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Sample records for circulating cd4 t-cells

  1. Interleukin-2 Therapy Induces CD4 Downregulation, Which Decreases Circulating CD4 T Cell Counts, in African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Joseph C.; Perkins, Molly R.; DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Hirsch, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT African green monkeys (AGMs) are natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVAGM). Because these animals do not develop simian AIDS despite maintaining high viral loads, there is considerable interest in determining how these animals have evolved to avoid SIV disease progression. Unlike nonnatural hosts of SIV, adult AGMs maintain low levels of CD4+ T cells at steady states and also have a large population of virus-resistant CD8αα T cells that lack CD4 expression despite maintaining T helper cell functionalities. In recent work, we have shown that homeostatic cytokines can induce CD4 downregulation in AGM T cells in vitro. Through administering therapeutic doses of recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2) to AGMs, we show here that this mechanism is operative in vivo. IL-2 therapy induced transient yet robust proliferation in all major T cell subsets. Within the CD4+ T cell population, those that were induced into cycle by IL-2 exhibited characteristics of CD4-to-CD8αα conversion. In all animals receiving IL-2, circulating CD4+ T cell counts and proportions tended to be lower and CD4− CD8αα+ T cell counts tended to be higher. Despite reductions in circulating target cells, the viral load was unaffected over the course of study. IMPORTANCE The data in this study identify that homeostatic cytokines can downregulate CD4 in vivo and, when given therapeutically, can induce AGMs to sustain very low levels of circulating CD4+ T cells without showing signs of immunodeficiency. PMID:27053558

  2. Dysregulation of circulating CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qijin; Zhai, Xiao; Chen, Xiao; Lu, Jiancan; Zhang, Yaping; Huang, Qin

    2015-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. Follicular helper T cells (Tfh) play critical roles in inducing B-cell activation and producing various cytokines, whereas circulating CD4+CXCR5+ T cells (CTfh) may act as a counterpart to measure Tfh cell disorders. In this study, we investigated whether Tfh could be involved in the development of T2DM by assessing CTfh in peripheral blood. CTfh and it subtypes were determined by measuring CD3, CD4, CXCR5, CXCR3, and CCR6 in 68 T2DM patients and 60 healthy controls using flow cytometry. Results showed that proportion of CTfh in the peripheral CD4+ T cells was significantly increased in T2DM patients (8.5 ± 0.5%) than in controls (4.5 ± 0.3%) (p < 0.001). Further study revealed that the balance of CTfh subtypes was greatly dysregulated, in which percentage of Th17 subtype was significantly increased in patients. Investigating the correlation between CTfh and risk factors of T2DM demonstrated that proportion of CTfh were significantly elevated in patients with body mass index (BMI) over 24.0 (p = 0.005). Interestingly, patients with abdominal obesity had further increase in CTfh than those without abdominal obesity. This study suggests the involvement of CTfh in T2DM, especially in T2DM-related obesity.

  3. Statins Increase the Frequency of Circulating CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Perea, Ana Lucía; Montoya, Carlos J.; Olek, Sven; Chougnet, Claire A.; Velilla, Paula A.

    2015-01-01

    Statins have been shown to modulate the number and the suppressive function of CD4+FOXP3+ T cells (Treg) in inflammatory conditions. However, it is not well established whether statin could also affect Treg in absence of inflammation. To address this question, eighteen normocholesterolemic male subjects were treated with lovastatin or atorvastatin daily for 45 days. The frequency and phenotype of circulating Treg were evaluated at days 0, 7, 30, and 45. mRNA levels of FOXP3, IDO, TGF-β, and IL-10 were measured in CD4+ T cells. We found that both statins significantly increased Treg frequency and FOXP3 mRNA levels at day 30. At day 45, Treg numbers returned to baseline values; however, TGF-β and FOXP3 mRNA levels remained high, accompanied by increased percentages of CTLA-4- and GITR-expressing Treg. Treg Ki-67 expression was decreased upon statin treatment. Treg frequency positively correlated with plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), suggesting a role for HDL-c in Treg homeostasis. Therefore, statins appear to have inflammation-independent immune-modulatory effects. Thus, the increase in Treg cells frequency likely contributes to immunomodulatory effect of statins, even in healthy individuals. PMID:25759848

  4. Impaired Circulating CD4+LAP+ Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Its Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiao-Bo; Yu, Kun-Wu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Peng-Fei; Ren, Ze-Peng; Wu, Bang-Wei; Ji, Qin-Wei; Wang, Xiang; Zeng, Qiu-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Objective CD4+ latency-associated peptide (LAP)+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a newly discovered T cell subset in humans and the role of these cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been explored. We designed to investigate whether circulating frequency and function of CD4+LAP+ Tregs are defective in ACS. Methods One hundred eleven ACS patients (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina) and 117 control patients were enrolled in the study. The control patients consisted of chronic stable angina (CSA) and chest pain syndrome (CPS). The frequencies of circulating CD4+LAP+ Tregs and the expression of the transmembrane protein glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP) on CD4+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. The function of CD4+LAP+ Tregs was detected using thymidine uptake. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β protein (TGF-β) levels were detected using ELISA and expression of GARP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction. Results We found ACS patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4+LAP+ Tregs, and the function of these cells was reduced compared to controls. The expression of GARP in CD4+ T cells and the serum levels of TGF-β in ACS patients were lower than those of control patients. The serum levels of IL-10 were similar between the two cohorts. Conclusions A novel regulatory T cell subset, defined as CD4+LAP+ T cells is defective in ACS patients. PMID:24558424

  5. Skin CD4+ memory T cells exhibit combined cluster-mediated retention and equilibration with the circulation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nicholas; Jiang, Xiaodong; Zaid, Ali; Macleod, Bethany L.; Li, Jane; Park, Chang Ook; Haque, Ashraful; Bedoui, Sammy; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Gebhardt, Thomas; Carbone, Francis R.

    2016-01-01

    Although memory T cells within barrier tissues can persist as permanent residents, at least some exchange with blood. The extent to which this occurs is unclear. Here we show that memory CD4+ T cells in mouse skin are in equilibrium with the circulation at steady state. These cells are dispersed throughout the inter-follicular regions of the dermis and form clusters with antigen presenting cells around hair follicles. After infection or administration of a contact sensitizing agent, there is a sustained increase in skin CD4+ T-cell content, which is confined to the clusters, with a concomitant CCL5-dependent increase in CD4+ T-cell recruitment. Skin CCL5 is derived from CD11b+ cells and CD8+ T cells, with the elimination of the latter decreasing CD4+ T-cell numbers. These results reveal a complex pattern of tissue-retention and equilibration for CD4+ memory T cells in skin, which is altered by infection and inflammation history. PMID:27160938

  6. Preferential loss of gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells and their circulating functional subsets in acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Zhen; Li, Qunhui; Jiao, Yanmei; Ji, Yunxia; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Zhuoming; Li, Wei; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Preferential infection and depletion of gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells in the blood are observed in chronic HIV/SIV infection. The dynamic change in gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells and their functional subsets during the acute stages of HIV-1 infection are less documented. Therefore, we conducted a cohort study to investigate whether acute HIV-1 infection induced abnormalities in gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells and their functional subsets. We examined the frequency, absolute number, and functionality of gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells in 26 acute HIV-1-infected patients compared with 20 healthy individuals. We found that circulating gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells were preferentially depleted during acute HIV-1 infection and were positively correlated with absolute CD4+ T-cell count in blood. Notably, Th17 and Th1 cell subsets of gut-homing CD4+ T cells were also decreased, which resulted in an imbalance of T helper cells (Th1):regulatory T cells (Treg) and Treg:Th17 ratios. Gut-homing Th17 and Th1 cells were also positively correlated with the absolute number of total CD4+ T cells and gut-homing CD4+ T cells. The gut-homing Treg:Th17 ratio was inversely correlated with the CD4+ T-cell count. Taken together, the analyses of our acute HIV-1 cohort demonstrate that gut-homing α4β7 CD4+ T cells and their functional subsets were profoundly depleted during acute HIV-1 infection, which may have resulted in the persistent loss of circulating CD4+ T cells and an imbalance of Th1:Treg and Treg:Th17 ratios and contribute to HIV-1 disease pathogenesis. PMID:26277899

  7. Circulating CXCR5+CD4+ T cells assist in the survival and growth of primary diffuse large B cell lymphoma cells through interleukin 10 pathway.

    PubMed

    Cha, Zhanshan; Qian, Guangfang; Zang, Yan; Gu, Haihui; Huang, Yanyan; Zhu, Lishuang; Li, Jinqi; Liu, Yang; Tu, Xiaohua; Song, Haihan; Qian, Baohua

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common and aggressive cancer caused by the malignant transformation of B cells. Although it has been established that the follicular helper T (Tfh) cells play a central role in B cell development, little information is available on their involvement in DLBCL pathogenesis. We studied the role of the peripheral Tfh equivalent, the CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells, in DLBCL. Data showed that compared to CXCR5(-) CD4(+) T cells, CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells were significantly more effective at promoting the proliferation as well as inhibiting the apoptosis of primary autologous DLBCL tumor cells. Surprisingly, we found that at equal cell numbers, CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells in DLBCL patients secreted significantly less interleukin (IL)-21 than CXCR5(-) CD4(+) T cells, while the level of IL-10 secretion was significant elevated in the CXCR5(+) compartment compared to the CXCR5(-) compartment. Neutralization of IL-10 in the primary DLBCL-CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cell coculture compromised the CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cell-mediated pro-tumor effects, in a manner that was dependent on the concentration of anti-IL-10 antibodies. The CXCR5(+) compartment also contained significantly lower frequencies of cytotoxic CD4(+) T cells than the CXCR5(-) compartment. In conclusion, our investigations discovered a previously unknown pro-tumor role of CXCR5-expressing circulating CD4(+) T cells, which assisted the survival and proliferation of primary DLBCL cells through IL-10.

  8. Substantial increase in the frequency of circulating CD4+NKG2D+ T cells in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The NKG2D receptor confers important activating signals to NK cells via ligands expressed during cellular stress and viral infection. This receptor has generated great interest because not only is it expressed on NK cells, but it is also seen in virtually all CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and is classically considered absent in CD4+ T cells. However, recent studies have identified a distinctive population of CD4+ T cells that do express NKG2D, which could represent a particular cytotoxic effector population involved in viral infections and chronic diseases. On the other hand, increased incidence of human papillomavirus-associated lesions in CD4+ T cell-immunocompromised individuals suggests that CD4+ T cells play a key role in controlling the viral infection. Therefore, this study was focused on identifying the frequency of NKG2D-expressing CD4+ T cells in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1. Additionally, factors influencing CD4+NKG2D+ T cell expansion were also measured. Results Close to 50% of patients with CIN 1 contained at least one of the 37 HPV types detected by our genotyping system. A tendency for increased CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells and decreased NK cells was found in CIN 1 patients. The percentage of circulating CD4+ T cells co-expressing the NKG2D receptor significantly increased in women with CIN 1 versus control group. Interestingly, the increase of CD4+NKG2D+ T cells was seen in patients with CIN 1, despite the overall levels of CD4+ T cells did not significantly increase. We also found a significant increase of soluble MICB in CIN 1 patients; however, no correlation with the presence of CD4+NKG2D+ T cells was seen. While TGF-beta was significantly decreased in the group of CIN 1 patients, both TNF-alpha and IL-15 showed a tendency to increase in this group. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that the significant increase within the CD4+NKG2D+ T cell population in CIN 1 patients might be the result of a

  9. Circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T Cells Exacerbate B Cell Antibody Production in Crohn's Disease Through IL-21 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenlong; Ding, Lan; Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Jinjing; Zhu, Nan; Diao, Yanqing; Demmy, Todd A; Haitsma, Jack M; Lech-Maranda, Ewa E; Bangia, Naveen N; Czuczman, Myron A; Qian, Xiaoli; Kovacs, Kalman L

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) upregulation was observed in Crohn's disease (CD) patients and was shown to contribute to ongoing mucosal inflammation in CD patients through stabilizing Th1 cell differentiation and IFN-γ production. Given the role of IL-21 in mediating adaptive B cell antibody responses in healthy individuals, we examined the effect of IL-21 upregulation in B cell responses in patients with active CD, including ileum, ileocolonic and colon subtypes, defined by the primary site of CD involvement. We first observed an upregulation of blood plasma IL-21 concentration and IL-21 production from CD4(+) T cells in CD patients compared to healthy individuals. The IL-21-expressing T cells were more concentrated in the CD4(+)CXCR5(+) compartment, both in unstimulated medium and after stimulation with SEB. ICOS and PD-1 expressions were also concentrated in the CD4(+)CXCR5(+) subset in CD patients. Since peripheral blood CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cell-mediated antibody secretion is IL-21-dependent, we examined the plasma antibody concentration in CD patients and healthy controls. We found that CD patients had significantly higher plasma Ig level than healthy patients, with no significant differences between different CD subtypes. Higher plasma IL-21 concentration and increased IL-21 production from CD4(+) T cells were directly correlated with higher plasma antibody levels. Moreover, we found that IL-21 and CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells can directly enhance B cell antibody response in CD patients. Depletion of secreted IL-21 by sIL-21R addition compromised the CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cell-mediated increase in antibody production. Together, our results demonstrated a novel role of IL-21 in mediating B cell inflammation in CD development.

  10. Effect of diet and age on jejunal and circulating lymphocyte subsets in children with coeliac disease: persistence of CD4-8-intraepithelial T cells through treatment.

    PubMed

    Verkasalo, M A; Arató, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M

    1990-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to determine the relative numbers of T lymphocyte subsets in 61 jejunal biopsies and in peripheral blood of 35 children with coeliac disease, and of 13 healthy controls. The T cell numbers in the lamina propria were unaffected by a change from gluten-free to gluten containing diet in the patients. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (where the CD8 cells predominated) were significantly raised in patients taking gluten. Ten to 20% of the patients' intraepithelial CD3 (mature T) cells expressed neither CD8 nor CD4 surface antigens. This CD4 8 T cell population persisted through gluten elimination and challenge. The circulating lymphocyte subsets showed little variation with the diet although there was a marked increase in the proportion (14.9%) of CD4 8 T cells in patients during gluten elimination. In the histologically normal jejunal mucosa from control subjects, the age of the subject showed a positive correlation with villus intraepithelial CD3+ and CD8+ cells, and crypt intraepithelial CD4+ cells. No clear cut effect of age was observed on lamina propria lymphocyte counts of the controls, or on the lymphocyte counts in jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients. The observed CD3+4-8- lymphocytes may represent activated cells unable to present their surface antigens, or they may be gamma delta-receptor bearing T cells, which could have a significant role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  11. Subunit vaccine H56/CAF01 induces a population of circulating CD4 T cells that traffic into the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lung

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Joshua S.; Cohen, Sara B.; Moguche, Albanus O.; Plumlee, Courtney R.; Agger, Else Marie; Urdahl, Kevin B.; Andersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of CD4 T cells to protect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is governed by their ability to localize to the lung site of infection. Subunit vaccine H56/CAF01, a liposome-adjuvanted fusion protein of Mtb antigens Ag85B, ESAT-6, and Rv2660, conferred durable protection and elicited polyfunctional CD4 T cells that preferentially localized to the lung parenchyma. These lung-resident T cells had reduced KLRG1 and increased CXCR3 expression, an intermediate state of Th1 differentiation that has been associated with Mtb protection. Importantly, KLGR1−CXCR3+ cells were also enriched in the lung vasculature and peripheral circulation of vaccinated animals, but not controls. Moreover, S1P1R blockade rapidly cleared this population from the blood and adoptive transfer of T cells recovered from the vasculature of vaccinated, but not control, mice efficiently trafficked into the Mtb-infected lung parenchyma. Thus, durable immunity elicited by H56/CAF01 vaccination is associated with the maintenance of circulating CD4 T cells that selectively home to the lung parenchyma. PMID:27554293

  12. Subunit vaccine H56/CAF01 induces a population of circulating CD4 T cells that traffic into the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lung.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, J S; Cohen, S B; Moguche, A O; Plumlee, C R; Agger, E M; Urdahl, K B; Andersen, P

    2017-03-01

    The capacity of CD4 T cells to protect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is governed by their ability to localize to the lung site of infection. Subunit vaccine H56/CAF01, a liposome-adjuvanted fusion protein of Mtb antigens Ag85B, ESAT-6, and Rv2660, conferred durable protection and elicited polyfunctional CD4 T cells that preferentially localized to the lung parenchyma. These lung-resident T cells had reduced KLRG1 and increased CXCR3 expression, an intermediate state of Th1 differentiation that has been associated with Mtb protection. Importantly, KLGR1(-) CXCR3(+) cells were also enriched in the lung vasculature and peripheral circulation of vaccinated animals, but not controls. Moreover, S1P1R blockade rapidly cleared this population from the blood and adoptive transfer of T cells recovered from the vasculature of vaccinated, but not control, mice efficiently trafficked into the Mtb-infected lung parenchyma. Thus, durable immunity elicited by H56/CAF01 vaccination is associated with the maintenance of circulating CD4 T cells that selectively home to the lung parenchyma.

  13. Levels of circulating myeloid subpopulations and of heme oxygenase-1 do not predict CD4+ T cell recovery after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The level (or frequency) of circulating monocyte subpopulations such as classical (CD14hiCD16-) and non-classical (CD14dimCD16+) monocytes varies during the course of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesized that such variation and/or differences in the degree to which these cells expressed the immunoregulatory enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), would be associated with CD4+ T cell recovery after the initiation of ART. This hypothesis was tested in a cross-sectional study of four groups of HIV-infected subjects, including those who were seronegative, untreated virologic controllers [detectable viral load (VL) of <1000 copies/mL], untreated virologic non-controllers [VL > 10,000 copies/mL], and ART-mediated virologic controllers [VL < 75 copies/mL]. A longitudinal analysis of ART-treated subjects was also performed along with regression analysis to determine which biomarkers were associated with and/or predictive of CD4+ T cell recovery. Suppressive ART was associated with increased levels of classical monocyte subpopulations (CD14hiCD16-) and decreased levels of non-classical monocyte populations (CD14dimCD16+). Among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), HO-1 was found to be most highly up-regulated in CD14+ monocytes after ex vivo stimulation. Neither the levels of monocyte subpopulations nor of HO-1 expression in CD14+ monocytes were significantly associated with the degree of CD4+ T cell recovery. Monocyte subpopulations and HO-1 gene expression were, however, restored to normal levels by suppressive ART. These results suggest that the level of circulating monocyte subpopulations and their expression of HO-1 have no evident relationship to CD4+ T cell recovery after the initiation of ART. PMID:25180041

  14. Development of promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-expressing innate CD4 T cells requires stronger T-cell receptor signals than conventional CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Zhu, Lingqiao; Sofi, Hanief; Lapinski, Philip E; Horai, Reiko; Mueller, Kristen; Stritesky, Gretta L; He, Xi; Teh, Hung-Sia; Wiest, David L; Kappes, Dietmar J; King, Philip D; Hogquist, Kristin A; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-10-02

    MHC class II-expressing thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells can mediate CD4 T-cell selection resulting in functionally distinct thymocyte-selected CD4 (T-CD4) and epithelial-selected CD4 (E-CD4) T cells, respectively. However, little is known about how T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling influences the development of these two CD4 T-cell subsets. To study TCR signaling for T-CD4 T-cell development, we used a GFP reporter system of Nur77 in which GFP intensity directly correlates with TCR signaling strength. T-CD4 T cells expressed higher levels of GFP than E-CD4 T cells, suggesting that T-CD4 T cells received stronger TCR signaling than E-CD4 T cells during selection. Elimination of Ras GTPase-activating protein enhanced E-CD4 but decreased T-CD4 T-cell selection efficiency, suggesting a shift to negative selection. Conversely, the absence of IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase that causes poor E-CD4 T-cell selection due to insufficient TCR signaling improved T-CD4 T-cell generation, consistent with rescue from negative selection. Strong TCR signaling during T-CD4 T-cell development correlates with the expression of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein. However, although modulation of the signaling strength affected the efficiency of T-CD4 T-cell development during positive and negative selection, the signaling strength is not as important for the effector function of T-CD4 T cells. These findings indicate that innate T-CD4 T cells, together with invariant natural killer T cells and γδ T cells, receive strong TCR signals during their development and that signaling requirements for the development and the effector functions are distinct.

  15. Immune memory in CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, D; Chapman, M D; Sasama, J; Lee, T H; Kemeny, D M

    1997-01-01

    This study addresses the question of whether human peripheral CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells possess antigen-specific immune memory. CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells were isolated by a combination of positive and negative selection. Putative CD4+ CD45RA+ cells expressed CD45RA (98.9%) and contained < 0.1% CD4+ CD45RO+ and < 0.5% CD4+ CD45RA+ CD45RO+ cells. Putative CD45RO+ cells expressed CD45RO (90%) and contained 9% CD45RA+ CD45RO+ and < 0.1% CD4+ CD45RA+ cells. The responder frequency of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus-stimulated CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells was determined in two atopic donors and found to be 1:11,314 and 1:8031 for CD4+ CD45RA+ and 1:1463 and 1:1408 for CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells. The responder frequencies of CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells from two non-atopic, but exposed, donors were 1:78031 and 1:176,903 for CD4+ CD45RA+ and 1:9136 and 1:13,136 for CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells. T cells specific for D. pteronyssinus were cloned at limiting dilution following 10 days of bulk culture with D. pteronyssinus antigen. Sixty-eight clones were obtained from CD4+ CD45RO+ and 24 from CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells. All clones were CD3+ CD4+ CD45RO+ and proliferated in response to D. pteronyssinus antigens. Of 40 clones tested, none responded to Tubercule bacillus purified protein derivative (PPD). No difference was seen in the pattern of interleukin-4 (IL-4) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) producing clones derived from CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ precursors, although freshly isolated and polyclonally activated CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells produced 20-30-fold lower levels of IL-4 and IFN-gamma than their CD4+ CD45RO+ counterparts. Sixty per cent of the clones used the same pool of V beta genes. These data support the hypothesis that immune memory resides in CD4+ CD45RA+ as well as CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells during the chronic immune response to inhaled antigen. PMID:9301520

  16. CD62LnegCD38+ expression on circulating CD4+ T cells identifies mucosally differentiated cells in protein fed mice and in human celiac disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    du Pré, M. Fleur; van Berkel, Lisette A.; Ráki, Melinda; van Leeuwen, Marieke A.; de Ruiter, Lilian F.; Broere, Femke; ter Borg, Mariëtte N.D.; Lund, Frances E.; Escher, Johanna C.; Lundin, Knut E. A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Kraal, Georg; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Samsom, Janneke N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify new markers of mucosal T cells to monitor ongoing intestinal immune responses in peripheral blood. Design Expression of cell-surface markers was studied in mice on ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells in the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) after OVA feed. The effect of the local mucosal mediators retinoic acid (RA) and TGF-β on the induction of a mucosal phenotype was determined in in vitro T-cell differentiation assays with murine and human T cells. Tetramer stainings were performed to study gluten-specific T cells in the circulation of patients with celiac disease, a chronic small intestinal inflammation. Results In mice, proliferating T cells in MLN were CD62LnegCD38+ during both tolerance induction and abrogation of intestinal homeostasis. This mucosal CD62LnegCD38+ T-cell phenotype was efficiently induced by RA and TGF-β in mice, whereas for human CD4+ T cells RA alone was sufficient. The CD4+CD62LnegCD38+ T-cell phenotype could be used to identify T cells with mucosal origin in human peripheral blood, as expression of the gut-homing chemokine receptor CCR9 and β7 integrin were highly enriched in this subset whereas expression of cutaneous leukocyte associated antigen was almost absent. Tetramer staining revealed that gluten-specific T cells appearing in blood of treated celiac disease patients after oral gluten challenge were predominantly CD4+CD62LnegCD38+. The total percentage of circulating CD62LnegCD38+ of CD4 T cells was not an indicator of intestinal inflammation as percentages did not differ between pediatric celiac disease patients, inflammatory bowel disease patients and respective controls. However, the phenotypic selection of mucosal T cells allowed cytokine profiling as upon restimulation of CD62LnegCD38+ cells IL-10 and IFN-γ transcripts were readily detected in circulating mucosal T-cells. Conclusions By selecting for CD62LnegCD38+ expression which comprises 5–10% of the cells within

  17. Administration of interleukin-7 increases CD4 T cells in idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Brian O.; DerSimonian, Rebecca; Kovacs, Stephen B.; Thompson, William L.; Perez-Diez, Ainhoa; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Roby, Gregg; Mican, JoAnn; Pau, Alice; Rupert, Adam; Adelsberger, Joseph; Higgins, Jeanette; Bourgeois, Jeffrey S.; Jensen, Stig M. R.; Morcock, David R.; Burbelo, Peter D.; Osnos, Leah; Maric, Irina; Natarajan, Ven; Croughs, Therese; Yao, Michael D.; Estes, Jacob D.; Sereti, Irini

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic CD4 lymphopenia (ICL) is a rare syndrome defined by low CD4 T-cell counts (<300/µL) without evidence of HIV infection or other known cause of immunodeficiency. ICL confers an increased risk of opportunistic infections and has no established treatment. Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is fundamental for thymopoiesis, T-cell homeostasis, and survival of mature T cells, which provides a rationale for its potential use as an immunotherapeutic agent for ICL. We performed an open-label phase 1/2A dose-escalation trial of 3 subcutaneous doses of recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) per week in patients with ICL who were at risk of disease progression. The primary objectives of the study were to assess safety and the immunomodulatory effects of rhIL-7 in ICL patients. Injection site reactions were the most frequently reported adverse events. One patient experienced a hypersensitivity reaction and developed non-neutralizing anti-IL-7 antibodies. Patients with autoimmune diseases that required systemic therapy at screening were excluded from the study; however, 1 participant developed systemic lupus erythematosus while on study and was excluded from further rhIL-7 dosing. Quantitatively, rhIL-7 led to an increase in the number of circulating CD4 and CD8 T cells and tissue-resident CD3 T cells in the gut mucosa and bone marrow. Functionally, these T cells were capable of producing cytokines after mitogenic stimulation. rhIL-7 was well tolerated at biologically active doses and may represent a promising therapeutic intervention in ICL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00839436. PMID:26675348

  18. CD4 CTL, a Cytotoxic Subset of CD4+ T Cells, Their Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Arata; Saito, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cells with cytotoxic activity (CD4 CTL) have been observed in various immune responses. These cells are characterized by their ability to secrete granzyme B and perforin and to kill the target cells in an MHC class II-restricted fashion. Although CD4 CTLs were once thought to be an in vitro artifact associated with long-term culturing, they have since been identified in vivo and shown to play important roles in antiviral and antitumor immunity, as well as in inflammation. Functional characterization of CD4 CTL suggests their potential significance for therapeutic purposes. However, in order to develop effective CD4 CTL therapy it is necessary to understand the differentiation and generation of these cells. Although the mechanisms regulating development of various CD4+ Th subsets have been clarified in terms of the cytokine and transcription factor requirement, the CD4 CTL differentiation mechanism remains elusive. These cells are thought to be most closely related to Th1 cells secreting IFNγ and regulated by eomesodermin and/or T-bet transcription factors for their differentiation. However, our studies and those of others have identified CD4 CTLs within other CD4+ T cell subsets, including naïve T cells. We have identified class I-restricted T cell-associated molecule as a marker of CD4 CTL and, by using this marker, we detected a subset of naïve T cells that have the potential to differentiate into CD4 CTL. CD4 CTL develops at sites of infections as well as inflammation. In this review, we summarize recent findings about the generation of CD4 CTL and propose a model with several differentiation pathways. PMID:28280496

  19. Low SAMHD1 expression following T-cell activation and proliferation renders CD4+ T cells susceptible to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Brezar, Vedran; Ayinde, Diana; Lefebvre, Cécile; Wiesch, Julian Schulze Zur; van Lunzen, Jan; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Schwartz, Olivier; Hocini, Hakim; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Banchereau, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Seddiki, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: HIV-1 replication depends on the state of cell activation and division. It is established that SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 infection of resting CD4+ T cells. The modulation of SAMHD1 expression during T-cell activation and proliferation, however, remains unclear, as well as a role for SAMHD1 during HIV-1 pathogenesis. Methods: SAMHD1 expression was assessed in CD4+ T cells after their activation and in-vitro HIV-1 infection. We performed phenotype analyzes using flow cytometry on CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood and lymph nodes from cohorts of HIV-1-infected individuals under antiretroviral treatment or not, and controls. Results: We show that SAMHD1 expression decreased during CD4+ T-cell proliferation in association with an increased susceptibility to in-vitro HIV-1 infection. Additionally, circulating memory CD4+ T cells are enriched in cells with low levels of SAMHD1. These SAMHD1low cells are highly differentiated, exhibit a large proportion of Ki67+ cycling cells and are enriched in T-helper 17 cells. Importantly, memory SAMHD1low cells were depleted from peripheral blood of HIV-infected individuals. We also found that follicular helper T cells present in secondary lymphoid organs lacked the expression of SAMHD1, which was accompanied by a higher susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. Conclusion: We demonstrate that SAMHD1 expression is decreased during CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation. Also, CD4+ T-cell subsets known to be more susceptible to HIV-1 infection, for example, T-helper 17 and follicular helper T cells, display lower levels of SAMHD1. These results pin point a role for SAMHD1 expression in HIV-1 infection and the concomitant depletion of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25715102

  20. Differential T cell receptor-mediated signaling in naive and memory CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Farber, D L; Acuto, O; Bottomly, K

    1997-08-01

    Naive and memory CD4 T cells differ in cell surface phenotype, function, activation requirements, and modes of regulation. To investigate the molecular bases for the dichotomies between naive and memory CD4 T cells and to understand how the T cell receptor (TCR) directs diverse functional outcomes, we investigated proximal signaling events triggered through the TCR/CD3 complex in naive and memory CD4 T cell subsets isolated on the basis of CD45 isoform expression. Naive CD4 T cells signal through TCR/CD3 similar to unseparated CD4 T cells, producing multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated protein species overall and phosphorylating the T cell-specific ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase which is recruited to the CD3zeta subunit of the TCR. Memory CD4 T cells, however, exhibit a unique pattern of signaling through TCR/CD3. Following stimulation through TCR/CD3, memory CD4 T cells produce fewer species of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates and fail to phosphorylate ZAP-70, yet unphosphorylated ZAP-70 can associate with the TCR/CD3 complex. Moreover, a 26/28-kDa phosphorylated doublet is associated with CD3zeta in resting and activated memory but not in naive CD4 T cells. Despite these differences in the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and CD3-associated proteins, the ZAP-70-related kinase, p72syk, exhibits similar phosphorylation in naive and memory T cell subsets, suggesting that this kinase could function in place of ZAP-70 in memory CD4 T cells. These results indicate that proximal signals are differentially coupled to the TCR in naive versus memory CD4 T cells, potentially leading to distinct downstream signaling events and ultimately to the diverse functions elicited by these two CD4 T cell subsets.

  1. Normalization of CD4+ T Cell Metabolism Reverses Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yiming; Choi, Seung-Chul; Xu, Zhiwei; Perry, Daniel J.; Seay, Howard; Croker, Byron P.; Sobel, Eric S.; Brusko, Todd M.; Morel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease in which autoreactive CD4+ T cells play an essential role. CD4+ T cells rely on glycolysis for inflammatory effector functions, but recent studies have shown that mitochondrial metabolism supports their chronic activation. How these processes contribute to lupus is unclear. Here, we show that both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are elevated in CD4+ T cells from lupus-prone B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (TC) mice as compared to non-autoimmune controls. In vitro, both the mitochondrial metabolism inhibitor metformin and the glucose metabolism inhibitor 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) reduced IFNγ production, although at different stages of activation. Metformin also restored the defective IL-2 production by TC CD4+ T cells. In vivo, treatment of TC mice and other lupus models with a combination of metformin and 2DG normalized T cell metabolism and reversed disease biomarkers. Further, CD4+ T cells from SLE patients also exhibited enhanced glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism that correlated with their activation status, and their excessive IFNγ production was significantly reduced by metformin in vitro. These results suggest that normalization of T cell metabolism through the dual inhibition of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism is a promising therapeutic venue for SLE. PMID:25673763

  2. NY-ESO-1-specific circulating CD4+ T cells in ovarian cancer patients are prevalently T(H)1 type cells undetectable in the CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg compartment.

    PubMed

    Redjimi, Nassima; Duperrier-Amouriaux, Karine; Raimbaud, Isabelle; Luescher, Immanuel; Dojcinovic, Danijel; Classe, Jean-Marc; Berton-Rigaud, Dominique; Frenel, Jean-Sébastien; Bourbouloux, Emmanuelle; Valmori, Danila; Ayyoub, Maha

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous CD4(+) T-cell responses to the tumor-specific antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) are frequently found in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). If these responses are of effector or/and Treg type, however, has remained unclear. Here, we have used functional approaches together with recently developed MHC class II/ESO tetramers to assess the frequency, phenotype and function of ESO-specific cells in circulating lymphocytes from EOC patients. We found that circulating ESO-specific CD4(+) T cells in EOC patients with spontaneous immune responses to the antigen are prevalently T(H)1 type cells secreting IFN-γ but no IL-17 or IL-10 and are not suppressive. We detected tetramer(+) cells ex vivo, at an average frequency of 1:25,000 memory cells, that is, significantly lower than in patients immunized with an ESO vaccine. ESO tetramer(+) cells were mostly effector memory cells at advanced stages of differentiation and were not detected in circulating CD25(+)FOXP3(+)Treg. Thus, spontaneous CD4(+) T-cell responses to ESO in cancer patients are prevalently of T(H)1 type and not Treg. Their relatively low frequency and advanced differentiation stage, however, may limit their efficacy, that may be boosted by immunogenic ESO vaccines.

  3. Dysregulation of CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; He, Wenxiu; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and potential IA rupture are one of the direct causes of permanent brain damage and mortality. Interestingly, the major risk factors of IA development, including hemodynamic stress, hypertension, smoking, and genetic predispositions, are closely associated with a proinflammatory immune status. Therefore, we examined the roles of CD4(+) T cells in IA pathogenesis. IA patients exhibited peripheral CD4(+) T-cell imbalance, with overrepresented T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 activities and underrepresented Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) activities, including increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 production and decreased IL-10 production from total CD4(+) T cells. Chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 were used to identify Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell subsets, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) was used to identify Treg cells. Based on these markers, the data then showed altered cytokine production by each cell type and shifted subpopulation frequency. Moreover, this shift in frequency was directly correlated with IA severity. To examine the underlying mechanism of CD4(+) T cell skewing, we cocultured CD4(+) T cells with autologous monocytes and found that coculture with monocytes could significantly increase IFN-γ and IL-17 production through contact-independent mechanisms, demonstrating that monocytes could potentially contribute to the altered CD4(+) T cell composition in IA. Analyzing mRNA transcripts revealed significantly upregulated IL-1β and TNF-α expression by monocytes from IA patients. We found a loss of CD4(+) T cell subset balance that was likely to promote a higher state of inflammation in IA, which may exacerbate the disease through a positive feedback loop.

  4. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  5. Development of a device for selective removal of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hirokazu; Ninomiya, Kasumi; Yoshida, Makoto; Matsuo, Hidenori; Shibuya, Noritoshi

    2003-06-01

    To control antigen (Ag)-specific immune cells is important in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In particular, controlling the immune response of autoimmune T cells is effective in the treatment of these diseases. The development of a device that can remove CD4+ T cells specifically by extracorporeal circulation is now in progress, with the aim to deplete autoimmune T cells. We developed a removal material made of polypropylene non-woven fabrics with anti human CD4 monoclonal antibody immobilized on the surface. Using a column packed with the removal material, we succeeded in removing CD4+ T cells specifically from peripheral whole blood by direct perfusion. Moreover, CD4+ T cells can be specifically removed even from blood with lower surface antigen density by in vitro activation.

  6. CD4+ regulatory T cell responses induced by T cell vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jian; Zang, Ying C. Q.; Nie, Hong; Zhang, Jingwu Z.

    2006-01-01

    Immunization with irradiated autologous T cells (T cell vaccination) is shown to induce regulatory T cell responses that are poorly understood. In this study, CD4+ regulatory T cell lines were generated from patients with multiple sclerosis that received immunization with irradiated autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells. The resulting CD4+ regulatory T cell lines had marked inhibition on autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells and displayed two distinctive patterns distinguishable by the expression of transcription factor Foxp3 and cytokine profile. The majority of the T cell lines had high Foxp3 expression and secreted both IFN-γ and IL-10 as compared with the other pattern characteristic of low Foxp3 expression and predominant production of IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD4+ regulatory T cell lines of both patterns expressed CD25 and reacted with activated autologous T cells but not resting T cells, irrespective of antigen specificity of the target T cells. It was evident that they recognized preferentially a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 61–73 of the IL-2 receptor α chain. T cell vaccination correlated with increased Foxp3 expression and T cell reactivity to peptide 61–73. The findings have important implications in the understanding of the role of CD4+ regulatory T cell response induced by T cell vaccination. PMID:16547138

  7. Circulating precursor CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) CXCR5⁺ CD4T cells indicate Tfh cell activity and promote antibody responses upon antigen reexposure.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Tsai, Louis M; Leong, Yew Ann; Hu, Xin; Ma, Cindy S; Chevalier, Nina; Sun, Xiaolin; Vandenberg, Kirsten; Rockman, Steve; Ding, Yan; Zhu, Lei; Wei, Wei; Wang, Changqi; Karnowski, Alexander; Belz, Gabrielle T; Ghali, Joanna R; Cook, Matthew C; Riminton, D Sean; Veillette, André; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Mackay, Fabienne; Brink, Robert; Tangye, Stuart G; Vinuesa, Carola G; Mackay, Charles R; Li, Zhanguo; Yu, Di

    2013-10-17

    Follicular B helper T (Tfh) cells support high affinity and long-term antibody responses. Here we found that within circulating CXCR5⁺ CD4T cells in humans and mice, the CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) subset has a partial Tfh effector phenotype, whereas CCR7(hi)PD-1(lo) cells have a resting phenotype. The circulating CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) subset was indicative of active Tfh differentiation in lymphoid organs and correlated with clinical indices in autoimmune diseases. Thus the CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) subset provides a biomarker to monitor protective antibody responses during infection or vaccination and pathogenic antibody responses in autoimmune diseases. Differentiation of both CCR7(hi)PD-1(lo) and CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) subsets required ICOS and BCL6, but not SAP, suggesting that circulating CXCR5⁺ helper T cells are primarily generated before germinal centers. Upon antigen reencounter, CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) CXCR5⁺ precursors rapidly differentiate into mature Tfh cells to promote antibody responses. Therefore, circulating CCR7(lo)PD-1(hi) CXCR5⁺ CD4T cells are generated during active Tfh differentiation and represent a new mechanism of immunological early memory.

  8. A novel differentiation pathway from CD4+ T cells to CD4T cells for maintaining immune system homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X; Sun, G; Sun, X; Tian, D; Liu, K; Liu, T; Cong, M; Xu, H; Li, X; Shi, W; Tian, Y; Yao, J; Guo, H; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T lymphocytes are key players in the adaptive immune system and can differentiate into a variety of effector and regulatory T cells. Here, we provide evidence that a novel differentiation pathway of CD4+ T cells shifts the balance from a destructive T-cell response to one that favors regulation in an immune-mediated liver injury model. Peripheral CD4−CD8−NK1.1− double-negative T cells (DNT) was increased following Concanavalin A administration in mice. Adoptive transfer of DNT led to significant protection from hepatocyte necrosis by direct inhibition on the activation of lymphocytes, a process that occurred primarily through the perforin-granzyme B route. These DNT converted from CD4+ rather than CD8+ T cells, a process primarily regulated by OX40. DNT migrated to the liver through the CXCR3-CXCL9/CXCL10 interaction. In conclusion, we elucidated a novel differentiation pathway from activated CD4+ T cells to regulatory DNT cells for maintaining homeostasis of the immune system in vivo, and provided key evidence that utilizing this novel differentiation pathway has potential application in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27077809

  9. CD4+ T Cells: guardians of the phagosome.

    PubMed

    Tubo, Noah J; Jenkins, Marc K

    2014-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells are key cells of the adaptive immune system that use T cell antigen receptors to recognize peptides that are generated in endosomes or phagosomes and displayed on the host cell surface bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules. These T cells participate in immune responses that protect hosts from microbes such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Leishmania major, and Salmonella enterica, which have evolved to live in the phagosomes of macrophages and dendritic cells. Here, we review studies indicating that CD4(+) T cells control phagosomal infections asymptomatically in most individuals by secreting cytokines that activate the microbicidal activities of infected phagocytes but in a way that inhibits the pathogen but does not eliminate it. Indeed, we make the case that localized, controlled, persistent infection is necessary to maintain large numbers of CD4(+) effector T cells in a state of activation needed to eradicate systemic and more pathogenic forms of the infection. Finally, we posit that current vaccines for phagosomal infections fail because they do not produce this "periodic reminder" form of CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune control.

  10. Apoptotic depletion of CD4+ T cells in idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, J; Mitra, D; Steiner, M; Lynch, D H; Siegal, F P; Staiano-Coico, L

    1996-01-01

    Progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, accompanied by opportunistic infections characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome, ahs been reported in the absence of any known etiology. The pathogenesis of this syndrome, a subset of idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia (ICL), is uncertain. We report that CD4+ T cells from seven of eight ICL patients underwent accelerated programmed cell death, a process facilitated by T cell receptor cross-linking. Apoptosis was associated with enhanced expression of Fas and Fas ligand in unstimulated cell populations, and partially inhibited by soluble anti-Fas mAb. In addition, apoptosis was suppressed by aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-dependent endonucleases and proteases, in cells from four of seven patients, The in vivo significance of these findings was supported by three factors: the absence of accelerated apoptosis in persons with stable, physiologic CD4 lymphopenia without clinical immune deficiency; detection of serum antihistone H2B autoantibodies, one consequence of DNA fragmentation, in some patients; and its selectivity, with apoptosis limited to the CD4 population in some, and occurring among CD8+ T cells predominantly in those individuals with marked depletion of both CD4+ T lymphocytes linked to clinical immune suppression have evidence for accelerated T cell apoptosis in vitro that may be pathophysiologic and amenable to therapy with apoptosis inhibitors. PMID:8609222

  11. CD4+ T cell activation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Verselis, S J; Goust, J M

    1987-02-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by CD4-enriched T cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and normal individuals stimulated with concanavalin A (conA) and/or autologous and allogeneic B lymphoid cell lines (B-LCL) was evaluated 24, 48 and 96 h after stimulation. ConA-stimulated CD4+ cells from MS patients did not produce significantly more IL-2 than normal CD4+ cells. In contrast, autologous B-LCL-induced IL-2 production by MS CD4+ cells significantly (P = 0.026) exceeded that produced by normal CD4+ cells identically stimulated after 24 h in culture. Differences in IL-2 production by CD4+ cells from MS patients reached highest significance using allogeneic B-LCL, whose stimulatory capacity was similar, whether established from normal individuals or MS patients. This increased IL-2 production in response to B-LCL may represent a supranormal response of CD4+ cells from MS patients to class II major histocompatibility (MHC)-associated stimuli. It suggests that the deficiency of suppressor T cell functions postulated to play a role in MS does not arise from a lack of IL-2 induction and might indicate that bursts of IL-2 production could play a role in MS.

  12. Cellular Plasticity of CD4+ T Cells in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Brucklacher-Waldert, Verena; Carr, Edward J.; Linterman, Michelle A.; Veldhoen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Barrier sites such as the gastrointestinal tract are in constant contact with the environment, which contains both beneficial and harmful components. The immune system at the epithelia must make the distinction between these components to balance tolerance, protection, and immunopathology. This is achieved via multifaceted immune recognition, highly organized lymphoid structures, and the interaction of many types of immune cells. The adaptive immune response in the gut is orchestrated by CD4+ helper T (Th) cells, which are integral to gut immunity. In recent years, it has become apparent that the functional identity of these Th cells is not as fixed as initially thought. Plasticity in differentiated T cell subsets has now been firmly established, in both health and disease. The gut, in particular, utilizes CD4+ T cell plasticity to mold CD4+ T cell phenotypes to maintain its finely poised balance of tolerance and inflammation and to encourage biodiversity within the enteric microbiome. In this review, we will discuss intestinal helper T cell plasticity and our current understanding of its mechanisms, including our growing knowledge of an evolutionarily ancient symbiosis between microbiota and malleable CD4+ T cell effectors. PMID:25339956

  13. Peripheral and site-specific CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients show distinct characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pieper, J; Johansson, S; Snir, O; Linton, L; Rieck, M; Buckner, J H; Winqvist, O; van Vollenhoven, R; Malmström, V

    2014-02-01

    Proinflammatory CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells are frequently found in the circulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but are less common in the rheumatic joint. In the present study, we sought to identify functional differences between CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from blood and synovial fluid in comparison with conventional CD28-expressing CD4(+) T cells. Forty-four patients with RA, displaying a distinct CD4(+) CD28(null) T cell population in blood, were recruited for this study; the methylation status of the IFNG locus was examined in isolated T cell subsets, and intracellular cytokine production (IFN-γ, TNF, IL-17) and chemokine receptor expression (CXCR3, CCR6 and CCR7) were assessed by flow cytometry on T cells from the two compartments. Circulating CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells were significantly more hypomethylated in the CNS-1 region of the IFNG locus than conventional CD4(+) CD28(+) T cells and produced higher levels of both IFN-γ and TNF after TCR cross-linking. CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from the site of inflammation expressed significantly more CXCR3 and CCR6 compared to their counterparts in blood. While IL-17A production could hardly be detected in CD4(+) CD28(null) cells from the blood, a significant production was observed in CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from synovial fluid. CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells were not only found to differ from conventional CD4(+) CD28(+) T cells in the circulation, but we could also demonstrate that synovial CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells showed additional effector functions (IL-17 coproduction) as compared to the same subset in peripheral blood, suggesting an active role for these cells in the perpetuation of inflammation in the subset of patients having a CD28(null) population.

  14. STAT5 and CD4 + T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David L.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    STAT5 plays a critical role in the development and function of many cell types. Here, we review the role of STAT5 in the development of T lymphocytes in the thymus and its subsequent role in the differentiation of distinct CD4 + helper and regulatory T-cell subsets. PMID:28163905

  15. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, P A; Fu, H H; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, Q M; Puddington, L; Khanna, K M; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, B S

    2017-03-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T-cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T-cell response after oral infection with an internalin A 'murinized' Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T-cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the 'gut-homing' integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of interleukin (IL)-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27(-) Ly6C(-) and CD69(+) CD103(-) while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69(-). LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens.

  16. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, PA; Fu, HH; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, QM; Puddington, L; Khanna, KM; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, BS

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T cell response after oral infection with an internalin A ‘murinized’ Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the ‘gut-homing’ integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of IL-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27− Ly6C− and CD69+ CD103− while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69−. LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens. PMID:27461178

  17. The transcriptome of HIV-1 infected intestinal CD4+ T cells exposed to enteric bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Stephanie M.; Phang, Tzu; Lee, Eric J.; Helm, Karen; Kappes, John C.; McCarter, Martin D.

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptome studies can help pinpoint key cellular pathways exploited by viruses to replicate and cause pathogenesis. Previous data showed that laboratory-adapted HIV-1 triggers significant gene expression changes in CD4+ T cell lines and mitogen-activated CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood. However, HIV-1 primarily targets mucosal compartments during acute infection in vivo. Moreover, early HIV-1 infection causes extensive depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract that herald persistent inflammation due to the translocation of enteric microbes to the systemic circulation. Here, we profiled the transcriptome of primary intestinal CD4+ T cells infected ex vivo with transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1. Infections were performed in the presence or absence of Prevotella stercorea, a gut microbe enriched in the mucosa of HIV-1-infected individuals that enhanced both TF HIV-1 replication and CD4+ T cell death ex vivo. In the absence of bacteria, HIV-1 triggered a cellular shutdown response involving the downregulation of HIV-1 reactome genes, while perturbing genes linked to OX40, PPAR and FOXO3 signaling. However, in the presence of bacteria, HIV-1 did not perturb these gene sets or pathways. Instead, HIV-1 enhanced granzyme expression and Th17 cell function, inhibited G1/S cell cycle checkpoint genes and triggered downstream cell death pathways in microbe-exposed gut CD4+ T cells. To gain insights on these differential effects, we profiled the gene expression landscape of HIV-1-uninfected gut CD4+ T cells exposed to bacteria. Microbial exposure upregulated genes involved in cellular proliferation, MAPK activation, Th17 cell differentiation and type I interferon signaling. Our findings reveal that microbial exposure influenced how HIV-1 altered the gut CD4+ T cell transcriptome, with potential consequences for HIV-1 susceptibility, cell survival and inflammation. The HIV-1- and microbe-altered pathways unraveled here may serve as a molecular blueprint

  18. CD4+ T cell anergy prevents autoimmunity and generates regulatory T cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kalekar, Lokesh A.; Schmiel, Shirdi E.; Nandiwada, Sarada L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Barsness, Laura O.; Zhang, Na; Stritesky, Gretta L.; Malhotra, Deepali; Pauken, Kristen E.; Linehan, Jonathan L.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Fife, Brian T.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Mueller, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The role that anergy, an acquired state of T cell functional unresponsiveness, plays in natural peripheral tolerance remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that anergy is selectively induced in fetal antigen-specific maternal CD4+ T cells during pregnancy. A naturally occurring subpopulation of anergic polyclonal CD4+ T cells, enriched in self antigen-specific T cell receptors, is also observed in healthy hosts. Neuropilin-1 expression in anergic conventional CD4+ T cells is associated with thymic regulatory T cell (Treg cell)-related gene hypomethylation, and this correlates with their capacity to differentiate into Foxp3+ Treg cells that suppress immunopathology. Thus, our data suggest that not only is anergy induction important in preventing autoimmunity, but it also generates the precursors for peripheral Treg cell differentiation. PMID:26829766

  19. CD4 T-cell memory generation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Gasper, David J; Tejera, Melba Marie; Suresh, M

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic memory is the adaptive immune system's powerful ability to remember a previous antigen encounter and react with accelerated vigor upon antigen re-exposure. It provides durable protection against reinfection with pathogens and is the foundation for vaccine-induced immunity. Unlike the relatively restricted immunologic purview of memory B cells and CD8 T cells, the field of CD4 T-cell memory must account for multiple distinct lineages with diverse effector functions, the issue of lineage commitment and plasticity, and the variable distribution of memory cells within each lineage. Here, we discuss the evidence for lineage-specific CD4 T-cell memory and summarize the known factors contributing to memory-cell generation, plasticity, and long-term maintenance.

  20. Unusual CD4+CD28− T Cells and Their Pathogenic Role in Chronic Inflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga Hye

    2016-01-01

    CD28 is a primary co-stimulatory receptor that is essential for successful T cell activation, proliferation, and survival. While ubiquitously expressed on naive T cells, the level of CD28 expression on memory T cells is largely dependent on the T-cell differentiation stage in humans. Expansion of circulating T cells lacking CD28 was originally considered a hallmark of age-associated immunological changes in humans, with a progressive loss of CD28 following replicative senescence with advancing age. However, an increasing body of evidence has revealed that there is a significant age-inappropriate expansion of CD4+CD28− T cells in patients with a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, suggesting that these cells play a role in their pathogenesis. In fact, expanded CD4+CD28− T cells can produce large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α and also have cytotoxic potential, which may cause tissue damage and development of pathogenesis in many inflammatory disorders. Here we review the characteristics of CD4+CD28− T cells as well as the recent advances highlighting the contribution of these cells to several disease conditions. PMID:28035207

  1. Gene Editing of CCR5 in Autologous CD4 T Cells of Persons Infected with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Tang, Winson W.; Frank, Ian; Wang, Shelley Q.; Lee, Gary; Spratt, S. Kaye; Surosky, Richard T.; Giedlin, Martin A.; Nichol, Geoff; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Ando, Dale G.; Kalos, Michael; Collman, Ronald G.; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Plesa, Gabriela; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CCR5 is the major coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We investigated whether site-specific modification of the gene (“gene editing”) — in this case, the infusion of autologous CD4 T cells in which the CCR5 gene was rendered permanently dysfunctional by a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) — is safe. METHODS We enrolled 12 patients in an open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled study of a single dose of ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells. The patients had chronic aviremic HIV infection while they were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Six of them underwent an interruption in antiretroviral treatment 4 weeks after the infusion of 10 billion autologous CD4 T cells, 11 to 28% of which were genetically modified with the ZFN. The primary outcome was safety as assessed by treatment-related adverse events. Secondary outcomes included measures of immune reconstitution and HIV resistance. RESULTS One serious adverse event was associated with infusion of the ZFN-modified autologous CD4 T cells and was attributed to a transfusion reaction. The median CD4 T-cell count was 1517 per cubic millimeter at week 1, a significant increase from the preinfusion count of 448 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). The median concentration of CCR5-modified CD4 T cells at 1 week was 250 cells per cubic millimeter. This constituted 8.8% of circulating peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and 13.9% of circulating CD4 T cells. Modified cells had an estimated mean half-life of 48 weeks. During treatment interruption and the resultant viremia, the decline in circulating CCR5-modified cells (−1.81 cells per day) was significantly less than the decline in unmodified cells (−7.25 cells per day) (P = 0.02). HIV RNA became undetectable in one of four patients who could be evaluated. The blood level of HIV DNA decreased in most patients. CONCLUSIONS CCR5-modified autologous CD4 T-cell infusions are safe within the limits of this study. (Funded by the National

  2. CD4+ T cells are important mediators of oxidative stress that cause hypertension in response to placental ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Kedra; Cornelius, Denise C; Scott, Jeremy; Heath, Judith; Moseley, Janae; Chatman, Krystal; LaMarca, Babbette

    2014-11-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with oxidative stress, which is suspected to play a role in hypertension, placental ischemia, and fetal demise associated with the disease. Various cellular sources of oxidative stress, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and CD4(+) T cells have been suggested as culprits in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to examine a role of circulating and placental CD4(+) T cells in oxidative stress in response to placental ischemia during pregnancy. CD4(+) T cells and oxidative stress were measured in preeclamptic and normal pregnant women, placental ischemic and normal pregnant rats, and normal pregnant recipient rats of placental ischemic CD4(+) T cells. Women with preeclampsia had significantly increased circulating (P=0.02) and placental CD4(+) T cells (P=0.0001); lymphocyte secretion of myeloperoxidase (P=0.004); and placental reactive oxygen species (P=0.0004) when compared with normal pregnant women. CD4(+) T cells from placental ischemic rats cause many facets of preeclampsia when injected into normal pregnant recipient rats on gestational day 13. On gestational day 19, blood pressure increased in normal pregnant recipients of placental ischemic CD4(+) T cells (P=0.002) compared with that in normal pregnant rats. Similar to preeclamptic patients, CD4(+) T cells from placental ischemic rats secreted significantly more myeloperoxidase (P=0.003) and induced oxidative stress in cultured vascular cells (P=0.003) than normal pregnant rat CD4(+)Tcells. Apocynin, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor, attenuated hypertension and all oxidative stress markers in placental ischemic and normal pregnant recipient rats of placental ischemic CD4(+)Tcells (P=0.05). These data demonstrate an important role for CD4(+) T cells in mediating another factor, oxidative stress, to cause hypertension during preeclampsia.

  3. Control of inflammatory heart disease by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Barin, Jobert G; Čiháková, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    This review focuses on autoimmune myocarditis and its sequela, inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI), and the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases. Several mouse models of myocarditis and DCMI have improved our knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases, informing more general problems of cardiac remodeling and heart failure. CD4(+) T cells are critical in driving the pathogenesis of myocarditis. We discuss in detail the role of T helper cell subtypes in the pathogenesis of myocarditis, the biology of T cell-derived effector cytokines, and the participation of other leukocytic effectors in mediating disease pathophysiology. We discuss interactions between these subsets in both suppressive and collaborative fashions. These findings indicate that cardiac inflammatory disease, and autoimmunity in general, may be more diverse in divergent effector mechanisms than has previously been appreciated.

  4. CD4 aptamer-RORγt shRNA chimera inhibits IL-17 synthesis by human CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Pingfang; Chou, Yuan K; Zhang, Xiaowei; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Yomogida, Kentaro; Benedek, Gil; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2014-10-03

    Cell type specific delivery of RNAi to T cells has remained to be a challenge. Here we describe an aptamer mediated delivery of shRNA to CD4(+) T cells targeting RORγt to suppress Th17 cells. A cDNA encoding CD4 aptamer and RORγt shRNA was constructed and the chimeric CD4 aptamer-RORγt shRNA (CD4-AshR-RORγt) was generated using in vitro T7 RNA transcription. 2'-F-dCTP and 2'-F-dUTP were incorporated into CD4-AshR-RORγt for RNase resistance. CD4-AshR-RORγt was specifically uptaken by CD4(+) Karpas 299 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells. The RORγt shRNA moiety of CD4-AshR-RORγt chimera was cleaved and released by Dicer. Furthermore, CD4-AshR-RORγt suppressed RORγt gene expression in Karpas 299 cells and CD4(+) T cells and consequently inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and IL-17 production. These results demonstrate that aptamer-facilitated cell specific delivery of shRNA represents a novel approach for efficient RNAi delivery and is potentially to be developed for therapeutics targeting specific T cells subtypes.

  5. The α4 Nicotinic Receptor Promotes CD4+ T-Cell Proliferation and a Helper T-Cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Nordman, Jacob C.; Muldoon, Pretal; Clark, Sarah; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is a common addiction and a leading cause of disease. Chronic nicotine exposure is known to activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in immune cells. We demonstrate a novel role for α4 nAChRs in the effect of nicotine on T-cell proliferation and immunity. Using cell-based sorting and proteomic analysis we define an α4 nAChR expressing helper T-cell population (α4+CD3+CD4+) and show that this group of cells is responsive to sustained nicotine exposure. In the circulation, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus, we find that nicotine promotes an increase in CD3+CD4+ cells via its activation of the α4 nAChR and regulation of G protein subunit o, G protein regulated–inducer of neurite outgrowth, and CDC42 signaling within T cells. In particular, nicotine is found to promote a helper T cell 2 adaptive immunologic response within T cells that is absent in α4−/− mice. We thus present a new mechanism of α4 nAChR signaling and immune regulation in T cells, possibly accounting for the effect of smoking on the immune system. PMID:24107512

  6. Distinct CD4 T-cell effects on primary versus recall CD8 T-cell responses during viral encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Mihyun; Phares, Timothy W; Hinton, David R; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Min, Booki

    2015-01-01

    CD4 T-cell help is not a universal requirement for effective primary CD8 T cells but is essential to generate memory CD8 T cells capable of recall responses. This study examined how CD4 T cells affect primary and secondary anti-viral CD8 T-cell responses within the central nervous system (CNS) during encephalomyelitis induced by sublethal gliatropic coronavirus. CD4 T-cell depletion before infection did not impair peripheral expansion, interferon-γ production, CNS recruitment or initial CNS effector capacity of virus-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Nevertheless, impaired virus control in the absence of CD4 T cells was associated with gradually diminished CNS CD8 T-cell interferon-γ production. Furthermore, within the CD8 T-cell population short-lived effector cells were increased and memory precursor effector cells were significantly decreased, consistent with higher T-cell turnover. Transfer of memory CD8 T cells to reduce viral load in CD4-depleted mice reverted the recipient CNS CD8 T-cell phenotype to that in wild-type control mice. However, memory CD8 T cells primed without CD4 T cells and transferred into infected CD4-sufficient recipients expanded less efficiently and were not sustained in the CNS, contrasting with their helped counterparts. These data suggest that CD4 T cells are dispensable for initial expansion, CNS recruitment and differentiation of primary resident memory CD8 T cells as long as the duration of antigen exposure is limited. By contrast, CD4 T cells are essential to prolong primary CD8 T-cell function in the CNS and imprint memory CD8 T cells for recall responses. PMID:25187405

  7. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells-Friend or Foe during Viral Infection?

    PubMed

    Juno, Jennifer A; van Bockel, David; Kent, Stephen J; Kelleher, Anthony D; Zaunders, John J; Munier, C Mee Ling

    2017-01-01

    CD4 T cells with cytotoxic function were once thought to be an artifact due to long-term in vitro cultures but have in more recent years become accepted and reported in the literature in response to a number of viral infections. In this review, we focus on cytotoxic CD4 T cells in the context of human viral infections and in some infections that affect mice and non-human primates. We examine the effector mechanisms used by cytotoxic CD4 cells, the phenotypes that describe this population, and the transcription factors and pathways that lead to their induction following infection. We further consider the cells that are the predominant targets of this effector subset and describe the viral infections in which CD4 cytotoxic T lymphocytes have been shown to play a protective or pathologic role. Cytotoxic CD4 T cells are detected in the circulation at much higher levels than previously realized and are now recognized to have an important role in the immune response to viral infections.

  8. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-12-16

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions.

  9. CD40 Ligand enhances immunogenicity of vector-based vaccines in immunocompetent and CD4+ T cell deficient individuals

    PubMed Central

    Auten, Matthew W.; Huang, Weitao; Dai, Guixiang; Ramsay, Alistair J.

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of host immunity, particularly CD4+ T cell deficiency, presents significant complications for vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. CD40 ligand (CD40L or CD154), a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF), is an important co-stimulatory molecule and, through interactions with its cognate receptor CD40, plays a pivotal role in the generation of host immune responses. Exploitation of CD40L and its receptor CD40 could provide a means to enhance and potentially restore protective immune responses in CD4+ T cell deficiency. To investigate the potential adjuvanticity of CD40L, we constructed recombinant plasmid DNA and adenoviral (Ad) vaccine vectors expressing murine CD40L and the mycobacterial protein antigen 85B (Ag85B). Co-immunization of mice with CD40L and Ag85B by intranasal or intramuscular prime-boosting led to route-dependent enhancement of the magnitude of vaccine-induced circulating and lung mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both normal (CD4-replete) and CD4+ T cell deficient animals, including polyfunctional T cell responses. The presence of CD40L alone was insufficient to enhance or restore CD4+ T cell responses in CD4-ablated animals; however, in partially-depleted animals, co-immunization with Ag85B and CD40L was capable of eliciting enhanced T cell responses, similar to those observed in normal animals, when compared to those given vaccine antigen alone. In summary, these findings show that CD40L has the capacity to enhance the magnitude of vaccine-induced polyfunctional T cell responses in CD4+ T cell deficient mice, and warrants further study as an adjuvant for immunization against opportunistic pathogens in individuals with CD4+ T cell deficiency. PMID:22349523

  10. Human CD4+ central and effector memory T cells produce IL-21: effect on cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Tadashi; Rahman, Mizanur; Nara, Hidetoshi; Araki, Akemi; Makabe, Koki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Kumagai, Izumi; Kudo, Toshio; Ishii, Naoto; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Asao, Hironobu

    2007-10-01

    IL-21 regulates certain functions of T cells, B cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. Although activated CD4(+) T cells produce IL-21, data identifying the specific CD4(+) T cell subsets that produce IL-21 are conflicting. In a previous study, mouse IL-21 message was detected in T(H)2, whereas human IL-21 (hIL-21) message was found in both T(H)1 and follicular helper T cells. To identify the IL-21-secreting cell populations in human, we established a hybridoma cell line producing an anti-hIL-21 mAb. Intracellular hIL-21-staining experiments showed that hIL-21 was mainly expressed in activated CD4(+) central memory T cells and in activated CD4(+) effector memory T cells, but not in activated CD4(+) naive T cells. Moreover, IL-21 was produced upon activation by some IFN-gamma-producing T(H)1-polarized cells and some IL-17-producing T(H)17-polarized cells, but not by IL-4-producing T(H)2-polarized cells. These results suggest that specific CD4(+) T cell populations produce IL-21. In the functional analysis, we found that IL-21 significantly enhanced the cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4(+) helper T cells synergistically with IL-7 and IL-15 without T cell activation stimuli. Taken together, IL-21 produced from CD4(+) memory T cells may have a supportive role in the maintenance of CD4(+) T cell subsets.

  11. Measurement of Phenotype and Absolute Number of Circulating Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and Purified Protein Derivative Antigen-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Discriminate Active from Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barkham, Timothy M. S.; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M.; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154+ TNF-α+ cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154+ TNF-α+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ and CD154+ TNF-α+ CXCR3+. Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  12. Memory CD4+ T cells are suppressed by CD8+ regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xin; Cheng, Qi; Liang, Huifang; Zhao, Jianping; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Tomlinson, Stephen; Chen, Lin; Atkinson, Carl; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute graft rejection mediated by alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells is a major obstacle to transplantation tolerance. It has been reported that CD8+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) have the ability to induce graft tolerance by restraining the function of activated CD4+ T cells, but not including memory T cells. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of CD8+ Tregs on alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells. Methods: We detected Qa-1 expression and performed proliferative assay on memory CD4+ T cells. All memory CD4+ T cells were purified from mice receiving skin allografts. We performed inhibitory and cytotoxic assays on CD8+ Tregs, which were isolated from a T cell vaccination mouse model, and IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were measured in co-culture supernatants by ELISA. To confirm CD8+ Tregs inhibition of memory CD4+ T cells in-vivo, we utilized a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Results: Memory CD4+ T cells mediated acute allograft rejection, and CD8+ Tregs suppressed the proliferation of memory CD4+ T cells. In vitro, memory CD4+ T cells were inhibited and lysed by CD8+ Tregs. There was a positive correlation between IFN-γ levels, and cell lysis rate induced by CD8+ Tregs. In-vivo studies demonstrated CD8+ Tregs prolonged graft survival times, by inhibiting CD4+ memory T cells, through a Qa-1-peptide-TCR pathway. Conclusions: CD8+ Tregs inhibit CD4+ memory T cell-mediated acute murine cardiac allograft rejection, and further prolong graft survival times. These results provide new insights into immune regulation of organ rejection. PMID:28123634

  13. The Transcription Factor Hobit Identifies Human Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oja, Anna E.; Vieira Braga, Felipe A.; Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; Kragten, Natasja A. M.; Hertoghs, Kirsten M. L.; Zuo, Jianmin; Moss, Paul A.; van Lier, René A. W.; van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Hombrink, Pleun

    2017-01-01

    The T cell lineage is commonly divided into CD4-expressing helper T cells that polarize immune responses through cytokine secretion and CD8-expressing cytotoxic T cells that eliminate infected target cells by virtue of the release of cytotoxic molecules. Recently, a population of CD4+ T cells that conforms to the phenotype of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells has received increased recognition. These cytotoxic CD4+ T cells display constitutive expression of granzyme B and perforin at the protein level and mediate HLA class II-dependent killing of target cells. In humans, this cytotoxic profile is found within the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV)-specific, but not within the influenza- or Epstein–Barr virus-specific CD4+ T cell populations, suggesting that, in particular, hCMV infection induces the formation of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells. We have previously described that the transcription factor Homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells (Hobit) is specifically upregulated in CD45RA+ effector CD8+ T cells that arise after hCMV infection. Here, we describe the expression pattern of Hobit in human CD4+ T cells. We found Hobit expression in cytotoxic CD4+ T cells and accumulation of Hobit+ CD4+ T cells after primary hCMV infection. The Hobit+ CD4+ T cells displayed highly overlapping characteristics with Hobit+ CD8+ T cells, including the expression of cytotoxic molecules, T-bet, and CX3CR1. Interestingly, γδ+ T cells that arise after hCMV infection also upregulate Hobit expression and display a similar effector phenotype as cytotoxic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings suggest a shared differentiation pathway in CD4+, CD8+, and γδ+ T cells that may involve Hobit-driven acquisition of long-lived cytotoxic effector function. PMID:28392788

  14. Association of peripheral CD4+ CXCR5+ T cells with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cha, Zhanshan; Zang, Yan; Guo, Huijun; Rechlic, James R; Olasnova, Lindsay M; Gu, Haihui; Tu, Xiaohua; Song, Haihan; Qian, Baohua

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidences indicate that immune dysregulation plays a key role in both lymphomagenesis and patient outcome of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Peripheral blood CD4+ CXCR5+ T cells, known as circulating follicular helper T cells (Tfh), can induce B cell activation and production of specific antibody responses. The aim of the study was to investigate changes of circulating Tfh in CLL. Tfh and it subtypes were tested by measuring CD4, CXCR5, CXCR3, and CCR6 in 72 CLL cases and 86 healthy controls using flow cytometry. Data showed that the percentage of Tfh in the peripheral CD4+ T cells was significantly increased in CLL (25.1%) than in controls (8.4%) (p < 0.001). Further analysis revealed that the upregulation of Tfh was contributed by Tfh-th2 subtype and Tfh-th17 subtype. Investigating staging of the cases demonstrated that the prevalence of Tfh was significantly elevated in cases with Binet stage C (37.3%) than those with stage A (20.1 %) or stage B (23.9 %). In addition, we analyzed Tfh in patients with immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (IGHV) gene mutational status. Results presented that Tfh-th17 subtype had clearly higher frequency in patients with IGHV mutation compared to the unmutated cases (p = 0.035). This study suggested the involvement of Tfh in the pathogenesis and progression of CLL, and provided a potential target for treating this disease.

  15. Involvement of Different CD4+ T Cell Subsets Producing Granzyme B in the Immune Response to Leishmania major Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Naouar, Ikbel; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Ben Ahmed, Melika; Belhaj Hmida, Nabil; Gharbi, Adel; Gritli, Sami; Ben Salah, Afif; Louzir, Hechmi

    2014-01-01

    The nature of effector cells and the potential immunogenicity of Leishmania major excreted/secreted proteins (LmES) were evaluated using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healed zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis individuals (HZCL) and healthy controls (HC). First, we found that PBMCs from HZCL individuals proliferate and produce high levels of IFN-γ and granzyme B (GrB), used as a marker of activated cytotoxic T cells, in response to the parasite antigens. IFN-γ is produced by CD4+ T cells, but unexpectedly GrB is also produced by CD4+ T cells in response to stimulation with LmES, which were found to be as effective as soluble Leishmania antigens to induce proliferation and cytokine production by PBMCs from immune individuals. To address the question of regulatory T cell (Tregs) involvement, the frequency of circulating Tregs was assessed and found to be higher in HZCL individuals compared to that of HC. Furthermore, both CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25− T cells, purified from HZCL individuals, produced IFN-γ and GrB when stimulated with LmES. Additional experiments showed that CD4+CD25+CD127dim/− Tregs were involved in GrB production. Collectively, our data indicate that LmES are immunogenic in humans and emphasize the involvement of CD4+ T cells including activated and regulatory T cells in the immune response against parasite antigens. PMID:25104882

  16. Selective Loss of Early Differentiated, Highly Functional PD1high CD4 T Cells with HIV Progression

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Robert M.; Petrovas, Constantinos; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Moysi, Eirini; Boswell, Kristin L.; Archer, Eva; Yamamoto, Takuya; Ambrozak, David; Casazza, Joseph P.; Haubrich, Richard; Connors, Mark; Ake, Julie; Kim, Jerome H.; Koup, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of PD-1 expression on CD4 T cells during HIV infection is not well understood. Here, we describe the differential expression of PD-1 in CD127high CD4 T cells within the early/intermediate differentiated (EI) (CD27highCD45RAlow) T cell population among uninfected and HIV-infected subjects, with higher expression associated with decreased viral replication (HIV-1 viral load). A significant loss of circulating PD-1highCTLA-4low CD4 T cells was found specifically in the CD127highCD27highCD45RAlow compartment, while initiation of antiretroviral treatment, particularly in subjects with advanced disease, reversed these dynamics. Increased HIV-1 Gag DNA was also found in PD-1high compared to PD-1low ED CD4 T cells. In line with an increased susceptibility to HIV infection, PD-1 expression in this CD4 T cell subset was associated with increased activation and expression of the HIV co-receptor, CCR5. Rather than exhaustion, this population produced more IFN-g, MIP1-a, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17a compared to PD-1low EI CD4 T cells. In line with our previous findings, PD-1high EI CD4 T cells were also characterized by a high expression of CCR7, CXCR5 and CCR6, a phenotype associated with increased in vitro B cell help. Our data show that expression of PD-1 on early-differentiated CD4 T cells may represent a population that is highly functional, more susceptible to HIV infection and selectively lost in chronic HIV infection. PMID:26678998

  17. Increased autophagy in CD4(+) T cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients results in T-cell hyperactivation and apoptosis resistance.

    PubMed

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Rossetti, Maura; Spreafico, Roberto; Moshref, Maryam; Olmer, Merissa; Williams, Gary W; Kumar, Pavanish; Copeland, Dana; Pischel, Ken; Lotz, Martin; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease hallmarked by aberrant cellular homeostasis, resulting in hyperactive CD4(+) T cells that are more resistant to apoptosis. Both hyperactivation and resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the pathogenicity of CD4(+) T cells in the autoimmune process. A better knowledge of the mechanisms determining such impaired homeostasis could contribute significantly to both the understanding and the treatment of the disease. Here we investigated whether autophagy, is dysregulated in CD4(+) T cells of RA patients, resulting in disturbed T-cell homeostasis. We demonstrate that the rate of autophagy is significantly increased in CD4(+) T cells from RA patients, and that increased autophagy is also a feature of in vitro activated CD4(+) T cells. The increased apoptosis resistance observed in CD4(+) T cells from RA patients was significantly reversed upon autophagy inhibition. These mechanisms may contribute to RA pathogenesis, as autophagy inhibition reduced both arthritis incidence and disease severity in a mouse collagen induced arthritis mouse model. Conversely, in Atg5(flox/flox) -CD4-Cre(+) mice, in which all T cells are autophagy deficient, T cells showed impaired activation and proliferation. These data provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of RA and underscore the relevance of autophagy as a promising therapeutic target.

  18. CD4+ primary T cells expressing HCV-core protein upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, suppressing CD4 and CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ponce, Cecilia; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; Aguado, Enrique; Garcia-Cozar, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127(low)PD-1(high)TIM-3(high) regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein.

  19. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-12-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection.

  20. [In vitro amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and identification of amplified T cell immunosuppressive function].

    PubMed

    Weng, Wen-Jun; Pan, Li; Fang, Jian-Pei; Xu, Lv-Hong

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to compare the effect of 3 different cell components for expanding CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg in vitro, and identify their immunosuppressive function. CD4(+) T cells, CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+)T cells were isolated from mouse splenocytes by MACS and then expanded in vitro. Phenotype of the T cell lines and expression of the FOXP3 was determined by flow cytometry. The inhibitory effect of expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells on CD4(+) CD25(-)T cells was tested by MLR method. The results showed that the Treg cells from all the three groups were expanded significantly after culture for 2 weeks. In the CD4(+) T cells group, the proliferation rate was (77.8 ± 5.32) folds with a percentage of Treg cells increasing from (6.61 ± 1.00)% to (15.33 ± 1.31)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells group was (95.20 ± 7.67) folds, with the percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells raising from (0.37 ± 0.13)% to (9.84 ± 0.98)%. The proliferation rate in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group was (41.20 ± 6.92) folds, the proportion of Treg cells decreased from (86.75 ± 1.25)% to (85.32 ± 1.62)%, and the expression of Foxp3 decreased from (76.92 ± 1.72)% to (75.33 ± 2.11)% during the culture, there were not significant differences in the cell purity and the expression of Foxp3, compared with pre-amplification. The inhibitory test showed that the expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells could inhibit the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells in vitro in a cell dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that the amplification of CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg cells is successful in vitro, especially in the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells group, the cell purity and Foxp3 gene is not obviously changes after amplification.

  1. Blimp-1–mediated CD4 T cell exhaustion causes CD8 T cell dysfunction during chronic toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Dustin A.; Bhadra, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    CD8, but not CD4, T cells are considered critical for control of chronic toxoplasmosis. Although CD8 exhaustion has been previously reported in Toxoplasma encephalitis (TE)–susceptible model, our current work demonstrates that CD4 not only become exhausted during chronic toxoplasmosis but this dysfunction is more pronounced than CD8 T cells. Exhausted CD4 population expressed elevated levels of multiple inhibitory receptors concomitant with the reduced functionality and up-regulation of Blimp-1, a transcription factor. Our data demonstrates for the first time that Blimp-1 is a critical regulator for CD4 T cell exhaustion especially in the CD4 central memory cell subset. Using a tamoxifen-dependent conditional Blimp-1 knockout mixed bone marrow chimera as well as an adoptive transfer approach, we show that CD4 T cell–intrinsic deletion of Blimp-1 reversed CD8 T cell dysfunction and resulted in improved pathogen control. To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel finding, which demonstrates the role of Blimp-1 as a critical regulator of CD4 dysfunction and links it to the CD8 T cell dysfunctionality observed in infected mice. The critical role of CD4-intrinsic Blimp-1 expression in mediating CD4 and CD8 T cell exhaustion may provide a rational basis for designing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27481131

  2. ESTABLISHING MEAN CD4+ T CELL VALUES AMONG HEALTHY JAVANESE ADULTS IN INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Zaini, Khilyat Ulin Nur

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish mean CD4+ T cell values among healthy Javanese adults in Indonesia. Two hundred forty-one healthy adults (119 women and 122 men), aged 18-65 years, were enrolled in the study. CD4+ T cells were analyzed by immunophenotyping. The mean absolute CD4+ T cell count was 753.3 ± 270.3 cells/µl (median = 725.0 cells/µl) and the mean CD4+ T cell percentage was 32.6 ± 7.7%, (median = 31.0%). Women had a slightly higher mean absolute CD4+ T cell count and CD4+ T cell percentage (779.1 ± 271.0 cells/ µl; 33.4 ± 8.2%) than men (728.2 ± 268.3 cells/µl; 31.8 ± 7.1%), but the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.126, p = 0.216, respectively). The mean absolute CD4+ T cell varied significantly by age group (p = 0.002). Sixty-one point seven percent of men studied (37/60) had a CD4+ T cell count less than 500 cells/µl (OR 1.8; 95% CI = 1.001-3.300). Absolute CD4+ T cell counts among Javanese Indonesians varied significantly by age.

  3. Polyfunctional and IFN-γ monofunctional human CD4+ T cell populations are molecularly distinct

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Julie G.; Apte, Simon H.; Groves, Penny L.; McCarthy, James S.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen-specific polyfunctional T cell responses have been associated with favorable clinical outcomes, but it is not known whether molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional cytokine-producing T cells. Here, we report that polyfunctional CD4+ T cells induced during Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) blood-stage infection in humans have a unique transcriptomic profile compared with IFN-γ monofunctional CD4+ T cells and, thus, are molecularly distinct. The 14-gene signature revealed in P. falciparum–reactive polyfunctional T cells is associated with cytokine signaling and lymphocyte chemotaxis, and systems biology analysis identified IL-27 as an upstream regulator of the polyfunctional gene signature. Importantly, the polyfunctional gene signature is largely conserved in Influenza-reactive polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, suggesting that polyfunctional T cells have core characteristics independent of pathogen specificity. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that consistent molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional CD4+ T cells. PMID:28194431

  4. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  5. Itk Signals Promote Neuroinflammation by Regulating CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun K.; Kim, Do-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (Itk) signaling in cluster of differentiation 4-positive (CD4+) T cells promotes experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We show that Itk−/− mice exhibit reduced disease severity, and transfer of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into T cell-deficient recipients results in lower disease severity. We observed a significant reduction of CD4+ T cells in the CNS of Itk−/− mice or recipients of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells during EAE, which is consistent with attenuated disease. Itk−/− CD4+ T cells exhibit defective response to myelin antigen stimulation attributable to displacement of filamentous actin from the CD4+ coreceptor. This results in inadequate transmigration of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into the CNS and across brain endothelial barriers in vitro. Finally, Itk−/− CD4+ T cells show significant reduction in production of T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cytokines and exhibit skewed T effector/T regulatory cell ratios. These results indicate that signaling by Itk promotes autoimmunity and CNS inflammation, suggesting that it may be a viable target for treatment of MS. PMID:25568116

  6. Human CD4−8− T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D.; Longo, Dan L.; Goetzl, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Human CD4−8− T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4−8− T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-β. At 2–5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4−8− T cells enhance the generation of IFN-γ and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4−8− T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFβ their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4−8− T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.—Huang, M.-C., Patel, K., Taub, D. D., Longo, D. L., Goetzl, E. J. Human CD4−8− T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset. PMID:20154266

  7. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  8. Immediate Dysfunction of Vaccine-Elicited CD8+ T Cells Primed in the Absence of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Aid, Malika; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Borducchi, Erica N.; Yates, Kathleen B.; Abbink, Peter; Kirilova, Marinela; Ng’ang’a, David; Bramson, Jonathan; Haining, W. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cell help is critical for optimal CD8+ T cell memory differentiation and maintenance in many experimental systems. In addition, many reports have identified reduced primary CD8+ T cell responses in the absence of CD4+ T cell help, which often coincides with reduced Ag or pathogen clearance. In this study, we demonstrate that absence of CD4+ T cells at the time of adenovirus vector immunization of mice led to immediate impairments in early CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. Unhelped CD8+ T cells exhibited a reduced effector phenotype, decreased ex vivo cytotoxicity, and decreased capacity to produce cytokines. This dysfunctional state was imprinted within 3 d of immunization. Unhelped CD8+ T cells expressed elevated levels of inhibitory receptors and exhibited transcriptomic exhaustion and anergy profiles by gene set enrichment analysis. Dysfunctional, impaired effector differentiation also occurred following immunization of CD4+ T cell–deficient mice with a poxvirus vector. This study demonstrates that following priming with viral vectors, CD4+ T cell help is required to promote both the expansion and acquisition of effector functions by CD8+ T cells, which is accomplished by preventing immediate dysfunction. PMID:27448585

  9. CD31 is required on CD4+ T cells to promote T cell survival during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ewan A; Coughlan, Ruth E; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Marshall, Jennifer L; Hussain, Khiyam; Charlesworth, James; Abhyankar, Nikita; Hitchcock, Jessica; Gil, Cristina; López-Macías, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R; Khan, Mahmood; Watson, Steve P; MacLennan, Ian C M; Buckley, Christopher D; Cunningham, Adam F

    2011-08-15

    Hematopoietic cells constitutively express CD31/PECAM1, a signaling adhesion receptor associated with controlling responses to inflammatory stimuli. Although expressed on CD4(+) T cells, its function on these cells is unclear. To address this, we have used a model of systemic Salmonella infection that induces high levels of T cell activation and depends on CD4(+) T cells for resolution. Infection of CD31-deficient (CD31KO) mice demonstrates that these mice fail to control infection effectively. During infection, CD31KO mice have diminished numbers of total CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. This is despite a higher proportion of CD31KO CD4(+) T cells exhibiting an activated phenotype and an undiminished capacity to prime normally and polarize to Th1. Reduced numbers of T cells reflected the increased propensity of naive and activated CD31KO T cells to undergo apoptosis postinfection compared with wild-type T cells. Using adoptive transfer experiments, we show that loss of CD31 on CD4(+) T cells alone is sufficient to account for the defective CD31KO T cell accumulation. These data are consistent with CD31 helping to control T cell activation, because in its absence, T cells have a greater propensity to become activated, resulting in increased susceptibility to become apoptotic. The impact of CD31 loss on T cell homeostasis becomes most pronounced during severe, inflammatory, and immunological stresses such as those caused by systemic Salmonella infection. This identifies a novel role for CD31 in regulating CD4 T cell homeostasis.

  10. A novel differentiation pathway from CD4T cells to CD4T cells for maintaining immune system homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Sun, G; Sun, X; Tian, D; Liu, K; Liu, T; Cong, M; Xu, H; Li, X; Shi, W; Tian, Y; Yao, J; Guo, H; Zhang, D

    2016-04-14

    CD4(+) T lymphocytes are key players in the adaptive immune system and can differentiate into a variety of effector and regulatory T cells. Here, we provide evidence that a novel differentiation pathway of CD4(+) T cells shifts the balance from a destructive T-cell response to one that favors regulation in an immune-mediated liver injury model. Peripheral CD4(-)CD8(-)NK1.1(-) double-negative T cells (DNT) was increased following Concanavalin A administration in mice. Adoptive transfer of DNT led to significant protection from hepatocyte necrosis by direct inhibition on the activation of lymphocytes, a process that occurred primarily through the perforin-granzyme B route. These DNT converted from CD4(+) rather than CD8(+) T cells, a process primarily regulated by OX40. DNT migrated to the liver through the CXCR3-CXCL9/CXCL10 interaction. In conclusion, we elucidated a novel differentiation pathway from activated CD4(+) T cells to regulatory DNT cells for maintaining homeostasis of the immune system in vivo, and provided key evidence that utilizing this novel differentiation pathway has potential application in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  11. Polyfunctional cytokine responses by central memory CD4+T cells in response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. Mycobacterium ...

  12. Polyfunctional cytokine responses by central memory CD4*T cells in response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB. Mycobacterium bovis in...

  13. Chronic exposure to trichloroethylene increases DNA methylation of the Ifng promoter in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Blossom, Sarah J; Erickson, Stephen W; Broadfoot, Brannon; West, Kirk; Bai, Shasha; Li, Jingyun; Cooney, Craig A

    2016-10-17

    CD4(+) T cells in female MRL+/+ mice exposed to solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) skew toward effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, and demonstrate seemingly non-monotonic alterations in IFN-γ production. In the current study we examined the mechanism for this immunotoxicity using effector/memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells isolated every 6 weeks during a 40 week exposure to TCE (0.5mg/ml in drinking water). A time-dependent effect of TCE exposure on both Ifng gene expression and IFN-γ protein production was observed in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, with an increase after 22 weeks of exposure and a decrease after 40 weeks of exposure. No such effect of TCE was observed in naïve CD4(+) T cells. A cumulative increase in DNA methylation in the CpG sites of the promoter of the Ifng gene was observed in effector/memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells over time. Also unique to the Ifng promoter was an increase in methylation variance in effector/memory compared to naïve CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, the CpG sites of the Ifng promoter in effector/memory CD4(+) T cells were especially sensitive to the effects of TCE exposure, which may help explain the regulatory effect of the chemical on this gene.

  14. Therapeutic Potential of Hyporesponsive CD4+ T Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schafer, Carolina; Ubilla-Olguín, Gabriela; Catalán, Diego; Schinnerling, Katina; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells is crucial on immunity or tolerance induction. In an immature or semi-mature state, DCs induce tolerance through T-cell deletion, generation of regulatory T cells, and/or induction of T-cell anergy. Anergy is defined as an unresponsive state that retains T cells in an “off” mode under conditions in which immune activation is undesirable. This mechanism is crucial for the control of T-cell responses against self-antigens, thereby preventing autoimmunity. Tolerogenic DCs (tDCs), generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes of healthy donors or patients with autoimmune pathologies, were shown to modulate immune responses by inducing T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Animal models of autoimmune diseases confirmed the impact of T-cell anergy on disease development and progression in vivo. Thus, the induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness by tDCs has become a promising immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. Here, we review recent findings in the area and discuss the potential of anergy induction for clinical purposes. PMID:26441992

  15. Production of CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Hybridomas

    PubMed Central

    Canaday, David H.

    2015-01-01

    T cell hybridomas are very useful tools to investigate antigen presenting cell (APC) function. They were developed based on the fusion technology that led to monoclonal antibody section. Antigen-specific primary T cells are generated and fused to an immortal thymoma line. Unfused thymoma cells are eliminated by engineered metabolic selection. Antigen-specific hybridomas are identified and may be characterized in detail. Primary T cells are preferable for studies of the regulatory mechanisms intrinsic to T cells, but for study of antigen presentation T cell hybridomas have advantages over primary T cell clones, including their relative uniformity, stability over time, and ready availability in large numbers for extensive antigen presentation experiments. PMID:23329495

  16. Role of LAP+CD4+ T cells in the tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wu; Jiang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Jia-Hao; Wang, Shi-Jun; Liao, Cun; Cai, Bin; Chen, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Sen; Guo, Yun; Cao, Yun-Fei; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the abundance and potential functions of LAP+CD4+ T cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS Proportions of LAP+CD4+ T cells were examined in peripheral blood and tumor/paratumor tissues of CRC patients and healthy controls using flow cytometry. Expression of phenotypic markers such as forkhead box (Fox)p3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA)-4, chemokine CC receptor (CCR)4 and CCR5 was measured using flow cytometry. LAP-CD4+ and LAP+CD4+ T cells were isolated using a magnetic cell-sorting system and cell purity was analyzed by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. RESULTS The proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in peripheral blood from patients (9.44% ± 3.18%) than healthy controls (1.49% ± 1.00%, P < 0.001). Among patients, the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in tumor tissues (11.76% ± 3.74%) compared with paratumor tissues (3.87% ± 1.64%, P < 0.001). We also observed positive correlations between the proportion of LAP+CD4+ T cells and TNM stage (P < 0.001), distant metastasis (P < 0.001) and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen (P < 0.05). Magnetic-activated cell sorting gave an overall enrichment of LAP+CD4+ T cells (95.02% ± 2.87%), which was similar for LAP-CD4+ T cells (94.75% ± 2.76%). In contrast to LAP-CD4+ T cells, LAP+CD4+ T cells showed lower Foxp3 expression but significantly higher levels of CTLA-4, CCR4 and CCR5 (P < 0.01). LAP+CD4+ T cells expressed significantly larger amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β but lower levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17 and interferon-γ, compared with LAP-CD4+ T cells. CONCLUSION LAP+CD4+ T cells accumulated in the tumor microenvironment of CRC patients and were involved in immune evasion mediated by IL-10 and TGF-β. PMID:28210081

  17. The CD4+ T cell methylome contributes to a distinct CD4+ T cell transcriptional signature in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Rachael; Whiston, Ronan; Cormican, Paul; Finlay, Emma K.; Couldrey, Christine; Brady, Colm; O’Farrelly, Cliona; Meade, Kieran G.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesised that epigenetic regulation of CD4+ T lymphocytes contributes to a shift toward a dysfunctional T cell phenotype which may impact on their ability to clear mycobacterial infection. Combined RNA-seq transcriptomic profiling and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing identified 193 significantly differentially expressed genes and 760 differentially methylated regions (DMRs), between CD4+ T cells from M. bovis infected and healthy cattle. 196 DMRs were located within 10 kb of annotated genes, including GATA3 and RORC, both of which encode transcription factors that promote TH2 and TH17 T helper cell subsets respectively. Gene-specific DNA methylation and gene expression levels for the TNFRSF4 and Interferon-γ genes were significantly negatively correlated suggesting a regulatory relationship. Pathway analysis of DMRs identified enrichment of genes involved in the anti-proliferative TGF-β signaling pathway and TGFB1 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood leukocytes from TB-infected cattle. This first analysis of the bovine CD4+ T cell methylome suggests that DNA methylation directly contributes to a distinct gene expression signature in CD4+ T cells from cattle infected with M. bovis. Specific methylation changes proximal to key inflammatory gene loci may be critical to the emergence of a non-protective CD4+ T cell response during mycobacterial infection in cattle. PMID:27507428

  18. In situ depletion of CD4+ T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab.

    PubMed

    Villadsen, L S; Skov, L; Dam, T N; Dagnaes-Hansen, F; Rygaard, J; Schuurman, J; Parren, P W H I; van de Winkel, J G J; Baadsgaard, O

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells, in activated or malignant form, are involved in a number of diseases including inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, and T cell lymphomas such as the majority of cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). Targeting CD4 with an antibody that inhibits and/or eliminates disease-driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis xenograft mouse model. Zanolimumab treatment was shown to induce a significant reduction in the numbers of inflammatory mononuclear cells in upper dermis. This reduction in inflammatory mononuclear cells in situ was primarily due to a significant reduction in the numbers of skin-infiltrating CD4(+), but not CD8(+) CD3(+) T cells. The capacity of Zanolimumab to deplete the CD4(+) T cells in the skin may be of importance in diseases where CD4(+) T cells play a central role. Indeed, in a phase II clinical trial Zanolimumab has shown a dose-dependent clinical response in patients with CTCL and the antibody is currently in a phase III clinical trial for CTCL, a disease for which there is no safe and effective treatment available today.

  19. Human CD4- 8- T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D; Longo, Dan L; Goetzl, Edward J

    2010-07-01

    Human CD4(-)8(-) T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4(-)8(-) T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-beta. At 2-5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4(-)8(-) T cells enhance the generation of IFN-gamma and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4(-)8(-) T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFbeta their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4(-)8(-) T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.

  20. Frequency of CD4+CD161+ T Cell and Interleukin-10 Expression in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Kazuyo; Ikeda, Takuto; Batmunkh, Baatarsuren; Choijookhuu, Narantsog; Ishizaki, Hidenobu; Hotokezaka, Masayuki; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Nanashima, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal immune dysregulation associated with T cells plays a critical role in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the definite significances of these cells in IBD still remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the population and expression of CD4+CD161+ T cells in the colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) in patients with IBD by analyses using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA levels in both LPMCs and CD4+ T cells in lamina propria (LP-CD4+ T cells) were measured using a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. IL-10 production was investigated with immunohistochemistry. The results revealed that the population of CD4+CD161+ T cells was significantly decreased in active ulcerative colitis (UC) compared with inactive UC (P < 0.05). The CD4+CD161+ T cell population was inversely correlated with disease activity in patients with UC (r = −0.6326, P = 0.0055), but there was no significant correlation in those with Crohn’s disease. Over-expression of IL-10 mRNA in both LPMCs and LP-CD4+ T cells were detected in active UC. Immunohistochemistry revealed decreased frequency of CD161+ cells and increased IL-10 positive cells in active UC. The frequency of CD4+CD161+ T cells and IL-10 expression was supposed to be associated with the pathological status of mucosal immunoregulation in IBD. PMID:28386147

  1. Upregulation of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong; Luo, Gang; Son, Haihang; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Wenjie

    2014-06-01

    Immune dysregulation plays a key role in the development of osteosarcoma (OS). Peripheral blood CD4+CXCR5+ T cells can induce B-cell activation and produce various cytokines and therefore may play critical roles in tumorigenesis. The purpose of the study was to investigate changes of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in OS. Peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells and its subtypes were determined by measuring CD3, CD4, CXCR5, CXCR3, and CCR6 in 38 OS patients and 42 healthy controls using flow cytometry. Data demonstrated that percentage of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells was significantly increased in OS patients (13.9 %) than in controls (8.6 %, p<0.001). Further analysis identified a profound skewing of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cell subsets toward Th2 and Th17 cells in OS patients. Investigating clinical status of the patients showed that prevalence of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells was significantly elevated in cases with metastasis (17.4 %) than those without metastasis (12.7 %). Similarly, patients with high tumor grade revealed increased percentage of CD4+CXCR5+ T cells compared to those with low tumor grade (15.3 versus 11.0 %). Interestingly, the upregulation of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in patients with metastasis or high tumor grade was contributed by Th1 and Th17 subtypes. This study suggests the involvement of peripheral CD4+CXCR5+ T cells in the pathogenesis and progression of OS and provides novel knowledge for understanding this disease.

  2. Stephanthraniline A suppressed CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis through impairing PKCθ function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yang; Zhou, Li-Fei; Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Wen; Xu, Shi-Fang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Gao, Li-Juan; Hao, Shu-Juan; Ye, Yi-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-15

    Stephanthraniline A (STA), a C21 steroid isolated from Stephanotis mucronata (Blanco) Merr., was previously shown to inhibit T cells activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the in vivo immunosuppressive activity of STA and to elucidate its potential mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with STA significantly attenuated concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and reduced CD4(+) T cells activation and aggregation in hepatic tissue in mice. STA directly suppressed the activation and proliferation of Con A-induced CD4(+) T cells, and inhibited NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Moreover, it was proved that STA inhibited T cells activation and proliferation through proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling- and Ca(2+) signaling-independent way. The molecular docking studies predicted that STA could tight bind to PKCθ via five hydrogen. The further findings indicated STA directly inhibited PKCθ kinase activity, and its phosphorylation in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, the present study indicated that STA could protect against CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis in mice through PKCθ and its downstream NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades. These results highlight the potential of STA as an effective leading compound for use in the treatment of CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  3. Clonally expanded cytotoxic CD4(+) T cells and the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Mattoo, Hamid; Stone, John H; Pillai, Shiv

    2017-02-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic condition of unknown cause characterized by highly fibrotic lesions, with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates containing a preponderance of IgG4-expressing plasma cells. CD4(+) T cells and B cells constitute the major inflammatory cell populations in IgG4-RD lesions. IgG4-RD patients with active, untreated disease show a marked expansion of plasmablasts in the circulation. Although the therapeutic depletion of B cells suggests a role for these cells in the disease, a direct role for B cells or IgG4 in the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is yet to be demonstrated. Among the CD4(+) T-cell subsets, Th2 cells were initially thought to contribute to IgG4-RD pathogenesis, but many previous studies were confounded by the concomitant history of allergic diseases in the patients studied and the failure to use multi-color staining to definitively identify T-cell subsets in tissue samples. More recently, using an unbiased approach to characterize CD4(+) T-cell subsets in patients with IgG4-RD - based on their clonal expansion and ability to infiltrate affected tissue sites - CD4(+) CTLs have been identified as the major CD4(+) T-cell subset in disease lesions as well as in the circulation. CD4(+) CTLs in affected tissues secrete pro-fibrotic cytokines including IL-1β, TGF-β1, and IFN-γ as well as cytolytic molecules such as perforin and granzymes A and B. In this review, we examine possible mechanisms by which activated B cells and plasmablasts may collaborate with the expanded CD4(+) CTLs in driving the fibrotic pathology of the disease and describe the lacunae in the field and in our understanding of IgG4-RD pathogenesis.

  4. Old Mice Accumulate Activated Effector CD4 T Cells Refractory to Regulatory T Cell-Induced Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Idan; Bhattacharya, Udayan; Elyahu, Yehezqel; Strominger, Itai; Monsonego, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and reduced lymphocyte potency are implicated in the pathogenesis of major illnesses associated with aging. Whether this immune phenotype results from a loss of cell-mediated regulation or intrinsic dysregulated function of effector T cells (Teffs) requires further research. Here, we report that, as compared with young C57BL6 mice, old mice show an increased frequency of CD4+CD62L− Teffs with a dysregulated activated phenotype and markedly increased effector functions. Analysis of the frequency and suppressive function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicates an increase in the frequency of FoxP3+ T cells with aging which, however, occurs within the CD4+CD25− T cells. Furthermore, whereas Tregs from young and old mice similarly suppress Teffs from young mice, both have a compromised suppressive capacity of Teffs from old mice, a phenomenon which is partially recovered in the presence of IL-2-producing CD4+CD62L+ non-Teffs. Finally, we observed that Teff subsets from old mice are enriched with IL-17A-producing T cells and exhibit intrinsically dysregulated expression of genes encoding cell-surface molecules and transcription factors, which play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation. We, thus, demonstrate an age-related impairment in the regulation of effector CD4 T cells, which may underlie the higher risk for destructive inflammation associated with aging. PMID:28382033

  5. Old Mice Accumulate Activated Effector CD4 T Cells Refractory to Regulatory T Cell-Induced Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Idan; Bhattacharya, Udayan; Elyahu, Yehezqel; Strominger, Itai; Monsonego, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and reduced lymphocyte potency are implicated in the pathogenesis of major illnesses associated with aging. Whether this immune phenotype results from a loss of cell-mediated regulation or intrinsic dysregulated function of effector T cells (Teffs) requires further research. Here, we report that, as compared with young C57BL6 mice, old mice show an increased frequency of CD4+CD62L- Teffs with a dysregulated activated phenotype and markedly increased effector functions. Analysis of the frequency and suppressive function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicates an increase in the frequency of FoxP3+ T cells with aging which, however, occurs within the CD4+CD25- T cells. Furthermore, whereas Tregs from young and old mice similarly suppress Teffs from young mice, both have a compromised suppressive capacity of Teffs from old mice, a phenomenon which is partially recovered in the presence of IL-2-producing CD4+CD62L+ non-Teffs. Finally, we observed that Teff subsets from old mice are enriched with IL-17A-producing T cells and exhibit intrinsically dysregulated expression of genes encoding cell-surface molecules and transcription factors, which play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation. We, thus, demonstrate an age-related impairment in the regulation of effector CD4 T cells, which may underlie the higher risk for destructive inflammation associated with aging.

  6. Key role for CD4 T cells during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, A.; Wang, J.; Pelletier, R.P.; Nadasdy, T.; Brodsky, S.; Roy, S.; Lodder, M.; Bobek, D.; Mofatt-Bruce, S.; Fairchild, R.L.; Henry, M.L.; Hadley, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized mouse models to elucidate the immunologic mechanisms of functional graft loss during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts (mixed AMR), in which humoral and cellular responses to the graft occur concomitantly. Although the majority of T cells in the graft at the time of rejection were CD8 T cells with only a minor population of CD4 T cells, depletion of CD4 but not CD8 cells prevented acute graft loss during mixed AMR. CD4 depletion eliminated anti-donor alloantibodies and conferred protection from destruction of renal allografts. ELISPOT revealed that CD4 T effectors responded to donor alloantigens by both the direct and indirect pathways of allorecognition. In transfer studies, CD4 T effectors primed to donor alloantigens were highly effective at promoting acute graft dysfunction, and exhibited the attributes of effector T cells. Laser capture microdissection and confirmatory immunostaining studies revealed that CD4 T cells infiltrating the graft produced effector molecules with graft destructive potential. Bioluminescent imaging confirmed that CD4 T effectors traffic to the graft site in immune replete hosts. These data document that host CD4 T cells can promote acute dysfunction of renal allografts by directly mediating graft injury in addition to facilitating anti-donor alloantibody responses. PMID:24410909

  7. CD4 T-Cell Subsets in Malaria: TH1/TH2 Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Mazliah, Damian; Langhorne, Jean

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T-cells have been shown to play a central role in immune control of infection with Plasmodium parasites. At the erythrocytic stage of infection, IFN-γ production by CD4+ T-cells and CD4+ T-cell help for the B-cell response are required for control and elimination of infected red blood cells. CD4+ T-cells are also important for controlling Plasmodium pre-erythrocytic stages through the activation of parasite-specific CD8+ T-cells. However, excessive inflammatory responses triggered by the infection have been shown to drive pathology. Early classical experiments demonstrated a biphasic CD4+ T-cell response against erythrocytic stages in mice, in which T helper (Th)1 and antibody-helper CD4+ T-cells appear sequentially during a primary infection. While IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells do play a role in controlling acute infections, and they contribute to acute erythrocytic-stage pathology, it became apparent that a classical Th2 response producing IL-4 is not a critical feature of the CD4+ T-cell response during the chronic phase of infection. Rather, effective CD4+ T-cell help for B-cells, which can occur in the absence of IL-4, is required to control chronic parasitemia. IL-10, important to counterbalance inflammation and associated with protection from inflammatory-mediated severe malaria in both humans and experimental models, was originally considered be produced by CD4+ Th2 cells during infection. We review the interpretations of CD4+ T-cell responses during Plasmodium infection, proposed under the original Th1/Th2 paradigm, in light of more recent advances, including the identification of multifunctional T-cells such as Th1 cells co-expressing IFN-γ and IL-10, the identification of follicular helper T-cells (Tfh) as the predominant CD4+ T helper subset for B-cells, and the recognition of inherent plasticity in the fates of different CD4+ T-cells. PMID:25628621

  8. Antigen affinity and antigen dose exert distinct influences on CD4 T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Keck, Simone; Schmaler, Mathias; Ganter, Stefan; Wyss, Lena; Oberle, Susanne; Huseby, Eric S; Zehn, Dietmar; King, Carolyn G

    2014-10-14

    Cumulative T-cell receptor signal strength and ensuing T-cell responses are affected by both antigen affinity and antigen dose. Here we examined the distinct contributions of these parameters to CD4 T-cell differentiation during infection. We found that high antigen affinity positively correlates with T helper (Th)1 differentiation at both high and low doses of antigen. In contrast, follicular helper T cell (TFH) effectors are generated after priming with high, intermediate, and low affinity ligand. Unexpectedly, memory T cells generated after priming with very low affinity antigen remain impaired in their ability to generate secondary Th1 effectors, despite being recalled with high affinity antigen. These data challenge the view that only strongly stimulated CD4 T cells are capable of differentiating into the TFH and memory T-cell compartments and reveal that differential strength of stimulation during primary T-cell activation imprints unique and long lasting T-cell differentiation programs.

  9. IL-21 induces IL-22 production in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Ada; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Nadeau, Meghan; Burns, Evan J; Tukpah, Ann-Marcia; Santiago, Andrezza; Wu, Chuan; Patel, Bonny; Kumar, Deepak; Quintana, Francisco J

    2014-05-06

    Interleukin (IL)-22 produced by innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and CD4+ T cells plays an important role in host defence and mucosal homeostasis, thus it is important to investigate the mechanisms that regulate IL-22 production. We investigated the regulation IL-22 production by CD4+ T cells. Here we show that IL-21 triggers IL-22, but not IL-17 production by CD4+ T cells. STAT3, activated by IL-21, controls the epigenetic status of the il22 promoter and its interaction with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Moreover, IL-21 and AhR signalling in T cells control IL-22 production and the development of dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis in ILC-deficient mice. Thus, we have identified IL-21 as an inducer of IL-22 production in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Interleukin-7 is required for CD4+ T cell activation and autoimmune neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Brian R.; Gonzalez-Quintial, Rosana; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Farrar, Michael A.; Miller, Stephen D.; Sauer, Karsten; McGavern, Dorian B.; Kono, Dwight H.; Baccala, Roberto; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.

    2015-01-01

    IL-7 is known to be vital for T cell homeostasis but has previously been presumed to be dispensable for TCR-induced activation. Here, we show that IL-7 is critical for the initial activation of CD4+ T cells in that it provides some of the necessary early signaling components, such as activated STAT5 and Akt. Accordingly, short-term in vivo IL-7Rα blockade inhibited the activation and expansion of autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells and, when used to treat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), prevented and ameliorated disease. Our studies demonstrate that IL-7 signaling is a prerequisite for optimal CD4+ T cell activation and that IL-7R antagonism may be effective in treating CD4+ T cell-mediated neuroinflammation and other autoimmune inflammatory conditions. PMID:26319414

  11. Cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells against autologous tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Konomi, Y; Sekine, T; Takayama, T; Fuji, M; Tanaka, T

    1995-09-01

    The 51Cr-release assay is mostly applied to detecting the cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, and little is known about the activity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the correlation between the cytotoxic activity of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells and the incubation period with autologous tumor cells was analyzed by two methods. The incubation periods were 4 and 20 h (4 h and 20 h assay) for the 51Cr-release assay. Eight pairs of tumor cells and T cells were assayed. T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by using magnetic beads and panning methods, and those cells were activated by culture with recombinant interleukin-2 and immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. In 6 out of 8 cases, no cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells was detected by the 4 h assay, whereas cytotoxic activity was detected in all cases in the 20 h assay. The cytotoxic activities in 20 h assay of CD4+ T cells were increased 67-fold in comparison with the activities in 4 h assay (range: 5-197). In the case of CD8+ T cells, cytotoxic activities were detected in 6 out of 8 cases in the 4 h assay. The lytic unit ratio of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was calculated as 1.5 in the 20 h assay (range: 0.2- > 7.2) versus 0.4 in the 4 h assay (range: < 0.1-1.3). Cytotoxic activities in colorimetric assay using Crystal Violet with a 24 h incubation were similar to those in the 20 h 51Cr-release assay in all eight cases. These results indicate that CD4+ T cells have cytotoxic activity as strong as that of CD8+ T cells towards autologous tumor cells.

  12. DJ-1/Park7 Sensitive Na(+) /H(+) Exchanger 1 (NHE1) in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuetao; Shi, Xiaolong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shaqiu; Salker, Madhuri S; Mack, Andreas F; Föller, Michael; Mak, Tak W; Singh, Yogesh; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-10

    DJ-1/Park7 is a redox-sensitive chaperone protein counteracting oxidation and presumably contributing to the control of oxidative stress responses and thus inflammation. DJ-1 gene deletion exacerbates the progression of Parkinson's disease presumably by augmenting oxidative stress. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is paralleled by activation of the Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1). ROS formation in CD4(+) T cells plays a decisive role in regulating inflammatory responses. In the present study we explored whether DJ-1 is expressed in CD4(+) T cells and affects ROS production as well as NHE1 in those cells. To this end, DJ-1 and NHE1 transcript and protein levels were quantified by qRT-PCR and Western blotting respectively, intracellular pH (pHi) utilizing bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) fluorescence, NHE activity from realkalinization after an ammonium pulse, and ROS production utilizing 2',7' -dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. As a result DJ-1 was expressed in CD4(+) T cells. ROS formation, NHE1 transcript levels, NHE1 protein, and NHE activity were higher in CD4(+) T cells from DJ-1 deficient mice than in CD4(+) T cells from wild type mice. Antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor staurosporine decreased the NHE activity in DJ-1 deficient CD4(+) T cells, and blunted the difference between DJ-1(-/-) and DJ-1(+/+) CD4(+) T cells, an observation pointing to a role of ROS in the up-regulation of NHE1 in DJ-1(-/-) CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, DJ-1 is a powerful regulator of ROS production as well as NHE1 expression and activity in CD4(+) T cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Tracking Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells during and after Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pfafferot, Katja; Heeg, Malte H.J.; Gaudieri, Silvana; Grüner, Norbert; Rauch, Andri; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Jung, Maria-Christina; Zachoval, Reinhart; Pape, Gerd R.; Schraut, Winfried; Santantonio, Teresa; Nitschko, Hans; Obermeier, Martin; Phillips, Rodney; Scriba, Thomas J.; Semmo, Nasser; Day, Cheryl; Weber, Jonathan N.; Fidler, Sarah; Thimme, Robert; Haberstroh, Anita; Baumert, Thomas F.; Klenerman, Paul; Diepolder, Helmut M.

    2007-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C. Conclusions/Significance During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists. PMID:17653276

  14. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  15. Immune activation induces immortalization of HTLV-1 LTR-Tax transgenic CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Swaims, Alison Y.; Khani, Francesca; Zhang, Yingyu; Roberts, Arthur I.; Devadas, Satish

    2010-01-01

    Infection with the human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) results in a variety of diseases including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Although the pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, it involves complex interactions with the host immune system. Activation of infected T cells may play an important role in disease pathogenesis through induction of the oncogenic HTLV-1 Tax transactivator protein. To test this hypothesis, we employed transgenic mice in which Tax is regulated by the HTLV-1 LTR. T-cell receptor stimulation of LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells induced Tax expression, hyper-proliferation, and immortalization in culture. The transition to cellular immortalization was accompanied by markedly increased expression of the antiapoptotic gene, mcl-1, previously implicated as important in T-cell survival. Immortalized cells exhibited a CD4+CD25+CD3− phenotype commonly observed in ATL. Engraftment of activated LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγ null mice resulted in a leukemia-like phenotype with expansion and tissue infiltration of Tax+, CD4+ lymphocytes. We suggest that immune activation of infected CD4+ T cells plays an important role in the induction of Tax expression, T-cell proliferation, and pathogenesis of ATL in HTLV-1–infected individuals. PMID:20634377

  16. Innate-like CD4 T cells selected by thymocytes suppress adaptive immune responses against bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yu; Gray, Brian M.; Sofi, Mohammed H.; Bauler, Laura D.; Eaton, Kathryn A.; O'Riordan, Mary X. D.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-01-01

    We have reported a new innate-like CD4 T cell population that expresses cell surface makers of effector/memory cells and produce Th1 and Th2 cytokines immediately upon activation. Unlike conventional CD4 T cells that are selected by thymic epithelial cells, these CD4 T cells, named T-CD4 T cells, are selected by MHC class II expressing thymocytes. Previously, we showed that the presence of T-CD4 T cells protected mice from airway inflammation suggesting an immune regulatory role of T-CD4 T cells. To further understand the function of T-CD4 T cells, we investigated immune responses mediated by T-CD4 T cells during bacterial infection because the generation of antigen specific CD4 T cells contributes to clearance of infection and for the development of immune memory. The current study shows a suppressive effect of T-CD4 T cells on both CD8 and CD4 T cell-mediated immune responses during Listeria and Helicobacter infections. In the mouse model of Listeria monocytogenes infection, T-CD4 T cells resulted in decreasedfrequency of Listeria-specific CD8 T cells and the killing activity of them. Furthermore, mice with T-CD4 T cells developed poor immune memory, demonstrated by reduced expansion of antigen-specific T cells and high bacterial burden upon re-infection. Similarly, the presence of T-CD4 T cells suppressed the generation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in Helicobacter pylori infected mice. Thus, our studies reveal a novel function of T-CD4 T cells in suppressing anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:23264931

  17. A colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell population mediates gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Vivian; Agle, Kimberle; Chen, Xiao; Beres, Amy; Komorowski, Richard; Belle, Ludovic; Taylor, Carolyn; Zhu, Fenlu; Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Calvin B.; Verbsky, James; Blumenschein, Wendy; Sadekova, Svetlana; Bowman, Eddie; Ballantyne, Christie; Weaver, Casey; Serody, David A.; Vincent, Benjamin; Serody, Jonathan; Cua, Daniel J.; Drobyski, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the gastrointestinal tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and is attributable to T cell–mediated inflammation. In this work, we identified a unique CD4+ T cell population that constitutively expresses the β2 integrin CD11c and displays a biased central memory phenotype and memory T cell transcriptional profile, innate-like properties, and increased expression of the gut-homing molecules α4β7 and CCR9. Using several complementary murine GVHD models, we determined that adoptive transfer and early accumulation of β2 integrin–expressing CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract initiated Th1-mediated proinflammatory cytokine production, augmented pathological damage in the colon, and increased mortality. The pathogenic effect of this CD4+ T cell population critically depended on coexpression of the IL-23 receptor, which was required for maximal inflammatory effects. Non–Foxp3-expressing CD4+ T cells produced IL-10, which regulated colonic inflammation and attenuated lethality in the absence of functional CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Thus, the coordinate expression of CD11c and the IL-23 receptor defines an IL-10–regulated, colitogenic memory CD4+ T cell subset that is poised to initiate inflammation when there is loss of tolerance and breakdown of mucosal barriers. PMID:27500496

  18. Altered Intracellular ATP Production by Activated CD4+ T-Cells in Very Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Gabrielli, Liliana; Chiereghin, Angela; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Background. The neonatal immune system is not fully developed at birth; newborns have adequate lymphocytes counts but these cells lack function. Objective. To assess the activity of T-cells and the influence of the main perinatal factors in very preterm infants (birth weight < 1500 g). Design. Blood samples from 59 preterm infants (21/59 were dizygotic twins) were collected at birth and at 30 days of life to measure CD4+ T-cell activity using the ImmuKnow™ assay. Fifteen healthy adults were included as a control group. Results. CD4+ T-cell activity was lower in VLBW infants compared with adults (p < 0.001). Twins showed lower immune activity compared to singletons (p = 0.005). Infants born vaginally showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity compared to those born by C-section (p = 0.031); infants born after prolonged Premature Rupture of Membranes (pPROM) showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity at birth (p = 0.002) compared to infants born without pPROM. Low CD4+ T-cell activity at birth is associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in the first week of life (p = 0.049). Conclusions. Preterm infants show a lack in CD4+ T-cell activity at birth. Perinatal factors such as intrauterine inflammation, mode of delivery, and zygosity can influence the adaptive immune activation capacity at birth and can contribute to exposing these infants to serious complications such as NEC. PMID:28070527

  19. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have opposing roles in breast cancer progression and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qunyuan; Ye, Jian; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yanping; Hunborg, Pamela; Varvares, Mark A.; Hoft, Daniel F.; Hsueh, Eddy C.; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Immunoediting concept has provided critical insights suggesting dual functions of immune system during the cancer initiation and development. However, the dynamics and roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the pathogenesis of breast cancer remain unclear. Here we utilized two murine breast cancer models (4T1 and E0771) and demonstrated that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were increased and involved in immune responses, but with distinct dynamic trends in breast cancer development. In addition to cell number increases, CD4+ T cells changed their dominant subsets from Th1 in the early stages to Treg and Th17 cells in the late stages of the cancer progression. We also analyzed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell infiltration in primary breast cancer tissues from cancer patients. We observed that CD8+ T cells are the key effector cell population mediating effective anti-tumor immunity resulting in better clinical outcomes. In contrast, intra-tumoral CD4+ T cells have negative prognostic effects on breast cancer patient outcomes. These studies indicate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have opposing roles in breast cancer progression and outcomes, which provides new insights relevant for the development of effective cancer immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:25968569

  20. The generation and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Taams, Leonie S; Curnow, S John; Vukmanovic-Stejic, M; Akbar, Arne N

    2006-09-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are essential components of the immune system. They help to maintain immune tolerance by exerting suppressive effects on cells of the adaptive and innate immune system. In the last few years there has been an abundance of papers addressing the suppressive effects of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and their putative role in various experimental disease models and human diseases. Despite the enormous amounts of data on these cells a number of controversial issues still exists. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were originally described as thymus-derived anergic/suppressive T cells. Recent papers however indicate that these cells might also be generated in the periphery. Due to the thymic development of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells it was thought that these cells were specific for self-antigens. Indeed it was shown that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells could be positively selected upon high affinity interaction with self-antigens. However, evidence is accumulating that these cells might also interact with non-self antigens. Finally, in the literature there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of soluble factors versus cell-contact in the mechanism of suppression. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting these opposing viewpoints and to combine them into a general model for the origin, function and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

  1. Definition of target antigens for naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Kato, Takuma; Tawara, Isao; Saito, Kanako; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Kuribayashi, Kagemasa; Allen, Paul M; Schreiber, Robert D; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Old, Lloyd J; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2005-03-07

    The antigenic targets recognized by naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells (T reg cells) have been elusive. We have serologically defined a series of broadly expressed self-antigens derived from chemically induced mouse sarcomas by serological identification of antigens by recombinant expression cloning (SEREX). CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells from mice immunized with SEREX-defined self-antigens had strong suppressive activity on peptide-specific proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells and CD8(+) T cells. The suppressive effect was observed without in vitro T cell stimulation. Foxp3 expression in these CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells from immunized mice was 5-10 times greater than CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells derived from naive mice. The suppressive effect required cellular contact and was blocked by anti-glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related gene antibody. In vitro suppressive activity essentially disappeared 8 wk after the last immunization. However, it was regained by in vitro restimulation with cognate self-antigen protein but not with control protein. We propose that SEREX-defined self-antigens such as those used in this study represent self-antigens that elicit naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) T reg cells.

  2. Tissue adaptation of regulatory and intraepithelial CD4+ T cells controls gut inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sujino, Tomohisa; London, Mariya; Hoytema van Konijnenburg, David P.; Rendon, Tomiko; Buch, Thorsten; Silva, Hernandez M.; Lafaille, Juan J.; Reis, Bernardo S.; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in peripheral tissues (pTregs) are instrumental in limiting inflammatory responses to non-self antigens. Within the intestine, pTregs are located primarily in the lamina propria, while intraepithelial CD4+ T cells (CD4IELs), which also exhibit anti-inflammatory properties and depend on similar environmental cues, reside in the epithelium. Using intravital microscopy, we show distinct cell dynamics of intestinal Tregs and CD4IELs. Upon migration to the epithelium, Tregs lose Foxp3 and convert to CD4IELs in a microbiota-dependent fashion, an effect attributed to the loss of the transcription factor ThPOK. Finally, we demonstrate that pTregs and CD4IELs perform complementary roles in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. These results reveal intra-tissue specialization of anti-inflammatory T cells shaped by discrete niches of the intestine. PMID:27256884

  3. Fighting Viral Infections and Virus-Driven Tumors with Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Elena; Merlo, Anna; Martorelli, Debora; Cangemi, Michela; Dalla Santa, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Rosato, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cells have been and are still largely regarded as the orchestrators of immune responses, being able to differentiate into distinct T helper cell populations based on differentiation signals, transcription factor expression, cytokine secretion, and specific functions. Nonetheless, a growing body of evidence indicates that CD4+ T cells can also exert a direct effector activity, which depends on intrinsic cytotoxic properties acquired and carried out along with the evolution of several pathogenic infections. The relevant role of CD4+ T cell lytic features in the control of such infectious conditions also leads to their exploitation as a new immunotherapeutic approach. This review aims at summarizing currently available data about functional and therapeutic relevance of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in the context of viral infections and virus-driven tumors. PMID:28289418

  4. Clonally expanded CD4+ T cells can produce infectious HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Francesco R; Sobolewski, Michele D; Fyne, Elizabeth; Shao, Wei; Spindler, Jonathan; Hattori, Junko; Anderson, Elizabeth M; Watters, Sarah A; Hill, Shawn; Wu, Xiaolin; Wells, David; Su, Li; Luke, Brian T; Halvas, Elias K; Besson, Guillaume; Penrose, Kerri J; Yang, Zhiming; Kwan, Richard W; Van Waes, Carter; Uldrick, Thomas; Citrin, Deborah E; Kovacs, Joseph; Polis, Michael A; Rehm, Catherine A; Gorelick, Robert; Piatak, Michael; Keele, Brandon F; Kearney, Mary F; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H; Mellors, John W; Maldarelli, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Reservoirs of infectious HIV-1 persist despite years of combination antiretroviral therapy and make curing HIV-1 infections a major challenge. Most of the proviral DNA resides in CD4(+)T cells. Some of these CD4(+)T cells are clonally expanded; most of the proviruses are defective. It is not known if any of the clonally expanded cells carry replication-competent proviruses. We report that a highly expanded CD4(+) T-cell clone contains an intact provirus. The highly expanded clone produced infectious virus that was detected as persistent plasma viremia during cART in an HIV-1-infected patient who had squamous cell cancer. Cells containing the intact provirus were widely distributed and significantly enriched in cancer metastases. These results show that clonally expanded CD4(+)T cells can be a reservoir of infectious HIV-1.

  5. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  6. A simple theoretical framework for understanding heterogeneous differentiation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cells have several subsets of functional phenotypes, which play critical yet diverse roles in the immune system. Pathogen-driven differentiation of these subsets of cells is often heterogeneous in terms of the induced phenotypic diversity. In vitro recapitulation of heterogeneous differentiation under homogeneous experimental conditions indicates some highly regulated mechanisms by which multiple phenotypes of CD4+ T cells can be generated from a single population of naïve CD4+ T cells. Therefore, conceptual understanding of induced heterogeneous differentiation will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the response of populations of CD4+ T cells under physiological conditions. Results We present a simple theoretical framework to show how heterogeneous differentiation in a two-master-regulator paradigm can be governed by a signaling network motif common to all subsets of CD4+ T cells. With this motif, a population of naïve CD4+ T cells can integrate the signals from their environment to generate a functionally diverse population with robust commitment of individual cells. Notably, two positive feedback loops in this network motif govern three bistable switches, which in turn, give rise to three types of heterogeneous differentiated states, depending upon particular combinations of input signals. We provide three prototype models illustrating how to use this framework to explain experimental observations and make specific testable predictions. Conclusions The process in which several types of T helper cells are generated simultaneously to mount complex immune responses upon pathogenic challenges can be highly regulated, and a simple signaling network motif can be responsible for generating all possible types of heterogeneous populations with respect to a pair of master regulators controlling CD4+ T cell differentiation. The framework provides a mathematical basis for understanding the decision-making mechanisms of CD4+ T cells, and it can be

  7. The differentiation and protective function of cytolytic CD4 T cells in influenza infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of Class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity play a role in chronic, as well as, acute infections...

  8. TNFAIP3 promotes survival of CD4 T cells by restricting MTOR and promoting autophagy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Yu; Oshima, Shigeru; Takahara, Masahiro; Maeyashiki, Chiaki; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Nibe, Yoichi; Nozaki, Kengo; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ma, Averil; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in metabolism, differentiation, and survival in T cells. TNFAIP3/A20 is a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is thought to be a negative regulator of autophagy in cell lines. However, the role of TNFAIP3 in autophagy remains unclear. To determine whether TNFAIP3 regulates autophagy in CD4 T cells, we first analyzed Tnfaip3-deficient naïve CD4 T cells in vitro. We demonstrated that Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited reduced MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) puncta formation, increased mitochondrial content, and exaggerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These results indicate that TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy after T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in CD4 T cells. We then investigated the mechanism by which TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy signaling. We found that TNFAIP3 bound to the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex and that Tnfaip3-deficient cells displayed enhanced ubiquitination of the MTOR complex and MTOR activity. To confirm the effects of enhanced MTOR activity in Tnfaip3-deficient cells, we analyzed cell survival following treatment with Torin1, an MTOR inhibitor. Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited fewer cell numbers than the control cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the impaired survival of Tnfaip3-deficient cells was ameliorated with Torin1 treatment in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Torin1 was abolished by Atg5 deficiency. Thus, enhanced MTOR activity regulates the survival of Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells. Taken together, our findings illustrate that TNFAIP3 restricts MTOR signaling and promotes autophagy, providing new insight into the manner in which MTOR and autophagy regulate survival in CD4 T cells.

  9. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1–Induced CD4+ T-Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B.; Mantri, Chinmay K.; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M.; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A.; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1–associated CD4+ T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4+ T cells from HIV-1–negative and HIV-1–positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4+ T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4+ T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4+ T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4+ T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1–infected drug abusers. PMID:24486327

  10. CD4⁺ follicular helper T cell infiltration predicts breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Gu-Trantien, Chunyan; Loi, Sherene; Garaud, Soizic; Equeter, Carole; Libin, Myriam; de Wind, Alexandre; Ravoet, Marie; Le Buanec, Hélène; Sibille, Catherine; Manfouo-Foutsop, Germain; Veys, Isabelle; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Singhal, Sandeep K; Michiels, Stefan; Rothé, Françoise; Salgado, Roberto; Duvillier, Hugues; Ignatiadis, Michail; Desmedt, Christine; Bron, Dominique; Larsimont, Denis; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos; Willard-Gallo, Karen

    2013-07-01

    CD4T cells are critical regulators of immune responses, but their functional role in human breast cancer is relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to produce an image of CD4T cells infiltrating breast tumors using limited ex vivo manipulation to better understand the in vivo differences associated with patient prognosis. We performed comprehensive molecular profiling of infiltrating CD4T cells isolated from untreated invasive primary tumors and found that the infiltrating T cell subpopulations included follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which have not previously been found in solid tumors, as well as Th1, Th2, and Th17 effector memory cells and Tregs. T cell signaling pathway alterations included a mixture of activation and suppression characterized by restricted cytokine/chemokine production, which inversely paralleled lymphoid infiltration levels and could be reproduced in activated donor CD4T cells treated with primary tumor supernatant. A comparison of extensively versus minimally infiltrated tumors showed that CXCL13-producing CD4⁺ Tfh cells distinguish extensive immune infiltrates, principally located in tertiary lymphoid structure germinal centers. An 8-gene Tfh signature, signifying organized antitumor immunity, robustly predicted survival or preoperative response to chemotherapy. Our identification of CD4⁺ Tfh cells in breast cancer suggests that they are an important immune element whose presence in the tumor is a prognostic factor.

  11. CD4+ follicular helper T cell infiltration predicts breast cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Gu-Trantien, Chunyan; Loi, Sherene; Garaud, Soizic; Equeter, Carole; Libin, Myriam; de Wind, Alexandre; Ravoet, Marie; Le Buanec, Hélène; Sibille, Catherine; Manfouo-Foutsop, Germain; Veys, Isabelle; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Singhal, Sandeep K.; Michiels, Stefan; Rothé, Françoise; Salgado, Roberto; Duvillier, Hugues; Ignatiadis, Michail; Desmedt, Christine; Bron, Dominique; Larsimont, Denis; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos; Willard-Gallo, Karen

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are critical regulators of immune responses, but their functional role in human breast cancer is relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to produce an image of CD4+ T cells infiltrating breast tumors using limited ex vivo manipulation to better understand the in vivo differences associated with patient prognosis. We performed comprehensive molecular profiling of infiltrating CD4+ T cells isolated from untreated invasive primary tumors and found that the infiltrating T cell subpopulations included follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which have not previously been found in solid tumors, as well as Th1, Th2, and Th17 effector memory cells and Tregs. T cell signaling pathway alterations included a mixture of activation and suppression characterized by restricted cytokine/chemokine production, which inversely paralleled lymphoid infiltration levels and could be reproduced in activated donor CD4+ T cells treated with primary tumor supernatant. A comparison of extensively versus minimally infiltrated tumors showed that CXCL13-producing CD4+ Tfh cells distinguish extensive immune infiltrates, principally located in tertiary lymphoid structure germinal centers. An 8-gene Tfh signature, signifying organized antitumor immunity, robustly predicted survival or preoperative response to chemotherapy. Our identification of CD4+ Tfh cells in breast cancer suggests that they are an important immune element whose presence in the tumor is a prognostic factor. PMID:23778140

  12. Abdominal visceral adiposity influences CD4+ T cell cytokine production in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ozias, Marlies K; Li, Shengqi; Hull, Holly R; Brooks, William M; Petroff, Margaret G; Carlson, Susan E

    2015-02-01

    Women with pre-gravid obesity are at risk for pregnancy complications. While the macrophage response of obese pregnant women categorized by body mass index (BMI) has been documented, the relationship between the peripheral CD4(+) T cell cytokine profile and body fat compartments during pregnancy is unknown. In this study, third trimester peripheral CD4(+) T cell cytokine profiles were measured in healthy pregnant women [n=35; pre-pregnancy BMI: 18.5-40]. CD4(+) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and stimulated to examine their capacity to generate cytokines. Between 1 and 3weeks postpartum, total body fat was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat masses were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Pearson's correlation was performed to assess relationships between cytokines and fat mass. Results showed that greater abdominal visceral fat mass was associated with a decrease in stimulated CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression. IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-12p70, IL-10 and IL-17A were inversely related to visceral fat mass. Chemokines CCL3 and IL-8 and growth factors G-CSF and FLT-3L were also inversely correlated. Additionally, total body fat mass was inversely correlated with FGF-2 while abdominal subcutaneous fat mass and BMI were unrelated to any CD4(+) T cell cytokine. In conclusion, lower responsiveness of CD4(+) T cell cytokines associated with abdominal visceral fat mass is a novel finding late in gestation.

  13. Impact of nicotine on the interplay between human periodontal ligament cells and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wong, Yong; Wu, Li-Zheng; Tan, Ling; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common infectious disease associated with destruction of periodontal ligaments and alveolar bones. CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune response is involved in the progression of periodontitis. Tobacco consumption increases the risk of periodontal disease. However, the impact of nicotine on the interaction between human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and CD4(+) T cells remains unrevealed. Our study aims to investigate the effect of nicotine on PDL cells and the cocultured CD4(+) T cells. The PDL cell cultures were established by explants from healthy individuals, exposed to nicotine or α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), and incubated solely or in combination with CD4(+) T cells. Afterwards, cell viability, secreted cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were evaluated. In monoculture of PDL cells, nicotine dramatically repressed cell viability and increased apoptosis. Meanwhile, α-BTX largely reversed the nicotine-induced apoptosis and increased viability of PDL cells. Compared with the monoculture, MMP-1, MMP-3, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-21 in supernatant of cocultures were markedly elevated after treatment with nicotine. Moreover, α-BTX significantly attenuated nicotine-triggered production of these components either in mono- or co-cultures. In addition, PDL cell-derived CXCL12 following nicotine treatment recruited CD4(+) T cells. Above all, nicotine deteriorated periodontitis partially by promoting PDL cell-CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response and matrix degradation.

  14. The Story of CD4+CD28− T Cells Revisited: Solved or Still Ongoing?

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD28− T cells are a unique type of proinflammatory T cells characterised by blockade of costimulatory CD28 receptor expression at the transcriptional level, which is still reversible by IL-12. In healthy individuals older than 65 years, these cells may accumulate to up to 50% of total CD4+ T lymphocytes as in many immune-mediated diseases, immunodeficiency, and specific infectious diseases. Here we focus on CD4+CD28− T cells in chronic immune-mediated diseases, summarizing various phenotypic and functional characteristics, which vary depending on the underlying disease, disease activity, and concurrent treatment. CD4+CD28− T cells present as effector/memory cells with increased replicative history and oligoclonality but reduced apoptosis. As an alternative costimulatory signal instead of CD28, not only natural killer cell receptors and Toll-like receptors, but also CD47, CTLA-4, OX40, and 4-1BB have to be considered. The proinflammatory and cytotoxic capacities of these cells indicate an involvement in progression and maintenance of chronic immune-mediated disease. So far it has been shown that treatment with TNF-α blockers, abatacept, statins, and polyclonal antilymphocyte globulins (ATG) mediates reduction of the CD4+CD28− T cell level. The clinical relevance of targeting CD4+CD28− T cells as a therapeutic option has not been examined so far. PMID:25834833

  15. Long-Lived CD4+IFN-γ+ T Cells rather than Short-Lived CD4+IFN-γ+IL-10+ T Cells Initiate Rapid IL-10 Production To Suppress Anamnestic T Cell Responses during Secondary Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Mendez, Ana; Inkson, Colette A.; Shaw, Tovah N.; Strangward, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells that produce IFN-γ are the source of host-protective IL-10 during primary infection with a number of different pathogens, including Plasmodium spp. The fate of these CD4+IFN-γ+IL-10+ T cells following clearance of primary infection and their subsequent influence on the course of repeated infections is, however, presently unknown. In this study, utilizing IFN-γ–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and IL-10–GFP dual reporter mice, we show that primary malaria infection–induced CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cells have limited memory potential, do not stably express IL-10, and are disproportionately lost from the Ag-experienced CD4+ T cell memory population during the maintenance phase postinfection. CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cells generally exhibited a short-lived effector rather than effector memory T cell phenotype postinfection and expressed high levels of PD-1, Lag-3, and TIGIT, indicative of cellular exhaustion. Consistently, the surviving CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cell–derived cells were unresponsive and failed to proliferate during the early phase of secondary infection. In contrast, CD4+YFP+GFP− T cell–derived cells expanded rapidly and upregulated IL-10 expression during secondary infection. Correspondingly, CD4+ T cells were the major producers within an accelerated and amplified IL-10 response during the early stage of secondary malaria infection. Notably, IL-10 exerted quantitatively stronger regulatory effects on innate and CD4+ T cell responses during primary and secondary infections, respectively. The results in this study significantly improve our understanding of the durability of IL-10–producing CD4+ T cells postinfection and provide information on how IL-10 may contribute to optimized parasite control and prevention of immune-mediated pathology during repeated malaria infections. PMID:27630165

  16. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Víctor G.; Sacedón, Rosa; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M.; Hernández-López, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application. PMID:26110906

  17. Complementary Dendritic Cell–activating Function of CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mailliard, Robbie B.; Egawa, Shinichi; Cai, Quan; Kalinska, Anna; Bykovskaya, Svetlana N.; Lotze, Michael T.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Storkus, Walter J.; Kalinski, Pawel

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) activated by CD40L-expressing CD4+ T cells act as mediators of “T helper (Th)” signals for CD8+ T lymphocytes, inducing their cytotoxic function and supporting their long-term activity. Here, we show that the optimal activation of DCs, their ability to produce high levels of bioactive interleukin (IL)-12p70 and to induce Th1-type CD4+ T cells, is supported by the complementary DC-activating signals from both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Cord blood– or peripheral blood–isolated naive CD8+ T cells do not express CD40L, but, in contrast to naive CD4+ T cells, they are efficient producers of IFN-γ at the earliest stages of the interaction with DCs. Naive CD8+ T cells cooperate with CD40L-expressing naive CD4+ T cells in the induction of IL-12p70 in DCs, promoting the development of primary Th1-type CD4+ T cell responses. Moreover, the recognition of major histocompatibility complex class I–presented epitopes by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells results in the TNF-α– and IFN-γ–dependent increase in the activation level of DCs and in the induction of type-1 polarized mature DCs capable of producing high levels of IL-12p70 upon a subsequent CD40 ligation. The ability of class I–restricted CD8+ T cells to coactivate and polarize DCs may support the induction of Th1-type responses against class I–presented epitopes of intracellular pathogens and contact allergens, and may have therapeutical implications in cancer and chronic infections. PMID:11854360

  18. The Induction and Maintenance of Transplant Tolerance Engages Both Regulatory and Anergic CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Besançon, Alix; Baas, Marije; Goncalves, Tania; Valette, Fabrice; Waldmann, Herman; Chatenoud, Lucienne; You, Sylvaine

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic tolerance to self-antigens or foreign antigens is thought to depend on constant vigilance by Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Previous work using a pancreatic islet allograft model and a short pulse of CD3 antibody therapy has shown that CD8(+) T cells become anergic and use TGFβ and coinhibitory signaling as their contribution to the tolerance process. Here, we examine the role of CD4(+) T cells in tolerization by CD3 antibodies. We show that both Foxp3(+) Tregs and CD4(+) T cell anergy play a role in the induction of tolerance and its maintenance. Foxp3(+) Tregs resisted CD3 antibody-mediated depletion, unlike intragraft Th1 CD4(+) lymphocytes coexpressing granzyme B and Tbx21, which were selectively eliminated. Tregs were mandatory for induction of tolerance as their depletion at the time of CD3 antibody therapy or for a short time thereafter, by an antibody to CD25 (PC61), led to graft rejection. Early treatment with CTLA-4 antibody gave the same outcome. In contrast, neither PC61 nor anti-CTLA-4 given late, at day 100 posttransplant, reversed tolerance once established. Ablation of Foxp3 T cells after diphtheria toxin injection in tolerant Foxp3(DTR) recipient mice provided the same outcome. Alloreactive T cells had been rendered intrinsically unresponsive as total CD4(+) or Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells from tolerant recipients were unable to mount donor-specific IFN-γ responses. In addition, intragraft Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells lacked proliferative capacities, expressed high levels of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and exhibited a CD73(hi)FR4(hi) phenotype, thus reflecting a state of T cell anergy. We conclude that Tregs play a substantive and critical role in guiding the immune system toward tolerance of the allograft, when induced by CD3 antibody, but are less important for maintenance of the tolerant state, where T cell anergy appears sufficient.

  19. Helper T cells down-regulate CD4 expression upon chronic stimulation giving rise to double-negative T cells.

    PubMed

    Grishkan, Inna V; Ntranos, Achilles; Calabresi, Peter A; Gocke, Anne R

    2013-01-01

    Double-negative T (DNT) cells are αβTCR(+)CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-)NK1.1(-) cells that constitute a small but significant proportion of the αβTCR(+) T cells. Their developmental pathway and pathological significance remain unclear. In the present study, we utilized chronic in vitro stimulation of CD4(+) T cells to mimic immune hyper-activation of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus, conditions characterized by DNT cells accumulation. After approximately 4-5 rounds of stimulation, the CD3(+)CD4(-) population became apparent. These cells did not express CD8, NK1.1, γδTCR, or B220, exhibited a highly proliferative effector phenotype, and were dependent on T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation for survival. Moreover, CD3(+)CD4(-) cells expressed MHC class II-restricted αβTCR, indicative of their origin from a CD4(+) T cell population. The results presented herein illustrate a novel method of DNT cell generation in vitro and suggest that immune hyper-activation could also be implicated in the genesis of the disease-associated DNT cells in vivo.

  20. Persistent expansion of CD4+ effector memory T cells in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Abdulahad, W H; van der Geld, Y M; Stegeman, C A; Kallenberg, C G M

    2006-09-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is associated with an ongoing immune effector response, even in remission, we examined the distribution of peripheral naive and memory T-lymphocytes in this disease, and analyzed the function-related phenotypes of the memory T-cell population. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were freshly isolated from WG-patients in remission (R-WG, n=40), active WG-patients (A-WG, n=17), and age-matched healthy controls (HCs, n=21). Expression of CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CCR7, interleukin (IL)-18Ralpha, ST2L, and FoxP3 were determined by four-color flow cytometric analysis. CD45RO and CCR7 were used for distinction between naive and memory T cells, IL-18Ralpha, ST2L, and FoxP3 for the assessment of Type1, Type2, and regulatory T-cells, respectively. In R-WG, the CD4+CD45RO+CCR7- effector memory T-cell subpopulation (TEM) was relatively increased, whereas the CD4+CD45RO-CCR7+ naive T-cell population (TNaive) was decreased as compared to HC. The distribution of naive and memory CD8+T cells did not differ between R-WG, A-WG, and HC, nor did CD4+CD45RO+CCR7+ central memory T cells (TCM). In contrast to HC, the percentage of CD4+TNaive cells in R-WG correlated negatively with age, whereas CD4+TEM cells showed a positive correlation. In R-WG, a skewing towards Type2 T cells was observed in CD4+TEM cells. No differences were detected in FoxP3+CD4+TEM cells between R-WG and A-WG, whereas the FoxP3-CD4+TEM cells were increased in R-WG and decreased in A-WG as compared to HC. Collectively, peripheral blood homeostasis of CD4+T cells is disturbed in R-WG with the persistent expansion of non-regulatory CD4+TEM cells. These cells might be involved in relapse and may constitute a target for therapy.

  1. Interleukin 4-producing CD4+ T cells in the skin of cats with allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roosje, P J; Dean, G A; Willemse, T; Rutten, V P M G; Thepen, T

    2002-03-01

    Lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis has a cellular infiltrate and a CD4/CD8 ratio comparable to that in humans with atopic dermatitis. CD4+ helper T cells and in particular cells belonging to the Th2 subset play an important role in disease pathogenesis in humans. We investigated the cytokine pattern of CD4+ T cells in situ, with special emphasis on the putative presence of cells producing interleukin 4 (IL4), in cats with allergic dermatitis. Immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine that CD4+ T cells in lesional and nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis can produce IL4, as occurs in humans. Lesional and nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis had significantly more IL4+ T cells (P = 0.001) than did skin of healthy control cats. Double staining indicated that all IL4+ cells were positive for pan-T or CD4 markers. Double labeling for mast cell chymase and IL4 stained primarily different cells. Western blotting demonstrated cross-reactivity between the antibody against human IL4 and a feline recombinant IL4. These results indicate that IL4 is primarily produced by CD4+ T cells and is also present in clinically uninvolved skin, indicating a role in the pathogenesis of allergic dermatitis in cats.

  2. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  3. Regulators of Glucose Metabolism in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Clovis S; Hussain, Tabinda; Duette, Gabriel; Weller, Thomas J; Ostrowski, Matias; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-11-01

    Much like cancer cells, activated T cells undergo various metabolic changes that allow them to grow and proliferate rapidly. By adopting aerobic glycolysis upon activation, T cells effectively prioritize efficiency in biosynthesis over energy generation. There are distinct differences in the way CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells process activation signals. CD8(+) effector T cells are less dependent on Glut1 and oxygen levels compared to their CD4(+) counterparts. Similarly the downstream signaling by TCR also differs in both effector T cell types. Recent studies have explored PI3K/Akt, mTORC, HIF1α, p70S6K and Bcl-6 signaling in depth providing definition of the crucial roles of these regulators in glucose metabolism. These new insights may allow improved therapeutic manipulation against inflammatory conditions that are associated with dysfunctional T-cell metabolism such as autoimmune disorders, metabolic syndrome, HIV, and cancers.

  4. Manipulating Antigenic Ligand Strength to Selectively Target Myelin-Reactive CD4+ T Cells in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Joseph J.; Rosenthal, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of antigen-specific therapies for the selective tolerization of autoreactive T cells remains the Holy Grail for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This quest remains elusive, however, as the numerous antigen-specific strategies targeting myelin-specific T cells over the years have failed to result in clinical success. In this review, we revisit the antigen-based therapies used in the treatment of myelin-specific CD4+ T cells in the context of the functional avidity and the strength of signal of the encephalitogenic CD4+ T cell repertoire. In light of differences in activation thresholds, we propose that autoreactive T cells are not all equal, and therefore tolerance induction strategies must incorporate ligand strength in order to be successful in treating EAE and ultimately the human disease MS. PMID:19904613

  5. Quorum-Sensing in CD4+ T Cell Homeostasis: A Hypothesis and a Model

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Afonso R. M.; Amado, Inês F.; Reynolds, Joseph; Berges, Julien; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers is believed to be due to competition between cellular populations for a common niche of restricted size, defined by the combination of interactions and trophic factors required for cell survival. Here we propose a new mechanism: homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers could also be achieved by the ability of lymphocytes to perceive the density of their own populations. Such a mechanism would be reminiscent of the primordial quorum-sensing systems used by bacteria, in which some bacteria sense the accumulation of bacterial metabolites secreted by other elements of the population, allowing them to “count” the number of cells present and adapt their growth accordingly. We propose that homeostasis of CD4+ T cell numbers may occur via a quorum-sensing-like mechanism, where IL-2 is produced by activated CD4+ T cells and sensed by a population of CD4+ Treg cells that expresses the high-affinity IL-2Rα-chain and can regulate the number of activated IL-2-producing CD4+ T cells and the total CD4+ T cell population. In other words, CD4+ T cell populations can restrain their growth by monitoring the number of activated cells, thus preventing uncontrolled lymphocyte proliferation during immune responses. We hypothesize that malfunction of this quorum-sensing mechanism may lead to uncontrolled T cell activation and autoimmunity. Finally, we present a mathematical model that describes the key role of IL-2 and quorum-sensing mechanisms in CD4+ T cell homeostasis during an immune response. PMID:22654881

  6. Cell-to-cell transfer of M. tuberculosis antigens optimizes CD4 T cell priming.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D

    2014-06-11

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other respiratory infections, optimal T cell activation requires pathogen transport from the lung to a local draining lymph node (LN). However, the infected inflammatory monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that transport M. tuberculosis to the local lymph node are relatively inefficient at activating CD4 T cells, possibly due to bacterial inhibition of antigen presentation. We found that infected migratory DCs release M. tuberculosis antigens as soluble, unprocessed proteins for uptake and presentation by uninfected resident lymph node DCs. This transfer of bacterial proteins from migratory to local DCs results in optimal priming of antigen-specific CD4 T cells, which are essential in controlling tuberculosis. Additionally, this mechanism does not involve transfer of the whole bacterium and is distinct from apoptosis or exosome shedding. These findings reveal a mechanism that bypasses pathogen inhibition of antigen presentation by infected cells and generates CD4 T cell responses that control the infection.

  7. Distinctive selection mechanisms govern the T cell receptor repertoire of peripheral CD4-CD8- alpha/beta T cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of CD4+ and CD8+ alpha/beta T cells is heavily influenced by positive and negative selection events that occur during T cell development in the thymus. The coreceptors CD4 and CD8 appear to be essential for this selection to occur. To gain insight into whether T cells that express TCR alpha/beta but lack either coreceptor (CD4- CD8- TCR alpha/beta or alpha/beta double- negative [DN] cells) are also subject to positive and negative selection, and whether selection can occur in the absence of coreceptors, we have performed an extensive immunogenetic analysis of the TCR V beta repertoire of alpha/beta DN cells in lymph nodes of normal mice. Our results show that alpha/beta DN cells appear to be unaffected by clonal deletion of V beta 5 and V beta 11 in I-E- expressing mice, and do not undergo deletion of V beta 6- and V beta 8.1-expressing T cells in Mls-1a-positive mice. They are also unaffected by positive selection of V beta 17a+ T cells in the context of I-Aq. The results suggest that most selection events require the participation of CD4 and CD8, while alpha/beta DN cells are unselected. This argues that most alpha/beta DN cells probably have never expressed CD4 or CD8. However, a unique form of repertoire selection occurs: enrichment of V beta 17a+ alpha/beta DN cells in I-E+ mice. This could be an instance of coreceptor-independent selection. PMID:1512537

  8. Homeostatically Maintained Resting Naive CD4+ T Cells Resist Latent HIV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Kobayahi-Ishihara, Mie; Wada, Yamato; Terahara, Kazutaka; Takeyama, Haruko; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Yamagishi, Makoto; Martinez, Javier P.; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic proliferation (HSP) is a major mechanism by which long-lived naïve and memory CD4+ T cells are maintained in vivo and suggested to contribute to the persistence of the latent HIV-1 reservoir. However, while many in vitro latency models rely on CD4+ T cells that were initially differentiated via T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation into memory/effector cells, latent infection of naïve resting CD4+ T cells maintained under HSP conditions has not been fully addressed. Here, we describe an in vitro HSP culture system utilizing the cytokines IL-7 and IL-15 that allows studying latency in naïve resting CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells isolated from several healthy donors were infected with HIV pseudotypes expressing GFP and cultured under HSP conditions or TCR conditions as control. Cell proliferation, phenotype, and GFP expression were analyzed by flow cytometry. RNA expression was quantified by qRT-PCR. Under HSP culture conditions, latently HIV-1 infected naïve cells are in part maintained in the non-dividing (= resting) state. Although a few HIV-1 provirus+ cells were present in these resting GFP negative cells, the estimated level of GFP transcripts per infected cell seems to indicate a block at the post-transcriptional level. Interestingly, neither TCR nor the prototypic HDAC inhibitor SAHA were able to reactivate HIV-1 provirus from these cells. This lack of reactivation was not due to methylation of the HIV LTR. These results point to a mechanism of HIV control in HSP-cultured resting naïve CD4+ T cells that may be distinct from that in TCR-stimulated memory/effector T cells. PMID:27990142

  9. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease

    PubMed Central

    Falta, Michael T.; Mack, Douglas G.; Tinega, Alex N.; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M.; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A.; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4+ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4+ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLA-DP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4+ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD. PMID:23797096

  10. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Falta, Michael T; Pinilla, Clemencia; Mack, Douglas G; Tinega, Alex N; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-07-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4T cells specific for these ligands in all HLADP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD.

  11. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells: Differentiation, Function, and Application to Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. The control of DENV infection has not yet been fully successful due to lack of effective therapeutics or vaccines. Nevertheless, a better understanding of the immune responses against DENV infection may reveal new strategies for eliciting and improving antiviral immunity. T cells provide protective immunity against various viral infections by generating effector cells that cooperate to eliminate antigens and memory cells that can survive for long periods with enhanced abilities to control recurring pathogens. Following activation, CD8 T cells can migrate to sites of infection and kill infected cells, whereas CD4 T cells contribute to the elimination of pathogens by trafficking to infected tissues and providing help to innate immune responses, B cells, as well as CD8 T cells. However, it is now evident that CD4 T cells can also perform cytotoxic functions and induce the apoptosis of target cells. Importantly, accumulating studies demonstrate that cytotoxic CD4 T cells develop following DENV infections and may play a crucial role in protecting the host from severe dengue disease. We review our current understanding of the differentiation and function of cytotoxic CD4 T cells, with a focus on DENV infection, and discuss the potential of harnessing these cells for the prevention and treatment of DENV infection and disease. PMID:28003809

  12. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells: Differentiation, Function, and Application to Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. The control of DENV infection has not yet been fully successful due to lack of effective therapeutics or vaccines. Nevertheless, a better understanding of the immune responses against DENV infection may reveal new strategies for eliciting and improving antiviral immunity. T cells provide protective immunity against various viral infections by generating effector cells that cooperate to eliminate antigens and memory cells that can survive for long periods with enhanced abilities to control recurring pathogens. Following activation, CD8 T cells can migrate to sites of infection and kill infected cells, whereas CD4 T cells contribute to the elimination of pathogens by trafficking to infected tissues and providing help to innate immune responses, B cells, as well as CD8 T cells. However, it is now evident that CD4 T cells can also perform cytotoxic functions and induce the apoptosis of target cells. Importantly, accumulating studies demonstrate that cytotoxic CD4 T cells develop following DENV infections and may play a crucial role in protecting the host from severe dengue disease. We review our current understanding of the differentiation and function of cytotoxic CD4 T cells, with a focus on DENV infection, and discuss the potential of harnessing these cells for the prevention and treatment of DENV infection and disease.

  13. Low-affinity CD4+ T cells are major responders in the primary immune response

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ryan J.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Martinez, Hunter A.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust primary immune response has been correlated with the precursor number of antigen-specific T cells, as identified using peptide MHCII tetramers. However, these tetramers identify only the highest-affinity T cells. Here we show the entire CD4+ T-cell repertoire, inclusive of low-affinity T cells missed by tetramers, using a T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling reporter and micropipette assay to quantify naive precursors and expanded populations. In vivo limiting dilution assays reveal hundreds more precursor T cells than previously thought, with higher-affinity tetramer-positive T cells, comprising only 5–30% of the total antigen-specific naive repertoire. Lower-affinity T cells maintain their predominance as the primary immune response progresses, with no enhancement of survival of T cells with high-affinity TCRs. These findings demonstrate that affinity for antigen does not control CD4+ T-cell entry into the primary immune response, as a diverse range in affinity is maintained from precursor through peak of T-cell expansion. PMID:27976744

  14. Low-affinity CD4+ T cells are major responders in the primary immune response.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ryan J; Andargachew, Rakieb; Martinez, Hunter A; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-12-15

    A robust primary immune response has been correlated with the precursor number of antigen-specific T cells, as identified using peptide MHCII tetramers. However, these tetramers identify only the highest-affinity T cells. Here we show the entire CD4+ T-cell repertoire, inclusive of low-affinity T cells missed by tetramers, using a T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling reporter and micropipette assay to quantify naive precursors and expanded populations. In vivo limiting dilution assays reveal hundreds more precursor T cells than previously thought, with higher-affinity tetramer-positive T cells, comprising only 5-30% of the total antigen-specific naive repertoire. Lower-affinity T cells maintain their predominance as the primary immune response progresses, with no enhancement of survival of T cells with high-affinity TCRs. These findings demonstrate that affinity for antigen does not control CD4+ T-cell entry into the primary immune response, as a diverse range in affinity is maintained from precursor through peak of T-cell expansion.

  15. Imaging CD4+ T cell interstitial migration in the inflamed dermis

    PubMed Central

    Gaylo, Alison; Overstreet, Michael G.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of CD4+ T cells to carry out effector functions is dependent upon the rapid and efficient migration of these cells in inflamed peripheral tissues through an as-yet undefined mechanism. The application of multiphoton microscopy to the study of the immune system provides a tool to measure the dynamics of immune responses within intact tissues. Here we present a protocol for non-invasive intravital multiphoton imaging of CD4+ T cells in the inflamed mouse ear dermis. Use of a custom imaging platform and a venous catheter allows for the visualization of CD4+ T cell dynamics in the dermal interstitium, with the ability to interrogate these cells in real-time via the addition of blocking antibodies to key molecular components involved in motility. This system provides advantages over both in vitro models and surgically invasive imaging procedures. Understanding the pathways used by CD4+ T cells for motility may ultimately provide insight into the basic function of CD4+ T cells as well as the pathogenesis of both autoimmune diseases and pathology from chronic infections. PMID:27078264

  16. Computational modeling of heterogeneity and function of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Carbo, Adria; Hontecillas, Raquel; Andrew, Tricity; Eden, Kristin; Mei, Yongguo; Hoops, Stefan; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is composed of many different cell types and hundreds of intersecting molecular pathways and signals. This large biological complexity requires coordination between distinct pro-inflammatory and regulatory cell subsets to respond to infection while maintaining tissue homeostasis. CD4+ T cells play a central role in orchestrating immune responses and in maintaining a balance between pro- and anti- inflammatory responses. This tight balance between regulatory and effector reactions depends on the ability of CD4+ T cells to modulate distinct pathways within large molecular networks, since dysregulated CD4+ T cell responses may result in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The CD4+ T cell differentiation process comprises an intricate interplay between cytokines, their receptors, adaptor molecules, signaling cascades and transcription factors that help delineate cell fate and function. Computational modeling can help to describe, simulate, analyze, and predict some of the behaviors in this complicated differentiation network. This review provides a comprehensive overview of existing computational immunology methods as well as novel strategies used to model immune responses with a particular focus on CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:25364738

  17. Single wall carbon nanotube electrode system capable of quantitative detection of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonhyub; Park, Gayoung; Lee, Seoho; Hwang, Suk-Won; Min, Namki; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-04-15

    Development of CNT-based CD4(+) T cell imunosensors remains in its infancy due to the poor immobilization efficiency, lack of reproducibility, and difficulty in providing linear quantification. Here, we developed a fully-integrated single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based immunosensor capable of selective capture and linear quantification of CD4(+) T cells with greater dynamic range. By employing repeated two-step oxygen (O2) plasma treatment processes with 35 days of recovery periods, we achieved the enhanced functionalization of the CNT surface and the removal of the byproduct of spray-coated SWCNTs that hinders charge transfer and stable CD4(+) T cell sensing. As a result, a linear electrochemical signal was generated in direct proportion to the bound cells. The slope of a SWCNT electrode in a target concentration range (10(2)~10(6)cells/mL) was 4.55×10(-2)μA per concentration decade, with the lowest detection limit of 1×10(2)cells/mL. Since the reduced number of CD4(+) T cell counts in patients' peripheral blood corresponds to the progression of HIV disease, our CD4(+) T cell-immunosensor provides a simple and low-cost platform which can fulfill the requirement for the development of point-of-care (POC) diagnostic technologies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in resource-limited countries.

  18. Cell death by pyroptosis drives CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doitsh, Gilad; Galloway, Nicole L. K.; Geng, Xin; Yang, Zhiyuan; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Zepeda, Orlando; Hunt, Peter W.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Sowinski, Stefanie; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Greene, Warner C.

    2014-01-01

    The pathway causing CD4 T-cell death in HIV-infected hosts remains poorly understood although apoptosis has been proposed as a key mechanism. We now show that caspase-3-mediated apoptosis accounts for the death of only a small fraction of CD4 T cells corresponding to those that are both activated and productively infected. The remaining over 95% of quiescent lymphoid CD4 T cells die by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis triggered by abortive viral infection. Pyroptosis corresponds to an intensely inflammatory form of programmed cell death in which cytoplasmic contents and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, are released. This death pathway thus links the two signature events in HIV infection--CD4 T-cell depletion and chronic inflammation--and creates a pathogenic vicious cycle in which dying CD4 T cells release inflammatory signals that attract more cells to die. This cycle can be broken by caspase 1 inhibitors shown to be safe in humans, raising the possibility of a new class of `anti-AIDS' therapeutics targeting the host rather than the virus.

  19. Tyrosine kinase activity of CD4-associated p56lck may not be required for CD4-dependent T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, T L; Burakoff, S J

    1993-01-01

    The lymphoid-specific tyrosine kinase p56lck (Lck) is critical for the development and activation of T lymphocytes, and Lck kinase activity has been implicated in both T-cell antigen receptor/CD3- and CD4-mediated signaling. CD4-dependent T-cell activation has been demonstrated to be dependent upon the association of CD4 with Lck. To examine the role of the kinase activity of Lck in CD4-dependent T-cell activation, we have generated several kinase-deficient mutants of Lck. When transfected into CD4+ murine T-cell hybridoma cells, these mutants cause approximately 90% diminution in CD4-associated Lck kinase activity. Specifically, upon CD4 crosslinking there is decreased Lck autophosphorylation and decreased phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate. When CD4 is crosslinked to the T-cell antigen receptor-CD3 complex, decreased phosphorylation of associated substrates is also observed. In spite of this striking inhibition of Lck kinase function, cells expressing the kinase-deficient mutants demonstrate normal or enhanced CD4-dependent antigen responsiveness. These data demonstrate that the level of Lck kinase activity does not correlate with its CD4-associated function and suggest that the kinase activity of Lck may not be required for CD4-mediated signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7505449

  20. Reconstitution of CD4 T Cells in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid after Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Kenneth S.; Vinton, Carol; Hage, Chadi A.; Kohli, Lisa M.; Twigg, Homer L.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Zwickl, Beth; Waltz, Jeffrey; Goldman, Mitchell; Douek, Daniel C.; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The massive depletion of gastrointestinal-tract CD4 T cells is a hallmark of the acute phase of HIV infection. In contrast, the depletion of the lower-respiratory-tract mucosal CD4 T cells as measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is more moderate and similar to the depletion of CD4 T cells observed in peripheral blood (PB). To understand better the dynamics of disease pathogenesis and the potential for the reconstitution of CD4 T cells in the lung and PB following the administration of effective antiretroviral therapy, we studied cell-associated viral loads, CD4 T-cell frequencies, and phenotypic and functional profiles of antigen-specific CD4 T cells from BAL fluid and blood before and after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The major findings to emerge were the following: (i) BAL CD4 T cells are not massively depleted or preferentially infected by HIV compared to levels for PB; (ii) BAL CD4 T cells reconstitute after the initiation of HAART, and their infection frequencies decrease; (iii) BAL CD4 T-cell reconstitution appears to occur via the local proliferation of resident BAL CD4 T cells rather than redistribution; and (iv) BAL CD4 T cells are more polyfunctional than CD4 T cells in blood, and their functional profile is relatively unchanged after the initiation of HAART. Taken together, these data suggest mechanisms for mucosal CD4 T-cell depletion and interventions that might aid in the reconstitution of mucosal CD4 T cells. PMID:20610726

  1. A role for the transcription factor Helios in human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Goldberg, Monica V.; Harris, Timothy J.; Yen, Hung-Rong; Bruno, Tullia C.; Durham, Nicholas M.; Hipkiss, Edward L.; Pyle, Kristin J.; Wada, Satoshi; Pan, Fan; Pardoll, Drew M.; Drake, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Relative up-regulation of the Ikaros family transcription factor Helios in natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been reported by several groups. However, a role for Helios in regulatory T cells has not yet been described. Here, we show that Helios is upregulated in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments indicated that Helios binds to the FoxP3 promoter. These data were further corroborated by experiments showing that knocking-down Helios with siRNA oligonucleotides results in down-regulation of FoxP3. Functionally, we found that suppression of Helios message in CD4+CD25+ T cells significantly attenuates their suppressive function. Taken together, these data suggest that Helios may play an important role in regulatory T cell function and support the concept that Helios may be a novel target to manipulate Treg activity in a clinical setting. PMID:20226531

  2. Epigenetic Alterations May Regulate Temporary Reversal of CD4+ T Cell Activation Caused by Trichloroethylene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Ashley R.; Cooney, Craig A.; Reisfeld, Brad; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that short-term (4 weeks) or chronic (32 weeks) exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) in drinking water of female MRL+/+ mice generated CD4+ T cells that secreted increased levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and expressed an activated (CD44hiCD62Llo) phenotype. In contrast, the current study of subchronic TCE exposure showed that midway in the disease process both of these parameters of CD4+ T cell activation were reversed. This phase of the disease process may represent an attempt by the body to counteract the inflammatory effects of TCE. The decrease in CD4+ T cell production of IFN-γ following subchronic TCE exposure could not be attributed to skewing toward a Th2 or Th17 phenotype or to an increase in Treg cells. Instead, the suppression corresponded to alterations in markers used to assess DNA methylation, namely increased expression of retrotransposons Iap (intracisternal A particle) and Muerv (murine endogenous retrovirus). Also observed was an increase in the expression of Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase-1) and decreased expression of several genes known to be downregulated by DNA methylation, namely Ifng, Il2, and Cdkn1a. CD4+ T cells from a second study in which MRL+/+ mice were treated for 17 weeks with TCE showed a similar increase in Iap and decrease in Cdkn1a. In addition, DNA collected from the CD4+ T cells in the second study showed TCE-decreased global DNA methylation. Thus, these results described the biphasic nature of TCE-induced alterations in CD4+ T cell function and suggested that these changes represented potentially reversible alterations in epigenetic processes. PMID:22407948

  3. A rapid manual method for CD4+ T-cell quantitation for use in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Landay, A; Ho, J L; Hom, D; Russell, T; Zwerner, R; Minuty, J G; Kataaha, P; Mmiro, F; Jackson, B

    1993-12-01

    Clinicians took blood samples from 294 HIV-1 seropositive patients and 88 HIV-1 seronegative patients at Cornell University Medical College and The New York Hospital in New York City, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago, and Makerere University Medical school in Kampala, Uganda, to assess a manual method's (Cytosphere) ability to accurately determine the CD4+ T-cell count. The Cytosphere assay uses latex beads coated with CD4 antibody which are combined with anticoagulated whole blood followed by red cell lysis. A hemacytometer then counts the bead-coated cells. The average technologist only needs 1-3 days of training (20 CD4 practice assays/days) in the Cytosphere assay. The minimal equipment required for the assay are a pipette, a hemacytometer, and a light microscope. The lysing agent inactivates HIV-1. The overall correlation between the standard flow cytometry method and the Cytosphere assay stood at 0.912 and was significant (p .001). When the researchers stratified the samples based on CD4+ T-cell counts defined by flow cytometry, the predictive values of the Cytosphere assay for correctly identifying patients with CD4 T-cell counts greater or less than 200 x 1 million/1 were 96% and 92%, respectively. These findings suggested that the Cytosphere assay has the potential to quantify CD4 cells in the limited laboratories in developing countries. Larger longitudinal studies of HIV seropositive people in developing countries are needed to test the reliability and reproducibility of the assay.

  4. Heritable Gene Regulation in the CD4:CD8 T Cell Lineage Choice

    PubMed Central

    Issuree, Priya D. A.; Ng, Charles P.; Littman, Dan R.

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is dependent on functionally distinct lineages of T cell antigen receptor αβ-expressing T cells that differentiate from a common progenitor in the thymus. CD4+CD8+ progenitor thymocytes undergo selection following interaction with MHC class I and class II molecules bearing peptide self-antigens, giving rise to CD8+ cytotoxic and CD4+ helper or regulatory T cell lineages, respectively. The strict correspondence of CD4 and CD8 expression with distinct cellular phenotypes has made their genes useful surrogates for investigating molecular mechanisms of lineage commitment. Studies of Cd4 and Cd8 transcriptional regulation have uncovered cis-regulatory elements that are critical for mediating epigenetic modifications at distinct stages of development to establish heritable transcriptional programs. In this review, we examine the epigenetic mechanisms involved in Cd4 and Cd8 gene regulation during T cell lineage specification and highlight the features that make this an attractive system for uncovering molecular mechanisms of heritability. PMID:28382035

  5. CD4+ T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Rua, Nicholas M.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Charles, Tysheena P.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4+ T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4+ T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8+ T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8+ T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4+ T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8+ T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8+ T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ+ CD8+ T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8+ T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  6. CD4(+) T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de la Rua, Nicholas M; Samuelson, Derrick R; Charles, Tysheena P; Welsh, David A; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4(+) T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4(+) T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8(+) T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8(+) T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4(+) T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8(+) T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8(+) T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8(+) T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG.

  7. Extensive CD4 and CD8 T-cell cross-reactivity between alphaherpesviruses1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lichun; Russell, Ronnie M.; Barlow, Russell S.; Haas, Juergen G.; Ramchandani, Meena S.; Johnston, Christine; Buus, Soren; Redwood, Alec J.; White, Katie D.; Mallal, Simon A.; Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Posavad, Christine M.; Wald, Anna; Koelle, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The alphaherpesvirinae subfamily includes HSV types 1 and 2 and the sequence-divergent pathogen varicella zoster virus (VZV). T cells, controlled by TCR and HLA molecules that tolerate limited epitope amino acid variation, might cross-react between these microbes. We show that memory PBMC expansion with either HSV or VZV enriches for CD4 T cell lines that recognize the other agent at the whole virus, protein, and peptide levels, consistent with bi-directional cross-reactivity. HSV-specific CD4 T cells recovered from HSV seronegative persons can be partially explained by such VZV cross-reactivity. HSV-1-reactive CD8 T cells also cross-react with VZV-infected cells, full-length VZV proteins, and VZV peptides, and kill VZV-infected dermal fibroblasts. Mono- and cross-reactive CD8 T cells use distinct TCRB CDR3 sequences. Cross-reactivity to VZV is reconstituted by cloning and expressing TCRA/TCRB receptors from T-cells that are initially isolated using HSV reagents. Overall, we define 13 novel CD4 and CD8 HSV-VZV cross-reactive epitopes and strongly imply additional cross-reactive peptide sets. Viral proteins can harbor both CD4 and CD8 HSV/VZV cross-reactive epitopes. Quantitative estimates of HSV/VZV cross-reactivity for both CD4 and CD8 T cells vary from 10-50%. Based on these findings, we hypothesize host herpesvirus immune history may influence the pathogenesis and clinical outcome of subsequent infections or vaccinations for related pathogens, and that cross-reactive epitopes and TCRs may be useful for multi-alphaherpesvirus vaccine design and adoptive cellular therapy. PMID:26810224

  8. Human memory, but not naive, CD4+ T cells expressing transcription factor T-bet might drive rapid cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si-fei; Zhang, Yan-nan; Yang, Bin-yan; Wu, Chang-you

    2014-12-19

    We found that after stimulation for a few hours, memory but not naive CD4(+) T cells produced a large amount of IFN-γ; however, the mechanism of rapid response of memory CD4(+) T cells remains undefined. We compared the expression of transcription factors in resting or activated naive and memory CD4(+) T cells and found that T-bet, but not pSTAT-1 or pSTAT-4, was highly expressed in resting memory CD4(+) T cells and that phenotypic characteristics of T-bet(+)CD4(+) T cells were CD45RA(low)CD62L(low) CCR7(low). After short-term stimulation, purified memory CD4(+) T cells rapidly produced effector cytokines that were closely associated with the pre-existence of T-bet. By contrast, resting naive CD4(+) T cells did not express T-bet, and they produced cytokines only after sustained stimulation. Our further studies indicated that T-bet was expressed in the nuclei of resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which might have important implications for rapid IFN-γ production. Our results indicate that the pre-existence and nuclear mobilization of T-bet in resting memory CD4(+) T cells might be a possible transcriptional mechanism for rapid production of cytokines by human memory CD4(+) T cells.

  9. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James T; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell-mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4-producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4-deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4-deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell-derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration.

  10. Conventional and Regulatory CD4+ T Cells That Share Identical TCRs Are Derived from Common Clones.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle J; Emerson, Ryan O; Pingel, Jeanette; Buller, R Mark; DiPaolo, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Results from studies comparing the diversity and specificity of the TCR repertoires expressed by conventional (Tconv) and regulatory (Treg) CD4+ T cell have varied depending on the experimental system employed. We developed a new model in which T cells express a single fixed TCRα chain, randomly rearranged endogenous TCRβ chains, and a Foxp3-GFP reporter. We purified CD4+Foxp3- and CD4+Foxp3+ cells, then performed biased controlled multiplex PCR and high throughput sequencing of endogenous TCRβ chains. We identified >7,000 different TCRβ sequences in the periphery of 5 individual mice. On average, ~12% of TCR sequences were expressed by both conventional and regulatory populations within individual mice. The CD4+ T cells that expressed shared TCR sequences were present at higher frequencies compared to T cells expressing non-shared TCRs. Furthermore, nearly all (>90%) of the TCR sequences that were shared within mice were identical at the DNA sequence level, indicating that conventional and regulatory T cells that express shared TCRs are derived from common clones. Analysis of TCR repertoire overlap in the thymus reveals that a large proportion of Tconv and Treg sharing observed in the periphery is due to clonal expansion in the thymus. Together these data show that there are a limited number of TCR sequences shared between Tconv and Tregs. Also, Tconv and Tregs sharing identical TCRs are found at relatively high frequencies and are derived from common progenitors, of which a large portion are generated in the thymus.

  11. Bromelain treatment reduces CD25 expression on activated CD4+ T cells in vitro✩

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Eric R.; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda A.; McNamara, Jeff T.; Zhan, Lijun; Maulik, Nilanjana; Thrall, Roger S.

    2009-01-01

    Bromelain (Br), an extract from pineapple stem with cysteine protease activity, exerts anti-inflammatory effects in a number of inflammatory models. We have previously shown that Br treatment decreased activated CD4+ T cells and has a therapeutic role in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of allergic airway disease. The current study was designed to determine the effect of Br on CD4+ T cell activation, specifically the expression of CD25 in vitro. CD25 is up regulated upon T cell activation, found as a soluble fraction (sCD25) and is a therapeutic target in inflammation, autoimmunity and allergy. Br treatment of anti-CD3 stimulated CD4+ T cells reduced CD25 expression in a dose and time dependent manner. This reduction of CD25 was dependent on the proteolytic action of Br as the addition of E64 (a cysteine protease inhibitor) abrogated this response. The concentration of sCD25 was increased in supernatants of Br treated activated CD4+ T cells as compared to control cells, suggesting that Br proteolytically cleaved cell-surface CD25. This novel mechanism of action identifies how Br may exert its therapeutic benefits in inflammatory conditions. PMID:19162239

  12. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Deborah M.; Lampe, Anna T.; Workman, Aspen M.

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL) play a role in chronic as well as acute infections, such as influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein–Barr virus, and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and antitumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin-mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin-mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other antiviral and antitumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell-mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection. PMID:27014272

  13. CD4+ T-cell survival in the GI tract requires dectin-1 during fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, R A; Dambuza, I M; Vautier, S; Taylor, J A; Reid, D M; Bain, C C; Underhill, D M; Masopust, D; Kaplan, D H; Brown, G D

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 is an innate antifungal C-type lectin receptor necessary for protective antifungal immunity. We recently discovered that Dectin-1 is involved in controlling fungal infections of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but how this C-type lectin receptor mediates these activities is unknown. Here, we show that Dectin-1 is essential for driving fungal-specific CD4+ T-cell responses in the GI tract. Loss of Dectin-1 resulted in abrogated dendritic cell responses in the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs) and defective T-cell co-stimulation, causing substantial increases in CD4+ T-cell apoptosis and reductions in the cellularity of GI-associated lymphoid tissues. CD8+ T-cell responses were unaffected by Dectin-1 deficiency. These functions of Dectin-1 have significant implications for our understanding of intestinal immunity and susceptibility to fungal infections. PMID:26349660

  14. The Induction and Maintenance of Transplant Tolerance Engages Both Regulatory and Anergic CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Besançon, Alix; Baas, Marije; Goncalves, Tania; Valette, Fabrice; Waldmann, Herman; Chatenoud, Lucienne; You, Sylvaine

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic tolerance to self-antigens or foreign antigens is thought to depend on constant vigilance by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Previous work using a pancreatic islet allograft model and a short pulse of CD3 antibody therapy has shown that CD8+ T cells become anergic and use TGFβ and coinhibitory signaling as their contribution to the tolerance process. Here, we examine the role of CD4+ T cells in tolerization by CD3 antibodies. We show that both Foxp3+ Tregs and CD4+ T cell anergy play a role in the induction of tolerance and its maintenance. Foxp3+ Tregs resisted CD3 antibody-mediated depletion, unlike intragraft Th1 CD4+ lymphocytes coexpressing granzyme B and Tbx21, which were selectively eliminated. Tregs were mandatory for induction of tolerance as their depletion at the time of CD3 antibody therapy or for a short time thereafter, by an antibody to CD25 (PC61), led to graft rejection. Early treatment with CTLA-4 antibody gave the same outcome. In contrast, neither PC61 nor anti-CTLA-4 given late, at day 100 posttransplant, reversed tolerance once established. Ablation of Foxp3 T cells after diphtheria toxin injection in tolerant Foxp3DTR recipient mice provided the same outcome. Alloreactive T cells had been rendered intrinsically unresponsive as total CD4+ or Treg-deprived CD4+ T cells from tolerant recipients were unable to mount donor-specific IFN-γ responses. In addition, intragraft Treg-deprived CD4+ T cells lacked proliferative capacities, expressed high levels of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and exhibited a CD73hiFR4hi phenotype, thus reflecting a state of T cell anergy. We conclude that Tregs play a substantive and critical role in guiding the immune system toward tolerance of the allograft, when induced by CD3 antibody, but are less important for maintenance of the tolerant state, where T cell anergy appears sufficient. PMID:28321218

  15. CD4+ T cells are not required for the induction of dengue virus-specific CD8+ T cell or antibody responses but contribute to protection after vaccination.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Lauren E; Prestwood, Tyler R; May, Monica M; Morar, Malika M; Zellweger, Raphaël M; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Shresta, Sujan

    2010-11-01

    The contribution of T cells to the host response to dengue virus (DENV) infection is not well understood. We previously demonstrated a protective role for CD8(+) T cells during primary DENV infection using a mouse-passaged DENV strain and IFN-α/βR(-/-) C57BL/6 mice, which are susceptible to DENV infection. In this study, we examine the role of CD4(+) T cells during primary DENV infection. Four I-A(b)-restricted epitopes derived from three of the nonstructural DENV proteins were identified. CD4(+) T cells expanded and were activated after DENV infection, with peak activation occurring on day 7. The DENV-specific CD4(+) T cells expressed intracellular IFN-γ, TNF, IL-2, and CD40L, and killed peptide-pulsed target cells in vivo. Surprisingly, depletion of CD4(+) T cells before DENV infection had no effect on viral loads. Consistent with this observation, CD4(+) T cell depletion did not affect the DENV-specific IgG or IgM Ab titers or their neutralizing activity, or the DENV-specific CD8(+) T cell response. However, immunization with the CD4(+) T cell epitopes before infection resulted in significantly lower viral loads. Thus, we conclude that whereas CD4(+) T cells are not required for controlling primary DENV infection, their induction by immunization can contribute to viral clearance. These findings suggest inducing anti-DENV CD4(+) T cell responses by vaccination may be beneficial.

  16. Addition of maraviroc to antiretroviral therapy decreased interferon-γ mRNA in the CD4+ T cells of patients with suboptimal CD4+ T-cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Minami, Rumi; Takahama, Soichiro; Kaku, Yu; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc (MVC), is associated with an enhanced CD4+ T-cell response independent of virological suppression; however, its mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study, we confirmed the effect of MVC on CD4+ T-cell count recovery in immunological non-responders, and compared the conventional combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) with MVC-intensified cART. We also investigated the effect of MVC on interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the relationship between the mRNA level of IFN-γ and the degree of CD4+ T-cell count recovery. In vitro analysis indicated that MVC significantly decreased mRNA levels of IFN-γ in HIV-Tat stimulated CD4+ T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Of the 18 HIV-infected patients treated with MVC-intensified cART, 12 had a significantly increased CD4+ T-cell count after 24 weeks of additional treatment with MVC. In patients exhibiting a response in CD4+ T-cell counts, mRNA levels of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells were lower than those in patients showing a non-response at baseline and at week 24, while mRNA levels of IFN-γ decreased in both groups at 24 weeks. In conclusion, MVC decreased the mRNA level of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, especially in patients whose CD4+ T-cell count increased significantly. We also found that the lower baseline IFN-γ mRNA level and the larger decreased rate of IFN-γ mRNA in CD4+ T cells were associated with a good response to MVC regarding CD4+ T-cell recovery.

  17. High CD4+ T cell density is associated with poor prognosis in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinglei; Hao, Chongli; Cheng, Guangzhou; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chang; Qiu, Juhui; Ding, Kejia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of CD4+ T cells in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) tissues in situ. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the distribution of CD4+ T cells in 131 NMIBC tissues. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to estimate overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: NMIBC patients were divided into two groups based on the median frequency of CD4+ T cells (median, 1/×400 high resolution). On univariate analysis, CD4+ T cell density was inversely associated with overall survival (P = 0.01). In those patients with high CD4+ T density, 5-year OS rates was only 77%, compared with 86% in those with low density, respectively. Although CD4+ T cell density showed no prognostic significance for RFS (P = 0.36), 5-year RFS rates of patients with high CD4+ T density (58%) was lower than those of patients with low CD4+ T density (65%, respectively). By multivariate analysis, tumor infiltrating CD4+ T cell density emerged as an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR, 2.75; P = 0.004). In addition, no association was found between CD4+ T cell density and any clinicopathological variables (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CD4+ T cells could potentially serve as a poor prognostic marker for patients with NMIBC. PMID:26617883

  18. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections.

  19. Linked CD4 T Cell Help: Broadening Immune Attack Against Cancer by Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Savelyeva, Natalia; Allen, Alex; Chotprakaikiat, Warayut; Harden, Elena; Jobsri, Jantipa; Godeseth, Rosemary; Wang, Yidao; Stevenson, Freda; Ottensmeier, Christian

    2016-10-05

    In the last decade, immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting immunological check points has become a breakthrough therapeutic modality for solid cancers. However, only up to 50 % of patients benefit from this powerful approach. For others vaccination might provide a plausible addition or alternative. For induction of effective anticancer immunity CD4+ T cell help is required, which is often difficult to induce to self cancer targets because of tolerogenic mechanisms. Our approach for cancer vaccines has been to incorporate into the vaccine design sequences able to activate foreign T cell help, through genetically linking cancer targets to microbial sequences (King et al. in Nat Med 4(11):1281-1286, 1998; Savelyeva et al. in Nat Biotechnol 19(8):760-764, 2001). This harnesses the non-tolerized CD4 T cell repertoire available in patients to help induction of effective immunity against fused cancer antigens. Multiple immune effector mechanisms including antibody, CD8+ T cells as well as CD4 effector T cells can be activated using this strategy. Delivery via DNA vaccines has already indicated clinical efficacy. The same principle of linked T cell help has now been transferred to other novel vaccine modalities to further potentiate immunity against cancer targets.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis EsxH inhibits ESCRT-dependent CD4(+) T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Tufariello, JoAnn M; Srivastava, Smita; Zahra, Aleena; Klevorn, Thais; Grace, Patricia S; Mehra, Alka; Park, Heidi S; Ernst, Joel D; Jacobs, William R; Philips, Jennifer A

    2016-12-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) establishes a persistent infection, despite inducing antigen-specific T-cell responses. Although T cells arrive at the site of infection, they do not provide sterilizing immunity. The molecular basis of how Mtb impairs T-cell function is not clear. Mtb has been reported to block major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation; however, no bacterial effector or host-cell target mediating this effect has been identified. We recently found that Mtb EsxH, which is secreted by the Esx-3 type VII secretion system, directly inhibits the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Here, we showed that ESCRT is required for optimal antigen processing; correspondingly, overexpression and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that EsxH inhibited the ability of macrophages and dendritic cells to activate Mtb antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells. Compared with the wild-type strain, the esxH-deficient strain induced fivefold more antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell proliferation in the mediastinal lymph nodes of mice. We also found that EsxH undermined the ability of effector CD4(+) T cells to recognize infected macrophages and clear Mtb. These results provide a molecular explanation for how Mtb impairs the adaptive immune response.

  1. Identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis CD4 T-cell antigens via high throughput proteome screening

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Kaustuv; Jing, Lichen; Russell, Ronnie M.; Davies, D. Huw; Hermanson, Gary; Molina, Douglas M.; Liang, Xiaowu; Sherman, David R.; Kwok, William W.; Yang, Junbao; Kenneth, John; Ahamed, Syed F.; Chandele, Anmol; Kaja, Murali-Krishna; Koelle, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Elicitation of CD4 IFN-gamma T cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a rational vaccine strategy to prevent clinical tuberculosis. Diagnosis of MTB infection is based on T-cell immune memory to MTB antigens. The MTB proteome contains over four thousand open reading frames (ORFs). We conducted a pilot antigen identification study using 164 MTB proteins and MTB-specific T-cells expanded in vitro from 12 persons with latent MTB infection. Enrichment of MTB-reactive T-cells from PBMC used cell sorting or an alternate system compatible with limited resources. MTB proteins were used as single antigens or combinatorial matrices in proliferation and cytokine secretion readouts. Overall, our study found that 44 MTB proteins were antigenic, including 27 not previously characterized as CD4 T-cell antigens. Antigen truncation, peptide, NTM homology, and HLA class II tetramer studies confirmed malate synthase G (encoded by gene Rv1837) as a CD4 T-cell antigen. This simple, scalable system has potential utility for the identification of candidate MTB vaccine and biomarker antigens. PMID:25857935

  2. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-04-12

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4(+) T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation.

  3. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A.; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C.; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4+ T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation. PMID:27068814

  4. Identification of two regulatory elements controlling Fucosyltransferase 7 transcription in murine CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Pink, Matthias; Ratsch, Boris A; Mardahl, Maibritt; Schröter, Micha F; Engelbert, Dirk; Triebus, Julia; Hamann, Alf; Syrbe, Uta

    2014-11-01

    Fucosyltransferase VII encoded by the gene Fut7 is essential in CD4(+) T cells for the generation of E- and P-selectin ligands (E- and P-lig) which facilitate recruitment of lymphocytes into inflamed tissues and into the skin. This study aimed to identify regulatory elements controlling the inducible Fut7 expression in CD4(+) T cells that occurs upon activation and differentiation of naive T cells into effector cells. Comparative analysis of the histone modification pattern in non-hematopoetic cells and CD4(+) T cell subsets revealed a differential histone modification pattern within the Fut7 locus including a conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) identified by cross-species conservation comparison suggesting that regulatory elements are confined to this region. Cloning of the CNS located about 500 bp upstream of the Fut7 locus, into a luciferase reporter vector elicited reporter activity after transfection of the αβ-WT T cell line, but not after transfection of primary murine CD4(+) Th1 cells. As quantification of different Fut7 transcripts revealed a predominance of transcripts lacking the first exons in primary Th1 cells we searched for an alternative promoter. Cloning of an intragenic region spanning a 1kb region upstream of exon 4 into an enhancer-containing vector indeed elicited promoter activity. Interestingly, also the CNS enhanced activity of this intragenic minimal promoter in reporter assays in primary Th1 cells suggesting that both elements interact in primary CD4(+) T cells to induce Fut7 transcription.

  5. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-09-16

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component.

  6. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4+ T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4+ effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4+ EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4+ EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  7. Decreased Expression of T-Cell Costimulatory Molecule CD28 on CD4 and CD8 T Cells of Mexican Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Fernandez, German; Espinosa-Cueto, Patricia; Leyva-Meza, Rosario; Mancilla, Nathalie; Mancilla, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Patients with tuberculosis frequently develop anergy, a state of T-cell hyporesponsiveness in which defective T-cell costimulation could be a factor. To know if the expression of T-cell costimulatory molecules was altered in tuberculosis, we analyzed the peripheral blood T-cell phenotype of 23 Mexican patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. There was severe CD4 (P < .001) and CD8 (P < .01) lymphopenia and upregulation of costimulatory molecule CD30 on CD4 and CD8 T cells (P < .05); this increase was higher in relapsing tuberculosis. The main finding was severe downregulation of the major costimulatory molecule CD28 on both CD8 and CD4 T cells (P < .001). Depletion of the CD4/CD28 subset, a hitherto undescribed finding, is relevant because CD4 T cells constitute the main arm of the cell-mediated antimycobacterial immune response. PMID:22567259

  8. Suppression of IL-2 production and proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by tuberostemonine O.

    PubMed

    Jung Jang, Eun; Kil, Yun-Seo; Ryeon Park, Hye; Oh, Sera; Kyeong Kim, Hyo; Gyeong Jeong, Mi; Kyoung Seo, Eun; Sook Hwang, Eun

    2014-12-01

    Tuberostemonine stereoisomers are natural alkaloids found in Stemona tuberosa, that are known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-infective properties. Tuberostemonine alkaloids inhibit inflammation by suppressing the expression of inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase and nitric oxide synthase. However, the direct immunomodulatory properties of tuberostemonine alkaloids in T cells have not been elucidated so far. In this study, the activities in T cells of tuberostemonine N (TbN) and a novel alkaloid, tuberostemonine O (TbO), isolated from S. tuberosa, were investigated. Although TbN did not have a significant effect on cytokine production in splenic T cells, TbO selectively suppressed interleukin (IL)-2 production. Moreover, TbO, but not TbN, significantly inhibited IL-2 production by primary CD4(+) T cells and delayed the T-cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of excess recombinant IL-2 restored the decreased cell-division rates in TbO-treated CD4(+) T cells to control levels. Collectively, these findings suggest that the immunomodulatory effects of TbO occurred by the suppression of IL-2 expression and IL-2-induced T-cell proliferation, suggesting a potential beneficial role of tuberostemonine alkaloids for the control of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases caused by hyperactivated T cells.

  9. Low-avidity recognition by CD4+ T cells directed to self-antigens.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Falk, Ben A; Rock, Kellee A; Kochik, Sharon A; Heninger, Anne K; Reijonen, Helena; Kwok, William W; Nepom, Gerald T

    2003-05-01

    Self-reactive T cells populate the peripheral immune system, and likely form the reservoir from which autoreactive cells are derived. We analyzed a panel of self and non-self peptides presented by HLA-DR4, a class II molecule associated with autoimmunity, by immunization of mice transgenic for HLA-DR4. Significant structural avidity for T cell recognition, as measured by MHC class II tetramer binding to CD4(+) T cells was only observed in mice immunized with the non-self antigens. T cell hybridomas were generated from mice immunized with the naturally processed self-peptide hGAD65 (552-572) and also from mice immunized with an influenza-derived non-self epitope (HA 306-318). T cells specific for the self peptide failed to bind tetramers and exhibited low functional avidity as measured by the peptide concentration required to reach half-maximum proliferation values. In contrast, T cells specific for the non-self HA (306-318) peptide exhibited high structural and functional avidity profiles. As recently described in studies of murine CD8(+) T cell function, the predominance of low avidity recognition of self-peptide epitopes may be a characteristic feature of CD4(+) T cells responding to autoantigens.

  10. Sustained interactions between T cell receptors and antigens promote the differentiation of CD4⁺ memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulwoo; Wilson, Theodore; Fischer, Kael F; Williams, Matthew A

    2013-09-19

    During CD4T cell activation, T cell receptor (TCR) signals impact T cell fate, including recruitment, expansion, differentiation, trafficking, and survival. To determine the impact of TCR signals on the fate decision of activated CD4T cells to become end-stage effector or long-lived memory T helper 1 (Th1) cells, we devised a deep-sequencing-based approach that allowed us to track the evolution of TCR repertoires after acute infection. The transition of effector Th1 cells into the memory pool was associated with a significant decrease in repertoire diversity, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II tetramer off rate, but not tetramer avidity, was a key predictive factor in the representation of individual clonal T cell populations at the memory stage. We conclude that stable and sustained interactions with antigens during the development of Th1 responses to acute infection are a determinative factor in promoting the differentiation of Th1 memory cells.

  11. The ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8(+) T cells and regulatory CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Teh, Hung-Sia

    2014-03-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor ThPOK plays a crucial role in CD4 T-cell development and CD4/CD8 lineage decision. In ThPOK-deficient mice, developing T cells expressing MHC class II-restricted T-cell receptors are redirected into the CD8 T-cell lineage. In this study, we investigated whether the ThPOK transgene affected the development and function of two additional types of T cells, namely self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells. Self-specific CD8 T cells are characterized by high expression of CD44, CD122, Ly6C, 1B11 and proliferation in response to either IL-2 or IL-15. The ThPOK transgene converted these self-specific CD8 T cells into CD4 T cells. The converted CD4(+) T cells are no longer self-reactive, lose the characteristics of self-specific CD8 T cells, acquire the properties of conventional CD4 T cells and survive poorly in peripheral lymphoid organs. By contrast, the ThPOK transgene promoted the development of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells resulting in an increased recovery of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells that expressed higher transforming growth factor-β-dependent suppressor activity. These studies indicate that the ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells.

  12. Interleukin-37 Enhances the Suppressive Activity of Naturally Occurring CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Wei; Dong, Ning; Wu, Yao; Zhu, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Chun-Ting; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for the suppression of autoimmunity and can control the immune-mediated pathology during the early phase of sepsis. Our previous data showed that silencing interleukin-37 (IL-37) in human CD4+CD25+ Tregs obviously reduced the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Here, we found that rhIL-37 stimulation markedly enhanced the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs isolated from naive C57BL/6 J mice in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Treatment with rhIL-37 could significantly upregulate the expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen (CTLA)-4 and forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3) on CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Also, rhIL-37 stimulation promoted the production of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) but not IL-10 in the supernatants of cultured CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Pretreated CD4+CD25+ Tregs with rhIL-37 in the presence or absence of LPS were cocultured with CD4+CD25− T cells, ratio of IL-4/interferon-γ in the supernatants obviously increased in IL-37-stimulated groups. In addition, early administration of IL-37 significantly improved the survival rate of septic mice induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Taken together, we concluded that rhIL-37 enhances the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Tregs and might be a potential immunomodulator for the treatment of septic complications. PMID:27941849

  13. IL-15 induces CD4+ effector memory T cell production and tissue emigration in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Louis J.; Reed-Inderbitzin, Edward F.; Hagen, Shoko I.; Edgar, John B.; Hansen, Scott G.; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Maino, Vernon C.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Villinger, Francois

    2006-01-01

    HIV infection selectively targets CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, resulting in dramatic depletion of CD4+ T cells in mucosal effector sites in early infection. Regeneration of the TEM cell compartment is slow and incomplete, even when viral replication is controlled by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here, we demonstrate that IL-15 dramatically increases in vivo proliferation of rhesus macaque (RM) CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells with little effect on the naive or central memory T (TCM) cell subsets, a response pattern that is quite distinct from that of either IL-2 or IL-7. TEM cells produced in response to IL-15 did not accumulate in blood. Rather, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling studies suggest that many of these cells rapidly disperse to extralymphoid effector sites, where they manifest (slow) decay kinetics indistinguishable from that of untreated controls. In RMs with uncontrolled SIV infection and highly activated immune systems, IL-15 did not significantly increase CD4+ TEM cell proliferation, but with virologic control and concomitant reduction in immune activation by ART, IL-15 responsiveness was again observed. These data suggest that therapeutic use of IL-15 in the setting of ART might facilitate specific restoration of the CD4+ T cell compartment that is the primary target of HIV with less risk of exhausting precursor T cell compartments or generating potentially deleterious regulatory subsets. PMID:16691294

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi impairs CD4 T cell responses by reducing antigen availability.

    PubMed

    Atif, Shaikh M; Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is associated with a disseminated febrile illness in humans, termed typhoid fever, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. One of the genetic differences between both pathogens is the presence in S. Typhi of TviA, a regulatory protein that shuts down flagellin (FliC) expression when bacteria transit from the intestinal lumen into the intestinal mucosa. Here we investigated the consequences of TviA-mediated flagellum gene regulation on flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses in a mouse model of S. Typhimurium infection. Introduction of the S. Typhi tviA gene into S. Typhimurium suppressed antigen presentation of dendritic cells to flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in vitro. Furthermore, TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression impaired the activation and proliferation of naive flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, which was accompanied by increased bacterial dissemination to the spleen. We conclude that TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression reduces antigen availability, thereby weakening flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses.

  15. Polyfunctional CD4 T cells in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. However, the assessment of this response in bovine infections was not fe...

  16. Effector CD4+ T cell expression signatures and immune-mediated disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ferguson, John; Ng, Sok Meng; Hui, Ken; Goh, Gerald; Lin, Aiping; Esplugues, Enric; Flavell, Richard A; Abraham, Clara; Zhao, Hongyu; Cho, Judy H

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in immune-mediated diseases have identified over 150 associated genomic loci. Many of these loci play a role in T cell responses, and regulation of T cell differentiation plays a critical role in immune-mediated diseases; however, the relationship between implicated disease loci and T cell differentiation is incompletely understood. To further address this relationship, we examined differential gene expression in naïve human CD4+ T cells, as well as in in vitro differentiated Th1, memory Th17-negative and Th17-enriched CD4+ T cells subsets using microarray and RNASeq. We observed a marked enrichment for increased expression in memory CD4+ compared to naïve CD4+ T cells of genes contained among immune-mediated disease loci. Within memory T cells, expression of disease-associated genes was typically increased in Th17-enriched compared to Th17-negative cells. Utilizing RNASeq and promoter methylation studies, we identified a differential regulation pattern for genes solely expressed in Th17 cells (IL17A and CCL20) compared to genes expressed in both Th17 and Th1 cells (IL23R and IL12RB2), where high levels of promoter methylation are correlated to near zero RNASeq levels for IL17A and CCL20. These findings have implications for human Th17 celI plasticity and for the regulation of Th17-Th1 expression signatures. Importantly, utilizing RNASeq we found an abundant isoform of IL23R terminating before the transmembrane domain that was enriched in Th17 cells. In addition to molecular resolution, we find that RNASeq provides significantly improved power to define differential gene expression and identify alternative gene variants relative to microarray analysis. The comprehensive integration of differential gene expression between cell subsets with disease-association signals, and functional pathways provides insight into disease pathogenesis.

  17. Avidity of human T cell receptor engineered CD4+ T cells drives T-helper differentiation fate

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Patrick; Kim, Yong Chan; Pratt, Kathleen P.; Scott, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the T cell receptor (TCR) in antigen recognition and activation of T lymphocytes is well established. However, how the TCR affects T-helper differentiation/skewing is less well understood, particularly for human CD4+ (CD4) T cell subsets. Here we investigate the role of TCR specific antigen avidity in differentiation and maintenance of human Th1, Th2 and Th17 subsets. Two human TCRs, both specific for the same peptide antigen but with different avidities, were cloned and expressed in human CD4 T cells. These TCR engineered cells were then stimulated with specific antigen in unskewed and T-helper skewed conditions. We show that TCR avidity can control the percentage of IL-4 and IFN-γ co-expression in unskewed TCR engineered cells, that effector function can be maintained in a TCR avidity-dependent manner in skewed TCR engineered cells, and that increased TCR avidity can accelerate Th1 skewing of TCR engineered cells. PMID:26653006

  18. CD4+ T cells provide protection against acute lethal encephalitis caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Peng, Bi-Hung; Bertke, Andrea S; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Smith, Jennifer K; Smith, Jeanon N; Poussard, Allison L; Salazar, Milagros; Judy, Barbara M; Zacks, Michele A; Estes, D Mark; Paessler, Slobodan

    2009-06-19

    Studying the mechanisms of host survival resulting from viral encephalitis is critical to the development of vaccines. Here we have shown in several independent studies that high dose treatment with neutralizing antibody prior to intranasal infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus had an antiviral effect in the visceral organs and prolonged survival time of infected mice, even in the absence of alphabeta T cells. Nevertheless, antibody treatment did not prevent the development of lethal encephalitis. On the contrary, the adoptive transfer of primed CD4(+) T cells was necessary to prevent lethal encephalitis in mice lacking alphabeta T cell receptor.

  19. Viral Load and CD4+ T-Cell Dynamics in Primary HIV-1 Subtype C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, Vladimir; Woldegabriel, Elias; Kebaabetswe, Lemme; Rossenkhan, Raabya; Mlotshwa, Busisiwe; Bonney, Caitlin; Finucane, Mariel; Musonda, Rosemary; Moyo, Sikhulile; Wester, Carolyn; van Widenfelt, Erik; Makhema, Joseph; Lagakos, Stephen; Essex, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Most knowledge of primary HIV-1 infection is based on subtype B studies, whereas the evolution of viral parameters in the early phase of HIV-1 subtype C infection is not well characterized. Methods The kinetics of viral RNA, proviral DNA, CD4+ T-cell count, and subsets of CD4+ T cells expressing CCR5 or CXCR4 were characterized in 8 acute and 62 recent subtype C infections over the first year postseroconversion. Results The viral RNA peak was 6.25 ± 0.92 log10 copies per milliliter. After seroconversion, heterogeneity among acute cases was evident by patterns of change in viral load and CD4+ T-cell count over time. The patterns were supported by the rate of viral RNA decline from peak (P = 0.022), viral RNA means (P = 0.005), CD4 levels (P <0.001), and CD4 decline to 350 (P = 0.011) or 200 (P = 0.046). Proviral DNA had no apparent peak and its mean was 2.59 ± 0.69 log10 per 106 peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In recent infections, viral RNA set point was 4.00 ± 0.97 log10 and viral RNA correlated inversely with CD4+ T cells (P <0.001) and directly with proviral DNA (P <0.001). Conclusions Distinct patterns of viral RNA evolution may exist shortly after seroconversion in HIV-1 subtype C infection. The study provides better understanding of the early phase of subtype C infection. PMID:19295336

  20. Endogenous factors enhance HIV infection of tissue naive CD4 T cells by stimulating high molecular mass APOBEC3G complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kreisberg, Jason F; Yonemoto, Wes; Greene, Warner C

    2006-04-17

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can infect resting CD4 T cells residing in lymphoid tissues but not those circulating in peripheral blood. The molecular mechanisms producing this difference remain unknown. We explored the potential role of the tissue microenvironment and its influence on the action of the antiviral factor APOBEC3G (A3G) in regulating permissivity to HIV infection. We found that endogenous IL-2 and -15 play a key role in rendering resident naive CD4 T cells susceptible to HIV infection. Infection of memory CD4 T cells also requires endogenous soluble factors, but not IL-2 or -15. A3G is found in a high molecular mass complex in HIV infection-permissive, tissue-resident naive CD4 T cells but resides in a low molecular mass form in nonpermissive, blood-derived naive CD4 T cells. Upon treatment with endogenous soluble factors, these cells become permissive for HIV infection, as low molecular mass A3G is induced to assemble into high molecular mass complexes. These findings suggest that in lymphoid tissues, endogenous soluble factors, likely including IL-2 and -15 and others, stimulate the formation of high molecular mass A3G complexes in tissue-resident naive CD4 T cells, thereby relieving the potent postentry restriction block for HIV infection conferred by low molecular mass A3G.

  1. Inactivation of T cell receptor peptide-specific CD4 regulatory T cells induces chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Stellrecht, K; Sercarz, E

    1996-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-recognizing regulatory cells, induced after vaccination with self-reactive T cells or TCR peptides, have been shown to prevent autoimmunity. We have asked whether this regulation is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to myelin basic protein (MBP) in an autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Antigen-induced EAE in (SJL x B10.PL)F1 mice is transient in that most animals recover permanently from the disease. Most of the initial encephalitogenic T cells recognize MBP Ac1-9 and predominantly use the TCR V beta 8.2 gene segment. In mice recovering from MBP-induced EAE, regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) specific for a single immunodominant TCR peptide B5 (76-101) from framework region 3 of the V beta 8.2 chain, become primed. We have earlier shown that cloned B5-reactive Treg can specifically downregulate responses to Ac1-9 and also protect mice from EAE. These CD4 Treg clones predominantly use the TCR V beta 14 or V beta 3 gene segments. Here we have directly tested whether deletion/blocking of the Treg from the peripheral repertoire affects the spontaneous recovery from EAE. Treatment of F1 mice with appropriate V beta-specific monoclonal antibodies resulted in an increase in the severity and duration of the disease; even relapses were seen in one-third to one-half of the Treg-deleted mice. Interestingly, chronic disease in treated mice appears to be due to the presence of Ac1-9-specific T cells. Thus, once self-tolerance to MBP is broken by immunization with the antigen in strong adjuvant, TCR peptide-specific CD4 Treg cells participate in reestablishing peripheral tolerance. Thus, a failure to generate Treg may be implicated in chronic autoimmune conditions.

  2. The Nrf2 activator tBHQ inhibits T cell activation of primary human CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Turley, Alexandra E; Zagorski, Joseph W; Rockwell, Cheryl E

    2015-02-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates a battery of antioxidant, detoxification, and cell stress genes. It is activated by oxidative stress and a number of exogenous compounds, one of which is tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a widely used food preservative. Nrf2 modulates immune responses in numerous rodent models of inflammation, but its effects on human immune cells are not well characterized. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of the Nrf2 activator tBHQ on early events of T cell activation in primary human cells. Treatment with tBHQ induced mRNA expression of the Nrf2 target genes HMOX-1, GCLC, and NQO1, and also increased NRF2 mRNA expression, albeit to a lesser extent than the other target genes. tBHQ decreased production of the cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ at both the protein and mRNA levels after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to an even greater extent in isolated CD4 T cells. Likewise, tBHQ decreased induction of CD25 and CD69 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and this decrease was even more marked in isolated CD4 T cells. In addition, tBHQ inhibited induction of NFκB DNA binding in anti-CD3/anti-CD28-activated PBMCs. Collectively, these data suggest that tBHQ inhibits activation of primary human CD4 T cells, which correlates with activation of Nrf2 and inhibition of NFκB DNA binding. Although these studies suggest the food additive tBHQ negatively impacts T cell activation, further studies will be needed to fully elucidate the effect of tBHQ on human immune responses.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus convert neonatal conventional CD4(+) T cells into FOXP3(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells via the PD-1/PD-L1 axis.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Hardis; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Rudin, Anna

    2014-03-01

    The gut microbiota provides an important stimulus for the induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells in mice, whether this applies to newborn children is unknown. In Swedish children, Staphylococcus aureus has become a common early colonizer of the gut. Here, we sought to study the effects of bacterial stimulation on neonatal CD4(+) T cells for the induction of CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells in vitro. The proportion of circulating CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells and their expression of FOXP3, Helios and CTLA-4 was examined in newborns and adults. To evaluate if commensal gut bacteria could induce Treg cells, CellTrace violet-stained non-Treg cells from cord or peripheral blood from adults were co-cultured with autologous CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells and remaining mononuclear cells and stimulated with S. aureus. Newborns had a significantly lower proportion of CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells than adults, but these cells were Helios(+) and CTLA-4(+) to a higher extent than in adults. FOXP3(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells were induced mainly in neonatal CellTrace-stained non-Treg cells after stimulation with S. aureus. In cell cultures from adults, S. aureus induced CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells only if sorted naive CD45RA(+) non-Treg cells were used, but these cells expressed less FOXP3 than those induced from newborns. Sorted neonatal CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells from S. aureus-stimulated cultures were still suppressive. Finally, blocking PD-L1 during stimulation reduced the induction of FOXP3(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells. These results suggest that newborns have a higher proportion of circulating thymically derived Helios(+) Treg cells than adults and that S. aureus possess an ability to convert neonatal conventional CD4(+) T cells into FOXP3(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells via the PD-1/PD-L1 axis.

  4. Functional Signatures of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prezzemolo, Teresa; Guggino, Giuliana; La Manna, Marco Pio; Di Liberto, Diana; Dieli, Francesco; Caccamo, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    With 1.4 million deaths and 8.7 million new cases in 2011, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health care problem and together with HIV and Malaria represents one of the three infectious diseases world-wide. Control of the global TB epidemic has been impaired by the lack of an effective vaccine, by the emergence of drug-resistant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and by the lack of sensitive and rapid diagnostics. It is estimated, by epidemiological reports, that one third of the world's population is latently infected with Mtb, but the majority of infected individuals develop long-lived protective immunity, which controls and contains Mtb in a T cell-dependent manner. Development of TB disease results from interactions among the environment, the host, and the pathogen, and known risk factors include HIV co-infection, immunodeficiency, diabetes mellitus, overcrowding, malnutrition, and general poverty; therefore, an effective T cell response determines whether the infection resolves or develops into clinically evident disease. Consequently, there is great interest in determining which T cells subsets mediate anti-mycobacterial immunity, delineating their effector functions. On the other hand, many aspects remain unsolved in understanding why some individuals are protected from Mtb infection while others go on to develop disease. Several studies have demonstrated that CD4(+) T cells are involved in protection against Mtb, as supported by the evidence that CD4(+) T cell depletion is responsible for Mtb reactivation in HIV-infected individuals. There are many subsets of CD4(+) T cells, such as T-helper 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17, and regulatory T cells (Tregs), and all these subsets co-operate or interfere with each other to control infection; the dominant subset may differ between active and latent Mtb infection cases. Mtb-specific-CD4(+) Th1 cell response is considered to have a protective role for the ability to produce cytokines such as IFN-γ or TNF-α that

  5. Estradiol reduces susceptibility of CD4+ T cells and macrophages to HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V; Barr, Fiona D; Crist, Sarah G; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V; Wira, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4(+) T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4(+) T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4(+) T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4(+) T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2-treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms.

  6. Estradiol Reduces Susceptibility of CD4+ T Cells and Macrophages to HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Biswas, Nabanita; Patel, Mickey V.; Barr, Fiona D.; Crist, Sarah G.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the HIV epidemic in women requires urgent efforts to find effective preventive methods. Even though sex hormones have been described to influence HIV infection in epidemiological studies and regulate different immune responses that may affect HIV infection, the direct role that female sex hormones play in altering the susceptibility of target cells to HIV-infection is largely unknown. Here we evaluated the direct effect of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) in HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages. Purified CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived macrophages were generated in vitro from peripheral blood and infected with R5 and X4 viruses. Treatment of CD4+ T-cells and macrophages with E2 prior to viral challenge reduced their susceptibility to HIV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of E2 2 h after viral challenge however did not result in reduced infection. In contrast, EE reduced infection in macrophages to a lesser extent than E2 and had no effect on CD4+ T-cell infection. Reduction of HIV-infection induced by E2 in CD4+ T-cells was not due to CCR5 down-regulation, but was an entry-mediated mechanism since infection with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV was not modified by E2. In macrophages, despite the lack of an effect of E2 on CCR5 expression, E2–treatment reduced viral entry 2 h after challenge and increased MIP-1β secretion. These results demonstrate the direct effect of E2 on susceptibility of HIV-target cells to infection and indicate that inhibition of target cell infection involves cell-entry related mechanisms. PMID:23614015

  7. Immune-responsiveness of CD4+ T cells during Streptococcus suis serotype 2 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lecours, Marie-Pier; Letendre, Corinne; Clarke, Damian; Lemire, Paul; Galbas, Tristan; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Thibodeau, Jacques; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Segura, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Streptococcus suis infection, a major swine and human pathogen, is only partially understood and knowledge on the host adaptive immune response is critically scarce. Yet, S. suis virulence factors, particularly its capsular polysaccharide (CPS), enable this bacterium to modulate dendritic cell (DC) functions and potentially impair the immune response. This study aimed to evaluate modulation of T cell activation during S. suis infection and the role of DCs in this response. S. suis-stimulated total mouse splenocytes readily produced TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, CCL3, CXCL9, and IL-10. Ex vivo and in vivo analyses revealed the involvement of CD4+ T cells and a Th1 response. Nevertheless, during S. suis infection, levels of the Th1-derived cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ were very low. A transient splenic depletion of CD4+ T cells and a poor memory response were also observed. Moreover, CD4+ T cells secreted IL-10 and failed to up-regulate optimal levels of CD40L and CD69 in coculture with DCs. The CPS hampered release of several T cell-derived cytokines in vitro. Finally, a correlation was established between severe clinical signs of S. suis disease and impaired antibody responses. Altogether, these results suggest S. suis interferes with the adaptive immune response. PMID:27905502

  8. Migratory and lymphoid-resident dendritic cells cooperate to efficiently prime naive CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Allenspach, Eric J; Lemos, Maria P; Porrett, Paige M; Turka, Laurence A; Laufer, Terri M

    2008-11-14

    To initiate an adaptive immune response, rare antigen-specific naive CD4(+) T cells must interact with equally rare dendritic cells (DCs) bearing cognate peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes. Lymph nodes (LNs) draining the site of antigen entry are populated by lymphoid-resident DCs as well as DCs that have immigrated from tissues, although the requirement for each population in initiating the T cell response remains unclear. Here, we show that antigen processing and presentation by both lymphoid-resident and migratory DCs was required for clonal selection and expansion of CD4(+) T cells after subcutaneous immunization. Early antigen presentation by lymphoid-resident DCs initiated activation and trapping of antigen-specific T cells in the draining LN, without sufficing for clonal expansion. Migratory DCs, however, interacted with the CD4(+) T cells retained in the LN to induce proliferation. Therefore, distinct DC subsets cooperate to alert and trap the appropriate cell and then license its expansion and differentiation.

  9. Nocardia rubra cell-wall skeleton promotes CD4(+) T cell activation and drives Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangchuan; Wu, Jie; Miao, Miao; Dou, Heng; Nan, Ning; Shi, Mingsheng; Yu, Guang; Shan, Fengping

    2017-03-15

    Several lines of evidences have shown that Nocardia rubra cell wall skeleton (Nr-CWS) has immunoregulatory and anti-tumor activities. However, there is no information about the effect of Nr-CWS on CD4(+) T cells. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Nr-CWS on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) T cells. Our results of in vitro experiments showed that Nr-CWS could significantly up-regulate the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, increase the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in the supernatants, but has no significant effect on the apoptosis and death of CD4(+) T cells. Results of in vivo experiments showed that Nr-CWS could promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, and increase the production of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α (Th1 type cytokines). These data suggest that Nr-CWS can enhance the activation of CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells to Th1 cells.

  10. Inflammation-induced effector CD4+ T cell interstitial migration is alpha-v integrin dependent

    PubMed Central

    Overstreet, Michael G.; Gaylo, Alison; Angermann, Bastian; Hughson, Angela; Hyun, Young-min; Lambert, Kris; Acharya, Mridu; Billroth-Maclurg, Alison C.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Topham, David J.; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Minsoo; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Leukocytes must traverse inflamed tissues to effectively control local infection. Although motility in dense tissues appears to be integrin-independent actin-myosin based, during inflammation changes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) may necessitate distinct motility requirements. Indeed, we found that T cell interstitial motility was critically dependent on RGD-binding integrins in the inflamed dermis. Inflammation-induced deposition of fibronectin was functionally linked to increased αv integrin expression on effector CD4+ T cells. Using intravital multi-photon imaging, we found that CD4+ T cell motility was dependent on αv expression. Selective αv blockade or knockdown arrested TH1 motility in the inflamed tissue and attenuated local effector function. These data show a context-dependent specificity of lymphocyte movement in inflamed tissues that is essential for protective immunity. PMID:23933892

  11. Antiretroviral therapy suppressed participants with low CD4+ T-cell counts segregate according to opposite immunological phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Ouchi, Dan; Urrea, Victor; Carrillo, Jorge; Cabrera, Cecilia; Villà-Freixa, Jordi; Puig, Jordi; Paredes, Roger; Negredo, Eugènia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Massanella, Marta; Blanco, Julià

    2016-01-01

    Background: The failure to increase CD4+ T-cell counts in some antiretroviral therapy suppressed participants (immunodiscordance) has been related to perturbed CD4+ T-cell homeostasis and impacts clinical evolution. Methods: We evaluated different definitions of immunodiscordance based on CD4+ T-cell counts (cutoff) or CD4+ T-cell increases from nadir value (ΔCD4) using supervised random forest classification of 74 immunological and clinical variables from 196 antiretroviral therapy suppressed individuals. Unsupervised clustering was performed using relevant variables identified in the supervised approach from 191 individuals. Results: Cutoff definition of CD4+ cell count 400 cells/μl performed better than any other definition in segregating immunoconcordant and immunodiscordant individuals (85% accuracy), using markers of activation, nadir and death of CD4+ T cells. Unsupervised clustering of relevant variables using this definition revealed large heterogeneity between immunodiscordant individuals and segregated participants into three distinct subgroups with distinct production, programmed cell-death protein-1 (PD-1) expression, activation and death of T cells. Surprisingly, a nonnegligible number of immunodiscordant participants (22%) showed high frequency of recent thymic emigrants and low CD4+ T-cell activation and death, very similar to immunoconcordant participants. Notably, human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related (HLA-DR) PD-1 and CD45RA expression in CD4+ T cells allowed reproducing subgroup segregation (81.4% accuracy). Despite sharp immunological differences, similar and persistently low CD4+ values were maintained in these participants over time. Conclusion: A cutoff value of CD4+ T-cell count 400 cells/μl classified better immunodiscordant and immunoconcordant individuals than any ΔCD4 classification. Immunodiscordance may present several, even opposite, immunological patterns that are identified by a simple immunological follow-up. Subgroup

  12. Absence of β2 Integrins Impairs Regulatory T Cells and Exacerbates CD4+ T cell-Dependent Autoimmune Carditis1

    PubMed Central

    Haasken, Stefanie; Auger, Jennifer L.; Binstadt, Bryce A.

    2011-01-01

    The immunopathogenic mechanisms mediating inflammation in multi-organ autoimmune diseases may vary between the different target tissues. We utilized the K/BxN TCR transgenic mouse model to investigate the contribution of CD4+ T cells and β2 integrins in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and endocarditis. Depletion of CD4+ T cells following the onset of arthritis specifically prevented the development of cardiac valve inflammation. Genetic absence of β2 integrins had no effect on the severity of arthritis and unexpectedly increased the extent of cardiovascular pathology. The exaggerated cardiac phenotype of the β2 integrin-deficient K/BxN mice was accompanied by immune hyperactivation and was linked to a defect in regulatory T cells. These findings are consistent with a model in which the development of arthritis in K/BxN mice relies primarily on autoantibodies, whereas endocarditis depends on an additional contribution of effector T cells. Furthermore, strategies targeting β2 integrins for the treatment of systemic autoimmune conditions need to consider not only the role of these molecules in leukocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation, but also their impact on the regulation of immunological tolerance. PMID:21795599

  13. Characterization of peripheral regulatory CD4+ T cells that prevent diabetes onset in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lepault, F; Gagnerault, M C

    2000-01-01

    The period that precedes onset of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus corresponds to an active dynamic state in which pathogenic autoreactive T cells are kept from destroying beta cells by regulatory T cells. In prediabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, CD4+ splenocytes were shown to prevent diabetes transfer in immunodeficient NOD recipients. We now demonstrate that regulatory splenocytes belong to the CD4+ CD62Lhigh T cell subset that comprises a vast majority of naive cells producing low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma and no IL-4 and IL-10 upon in vitro stimulation. Consistently, the inhibition of diabetes transfer was not mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Regulatory cells homed to the pancreas and modified the migration of diabetogenic to the islets, which resulted in a decreased insulitis severity. The efficiency of CD62L+ T cells was dose dependent, independent of sex and disease prevalence. Protection mechanisms did not involve the CD62L molecule, an observation that may relate to the fact that CD4+ CD62Lhigh lymph node cells were less potent than their splenic counterparts. Regulatory T cells were detectable after weaning and persist until disease onset, sustaining the notion that diabetes is a late and abrupt event. Thus, the CD62L molecule appears as a unique marker that can discriminate diabetogenic (previously shown to be CD62L-) from regulatory T cells. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of protective CD4+ CD62L+ cells suggest they are different from Th2-, Tr1-, and NK T-type cells, reported to be implicated in the control of diabetes in NOD mice, and may represent a new immunoregulatory population.

  14. Regional delivery of mesothelin-targeted CAR T cell therapy generates potent and long-lasting CD4-dependent tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Adusumilli, Prasad S; Cherkassky, Leonid; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Colovos, Christos; Servais, Elliot; Plotkin, Jason; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel

    2014-11-05

    Translating the recent success of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for hematological malignancies to solid tumors will necessitate overcoming several obstacles, including inefficient T cell tumor infiltration and insufficient functional persistence. Taking advantage of an orthotopic model that faithfully mimics human pleural malignancy, we evaluated two routes of administration of mesothelin-targeted T cells using the M28z CAR. We found that intrapleurally administered CAR T cells vastly outperformed systemically infused T cells, requiring 30-fold fewer M28z T cells to induce long-term complete remissions. After intrapleural T cell administration, prompt in vivo antigen-induced T cell activation allowed robust CAR T cell expansion and effector differentiation, resulting in enhanced antitumor efficacy and functional T cell persistence for 200 days. Regional T cell administration also promoted efficient elimination of extrathoracic tumor sites. This therapeutic efficacy was dependent on early CD4(+) T cell activation associated with a higher intratumoral CD4/CD8 cell ratios and CD28-dependent CD4(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, intravenously delivered CAR T cells, even when accumulated at equivalent numbers in the pleural tumor, did not achieve comparable activation, tumor eradication, or persistence. The ability of intrapleurally administered T cells to circulate and persist supports the concept of delivering optimal CAR T cell therapy through "regional distribution centers." On the basis of these results, we are opening a phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety of intrapleural administration of mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells in patients with primary or secondary pleural malignancies.

  15. Crystal structure of a complete ternary complex of T-cell receptor, peptide-MHC, and CD4

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yiyuan; Wang, Xin Xiang; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2012-07-11

    Adaptive immunity depends on specific recognition by a T-cell receptor (TCR) of an antigenic peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecule on an antigen-presenting cell (APC). In addition, T-cell activation generally requires binding of this same pMHC to a CD4 or CD8 coreceptor. Here, we report the structure of a complete TCR-pMHC-CD4 ternary complex involving a human autoimmune TCR, a myelin-derived self-peptide bound to HLA-DR4, and CD4. The complex resembles a pointed arch in which TCR and CD4 are each tilted ~65° relative to the T-cell membrane. By precluding direct contacts between TCR and CD4, the structure explains how TCR and CD4 on the T cell can simultaneously, yet independently, engage the same pMHC on the APC. The structure, in conjunction with previous mutagenesis data, places TCR-associated CD3εγ and CD3εδ subunits, which transmit activation signals to the T cell, inside the TCR-pMHC-CD4 arch, facing CD4. By establishing anchor points for TCR and CD4 on the T-cell membrane, the complex provides a basis for understanding how the CD4 coreceptor focuses TCR on MHC to guide TCR docking on pMHC during thymic T-cell selection.

  16. JEG-3 Trophoblast Cells Producing Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Promote Conversion of Human CD4+FOXP3- T Cells into CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells and Foster T Cell Suppressive Activity.

    PubMed

    Poloski, Eileen; Oettel, Anika; Ehrentraut, Stefanie; Luley, Lydia; Costa, Serban Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Schumacher, Anne

    2016-03-09

    The pregnancy hormone human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) reportedly modulates innate and adaptive immune responses and contributes thereby to fetal survival. More precisely, hCG has been shown to support human Treg cell homing into the fetal-maternal interface and enhance number and function of Treg cells in murine pregnancy. Here, we aimed to study whether hCG and hCG-producing human trophoblast cell lines induce Treg cells from CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells and promote T cell suppressive activity. CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of normal pregnant women and cultured in the presence of hCG-producing (JEG-3, HTR-8) and non-producing (SWAN-71) cell lines. To confirm the participation of hCG in Treg cell conversion, the experiments were performed in the presence of anti-hCG and additional experiments were run with recombinant or urine-purified hCG. After culture the number of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg cells as well as the suppressive capacity of total T cells was assessed. hCG-producing JEG-3 cells as well as recombinant and urine-purified hCG induced CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg cells from CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells. Blockage of hCG impaired Treg cell induction. Moreover, hCG-producing JEG-3 cells increased suppressive activity of CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells through an antigen-independent pathway. Our results propose another mechanism through which hCG modulates the female immune system during pregnancy in favor of the fetus.

  17. Activated CD4+ T cells preferentially take up lipid microspheres, but resting cells do not.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K

    1995-01-01

    Lipid microspheres (LM) used as drug carriers increase the effectiveness and reduce the toxicity of incorporated drugs. The present study is designed to determine whether or not activated T lymphocytes, which were the cells chosen first from the 'inflammatory cells', can take up LM in vitro. LM were labelled with a fluorescent probe, DiI (DiI-LM), to examine the kinetics. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes principally took up DiI-LM, while lymphocytes and granulocytes did not. When PBMC were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 MoAb and IL-2, cells expressing CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD16 incorporated DiI-LM. Purified CD4+ T cells, obtained by positive panning selection, were stimulated with this system. They were CD25, CD71, LFA-1-positive, and also showed an ability to take up DiI-LM, which resting cells did not. The findings were confirmed by flow cytometry and quantitative analysis of DiI. Confocal micrographs showed fluorescent granules from the probe in the cytoplasm of stimulated CD4+ T cells after incubation with DiI-LM. These results suggest that immunomodulatory agents incorporated into LM might selectively regulate the function of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells when these are activated. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7882572

  18. Ultrasensitive detection and phenotyping of CD4+ T cells with optimized HLA class II tetramer staining.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Thomas J; Purbhoo, Marco; Day, Cheryl L; Robinson, Nicola; Fidler, Sarah; Fox, Julie; Weber, Jonathan N; Klenerman, Paul; Sewell, Andrew K; Phillips, Rodney E

    2005-11-15

    HLA class I tetramers have revolutionized the study of Ag-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Technical problems and the rarity of Ag-specific CD4+ Th cells have not allowed the potential of HLA class II tetramers to be fully realized. Here, we optimize HLA class II tetramer staining methods through the use of a comprehensive panel of HIV-, influenza-, CMV-, and tetanus toxoid-specific tetramers. We find rapid and efficient staining of DR1- and DR4-restricted CD4+ cell lines and clones and show that TCR internalization is not a requirement for immunological staining. We combine tetramer staining with magnetic bead enrichment to detect rare Ag-specific CD4+ T cells with frequencies as low as 1 in 250,000 (0.0004% of CD4+ cells) in human PBLs analyzed directly ex vivo. This ultrasensitive detection allowed phenotypic analysis of rare CD4+ T lymphocytes that had experienced diverse exposure to Ag during the course of viral infections. These cells would not be detectable with normal flow-cytometric techniques.

  19. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation.

  20. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John F.; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Jay, David C.; Boyd, Scott D.; Chinthrajah, R. Sharon; Davis, Mark M.; Galli, Stephen J.; Maecker, Holden T.; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2016-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional “roadmap” of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an “anergic” Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  1. Critical role of histone demethylase Jmjd3 in the regulation of CD4+ T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xilai; Chepelev, Iouri; Zhou, Xikun; Zhao, Wei; Wei, Gang; Cui, Jun; Zhao, Keji; Wang, Helen Y.; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic factors have been implicated in the regulation of CD4+ T cell differentiation. Jmjd3 plays a role in many biological processes, but its in vivo function in T cell differentiation remains unknown. Here, we report that Jmjd3 ablation promotes CD4+ T cell differentiation into Th2 and Th17 cells in the small intestine and colon, and inhibits T cell differentiation into Th1 cells under different cytokine-polarizing conditions and in a Th1-dependent colitis model. Jmjd3 deficiency also restrains the plasticity of the conversion of Th2, Th17 or Treg cells to Th1 cells. The skewing of T cell differentiation is concomitant with changes in the expression of key transcription factors and cytokines. H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 levels in Jmjd3-deficient cells are correlated with altered gene expression through interactions with specific transcription factors. Our results identify Jmjd3 as an epigenetic factor in T cell differentiation via changes in histone methylation and target gene expression. PMID:25531312

  2. Chloroquine inhibits human CD4+ T-cell activation by AP-1 signaling modulation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ralf L. J.; Jutz, Sabrina; Goldhahn, Katrin; Witzeneder, Nadine; Gerner, Marlene C.; Trapin, Doris; Greiner, Georg; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Guenter; Pickl, Winfried F.; Burgmann, Heinz; Steinberger, Peter; Ratzinger, Franz; Schmetterer, Klaus G.

    2017-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic for rheumatic diseases. Although its modes of action on the innate immune system are well described, there is still insufficient knowledge about its direct effects on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we evaluated the influence of CQ on activation parameters of human CD4+ T-cells. CQ directly suppressed proliferation, metabolic activity and cytokine secretion of T-cells following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activation. In contrast, CQ showed no effect on up-regulation of T-cell activation markers. CQ inhibited activation of all T helper cell subsets, although IL-4 and IL-13 secretion by Th2 cells were less influenced compared to other Th-specific cytokines. Up to 10 μM, CQ did not reduce cell viability, suggesting specific suppressive effects on T-cells. These properties of CQ were fully reversible in re-stimulation experiments. Analyses of intracellular signaling showed that CQ specifically inhibited autophagic flux and additionally activation of AP-1 by reducing phosphorylation of c-JUN. This effect was mediated by inhibition of JNK catalytic activity. In summary, we characterized selective and reversible immunomodulatory effects of CQ on human CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide new insights into the biological actions of JNK/AP-1 signaling in T-cells and may help to expand the therapeutic spectrum of CQ. PMID:28169350

  3. Ectonucleotidase activity and immunosuppression in astrocyte-CD4 T cell bidirectional signaling

    PubMed Central

    Filipello, Fabia; Romagnani, Andrea; Mazzitelli, Sonia; Matteoli, Michela; Verderio, Claudia; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes play a crucial role in neuroinflammation as part of the glia limitans, which regulates infiltration of the brain parenchyma by leukocytes. The signaling pathways and molecular events, which result from the interaction of activated T cells with astrocytes are poorly defined. Here we show that astrocytes promote the expression and enzymatic activity of CD39 and CD73 ectonucleotidases in recently activated CD4 cells by a contact dependent mechanism that is independent of T cell receptor interaction with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is robustly upregulated and sufficient to promote ectonucleotidases expression. T cell adhesion to astrocyte results in differentiation to an immunosuppressive phenotype defined by expression of the transcription factor Rorγt, which characterizes the CD4 T helper 17 subset. CD39 activity in T cells in turn inhibits spontaneous calcium oscillations in astrocytes that correlated with enhanced and reduced transcription of CCL2 chemokine and Sonic hedgehog (Shh), respectively. We hypothesize this TCR-independent interaction promote an immunosuppressive program in T cells to control possible brain injury by deregulated T cell activation during neuroinflammation. On the other hand, the increased secretion of CCL2 with concomitant reduction of Shh might promote leukocytes extravasation into the brain parenchyma. PMID:26784253

  4. Characterization of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses in MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, JS; Guidon, A; Sparks, S; Osborne, R; Juel, VC; Massey, JM; Sanders, DB; Weinhold, KJ; Guptill, JT

    2014-01-01

    Muscle specific tyrosine kinase myasthenia gravis (MuSK MG) is a form of autoimmune MG that predominantly affects women and has unique clinical features, including prominent bulbar weakness, muscle atrophy, and excellent response to therapeutic plasma exchange. Patients with MuSK MG have predominantly IgG4 autoantibodies directed against MuSK on the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Lymphocyte functionality has not been reported in this condition. The goal of this study was to characterize T-cell responses in patients with MuSK MG. Intracellular production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-17, and IL-21 by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells was measured by polychromatic flow cytometry in peripheral blood samples from 11 Musk MG patients and 10 healthy controls. Only one MuSK MG patient was not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) were also included in our analysis to determine if changes in T cell function were due to altered Treg frequencies. CD8+ T-cells from MuSK MG patients had higher frequencies of polyfunctional responses than controls, and CD4+ T-cells had higher IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IL-17. MuSK MG patients had a higher percentage of CD4+ T-cells producing combinations of IFN-gamma/IL-2/TNF-gamma, TNF-alpha/IL-2, and IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha. Interestingly, Treg numbers and CD39 expression were not different from control values. MuSK MG patients had increased frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cytokines and were primed for polyfunctional proinflammatory responses that cannot be explained by a defect in Treg function or number. PMID:24378287

  5. Characterization of CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in MuSK myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Yi, J S; Guidon, A; Sparks, S; Osborne, R; Juel, V C; Massey, J M; Sanders, D B; Weinhold, K J; Guptill, J T

    2014-08-01

    Muscle specific tyrosine kinase myasthenia gravis (MuSK MG) is a form of autoimmune MG that predominantly affects women and has unique clinical features, including prominent bulbar weakness, muscle atrophy, and excellent response to therapeutic plasma exchange. Patients with MuSK MG have predominantly IgG4 autoantibodies directed against MuSK on the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Lymphocyte functionality has not been reported in this condition. The goal of this study was to characterize T cell responses in patients with MuSK MG. Intracellular production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-17, and IL-21 by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was measured by polychromatic flow cytometry in peripheral blood samples from 11 Musk MG patients and 10 healthy controls. Only one MuSK MG patient was not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Regulatory T cells (Treg) were also included in our analysis to determine if changes in T cell function were due to altered Treg frequencies. CD8+ T cells from MuSK MG patients had higher frequencies of polyfunctional responses than controls, and CD4+ T cells had higher IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IL-17. MuSK MG patients had a higher percentage of CD4+ T cells producing combinations of IFN-gamma/IL-2/TNF-gamma, TNF-alpha/IL-2, and IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha. Interestingly, Treg numbers and CD39 expression were not different from control values. MuSK MG patients had increased frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cytokines and were primed for polyfunctional proinflammatory responses that cannot be explained by a defect in CD39 expression or Treg number.

  6. Regulation of the Neurodegenerative Process Associated to Parkinson's Disease by CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    González, Hugo; Contreras, Francisco; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Neuroinflammation constitutes a fundamental process involved in the physiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Microglial cells play a central role in the outcome of neuroinflammation and consequent neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Current evidence indicates that CD4+ T-cells infiltrate the central nervous system (CNS) in PD, where they play a critical role determining the functional phenotype of microglia, thus regulating the progression of the neurodegenerative process. Here, we first analysed the pathogenic role of inflammatory phenotypes and the beneficial role of anti-inflammatory phenotypes of encephalitogenic CD4+ T-cells involved in the physiopathology of PD. Next, we discussed how alterations of neurotransmitter levels observed in the basal ganglia throughout the time course of PD progression could be strongly affecting the behaviour of encephalitogenic CD4+ T-cells and thereby the outcome of the neuroinflammatory process and the consequent neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Afterward, we integrated the evidence indicating the involvement of an antigen-specific immune response mediated by T-cells and B-cells against CNS-derived self-constituents in PD. Consistent with the involvement of a relevant autoimmune component in PD, we also reviewed the polymorphisms of both, class I and class II major histocompatibility complexes, associated to the risk of PD. Overall, this study gives an overview of how an autoimmune component involved in PD plays a fundamental role in the progression of the neurodegenerative process.

  7. Subsets of CD4+ T cells and their roles in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mason, D W

    1993-10-29

    The CD4 molecule has a very restricted tissue distribution being found at high levels only on subpopulations of thymocytes and peripheral T cells. This finding implicated the molecule in the specialized actions of these cells and provided the impetus for studies directed at determining the function of the CD4 molecule itself and of those T cells that expressed it. The first part of this paper reviews briefly some of the earlier work in this field in which Alan Williams played such a major role. The paper concludes with an account of more recent findings which reveal that CD4+ T cells are themselves phenotypically heterogeneous and that the different subsets that can be identified mediate markedly different immunological functions. In particular studies with laboratory rats have shown that one subset plays an essential role in the prevention of autoimmunity. This finding indicates that self tolerance cannot be accounted for entirely in terms of the deletion or irreversible inactivation of autoreactive T cells and raises a number of questions about how the immune response to self antigens is actively regulated and how possible deficiencies in this regulation may give rise to autoimmune disease.

  8. Expanding Roles for CD4 T Cells and Their Subpopulations in Tumor Immunity and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dobrzanski, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in orchestrating the immune system and their role in inducing effective T cell-mediated therapies for the treatment of patients with select established malignancies are undisputable. Through a complex and balanced array of direct and indirect mechanisms of cellular activation and regulation, this functionally diverse family of lymphocytes can potentially promote tumor eradication, long-term tumor immunity, and aid in establishing and/or rebalancing immune cell homeostasis through interaction with other immune cell populations within the highly dynamic tumor environment. However, recent studies have uncovered additional functions and roles for CD4 T cells, some of which are independent of other lymphocytes, that can not only influence and contribute to tumor immunity but paradoxically promote tumor growth and progression. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the various CD4 T cell lineages and their signature cytokines in disease progression and/or regression. We discuss their direct and indirect mechanistic interplay among themselves and with other responding cells of the antitumor response, their potential roles and abilities for “plasticity” and memory cell generation within the hostile tumor environment, and their potentials in cancer treatment and immunotherapy. PMID:23533029

  9. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  10. Limited HIV-1 Reactivation in Resting CD4+ T cells from Aviremic Patients under Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Bouchat, Sophie; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Kabeya, Kabamba; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    A latent viral reservoir that resides in resting CD4+ T cells represents a major barrier for eradication of HIV infection. We test here the impact of HIV protease inhibitor (PI) based combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) over nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART on HIV-1 reactivation and integration in resting CD4+ T cells. This is a prospective cohort study of patients with chronic HIV-1 infection treated with conventional cART with an undetectable viremia. We performed a seven-year study of 47 patients with chronic HIV-infection treated with cART regimens and with undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels for at least 1 year. Of these 47 patients treated with cART, 24 were treated with a PI-based regimen and 23 with a NNRTI-based regimen as their most recent treatment for more than one year. We evaluated the HIV-1 reservoir using reactivation assay and integrated HIV-1 DNA, respectively, in resting CD4+ T cells. Resting CD4+ T cells isolated from PI-treated patients compared to NNRTI-treated patients showed a limited HIV-1 reactivation upon T-cell stimulation (p = 0·024) and a lower level of HIV-1 integration (p = 0·024). Our study indicates that PI-based cART could be more efficient than NNRTI-based cART for limiting HIV-1 reactivation in aviremic chronically infected patients. PMID:27922055

  11. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4(+) TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D; McKeague, Matthew G; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-04-11

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4(+) or CD8(+) TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4(+) TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4(+) T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation and Gene Expression Profiling of NKG2D Positive Human Cytomegalovirus-Primed CD4+ T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Helle; Folkersen, Lasse; Skov, Søren

    2012-01-01

    NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D– CD4+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D+ CD4+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression. PMID:22870231

  13. Maraviroc intensification in patients with suppressed HIV viremia has limited effects on CD4+ T cell recovery and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Jain, Sonia; Woelk, Christopher H; Witt, Mallory D; Sun, Xiaoying; Lada, Steven M; Spina, Celsa A; Goicoechea, Miguel; Rought, Steffney E; Haubrich, Richard; Dubé, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Addition of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc (MVC) to ongoing antiretroviral therapy increases CD4+ T cell counts in some virologically suppressed patients with suboptimal CD4+ T cell recovery. To understand the mechanisms by which MVC elicits increases in CD4+ T cell counts, the present study was undertaken to identify host factors (i.e. genes) that are modulated and are correlated with CD4+ T cell recovery during the 24weeks of MVC intensification in 32 subjects. Median changes of CD4+ T cell counts over 24weeks of MVC compared to baseline were 38cells/mm(3) (p<0.001). The median slope of CD4+ T cell recovery was 39cells/mm(3) per year before initiation of MVC and 76cells/mm(3) per year during MVC intensification, however, this increase was not statistically significant (p=0.33). Microarray analysis (N=31,426 genes) identified a single differentially expressed gene, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), which was modestly (1.44-fold, p<0.001) downregulated by MVC at week 24 compared to baseline. TNF differential expression was evaluated using an independent method of droplet digital PCR, but the difference was not significant (p=0.6). Changes in gene expression did not correlate with CD4+ T cell recovery or any changes in the CD4+ T cell maturation, proliferation and activation phenotypes. In summary, our data suggest that modest improvements of CD4+ T cell counts during MVC intensification cannot be explained by changes in gene expression elicited by MVC. However, the modest changes in T cell composition, including reduction of the percentages of Tregs, proliferating CD4+ T cells and senescent CD8+ T cells, suggest immunologically favorable effects of MVC.

  14. Comparative Impact of Suppressive Antiretroviral Regimens on the CD4/CD8 T-Cell Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Barber, Xavier; Sanchis, Marina; Terol, Gertrudis; Lidón, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although different factors have been implicated in the CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio recovery in HIV-infected patients who receive effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), limited information exists on the influence of the regimen composition. A longitudinal study carried out in a prospective, single-center cohort of HIV-infected patients. ART regimens including non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), protease inhibitors (PI), or integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI) from patients who achieved long-term (≥6-month duration) virological suppression (HIV-RNA < 400 copies/mL) from January 1998 to June 2014 were analyzed. The impact of ART composition on the changes of the CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio was modeled using a mixed linear approach with adjustment for possible confounders. A total of 1068 ART regimens from 570 patients were analyzed. Mean (SD) age of the patients was 42.15 (10.68) years and 276 (48.42%) had hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. Five hundred fifty-eight (52.25%) regimens were PI-based, 439 (40.10%) NNRTI-based, and 71 (6.65%) INSTI-based; 487 (45.60%) were initial regimens, 476 (44.57%) simplification, and 105 (9.83%) salvage regimens. Median (IQR) number of regimens was 1 (1–2) per patient, of 29 (14–58) months duration, and 4 (3–7) CD4/CD8 measurements per regimen. The median baseline CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.42, 0.50, and 0.54, respectively, with the PI-, NNRTI-, and INSTI-based regimens (P = 0.0073). Overall median (IQR) increase of CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.0245 (−0.0352–0.0690) per year, and a CD4/CD8 ratio ≥1 was achieved in 19.35% of the cases with PI-based, 25.97% with NNRTI-based, and 22.54% with INSTI-based regimens (P = 0.1406). In the adjusted model, the mean CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio increase was higher with NNRTI-based regimens compared for PI-based (estimated coefficient for PI [95% CI], −0.0912 [−0.1604 to −0.0219], P = 0.009). Also, a higher CD4/CD8 baseline ratio was associated with higher

  15. A novel role for CD4+ T cells in the control of cachexia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuangzhi; Zhao, Chunfang; Moya, Rosa; Davies, Joanna D

    2008-10-01

    Cachexia is the dramatic weight loss and muscle atrophy seen in chronic disease states, including autoimmunity, cancer, and infection, and is often associated with lymphopenia. We have previously shown that CD4(+) T cells that express the lowest density of CD44 (CD4(+)CD44(v.low)) are significantly reduced in diabetic NOD mice that are cachexic compared with diabetic mice that are not cachexic. Using this model, and a model of cancer cachexia, we test the hypothesis that CD4(+)CD44(v.low) cells play an active role in protecting the host from cachexia. CD4(+)CD44(v.low) cells, but not CD4(+) cells depleted of CD44(v.low) cells, delay the onset of wasting when infused into either diabetic or prediabetic NOD recipients. However, no significant effect on the severity of diabetes was detected. In a model of cancer cachexia, they significantly reduce muscle atrophy, and inhibit muscle protein loss and DNA loss, even when given after the onset of cachexia. Protection from wasting and muscle atrophy by CD4(+)CD44(v.low) cells is associated with protection from lymphopenia. These data suggest, for the first time, a role for an immune cell subset in protection from cachexia, and further suggest that the mechanism of protection is independent of protection from autoimmunity.

  16. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  17. Induction of Gag-Specific CD4 T Cell Responses during Acute HIV Infection Is Associated with Improved Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Schieffer, Miriam; Jessen, Heiko K.; Oster, Alexander F.; Pissani, Franco; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Jessen, Arne B.; Zedlack, Carmen; Schultz, Bruce T.; Davis, Isaiah; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Alter, Galit; Schumann, Ralf R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effector CD4 T cell responses have been shown to be critically involved in the containment and clearance of viral pathogens. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of HIV infection is less clear, given their additional role as preferred viral targets. We previously demonstrated that the presence of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses is somewhat associated with HIV control and that specific CD4 T cell functions, such as direct cytolytic activity, can contribute to control of HIV viremia. However, little is known about how the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection influences disease progression and whether responses induced during the early phase of infection are preferentially depleted. We therefore longitudinally assessed, in a cohort of 55 acutely HIV-infected individuals, HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses from acute to chronic infection. Interestingly, we found that the breadth, magnitude, and protein dominance of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses remained remarkably stable over time. Moreover, we found that the epitopes targeted at a high frequency in acute HIV infection were recognized at the same frequency by HIV-specific CD4 T cells in chronic HIV infection. Interestingly the induction of Gag-specific CD4 T cell responses in acute HIV infection was significantly inversely correlated with viral set point in chronic HIV infection (R = −0.5; P = 0.03), while the cumulative contribution of Env-specific CD4 T cell responses showed the reverse effect. Moreover, individuals with HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses dominantly targeting Gag over Env in acute HIV infection remained off antiretroviral therapy significantly longer (P = 0.03; log rank). Thus, our data suggest that the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection is beneficial overall and does not fuel disease progression. IMPORTANCE CD4 T cells are critical for the clearance and control of viral infections. However, HIV

  18. Green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate modulates differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into specific lineage effector cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4+ T helper (Th) subsets Th1, Th9, and Th17 cells are implicated in inducing autoimmunity whereas regulatory T cells (Treg) have a protective effect. We previously showed that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and altered CD4+ T cell subpo...

  19. Influence of CD4+CD25+ T cells on Plasmodium berghei NK65 infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Ton That Ai; Nakazawa, Shusuke; Onizuka, Shozaburo; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Kanbara, Hiroji

    2003-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells co-expressing CD25 (CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells) have been identified as immunoregulatory suppressors modulating autoimmune response. Beside that, autoimmune response was supposed to be associated with malaria infection. Based on these data, we hypothesised that CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells may influence protective immunity to malaria parasites, while suppressing autoimmune response arising throughout the course of malarial infection. To test this possibility, we evaluated the kinetics of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells during malaria infection and investigated the influence of CD25 depletion by anti-mouse CD25 monoclonal antibody (PC61) on the infection, using a mouse model of premunition to Plasmodium berghei NK65 malaria. The results showed that, during exacerbation of P. berghei NK65 infection, the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells among CD4(+) T cells decreased, although that of CD4(+) T cells increased. CD25 depletion clearly delayed the growth of parasitaemia during parasite challenge, particularly in immunised mice. These findings demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells are able to influence protective immunity underlying premunition to P. berghei NK65 parasites.

  20. The T cell antigen receptor CD3:CD4 molecular complex is diminished on the surface of pulmonary lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Marathias, K.; Pinto, C.; Rodberg, G.; Preffer, F.; Wong, J.; Kradin, R.

    1994-01-01

    CD4, a 55-kd cell surface glycoprotein, binds to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (Ia) antigens and functions as a coreceptor for the T cell antigen receptor (Ti alpha beta)-CD3 complex. We have observed that critical elements of the T cell antigen multireceptor complex, including Ti alpha beta, CD3, CD4, but not CD8, were diminished on CD45RO+ pulmonary T lymphocytes but not CD45RO+ peripheral blood T lymphocytes (PBL). Epitopes mapping from the first (D1) to the fourth (D4) extracytoplasmic Ig-like domains of CD4 were expressed to a lesser degree on pulmonary T cells than on PBL (P = 0.002). CD4 expression on pulmonary T cells did not increase after 72 hours of ex vivo culture in complete medium but was restored toward control levels by stimulation with phytohemagglutinin, anti-CD3, or interleukin-2. CD4 mRNA isolated from lung T cells and PBL co-migrated on Northern blots and the total levels of CD4 mRNA were comparable, suggesting that diminished CD4 expression by pulmonary T cells might reflect a posttranscriptional change. To determine whether CD4bright T cells convert with mitogen stimulation to CD4dim cells, PBLs were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, anti-CD4, or a molecularly engineered anti-CD3:CD4 bispecific monoclonal antibody and the ratio of the CD4:CD3 mean fluorescence staining intensities was calculated at days 3 and 13. The CD4:CD3 ratio decreased primarily for cells stimulated with anti-CD3:CD4, suggesting that co-ligation of CD3 and CD4 is required for the generation of CD4dim T cells. We conclude that diminished Ti alpha beta-CD3:CD4 expression is a characteristic of T cells in lung that is not shared by peripheral blood T cells in vivo, and speculate that this change reflects T cell activation in a millieu of limited interleukin-2 availability. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7977652

  1. Defining CD4 T cell memory by the epigenetic landscape of CpG DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Komori, H Kiyomi; Hart, Traver; LaMere, Sarah A; Chew, Pamela V; Salomon, Daniel R

    2015-02-15

    Memory T cells are primed for rapid responses to Ag; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for priming remain incompletely defined. CpG methylation in promoters is an epigenetic modification, which regulates gene transcription. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we examined methylation of 2100 genes (56,000 CpGs) mapped by deep sequencing of T cell activation in human naive and memory CD4 T cells. Four hundred sixty-six CpGs (132 genes) displayed differential methylation between naive and memory cells. Twenty-one genes exhibited both differential methylation and gene expression before activation, linking promoter DNA methylation states to gene regulation; 6 of 21 genes encode proteins closely studied in T cells, whereas 15 genes represent novel targets for further study. Eighty-four genes demonstrated differential methylation between memory and naive cells that correlated to differential gene expression following activation, of which 39 exhibited reduced methylation in memory cells coupled with increased gene expression upon activation compared with naive cells. These reveal a class of primed genes more rapidly expressed in memory compared with naive cells and putatively regulated by DNA methylation. These findings define a DNA methylation signature unique to memory CD4 T cells that correlates with activation-induced gene expression.

  2. Defining CD4 T Cell Memory by the Epigenetic Landscape of CpG DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Komori, H. Kiyomi; Hart, Traver; LaMere, Sarah A.; Chew, Pamela V.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are primed for rapid responses to antigen; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for priming remain incompletely defined. CpG methylation in promoters is an epigenetic modification, which regulates gene transcription. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we examined methylation of 2100 genes (56,000 CpG) mapped by deep sequencing of T cell activation in human naïve and memory CD4 T cells. 466 CpGs (132 genes) displayed differential methylation between naïve and memory cells. 21 genes exhibited both differential methylation and gene expression before activation, linking promoter DNA methylation states to gene regulation; 6 of 21 genes encode proteins closely studied in T cells, while 15 genes represent novel targets for further study. 84 genes demonstrated differential methylation between memory and naïve cells that correlated to differential gene expression following activation, of which 39 exhibited reduced methylation in memory cells coupled with increased gene expression upon activation compared to naïve cells. These reveal a class of primed genes more rapidly expressed in memory compared to naïve cells and putatively regulated by DNA methylation. These findings define a DNA methylation signature unique to memory CD4 T cells that correlates with activation-induced gene expression. PMID:25576597

  3. [Th17 cells, a novel proinflammatory effector CD4 T cell population].

    PubMed

    Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Guerder, Sylvie

    2008-11-01

    After more than 20 years of hegemony, the Th1-Th2 paradigm was recently shaken by the discovery of a novel population of CD4 effector T cells, the Th17 cells. Th17 effector cells produce IL-17 and IL-22 and thus have pro-inflammatory properties notably favoring neutrophils recruitment and thus control of extracellular bacteria mainly at the epithelium surface. Th17 cells appear also as the major inducer of organ specific autoimmune pathologies such as EAE or rheumatoid arthritis, a function previously attributed to Th1 effector cells. The discovery of Th17 cells further supports the notion that effector CD4 T cells responses are diverse in vivo and that fine tuning of these different effector cells is critical to maintain tissue integrity.

  4. Retention of Ag-specific memory CD4(+) T cells in the draining lymph node indicates lymphoid tissue resident memory populations.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Clare L; Dutton, Emma E; Tomura, Michio; Withers, David R

    2017-03-15

    Several different memory T-cell populations have now been described based upon surface receptor expression and migratory capabilities. Here we have assessed murine endogenous memory CD4(+) T cells generated within a draining lymph node and their subsequent migration to other secondary lymphoid tissues. Having established a model response targeting a specific peripheral lymph node, we temporally labelled all the cells within draining lymph node using photoconversion. Tracking of photoconverted and non-photoconverted Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells revealed the rapid establishment of a circulating memory population in all lymph nodes within days of immunisation. Strikingly, a resident memory CD4(+) T cell population became established in the draining lymph node and persisted for several months in the absence of detectable migration to other lymphoid tissue. These cells most closely resembled effector memory T cells, usually associated with circulation through non-lymphoid tissue, but here, these cells were retained in the draining lymph node. These data indicate that lymphoid tissue resident memory CD4(+) T-cell populations are generated in peripheral lymph nodes following immunisation.

  5. CD4+ T-cell Epitope Prediction Using Antigen Processing Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Tysheena; Landry, Samuel J.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell CD4+ epitopes are important targets of immunity against infectious diseases and cancer. State-of-the-art methods for MHC class II epitope prediction rely on supervised learning methods in which an implicit or explicit model of sequence specificity is constructed using a training set of peptides with experimentally tested MHC class II binding affinity. In this paper we present a novel method for CD4+ T-cell eptitope prediction based on modeling antigen-processing constraints. Previous work indicates that dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes tend to occur adjacent to sites of initial proteolytic cleavage. Given an antigen with known three-dimensional structure, our algorithm first aggregates four types of conformational stability data in order to construct a profile of stability that allows us to identify regions of the protein that are most accessible to proteolysis. Using this profile, we then construct a profile of epitope likelihood based on the pattern of transitions from unstable to stable regions. We validate our method using 35 datasets of experimentally measured CD4+ T cell responses of mice bearing I-Ab or HLA-DR4 alleles as well as of human subjects. Overall, our results show that antigen processing constraints provide a significant source of predictive power. For epitope prediction in single-allele systems, our approach can be combined with sequence-based methods, or used in instances where little or no training data is available. In multiple-allele systems, sequence-based methods can only be used if the allele distribution of a population is known. In contrast, our approach does not make use of MHC binding prediction, and is thus agnostic to MHC class II genotypes. PMID:26891811

  6. Studying the Role for CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Human Lupus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    subsets in human lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Insoo Kang, M.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Studying the role for CD4+ T cell subsets in human lupus 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0150 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have investigated whether and how autoimmune complex (AIC) in SLE ( lupus ) can

  7. Meta-analysis of the changes of peripheral blood regulatory T cell to CD4+ T cell ratio in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Chuiwen; Li, Wenli; Chen, Si; Li, Yongzhe

    2017-01-01

    Current reports on the changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Tregs) to CD4+ T cell ratio in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients are varied in their conclusions. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to identify the actual change in the proportion of peripheral Tregs in SSc. Three databases, namely EMBASE, ISI web of knowledge, and Pubmed were systematically searched for relevant literature. Approximately 250 SSc patients and controls from several studies were included in this analysis. Comprehensive Meta Analysis Version 2.0 software was used to conduct the meta-analysis. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis. Results of the meta-analysis showed high degree of heterogeneity (I2 = 96.98), and a random-effect model was used in the subsequent analysis. The ratio of circulating Tregs to CD4+ T cell in SSc was lower than in controls, but not statistically significantly so (−0.61 ± 0.94, P = 0.52). Subgroup analysis did not identify any potential source of heterogeneity. This meta-analysis indicated that Tregs might play a less prominent immunosuppressive role in the immune system in SSc patients, but needs further confirmation. PMID:28317890

  8. Association of CD4+ T cell subpopulations and psychological stress measures in women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Kristina E; Konkle-Parker, Deborah

    2017-01-24

    Psychological stress is a known immunomodulator. In individuals with HIV, depression, the most common manifestation of increased psychological stress, can affect immune function with lower CD4+ T cell counts correlating with higher levels of depression. It is unknown how other forms of psychological stress can impact immune markers in people living with HIV. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine how CD4+ T cell subpopulations correlated with different forms of psychological stress. We recruited 50 HIV-positive women as part of the Women's Interagency HIV Study. We assessed perceived stress, worry, acute anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression through self-report questionnaires and CD4+ T cell subpopulations using flow cytometry. Our sample was 96% African-American with a mean ± SD age and body mass index of 42 ± 8.8 years and 36.6 ± 11.5 kg/m(2), respectively. The mean ± SD scores on the psychological measures were as follows: Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), 16.5 ± 6.4; Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ), 47.7 ± 13.8; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - State (STAIS), 39.1 ± 12.3; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Trait (STAIT), 40.2 ± 11.4; Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), 15.6 ± 11.4. The mean + SD values for the immune parameters were as follows: regulatory T cells (Treg), 1.25% ± 0.7; T helper 1 (Th1), 14.9% ± 6.1; T helper 2 (Th2), 3.8% ± 2; Th1/Th2 ratio, 4.6 ± 3; and CD4+ T cell count (cells/mm(3)), 493 ± 251. Treg levels positively correlated with PSS, STAIS, and STAIT. CD4+ T cell count negatively correlated with PSS, PSWQ, STAIS, STAIT, and CES-D. These data suggest that immune function may be impacted by various forms of psychological stress in HIV-positive women. Interventions that target stress reduction may be useful in improving immune parameters and quality of life.

  9. Lymph node and circulating T cell characteristics are strongly correlated in end-stage renal disease patients, but highly differentiated T cells reside within the circulation.

    PubMed

    Dedeoglu, B; de Weerd, A E; Huang, L; Langerak, A W; Dor, F J; Klepper, M; Verschoor, W; Reijerkerk, D; Baan, C C; Litjens, N H R; Betjes, M G H

    2017-05-01

    Ageing is associated with changes in the peripheral T cell immune system, which can be influenced significantly by latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. To what extent changes in circulating T cell populations correlate with T cell composition of the lymph node (LN) is unclear, but is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of the T cell system. T cells from peripheral blood (PB) and LN of end-stage renal disease patients were analysed for frequency of recent thymic emigrants using CD31 expression and T cell receptor excision circle content, relative telomere length and expression of differentiation markers. Compared with PB, LN contained relatively more CD4(+) than CD8(+) T cells (P < 0·001). The percentage of naive and central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and thymic output parameters showed a strong linear correlation between PB and LN. Highly differentiated CD28(null) T cells, being CD27(-) , CD57(+) or programmed death 1 (PD-1(+) ), were found almost exclusively in the circulation but not in LN. An age-related decline in naive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell frequency was observed (P = 0·035 and P = 0·002, respectively) within LN, concomitant with an increase in central memory CD8(+) T cells (P = 0·033). Latent CMV infection increased dramatically the frequency of circulating terminally differentiated T cells, but did not alter T cell composition and ageing parameters of LN significantly. Overall T cell composition and measures of thymic function in PB and LN are correlated strongly. However, highly differentiated CD28(null) T cells, which may comprise a large part of circulating T cells in CMV-seropositive individuals, are found almost exclusively within the circulation.

  10. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  11. Myd88 Initiates Early Innate Immune Responses and Promotes CD4 T Cells during Coronavirus Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Butchi, Niranjan; Kapil, Parul; Puntambekar, Shweta; Stohlman, Stephen A.; Hinton, David R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myd88 signaling is critical to the control of numerous central nervous system (CNS) infections by promoting both innate and adaptive immune responses. Nevertheless, the extent to which Myd88 regulates type I interferon (IFN) versus proinflammatory factors and T cell function, as well as the anatomical site of action, varies extensively with the pathogen. CNS infection by neurotropic coronavirus with replication confined to the brain and spinal cord induces protective IFN-α/β via Myd88-independent activation of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). However, a contribution of Myd88-dependent signals to CNS pathogenesis has not been assessed. Infected Myd88−/− mice failed to control virus, exhibited enhanced clinical disease coincident with increased demyelination, and succumbed to infection within 3 weeks. The induction of IFN-α/β, as well as of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, was impaired early during infection. However, defects in both IFN-α/β and select proinflammatory factors were rapidly overcome prior to T cell recruitment. Myd88 deficiency also specifically blunted myeloid and CD4 T cell recruitment into the CNS without affecting CD8 T cells. Moreover, CD4 T cells but not CD8 T cells were impaired in IFN-γ production. Ineffective virus control indeed correlated most prominently with reduced antiviral IFN-γ in the CNS of Myd88−/− mice. The results demonstrate a crucial role for Myd88 both in early induction of innate immune responses during coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis and in specifically promoting protective CD4 T cell activation. In the absence of these responses, functional CD8 T cells are insufficient to control viral spread within the CNS, resulting in severe demyelination. IMPORTANCE During central nervous system (CNS) infections, signaling through the adaptor protein Myd88 promotes both innate and adaptive immune responses. The extent to which Myd88 regulates antiviral type I IFN, proinflammatory

  12. Oct1 and OCA-B are selectively required for CD4 memory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Arvind; Goren, Alon; Shalek, Alex; German, Cody N; Snook, Jeremy; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Yosef, Nir; Chan, Raymond C; Regev, Aviv; Williams, Matthew A; Tantin, Dean

    2015-11-16

    Epigenetic changes are crucial for the generation of immunological memory. Failure to generate or maintain these changes will result in poor memory responses. Similarly, augmenting or stabilizing the correct epigenetic states offers a potential method of enhancing memory. Yet the transcription factors that regulate these processes are poorly defined. We find that the transcription factor Oct1 and its cofactor OCA-B are selectively required for the in vivo generation of CD4(+) memory T cells. More importantly, the memory cells that are formed do not respond properly to antigen reencounter. In vitro, both proteins are required to maintain a poised state at the Il2 target locus in resting but previously stimulated CD4(+) T cells. OCA-B is also required for the robust reexpression of multiple other genes including Ifng. ChIPseq identifies ∼50 differentially expressed direct Oct1 and OCA-B targets. We identify an underlying mechanism involving OCA-B recruitment of the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1a to targets such as Il2, Ifng, and Zbtb32. The findings pinpoint Oct1 and OCA-B as central mediators of CD4(+) T cell memory.

  13. Public T cell receptors confer high-avidity CD4 responses to HIV controllers

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Moran; Lambotte, Olivier; Gras, Stéphanie; Lim, Annick; Mukhopadhyay, Madhura; Campbell, Kristy-Anne; Lemercier, Brigitte; Claireaux, Mathieu; Hendou, Samia; Lechat, Pierre; de Truchis, Pierre; Boufassa, Faroudy; Rossjohn, Jamie; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Chakrabarti, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    The rare patients who are able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of therapy show signs of a particularly efficient cellular immune response. To identify the molecular determinants that underlie this response, we characterized the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire directed at Gag293, the most immunoprevalent CD4 epitope in the HIV-1 capsid. HIV controllers from the ANRS CODEX cohort showed a highly skewed TCR repertoire that was characterized by a predominance of TRAV24 and TRBV2 variable genes, shared CDR3 motifs, and a high frequency of public clonotypes. The most prevalent public clonotypes generated TCRs with affinities at the higher end of values reported for naturally occurring TCRs. The high-affinity Gag293-specific TCRs were cross-restricted by up to 5 distinct HLA-DR alleles, accounting for the expression of these TCRs in HIV controllers of diverse genetic backgrounds. Transfer of these TCRs to healthy donor CD4+ T cells conferred high antigen sensitivity and polyfunctionality, thus recapitulating key features of the controller CD4 response. Transfer of a high-affinity Gag293-specific TCR also redirected CD8+ T cells to target HIV-1 capsid via nonconventional MHC II restriction. Together, these findings indicate that TCR clonotypes with superior functions are associated with HIV control. Amplification or transfer of such clonotypes may contribute to immunotherapeutic approaches aiming at a functional HIV cure. PMID:27111229

  14. TNF Blockade Maintains an IL-10+ Phenotype in Human Effector CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ceri A.; Durham, Lucy E.; Fleskens, Veerle; Evans, Hayley G.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cell subpopulations can display regulatory potential characterized by expression of the prototypically anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms that regulate expression of IL-10 in different T cell subpopulations are not yet fully elucidated. We recently showed that TNF inhibitors (TNFi) promote IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells, including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Here, we further characterized the regulation of IL-10 expression via blockade of TNF signaling or other cytokine/co-stimulatory pathways, in human T cell subpopulations. Addition of the TNFi drug adalimumab to anti-CD3-stimulated human CD4+ T cell/monocyte cocultures led to increased percentages of IL-10+ cells in pro-inflammatory IL-17+, IFNγ+, TNFα+, GM-CSF+, and IL-4+ CD4+ T cell subpopulations. Conversely, exogenous TNFα strongly decreased IL-10+ cell frequencies. TNF blockade also regulated IL-10 expression in CD4+ T cells upon antigenic stimulation. Using time course experiments in whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures, we show that TNF blockade maintained, rather than increased, IL-10+ cell frequencies in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following in vitro stimulation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Blockade of IL-17, IFNγ, IL-6R, or CD80/CD86-mediated co-stimulation did not significantly regulate IL-10 expression within CD4+ or CD8+ T cell subpopulations. We show that TNF blockade acts directly on effector CD4+ T cells, in the absence of monocytes or CD4+ CD25highCD127low regulatory T cells and independently of IL-27, resulting in higher IL-10+ frequencies after 3 days in culture. IL-10/IL-10R blockade reduced the frequency of IL-10-expressing cells both in the presence and absence of TNF blockade. Addition of recombinant IL-10 alone was insufficient to drive an increase in IL-10+ CD4+ T cell frequencies in 3-day CD4+ T cell/monocyte cocultures, but resulted in increased IL-10 expression at later time points in

  15. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak, Martin; Rode, Anna K O; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2015-09-08

    Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys2. Vice-versa, the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) and inhibition of Cys2 uptake with glutamate inhibited GSH and DNA synthesis in parallel. We further found that thioredoxin (Trx) can partly substitute for GSH during DNA synthesis. Finally, we show that GSH or Trx is required for the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for generation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA building blocks. In conclusion, we show that activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 to proliferate and that this is partly explained by the fact that Cys2 is required for production of GSH, which in turn is required for optimal RNR-mediated deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and DNA replication.

  16. Cell-intrinsic mechanism involving Siglec-5 associated with divergent outcomes of HIV-1 infection in human and chimpanzee CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Soto, Paula C; Karris, Maile Y; Spina, Celsa A; Richman, Douglas D; Varki, Ajit

    2013-02-01

    Human and chimpanzee CD4+ T cells differ markedly in expression of the inhibitory receptor Siglec-5, which contributes towards differential responses to activating stimuli. While CD4+ T cells from both species are equally susceptible to HIV-1 infection, chimpanzee cells survive better, suggesting a cell-intrinsic difference. We hypothesized that Siglec-5 expression protects T cells from activation-induced and HIV-1-induced cell death. Transduction of human CEM T cells with Siglec-5 decreased cell responses to stimulation. Following HIV-1 infection, a higher percentage of Siglec-5-positive cells survived, suggesting relative resistance to virus-induced cell death. Consistent with this, we observed an increase in percentage of Siglec-5-positive cells surviving in mixed infected cultures. Siglec-5-transduced cells also showed decreased expression of apoptosis-related proteins following infection and reduced susceptibility to Fas-mediated cell death. Similar Siglec-5-dependent differences were seen when comparing infection outcomes in primary CD4+ T cells from humans and chimpanzees. A protective effect of Siglec-5 was further supported by observing greater proportions of circulating CD4+ T cells expressing Siglec-5 in acutely infected HIV-1 patients, compared to controls. Taken together, our results suggest that Siglec-5 expression protects T cells from HIV-1- and apoptosis-induced cell death and contributes to the different outcomes of HIV-1 infection in humans and chimpanzees.

  17. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James T.; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R.; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell–mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4–producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4–deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4–deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell–derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4–producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration. PMID:25607842

  18. Establishment and Maintenance of the Human Naïve CD4+ T-Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Susana L.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2016-01-01

    The naïve CD4+ T-cell compartment is considered essential to guarantee immune competence throughout life. Its replenishment with naïve cells with broad diverse receptor repertoire, albeit with reduced self-reactivity, is ensured by the thymus. Nevertheless, cumulative data support a major requirement of post-thymic proliferation both for the establishment of the human peripheral naïve compartment during the accelerated somatic growth of childhood, as well as for its lifelong maintenance. Additionally, a dynamic equilibrium is operating at the cell level to fine-tune the T-cell receptor threshold to activation and survival cues, in order to counteract the continuous naïve cell loss by death or conversion into memory/effector cells. The main players in these processes are low-affinity self-peptide/MHC and cytokines, particularly IL-7. Moreover, although naïve CD4+ T-cells are usually seen as a homogeneous population regarding stage of maturation and cell differentiation, increasing evidence points to a variety of phenotypic and functional subsets with distinct homeostatic requirements. The paradigm of cells committed to a distinct lineage in the thymus are the naïve regulatory T-cells, but other functional subpopulations have been identified based on their time span after thymic egress, phenotypic markers, such as CD31, or cytokine production, namely IL-8. Understanding the regulation of these processes is of utmost importance to promote immune reconstitution in several clinical settings, namely transplantation, persistent infections, and aging. In this mini review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms underlying human naïve CD4+ T-cell homeostasis, combining clinical data, experimental studies, and modeling approaches. PMID:27843891

  19. Different Levels of T-Cell Receptor Triggering Induce Distinct Functions in Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus-Specific Human CD4+ T-Cell Clones

    PubMed Central

    Diepolder, Helmut M.; Gruener, Norbert H.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Jung, Maria-Christina; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Pape, Gerd R.

    2001-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a major role in the host defense against viruses and intracellular microbes. During the natural course of such an infection, specific CD4+ T cells are exposed to a wide range of antigen concentrations depending on the body compartment and the stage of disease. While epitope variants trigger only subsets of T-cell effector functions, the response of virus-specific CD4+ T cells to various concentrations of the wild-type antigen has not been systematically studied. We stimulated hepatitis B virus core- and hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD4+ T-cell clones which had been isolated from patients with acute hepatitis during viral clearance with a wide range of specific antigen concentrations and determined the phenotypic changes and the induction of T-cell effector functions in relation to T-cell receptor internalization. A low antigen concentration induced the expression of T-cell activation markers and adhesion molecules in CD4+ T-cell clones in the absence of cytokine secretion and proliferation. The expression of CD25, HLA-DR, CD69, and intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 increased as soon as T-cell receptor internalization became detectable. A 30- to 100-fold-higher antigen concentration, corresponding to the internalization of 20 to 30% of T-cell receptor molecules, however, was required for the induction of proliferation as well as for gamma interferon and interleukin-4 secretion. These data indicate that virus-specific CD4+ T cells can respond to specific antigen in a graded manner depending on the antigen concentration, which may have implications for a coordinate regulation of specific CD4+ T-cell responses. PMID:11483723

  20. Identification of Caucasian CD4 T cell epitopes on the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax. T cell memory.

    PubMed

    Bilsborough, J; Carlisle, M; Good, M F

    1993-07-15

    We have identified a population of Caucasians with a defined past history of infection with Plasmodium vivax malaria. Using purified synthetic peptides overlapping the sequence of the circumsporozoite protein, we determined the percentage of individuals whose T cells proliferated or secreted IFN-gamma in response to peptide stimulation, for both this population and a population of nonmalaria-exposed control individuals. A number of peptides were recognized by both groups, but 11 peptides were uniquely recognized by the exposed population, and thus represented malaria-specific T cell epitopes. CD4 T cells were found to be responsible for the proliferative response. Humans last exposed to vivax sporozoites as long ago as 49 yr responded as well or better to these malaria-specific epitopes as individuals exposed within the previous month. Since such malaria-induced memory response may not be a feature of Plasmodium falciparum infections, and since P. falciparum does not have a persisting hypnozoite stage, our data argue that the persistence of T cell memory to vivax epitopes may result from antigenic persistence in the liver.

  1. Tumor-Unrelated CD4 T Cell Help Augments CD134 plus CD137 Dual Costimulation Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Payal; St Rose, Marie-Clare; Wang, Xi; Ryan, Joseph M.; Wasser, Jeffrey S.; Vella, Anthony T.; Adler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of immune-based cancer therapies to elicit beneficial CD8+ CTL is limited by tolerance pathways that inactivate tumor-specific CD4 helper T cells. A strategy to bypass this problem is to engage tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells. Thus, CD4 T cells, regardless of their specificity per se, can boost CD8+ CTL priming so long as the cognate epitopes are linked via presentation on the same dendritic cell. Here, we assessed the therapeutic impact of engaging tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells during dual costimulation with CD134 plus CD137 that not only provide help via the above-mentioned classical linked pathway, but also provide non-linked help that facilitates CTL function in T cells not directly responding to cognate antigen. We found that engagement of tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells dramatically boosted the ability of dual costimulation to control the growth of established B16 melanomas. Surprisingly, this effect depended upon a CD134-dependent component that was extrinsic to the tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells, suggesting that the dual-costimulated helper cells are themselves helped by a CD134+ cell(s). Nevertheless, the delivery of therapeutic help tracked with an increased frequency of tumor-infiltrating granzyme B+ effector CD8 T cells and a reciprocal decrease in Foxp3+CD4+ cell frequency. Notably, the tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells also infiltrated the tumors, and their deletion several days following initial T cell priming negated their therapeutic impact. Taken together, dual costimulation programs tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells to deliver therapeutic help during both the priming and effector stages of the anti-tumor response. PMID:26561553

  2. Rapid G0/1 transition and cell cycle progression in CD8(+) T cells compared to CD4(+) T cells following in vitro stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Takuya; Fukaya, Shotaro; Toda, Shoko; Ando, Yoshiaki; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Inobe, Manabu

    2017-04-01

    T cell population consists of two major subsets, CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, which can be distinguished by the expression of CD4 or CD8 molecules, respectively. Although they play quite different roles in an immune system, many of their basic cellular processes such as proliferation following stimulation are presumably common. In this study, we have carefully analyzed time course of G0/1 transition as well as cell cycle progression in the two subsets of quiescent T cell population following in vitro growth stimulation. We found that CD8(+) T cells promote G0/1 transition more rapidly and drive their cell cycle progression faster compared to CD4(+) T cells. In addition, expression of CD25 and effects of its blockade revealed that IL-2 is implicated in the rapid progression, but not the earlier G0/1 transition, of CD8(+) T cells.

  3. Tumor-infiltrating HLA-matched CD4(+) T cells retargeted against Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Schmid, Frederike; Weiser, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Heinrich, Tim; Warner, Kathrin; Becker, Petra S A; Wistinghausen, Robin; Kameh-Var, Sima; Werling, Eva; Billmeier, Arne; Seidl, Christian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Abken, Hinrich; Küppers, Ralf; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Newrzela, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presents with a unique histologic pattern. Pathognomonic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells usually account for less than 1% of the tumor and are embedded in a reactive infiltrate mainly comprised of CD4(+) T cells. HRS cells induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment and thereby escape antitumor immunity. To investigate the impact of interactions between HRS cells and T cells, we performed long-term co-culture studies that were further translated into a xenograft model. Surprisingly, we revealed a strong antitumor potential of allogeneic CD4(+) T cells against HL cell lines. HRS and CD4(+) T cells interact by adhesion complexes similar to immunological synapses. Tumor-cell killing was likely based on the recognition of allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) receptor, while CD4(+) T cells from MHC-II compatible donors did not develop any antitumor potential in case of HL cell line L428. However, gene expression profiling (GEP) of co-cultured HRS cells as well as tumor infiltration of matched CD4(+) T cells indicated cellular interactions. Moreover, matched CD4(+) T cells could be activated to kill CD30(+) HRS cells when redirected with a CD30-specific chimeric antigen receptor. Our work gives novel insights into the crosstalk between HRS and CD4(+) T cells, suggesting the latter as potent effector cells in the adoptive cell therapy of HL.

  4. Tumor-infiltrating HLA-matched CD4+ T cells retargeted against Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg cells

    PubMed Central

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Schmid, Frederike; Weiser, Christian; Döring, Claudia; Heinrich, Tim; Warner, Kathrin; Becker, Petra S. A.; Wistinghausen, Robin; Kameh-Var, Sima; Werling, Eva; Billmeier, Arne; Seidl, Christian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Abken, Hinrich; Küppers, Ralf; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Newrzela, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presents with a unique histologic pattern. Pathognomonic Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg (HRS) cells usually account for less than 1% of the tumor and are embedded in a reactive infiltrate mainly comprised of CD4+ T cells. HRS cells induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment and thereby escape antitumor immunity. To investigate the impact of interactions between HRS cells and T cells, we performed long-term co-culture studies that were further translated into a xenograft model. Surprisingly, we revealed a strong antitumor potential of allogeneic CD4+ T cells against HL cell lines. HRS and CD4+ T cells interact by adhesion complexes similar to immunological synapses. Tumor-cell killing was likely based on the recognition of allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) receptor, while CD4+ T cells from MHC-II compatible donors did not develop any antitumor potential in case of HL cell line L428. However, gene expression profiling (GEP) of co-cultured HRS cells as well as tumor infiltration of matched CD4+ T cells indicated cellular interactions. Moreover, matched CD4+ T cells could be activated to kill CD30+ HRS cells when redirected with a CD30-specific chimeric antigen receptor. Our work gives novel insights into the crosstalk between HRS and CD4+ T cells, suggesting the latter as potent effector cells in the adoptive cell therapy of HL. PMID:27471632

  5. Critical role of CD4 T cells in maintaining lymphoid tissue structure for immune cell homeostasis and reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Paiardini, Mirko; Engram, Jessica C; Beilman, Greg J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Schacker, Timothy W; Silvestri, Guido; Haase, Ashley T

    2012-08-30

    Loss of the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network in lymphoid tissues during HIV-1 infection has been shown to impair the survival of naive T cells and limit immune reconstitution after antiretroviral therapy. What causes this FRC loss is unknown. Because FRC loss correlates with loss of both naive CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets and decreased lymphotoxin-β, a key factor for maintenance of FRC network, we hypothesized that loss of naive T cells is responsible for loss of the FRC network. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the consequences of antibody-mediated depletion of CD4 and CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys. We found that only CD4 T-cell depletion resulted in FRC loss in both species and that this loss was caused by decreased lymphotoxin-β mainly produced by the CD4 T cells. We further found the same dependence of the FRC network on CD4 T cells in HIV-1-infected patients before and after antiretroviral therapy and in other immunodeficiency conditions, such as CD4 depletion in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy and irradiation. CD4 T cells thus play a central role in the maintenance of lymphoid tissue structure necessary for their own homeostasis and reconstitution.

  6. Tissue requirements for establishing long-term CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity following Leishmania donovani infection.

    PubMed

    Bunn, Patrick T; Stanley, Amanda C; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Mulherin, Alexander; Sheel, Meru; Alexander, Clare E; Faleiro, Rebecca J; Amante, Fiona H; Montes De Oca, Marcela; Best, Shannon E; James, Kylie R; Kaye, Paul M; Haque, Ashraful; Engwerda, Christian R

    2014-04-15

    Organ-specific immunity is a feature of many infectious diseases, including visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani. Experimental visceral leishmaniasis in genetically susceptible mice is characterized by an acute, resolving infection in the liver and chronic infection in the spleen. CD4+ T cell responses are critical for the establishment and maintenance of hepatic immunity in this disease model, but their role in chronically infected spleens remains unclear. In this study, we show that dendritic cells are critical for CD4+ T cell activation and expansion in all tissue sites examined. We found that FTY720-mediated blockade of T cell trafficking early in infection prevented Ag-specific CD4+ T cells from appearing in lymph nodes, but not the spleen and liver, suggesting that early CD4+ T cell priming does not occur in liver-draining lymph nodes. Extended treatment with FTY720 over the first month of infection increased parasite burdens, although this associated with blockade of lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid tissue, as well as with more generalized splenic lymphopenia. Importantly, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are required for the establishment and maintenance of antiparasitic immunity in the liver, as well as for immune surveillance and suppression of parasite outgrowth in chronically infected spleens. Finally, although early CD4+ T cell priming appeared to occur most effectively in the spleen, we unexpectedly revealed that protective CD4+ T cell-mediated hepatic immunity could be generated in the complete absence of all secondary lymphoid tissues.

  7. New candidates for CD4 T cell pathogenicity in experimental neuroinflammation and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Nicola; Graetz, Christiane; Paterka, Magdalena; Poisa-Beiro, Laura; Larochelle, Catherine; Hasan, Maruf; Lill, Christina M; Zipp, Frauke; Siffrin, Volker

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which is thought to be triggered by environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals leading to activation of autoreactive T lymphocytes. Large multi-centre genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic risk loci in multiple sclerosis. In this study, we investigated T cell transcriptomic changes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model for multiple sclerosis. We correlated these findings with the multiple sclerosis risk genes postulated by the most recent Immunochip analysis and found that multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes were significantly regulated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data indicate that nine distinct genes associated with multiple sclerosis risk, Bach2, Il2ra, Irf8, Mertk, Odf3b, Plek, Rgs1, Slc30a7 and Thada, can be confirmed to be differentially regulated in pathogenic CD4(+) T cells. During the effector phase within the inflamed CNS, CD4(+) T cells undergo comprehensive transformation and we identified key transcription factors and signalling networks involved in this process. The transformation was linked to metabolic changes with the involvement of liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor signalling and cholesterol biosynthesis, which might control the T cell effector function in the central nervous system. Thus, our study confirms the involvement of multiple sclerosis risk genes in the pathophysiology of the animal model and sheds light on additional disease-relevant inflammatory networks.

  8. A Human Immunodeficiency Virus Controller With a Large Population of CD4+CD8+ Double-Positive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Christine M.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Salgado, Maria; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Walker-Sperling, Victoria E.; Hegarty, Robert W.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) controllers are patients who control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. We present the case of an HIV controller who had CD4 and CD8 coexpressed on 40% of his T cells. Although a recent study found that double-positive T cells had superior antiviral capacity in HIV-1 controllers, in this case, the CD4+CD8+ T cells did not have strong antiviral activity. PMID:26380339

  9. In vitro activation and differentiation of naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into HCV core- and NS3-specific armed effector cells: a new role for CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnadas, Deepa K; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyrrell, Lorne J; Agrawal, Babita

    2009-01-01

    Viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been correlated with strong, multi-specific and sustained T cell responses. The number of functionally active effector T cells determines the outcome of infection. Only a small number of antigen-specific naïve T cells are originally present. Upon infection, they undergo activation, clonal expansion and differentiation to become effector cells. In this study, we determined the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to prime T cells in vitro to become effector cells upon stimulation with various TLR ligands or IFNalpha. T cell priming and activation was determined by proliferation and production of effector molecules, IFN-gamma and Granzyme B (GrB). HCV Core-specific T cells showed significant increase in proliferation, and the number of HCV Core-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IFN-gamma and GrB was higher than control or NS3-specific T cells. These in vitro-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells exhibit the phenotype of just-activated and/or armed effector lymphocytes confirming the transition of naïve T cells to effector cells. This is the first study demonstrating the activation of GrB+CD4+ T cells against antigen(s) derived from HCV. Our study suggests a novel role of CD4+ T cells in immunity against HCV.

  10. Adenovirus serotype 5 vaccine vectors trigger IL-27-dependent inhibitory CD4+ T cell responses that impair CD8+ T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Larocca, Rafael A.; Provine, Nicholas M.; Aid, Malika; Iampietro, M. Justin; Borducchi, Erica N.; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David; Bricault, Christine A.; Blass, Eryn; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vaccine vectors elicit robust CD8+ T cell responses, but these responses typically exhibit a partially exhausted phenotype. However, the immunologic mechanism by which Ad5 vectors induce dysfunctional CD8+ T cells has not previously been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that, following immunization of B6 mice, Ad5 vectors elicit antigen-specific IL-10+CD4+ T cells with a distinct transcriptional profile in a dose-dependent fashion. In rhesus monkeys, we similarly observed upregulated expression of IL-10 and PD-1 by CD4+ T cells following Ad5 vaccination. These cells markedly suppressed vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cell responses in vivo and IL-10 blockade increased the frequency and functionality of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells as well as improved protective efficacy against challenge with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Moreover, induction of these inhibitory IL-10+CD4+ T cells correlated with IL-27 expression and IL-27 blockade substantially improved CD4+ T cell functionality. These data highlight a role for IL-27 in the induction of inhibitory IL-10+CD4+ T cells, which suppress CD8+ T cell magnitude and function following Ad5 vector immunization. A deeper understanding of the cytokine networks and transcriptional profiles induced by vaccine vectors should lead to strategies to improve the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of viral vector-based vaccines. PMID:28239679

  11. 3'uridylation controls mature microRNA turnover during CD4 T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Vazquez, Cristina; Enright, Anton J; Rodríguez-Galán, Ana; Perez-García, Arantxa; Collier, Paul; Jones, Matthew R; Benes, Vladimir; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Mittelbrunn, María; Ramiro, Almudena R; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2017-03-28

    Activation of T lymphocytes requires a tight regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) expression. Terminal uridyltransferases (TUTases) catalyze 3' non-templated nucleotide addition (3'NTA) to miRNAs which may influence miRNA stability and function. Here, we investigated 3'NTA to mature miRNA in CD4 T lymphocytes by deep sequencing. Upon T cell activation, miRNA sequences bearing terminal uridines are specifically decreased, concomitantly with downregulation of TUT4 and TUT7 enzymes. Analyzing TUT4 deficient T lymphocytes, we proved that this terminal uridyltransferase is essential for the maintenance of miRNA uridylation in steady state of T lymphocytes. Analysis of synthetic uridylated miRNAs shows that 3' addition of uridine promotes degradation of these uridylated miRNAs after T cell activation. Our data underline post-transcriptional uridylation as a mechanism to fine tune miRNA levels during T cell activation.

  12. Vγ9Vδ2 T-Cell Polyfunctionality Is Differently Modulated in HAART-Treated HIV Patients according to CD4 T-Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Casetti, Rita; De Simone, Gabriele; Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Viola, Domenico; Agrati, Chiara; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Tumino, Nicola; Besi, Francesca; Martini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of γδ T-cell distribution and function in peripheral blood is among the earliest defects during HIV-infection. We asked whether the polyfunctional response could also be affected, and how this impairment could be associated to CD4 T-cell count. To this aim, we performed a cross-sectional study on HIV-infected individuals. In order to evaluate the polyfunctional-Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell response after phosphoantigen-stimulation, we assessed the cytokine/chemokine production and cytotoxicity by flow-cytometry in HAART-treated-HIV+ persons and healthy-donors. During HIV-infection Vγ9Vδ2-polyfunctional response quality is affected, since several Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell subsets resulted significantly lower in HIV+ patients in respect to healthy donors. Interestingly, we found a weak positive correlation between Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell-response and CD4 T-cell counts. By dividing the HIV+ patients according to CD4 T-cell count, we found that Low-CD4 patients expressed a lower number of two Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell subsets expressing MIP-1β in different combinations with other molecules (CD107a/IFNγ) in respect to High-CD4 individuals. Our results show that the Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell-response quality in Low-CD4 patients is specifically affected, suggesting a direct link between innate Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells and CD4 T-cell count. These findings suggest that Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell quality may be indirectly influenced by HAART therapy and could be included in a new therapeutical strategy which would perform an important role in fighting HIV infection. PMID:26161861

  13. Vγ9Vδ2 T-Cell Polyfunctionality Is Differently Modulated in HAART-Treated HIV Patients according to CD4 T-Cell Count.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Rita; De Simone, Gabriele; Sacchi, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Viola, Domenico; Agrati, Chiara; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Tumino, Nicola; Besi, Francesca; Martini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of γδ T-cell distribution and function in peripheral blood is among the earliest defects during HIV-infection. We asked whether the polyfunctional response could also be affected, and how this impairment could be associated to CD4 T-cell count. To this aim, we performed a cross-sectional study on HIV-infected individuals. In order to evaluate the polyfunctional-Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell response after phosphoantigen-stimulation, we assessed the cytokine/chemokine production and cytotoxicity by flow-cytometry in HAART-treated-HIV+ persons and healthy-donors. During HIV-infection Vγ9Vδ2-polyfunctional response quality is affected, since several Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell subsets resulted significantly lower in HIV+ patients in respect to healthy donors. Interestingly, we found a weak positive correlation between Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell-response and CD4 T-cell counts. By dividing the HIV+ patients according to CD4 T-cell count, we found that Low-CD4 patients expressed a lower number of two Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell subsets expressing MIP-1β in different combinations with other molecules (CD107a/IFNγ) in respect to High-CD4 individuals. Our results show that the Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell-response quality in Low-CD4 patients is specifically affected, suggesting a direct link between innate Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells and CD4 T-cell count. These findings suggest that Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell quality may be indirectly influenced by HAART therapy and could be included in a new therapeutical strategy which would perform an important role in fighting HIV infection.

  14. Vitamin D Actions on CD4(+) T Cells in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Colleen Elizabeth; Hubler, Shane L; Moore, Jerott R; Barta, Lauren E; Praska, Corinne E; Nashold, Faye E

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes and integrates research on vitamin D and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte biology to develop new mechanistic insights into the molecular etiology of autoimmune disease. A deep understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to gene-environment interactions is needed to deliver etiology-based autoimmune disease prevention and treatment strategies. Evidence linking sunlight, vitamin D, and the risk of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes is summarized to develop the thesis that vitamin D is the environmental factor that most strongly influences autoimmune disease development. Evidence for CD4(+) T-cell involvement in autoimmune disease pathogenesis and for paracrine calcitriol signaling to CD4(+) T lymphocytes is summarized to support the thesis that calcitriol is sunlight's main protective signal transducer in autoimmune disease risk. Animal modeling and human mechanistic data are summarized to support the view that vitamin D probably influences thymic negative selection, effector Th1 and Th17 pathogenesis and responsiveness to extrinsic cell death signals, FoxP3(+)CD4(+) T-regulatory cell and CD4(+) T-regulatory cell type 1 (Tr1) cell functions, and a Th1-Tr1 switch. The proposed Th1-Tr1 switch appears to bridge two stable, self-reinforcing immune states, pro- and anti-inflammatory, each with a characteristic gene regulatory network. The bi-stable switch would enable T cells to integrate signals from pathogens, hormones, cell-cell interactions, and soluble mediators and respond in a biologically appropriate manner. Finally, unanswered questions and potentially informative future research directions are highlighted to speed delivery of etiology-based strategies to reduce autoimmune disease.

  15. Vitamin D Actions on CD4+ T Cells in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Colleen Elizabeth; Hubler, Shane L.; Moore, Jerott R.; Barta, Lauren E.; Praska, Corinne E.; Nashold, Faye E.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes and integrates research on vitamin D and CD4+ T-lymphocyte biology to develop new mechanistic insights into the molecular etiology of autoimmune disease. A deep understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to gene–environment interactions is needed to deliver etiology-based autoimmune disease prevention and treatment strategies. Evidence linking sunlight, vitamin D, and the risk of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes is summarized to develop the thesis that vitamin D is the environmental factor that most strongly influences autoimmune disease development. Evidence for CD4+ T-cell involvement in autoimmune disease pathogenesis and for paracrine calcitriol signaling to CD4+ T lymphocytes is summarized to support the thesis that calcitriol is sunlight’s main protective signal transducer in autoimmune disease risk. Animal modeling and human mechanistic data are summarized to support the view that vitamin D probably influences thymic negative selection, effector Th1 and Th17 pathogenesis and responsiveness to extrinsic cell death signals, FoxP3+CD4+ T-regulatory cell and CD4+ T-regulatory cell type 1 (Tr1) cell functions, and a Th1–Tr1 switch. The proposed Th1–Tr1 switch appears to bridge two stable, self-reinforcing immune states, pro- and anti-inflammatory, each with a characteristic gene regulatory network. The bi-stable switch would enable T cells to integrate signals from pathogens, hormones, cell–cell interactions, and soluble mediators and respond in a biologically appropriate manner. Finally, unanswered questions and potentially informative future research directions are highlighted to speed delivery of etiology-based strategies to reduce autoimmune disease. PMID:25852682

  16. TLR2 engagement on CD4(+) T cells enhances effector functions and protective responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Reba, Scott M; Li, Qing; Onwuzulike, Sophia; Ding, Xuedong; Karim, Ahmad F; Hernandez, Yeritza; Fulton, Scott A; Harding, Clifford V; Lancioni, Christina L; Nagy, Nancy; Rodriguez, Myriam E; Wearsch, Pamela A; Rojas, Roxana E

    2014-05-01

    We have previously demonstrated that mycobacterial lipoproteins engage TLR2 on human CD4(+) T cells and upregulate TCR-triggered IFN-γ secretion and cell proliferation in vitro. Here we examined the role of CD4(+) T-cell-expressed TLR2 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Ag-specific T-cell priming and in protection against MTB infection in vivo. Like their human counterparts, mouse CD4(+) T cells express TLR2 and respond to TLR2 costimulation in vitro. This Th1-like response was observed in the context of both polyclonal and Ag-specific TCR stimulation. To evaluate the role of T-cell TLR2 in priming of CD4(+) T cells in vivo, naive MTB Ag85B-specific TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells (P25 TCR-Tg) were adoptively transferred into Tlr2(-/-) recipient C57BL/6 mice that were then immunized with Ag85B and with or without TLR2 ligand Pam3 Cys-SKKKK. TLR2 engagement during priming resulted in increased numbers of IFN-γ-secreting P25 TCR-Tg T cells 1 week after immunization. P25 TCR-Tg T cells stimulated in vitro via TCR and TLR2 conferred more protection than T cells stimulated via TCR alone when adoptively transferred before MTB infection. Our findings indicate that TLR2 engagement on CD4(+) T cells increases MTB Ag-specific responses and may contribute to protection against MTB infection.

  17. Adoptive transfer of cytomegalovirus-specific effector CD4+ T cells provides antiviral protection from murine CMV infection.

    PubMed

    Jeitziner, Sanja Mandaric; Walton, Senta M; Torti, Nicole; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects a majority of the human population and establishes a life-long persistence. CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but the virus carries pathogenic potential and causes severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. T-cell-mediated immunity plays an essential role in control of CMV infection and adoptive transfer of CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells restores viral immunity in immunosuppressed patients but a role for CD4(+) T cells remains elusive. Here, we analyzed in adoptive transfer studies the features and antiviral functions of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells during primary murine CMV (MCMV) infection. MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells expanded upon MCMV infection and displayed an effector phenotype and function. Adoptive transfer of in vivo activated MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells to immune-compromised mice was protective during pathogenic MCMV infection and IFN-γ was a crucial mediator of this protective capacity. Moreover, co-transfer of low doses of both MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells synergized in control of lytic viral replication in immune-compromised mice. Our data reveal a pivotal antiviral role for virus-specific CD4(+) T cells in protection from pathogenic CMV infection and provide evidence for their antiviral therapeutic potential.

  18. Accelerated type 1 diabetes induction in mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gregory; Waldner, Hanspeter

    2013-05-06

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes after 12 weeks of age and is the most extensively studied animal model of human Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Cell transfer studies in irradiated recipient mice have established that T cells are pivotal in T1D pathogenesis in this model. We describe herein a simple method to rapidly induce T1D by adoptive transfer of purified, primary CD4+ T cells from pre-diabetic NOD mice transgenic for the islet-specific T cell receptor (TCR) BDC2.5 into NOD.SCID recipient mice. The major advantages of this technique are that isolation and adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells can be completed within the same day, irradiation of the recipients is not required, and a high incidence of T1D is elicited within 2 weeks after T cell transfer. Thus, studies of pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions in T1D can proceed at a faster rate than with methods that rely on heterogenous T cell populations or clones derived from diabetic NOD mice.

  19. A unique unresponsive CD4+ T cell phenotype post TCR antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lindsay J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    The functional outcomes of the T cell’s interaction with the peptide:MHC complex can be dramatically altered by the introduction of a single amino acid substitution. Previous studies have described the varied effects of these altered peptide ligands (APL) on T cell responses. These outcomes of T cell interaction with an APL include the induction of clonal unresponsiveness (anergy) and inhibition of T cell responses (antagonism). The phenotype of peptide-induced anergy, i.e. low proliferation and low IL-2 production, has been extensively described, and a number of groups have demonstrated antagonism. However, the response of T cells to an agonist ligand after encountering an antagonistic stimulus has not been previously characterized. Here, we show that T cells post-antagonism fail to proliferate but produce large quantities of IL-2 upon stimulation with their wild type ligand. This unique phenotype is not due to differences in IL-2 receptor expression or rates of apoptosis, and cannot be overcome by the addition of recombinant IL-2. The response of CD4 T cells to agonist stimulation after encountering an antagonist is a novel phenotype, and is distinct from previously described forms of anergy. PMID:20031121

  20. Low dose antigen promotes induction of FOXP3 in human CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, S. Alice; Rieck, Mary; Tatum, Megan; Bollyky, Paul L.; Wu, Rebecca P.; Muller, Isabelle; Ho, Jhon-Chun; Shilling, Heather G.; Buckner, Jane H.

    2011-01-01

    Low antigen dose promotes induction and persistence of Treg in mice, yet few studies have addressed the role of antigen dose in the induction of adaptive CD4+FOXP3+ Treg in humans. To this end, we examined the level of FOXP3 expression in human CD4+CD25− T cells upon activation with autologous antigen presenting cells and varying doses of peptide. Antigen specific T cells expressing FOXP3 were identified by flow cytometry using MHC Class II tetramer (Tmr). We found an inverse relationship between antigen dose and the frequency of FOXP3+ cells for both foreign and self antigen specific T cells. Through studies of FOXP3 locus demethylation and helios expression, we determined that variation in the frequency of Tmr+FOXP3+ T cells was not due to expansion of natural Treg, but instead, we found that induction, proliferation and persistence of FOXP3+ cells was similar in high and low dose cultures whereas proliferation of FOXP3− T cells was favored in high antigen dose cultures. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells positively correlated with suppressive function, indicative of adaptive Treg generation. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells were maintained with IL-2, but not upon re-stimulation with antigen. Together, these data suggest that low antigen dose favors the transient generation of human antigen specific adaptive Treg over the proliferation of antigen specific FOXP3- effector T cells. These adaptive Treg could function to reduce ongoing inflammatory responses and promote low dose tolerance in humans, especially when antigen exposure and tolerance is transient. PMID:21865550

  1. Specific CD4+ T-Cell Reactivity and Cytokine Release in Different Clinical Presentations of Leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Volz, Magdalena Sarah; Moos, Verena; Allers, Kristina; Luge, Enno; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Nöckler, Karsten; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Jansen, Andreas; Schneider, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Clinical manifestations of leptospirosis are highly variable: from asymptomatic to severe and potentially fatal. The outcome of the disease is usually determined in the immunological phase, beginning in the second week of symptoms. The underlying mechanisms, predictive factors, and individual immune responses that contribute to clinical variations are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine the specifics of CD4(+) T-cell reactivity and cytokine release after stimulation with leptospiral antigens in patients with leptospirosis of different disease severities (patients with mild and severe symptoms) and in control subjects (with and without proven exposure to Leptospira). Whole-blood specimens were stimulated with Leptospira antigens in vitro. Subsequently, intracellular staining of cytokines was performed, and flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L) and the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by CD4(+) T cells. The production of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α by CD4(+) T cells after stimulation with leptospiral antigens was highest in patients with severe disease. In contrast, the ratio of IL-10 production to TNF-α production was higher in exposed subjects than in patients with mild and severe disease. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α may be useful markers of the severity of the immunological phase of leptospirosis. IL-10 production by T cells after antigen-specific stimulation may indicate a more successful downregulation of the inflammatory response and may contribute to an asymptomatic course of the disease.

  2. Dose-Responsive Gene Expression in Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Treated Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Brian; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Spina, Celsa A.; Singhania, Akul; Margolis, David M.; Richman, Douglas R.; Woelk, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Design Persistent latently infected CD4+ T cells represent a major obstacle to HIV eradication. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are a proposed activation therapy. However, off-target effects on expression in host immune cells are poorly understood. We hypothesized that HDACi-modulated genes would be best identified with dose-response analysis. Methods Resting primary CD4+ T cells were treated with 0.34, 1, 3, or 10 μM of the HDACi, SAHA, for 24 hours and subjected to microarray gene expression analysis. Genes with dose-correlated expression were filtered to identify a subset with consistent up or downregulation at each SAHA dose. Histone modifications were characterized in 6 SAHA dose-responsive genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-RT-qPCR). Results A large number of genes were shown to be up (N=657) or downregulated (N=725) by SAHA in a dose-responsive manner (FDR p-value < 0.05, fold change ≥ |2|). Several genes (CTNNAL1, DPEP2, H1F0, IRGM, PHF15, and SELL) are potential in vivo biomarkers of SAHA activity. SAHA dose-responsive genes included transcription factors, HIV restriction factors, histone methyltransferases, and host proteins that interact with HIV. Pathway analysis suggested net downregulation of T cell activation with increasing SAHA dose. Histone acetylation was not correlated with host gene expression, but plausible alternative mechanisms for SAHA-modulated gene expression were identified. Conclusions Numerous genes in CD4+ T cells are modulated by SAHA in a dose-responsive manner, including genes that may negatively influence HIV activation from latency. Our study suggests that SAHA influences gene expression through a confluence of several mechanisms, including histone modification, and altered expression and activity of transcription factors. PMID:26258524

  3. CD4 on CD8+ T cells directly enhances effector function and is a target for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Scott G.; Jones, Nicole R.; Laforge, Stuart; Whitmire, Jason K.; Vu, Bien-Aimee; Galic, Zoran; Brooks, David G.; Brown, Stephen J.; Kitchen, Christina M. R.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2004-06-01

    Costimulation of purified CD8+ T lymphocytes induces de novo expression of CD4, suggesting a previously unrecognized function for this molecule in the immune response. Here, we report that the CD4 molecule plays a direct role in CD8+ T cell function by modulating expression of IFN- and Fas ligand, two important CD8+ T cell effector molecules. CD4 expression also allows infection of CD8 cells by HIV, which results in down-regulation of the CD4 molecule and impairs the induction of IFN-, Fas ligand, and the cytotoxic responses of activated CD8+ T cells. Thus, the CD4 molecule plays a direct role in CD8 T cell function, and infection of these cells by HIV provides an additional reservoir for the virus and also may contribute to the immunodeficiency seen in HIV disease.

  4. ICOS and Bcl6-dependent pathways maintain a CD4 T cell population with memory-like properties during tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Moguche, Albanus O.; Shafiani, Shahin; Clemons, Corey; Larson, Ryan P.; Dinh, Crystal; Higdon, Lauren E.; Cambier, C.J.; Sissons, James R.; Gallegos, Alena M.; Fink, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Immune control of persistent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires a sustained pathogen-specific CD4 T cell response; however, the molecular pathways governing the generation and maintenance of Mtb protective CD4 T cells are poorly understood. Using MHCII tetramers, we show that Mtb-specific CD4 T cells are subject to ongoing antigenic stimulation. Despite this chronic stimulation, a subset of PD-1+ cells is maintained within the lung parenchyma during tuberculosis (TB). When transferred into uninfected animals, these cells persist, mount a robust recall response, and provide superior protection to Mtb rechallenge when compared to terminally differentiated Th1 cells that reside preferentially in the lung-associated vasculature. The PD-1+ cells share features with memory CD4 T cells in that their generation and maintenance requires intrinsic Bcl6 and intrinsic ICOS expression. Thus, the molecular pathways required to maintain Mtb-specific CD4 T cells during ongoing infection are similar to those that maintain memory CD4 T cells in scenarios of antigen deprivation. These results suggest that vaccination strategies targeting the ICOS and Bcl6 pathways in CD4 T cells may provide new avenues to prevent TB. PMID:25918344

  5. Systematic identification of immunodominant CD4+ T cell responses to HpaA in Helicobacter pylori infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wuchen; Li, Bin; Sun, Heqiang; Wei, Shanshan; He, Yafei; Zhao, Zhuo; Yang, Shiming; Zou, Quanming; Chen, Weisan; Guo, Hong; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    In mice, antigen-specific CD4+ T cell response is indispensible for the protective immunity against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). It has been demonstrated that neuraminyllactose-binding hemagglutinin (HpaA) immunization protected mice from H. pylori infection in a CD4+ T cell dependent manner. However, much remains unclear concerning the human CD4+ T cell responses to HpaA. We conducted a systematic study here to explore the immunodominant, HpaA-specific CD4+ T cell responses in H. pylori infected individuals. We found that HpaA-specific CD4+ T cell responses varied remarkably in their magnitude and had broad epitope-specificity. Importantly, the main responses focused on two regions: HpaA76-105 and HpaA130-159. The HLA-DRB1*0901 restricted HpaA142-159 specific CD4+ T cell response was the most immunodominant response at a population level. The immunodominant epitope HpaA142-159 was naturally presented and highly conserved. We also demonstrated that it was not the broad peptide specificity, but the strength of HpaA specific CD4+ T cell responses associated with gastric diseases potentially caused by H. pylori infection. Such investigation will aid development of novel vaccines against H. pylori infection. PMID:27509059

  6. Virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cell responses and long-term T-cell memory in individuals vaccinated against polio.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Rahnuma; Cannon, Martin J; Chow, Marie

    2005-05-01

    The presence of poliovirus (PV)-specific CD4(+) T cells in individuals vaccinated against polio has been shown, but CD8(+) T-cell responses have not been described. Here, we functionally characterize the CD4(+) T-cell response and show for the first time that dendritic cells and macrophages can stimulate PV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in vitro from vaccinees. Both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells secrete gamma interferon in response to PV antigens and are cytotoxic via the perforin/granzyme B-mediated pathway. Furthermore, the T cells also recognize and kill Sabin 1 vaccine-infected targets. The macrophage-stimulated CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells most likely represent memory T cells that persist for long periods in vaccinated individuals. Thus, immunity to PV vaccination involves not only an effective neutralizing antibody titer but also long-term CD4(+) and CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cell responses.

  7. Titrating T-cell epitopes within self-assembled vaccines optimizes CD4+ helper T cell and antibody outputs.

    PubMed

    Pompano, Rebecca R; Chen, Jianjun; Verbus, Emily A; Han, Huifang; Fridman, Arthur; McNeely, Tessie; Collier, Joel H; Chong, Anita S

    2014-11-01

    Epitope content plays a critical role in determining T-cell and antibody responses to vaccines, biomaterials, and protein therapeutics, but its effects are nonlinear and difficult to isolate. Here, molecular self-assembly is used to build a vaccine with precise control over epitope content, in order to finely tune the magnitude and phenotype of T helper and antibody responses. Self-adjuvanting peptide nanofibers are formed by co-assembling a high-affinity universal CD4+ T-cell epitope (PADRE) and a B-cell epitope from Staphylococcus aureus at specifiable concentrations. Increasing the PADRE concentration from micromolar to millimolar elicited bell-shaped dose-responses that are unique to different T-cell populations. Notably, the epitope ratios that maximize T follicular helper and antibody responses differed by an order of magnitude from those that maximized Th1 or Th2 responses. Thus, modular materials assembly provides a means of controlling epitope content and efficiently skewing the adaptive immune response in the absence of exogenous adjuvant; this approach may contribute to the development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies.

  8. Titrating T cell Epitopes within Self-Assembled Vaccines Optimizes CD4+ Helper T Cell and Antibody Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianjun; Verbus, Emily A.; Han, Huifang; Fridman, Arthur; McNeely, Tessie; Collier, Joel H.; Chong, Anita S.

    2014-01-01

    Epitope content plays a critical role in determining T cell and antibody responses to vaccines, biomaterials, and protein therapeutics, but its effects are nonlinear and difficult to isolate. Here, molecular self-assembly was used to build a vaccine with precise control over epitope content, in order to finely tune the magnitude and phenotype of T helper and antibody responses. Self-adjuvanting peptide nanofibers were formed by co-assembling a high-affinity universal CD4+ T cell epitope (PADRE) and a B cell epitope from Staphylococcus aureus at specifiable concentrations. Increasing the PADRE concentration from μM to mM elicited bell-shaped dose-responses that were unique to different T cell populations. Notably, the epitope ratios that maximized T follicular helper and antibody responses differed by an order of magnitude from those that maximized Th1 or Th2 responses. Thus, modular materials assembly provides a means of controlling epitope content and efficiently skewing the adaptive immune response in the absence of exogenous adjuvant; this approach may contribute to the development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies. PMID:24923735

  9. Bacterial translocation aggravates CCl4-induced liver cirrhosis by regulating CD4+ T cells in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haiyan; Lv, Longxian; Cao, Hongcui; Lu, Haifeng; Zhou, Ning; Yang, Jiezuan; Jiang, Haiyin; Dong, Huihui; Hu, Xinjun; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Xiawei; Zheng, Beiwen; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT) is thought to play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis, but the mechanisms have not been fully explored. This study aims to investigate the distribution of Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+), Th17 (CD3+CD4+IL-17+), and Th1 (CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+) cells in the intestinal lamina propria, liver and blood and to explore their relationships with BT. Cirrhotic rats with ascites were induced by CCl4. We found that there were lower levels of total protein and albumin, lower albumin/globulin ratio, lower body weight and higher spleen weight and ascites volume in cirrhotic rats with than without BT. We found that BT may cause increase of Treg cells in the proximal small intestine and decrease of Th17 cells in the whole intestine and blood in cirrhotic rats. It may also aggravate the CCl4-induced decrease in Th1 cells in the whole intestine, liver, caecum, and blood and the CCl4-induced increase in Th17 cells in the liver and Tregs in the distal small intestine, colon, and liver. Our data suggest that BT may aggravate liver injury and decrease liver function via an interaction with CD4+ T Cells. The results of this study may be helpful for the development of new treatments for liver cirrhosis. PMID:28134306

  10. The role of TRPV1 in the CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammatory response of allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hye Ran; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Bae, Jun-Sang; Chung, Young-Jun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Raz, Eyal; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which has been identified as a molecular target for the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli, was reported to regulate the signaling and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, the role of TRPV1 in CD4+ T cell in allergic rhinitis remains poorly understood. In this study, TRPV1 expression was localized in CD4+ T cells. Both knockout and chemical inhibition of TRPV1 suppressed Th2/Th17 cytokine production in CD4 T cells and Jurkat T cells, respectively, and can suppress T cell receptor signaling pathways including NF-κB, MAP kinase, and NFAT. In TRPV1 knockout allergic rhinitis (AR) mice, eosinophil infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines in the nasal mucosa, and total and ova-specific IgE levels in serum decreased, compared with wild-type AR mice. The TRPV1 antagonists, BCTC or theobromine, showed similar inhibitory immunologic effects on AR mice models. In addition, the number of TRPV1+/CD4+ inflammatory cells increased in the nasal mucosa of patients with AR, compared with that of control subjects. Thus, TRPV1 activation on CD4+ T cells is involved in T cell receptor signaling, and it could be a novel therapeutic target in AR. PMID:26700618

  11. The role of TRPV1 in the CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammatory response of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Samivel, Ramachandran; Kim, Dae Woo; Son, Hye Ran; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Bae, Jun-Sang; Chung, Young-Jun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Raz, Eyal; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-05

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which has been identified as a molecular target for the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli, was reported to regulate the signaling and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, the role of TRPV1 in CD4+ T cell in allergic rhinitis remains poorly understood. In this study, TRPV1 expression was localized in CD4+ T cells. Both knockout and chemical inhibition of TRPV1 suppressed Th2/Th17 cytokine production in CD4 T cells and Jurkat T cells, respectively, and can suppress T cell receptor signaling pathways including NF-κB, MAP kinase, and NFAT. In TRPV1 knockout allergic rhinitis (AR) mice, eosinophil infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines in the nasal mucosa, and total and ova-specific IgE levels in serum decreased, compared with wild-type AR mice. The TRPV1 antagonists, BCTC or theobromine, showed similar inhibitory immunologic effects on AR mice models. In addition, the number of TRPV1+/CD4+ inflammatory cells increased in the nasal mucosa of patients with AR, compared with that of control subjects. Thus, TRPV1 activation on CD4+ T cells is involved in T cell receptor signaling, and it could be a novel therapeutic target in AR.

  12. The Regulation of CD4(+) T Cell Responses during Protozoan Infections.

    PubMed

    Engwerda, Christian R; Ng, Susanna S; Bunn, Patrick T

    2014-01-01

    CD4(+) T cells are critical for defense against protozoan parasites. Intracellular protozoan parasite infections generally require the development of a Th1 cell response, characterized by the production of IFNγ and TNF that are critical for the generation of microbicidal molecules by phagocytes, as well as the expression of cytokines and cell surface molecules needed to generate cytolytic CD8(+) T cells that can recognize and kill infected host cells. Over the past 25 years, much has been learnt about the molecular and cellular components necessary for the generation of Th1 cell responses, and it has become clear that these responses need to be tightly controlled to prevent disease. However, our understanding of the immunoregulatory mechanisms activated during infection is still not complete. Furthermore, it is apparent that although these mechanisms are critical to prevent inflammation, they can also promote parasite persistence and development of disease. Here, we review how CD4(+) T cells are controlled during protozoan infections and how these regulatory mechanisms can influence parasite growth and disease outcome.

  13. Protective cellular retroviral immunity requires both CD4+ and CD8+ immune T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hom, R C; Finberg, R W; Mullaney, S; Ruprecht, R M

    1991-01-01

    We have found previously that postexposure chemoprophylaxis with 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (also known as zidovudine or AZT) in combination with recombinant human alpha A/D interferon fully protected mice exposed to a lethal dose of Rauscher murine leukemia virus (RLV) against viremia and disease. After cessation of therapy, over 90% of these mice were able to resist rechallenge with live RLV, thus demonstrating an acquired immunity. Adoptive cell transfer of 4 x 10(7) cells from immunized mice fully protected naive recipients from viremia and splenomegaly after RLV challenge. However, when these immune T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations, only partial protection was found when 4 x 10(7) T cells of either subset were given. Full protection against RLV challenge was seen again when the T-cell subsets from immunized mice were recombined and transferred at the same number into naive mice. We conclude that cellular immunity alone is protective and that both CD4+ and CD8+ cell types are required for conferring full protection against live virus challenge. Images PMID:1898666

  14. CD4 T cells and their antigens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Kathryn; Cooke, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is mediated by effector T cells and CD4 Th1 and Th17 T cells have important roles in this process. While effector function of Th1 cells is well established, due to their inherent plasticity Th17 cells have been more controversial. Th17 cells contribute to pathogenicity, but several studies indicate that Th17 cells transfer disease through conversion to Th1 cells in vivo. CD4 T cells are attracted to islets by β-cell antigens which include insulin and the two new autoantigens, chromogranin A and islet amyloid polypeptide, all proteins of the secretory granule. Peptides of insulin and ChgA bind to the NOD class II molecule in an unconventional manner and since autoantigenic peptides may typically bind to MHC with low affinity, it is postulated that post-translational modifications of β-cell peptides could contribute to the interaction between peptides, MHC, and the autoreactive TCR. PMID:21917439

  15. Adjuvant-enhanced CD4 T Cell Responses are Critical to Durable Vaccine Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Karen A.O.; Cooper, Christopher L.; Stronsky, Sabrina M.; Norris, Sarah L.W.; Kwilas, Steven A.; Steffens, Jesse T.; Benko, Jacqueline G.; van Tongeren, Sean A.; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based vaccines offer a safer alternative to live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines but have limited immunogenicity. The identification of adjuvants that augment immunogenicity, specifically in a manner that is durable and antigen-specific, is therefore critical for advanced development. In this study, we use the filovirus virus-like particle (VLP) as a model protein-based vaccine in order to evaluate the impact of four candidate vaccine adjuvants on enhancing long term protection from Ebola virus challenge. Adjuvants tested include poly-ICLC (Hiltonol), MPLA, CpG 2395, and alhydrogel. We compared and contrasted antibody responses, neutralizing antibody responses, effector T cell responses, and T follicular helper (Tfh) cell frequencies with each adjuvant's impact on durable protection. We demonstrate that in this system, the most effective adjuvant elicits a Th1-skewed antibody response and strong CD4 T cell responses, including an increase in Tfh frequency. Using immune-deficient animals and adoptive transfer of serum and cells from vaccinated animals into naïve animals, we further demonstrate that serum and CD4 T cells play a critical role in conferring protection within effective vaccination regimens. These studies inform on the requirements of long term immune protection, which can potentially be used to guide screening of clinical-grade adjuvants for vaccine clinical development. PMID:26870818

  16. Th2-polarized CD4+ T cells and macrophages limit efficacy of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Ruffell, Brian; DeNardo, David G.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Park, Catherine C.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CTX) following surgery are mainstays of treatment for breast cancer (BC). While multiple studies have recently revealed the significance of immune cells as mediators of CTX response in BC, less is known regarding roles for leukocytes as mediating outcomes following RT. To address this, we utilized a syngeneic orthotopic murine model of mammary carcinogenesis to investigate if response to RT could be improved when select immune cells or immune-based pathways in the mammary microenvironment were inhibited. Treatment of mammary tumor-bearing mice with either a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) to colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) or a small molecule inhibitor of the CSF-1 receptor kinase (i.e., PLX3397), resulting in efficient macrophage depletion, significantly delayed tumor regrowth following RT. Delayed tumor growth in this setting was associated with increased presence of CD8+ T cells, and reduced presence of CD4+ T cells, the main source of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)4 in mammary tumors. Selective depletion of CD4+ T cells or neutralization of IL4 in combination with RT, phenocopied results following macrophage depletion, whereas depletion of CD8+ T cells abrogated improved response to RT following these therapies. Analogously, therapeutic neutralization of IL4 or IL13, or IL4 receptor alpha deficiency, in combination with the CTX paclitaxel resulted in slowed primary mammary tumor growth by CD8+ T cell-dependent mechanisms. These findings indicate that clinical responses to cytotoxic therapy in general can be improved by neutralizing dominant Th2-based programs driving protumorigenic and immune suppressive pathways in mammary (breast) tumors to improve outcomes. PMID:25716473

  17. Comparative contribution of CD1 on the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Chun, T; Wang, C R

    2000-01-15

    CD1 molecules are MHC class I-like glycoproteins whose expression is essential for the development of a unique subset of T cells, the NK T cells. To evaluate to what extent CD1 contributes to the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, we generated CD1oIIo and CD1oTAPo mice and compared the generation of T cells in these double-mutant mice and IIo or TAPo mice. FACS analysis showed that the number of CD4+ T cells in CD1oIIo mice was reduced significantly compared with the corresponding population in IIo mice. Both CD4+ NK1.1+ and the CD4+ NK1.1- population were reduced in CD1oIIo mice, suggesting that CD1 can select not only CD4+ NK1.1+ T cells but also some NK1.1- CD4+ T cells. Functional analysis showed that the residual CD4+ cells in CD1oIIo can secrete large amounts of IFN-gamma and a significant amount of IL-4 during primary stimulation with anti-CD3, suggesting that this population may be enriched for NK T cells restricted by other class I molecules. In contrast to the CD4+ population, no significant differences in the CD8+ T cell compartment can be detected between TAPo and CD1oTAPo mice in all lymphoid tissues tested, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. Our data suggest that, unlike other MHC class I molecules, CD1 does not contribute in a major way to the development of CD8+ T cells.

  18. Effects of baicalin in CD4 + CD29 + T cell subsets of ulcerative colitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feng-Yan; Huang, Shao-Gang; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Ye, Hua; Chi, Hong-Gang; Zou, Ying; Lv, Ru-Xi; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of baicalin in ulcerative colitis (UC) with regard to the CD4+CD29+ T helper cell, its surface markers and serum inflammatory cytokines. METHODS: Flow cytometry was used to detect the percentage of CD4+CD29+ cells in patients with UC. Real time polymerase chain reaction was used to detect expression of GATA-3, forkhead box P3, T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet), and retinoic acid-related orphan nuclear hormone receptor C (RORC). Western blotting was used to analyze expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, phosphorylation of NF-κB (p-NF-κB) p65, STAT4, p-STAT4, STAT6 and p-STAT6. The concentrations of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10 and TGF-β in serum were determined by ELISA assay. RESULTS: The percentages of CD4+CD29+ T cells were lower in treatment with 40 and 20 μmol/L baicalin than in the treatment of no baicalin. Treatment with 40 or 20 μmol/L baicalin significantly upregulated expression of IL-4, TGF-β1 and IL-10, increased p-STAT6/STAT6 ratio, but downregulated expression of IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-6, RORC, Foxp3 and T-bet, and decreased ratios of T-bet/GATA-3, p-STAT4/STAT4 and p-NF-κB/NF-κB compared to the treatment of no baicalin. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that baicalin regulates immune balance and relieves the ulcerative colitis-induced inflammation reaction by promoting proliferation of CD4+CD29+ cells and modulating immunosuppressive pathways. PMID:25386078

  19. Influence of CD4+/CD25+ regulatory T cells on atherogenesis in patients with end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Meier, Rachel; Blanc, Edouard

    2008-08-01

    Atherosclerosis, which is influenced by both traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors and has been characterized as an inflammatory process, is considered to be the main cause of the elevated cardiovascular risk associated with chronic kidney disease. The inflammatory component of atherosclerosis can be separated into an innate immune response involving monocytes and macrophages that respond to the excessive uptake of lipoproteins and an adaptive immune response that involves antigen-specific T cells. Concurrent with the influx of immune cells to the site of atherosclerotic lesion, the role of the adaptive immune response gradually increases. One of those cells are represented by the CD4+/CD25+ Tregs, which play indispensable roles in the maintenance of natural self-tolerance and negative control of pathological, as well as physiological, immune responses. Altered self-antigens such as oxidized LDLs may induce the development of CD4+/CD25+ Tregs with atheroprotective properties. However, atherosclerosis may be promoted by an imbalance between regulatory and pathogenic immunity that may be represented by the low expression of the forkhead box transcription factor (Foxp3) in CD4+/CD25+ Tregs. Such a defect may break immunologic tolerance and alter both specific and bystander immune suppression, leading to exacerbation of plaque development. Patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) display a cellular immune dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis. Uremic solutes that accumulate during ESKD may be involved in these processes. In patients with ESKD and especially in those that are chronically hemodialyzed, oxidative stress induced by oxidized LDLs may increase CD4+/CD25+ Treg sensitivity to Fas-mediated apoptosis as a consequence of specific dysregulation of IL-2 expression. This review will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the influence of CD4+/CD25+ Tregs on atherogenesis in patients with ESKD, and the potential effect of

  20. CD4+CD8- T cells are the effector cells in disease pathogenesis in the scurfy (sf) mouse.

    PubMed

    Blair, P J; Bultman, S J; Haas, J C; Rouse, B T; Wilkinson, J E; Godfrey, V L

    1994-10-15

    Mice hemizygous for the X-linked mutation, scurfy (sf), exhibit a fatal lymphoreticular disease that is mediated by T lymphocytes. To evaluate the respective roles of CD4 or CD8 single positive T cells in scurfy disease, neonates were treated with mAbs directed against the CD4 or CD8 molecules. Whereas mice treated with an anti-CD8 Ab developed lesions and succumbed to disease at the same time (17 days) as their untreated scurfy littermates, mice treated with an anti-CD4 Ab lived up to 11 wk before developing scurfy disease. To insure a more complete elimination of the T cell subsets, the scurfy mutation was bred onto beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m)-deficient (CD8-less) and CD4-deficient transgenic mouse lines. Whereas there was little moderation of disease in beta 2m-deficient scurfy mice, CD4-deficient scurfy mice had markedly decreased scurfy lesions and a prolonged life span, similar to that of anti-CD4-treated sf/Y mice. Additionally, scurfy disease was transplanted into H-2-compatible nude mice through the adoptive transfer of CD4+CD8- T cells, but not CD4-CD8+ T cells. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that sf/Y mice have an increased percentage of activated CD4+ T cells in their lymph nodes. In addition, there is an increase in the in vitro production of cytokines in the cultured splenocytes of CD8-less, but not CD4-less, scurfy mice. These data suggest that CD4+ T cells are critical mediators of disease in the scurfy mouse.

  1. Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2014-02-10

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

  2. Quantifying Susceptibility of CD4+ Stem Memory T-Cells to Infection by Laboratory Adapted and Clinical HIV-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs. PMID:24517971

  3. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  4. Influence of phthiocerol dimycocerosate on CD4(+) T cell priming and persistence during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rachel; Nambiar, Jonathan K; Leotta, Lisa; Counoupas, Claudio; Britton, Warwick J; Triccas, James A

    2016-07-01

    The characterisation of mycobacterial factors that influence or modulate the host immune response may aid the development of more efficacious TB vaccines. We have previously reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis deficient in export of Phthiocerol Dimycocerosates (DIM) (MT103(ΔdrrC)) is more attenuated than wild type M. tuberculosis and provides sustained protective immunity compared to the existing BCG vaccine. Here we sought to define the correlates of immunity associated with DIM deficiency by assessing the impact of MT103(ΔdrrC) delivery on antigen presenting cell (APC) function and the generation of CD4(+) T cell antigen-specific immunity. MT103(ΔdrrC) was a potent activator of bone marrow derived dendritic cells, inducing significantly greater expression of CD86 and IL-12p40 compared to BCG or the MT103 parental strain. This translated to an increased ability to initiate early in vivo priming of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells compared to BCG with enhanced release of IFN-γ and TNF upon antigen-restimulation. The heightened immunity induced by MT103(ΔdrrC) correlated with greater persistence within the spleen compared to BCG, however both MT103(ΔdrrC) and BCG were undetectable in the lung at 70 days post-vaccination. In immunodeficient RAG (-/-) mice, MT103(ΔdrrC) was less virulent than the parental MT103 strain, yet MT103(ΔdrrC) infected mice succumbed more rapidly compared to BCG-infected animals. These results suggest that DIM translocation plays a role in APC stimulation and CD4(+) T cell activation during M. tuberculosis infection and highlights the potential of DIM-deficient strains as novel TB vaccine candidates.

  5. IL-10 within the CNS is necessary for CD4+ T cells to mediate neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Junping; Wainwright, Derek A.; Mesnard, Nichole A.; Serpe, Craig J.; Sanders, Virginia M.; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that immunodeficient mice exhibit significant facial motoneuron (FMN) loss compared to wild-type (WT) mice after a facial nerve axotomy. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is known as a regulatory cytokine that plays an important role in maintaining the anti-inflammatory environment within the central nervous system (CNS). IL-10 is produced by a number of different cells, including Th2 cells, and may exert an anti-apoptotic action on neurons directly. In the present study, the role of IL-10 in mediating neuroprotection following a facial nerve axotomy model in Rag2- and IL-10-deficient mice was investigated. Results indicate that IL-10 is neuroprotective, but only in the presence of CD4+ T cells that are not the requisite source of IL-10. In addition, using real-time PCR analysis of laser microdissected brainstem sections, results show that IL-10 mRNA is constitutively expressed in the facial nucleus and that a transient, significant reduction of IL-10 mRNA occurs following axotomy under immunodeficient conditions. Dual labeling immunofluorescence data show, unexpectedly, that the IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) is constitutively expressed by facial motoneurons, but is selectively induced in astrocytes within the facial nucleus after axotomy. Thus, a non-CD4+ T cell source of IL-10 is necessary for modulating both glial and neuronal events that mediate neuroprotection of injured motoneurons, but only with the cooperation of CD4+ T cells, providing an avenue of novel investigation into therapeutic approaches to prevent or reverse motoneuron diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). PMID:20723599

  6. IL-2 contributes to maintaining a balance between CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and effector CD4+ T cells required for immune control of blood-stage malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Floriana; St-Pierre, Jessica; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A; Stevenson, Mary M

    2011-04-15

    To investigate the role of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells in blood-stage malaria, we compared Plasmodium chabaudi AS infection in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 and transgenic mice overexpressing the transcription factor Foxp3 (Foxp3Tg) and observed that Foxp3Tg mice experienced lethal infection and deficient malaria-specific immune responses. Adoptive transfer of total CD4(+) T cells from Foxp3Tg mice or CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from WT mice to naive WT recipients confirmed that high numbers of Treg cells compromised immune control of malaria. Transfer of GFP(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells to naive WT recipients together with immunohistochemical staining of spleens from infected WT mice demonstrated that Foxp3(+) Treg cells localized in the T cell area of the spleen. Determination of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell responses in the spleen of infected WT mice revealed a significant but transient increase in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells early in infection. This was followed by a significant and sustained decrease due to reduced proliferation and apoptosis of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Importantly, the kinetics of IL-2 secretion by effector CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T cells coincided with changes in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) cells and the differentiation of CD4(+)T-bet(+)IFN-γ(+) cells required for immune control of infection. Administration of the IL-2/anti-IL-2 mAb (clone JES6-1) complex to infected WT mice increased the severity of P. chabaudi AS infection and promoted expansion of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the ability to control and eliminate P. chabaudi AS infection is due to a tight balance between natural Treg cells and effector CD4(+) Th1 cells, a balance regulated in part by IL-2.

  7. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  8. Chemokine Transfer by Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Contributes to the Recruitment of CD4+ T Cells into the Murine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Katrin; Erben, Ulrike; Kruse, Nils; Wechsung, Katja; Schumann, Michael; Klugewitz, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion and transmigration are central features governing immune surveillance and inflammatory reactions in body tissues. Within the liver sinusoids, chemokines initiate the first crucial step of T-cell migration into the hepatic tissue. We studied molecular mechanisms involved in endothelial chemokine supply during hepatic immune surveillance and liver inflammation and their impact on the recruitment of CD4+ T cells into the liver. In the murine model of Concanavalin A-induced T cell-mediated hepatitis, we showed that hepatic expression of the inflammatory CXC chemokine ligands (CXCL)9 and CXCL10 strongly increased whereas homeostatic CXCL12 significantly decreased. Consistently, CD4+ T cells expressing the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)3 accumulated within the inflamed liver tissue. In histology, CXCL9 was associated with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) which represent the first contact site for T-cell immigration into the liver. LSEC actively transferred basolaterally internalized CXCL12, CXCL9 and CXCL10 via clathrin-coated vesicles to CD4+ T cells leading to enhanced transmigration of CXCR4+ total CD4+ T cells and CXCR3+ effector/memory CD4+ T cells, respectively in vitro. LSEC-expressed CXCR4 mediated CXCL12 transport and blockage of endothelial CXCR4 inhibited CXCL12-dependent CD4+ T-cell transmigration. In contrast, CXCR3 was not involved in the endothelial transport of its ligands CXCL9 and CXCL10. The clathrin-specific inhibitor chlorpromazine blocked endothelial chemokine internalization and CD4+ T-cell transmigration in vitro as well as migration of CD4+ T cells into the inflamed liver in vivo. Moreover, hepatic accumulation of CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells during T cell-mediated hepatitis was strongly reduced after administration of chlorpromazine. These data demonstrate that LSEC actively provide perivascularly expressed homeostatic and inflammatory chemokines by CXCR4- and clathrin-dependent intracellular transport mechanisms thereby

  9. Short Communication: Preferential Killing of HIV Latently Infected CD4(+) T Cells by MALT1 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei; He, Hui; Gong, Leyi; Fu, Mingui; Wang, Tony T

    2016-02-01

    We report that the addition of an host paracaspase MALT1 inhibitor, MI-2, to HIV latently infected ACH-2, Jurkat E4, and J-LAT cells accelerated cell death in the presence of cell stimuli or the protein kinase C agonist, bryostatin 1. MI-2-mediated cell death correlated with the induction of the cellular RNase MCPIP1 and requires the presence of viral component(s). Altogether, the combination of MI-2 and bryostatin 1 displays selective killing of HIV latently infected CD4(+) T cells.

  10. Short Communication: Preferential Killing of HIV Latently Infected CD4+ T Cells by MALT1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; He, Hui; Gong, Leyi; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report that the addition of an host paracaspase MALT1 inhibitor, MI-2, to HIV latently infected ACH-2, Jurkat E4, and J-LAT cells accelerated cell death in the presence of cell stimuli or the protein kinase C agonist, bryostatin 1. MI-2-mediated cell death correlated with the induction of the cellular RNase MCPIP1 and requires the presence of viral component(s). Altogether, the combination of MI-2 and bryostatin 1 displays selective killing of HIV latently infected CD4+ T cells. PMID:26728103

  11. Isolation of a New Herpesvirus from Human CD4+ T Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    herpes simplex virus, Epstein- cytes were ɘ.1% as determined by staining with nonspecificBarr virus, varicella- zoster virus, and human cytomegalovi...antibody: HSV, herpes simplex virus. EBV, Epstein-Barr virus; VZV, varicella- zoster virus; The publication costs of this article were defrayed in part...herpesvirus 6?humn herp eviru8S/ -CD4+ human T cellsd latency ,T cell activation4~ virus laec 1 .1. ’~ Y ’ ") X)I- 19. ABSTRACT (Continue an peyerre if

  12. HIV persists in CCR6+CD4+ T cells from colon and blood during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Annie; Wiche Salinas, Tomas Raul; Planas, Delphine; Wacleche, Vanessa S.; Zhang, Yuwei; Fromentin, Rémi; Chomont, Nicolas; Cohen, Éric A.; Shacklett, Barbara; Mehraj, Vikram; Ghali, Maged P.; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Ancuta, Petronela

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this article is to investigate the contribution of colon and blood CD4+ T-cell subsets expressing the chemokine receptor CCR6 to HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy. Design: Matched sigmoid biopsies and blood samples (n = 13) as well as leukapheresis (n = 20) were collected from chronically HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy. Subsets of CD4+ T cells with distinct differentiation/polarization profiles were identified using surface markers as follows: memory (TM, CD45RA−), central memory (TCM; CD45RA−CCR7+), effector (TEM/TM; CD45RA−CCR7−), Th17 (CCR6+CCR4+), Th1Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3+), Th1 (CCR6−CXCR3+), and Th2 (CCR6−CCR4+). Methods: We used polychromatic flow cytometry for cell sorting, nested real-time PCR for HIV DNA quantification, ELISA and flow cytometry for HIV p24 quantification. HIV reactivation was induced by TCR triggering in the presence/absence of all-trans retinoic acid. Results: Compared with blood, the frequency of CCR6+ TM was higher in the colon. In both colon and blood compartments, CCR6+ TM were significantly enriched in HIV DNA when compared with their CCR6− counterparts (n = 13). In blood, integrated HIV DNA levels were significantly enriched in CCR6+ versus CCR6− TCM of four of five individuals and CCR6+ versus CCR6− TEM of three of five individuals. Among blood TCM, Th17 and Th1Th17 contributed the most to the pool of cells harboring integrated HIV DNA despite their reduced frequency compared with Th2, which were infected the least. HIV reactivation was induced by TCR triggering and/or retinoic acid exposure at higher levels in CCR6+ versus CCR6− TM, TCM, and TEM. Conclusion: CCR6 is a marker for colon and blood CD4+ T cells enriched for replication-competent HIV DNA. Novel eradication strategies should target HIV persistence in CCR6+CD4+ T cells from various anatomic sites. PMID:27835617

  13. Computational Analysis of the Model Describing HIV Infection of CD4+T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Atangana, Abdon

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the model underpinning the description of the spread of HIV infection of CD4+T cells is examined in detail in this work. Investigations of the disease free and endemic equilibrium are done using the method of Jacobian matrix. An iteration technique, namely, the homotopy decomposition method (HDM), is implemented to give an approximate solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equation systems. The technique is described and illustrated with numerical examples. The approximated solution obtained via HDM is compared with those obtained via other methods to prove the trustworthiness of HDM. Moreover, the lessening and simplicity in calculations furnish HDM with a broader applicability. PMID:25136605

  14. Dopamine Receptor D3 Signaling on CD4+ T Cells Favors Th1- and Th17-Mediated Immunity.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Francisco; Prado, Carolina; González, Hugo; Franz, Dafne; Osorio-Barrios, Francisco; Osorio, Fabiola; Ugalde, Valentina; Lopez, Ernesto; Elgueta, Daniela; Figueroa, Alicia; Lladser, Alvaro; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2016-05-15

    Dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3) expressed on CD4(+) T cells is required to promote neuroinflammation in a murine model of Parkinson's disease. However, how DRD3 signaling affects T cell-mediated immunity remains unknown. In this study, we report that TCR stimulation on mouse CD4(+) T cells induces DRD3 expression, regardless of the lineage specification. Importantly, functional analyses performed in vivo using adoptive transfer of OVA-specific OT-II cells into wild-type recipients show that DRD3 deficiency in CD4(+) T cells results in attenuated differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells toward the Th1 phenotype, exacerbated generation of Th2 cells, and unaltered Th17 differentiation. The reciprocal regulatory effect of DRD3 signaling in CD4(+) T cells favoring Th1 generation and impairing the acquisition of Th2 phenotype was also reproduced using in vitro approaches. Mechanistic analysis indicates that DRD3 signaling evokes suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 expression, a negative regulator of Th2 development, which indirectly favors acquisition of Th1 phenotype. Accordingly, DRD3 deficiency results in exacerbated eosinophil infiltration into the airways of mice undergoing house dust mite-induced allergic response. Interestingly, our results show that, upon chronic inflammatory colitis induced by transfer of naive CD4(+) T cells into lymphopenic recipients, DRD3 deficiency not only affects Th1 response, but also the frequency of Th17 cells, suggesting that DRD3 signaling also contributes to Th17 expansion under chronic inflammatory conditions. In conclusion, our findings indicate that DRD3-mediated signaling in CD4(+) T cells plays a crucial role in the balance of effector lineages, favoring the inflammatory potential of CD4(+) T cells.

  15. The impact of Nucleofection® on the activation state of primary human CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingce; Ma, Zhengyu; Selliah, Nithianandan; Weiss, Greta; Genin, Anna; Finkel, Terri H.; Cron, Randy Q.

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer into primary human CD4 T lymphocytes is a critical tool in studying the mechanism of T cell-dependent immune responses and human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection. Nucleofection® is an electroporation technique that allows efficient gene transfer into primary human CD4 T cells that are notoriously resistant to traditional electroporation. Despite its popularity in immunological research, careful characterization of its impact on the physiology of CD4 T cells has not been documented. Herein, using freshly-isolated primary human CD4 T cells, we examine the effects of Nucleofection® on CD4 T cell morphology, intracellular calcium levels, cell surface activation markers, and transcriptional activity. We find that immediately after Nucleofection®, CD4 T cells undergo dramatic morphological changes characterized by wrinkled and dilated plasma membranes before recovering 1 hour later. The intracellular calcium level also increases after Nucleofection®, peaking after 1 hour before recovering 8 hours post transfection. Moreover, Nucleofection® leads to increased expression of T cell activation markers, CD154 and CD69, for more than 24 hours, and enhances the activation effects of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation. In addition, transcriptional activity is increased in the first 24 hours after Nucleofection®, even in the absence of exogenous stimuli. Therefore, Nucleofection® significantly alters the activation state of primary human CD4 T cells. The effect of transferred gene products on CD4 T cell function by Nucleofection® should be assessed after sufficient resting time post transfection or analyzed in light of the activation caveats mentioned above. PMID:24910411

  16. Lack of IL-15 results in the suboptimal priming of CD4+ T cell response against an intracellular parasite.

    PubMed

    Combe, Crescent L; Moretto, Magali M; Schwartzman, Joseph D; Gigley, Jason P; Bzik, David J; Khan, Imtiaz A

    2006-04-25

    IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ T cells, although important for protection against acute Toxoplasma gondii infection, can cause gut pathology, which may prove to be detrimental for host survival. Here we show that mice lacking IL-15 gene develop a down-regulated IFN-gamma-producing CD4+ T cell response against the parasite, which leads to a reduction in gut necrosis and increased level of survival against infection. Moreover, transfer of immune CD4+ T cells from WT to IL-15-/- mice reversed inhibition of gut pathology and caused mortality equivalent to levels of parental WT mice. Down-regulated CD4+ T cell response in the absence of IL-15, manifested as reduced antigen-specific proliferation, was due to defective priming of the T cell subset by dendritic cells (DCs) of these animals. When stimulated with antigen-pulsed DCs from WT mice, CD4+ T cells from IL-15-/- mice were primed optimally, and robust proliferation of these cells was observed. A defect in the DCs of knockout mice was further confirmed by their reduced ability to produce IL-12 upon stimulation with Toxoplasma lysate antigen. Addition of exogenous IL-15 to DC cultures from knockout mice led to increased IL-12 production by these cells and restored their ability to prime an optimal parasite-specific CD4+ T cell response. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the role of IL-15 in the development of CD4+ T cell immunity against an intracellular pathogen. Furthermore, based on these observations, targeting of IL-15 should have a beneficial effect on individuals suffering from CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  17. GM-CSF Production Allows the Identification of Immunoprevalent Antigens Recognized by Human CD4+ T Cells Following Smallpox Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Judkowski, Valeria; Bunying, Alcinette; Ge, Feng; Appel, Jon R.; Law, Kingyee; Sharma, Atima; Raja- Gabaglia, Claudia; Norori, Patricia; Santos, Radleigh G.; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Slifka, Mark K.; Douek, Daniel C.; Graham, Barney S.; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2011-01-01

    The threat of bioterrorism with smallpox and the broad use of vaccinia vectors for other vaccines have led to the resurgence in the study of vaccinia immunological memory. The importance of the role of CD4+ T cells in the control of vaccinia infection is well known. However, more CD8+ than CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by human subjects immunized with vaccinia virus have been reported. This could be, in part, due to the fact that most of the studies that have identified human CD4+ specific protein-derived fragments or peptides have used IFN-γ production to evaluate vaccinia specific T cell responses. Based on these findings, we reasoned that analyzing a large panel of cytokines would permit us to generate a more complete analysis of the CD4 T cell responses. The results presented provide clear evidence that TNF-α is an excellent readout of vaccinia specificity and that other cytokines such as GM-CSF can be used to evaluate the reactivity of CD4+ T cells in response to vaccinia antigens. Furthermore, using these cytokines as readout of vaccinia specificity, we present the identification of novel peptides from immunoprevalent vaccinia proteins recognized by CD4+ T cells derived from smallpox vaccinated human subjects. In conclusion, we describe a “T cell–driven” methodology that can be implemented to determine the specificity of the T cell response upon vaccination or infection. Together, the single pathogen in vitro stimulation, the selection of CD4+ T cells specific to the pathogen by limiting dilution, the evaluation of pathogen specificity by detecting multiple cytokines, and the screening of the clones with synthetic combinatorial libraries, constitutes a novel and valuable approach for the elucidation of human CD4+ T cell specificity in response to large pathogens. PMID:21931646

  18. microRNA 184 regulates expression of NFAT1 in umbilical cord blood CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, R. Patrick; Lesniewski, Mathew L.; Haviernik, Peter; Kadereit, Suzanne; Leahy, Patrick; Greco, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    The reduced expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells-1 (NFAT1) protein in umbilical cord blood (UCB)–derived CD4+ T cells and the corresponding reduction in inflammatory cytokine secretion after stimulation in part underlies their phenotypic differences from adult blood (AB) CD4+ T cells. This muted response may contribute to the lower incidence and severity of high-grade acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) exhibited by UCB grafts. Here we provide evidence that a specific microRNA, miR-184, inhibits NFAT1 protein expression elicited by UCB CD4+ T cells. Endogenous expression of miR-184 in UCB is 58.4-fold higher compared with AB CD4+ T cells, and miR-184 blocks production of NFAT1 protein through its complementary target sequence on the NFATc2 mRNA without transcript degradation. Furthermore, its negative effects on NFAT1 protein and downstream interleukin-2 (IL-2) transcription are reversed through antisense blocking in UCB and can be replicated via exogenous transfection of precursor miR-184 into AB CD4+ T cells. Our findings reveal a previously uncharacterized role for miR-184 in UCB CD4+ T cells and a novel function for microRNA in the early adaptive immune response. PMID:19286996

  19. Next-Generation Sequencing Analysis of Long Noncoding RNAs in CD4+ T Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ranzani, Valeria; Arrigoni, Alberto; Rossetti, Grazisa; Panzeri, Ilaria; Abrignani, Sergio; Bonnal, Raoul J P; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing approaches, in particular RNA-seq, provide a genome-wide expression profiling allowing the identification of novel and rare transcripts such as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). Many RNA-seq studies have now been performed aimed at the characterization of lncRNAs and their possible involvement in cell development and differentiation in different organisms, cell types, and tissues. The adaptive immune system is an extraordinary context for the study of the role of lncRNAs in differentiation. Indeed lncRNAs seem to be key drivers in governing flexibility and plasticity of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell, together with lineage-specific transcription factors and cytokines, acting as fine-tuners of fate choices in T cell differentiation.We describe here a pipeline for the identification of lncRNAs starting from RNA-Seq raw data.

  20. HIV 2-Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA is Stable in Primary CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Matthew J; Graf, Erin H.; O’Doherty, Una

    2013-01-01

    Treatment resistant latent reservoirs remain a barrier to curing HIV, but the maintenance and properties of these reservoirs are not completely understood. 2-LTR circular HIV DNA has been used to assess ongoing viral replication in HAART treated patients. However, the half-life of this DNA form is still debated with conflicting in vivo and in vitro data. Prior in vitro studies have focused on cell lines or short lived activated cells in cultures of brief duration, while in vivo studies have the added complications of cell migration, division, and death. Therefore, we monitored the stability of 2-LTR circles in primary CD4+T cells in a month long culture and compared it to the stability of integrated HIV DNA and T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), another circular DNA form that is thought to be stable. We found that 2-LTRs, along with TRECs, were stable, suggesting 2-LTRs do not necessarily indicate ongoing replication. PMID:23537959

  1. HLA class II tetramers: tools for direct analysis of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Nepom, Gerald T; Buckner, Jane H; Novak, Erik J; Reichstetter, Sandra; Reijonen, Helena; Gebe, John; Wang, Rongfang; Swanson, Eric; Kwok, William W

    2002-01-01

    Immunotherapies for human autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases are proliferating rapidly, and with these changes comes the opportunity to monitor patients for immune responses to therapy based on early surrogate markers for clinical responses. Class II tetramers have the potential to serve as these sorts of markers for immune monitoring, and thereby assist with patient management, therapy selection, and improved outcomes. However, important issues of TCR avidity require resolution, because much is still unknown regarding location, quantitation, and characterization of the human T cell response. Opportunities for application of tetramer technologies in the near future will enable both clinical progress and the development of new insights into human CD4+ T cell biology in vivo.

  2. Macrophage infection via selective capture of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Amy E; Russell, Rebecca A; Duncan, Christopher J A; Moore, Michael D; Willberg, Christian B; Pablos, Jose L; Finzi, Andrés; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Groot, Fedde; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-12-10

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by forming a viral reservoir and mediating neurological disorders. Cell-free HIV-1 infection of macrophages is inefficient, in part due to low plasma membrane expression of viral entry receptors. We find that macrophages selectively capture and engulf HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells leading to efficient macrophage infection. Infected T cells, both healthy and dead or dying, were taken up through viral envelope glycoprotein-receptor-independent interactions, implying a mechanism distinct from conventional virological synapse formation. Macrophages infected by this cell-to-cell route were highly permissive for both CCR5-using macrophage-tropic and otherwise weakly macrophage-tropic transmitted/founder viruses but restrictive for nonmacrophage-tropic CXCR4-using virus. These results have implications for establishment of the macrophage reservoir and HIV-1 dissemination in vivo.

  3. CD4+CXCR3+ T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells drive accelerated atherosclerosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Clement, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Escoubet, Brigitte; Guedj, Kevin; Chauveheid, Marie-Paule; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Nicoletti, Antonino; Papo, Thomas; Sacre, Karim

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to accelerated atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Noteworthy, accelerated atherosclerosis in SLE patients appears to be independant of classical Framingham risk factors. This suggests that aggravated atherosclerosis in SLE patients may be a result of increased inflammation and altered immune responses. However, the mechanisms that mediate the acceleration of atherosclerosis in SLE remain elusive. Based on experimental data which includes both humans (SLE patients and control subjects) and rodents (ApoE-/- mice), we herein propose a multi-step model in which the immune dysfunction associated with SLE (i.e. high level of IFN-α production by TLR 9-stimulated pDCs) is associated with, first, an increased frequency of circulating pro inflammatory CD4+CXCR3+ T cells; second, an increased production of CXCR3 ligands by endothelial cells; third, an increased recruitment of pro-inflammatory CD4+CXCR3+ T cells into the arterial wall, and fourth, the development of atherosclerosis. In showing how SLE may promote accelerated atherosclerosis, our model also points to hypotheses for potential interventions, such as pDCs-targeted therapy, that might be studied in the future.

  4. Identification of tonsillar CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells as naturally occurring IL-10-producing regulatory T cells in human lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, Shuji; Nakachi, Shinichiro; Okamura, Tomohisa; Tsuchida, Yumi; Kato, Rika; Shoda, Hirofumi; Furukawa, Asayo; Kitahara, Nobuo; Kondo, Kenji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Fujio, Keishi

    2017-01-01

    IL-10-producing regulatory T cells (IL-10-producing Tregs) are one of the regulatory T cell subsets characterized by the production of high amounts of IL-10, the lack of FOXP3 expression and the strong immunosuppressive capabilities. IL-10-producing Tregs have been primarily reported as induced populations thus far, in part because identifying naturally occurring IL-10-producing Tregs was difficult due to the lack of definitive surface markers. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a CD4 homologue that we have identified as being expressed on IL-10 producing Tregs. In human PBMC, LAG3 combined with CD49b efficiently identifies IL-10-producing Tregs. However, naturally occurring IL-10-producing Tregs in human secondary lymphoid tissue have not been described. In this report, we identified CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells in human tonsil. This T cell subset produced high amounts of IL-10 and expressed low levels of FOXP3. Surface markers and microarray analysis revealed that this is a distinct tonsillar CD4(+) T cell subset. CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells expressed interleukin 10 (IL10), PR/SET domain 1 (PRDM1), and CD274 at high levels and chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5) at low levels. CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells suppressed antibody production more efficiently than CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells induced B cell apoptosis. Moreover, analysis of humanized mice revealed that this cell subset suppressed a graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) reaction in vivo. Our study reveals the existence of naturally occurring IL-10-producing Tregs in human secondary lymphoid tissue and their function in immune regulation.

  5. Circulating rotavirus-specific T cells have a poor functional profile

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Miguel; Herrera, Daniel; Jácome, María Fernanda; Mesa, Martha C.; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Guzmán, Carolina; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2014-11-15

    Frequencies of circulating T cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, and percentages of T cells proliferating after stimulation with rotavirus (RV), tetanus toxoid, and influenza were evaluated in PBMC derived from healthy adults and children. In addition, the potential anergic state of RV-specific T cells was analyzed by stimulation of PBMC with RV antigen in the presence of three anergy inhibitors (rIL-2, rIL-12, or DGKα-i). The quality and magnitude of RV-T cell responses were significantly lower than those of tetanus toxoid and influenza antigens. RV-CD4 T cell response was enriched in monofunctional IFN-γ{sup +} cells, while influenza-CD4 and tetanus toxoid-CD4 T cell responses were enriched in multifunctional T cells. Moreover, rIL-2 – unlike rIL-12 or DGKα-i – increased the frequencies of RV-CD4 TNF-α{sup +}, CD4 IFN-γ{sup +}, and CD8 IFN-γ{sup +} cells. Thus, circulating RV-T cells seem to have a relatively poor functional profile that may be partially reversed in vitro by the addition of rIL-2. - Highlights: • The quality and magnitude of circulating RV-T cell responses are relatively poor. • Circulating RV-CD4 T cells are enriched in monofunctional IFN-γ+ cells. • Treatment with rIL-2 increased the frequencies of cytokine secreting RV-T cells.

  6. Detection of autoreactive CD4 T cells using major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tetramers are useful tools to enumerate the frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. However, unlike CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells - especially self-reactive cells - are challenging to detect with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II tetramers because of low frequencies and low affinities of their T cell receptors to MHC-peptide complexes. Here, we report the use of fluorescent multimers, designated MHC dextramers that contain a large number of peptide-MHC complexes per reagent. Results The utility of MHC dextramers was evaluated in three autoimmune disease models: 1) proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in SJL/J (H-2s) mice; 2) myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) 35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57Bl/6 (H-2b) mice; and 3) cardiac myosin heavy chain (Myhc)-α 334-352-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis in A/J (H-2a) mice. Flow cytometrically, we demonstrate that IAs/PLP 139-151, IAb/MOG 35-55 and IAk/Myhc-α 334-352 dextramers detect the antigen-sensitized cells with specificity, and with a detection sensitivity significantly higher than that achieved with conventional tetramers. Furthermore, we show that binding of dextramers, but not tetramers, is less dependent on the activation status of cells, permitting enumeration of antigen-specific cells ex vivo. Conclusions The data suggest that MHC dextramers are useful tools to track the generation and functionalities of self-reactive CD4 cells in various experimental systems. PMID:21767394

  7. Intrahepatic CD4 T-Cell apoptosis is related to METAVIR score in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Roger, P-M; Chaillou, S; Breittmayer, J-P; Dahman, M; St Paul, M-C; Chevallier, P; Benzaken, S; Ticchioni, M; Bernard, A; Dellamonica, P; Tran, A

    2005-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to liver injury, which is thought to be immune-mediated. Apoptosis of hepatic T cells could influence histological damage. We quantified peripheral and intrahepatic T-cell apoptosis in 28 patients with chronic hepatitis C by using cytofluorometric techniques. METAVIR score and HCV plasma viral load were determined. Six liver biopsies, obtained from controls without chronic hepatitis during hepatobiliary surgery, served as controls. In patients, liver T-cell apoptosis was upregulated compared to peripheral T cells: 35 versus 7% for CD4+ and 56 versus 13% for CD8+ T cells (P < 0.001). Liver T-cell apoptosis levels from patients were increased compared to controls for both CD4+ (P = 0.041) and CD8+ T cells (P = 0.007). Nine patients exhibiting METAVIR scores A and F < or = 1 showed higher intrahepatic CD4+ T-cell apoptosis compared to the 19 patients with a higher METAVIR score (P = 0.001) and both histological activity and fibrosis were related to apoptosis level. There was also an inverse relationship between the level of intrahepatic CD8+ T-cell apoptosis and serum transaminase activity (P = 0.023). Our study shows immune compartmentalization, suggesting that the study of peripheral blood lymphocytes may not be fully relevant to the pathophysiology of HCV hepatitis, and that the severity of liver injury is inversely correlated with intrahepatic CD4+ T-cell apoptosis.

  8. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells eradicate myeloma cells genetically deficient in MHC class II display

    PubMed Central

    Tveita, Anders; Fauskanger, Marte; Bogen, Bjarne; Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells have been shown to reject tumor cells with no detectable expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II). However, under certain circumstances, induction of ectopic MHC II expression on tumor cells has been reported. To confirm that CD4+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity can be successful in the complete absence of antigen display on the tumor cells themselves, we eliminated MHC II on tumor cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Our results demonstrate that ablation of the relevant MHC II (I-Ed) in multiple myeloma cells (MOPC315) does not hinder rejection by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. These findings provide conclusive evidence that CD4+ T cells specific for tumor antigens can eliminate malignant cells in the absence of endogenous MHC class II expression on the tumor cells. This occurs through antigen uptake and indirect presentation on tumor-infiltrating macrophages. PMID:27626487

  9. Different competitive capacities of Stat4- and Stat6-deficient CD4+ T cells during lymphophenia-driven proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa; Borghans, José A M; Marquez, Maria-Elena; Garcia, Sylvie; Freitas, Antonio A

    2005-02-01

    The outcome of an immune response relies on the competitive capacities acquired through differentiation of CD4(+) T cells into Th1 or Th2 effector cells. Because Stat4 and Stat6 proteins are implicated in the Th1 vs Th2 generation and maintenance, respectively, we compare in this study the kinetics of Stat4(-/-) and Stat6(-/-) CD4(+) T cells during competitive bone marrow reconstitution and lymphopenia-driven proliferation. After bone marrow transplantation, both populations reconstitute the peripheral T cell pools equally well. After transfer into lymphopenic hosts, wild-type and Stat6(-/-) CD4(+) T cells show a proliferation advantage, which is early associated with the expression of an active phospho-Stat4 and the down-regulation of Stat6. Despite these differences, Stat4- and Stat6-deficient T cells reach similar steady state numbers. However, when both Stat4(-/-) and Stat6(-/-) CD4(+) T cells are coinjected into the same hosts, the Stat6(-/-) cells become dominant and out-compete Stat4(-/-) cells. These findings suggest that cell activation, through the Stat4 pathway and the down-regulation of Stat6, confers to pro-Th1 T cells a slight proliferation advantage that in a competitive situation has major late repercussions, because it modifies the final homeostatic equilibrium of the populations and favors the establishment of Th1 CD4(+) T cell dominance.

  10. Distinct epigenomes in CD4+ T cells of newborns, middle-ages and centenarians

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Qin, Jian; Yin, Hanqi; Tan, Yixin; Liao, Wei; Liu, Qian; Luo, Shuangyan; He, Min; Liang, Gongping; Shi, Yajing; Zhang, Qing; Cai, Wenjun; Yin, Guangliang; Zhou, Yin; Wang, Jing; Li, Mengying; Huang, Yi; Liu, Aiyun; Wu, Haijing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-01-01

    Age-related variations in genes and microRNAs expression and DNA methylation have been reported respectively; however, their interactions during aging are unclear. We therefore investigated alterations in the transcriptomes, miRNAomes and DNA methylomes in the same CD4+T cells from newborn (NB), middle-aged (MA) and long-lived (LL) individuals to elucidate the molecular changes and their interactions. A total 659 genes showed significantly expression changes across NB, MA and LL individuals, in which we identified four age-related co-expression modules with three hub networks of co-expressed genes and non-coding RNAs. Moreover, we identified 9835 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) including 7015 hypermethylated and 2820 hypomethylated DMRs in the NB compared with the MA, and 12,362 DMRs including 4809 hypermethylated and 7553 hypomethylated DMRs in the MA compared with the LL. The integrated analysis revealed a potential relationship between genes transcription and DNA methylation for many age- or immune-related genes, suggesting that DNA methylation-dependent transcription regulation is involved in development and functions of T cells during aging. Our results reveals age-related transcription and methylation changes and their interactions in human T cells from the cradle to the grave. Longitudinal work is required to establish the relationship between identified age-associated genes/DNA methylation and T cells aging phenotypes. PMID:27917918

  11. Immunostimulatory Effects of Melphalan and Usefulness in Adoptive Cell Therapy with Antitumor CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuczma, Michal; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The alkylating agent melphalan is used in the treatment of hematological malignancies, especially multiple myeloma. In the past, the usefulness of melphalan has been solely attributed to its cytotoxicity on fast-growing cancerous cells. Although the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan were suggested many years ago, only recently has this aspect of melphalan’s activity begun to be elucidated at the molecular level. Emerging evidence indicates that melphalan can foster an immunogenic microenvironment by inducing immunogenic cell death (ICD) as characterized by membrane translocation of endoplasmic reticulum protein calreticulin (CRT) and by release of chromatin-binding protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, the lympho-depletive effect of melphalan can induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, deplete regulatory T cells, and create space to facilitate the expansion of infused tumor-reactive T cells. These features suggest that melphalan can be used as a preparative chemotherapy for adoptive T-cell therapy. This notion is supported by our recent work demonstrating that the combination of melphalan and adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive CD4+ T cells can mediate potent antitumor effects in animal models. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding and utilizing the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan. PMID:27910767

  12. Virus-specific CD4+ memory phenotype T cells are abundant in unexposed adults

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; Kidd, Brian A.; Han, Arnold; Kotzin, Jonathan J.; Davis, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    While T cell memory is generally thought to require direct antigen exposure, we find an abundance of memory phenotype cells (20–90%, averaging over 50%) of CD4+ T cells specific for viral antigens in adults that have never been infected. These cells express the appropriate memory markers and genes, rapidly produce cytokines, and have clonally expanded. This contrasts with newborns where the same T cell receptor (TCR) specificities are almost entirely naïve, which may explain the vulnerability of young children to infections. One mechanism for this phenomenon is TCR cross-reactivity to environmental antigens and in support of this we find extensive cross-recognition by HIV-1 and influenza-reactive T lymphocytes to other microbial peptides and the expansion of one of these following influenza vaccination. Thus the presence of these memory phenotype T cells has significant implications for immunity to novel pathogens, child and adult health, and the influence of pathogen-rich versus hygienic environments. PMID:23395677

  13. Sequential Dysfunction and Progressive Depletion of Candida albicans-Specific CD4 T Cell Response in HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengliang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Auclair, Sarah; Ferguson, Monique; Sun, Jiaren; Soong, Lynn; Hou, Wei; Redfield, Robert R.; Birx, Deborah L.; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Hu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Loss of immune control over opportunistic infections can occur at different stages of HIV-1 (HIV) disease, among which mucosal candidiasis caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) is one of the early and common manifestations in HIV-infected human subjects. The underlying immunological basis is not well defined. We have previously shown that compared to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 cells, C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells are highly permissive to HIV in vitro. Here, based on an antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV infection cohort (RV21), we investigated longitudinally the impact of HIV on C. albicans- and CMV-specific CD4 T-cell immunity in vivo. We found a sequential dysfunction and preferential depletion for C. albicans-specific CD4 T cell response during progressive HIV infection. Compared to Th1 (IFN-γ, MIP-1β) functional subsets, the Th17 functional subsets (IL-17, IL-22) of C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more permissive to HIV in vitro and impaired earlier in HIV-infected subjects. Infection history analysis showed that C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more susceptible to HIV in vivo, harboring modestly but significantly higher levels of HIV DNA, than CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected individuals with ongoing CD4 depletion demonstrated that C. albicans-specific CD4 T-cell response was preferentially and progressively depleted. Taken together, these data suggest a potential mechanism for earlier loss of immune control over mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients and provide new insights into pathogen-specific immune failure in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:27280548

  14. CD4 T-Cell Responses in Primary HIV Infection: Interrelationship with Immune Activation and Virus Burden

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Mathieu F.; Didier, Céline; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Manea, Maria E.; Campa, Pauline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Weiss, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Early events during primary HIV infection (PHI) are thought to influence disease outcome. Although a growing body of evidence suggests a beneficial role of HIV-specific CD4 help in HIV infection, it is unclear how early viral replication, systemic immune activation, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) may shape CD4 T-cell responses during PHI, and whether HIV-specific CD4 responses contribute to the high immune activation observed in PHI. Twenty-seven patients with early PHI were included in a prospective longitudinal study and 12 of them received ART after enrollment. Fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used for measurement of ex vivo T-cell activation and of cytokine-producing CD4 T-cells following stimulation with PMA/ionomycin or HIV-1-gag-p24 antigen. Patients were segregated based on CD8 T-cell activation level (i.e., % HLA-DR+CD38+ CD8 T-cells) at baseline (BL). Patients with lower immune activation exhibited higher frequency of bulk CD4 T-cells producing IFN-γ or IL-17 and higher effector-to-regulatory cell ratios. No differences were found in HIV-specific CD4 T-cell frequencies. In contrast, segregation of patients based on plasma viral load (pVL) revealed that patients with higher pVL showed higher cytokine-producing HIV-specific CD4 responses. Of note, the frequency of IFN-γ+ HIV-specific CD4 T cells significantly diminished between BL and month 6 only in ART-treated patients. However, early treatment initiation was associated with better maintenance of HIV-specific IFN-γ+ CD4 T-cells. These data suggest that HIV-specific CD4 responses do not fuel systemic T-cell activation and are driven by viral replication but not able to contribute to its control in the early phase of infection. Moreover, our data also suggest a benefit of early treatment for the maintenance of HIV-specific CD4 T-cell help. PMID:27746782

  15. Dynamic Modulation of Expression of Lentiviral Restriction Factors in Primary CD4(+) T Cells following Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Rahmberg, Andrew R; Rajakumar, Premeela A; Billingsley, James M; Johnson, R Paul

    2017-04-01

    Although multiple restriction factors have been shown to inhibit HIV/SIV replication, little is known about their expression in vivo Expression of 45 confirmed and putative HIV/SIV restriction factors was analyzed in CD4(+) T cells from peripheral blood and the jejunum in rhesus macaques, revealing distinct expression patterns in naive and memory subsets. In both peripheral blood and the jejunum, memory CD4(+) T cells expressed higher levels of multiple restriction factors compared to naive cells. However, relative to their expression in peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells, jejunal CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells exhibited significantly lower expression of multiple restriction factors, including APOBEC3G, MX2, and TRIM25, which may contribute to the exquisite susceptibility of these cells to SIV infection. In vitro stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies or type I interferon resulted in upregulation of distinct subsets of multiple restriction factors. After infection of rhesus macaques with SIVmac239, the expression of most confirmed and putative restriction factors substantially increased in all CD4(+) T cell memory subsets at the peak of acute infection. Jejunal CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells exhibited the highest levels of SIV RNA, corresponding to the lower restriction factor expression in this subset relative to peripheral blood prior to infection. These results illustrate the dynamic modulation of confirmed and putative restriction factor expression by memory differentiation, stimulation, tissue microenvironment and SIV infection and suggest that differential expression of restriction factors may play a key role in modulating the susceptibility of different populations of CD4(+) T cells to lentiviral infection.IMPORTANCE Restriction factors are genes that have evolved to provide intrinsic defense against viruses. HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) target CD4(+) T cells. The baseline level of expression in vivo and degree to which expression of restriction factors is

  16. Evaluation of the impact of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles on the differentiation of human naive CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanxia; Bai, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Liping; Wang, Hai; Dong, Xia; Zhang, Hailing; Leng, Xigang

    2011-06-01

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most widely studied polymers in non-viral gene delivery since it is a cationic polysaccharide that forms nanoparticles with DNA and hence protects the DNA against digestion by DNase. However, the impact of CS/DNA nanoparticle on the immune system still remains poorly understood. Previous investigations did not found CS/DNA nanoparticles had any significant impact on the function of human and murine macrophages. To date, little is known about the interaction between CS/DNA nanoparticles and naive CD4+ T cells. This study was designed to investigate whether CS/DNA nanoparticles affect the initial differentiation direction of human naive CD4+ T cells. The indirect impact of CS/DNA nanoparticles on naive CD4+ T cell differentiation was investigated by incubating the nanoparticles with human macrophage THP-1 cells in one chamber of a transwell co-incubation system, with the enriched human naive CD4+ T cells being placed in the other chamber of the transwell. The nanoparticles were also co-incubated with the naive CD4+ T cells to explore their direct impact on naive CD4+ T cell differentiation by measuring the release of IL-4 and IFN-γ from the cells. It was demonstrated that CS/DNA nanoparticles induced slightly elevated production of IL-12 by THP-1 cells, possibly owing to the presence of CpG motifs in the plasmid. However, this macrophage stimulating activity was much less significant as compared with lipopolysaccharide and did not impact on the differentiation of the naive CD4+ T cells. It was also demonstrated that, when directly exposed to the naive CD4+ T cells, the nanoparticles induced neither the activation of the naive CD4+ T cells in the absence of recombinant cytokines (recombinant human IL-4 or IFN-γ) that induce naive CD4+ T cell polarization, nor any changes in the differentiation direction of naive CD4+ T cells in the presence of the corresponding cytokines.

  17. Antigen-Presenting Human γδ T Cells Promote Intestinal CD4(+) T Cell Expression of IL-22 and Mucosal Release of Calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christopher J; McCarthy, Neil E; Lindsay, James O; Stagg, Andrew J; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2017-03-22

    The cytokine IL-22 plays a critical role in mucosal barrier defense, but the mechanisms that promote IL-22 expression in the human intestine remain poorly understood. As human microbe-responsive Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells are abundant in the gut and recognize microbiota-associated metabolites, we assessed their potential to induce IL-22 expression by intestinal CD4(+) T cells. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with characteristics of APCs were generated from human blood and intestinal organ cultures, then cocultured with naive and memory CD4(+) T cells obtained from human blood or the colon. The potency of blood and intestinal γδ T-APCs was compared with that of monocytes and dendritic cells, by assessing CD4(+) T cell phenotypes and proliferation as well as cytokine and transcription factor profiles. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells in human blood, colon, and terminal ileum acquired APC functions upon microbial activation in the presence of microenvironmental signals including IL-15, and were capable of polarizing both blood and colonic CD4(+) T cells toward distinct effector fates. Unlike monocytes or dendritic cells, gut-homing γδ T-APCs employed an IL-6 independent mechanism to stimulate CD4(+) T cell expression of IL-22 without upregulating IL-17. In human intestinal organ cultures, microbial activation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells promoted mucosal secretion of IL-22 and ICOSL/TNF-α-dependent release of the IL-22 inducible antimicrobial protein calprotectin without modulating IL-17 expression. In conclusion, human γδ T-APCs stimulate CD4(+) T cell responses distinct from those induced by myeloid APCs to promote local barrier defense via mucosal release of IL-22 and calprotectin. Targeting of γδ T-APC functions may lead to the development of novel gut-directed immunotherapies and vaccines.

  18. Kynurenine Reduces Memory CD4 T-Cell Survival by Interfering with Interleukin-2 Signaling Early during HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dagenais-Lussier, Xavier; Aounallah, Mouna; Mehraj, Vikram; El-Far, Mohamed; Tremblay, Cecile; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early HIV-1 infection is characterized by enhanced tryptophan catabolism, which contributes to immune suppression and disease progression. However, the mechanism by which kynurenine, a tryptophan-related metabolite, induces immune suppression remains poorly understood. Herein, we show that the increased production of kynurenine correlates with defective interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling in memory CD4 T cells from HIV-infected subjects. Defective IL-2 signaling in these subjects, which drives reduced protection from Fas-mediated apoptosis, was also associated with memory CD4 T-cell loss. Treatment of memory CD4 T cells with the concentration of kynurenine found in plasma inhibited IL-2 signaling through the production of reactive oxygen species. We further show that IL-2 signaling in memory CD4 T cells is improved by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy restored the IL-2 response in memory CD4 T cells by reducing reactive oxygen species and kynurenine production. The study findings provide a kynurenine-dependent mechanism through IL-2 signaling for reduced CD4 T-cell survival, which can be reversed by early treatment initiation in HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE The persistence of functional memory CD4 T cells represents the basis for long-lasting immune protection in individuals after exposure to HIV-1. Unfortunately, primary HIV-1 infection results in the massive loss of these cells within weeks of infection, which is mainly driven by inflammation and massive infection by the virus. These new findings show that the enhanced production of kynurenine, a metabolite related to tryptophan catabolism, also impairs memory CD4 T-cell survival and interferes with IL-2 signaling early during HIV-1 infection. PMID:27356894

  19. Increased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roosje, P J; van Kooten, P J; Thepen, T; Bihari, I C; Rutten, V P; Koeman, J P; Willemse, T

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize T cells in the skin of cats with an allergic dermatitis histologically compatible with atopic dermatitis, since T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in humans. We observed a significantly greater number of T cells in lesional skin of domestic short-haired cats with allergic dermatitis (n = 10; median age 5.8 years) than in the skin of healthy control animals (n = 10; median age 5.0 years). In the skin of the healthy control animals, one or two CD4+ cells and no CD8+ cells were found. A predominant increase of CD4+ T cells and a CD4+/CD8+ ratio (mean +/- SD: 3.9 +/- 2.0) was found in the lesional skin of 10 cats with allergic dermatitis. The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in the skin of healthy control animals could not be determined because of the absence of CD8+ cells. The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in the peripheral blood of 10 cats with allergic dermatitis (mean +/- SD: 1.9 +/- 0.4) did not differ significantly from that in 10 healthy control animals (2.2 +/- 0.4). The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio and predominance of CD4+ T cells in the lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis is comparable to that found in atopic dermatitis in humans. In addition, the observed increase of CD4+ T cells in the nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis compared to the skin of healthy cats is similar to what is seen in humans. Cytokines produced by T cells and antigen-specific T cells are important mediators in the inflammatory cascade resulting in atopic dermatitis in humans. This study is a first step to investigate their role in feline allergic dermatitis.

  20. Protection from type 1 diabetes by invariant NK T cells requires the activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Dalam; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Hussain, Shabbir; Delovitch, Terry L

    2006-09-15

    Invariant NK T (iNKT) cells regulate immune responses, express NK cell markers and an invariant TCR, and recognize lipid Ags in a CD1d-restricted manner. Previously, we reported that activation of iNKT cells by alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) protects against type 1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice via an IL-4-dependent mechanism. To further investigate how iNKT cells protect from T1D, we analyzed whether iNKT cells require the presence of another subset(s) of regulatory T cells (Treg), such as CD4+ CD25+ Treg, for this protection. We found that CD4+ CD25+ T cells from NOD.CD1d(-/-) mice deficient in iNKT cell function similarly in vitro to CD4+ CD25+ T cells from wild-type NOD mice and suppress the proliferation of NOD T responder cells upon alpha-GalCer stimulation. Cotransfer of NOD diabetogenic T cells with CD4+ CD25+ Tregs from NOD mice pretreated with alpha-GalCer demonstrated that activated iNKT cells do not influence the ability of T(regs) to inhibit the transfer of T1D. In contrast, protection from T1D mediated by transfer of activated iNKT cells requires the activity of CD4+ CD25+ T cells, because splenocytes pretreated with alpha-GalCer and then inactivated by anti-CD25 of CD25+ cells did not protect from T1D. Similarly, mice inactivated of CD4+ CD25+ T cells before alpha-GalCer treatment were also not protected from T1D. Our data suggest that CD4+ CD25+ T cells retain their function during iNKT cell activation, and that the activity of CD4+ CD25+ Tregs is required for iNKT cells to transfer protection from T1D.

  1. Proteomic Studies of Nitrated Alpha-Synuclein Microglia Regulation by CD4+CD25+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Ashley D.; Stone, David K.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2009-01-01

    Microglial inflammatory responses affect Parkinson's disease (PD) associated nigrostriatal degeneration. This is triggered, in measure, by misfolded, nitrated alpha-synuclein (N-α-syn) contained within Lewy bodies that are released from dying or dead dopaminergic neurons into the extravascular space. N-α-syn-stimulated microglial immunity is regulated by CD4+ T cells. Indeed, CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Treg) induce neuroprotective immune responses. This is seen in rodent models of stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, human immunodeficiency virus associated dementia, and PD. To elucidate the mechanism for Treg-mediated microglial responses, we used a proteomic platform integrating difference gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry peptide sequencing. These tests served to determine the consequences of Treg on the N-α-syn stimulated microglia. The data demonstrated that Treg substantially alter the microglial proteome in response to N-α-syn. This is seen through Treg's abilities to suppress microglial neurotoxic proteins linked to cell metabolism, migration, protein transport and degradation, redox biology, cytoskeletal, and bioenergetic activities. We conclude that Treg modulate the N-α-syn microglial proteome and, in this way, can slow the tempo and course of PD. PMID:19432400

  2. CD4 T Cell Dependent Colitis Exacerbation Following Re-Exposure of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Bargen, Imke; Pils, Marina C.; Krey, Martina; Zur Lage, Susanne; Singh, Anurag K.; Basler, Tina; Falk, Christine S.; Seidler, Ursula; Hornef, Mathias W.; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of cattle characterized by intermittent to chronic diarrhea. In addition, MAP has been isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The impact of MAP on severity of clinical symptoms in JD as well as its role in CD are yet unknown. We have previously shown that MAP is able to colonize inflamed enteric tissue and to exacerbate the inflammatory tissue response (Suwandi et al., 2014). In the present study, we analyzed how repeated MAP administration influences the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In comparison to mice exposed to DSS or MAP only, repeated exposure of DSS-treated mice to MAP (DSS/MAP) revealed a significantly enhanced clinical score, reduction of colon length as well as severe CD4+ T cell infiltration into the colonic lamina propria. Functional analysis identified a critical role of CD4+ T cells in the MAP-induced disease exacerbation. Additionally, altered immune responses were observed when closely related mycobacteria species such as M. avium ssp. avium and M. avium ssp. hominissuis were administered. These data reveal the specific ability of MAP to aggravate intestinal inflammation and clinical symptoms. Overall, this phenotype is compatible with similar disease promoting capabilites of MAP in JD and CD. PMID:28361039

  3. Differential Th17 CD4 T-cell depletion in pathogenic and nonpathogenic lentiviral infections

    PubMed Central

    Paiardini, Mirko; Knox, Kenneth S.; Asher, Ava I.; Cervasi, Barbara; Asher, Tedi E.; Scheinberg, Phillip; Price, David A.; Hage, Chadi A.; Kholi, Lisa M.; Khoruts, Alexander; Frank, Ian; Else, James; Schacker, Timothy; Silvestri, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Acute HIV infection is characterized by massive loss of CD4 T cells from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Th17 cells are critical in the defense against microbes, particularly at mucosal surfaces. Here we analyzed Th17 cells in the blood, GI tract, and broncheoalveolar lavage of HIV-infected and uninfected humans, and SIV-infected and uninfected sooty mangabeys. We found that (1) human Th17 cells are specific for extracellular bacterial and fungal antigens, but not common viral antigens; (2) Th17 cells are infected by HIV in vivo, but not preferentially so; (3) CD4 T cells in blood of HIV-infected patients are skewed away from a Th17 phenotype toward a Th1 phenotype with cellular maturation; (4) there is significant loss of Th17 cells in the GI tract of HIV-infected patients; (5) Th17 cells are not preferentially lost from the broncheoalveolar lavage of HIV-infected patients; and (6) SIV-infected sooty mangabeys maintain healthy frequencies of Th17 cells in the blood and GI tract. These observations further elucidate the immunodeficiency of HIV disease and may provide a mechanistic basis for the mucosal barrier breakdown that characterizes HIV infection. Finally, these data may help account for the nonprogressive nature of nonpathogenic SIV infection in sooty mangabeys. PMID:18664624

  4. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alexandra M; Carnathan, Diane G; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H; Klatt, Nichole R; Brenchley, Jason M; Davenport, Miles P; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2'-bromo-5'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts.

  5. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Carnathan, Diane G.; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M.; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Davenport, Miles P.; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2’-bromo-5’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts. PMID:27227993

  6. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  7. Expression of PD-1/LAG-3 and cytokine production by CD4(+) T cells during infection with Plasmodium parasites.

    PubMed

    Doe, Henrietta T; Kimura, Daisuke; Miyakoda, Mana; Kimura, Kazumi; Akbari, Masoud; Yui, Katsuyuki

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells play critical roles in protection against the blood stage of malarial infection; however, their uncontrolled activation can be harmful to the host. In this study, in which rodent models of Plasmodium parasites were used, the expression of inhibitory receptors on activated CD4(+) T cells and their cytokine production was compared with their expression in a bacterial and another protozoan infection. CD4(+) T cells from mice infected with P. yoelii 17XL, P yoelii 17XNL, P. chabaudi, P. vinckei and P. berghei expressed the inhibitory receptors, PD-1 and LAG-3, as early as 6 days after infection, whereas those from either Listeria monocytogenes- or Leishmania major-infected mice did not. In response to T-cell receptor stimulation, CD4(+) T cells from mice infected with all the pathogens under study produced high concentrations of IFN-γ. IL-2 production was reduced in mice infected with Plasmodium species, but not in those infected with Listeria or Leishmania. In vitro blockade of the interaction between PD-1 and its ligands resulted in increased IFN-γ production in response to Plasmodium antigens, implying that PD-1 expressed on activated CD4(+) T cells actively inhibits T cell immune responses. Studies using Myd88(-/-), Trif(-/-) and Irf3(-/-) mice showed that induction of these CD4(+) T cells and their ability to produce cytokines is largely independent of TLR signaling. These studies suggest that expression of the inhibitory receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on CD4(+) T cells and their reduced IL-2 production are common characteristic features of Plasmodium infection.

  8. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders.

  9. Antigen-specific and non-specific CD4{sup +} T cell recruitment and proliferation during influenza infection

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Timothy J.; Castrucci, Maria R.; Padrick, Ryan C.; Bradley, Linda M.; Topham, David J. . E-mail: david_topham@urmc.rochester.edu

    2005-09-30

    To track epitope-specific CD4{sup +} T cells at a single-cell level during influenza infection, the MHC class II-restricted OVA{sub 323-339} epitope was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of influenza/A/WSN, creating a surrogate viral antigen. The recombinant virus, influenza A/WSN/OVA{sub II}, replicated well, was cleared normally, and stimulated both wild-type and DO11.10 or OT-II TCR transgenic OVA-specific CD4{sup +} T cells. OVA-specific CD4 T cells proliferated during infection only when the OVA epitope was present. However, previously primed (but not naive) transgenic CD4{sup +} T cells were recruited to the infected lung both in the presence and absence of the OVA{sub 323-339} epitope. These data show that, when primed, CD4{sup +} T cells may traffic to the lung in the absence of antigen, but do not proliferate. These results also document a useful tool for the study of CD4 T cells in influenza infection.

  10. HIV-1 Expression Within Resting CD4+ T Cells After Multiple Doses of Vorinostat

    PubMed Central

    Archin, Nancy M.; Bateson, Rosalie; Tripathy, Manoj K.; Crooks, Amanda M.; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Dahl, Noelle P.; Kearney, Mary F.; Anderson, Elizabeth M.; Coffin, John M.; Strain, Matthew C.; Richman, Douglas D.; Robertson, Kevin R.; Kashuba, Angela D.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Kuruc, Joann D.; Eron, Joseph J.; Margolis, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. A single dose of the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat (VOR) up-regulates HIV RNA expression within resting CD4+ T cells of treated, aviremic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive participants. The ability of multiple exposures to VOR to repeatedly disrupt latency has not been directly measured, to our knowledge. Methods. Five participants in whom resting CD4+ T-cell–associated HIV RNA (rc-RNA) increased after a single dose of VOR agreed to receive daily VOR Monday through Wednesday for 8 weekly cycles. VOR serum levels, peripheral blood mononuclear cell histone acetylation, plasma HIV RNA single-copy assays, rc-RNA, total cellular HIV DNA, and quantitative viral outgrowth assays from resting CD4+ T cells were assayed. Results. VOR was well tolerated, with exposures within expected parameters. However, rc-RNA measured after dose 11 (second dose of cycle 4) or dose 22 (second dose of cycle 8) increased significantly in only 3 of the 5 participants, and the magnitude of the rc-RNA increase was much reduced compared with that after a single dose. Changes in histone acetylation were blunted. Results of quantitative viral outgrowth and other assays were unchanged. Conclusions. Although HIV latency is disrupted by an initial VOR dose, the effect of subsequent doses in this protocol was much reduced. We hypothesize that the global effect of VOR results in a refractory period of ≥24 hours. The optimal schedule for VOR administration is still to be defined. PMID:24620025

  11. Low Double-Negative CD3+CD4−CD8− T Cells Are Associated with Incomplete Restoration of CD4+ T Cells and Higher Immune Activation in HIV-1 Immunological Non-Responders

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Su, Bin; Xia, Huan; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhiying; Ji, Yunxia; Yang, Zixuan; Dai, Lili; Mayr, Luzia M.; Moog, Christiane; Wu, Hao; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Failure of immune reconstitution increases the risk of AIDS or non-AIDS related morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. CD3+CD4−CD8− T cells, which are usually described as double-negative (DN) T cells, display CD4-like helper and immunoregulatory functions. Here, we have measured the percentage of DN T cells in the immune reconstituted vs. non-immune reconstituted HIV-1-infected individuals. We observed that immunological non-responders (INRs) had a low number of DN T cells after long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the number of these cells positively correlated with the CD4+ T cell count. The ART did not result in complete suppression of immune activation recorded by the percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+CD8+ T cells in INRs, and a strong inverse correlation was observed between DN T cells and immune activation. A low proportion of TGF-β1+DN T cells was found in INRs. Further mechanism study demonstrated that the level of TGF-β1-producing DN T cells and immune activation had a negative correlation after ART. Taken together, our study suggests that DN T cells control the immunological response in HIV-1-infected patients. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanism of immune reconstitution and could develop specific treatments to return the immune system to homeostasis following initiation of HIV-1 therapy. PMID:28018346

  12. Low Double-Negative CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T Cells Are Associated with Incomplete Restoration of CD4(+) T Cells and Higher Immune Activation in HIV-1 Immunological Non-Responders.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofan; Su, Bin; Xia, Huan; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhiying; Ji, Yunxia; Yang, Zixuan; Dai, Lili; Mayr, Luzia M; Moog, Christiane; Wu, Hao; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Failure of immune reconstitution increases the risk of AIDS or non-AIDS related morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, which are usually described as double-negative (DN) T cells, display CD4-like helper and immunoregulatory functions. Here, we have measured the percentage of DN T cells in the immune reconstituted vs. non-immune reconstituted HIV-1-infected individuals. We observed that immunological non-responders (INRs) had a low number of DN T cells after long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the number of these cells positively correlated with the CD4(+) T cell count. The ART did not result in complete suppression of immune activation recorded by the percentage of CD38(+)HLA-DR(+)CD8(+) T cells in INRs, and a strong inverse correlation was observed between DN T cells and immune activation. A low proportion of TGF-β1(+)DN T cells was found in INRs. Further mechanism study demonstrated that the level of TGF-β1-producing DN T cells and immune activation had a negative correlation after ART. Taken together, our study suggests that DN T cells control the immunological response in HIV-1-infected patients. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanism of immune reconstitution and could develop specific treatments to return the immune system to homeostasis following initiation of HIV-1 therapy.

  13. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  14. Decreased Numbers of CD4+ Naive and Effector Memory T Cells, and CD8+ Naïve T Cells, are Associated with Trichloroethylene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hosgood, H. Dean; Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Vermeulen, Roel; Qiu, Chuangyi; Shen, Min; Smith, Martyn T.; Ge, Yichen; Ji, Zhiying; Xiong, Jun; He, Jian; Reiss, Boris; Liu, Songwang; Xie, Yuxuan; Guo, Weihong; Galvan, Noe; Li, Laiyu; Hao, Zhenyue; Rothman, Nathaniel; Huang, Hanlin; Lan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a volatile chlorinated organic compound that is commonly used as a solvent for lipophilic compounds. Although recognized as an animal carcinogen, TCE’s carcinogenic potential in humans is still uncertain. We have carried out a cross-sectional study of 80 workers exposed to TCE and 96 unexposed controls matched on age and sex in Guangdong, China to study TCE’s early biologic effects. We previously reported that the total lymphocyte count and each of the major lymphocyte subsets (i.e., CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, and B cells) were decreased in TCE-exposed workers compared to controls, suggesting a selective effect on lymphoid progenitors, and/or lymphocyte survival. To explore which T lymphocyte subsets are affected in the same study population, we investigated the effect of TCE exposure on the numbers of CD4+ naïve and memory T cells, CD8+ naïve and memory T cells, and regulatory T cells by FACS analysis. Linear regression of each subset was used to test for differences between exposed workers and controls adjusting for potential confounders. We observed that CD4+ and CD8+ naïve T cell counts were about 8% (p = 0.056) and 17% (p = 0.0002) lower, respectively, among exposed workers. CD4+ effector memory T cell counts were decreased by about 20% among TCE-exposed workers compared to controls (p = 0.001). The selective targeting of TCE on CD8+ naive and possibly CD4+ naive T cells, and CD4+ effector memory T cells, provide further insights into the immunosuppression-related response of human immune cells upon TCE exposure. PMID:22649769

  15. Baseline Naive CD4+ T-cell Level Predicting Immune Reconstitution in Treated HIV-infected Late Presenters

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fu-Ping; Li, Yi-Jia; Qiu, Zhi-Feng; Lv, Wei; Han, Yang; Xie, Jing; Li, Yan-Ling; Song, Xiao-Jing; Du, Shan-Shan; Mehraj, Vikram; Li, Tai-Sheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Among HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), early changes in CD4+ T-cell subsets are well described. However, HIV-infected late presenters initiating treatment present with a suboptimal CD4+ T-cell reconstitution and remain at a higher risk for AIDS and non-AIDS events. Therefore, factors associated with CD4+ T-cell reconstitution need to be determined in this population, which will allow designing effective immunotherapeutic strategies. Methods: Thirty-one adult patients with baseline CD4+ T-cell count <350 cells/mm3 exhibiting viral suppression after ART initiation were followed in the HIV/AIDS research center of Peking Union Medical College Hospital in Beijing, China, from October 2002 to September 2013. Changes in T-cell subsets and associated determinants were measured. Results: Median baseline CD4+ T-cell count was 70 cells/mm3. We found a biphasic reconstitution of T-cell subsets and immune activation: a rapid change during the first 6 months followed by a more gradual change over the subsequent 8 years. Baseline CD4+ T-cell count >200 cells/mm3 in comparison to CD4+ T-cell count ≤200 cells/mm3 was associated with more complete immune Reconstitution (77.8% vs. 27.3% respectively; P = 0.017) and normalized CD4/CD8 ratio. We showed that the baseline percentage of naive CD4+ T-cell was a predictive marker for complete immune reconstitution (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.907), and 12.4% as cutoff value had a sensitivity of 84.6% and a specificity of 88.2%. Conclusions: Baseline naive CD4+ T-cell percentage may serve as a predictive marker for optimal immune reconstitution during long-term therapy. Such study findings suggest that increasing thymic output should represent an avenue to improve patients who are diagnosed late in the course of infection. PMID:27824000

  16. Postthymic expansion in human CD4 naive T cells defined by expression of functional high-affinity IL-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pekalski, Marcin L; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Coulson, Richard M R; Cutler, Antony J; Guo, Hui; Smyth, Deborah J; Downes, Kate; Dendrou, Calliope A; Castro Dopico, Xaquin; Esposito, Laura; Coleman, Gillian; Stevens, Helen E; Nutland, Sarah; Walker, Neil M; Guy, Catherine; Dunger, David B; Wallace, Chris; Tree, Timothy I M; Todd, John A; Wicker, Linda S

    2013-03-15

    As the thymus involutes with age, the maintenance of peripheral naive T cells in humans becomes strongly dependent on peripheral cell division. However, mechanisms that orchestrate homeostatic division remain unclear. In this study we present evidence that the frequency of naive CD4 T cells that express CD25 (IL-2 receptor α-chain) increases with age on subsets of both CD31(+) and CD31(-) naive CD4 T cells. Analyses of TCR excision circles from sorted subsets indicate that CD25(+) naive CD4 T cells have undergone more rounds of homeostatic proliferation than their CD25(-) counterparts in both the CD31(+) and CD31(-) subsets, indicating that CD25 is a marker of naive CD4 T cells that have preferentially responded to survival signals from self-Ags or cytokines. CD25 expression on CD25(-) naive CD4 T cells can be induced by IL-7 in vitro in the absence of TCR activation. Although CD25(+) naive T cells respond to lower concentrations of IL-2 as compared with their CD25(-) counterparts, IL-2 responsiveness is further increased in CD31(-) naive T cells by their expression of the signaling IL-2 receptor β-chain CD122, forming with common γ-chain functional high-affinity IL-2 receptors. CD25 plays a role during activation: CD25(+) naive T cells stimulated in an APC-dependent manner were shown to produce increased levels of IL-2 as compared with their CD25(-) counterparts. This study establishes CD25(+) naive CD4 T cells, which are further delineated by CD31 expression, as a major functionally distinct immune cell subset in humans that warrants further characterization in health and disease.

  17. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4+ T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model

    PubMed Central

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-01-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann–Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4+CD45RO+ and CD4+CD45RO+CXCR5+ cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  18. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans.

  19. Treatment with targeted Vesicular Stomatitis Virus generates therapeutic multifunctional anti-tumor memory CD4 T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanhua; Whitaker-Dowling, Patricia; Griffin, Judith A.; Bergman, Ira

    2011-01-01

    A generally applicable, easy-to-use method of focusing a patient's immune system to eradicate or prevent cancer has been elusive. We are attempting to develop a targeted virus to accomplish these aims. We previously created a recombinant replicating Vesicular Stomatitis Virus that preferentially infected Her2/neu expressing breast cancer cells and showed therapeutic efficacy in an implanted Balb/c mouse tumor model. The current work shows that this therapy generated therapeutic anti-tumor CD4 T-cells against multiple tumor antigens. CD4 T-cells transferred directly from cured donor mice could eradicate established tumors in host mice. T-cells were transferred directly from donor mice and were not stimulated ex vivo. Both tumors that expressed Her2/neu and those that did not were cured by transferred T-cells. Analysis of cytokines secreted by anti-tumor memory CD4 T-cells displayed a multifunctional pattern with high levels of IFNγ, IL-4 and IL-17. Anti-tumor memory CD4 T-cells traveled to the mesenteric lymph nodes and were activated there. Treatment with targeted rrVSV is a potent immune adjuvant that generates therapeutic, multifunctional anti-tumor memory CD4 T-cells that recognize multiple tumor antigens. Immunity elicited by viral therapy is independent of host major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or knowledge of tumor antigens. Virus-induced tumor immunity could have great benefit in the prevention and treatment of tumor metastases. PMID:22240921

  20. Gut Homing CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Frequencies in HIV Infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Briceño, Olivia; Pinto-Cardoso, Sandra; Rodríguez-Bernabe, Nataly; Murakami-Ogasawara, Akio; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The depletion of mucosal CD4+ T-cells occurs early in HIV infection and despite years on antiretroviral treatment (ART), this population never reconstitutes to pre-HIV infection levels. In an effort to understand the effect of ART initiation and different ART regimens on the reconstitution of mucosal T cells within the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), we quantified the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing the gut homing receptors CCR9 and β7 in peripheral blood (PB) of HIV infected individuals naive to ART and treated individuals on both short-term (less than a year) and long-term ART (more than 2 years). We found that the gut homing CD4+ T cells were depleted in ART-naive individuals and increased after ART initiation but levels were not comparable to HIV uninfected individuals. Gut homing CD4+ T cell activation decreased after ART initiation whilst gut homing CD8+ T cell activation remained elevated in ART experienced individuals, especially in those individuals taking protease inhibitors. Our findings provide new insights into the effects of ART initiation and ART regimens on the frequency and immune status of gut homing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. PMID:27898686

  1. CD4+ and CD8+ TCRβ repertoires possess different potentials to generate extraordinarily high-avidity T cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Rahman, Muhammed A.; Yamashita, Yuki; Ochi, Toshiki; Wnuk, Piotr; Tanaka, Shinya; Chamoto, Kenji; Kagoya, Yuki; Saso, Kayoko; Guo, Tingxi; Anczurowski, Mark; Butler, Marcus O.; Hirano, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Recent high throughput sequencing analysis has revealed that the TCRβ repertoire is largely different between CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Here, we show that the transduction of SIG35α, the public chain-centric HLA-A*02:01(A2)/MART127–35 TCRα hemichain, conferred A2/MART127–35 reactivity to a substantial subset of both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells regardless of their HLA–A2 positivity. T cells individually reconstituted with SIG35α and different A2/MART127–35 TCRβ genes isolated from CD4+ or CD8+ T cells exhibited a wide range of avidity. Surprisingly, approximately half of the A2/MART127–35 TCRs derived from CD4+ T cells, but none from CD8+ T cells, were stained by A2/MART127–35 monomer and possessed broader cross-reactivity. Our results suggest that the differences in the primary structure of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ TCRβ repertoire indeed result in the differences in their ability to form extraordinarily high avidity T cells which would otherwise have been deleted by central tolerance. PMID:27030642

  2. Cross-priming of long lived protective CD8+ T cells against Trypanosoma cruzi infection: importance of a TLR9 agonist and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Bruna C G; Araújo, Adriano F S; Penido, Marcus L O; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2007-08-10

    We recently described that vaccination of mice with a glutathione S transferase fusion protein representing amino acids 261-500 of the Amastigote Surface Protein-2 efficiently cross-primed protective CD8+ T cells against a lethal challenge with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. In this study, we initially established that this protective immunity was long lived. Subsequently, we studied the importance of TLR9 agonist CpG ODN 1826, TLR4 and CD4+ T cells for the generation of these protective CD8+ T cells. We found that: (i) the TLR9 agonist CpG ODN 1826 improved the efficiency of protective immunity; (ii) TLR4 is not relevant for priming of specific CD8+ T cells; (iii) CD4+ T cells are critical for priming of memory/protective CD8+ T cells.

  3. Epipolymorphisms associated with the clinical outcome of autoimmune arthritis affect CD4+ T cell activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, Roberto; Rossetti, Maura; Whitaker, John W; Wang, Wei; Lovell, Daniel J; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-11-29

    Multifactorial diseases, including autoimmune juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), result from a complex interplay between genetics and environment. Epigenetic mechanisms are believed to integrate such gene-environment interactions, fine-tuning gene expression, and possibly contributing to immune system dysregulation. Although anti-TNF therapy has strongly increased JIA remission rates, it is not curative and up to 80% of patients flare upon treatment withdrawal. Thus, a crucial unmet medical and scientific need is to understand the immunological mechanisms associated with remission or flare to inform clinical decisions. Here, we explored the CD4(+) T-cell DNA methylome of 68 poly-articular and extended oligo-articular JIA patients, before and after anti-TNF therapy withdrawal, to identify features associated with maintenance of inactive disease. Individual CpG sites were clustered in coherent modules without a priori knowledge of their function through network analysis. The methylation level of several CpG modules, specifically those enriched in CpG sites belonging to genes that mediate T-cell activation, uniquely correlated with clinical activity. Differences in DNA methylation were already detectable at the time of therapy discontinuation, suggesting epigenetic predisposition. RNA profiling also detected differences in T-cell activation markers (including HLA-DR) but, overall, its sensitivity was lower than epigenetic profiling. Changes to the T-cell activation signature at the protein level were detectable by flow cytometry, confirming the biological relevance of the observed alterations in methylation. Our work proposes epigenetic discrimination between clinical activity states, and reveals T-cell-related biological functions tied to, and possibly predicting or causing, clinical outcome.

  4. Interaction between ANXA1 and GATA-3 in Immunosuppression of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Zhou, Yuxiang; Liu, Zan

    2016-01-01

    Decreased Th1/Th2 ratio is one of the major characteristics of immunosuppression in sepsis. Both membrane adhesive protein Annexin-A1 (ANXA1) and transcription factor GATA-3 have been reported to play important roles in T cell differentiation. However, the relationship between ANXA1 and GATA-3 in Th1/Th2 shift is unknown. Our study investigated the interaction effects of ANXA1 and GATA-3 to influence T cell differentiation in CD4+ T cells. We found that GATA-3 and ANXA1 were coexpressed on Th0/Th1/Th2 cytoplasm and nuclear. Overexpressed ANXA1 significantly increased the expression of IFNγ and reduced IL-4 expression in T cells, while ANXA1-silenced T cells exhibited decreased production of IFNγ and increased production of IL-4. Knockdown of ANXA1 promoted higher expression level of GATA-3 and low level of T-box transcription factor (T-bet/Tbx21). Further study demonstrated that ANXA1 regulated GATA-3 expression through the formyl peptide receptor like-1 (FPRL-1) downstream signaling pathways ERK and PKB/Akt. These results suggested that ANXA1 modulates GATA-3/T-bet expression induced Th0/Th1 differentiation. Moreover, we found that GATA-3 inhibited ANXA1 expression by binding to its promoter for the first time. It is proposed that the interactions between ANXA1 and GATA-3 may provide clues to understand the immunosuppression and have potential as new therapeutic targets in immunotherapy after sepsis. PMID:27833268

  5. CD4+ T Cells Are as Protective as CD8+ T Cells against Rickettsia typhi Infection by Activating Macrophage Bactericidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Moderzynski, Kristin; Papp, Stefanie; Rauch, Jessica; Heine, Liza; Kuehl, Svenja; Richardt, Ulricke; Fleischer, Bernhard; Osterloh, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi is an intracellular bacterium that causes endemic typhus, a febrile disease that can be fatal due to complications including pneumonia, hepatitis and meningoencephalitis, the latter being a regular outcome in T and B cell-deficient C57BL/6 RAG1-/- mice upon Rickettsia typhi infection. Here, we show that CD4+ TH1 cells that are generated in C57BL/6 mice upon R. typhi infection are as protective as cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. CD4+- as well as CD8+-deficient C57BL/6 survived the infection without showing symptoms of disease at any point in time. Moreover, adoptively transferred CD8+ and CD4+ immune T cells entered the CNS of C57BL/6 RAG1-/- mice with advanced infection and both eradicated the bacteria. However, immune CD4+ T cells protected only approximately 60% of the animals from death. They induced the expression of iNOS in infiltrating macrophages as well as in resident microglia in the CNS which can contribute to bacterial killing but also accelerate pathology. In vitro immune CD4+ T cells inhibited bacterial growth in infected macrophages which was in part mediated by the release of IFNγ. Collectively, our data demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are as protective as CD8+ T cells against R. typhi, provided that CD4+ TH1 effector cells are present in time to support bactericidal activity of phagocytes via the release of IFNγ and other factors. With regard to vaccination against TG Rickettsiae, our findings suggest that the induction of CD4+ TH1 effector cells is sufficient for protection. PMID:27875529

  6. Suppression of CD4+ Effector Responses by Naturally Occurring CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Contributes to Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Anne-Laurence; Keswani, Tarun; Gorgette, Olivier; Bandeira, Antonio; Malissen, Bernard; Cazenave, Pierre-André

    2015-01-01

    The role of naturally occurring CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (nTreg) in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM), which involves both pathogenic T cell responses and parasite sequestration in the brain, is still unclear. To assess the contribution and dynamics of nTreg during the neuropathogenesis, we unbalanced the ratio between nTreg and naive CD4+ T cells in an attenuated model of Plasmodium berghei ANKA-induced experimental CM (ECM) by using a selective cell enrichment strategy. We found that nTreg adoptive transfer accelerated the onset and increased the severity of CM in syngeneic C57BL/6 (B6) P. berghei ANKA-infected mice without affecting the level of parasitemia. In contrast, naive CD4+ T cell enrichment prevented CM and promoted parasite clearance. Furthermore, early during the infection nTreg expanded in the spleen but did not efficiently migrate to the site of neuroinflammation, suggesting that nTreg exert their pathogenic action early in the spleen by suppressing the protective naive CD4+ T cell response to P. berghei ANKA infection in vivo in both CM-susceptible (B6) and CM-resistant (B6-CD4−/−) mice. However, their sole transfer was not sufficient to restore CM susceptibility in two CM-resistant congenic strains tested. Altogether, these results demonstrate that nTreg are activated and functional during P. berghei ANKA infection and that they contribute to the pathogenesis of CM. They further suggest that nTreg may represent an early target for the modulation of the immune response to malaria. PMID:26553468

  7. Potent HIV-specific responses are enriched in a unique subset of CD8+ T cells that coexpresses CD4 on its surface.

    PubMed

    Zloza, Andrew; Schenkel, Jason M; Tenorio, Allan R; Martinson, Jeffrey A; Jeziorczak, Paul M; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2009-10-29

    In humans, approximately 3% of peripheral CD8+ T cells coexpress CD4 dimly on their surface and hence are designated as CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells. We evaluated the contribution of this CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T-cell population to anti-HIV immunity. We demonstrate that CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells generate greater than 55% of CD8+ T-cell antigen recognition and effector response to HIV, as evaluated by multiple parameters for assessing T-cell antiviral immunity, including HIV tetramer recognition, cytokine production, and cytolytic potential. Inhibition of major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II) on target cells or CD4 on CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells diminishes their anti-HIV responses, suggesting that CD4 on effector cells and MHC-II on target cells provides an additional arm of contact between effector and target cells which is critical to CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T-cell function. CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells also exhibit features that are indicative of central memory T cells. Finally, CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells are elevated in blood of HIV+ long-term nonprogressors in comparison to HIV- donors. Collectively, our findings show that CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cells designate an enriched antiviral subpopulation of CD8+ T cells that should be targeted for therapeutic intervention or evaluation of vaccine efficacy.

  8. Jug r 2-reactive CD4+ T-cells have a dominant immune role in walnut allergy

    PubMed Central

    Archila, Luis Diego; Jeong, David; Pascal, Mariona; Bartra, Joan; Juan, Manel; Robinson, David; Farrington, Mary L.; Kwok, William.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic reactions to walnut can be life threatening. While IgE epitopes of walnut have been studied, CD4+ T-cell specific epitopes for walnut remain uncharacterized. Particularly, the relationship of both phenotype and frequency of walnut specific T-cells to the disease have not been examined. Objectives We sought to provide a thorough phenotypic analysis for walnut reactive T-cells in allergic and non-allergic subjects. Particularly, the relationship of phenotypes and frequencies of walnut specific T-cells with the disease. Methods CD154 up-regulation assay was used to examine CD4+ T-cell reactivity towards walnut allergens.Jug r 1, Jug r 2 and Jug r 3. Tetramer-Guided epitope mapping approach was utilized to identify HLA-restricted CD4+ T-cells epitopes in Jug r 2. Direct ex vivo staining with peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II (pMHC-II) tetramers enabled the comparison of frequency and phenotype of Jug r 2-specific CD4+ T-cells between allergic and non-allergic subjects. Jug r 2-specific T-cell-clones were also generated and mRNA transcription factor levels were assessed by RT qPCR. Intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays were performed for further phenotypical analyses. Results Jug r 2 was identified as the major allergen that elicited CD4+ T-cell responses. Multiple Jug r 2 T-cell epitopes were identified. The majority of these T-cells in allergic subjects have a CCR4+ TCM (central memory) phenotype. A subset of these T-cells express CCR4+CCR6+ irrespectively of the asthmatic status of the allergic subjects. ICS confirmed these TH2, TH2/TH17 and TH17-like heterogenic profiles. Jug r 2-specific T-cell-clones from allergic subjects mainly expressed GATA3; nonetheless, a portion of T-cell clones expressed either GATA3 and RORC, or RORC, confirming the presence of TH2, TH2/TH17 and TH17 cells. Conclusions Jug r 2 specific responses dominate walnut T-cell responses in subjects with walnut allergy. Jug r 2 central memory CD4+ cells

  9. Loss of NOX-Derived Superoxide Exacerbates Diabetogenic CD4 T-Cell Effector Responses in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Lindsey E; Anderson, Brian; Liu, Chao; Ganini, Douglas; Mason, Ronald P; Piganelli, Jon D; Mathews, Clayton E; Tse, Hubert M

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play prominent roles in numerous biological systems. While classically expressed by neutrophils and macrophages, CD4 T cells also express NADPH oxidase (NOX), the superoxide-generating multisubunit enzyme. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that superoxide-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD.Ncf1(m1J)) mice exhibited a delay in type 1 diabetes (T1D) partially due to blunted IFN-γ synthesis by CD4 T cells. For further investigation of the roles of superoxide on CD4 T-cell diabetogenicity, the NOD.BDC-2.5.Ncf1(m1J) (BDC-2.5.Ncf1(m1J)) mouse strain was generated, possessing autoreactive CD4 T cells deficient in NOX-derived superoxide. Unlike NOD.Ncf1(m1J), stimulated BDC-2.5.Ncf1(m1J) CD4 T cells and splenocytes displayed elevated synthesis of Th1 cytokines and chemokines. Superoxide-deficient BDC-2.5 mice developed spontaneous T1D, and CD4 T cells were more diabetogenic upon adoptive transfer into NOD.Rag recipients due to a skewing toward impaired Treg suppression. Exogenous superoxide blunted exacerbated Th1 cytokines and proinflammatory chemokines to approximately wild-type levels, concomitant with reduced IL-12Rβ2 signaling and P-STAT4 (Y693) activation. These results highlight the importance of NOX-derived superoxide in curbing autoreactivity due, in part, to control of Treg function and as a redox-dependent checkpoint of effector T-cell responses. Ultimately, our studies reveal the complexities of free radicals in CD4 T-cell responses.

  10. Transfer of protective immunity in murine histoplasmosis by a CD4+ T-cell clone.

    PubMed

    Allendoerfer, R; Magee, D M; Deepe, G S; Graybill, J R

    1993-02-01

    We have reported that a murine Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive CD4+ T-cell line and clones thereof did not adoptively transfer protection against H. capsulatum infection in normal or cyclophosphamide-treated C57BL/6 mice. One explanation for the results was that the T cells failed to traffic to lymphoid organs in these animals. In this study, we have sought to determine whether one of these clones, 2.3H3, could mediate protection in nude (C57BL/10) or irradiated (5 Gy) heterozygous nude (nu/+) C57BL/6 mice. Mice were inoculated intravenously with 10(7) resting 2.3H3 cells or with an equal number of cells of the ovalbumin-reactive clone 1S6; 2 h later, the mice were challenged intranasally with 5 x 10(6) yeast cells. By day 5 of infection, lungs, livers, and spleens of nude and irradiated nu/+ mice given 2.3H3 contained significantly fewer (P < 0.05) CFU than the same organs from mice inoculated with 1S6. This effect was specific for H. capsulatum, since 2.3H3 did not reduce the number of Coccidioides immitis CFU in lungs, livers, and spleens of irradiated nu/+ mice. By day 10, the amounts of H. capsulatum CFU in lungs, livers, or spleens of nude and irradiated nu/+ mice inoculated with 2.3H3 were smaller than those in 1S6-inoculated mice, but these differences did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). The mortality rate of mice inoculated with 2.3H3 and that of mice inoculated with 1S6 were similar. Histopathological examination of tissues from 2.3H3- and 1S6-inoculated mice demonstrated the presence of granulomatous inflammation in organs from both groups. Tissues from 2.3H3-treated mice contained fewer yeasts per high-power field than tissues from 1S6-treated mice. Thus, irradiated or nude mice are permissive for the expression of protective immunity by a CD4+ T-cell clone. Although the protective capacity of T cells in these animals is transient, these animals will be useful for differentiating protective from nonprotective T-cell clones.

  11. Synergistic Communication between CD4+ T Cells and Monocytes Impacts the Cytokine Environment.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Sarah B; Hill, Abby S; Plana, Deborah; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2016-10-10

    Physiological cytokine environments arise from factors produced by diverse cell types in coordinated concert. Understanding the contributions of each cell type in the context of cell-cell communication is important for effectively designing disease modifying interventions. Here, we present multi-plexed measurement of 48 cytokines from a coculture system of primary human CD4+ T cells and monocytes across a spectrum of stimuli and for a range of relative T cell/monocyte compositions, coupled with corresponding measurements from PBMCs and plasma from the same donors. Computational analysis of the resulting data-sets elucidated communication-independent and communication-dependent contributions, including both positive and negative synergies. We find that cytokines in cell supernatants were uncorrelated to those found in plasma. Additionally, as an example of positive synergy, production levels of CXCR3 cytokines IP-10 and MIG, depend non-linearly on both IFNγ and TNFα levels in cross-talk between T cells and monocytes. Overall, this work demonstrates that communication between cell types can significantly impact the consequent cytokine environment, emphasizing the value of mixed cell population studies.

  12. Trichloroethylene activates CD4+ T cells: potential role in an autoimmune response.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, K M; Griffin, J M; Pumford, N R

    1999-11-01

    Trichloroethylene is an industrial solvent and has become a major environmental contaminant. Autoimmune-prone MRL +/+ mice were treated for up to 22 weeks with trichloroethylene in the drinking water (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/mL) in order to study the immunoregulatory effects of this environmental toxicant. After only 4 weeks of treatment, trichloroethylene was shown to promote the expansion of CD4+ T cells that expressed a memory/activation phenotype (i.e., CD44hi CD45RBlo) and secreted high levels of IFN-gamma, but not IL-4. In addition, trichloroethylene treatment accelerated the development of an autoimmune response in the MRL +/+ mice as evidenced by an earlier appearance of antinuclear antibodies and increased levels of total IgG2a. MRL +/+ mice treated with trichloroethylene for 22 weeks also contained antibodies specific for trichloroethylene adducts, suggesting the activation of trichloroethylene-specific T cells. The results suggest that trichloroethylene can stimulate antigen nonspecific as well as specific T cells that are capable of promoting autoimmunity in genetically predisposed individuals.

  13. Role of the frequency of blood CD4(+) CXCR5(+) CCR6(+) T cells in autoimmunity in patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-yi; Wu, Zhen-biao; Ding, Jin; Zheng, Zhao-hui; Li, Xiao-yan; Chen, Li-na; Zhu, Ping

    2012-06-01

    The blood CD4(+) CXCR5(+) T cells, known as "circulating" Tfh, have been shown to efficiently induce naïve B cells to produce immunoglobulin. They play an important role in certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we show for the first time that the frequency of CD4(+) CXCR5(+) T cells is increased in pSS patients and positively correlated with autoantibodies in the blood. The concentration of Th17-like subsets (CD4(+) CXCR5(+) CCR6(+)) in pSS patients was found to be significantly higher than in healthy controls. Functional assays showed that activated Th17-like subtypes in the blood display the key features of Tfh cells, including invariably coexpressed PD-1, ICOS, CD40L and IL-21. Th17 subsets were found to highly express Bcl-6 protein and Th1 and Th2 were not. Bcl-6 is believed to be a master transforming factor for Tfh cell differentiation and facilitate B cell proliferation and somatic hypermutation within the germinal center. These data indicate that Th17 subsets of CD4(+) CXCR5(+) T cells in the blood may participate in the antibody-related immune responses and that high frequency of CD4(+) CXCR5(+) CCR6(+) Tfh cells in blood may be suitable biomarkers for the evaluation of the active immune stage of pSS patients. It might provide insights into the pathogenesis and perhaps help researchers identify novel therapeutic targets for pSS.

  14. Genome-wide metabolic model to improve understanding of CD4(+) T cell metabolism, immunometabolism and application in drug design.

    PubMed

    Han, Feifei; Li, Gonghua; Dai, Shaoxing; Huang, Jingfei

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells play a critical role in adaptive immunity and have been well studied in past decades. However, the systematic metabolism features are less clear. Here, we reconstructed the genome-wide metabolic network of naïve CD4(+) T cells, CD4T1670, by integrating transcriptome and metabolism data. We performed simulations for three critical metabolic subsystems (carbohydrate metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and glutaminolysis). The results were consistent with most experimental observations. Furthermore, we found that depletion of either glucose or glutamine did not significantly affect ATP production and biomass, but dramatically unbalanced the metabolic network and increased the release of some inflammation or anti-inflammation related factors, such as lysophosphatidylcholine, leukotriene and hyaluronan. Genome-wide single gene knockout analysis showed that acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) was essential for T cell activation. We further investigated the role of immunometabolic genes in metabolic network stability, and found that over 25% of them were essential. The results also showed that although PTEN is a well-studied proliferation inhibitor, it was essential for maintaining the stability of CD4 metabolic networks. Finally, we applied CD4T1670 to evaluate the side-effects of certain drugs in preclinical experiments. These results suggested that CD4T1670 would be useful in understanding CD4(+) T cells and drug design systematically.

  15. Antigen-specific CD4{sup +} effector T cells: Analysis of factors regulating clonal expansion and cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, Kazunobu; Watanabe, Yuri; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Watanabe, Shiho; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kotani, Motoko; Kozono, Haruo; Tanabe, Kazunari; Abe, Ryo

    2009-03-20

    In order to fully understand T cell-mediated immunity, the mechanisms that regulate clonal expansion and cytokine production by CD4{sup +} antigen-specific effector T cells in response to a wide range of antigenic stimulation needs clarification. For this purpose, panels of antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cell clones with different thresholds for antigen-induced proliferation were generated by repeated stimulation with high- or low-dose antigen. Differences in antigen sensitivities did not correlate with expression of TCR, CD4, adhesion or costimulatory molecules. There was no significant difference in antigen-dependent cytokine production by TG40 cells transfected with TCR obtained from either high- or low-dose-responding T cell clones, suggesting that the affinity of TCRs for their ligands is not primary determinant of T cell antigen reactivity. The proliferative responses of all T cell clones to both peptide stimulation and to TCR{beta} crosslinking revealed parallel dose-response curves. These results suggest that the TCR signal strength of effector T cells and threshold of antigen reactivity is determined by an intrinsic property, such as the TCR signalosome and/or intracellular signaling machinery. Finally, the antigen responses of high- and low-peptide-responding T cell clones reveal that clonal expansion and cytokine production of effector T cells occur independently of antigen concentration. Based on these results, the mechanisms underlying selection of high 'avidity' effector and memory T cells in response to pathogen are discussed.

  16. A voltage-gated sodium channel is essential for the positive selection of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wan-Lin; Donermeyer, David L; Allen, Paul M

    2012-09-01

    The sustained entry of Ca(2+) into CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive thymocytes is required for positive selection. Here we identified a voltage-gated Na(+) channel (VGSC) that was essential for positive selection of CD4(+) T cells. Pharmacological inhibition of VGSC activity inhibited the sustained Ca(2+) influx induced by positively selecting ligands and the in vitro positive selection of CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T cells. In vivo short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of the gene encoding a regulatory β-subunit of a VGSC specifically inhibited the positive selection of CD4(+) T cells. Ectopic expression of VGSC in peripheral AND CD4(+) T cells bestowed the ability to respond to a positively selecting ligand, which directly demonstrated that VGSC expression was responsible for the enhanced sensitivity. Thus, active VGSCs in thymocytes provide a mechanism by which a weak positive selection signal can induce the sustained Ca(2+) signals required for CD4(+) T cell development.

  17. Non-POU Domain-Containing Octamer-Binding Protein Negatively Regulates HIV-1 Infection in CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    St Gelais, Corine; Roger, Jonathan; Wu, Li

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 interacts with numerous cellular proteins during viral replication. Identifying such host proteins and characterizing their roles in HIV-1 infection can deepen our understanding of the dynamic interplay between host and pathogen. We previously identified non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NonO or p54nrb) as one of host factors associated with catalytically active preintegration complexes (PIC) of HIV-1 in infected CD4(+) T cells. NonO is involved in nuclear processes including transcriptional regulation and RNA splicing. Although NonO has been identified as an HIV-1 interactant in several recent studies, its role in HIV-1 replication has not been characterized. We investigated the effect of NonO on the HIV-1 life cycle in CD4(+) T cell lines and primary CD4(+) T cells using single-cycle and replication-competent HIV-1 infection assays. We observed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated stable NonO knockdown in a CD4(+) Jurkat T cell line and primary CD4(+) T cells did not affect cell viability or proliferation, but enhanced HIV-1 infection. The enhancement of HIV-1 infection in Jurkat T cells correlated with increased viral reverse transcription and gene expression. Knockdown of NonO expression in Jurkat T cells modestly enhanced HIV-1 gag mRNA expression and Gag protein synthesis, suggesting that viral gene expression and RNA regulation are the predominantly affected events causing enhanced HIV-1 replication in NonO knockdown (KD) cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NonO in Jurkat T cells reduced HIV-1 single-cycle infection by 41% compared to control cells. Our data suggest that NonO negatively regulates HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, albeit it has modest effects on early and late stages of the viral life cycle, highlighting the importance of host proteins associated with HIV-1 PIC in regulating viral replication.

  18. CXCR5+CD4+ follicular helper T cells accumulate in resting human lymph nodes and have superior B cell helper activity.

    PubMed

    Havenith, Simone H C; Remmerswaal, Ester B M; Idu, Mirza M; van Donselaar-van der Pant, Karlijn A M I; van der Bom, Nelly; Bemelman, Fréderike J; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; ten Berge, Ineke J M; van Lier, René A W

    2014-03-01

    Although many relevant immune reactions are initiated in the lymph nodes, this compartment has not been systematically studied in humans. Analyses have been performed on immune cells derived from tonsils, but as this tissue is most often inflamed, generalization of these data is difficult. Here, we analyzed the phenotype and function of the human CD4(+) T-cell subsets and lineages in paired resting lymph node and peripheral blood samples. Naive, central memory cells and effector memory cells as well as Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells were equally represented in both compartments. On the other hand, cytotoxic CD4(+) T cells were strikingly absent in the lymph nodes. CXCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells, representing putative follicular Th (Tfh) cells were over-represented in lymph nodes and expressed higher levels of Tfh markers than their peripheral blood counterparts. Compared with the circulating pool, lymph-node-derived CXCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells were superior in providing help to B cells. Thus, functionally competent Tfh cells accumulate in resting human lymph nodes, providing a swift induction of naive and memory antibody responses upon antigenic challenge.

  19. Dynamics of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells and of Treg induction upon hepatic AAV gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, George Q; Zolotukhin, Irene; Sherman, Alexandra; Biswas, Moanaro; de Jong, Ype P; Terhorst, Cox; Davidoff, Andrew M; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    The tolerogenic hepatic microenvironment impedes clearance of viral infections but is an advantage in viral vector gene transfer, which often results in immune tolerance induction to transgene products. Although the underlying tolerance mechanism has been extensively studied, our understanding of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells remains limited. To address this, we administered hepatotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV8) vector expressing cytoplasmic ovalbumin (OVA) into wt mice followed by adoptive transfer of transgenic OVA-specific T cells. We find that that the liver-draining lymph nodes (celiac and portal) are the major sites of MHC II presentation of the virally encoded antigen, as judged by in vivo proliferation of DO11.10 CD4+ T cells (requiring professional antigen-presenting cells, e.g., macrophages) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg induction. Antigen presentation in the liver itself contributes to activation of CD4+ T cells egressing from the liver. Hepatic-induced Treg rapidly disseminate through the systemic circulation. By contrast, a secreted OVA transgene product is presented in multiple organs, and OVA-specific Treg emerge in both the thymus and periphery. In summary, liver draining lymph nodes play an integral role in hepatic antigen presentation and peripheral Treg induction, which results in systemic regulation of the response to viral gene products. PMID:27933310

  20. Telomerase Is Involved in IL-7-Mediated Differential Survival of Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yinhua; An, Jie; Weng, Nan-ping

    2008-01-01

    IL-7 plays an essential role in T cell maintenance and survival. The survival effect of IL-7 is thought to be mediated through regulation of Bcl2 family proteins. After a comparative analysis of IL-7-induced growth and cell death of human naive and memory CD4+ T cells, we observed that more memory CD4+ T cells underwent cell division and proceeded to apoptosis than naive cells in response to IL-7. However, IL-7-induced expressions of Bcl2 family members (Bcl2, Bcl-xL, Bax, and Bad) were similar between naive and memory cells. Instead, we found that IL-7 induced higher levels of telomerase activity in naive cells than in memory cells, and the levels of IL-7-induced telomerase activity had a significant inverse correlation with cell death in CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we showed that reducing expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase and telomerase activity significantly increased cell death of IL-7-cultured CD4+ T cells. Together, these findings demonstrate that telomerase is involved in IL-7-mediated differential survival of naive and memory CD4+ T cells. PMID:18322183

  1. Understanding Factors That Modulate the Establishment of HIV Latency in Resting CD4+ T-Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jenny L; Mota, Talia M; Evans, Vanessa A; Kumar, Nitasha; Rezaei, Simin D; Cheong, Karey; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Cameron, Paul U; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-01-01

    Developing robust in vitro models of HIV latency is needed to better understand how latency is established, maintained and reversed. In this study, we examined the effects of donor variability, HIV titre and co-receptor usage on establishing HIV latency in vitro using two models of HIV latency. Using the CCL19 model of HIV latency, we found that in up to 50% of donors, CCL19 enhanced latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells by CXCR4-tropic HIV in the presence of low dose IL-2. Increasing the infectious titre of CXCR4-tropic HIV increased both productive and latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells. In a different model where myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) were co-cultured with resting CD4+ T-cells, we observed a higher frequency of latently infected cells in vitro than CCL19-treated or unstimulated CD4+ T-cells in the presence of low dose IL-2. In the DC-T-cell model, latency was established with both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic virus but higher titres of CCR5-tropic virus was required in most donors. The establishment of latency in vitro through direct infection of resting CD4+ T-cells is significantly enhanced by CCL19 and mDC, but the efficiency is dependent on virus titre, co-receptor usage and there is significant donor variability.

  2. West Nile virus-specific CD4 T cells exhibit direct anti-viral cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity and are sufficient for antiviral protection

    PubMed Central

    Brien, James D.; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2012-01-01

    CD4 T cells have been shown to be necessary for the prevention of encephalitis during West Nile virus infection. However, the mechanisms used by antigen-specific CD4 T cells to protect mice from West Nile virus encephalitis remain incompletely understood. Contrary to the belief that CD4 T cells are protective because they merely maintain the CD8 T cell response and improve antibody production, we here provide evidence for the direct anti-viral activity of CD4 T cells which functions to protect the host from WNV encephalitis. In adoptive transfers, naïve CD4 T cells protected a significant number of lethally infected RAG−/− mice, demonstrating the protective effect of CD4 T cells independent of B cells and CD8 T cells. To shed light on the mechanism of this protection, we defined the peptide specificities of the CD4 T cells responding to West Nile virus infection in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice, and used these peptides to characterize the in vivo function of antiviral CD4 T cells. WNV-specific CD4 T cells produced IFN-γ and IL-2, but also showed potential for in vivo and ex vivo cytotoxicity. Furthermore, peptide vaccination using CD4 epitopes conferred protection against lethal West Nile virus infection in immunocompetent mice. These results demonstrate the role of direct effector function of antigen-specific CD4 T cell in preventing severe West Nile virus disease. PMID:19050276

  3. Nef Neutralizes the Ability of Exosomes from CD4+ T Cells to Act as Decoys during HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Z. M.; Silveira, Paola P.; da Silva-Januário, Mara E.; Arruda, Eurico; Jamur, Maria C.; Oliver, Constance; Aguiar, Renato S.; daSilva, Luis L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Nef is an HIV-1 accessory protein that promotes viral replication and pathogenesis. A key function of Nef is to ensure sustained depletion of CD4 and MHC-I molecules in infected cells by inducing targeting of these proteins to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), and ultimately to lysosomes for degradation. Nef also affects cellular secretory routes promoting its own secretion via exosomes. To better understand the effects of Nef on the exocytic pathway, we investigated whether this viral factor modifies the composition of exosomes released by T lymphocytes. We showed that both CD4 and MHC-I molecules are secreted in exosomes from T cells and that the expression of Nef reduces the amount of these proteins in exosomes. To investigate the functional role for this novel activity of Nef, we performed in vitro HIV-1 infection assays in the presence of distinct populations of exosomes. We demonstrated that exosomes released by CD4+ T cells, but not CD4T cells, efficiently inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro. Because CD4 is the main receptor for HIV-1 infection, these results suggest that CD4 molecules displayed on the surface of exosomes can bind to envelope proteins of HIV-1 hindering virus interaction with target cells and infection. Importantly, CD4-depleted exosomes released by CD4+ T cells expressing Nef have a reduced capacity to inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro. These results provide evidence that Nef promotes HIV-1 infection by reducing the expression of CD4 in exosomes from infected cells, besides the original role of Nef in reducing the CD4 levels at the cell surface. PMID:25423108

  4. IL-4 confers resistance to IL-27-mediated suppression on CD4+ T cells by impairing STAT1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; Wang, Shanze; Erekosima, Nkiruka; Li, Yapeng; Hong, Jessie; Qi, Xiaopeng; Merkel, Patricia; Nagabhushanam, Vijaya; Choo, Eugene; Katial, Rohit; Alam, Rafeul; Trikha, Anita; Chu, HongWei; Zhuang, Yonghua; Jin, Meiling; Bai, Chunxue; Huang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Th2 cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. Established Th2 cells have been shown to resist reprogramming into Th1 cells. The inherent stability of Th2 cells poses a significant barrier to treating allergic diseases. Objective We sought to understand the mechanisms by which CD4+ T cells from asthmatic patients resist the IL-27-mediated inhibition. Methods We isolated and cultured CD4+ T cells from both healthy individuals and allergic asthmatic patients in order to test whether IL-27 can inhibit IL-4 production by the cultured CD4+ T cells using ELISA. Culturing conditions that resulted in resistance to IL-27 were determined using both murine and human CD4+ T cell culture systems. STAT1 phosphorylation was analyzed by Western blot and flow cytometry. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (Socs) mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR. The small interfering RNA method was used to knockdown the expression of Socs3 mRNA. Main Results We demonstrated that CD4+ T cells from asthmatic patients resisted the suppression of IL-4 production mediated by IL-27. We observed that repeated exposure to Th2-inducing conditions rendered healthy human CD4+ T cells resistant to IL-27-mediated inhibition. Using an in vitro murine culture system, we further demonstrated that repeated or higher doses of IL-4 stimulation, but not IL-2 stimulation, upregulated Socs3 mRNA expression and impaired IL-27-induced STAT1 phosphorylation. The Knockdown of Socs3 mRNA expression restored IL-27-induced STAT1 phosphorylation and IL-27-mediated inhibition of IL-4-production. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that differentiated Th2 cells can resist IL-27-induced reprogramming toward Th1 cells by downregulating STAT1 phosphorylation and likely explain why the CD4+ T cells of asthmatic patients are resistant to IL-27-mediated inhibition. PMID:23958647

  5. Functional deficits of pertussis-specific CD4+ T cells in infants compared to adults following DTaP vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S K; Pichichero, M E

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the immune responses that explain why infants require multiple doses of pertussis vaccine to achieve protection against infection is a high priority. The objective of this study was to compare the function and phenotypes of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in adults (n = 12), compared to infants (n = 20), following vaccination with acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with pertussis toxoid (PT), pertactin (PRN) and filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA). Multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to delineate CD4+ T cell populations and phenotypes producing interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-4. Based on surface CD69 expression, infants demonstrated activation of vaccine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells similar to adults. However, among infants, Boolean combinations of gates suggested that type 1 (Th-1) CD4+ T cell responses were confined largely to TNF-α+IL-2+IFN-γ- or TNF-α+IL-2-IFN-γ-. A significantly lower percentage of polyfunctional T helper type 1 (Th1) responses (TNF-α+IFN-γ+IL-2+) and type 2 (Th2) responses (IL-4) were present in the infants compared to adults. Moreover, a significantly higher percentage of infants' functional CD4+ T cells were restricted to CD45RA-CCR7+CD27+ phenotype, consistent with early-stage differentiated pertussis-specific memory CD4+ T cells. We show for the first time that DTaP vaccination-induced CD4+ T cells in infants are functionally and phenotypically dissimilar from those of adults. PMID:22861368

  6. Mtb-Specific CD27low CD4 T Cells as Markers of Lung Tissue Destruction during Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nikitina, Irina Yu; Kondratuk, Natalya A.; Kosmiadi, George A.; Amansahedov, Rasul B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Effector CD4 T cells represent a key component of the host’s anti-tuberculosis immune defense. Successful differentiation and functioning of effector lymphocytes protects the host against severe M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. On the other hand, effector T cell differentiation depends on disease severity/activity, as T cell responses are driven by antigenic and inflammatory stimuli released during infection. Thus, tuberculosis (TB) progression and the degree of effector CD4 T cell differentiation are interrelated, but the relationships are complex and not well understood. We have analyzed an association between the degree of Mtb-specific CD4 T cell differentiation and severity/activity of pulmonary TB infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The degree of CD4 T cell differentiation was assessed by measuring the percentages of highly differentiated CD27low cells within a population of Mtb- specific CD4 T lymphocytes (“CD27lowIFN-γ+” cells). The percentages of CD27lowIFN-γ+ cells were low in healthy donors (median, 33.1%) and TB contacts (21.8%) but increased in TB patients (47.3%, p<0.0005). Within the group of patients, the percentages of CD27lowIFN-γ+ cells were uniformly high in the lungs (>76%), but varied in blood (12–92%). The major correlate for the accumulation of CD27lowIFN-γ+ cells in blood was lung destruction (r = 0.65, p = 2.7×10−7). A cutoff of 47% of CD27lowIFN-γ+ cells discriminated patients with high and low degree of lung destruction (sensitivity 89%, specificity 74%); a decline in CD27lowIFN-γ+cells following TB therapy correlated with repair and/or reduction of lung destruction (p<0.01). Conclusions Highly differentiated CD27low Mtb-specific (CD27lowIFN-γ+) CD4 T cells accumulate in the lungs and circulate in the blood of patients with active pulmonary TB. Accumulation of CD27lowIFN-γ+ cells in the blood is associated with lung destruction. The findings indicate that there is no deficiency in CD4 T cell

  7. T-cell receptor-CD4 physical association in a murine T-cell hybridoma: induction by antigen receptor ligation.

    PubMed Central

    Mittler, R S; Goldman, S J; Spitalny, G L; Burakoff, S J

    1989-01-01

    By employing flow cytometric analysis and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we examined the physical relationship between the T-cell receptor-CD3 complex (Ti-CD3) and the CD4 molecule on helper T cells. Through the use of an L3T4-negative murine T-cell hybridoma infectant expressing the human CD4 gene and having antigen specificity for HLA-DR, we show that binding of the Ti-CD3 complex with an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody induces its redistribution proximal to cell-surface CD4. FRET efficiency was 9.4% on cells labeled with rhodaminated anti-CD3 and fluoresceinated anti-CD4. FRET was found to be temperature dependent, since similarly treated cells held at 4 degrees C displayed a FRET efficiency of less than 1%. Energy transfer was evident within 3 min after warming cells to 37 degrees C. Energy transfer was not detected between Ti-CD3 and the abundantly expressed leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Of greater significance was our observation that hybridomas infected with a truncated CD4 gene lacking the cytoplasmic domain failed to transfer energy despite the fact that CD4 was expressed on the cell surface at levels equivalent to or greater than the wild type. These studies suggest that after crosslinking of the Ti-CD3 on CD4+ T cells, a physical association occurs between the antigen receptor complex and CD4 and that the association is dependent upon the presence of the cytoplasmic domain of CD4. PMID:2530583

  8. Hoxb4 Overexpression in CD4 Memory Phenotype T Cells Increases the Central Memory Population upon Homeostatic Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Marilaine; Labrecque, Nathalie; Bijl, Janet J.

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cell populations allow a rapid immune response to pathogens that have been previously encountered and thus form the basis of success in vaccinations. However, the molecular pathways underlying the development and maintenance of these cells are only starting to be unveiled. Memory T cells have the capacity to self renew as do hematopoietic stem cells, and overlapping gene expression profiles suggested that these cells might use the same self-renewal pathways. The transcription factor Hoxb4 has been shown to promote self-renewal divisions of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in an expansion of these cells. In this study we investigated whether overexpression of Hoxb4 could provide an advantage to CD4 memory phenotype T cells in engrafting the niche of T cell deficient mice following adoptive transfer. Competitive transplantation experiments demonstrated that CD4 memory phenotype T cells derived from mice transgenic for Hoxb4 contributed overall less to the repopulation of the lymphoid organs than wild type CD4 memory phenotype T cells after two months. These proportions were relatively maintained following serial transplantation in secondary and tertiary mice. Interestingly, a significantly higher percentage of the Hoxb4 CD4 memory phenotype T cell population expressed the CD62L and Ly6C surface markers, characteristic for central memory T cells, after homeostatic proliferation. Thus Hoxb4 favours the maintenance and increase of the CD4 central memory phenotype T cell population. These cells are more stem cell like and might eventually lead to an advantage of Hoxb4 T cells after subjecting the cells to additional rounds of proliferation. PMID:24324706

  9. The dual functions of Fas ligand in the regulation of peripheral CD8+ and CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ivy; Fink, Pamela J.

    2000-01-01

    Although Fas ligand (FasL) is well characterized for its capacity to deliver a death signal through its receptor Fas, recent work demonstrates that FasL also can receive signals facilitating antigen (Ag)-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The fact that the gld mutation differentially influences the proliferative capacity of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells presented the intriguing possibility that a single molecule may play opposing roles in these two subpopulations. The present study focuses on how these positive and negative regulatory roles are balanced. We show that naive CD4