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Sample records for cintredekin besudotox il13-pe38qqr

  1. Interleukin-13 receptors on human prostate carcinoma cell lines represent a novel target for a chimeric protein composed of IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin.

    PubMed

    Maini, A; Hillman, G; Haas, G P; Wang, C Y; Montecillo, E; Hamzavi, F; Pontes, J E; Leland, P; Pastan, I; Debinski, W; Puri, R K

    1997-09-01

    We have discovered a new cell surface protein in the form of interleukin-13 receptor on several solid tumor cells, including human renal cell carcinoma cells (Obiri et al., 1995; Debinski et al., 1995). This study reports that human prostate cancer cell lines also express high affinity IL-13 receptors (Kd = 159 pM). These receptors are functional because IL-13 surprisingly increased proliferation of all three prostate cancer cell lines studied as determined by thymidine uptake and clonogenic assays. IL-13 receptors on prostate cancer cell lines were targeted using a chimeric protein composed of IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE38QQR). This molecule, termed IL13-PE38QQR, has been found cytotoxic to all three prostate cancer cell lines as determined by the inhibition of protein synthesis. The IC50 ranged between 1 nmol/l, to 15 nmol/l. These data were confirmed by clonogenic assays in which IL13-PE38QQR almost completely inhibited colony formation at 10 nmol/l. IL13-PE38QQR was not cytotoxic to cells that express little or no IL-13R. Heat inactivated IL13-PE38QQR was not cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells indicating specificity. IL13-PE38QQR was also cytotoxic to colonies when they were allowed to form first for several days before the addition of toxins. Our data suggest that additional studies should be performed to target IL-13 receptor bearing prostate cancer.

  2. Gene therapy-mediated delivery of targeted cytotoxins for glioma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Candolfi, Marianela; Xiong, Weidong; Yagiz, Kader; Liu, Chunyan; Muhammad, A K M G; Puntel, Mariana; Foulad, David; Zadmehr, Ali; Ahlzadeh, Gabrielle E; Kroeger, Kurt M; Tesarfreund, Matthew; Lee, Sharon; Debinski, Waldemar; Sareen, Dhruv; Svendsen, Clive N; Rodriguez, Ron; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2010-11-16

    Restricting the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents by targeting receptors exclusively expressed on tumor cells is critical when treating infiltrative brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBMs express an IL-13 receptor (IL13Rα2) that differs from the physiological IL4R/IL13R receptor. We developed a regulatable adenoviral vector (Ad.mhIL-4.TRE.mhIL-13-PE) encoding a mutated human IL-13 fused to Pseudomonas exotoxin (mhIL-13-PE) that specifically binds to IL13Rα2 to provide sustained expression, effective anti-GBM cytotoxicity, and minimal neurotoxicity. The therapeutic Ad also encodes mutated human IL-4 that binds to the physiological IL4R/IL13R without interacting with IL13Rα2, thus inhibiting potential binding of mhIL-13-PE to normal brain cells. Using intracranial GBM xenografts and syngeneic mouse models, we tested the Ad.mhIL-4.TRE.mhIL-13-PE and two protein formulations, hIL-13-PE used in clinical trials (Cintredekin Besudotox) and a second-generation mhIL-13-PE. Cintredekin Besudotox doubled median survival without eliciting long-term survival and caused severe neurotoxicity; mhIL-13-PE led to ∼40% long-term survival, eliciting severe neurological toxicity at the high dose tested. In contrast, Ad-mediated delivery of mhIL-13-PE led to tumor regression and long-term survival in over 70% of the animals, without causing apparent neurotoxicity. Although Cintredekin Besudotox was originally developed to target GBM, when tested in a phase III trial it failed to achieve clinical endpoints and revealed neurotoxicity. Limitations of Cintredekin Besudotox include its short half-life, which demanded frequent or continued administration, and binding to IL4R/IL13R, present in normal brain cells. These shortcomings were overcome by our therapeutic Ad, thus representing a significant advance in the development of targeted therapeutics for GBM.