development of discourses from neti's first introduction in mainstream news, through the hype following Dr. Oz's presentation on Oprah, to 2011 when two adults tragically died after using Naegleria fowleri amoeba-infested tap water in their neti pots. Neti pot discourses are an important site for communicative analysis because of the pot's complexity as an intercultural artifact: Neti pots and their use are enfolded into the biomedical practice of nasal irrigation and simultaneously Orientalized as exotic/magical and suspect/dangerous. This dual positioning as normal and exotic creates inequitable access for using the neti pot as a resource for increasing cultural health capital (CHC). This article contributes to work that critically theorizes the transnationalism of CIM, as the neti pot became successfully Americanized. These results have implications for understanding global health practices' incorporation or co-optation in new contexts, and the important role that popularly mediated health communication can play in framing what health care products and practices mean for consumers. PMID:26881301

  4. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder HCl Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Fuller, R. A.; Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Jucks, K. W.; Stachnik, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Christensen, L. E.; Webster, C. R.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Walker, K. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Harwood, R. S.; Manney, G. L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided daily global HCl profiles since August 2004. We provide a characterization of the resolution, random and systematic uncertainties, and known issues for the version 2.2 MLS HCl data. The MLS sampling allows for comparisons with many (1500 to more than 3000) closely matched profiles from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These data sets provide HCl latitudinal distributions that are, overall, very similar to those from (coincident) MLS profiles, although there are some discrepancies in the upper stratosphere between the MLS and HALOE gradients. As found in previous work, MLS and ACE HCl profiles agree very well (within approximately 5%, on average), but the MLS HCl abundances are generally larger (by 10-20%) than HALOE HCl. The bias versus HALOE is unlikely to arise mostly from MLS, as a similar systematic bias (of order 15%) is not observed between average MLS and balloon-borne measurements of HCl, obtained over Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 2004 and 2005. At the largest pressure (147 hPa) for MLS HCl, a high bias (approximately 0.2 ppbv) is apparent in analyses of low to midlatitude data versus in situ aircraft chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) HCl measurements from the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2006; this bias is also observed in comparisons of MLS and aircraftHCl/O3 correlations. Good agreement between MLS and CIMS HCl is obtained at 100 to 68 hPa. The recommended pressure range for MLS HCl is from 100 to 0.15 hPa.

  5. Genetic mapping of QTLs for sugar-related traits in a RIL population of Sorghum bicolor L. Moench.

    PubMed

    Shiringani, Amukelani Lacrecia; Frisch, Matthias; Friedt, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    The productivity of sorghum is mainly determined by quantitative traits such as grain yield and stem sugar-related characteristics. Substantial crop improvement has been achieved by breeding in the last decades. Today, genetic mapping and characterization of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) is considered a valuable tool for trait enhancement. We have investigated QTL associated with the sugar components (Brix, glucose, sucrose, and total sugar content) and sugar-related agronomic traits (flowering date, plant height, stem diameter, tiller number per plant, fresh panicle weight, and estimated juice weight) in four different environments (two locations) using a population of 188 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between grain (M71) and sweet sorghum (SS79). A genetic map with 157 AFLP, SSR, and EST-SSR markers was constructed, and several QTLs were detected using composite interval mapping (CIM). Further, additive x additive interaction and QTL x environmental interaction were estimated. CIM identified more than five additive QTLs in most traits explaining a range of 6.0-26.1% of the phenotypic variation. A total of 24 digenic epistatic locus pairs were identified in seven traits, supporting the hypothesis that QTL analysis without considering epistasis can result in biased estimates. QTLs showing multiple effects were identified, where the major QTL on SBI-06 was significantly associated with most of the traits, i.e., flowering date, plant height, Brix, sucrose, and sugar content. Four out of ten traits studied showed a significant QTL x environmental interaction. Our results are an important step toward marker-assisted selection for sugar-related traits and biofuel yield in sorghum. PMID:20229249

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of a proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene by chemically induced male sterility in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Y A; Zhang, G S; Zhang, J; Ju, L; Zhu, Q D; Song, Y L; Wang, J W; Niu, N; Ma, S C

    2015-10-05

    Although a number of studies have shown that chemical hybridizing agents (CHAs) affect anther growth and regulate cell-cycle progression, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential factor in DNA replication, and in many other processes in eukaryotic cells. In this study, the open reading frame of TaPCNA, the PCNA in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), was cloned by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Sequence analysis revealed that this gene was 792-bp long and encoded a protein with 234 amino acids. Alignment of the TaPCNA-predicted sequence revealed a high degree of identity with PCNAs from other plant species. A subcellular localization assay indicated that TaPCNA was localized in the nucleus. The TaPCNA was cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pET32a, and the recombinant plasmid was transformed into BL21 (DE3). TaPCNA expression was induced by 0.5 mM isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside and verified using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot assays, which indicated that the fusion protein was successfully expressed. The gene involved in the G1-to-S transition, Histone H4, was downregulated by 1376- CIMS, which is a chemically induced male sterility line. However, a semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed that TaPCNA expression was upregulated in 1376-CIMS. Our results suggest that CHAs (SQ-1) induce DNA damage in wheat anthers. DNA damage results in either the delay or arrest of cell-cycle progression, which affects anther development. This study will help to elucidate the mechanisms of SQ-1-induced male sterility.

  7. A chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique for airborne measurements of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Kozai, K.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D. J.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Frost, G. J.; McKeen, S. A.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2007-05-01

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) utilizing protonated acetone dimer ion chemistry to measure gas-phase ammonia (NH3) from the NOAA WP-3D aircraft is described. The average sensitivity determined from in-flight standard addition calibrations ranged from 2.6 to 5 ion counts s-1 pptv-1, depending on flow conditions, for 1 MHz of reagent ion signal. The instrument time response was determined to be 5 s from the 2 e-folding signal decay time after removal of a standard addition calibration. The instrumental background varied from flight to flight ranging from 0.5 to 1.3 ppbv. The variability between successive background measurements ranged from 50 pptv to 100 pptv. Total uncertainty for the 5 s data was conservatively estimated to be ±(30% + 125 pptv). Two NH3 sources were sampled during the New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (NEAQS-ITCT) 2004 campaign, one urban and one agricultural. During the 25 July flight, enhancements in NH3 mixing ratios were coincident with enhancements in CO, NOx, and SO2 mixing ratios downwind of New York City. The NH3 mixing ratios in the urban outflow plume ranged from 0.4 to 1 ppbv, or enhancements of 0.2 to 0.8 ppbv above local background. During the 15 August flight, NH3 mixing ratios were enhanced 0.3 to 0.45 ppbv above local background directly downwind of an agricultural area northeast of Atlanta, Georgia. The NH3 CIMS instrument has shown the ability to measure sub-ppbv NH3 levels at high time resolution from an aircraft.

  8. A Case Study of the Neti Pot's Rise, Americanization, and Rupture as Integrative Medicine in U.S. Media Discourse.

    PubMed

    Ho, Evelyn Y; Cady, Kathryn A; Robles, Jessica S

    2016-10-01

    In a period of only one decade in the United States, the neti pot shifted from obscure Ayurvedic health device to mainstream complementary and integrative medicine (CIM), touted by celebrities and sold widely in drug stores. We examine the neti pot as a case study for understanding how a foreign health practice became mainstreamed, and what that process reveals about more general discourses of health in the United States. Using discourse analysis of U.S. popular press and new media news (1999-2012) about the neti pot, we trace the development of discourses from neti's first introduction in mainstream news, through the hype following Dr. Oz's presentation on Oprah, to 2011 when two adults tragically died after using Naegleria fowleri amoeba-infested tap water in their neti pots. Neti pot discourses are an important site for communicative analysis because of the pot's complexity as an intercultural artifact: Neti pots and their use are enfolded into the biomedical practice of nasal irrigation and simultaneously Orientalized as exotic/magical and suspect/dangerous. This dual positioning as normal and exotic creates inequitable access for using the neti pot as a resource for increasing cultural health capital (CHC). This article contributes to work that critically theorizes the transnationalism of CIM, as the neti pot became successfully Americanized. These results have implications for understanding global health practices' incorporation or co-optation in new contexts, and the important role that popularly mediated health communication can play in framing what health care products and practices mean for consumers.

  9. Quantitative trait loci mapping and genetic dissection for lint percentage in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Li, Chengqi; Wang, Qinglian

    2014-08-01

    Lint percentage is an important character of cotton yield components and it is also correlated with cotton fibre development. In this study, we used a high lint percentage variety, Baimian1, and a low lint percentage, TM-1 genetic standard for Gossypium hirsutum, as parents to construct a mapping populations in upland cotton (G. hirsutum). A quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) analysis of lint percentage was performed by using two mapping procedures; composite interval mapping (CIM), inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) and the F2:3 populations in 2 years. Six main-effect QTL (M-QTL) for lint percentage (four significant and two suggestive) were detected in both years by CIM, and were located on chr. 3, chr. 19, chr. 26 and chr. 5/chr. 19. Of the six QTL, marker intervals and favourable gene sources of the significant M-QTL, qLP-3(2010) and qLP-3(2011) were consistent. These QTL were also detected by ICIM, and therefore, should preferentially be used for markerassisted selection (MAS) of lint percentage. Another M-QTL, qLP-19(2010), was detected by two mapping procedures, and it could also be a candidate for MAS. We detected the interaction between two M-QTL and environment, and 11 epistatic QTL (E-QTL) and their interaction with environment by using ICIM. The study also found two EST-SSRs, NAU1187 and NAU1255, linked to M-QTL for lint percentage that could be candidate markers affecting cotton fibre development.

  10. Br2, BrCl, BrO and surface ozone in coastal Antarctica: a meteorological and chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buys, Z.; Brough, N.; Huey, G.; Tanner, D.; von Glasow, R.; Jones, A. E.

    2012-04-01

    There is much debate over the source of bromine radicals in the atmosphere that drives polar boundary layer ozone depletion events (ODEs), but there is strong evidence to suggest a source associated with the sea ice zone. Here we report the first high temporal resolution measurements of Br2, BrCl and BrO in coastal Antarctica, made using a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Mixing ratios ranged from instrumental detection limits to 13 pptv for BrO, 45 pptv for Br2, and 6 pptv for BrCl. We find evidence for blowing snow as a source of reactive bromine both directly during a storm and subsequently from recycling of bromide deposited on the continental snowpack. An unusual event of trans-continental air mass transport might have been responsible for severe surface ozone depletion observed at Halley. The halogen source region was the Bellingshausen Sea, to the west of the Antarctic Peninsula, the air mass having spent 3 1/2 days in complete darkness prior to arrival at Halley. We, further, identify an artefact in daytime BrCl measurements arising from conversion of HOBr, similar to that already identified for CIMS observations of Br2. Model calculations using the MISTRA 0-D model suggest a 50-60% conversion of HOBr to Br2, and 5-10% conversion to BrCl. Careful data filtering enabled us to use the halogen observations, in conjunction with the MISTRA model, to explore the temperature dependence of the Br2:BrCl ratio. We find evidence of a ratio shift towards Br2 at temperatures below ~-21 °C, suggesting a relationship with hydrohalite (NaCl.2H2O) precipitation. This suite of Antarctic data provides the first analogue to similar measurements made in the Arctic.

  11. Observations of nitryl chloride and modeling its source and effect on ozone in the planetary boundary layer of southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tham, Yee Jun; Xue, Likun; Li, Qinyi; Zha, Qiaozhi; Wang, Zhe; Poon, Steven C. N.; Dubé, William P.; Blake, Donald R.; Louie, Peter K. K.; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Tsui, Wilson; Brown, Steven S.

    2016-03-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) plays potentially important roles in atmospheric chemistry, but its abundance and effect are not fully understood due to the small number of ambient observations of ClNO2 to date. In late autumn 2013, ClNO2 was measured with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) at a mountain top (957 m above sea level) in Hong Kong. During 12 nights with continuous CIMS data, elevated mixing ratios of ClNO2 (>400 parts per trillion by volume) or its precursor N2O5 (>1000 pptv) were observed on six nights, with the highest ever reported ClNO2 (4.7 ppbv, 1 min average) and N2O5 (7.7 ppbv, 1 min average) in one case. Backward particle dispersion calculations driven by winds simulated with a mesoscale meteorological model show that the ClNO2/N2O5-laden air at the high-elevation site was due to transport of urban/industrial pollution north of the site. The highest ClNO2/N2O5 case was observed in a later period of the night and was characterized with extensively processed air and with the presence of nonoceanic chloride. A chemical box model with detailed chlorine chemistry was used to assess the possible impact of the ClNO2 in the well-processed regional plume on next day ozone, as the air mass continued to downwind locations. The results show that the ClNO2 could enhance ozone by 5-16% at the ozone peak or 11-41% daytime ozone production in the following day. This study highlights varying importance of the ClNO2 chemistry in polluted environments and the need to consider this process in photochemical models for prediction of ground-level ozone and haze.

  12. Parametric Modelling (bim) for the Documentation of Vernacular Construction Methods: a Bim Model for the Commissariat Building, Ottawa, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fai, S.; Filippi, M.; Paliaga, S.

    2013-07-01

    Whether a house of worship or a simple farmhouse, the fabrication of a building reveals both the unspoken cultural aspirations of the builder and the inevitable exigencies of the construction process. In other-words, why buildings are made is intimately and inevitably associated with how buildings are made. Nowhere is this more evident than in vernacular architecture. At the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) we are concerned that the de-population of Canada's rural areas, paucity of specialized tradespersons, and increasing complexity of building codes threaten the sustainability of this invaluable cultural resource. For current and future generations, the quantitative and qualitative values of traditional methods of construction are essential for an inclusive cultural memory. More practically, and equally pressing, an operational knowledge of these technologies is essential for the conservation of our built heritage. To address these concerns, CIMS has launched a number of research initiatives over the past five years that explore novel protocols for the documentation and dissemination of knowledge related to traditional methods of construction. Our current project, Cultural Diversity and Material Imagination in Canadian Architecture (CDMICA), made possible through funding from Canada's Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), explores the potential of building information modelling (BIM) within the context of a web-based environment. In this paper, we discuss our work-to-date on the development of a web-based library of BIM details that is referenced to ''typical'' assemblies culled from 19C and early 20C construction manuals. The parametric potential of these ''typical'' details is further refined by evidence from the documentation of ''specific'' details studied during comprehensive surveys of extant heritage buildings. Here, we consider a BIM of the roof truss assembly of one of the oldest buildings in Canada's national

  13. Performance evaluation of trigger algorithm for the MACE telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Kuldeep; Yadav, K. K.; Bhatt, N.; Chouhan, N.; Sikder, S. S.; Behere, A.; Pithawa, C. K.; Tickoo, A. K.; Rannot, R. C.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Mitra, A. K.; Koul, R.

    The MACE (Major Atmospheric Cherenkov Experiment) telescope with a light collector diameter of 21 m, is being set up at Hanle (32.80 N, 78.90 E, 4200m asl) India, to explore the gamma-ray sky in the tens of GeV energy range. The imaging camera of the telescope comprises 1088 pixels covering a total field-of-view of 4.30 × 4.00 with trigger field-of-view of 2.60 × 3.00 and an uniform pixel resolution of 0.120. In order to achieve low energy trigger threshold of less than 30 GeV, a two level trigger scheme is being designed for the telescope. The first level trigger is generated within 16 pixels of the Camera Integrated Module (CIM) based on 4 nearest neighbour (4NN) close cluster configuration within a coincidence gate window of 5 ns while the second level trigger is generated by combining the first level triggers from neighbouring CIMs. Each pixel of the telescope is expected to operate at a single pixel threshold between 8-10 photo-electrons where the single channel rate dominated by the after- pulsing is expected to be ˜500 kHz. The hardware implementation of the trigger logic is based on complex programmable logic devices (CPLD). The basic design concept, hardware implementation and performance evaluation of the trigger system in terms of threshold energy and trigger rate estimates based on Monte Carlo data for the MACE telescope will be presented in this meeting.

  14. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bobrutzki, K.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Jones, S. K.; Blackall, T.; Smith, T. E. L.; Blom, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Ghalaieny, M.; McGillen, M. R.; Percival, C. J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J.; Mohacsi, A.; Pogany, A.; Junninen, H.; Rantanen, S.; Sutton, M. A.; Nemitz, E.

    2010-01-01

    Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3), based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in Southern Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD) and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia), two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system; DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system; c-QCLAS), two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux; Nitrolux-100), a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS), a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) Spectrometer. The instruments were compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84), was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS) to 1.13 (AiRRmonia) with intercepts of -0.74 ppbv (RBD) to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS). More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv). Here the main factors affecting measurement precision are (a) the inlet design, (b) the state of inlet filters (where applicable), and (c) the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable). By reference to the fast (1 Hz) instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  15. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bobrutzki, K.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Jones, S. K.; Blackall, T.; Smith, T. E. L.; Blom, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Ghalaieny, M.; McGillen, M. R.; Percival, C. J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J.; Mohacsi, A.; Junninen, H.; Pogany, A.; Rantanen, S.; Sutton, M. A.; Nemitz, E.

    2009-08-01

    Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3), based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in S. Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD) and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia), two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system, DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system, c-QCLAS), two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux, Nitrolux-100), a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS), a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. Each instrument was compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84), was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS) to 1.13 (AiRRmonia) with intercepts of -0.74 ppbv (RBD) to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS). More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv). Here the overruling factors affecting measurement precision are (a) the inlet design, (b) the state of inlet filters (where applicable), and (c) the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable). By reference to the fast (1 Hz) instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  16. Quantitative trait loci mapping and genetic dissection for lint percentage in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Li, Chengqi; Wang, Qinglian

    2014-08-01

    Lint percentage is an important character of cotton yield components and it is also correlated with cotton fibre development. In this study, we used a high lint percentage variety, Baimian1, and a low lint percentage, TM-1 genetic standard for Gossypium hirsutum, as parents to construct a mapping populations in upland cotton (G. hirsutum). A quantitative trait locus/loci (QTL) analysis of lint percentage was performed by using two mapping procedures; composite interval mapping (CIM), inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) and the F2:3 populations in 2 years. Six main-effect QTL (M-QTL) for lint percentage (four significant and two suggestive) were detected in both years by CIM, and were located on chr. 3, chr. 19, chr. 26 and chr. 5/chr. 19. Of the six QTL, marker intervals and favourable gene sources of the significant M-QTL, qLP-3(2010) and qLP-3(2011) were consistent. These QTL were also detected by ICIM, and therefore, should preferentially be used for markerassisted selection (MAS) of lint percentage. Another M-QTL, qLP-19(2010), was detected by two mapping procedures, and it could also be a candidate for MAS. We detected the interaction between two M-QTL and environment, and 11 epistatic QTL (E-QTL) and their interaction with environment by using ICIM. The study also found two EST-SSRs, NAU1187 and NAU1255, linked to M-QTL for lint percentage that could be candidate markers affecting cotton fibre development. PMID:25189232

  17. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  18. Volatility of methylglyoxal cloud SOA formed through OH radical oxidation and droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L.; Schwier, Allison N.; Lim, Yong B.; McNeill, V. Faye; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-04-01

    The volatility of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud processing (aqueous hydroxyl radical (radOH) oxidation and droplet evaporation) of methylglyoxal (MGly) was studied. Effective vapor pressure and effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap,eff) were determined using 1) droplets containing MGly and its oxidation products, 2) a Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG) system, and 3) Temperature Programmed Desorption Aerosol-Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TPD Aerosol-CIMS). Simulated in-cloud MGly oxidation (for 10-30 min) produces an organic mixture of higher and lower volatility components with an overall effective vapor pressure of (4 ± 7) × 10-7 atm at pH 3. The effective vapor pressure decreases by a factor of 2 with addition of ammonium hydroxide (pH 7). The fraction of organic material remaining in the particle-phase after drying was smaller than for similar experiments with glycolaldehyde and glyoxal SOA. The ΔHvap,eff of pyruvic acid and oxalic acid + methylglyoxal in the mixture (from TPD Aerosol-CIMS) were smaller than the theoretical enthalpies of the pure compounds and smaller than that estimated for the entire precursor/product mix after droplet evaporation. After 10-30 min of aqueous oxidation (one cloud cycle) the majority of the MGly + radOH precursor/product mix (even neutralized) will volatilize during droplet evaporation; neutralization and at least 80 min of oxidation at 10-12 M radOH (or >12 h at 10-14 M) is needed before low volatility ammonium oxalate exceeds pyruvate.

  19. Massively parallel neural circuits for stereoscopic color vision: encoding, decoding and identification.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B; Zhou, Yiyin

    2015-03-01

    Past work demonstrated how monochromatic visual stimuli could be faithfully encoded and decoded under Nyquist-type rate conditions. Color visual stimuli were then traditionally encoded and decoded in multiple separate monochromatic channels. The brain, however, appears to mix information about color channels at the earliest stages of the visual system, including the retina itself. If information about color is mixed and encoded by a common pool of neurons, how can colors be demixed and perceived? We present Color Video Time Encoding Machines (Color Video TEMs) for encoding color visual stimuli that take into account a variety of color representations within a single neural circuit. We then derive a Color Video Time Decoding Machine (Color Video TDM) algorithm for color demixing and reconstruction of color visual scenes from spikes produced by a population of visual neurons. In addition, we formulate Color Video Channel Identification Machines (Color Video CIMs) for functionally identifying color visual processing performed by a spiking neural circuit. Furthermore, we derive a duality between TDMs and CIMs that unifies the two and leads to a general theory of neural information representation for stereoscopic color vision. We provide examples demonstrating that a massively parallel color visual neural circuit can be first identified with arbitrary precision and its spike trains can be subsequently used to reconstruct the encoded stimuli. We argue that evaluation of the functional identification methodology can be effectively and intuitively performed in the stimulus space. In this space, a signal reconstructed from spike trains generated by the identified neural circuit can be compared to the original stimulus.

  20. A New Sail-Backed Styracosternan (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) from the Early Cretaceous of Morella, Spain.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, José Miguel; Escaso, Fernando; Narváez, Iván; Ortega, Francisco; Sanz, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    A new styracosternan ornithopod genus and species is here described based on a partial postcranial skeleton and an associated dentary tooth of a single specimen from the Arcillas de Morella Formation (Early Cretaceous, late Barremian) at the Morella locality, (Castellón, Spain). Morelladon beltrani gen. et sp. nov. is diagnosed by eight autapomorphic features. The set of autapomorphies includes: very elongated and vertical neural spines of the dorsal vertebrae, midline keel on ventral surface of the second to fourth sacral vertebrae restricted to the anterior half of the centrum, a posterodorsally inclined medial ridge on the postacetabular process of the ilium that meets its dorsal margin and distal end of the straight ischial shaft laterally expanded, among others. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the new Iberian form is more closely related to its synchronic and sympatric contemporary European taxa Iguanodon bernissartensis and Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis, known from Western Europe, than to other Early Cretaceous Iberian styracosternans (Delapparentia turolensis and Proa valdearinnoensis). The recognition of Morelladon beltrani gen. et sp. nov. indicates that the Iberian Peninsula was home to a highly diverse medium to large bodied styracosternan assemblage during the Early Cretaceous. PMID:26673161