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Sample records for circulating smooth muscle

  1. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  2. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  3. Smooth Muscle Strips for Intestinal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Walthers, Christopher M.; Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M.; Dunn, James C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Functionally contracting smooth muscle is an essential part of the engineered intestine that has not been replicated in vitro. The purpose of this study is to produce contracting smooth muscle in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle organization. We employed intact smooth muscle strips and compared them to dissociated smooth muscle cells in culture for 14 days. Cells isolated by enzymatic digestion quickly lost maturity markers for smooth muscle cells and contained few enteric neural and glial cells. Cultured smooth muscle strips exhibited periodic contraction and maintained neural and glial markers. Smooth muscle strips cultured for 14 days also exhibited regular fluctuation of intracellular calcium, whereas cultured smooth muscle cells did not. After implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds, smooth muscle strip constructs expressed high levels of smooth muscle maturity markers as well as enteric neural and glial cells. Intact smooth muscle strips may be a useful component for engineered intestinal smooth muscle. PMID:25486279

  4. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  5. Leiomodin and tropomodulin in smooth muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that actin filament remodeling is critical for smooth muscle contraction, which implicates actin filament ends as important sites for regulation of contraction. Tropomodulin (Tmod) and smooth muscle leiomodin (SM-Lmod) have been found in many tissues containing smooth muscle by protein immunoblot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both proteins cofractionate with tropomyosin in the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of rabbit stomach smooth muscle and are solubilized by high salt. SM-Lmod binds muscle tropomyosin, a biochemical activity characteristic of Tmod proteins. SM-Lmod staining is present along the length of actin filaments in rat intestinal smooth muscle, while Tmod stains in a punctate pattern distinct from that of actin filaments or the dense body marker alpha-actinin. After smooth muscle is hypercontracted by treatment with 10 mM Ca(2+), both SM-Lmod and Tmod are found near alpha-actinin at the periphery of actin-rich contraction bands. These data suggest that SM-Lmod is a novel component of the smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, that the pointed ends of actin filaments in smooth muscle may be capped by Tmod in localized clusters.

  6. Small Heat Shock Proteins in Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Salinthone, Sonemany; Tyagi, Manoj; Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    The small heat shock proteins (HSPs) HSP20, HSP27 and αB-crystallin are chaperone proteins that are abundantly expressed in smooth muscles are important modulators of muscle contraction, cell migration and cell survival. This review focuses on factors regulating expression of small HSPs in smooth muscle, signaling pathways that regulate macromolecular structure and the biochemical and cellular functions of small HSPs. Cellular processes regulated by small HSPs include chaperoning denatured proteins, maintaining cellular redox state and modifying filamentous actin polymerization. These processes influence smooth muscle proliferation, cell migration, cell survival, muscle contraction and synthesis of signaling proteins. Understanding functions of small heat shock proteins is relevant to mechanisms of disease in which dysfunctional smooth muscle causes symptoms, or is a target of drug therapy. One example is that secreted HSP27 may be a useful marker of inflammation during atherogenesis. Another is that phosphorylated HSP20 which relaxes smooth muscle may prove to be highly relevant to treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, asthma, premature labor and overactive bladder. Because small HSPs also modulate smooth muscle proliferation and cell migration they may prove to be targets for developing effective, novel treatments of clinical problems arising from remodeling of smooth muscle in vascular, respiratory and urogenital systems. PMID:18579210

  7. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  8. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  9. Effects of hydrogen sulphide in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Ralevic, Vera; Roberts, Richard E

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the gaseous pollutant, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) can be synthesised in the body and has a multitude of biological actions. This review summarizes some of the actions of this 'gasotransmitter' in influencing the smooth muscle that is responsible for controlling muscular activity of hollow organs. In the vasculature, while H2S can cause vasoconstriction by complex interactions with other biologically important gases, such as nitric oxide, the prevailing response is vasorelaxation. While most vasorelaxation responses occur by a direct action of H2S on smooth muscle cells, it has recently been proposed to be an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S also promotes relaxation in other smooth muscle preparations including bronchioles, the bladder, gastrointestinal tract and myometrium, opening up the opportunity of exploiting the pharmacology of H2S in the treatment of conditions where smooth muscle tone is excessive. The original concept, that H2S caused smooth muscle relaxation by activating ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, has been supplemented with observations that H2S can also modify the activity of other potassium channels, intracellular pH, phosphodiesterase activity and transient receptor potential channels on sensory nerves. While the enzymes responsible for generating endogenous H2S are widely expressed in smooth muscle preparations, it is much less clear what the physiological role of H2S is in determining smooth muscle contractility. Clarification of this requires the development of potent and selective inhibitors of H2S-generating enzymes.

  10. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  11. Migration of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Migration of smooth muscle cells is a process fundamental to development of hollow organs, including blood vessels and the airways. Migration is also thought to be part of the response to tissue injury. It has also been suggested to contribute to airways remodeling triggered by chronic inflammation. In both nonmuscle and smooth muscle cells numerous external signaling molecules and internal signal transduction pathways contribute to cell migration. The review includes evidence for the functional significance of airway smooth muscle migration, a summary of promigratory and antimigratory agents, and summaries of important signaling pathways mediating migration. Important signaling pathways and effector proteins described include small G proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3-K), Rho activated protein kinase (ROCK), p21-activated protein kinases (PAK), Src family tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These signaling modules control multiple critical effector proteins including actin nucleating, capping and severing proteins, myosin motors, and proteins that remodel microtubules. Actin filament remodeling, focal contact remodeling and propulsive force of molecular motors are all coordinated to move cells along gradients of chemical cues, matrix adhesiveness, or matrix stiffness. Airway smooth muscle cell migration can be modulated in vitro by drugs commonly used in pulmonary medicine including β-adrenergic agonists and corticosteroids. Future studies of airway smooth muscle cell migration may uncover novel targets for drugs aimed at modifying airway remodeling. PMID:18094091

  12. A monoclonal antibody against alpha-smooth muscle actin: a new probe for smooth muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (anti-alpha sm-1) recognizing exclusively alpha- smooth muscle actin was selected and characterized after immunization of BALB/c mice with the NH2-terminal synthetic decapeptide of alpha- smooth muscle actin coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Anti-alpha sm- 1 helped in distinguishing smooth muscle cells from fibroblasts in mixed cultures such as rat dermal fibroblasts and chicken embryo fibroblasts. In the aortic media, it recognized a hitherto unknown population of cells negative for alpha-smooth muscle actin and for desmin. In 5-d-old rats, this population is about half of the medial cells and becomes only 8 +/- 5% in 6-wk-old animals. In cultures of rat aortic media SMCs, there is a progressive increase of this cell population together with a progressive decrease in the number of alpha- smooth muscle actin-containing stress fibers per cell. Double immunofluorescent studies carried out with anti-alpha sm-1 and anti- desmin antibodies in several organs revealed a heterogeneity of stromal cells. Desmin-negative, alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells were found in the rat intestinal muscularis mucosae and in the dermis around hair follicles. Moreover, desmin-positive, alpha-smooth muscle actin- negative cells were identified in the intestinal submucosa, rat testis interstitium, and uterine stroma. alpha-Smooth muscle actin was also found in myoepithelial cells of mammary and salivary glands, which are known to express cytokeratins. Finally, alpha-smooth muscle actin is present in stromal cells of mammary carcinomas, previously considered fibroblastic in nature. Thus, anti-alpha sm-1 antibody appears to be a powerful probe in the study of smooth muscle differentiation in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:3539945

  13. Autophagic regulation of smooth muscle cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy regulates the metabolism, survival, and function of numerous cell types, including those comprising the cardiovascular system. In the vasculature, changes in autophagy have been documented in atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions and in hypertensive vessels. The biology of vascular smooth muscle cells appears particularly sensitive to changes in the autophagic program. Recent evidence indicates that stimuli or stressors evoked during the course of vascular disease can regulate autophagic activity, resulting in modulation of VSMC phenotype and viability. In particular, certain growth factors and cytokines, oxygen tension, and pharmacological drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy in smooth muscle cells. Importantly, each of these stimuli has a redox component, typically associated with changes in the abundance of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or lipid species. Collective findings support the hypothesis that autophagy plays a critical role in vascular remodeling by regulating smooth muscle cell phenotype transitions and by influencing the cellular response to stress. In this graphical review, we summarize current knowledge on the role of autophagy in the biology of the smooth muscle cell in (patho)physiology. PMID:25544597

  14. On the thermodynamics of smooth muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stålhand, Jonas; McMeeking, Robert M.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2016-09-01

    Cell function is based on many dynamically complex networks of interacting biochemical reactions. Enzymes may increase the rate of only those reactions that are thermodynamically consistent. In this paper we specifically treat the contraction of smooth muscle cells from the continuum thermodynamics point of view by considering them as an open system where matter passes through the cell membrane. We systematically set up a well-known four-state kinetic model for the cross-bridge interaction of actin and myosin in smooth muscle, where the transition between each state is driven by forward and reverse reactions. Chemical, mechanical and energy balance laws are provided in local forms, while energy balance is also formulated in the more convenient temperature form. We derive the local (non-negative) production of entropy from which we deduce the reduced entropy inequality and the constitutive equations for the first Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor, the heat flux, the ion and molecular flux and the entropy. One example for smooth muscle contraction is analyzed in more detail in order to provide orientation within the established general thermodynamic framework. In particular the stress evolution, heat generation, muscle shorting rate and a condition for muscle cooling are derived.

  15. Calcium Sensitization Mechanisms in Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Perrino, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    An increase in intracellular Ca2+ is the primary trigger of contraction of gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscles. However, increasing the Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofilaments by elevating myosin light chain phosphorylation also plays an essential role. Inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase activity with protein kinase C-potentiated phosphatase inhibitor protein-17 kDa (CPI-17) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation is considered to be the primary mechanism underlying myofilament Ca2+ sensitization. The relative importance of Ca2+ sensitization mechanisms to the diverse patterns of GI motility is likely related to the varied functional roles of GI smooth muscles. Increases in CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in response to agonist stimulation regulate myosin light chain phosphatase activity in phasic, tonic, and sphincteric GI smooth muscles. Recent evidence suggests that MYPT1 phosphorylation may also contribute to force generation by reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms responsible for maintaining constitutive CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in GI smooth muscles are still largely unknown. The characteristics of the cell-types comprising the neuroeffector junction lead to fundamental differences between the effects of exogenous agonists and endogenous neurotransmitters on Ca2+ sensitization mechanisms. The contribution of various cell-types within the tunica muscularis to the motor responses of GI organs to neurotransmission must be considered when determining the mechanisms by which Ca2+ sensitization pathways are activated. The signaling pathways regulating Ca2+ sensitization may provide novel therapeutic strategies for controlling GI motility. This article will provide an overview of the current understanding of the biochemical basis for the regulation of Ca2+ sensitization, while also discussing the functional importance to different smooth muscles of the GI tract. PMID:26701920

  16. Vascular calcification: Mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Jane A

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent and, when present, is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. Vascular smooth muscle cells play an integral role in mediating vessel calcification by undergoing differentiation to osteoblast-like cells and generating matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for calcium-phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Once believed to be a passive process, it is now recognized that vascular calcification is a complex and highly regulated process that involves activation of cellular signaling pathways, circulating inhibitors of calcification, genetic factors, and hormones. This review will examine several of the key mechanisms linking vascular smooth muscle cells to vessel calcification that may be targeted to reduce vessel wall mineralization and, thereby, reduce cardiovascular risk.

  17. Action of acetylcholine on smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bolton, T B; Lim, S P

    1991-01-01

    Contraction of smooth muscle by acetylcholine is mediated by activation of muscarinic receptors of which M2 and M3 subtypes are present in longitudinal muscle of guinea pig intestine. In single cells, muscarinic receptor activation evokes calcium release from stores which raises the internal free calcium concentration and causes opening of calcium-activated potassium channels. The rise in internal calcium suppresses the voltage-dependent inward calcium current. A third important effect is the opening of channels which cause depolarization of the membrane and so increase action potential discharge and contraction in the whole muscle. These channels were studied by voltage-clamp of single cells from longitudinal muscle of rabbit small intestine. They were found to be permeable to Na and K but not detectably permeable to Cl. They can pass Ca but the amount entering the cell is not sufficient to raise the internal calcium concentration appreciably.

  18. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  19. Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction and the Basis for Pharmacologic Treatment of Smooth Muscle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brozovich, F.V.; Nicholson, C.J.; Degen, C.V.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Aggarwal, M.

    2016-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell directly drives the contraction of the vascular wall and hence regulates the size of the blood vessel lumen. We review here the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which agonists, therapeutics, and diseases regulate contractility of the vascular smooth muscle cell and we place this within the context of whole body function. We also discuss the implications for personalized medicine and highlight specific potential target molecules that may provide opportunities for the future development of new therapeutics to regulate vascular function. PMID:27037223

  20. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  1. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm.

  2. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  3. Regeneration and Maintenance of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walthers, Christopher M.

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical engineering that involves growing artificial organs to replace those lost to disease or injury. Within tissue engineering, there is a demand for artificial smooth muscle to repair tissues of the digestive tract, bladder, and vascular systems. Attempts to develop engineered smooth muscle tissues capable of contracting with sufficient strength to be clinically relevant have so far proven unsatisfactory. The goal of this research was to develop and sustain mature, contractile smooth muscle. Survival of implanted SMCs is critical to sustain the benefits of engineered smooth muscle. Survival of implanted smooth muscle cells was studied with layered, electrospun polycaprolactone implants with lasercut holes ranging from 0--25% porosity. It was found that greater angiogenesis was associated with increased survival of implanted cells, with a large increase at a threshold between 20% and 25% porosity. Heparan sulfate coatings improved the speed of blood vessel infiltration after 14 days of implantation. With these considerations, thicker engineered tissues may be possible. An improved smooth muscle tissue culture technique was utilized. Contracting smooth muscle was produced in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle tissue organization, specifically by sustaining intact smooth muscle strips rather than dissociating tissue in to isolated smooth muscle cells. Isolated cells showed a decrease in maturity and contained fewer enteric neural and glial cells. Muscle strips also exhibited periodic contraction and regular fluctuation of intracellular calclium. The muscle strip maturity persisted after implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds. A low-cost, disposable bioreactor was developed to further improve maturity of cultured smooth muscle cells in an environment of controlled cyclical stress.The bioreactor consistently applied repeated mechanical strain with controllable inputs for strain

  4. Urethane and contraction of vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Altura, B. M.; Weinberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    1 In vitro studies were undertaken on rat aortic strips and portal vein segments in order to determine whether or not the anaesthetic, urethane, can exert direct actions on vascular smooth muscle. 2 Urethane was found to inhibit development of spontaneous mechanical activity. This action took place with a urethane concentration as little as one tenth of that found in anaesthetic plasma concentratios, i.e., 10(-3) M. 3 Urethane (10(-3 to 10(-1) M) dose-dependently attenuated contractions induced by adrenaline, angiotensin and KCl. These inhibitory actions were observed with urethane added either before or after the induced contractions. 4 Ca2+-induced contractions of K+-depolarized aortae and portal veins were also attenuated, dose-dependently, by urethane. 5 All of these inhibitory effects were completely, and almost immediately, reversed upon washing out the anaesthetic from the organ baths. 6 A variety of pharmacological antagonists failed to mimic or affect the inhibitory effects induced by urethane. 7 These data suggest that plasma concentrations of urethane commonly associated with induction of surgical anaesthesia can induce, directly, relaxation of vascular muscle. PMID:497529

  5. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  6. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion.

  7. Mechanotransduction in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Young, S H; Ennes, H S; Mayer, E A

    1997-11-15

    We evaluated mechanisms which mediate alterations in intracellular biochemical events in response to transient mechanical stimulation of colonic smooth muscle cells. Cultured myocytes from the circular muscle layer of the rabbit distal colon responded to brief focal mechanical deformation of the plasma membrane with a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) with peak of 422.7 +/- 43.8 nm above an average resting [Ca2+]i of 104.8 +/- 10.9 nM (n = 57) followed by both rapid and prolonged recovery phases. The peak [Ca2+]i increase was reduced by 50% in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, while the prolonged [Ca2+]i recovery was either abolished or reduced to less than or = 15% of control values. In contrast, no significant effect of gadolinium chloride (100 microM) or lanthanum chloride (25 microM) on either peak transient or prolonged [Ca2+]i recovery was observed. Pretreatment of cells with thapsigargin (1 microM) resulted in a 25% reduction of the mechanically induced peak [Ca2+]i response, while the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 had no effect on the [Ca2+]i transient peak. [Ca2+]i transients were abolished when cells previously treated with thapsigargin were mechanically stimulated in Ca2+-free solution, or when Ca2+ stores were depleted by thapsigargin in Ca2+-free solution. Pretreatment with the microfilament disrupting drug cytochalasin D (10 microM) or microinjection of myocytes with an intracellular saline resulted in complete inhibition of the transient. The effect of cytochalasin D was reversible and did not prevent the [Ca2+]i increases in response to thapsigargin. These results suggest a communication, which may be mediated by direct mechanical link via actin filaments, between the plasma membrane and an internal Ca2+ store.

  8. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis.

  9. Nox regulation of smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Ritsick, Darren R; Edens, William A; Finnerty, Victoria; Lambeth, J David

    2007-07-01

    The catalytic subunit gp91phox (Nox2) of the NADPH oxidase of mammalian phagocytes is activated by microbes and immune mediators to produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which participate in microbial killing. Homologs of gp91phox, the Nox and Duox enzymes, were recently described in a range of organisms, including plants, vertebrates, and invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster. While their enzymology and cell biology are being extensively studied in many laboratories, little is known about in vivo functions of Noxes. Here, we establish and use an inducible system for RNAi to discover functions of dNox, an ortholog of human Nox5 in Drosophila. We report here that depletion of dNox in musculature causes retention of mature eggs within ovaries, leading to female sterility. In dNox-depleted ovaries and ovaries treated with a Nox inhibitor, muscular contractions induced by the neuropeptide proctolin are markedly inhibited. This functional defect results from a requirement for dNox-for the proctolin-induced calcium flux in Drosophila ovaries. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel biological role for Nox-generated ROS in mediating agonist-induced calcium flux and smooth muscle contraction.

  10. Nodular smooth muscle metaplasia in multiple peritoneal endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Yoon, Gun; Ha, Sang Yun; Song, Sang Yong

    2015-01-01

    We report here an unusual presentation of peritoneal endometriosis with smooth muscle metaplasia as multiple protruding masses on the lateral pelvic wall. Smooth muscle metaplasia is a common finding in rectovaginal endometriosis, whereas in peritoneal endometriosis, smooth muscle metaplasia is uncommon and its nodular presentation on the pelvic wall is even rarer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of nodular smooth muscle metaplasia occurring in peritoneal endometriosis. As observed in this case, when performing laparoscopic surgery in order to excise malignant tumors of intra-abdominal or pelvic organs, it can be difficult for surgeons to distinguish the metastatic tumors from benign nodular pelvic wall lesions, including endometriosis, based on the gross findings only. Therefore, an intraoperative frozen section biopsy of the pelvic wall nodules should be performed to evaluate the peritoneal involvement by malignant tumors. Moreover, this report implies that peritoneal endometriosis, as well as rectovaginal endometriosis, can clinically present as nodular lesions if obvious smooth muscle metaplasia is present. The pathological investigation of smooth muscle cells in peritoneal lesions can contribute not only to the precise diagnosis but also to the structure and function of smooth muscle cells and related cells involved in the histogenesis of peritoneal endometriosis.

  11. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease.

  12. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  13. Localization of phospholamban in smooth muscle using immunogold electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Phospholamban, the putative regulator of the Ca2+-ATPase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum, was immunolocalized in canine visceral and vascular smooth muscle. Gently disrupted tissues were labeled with an affinity-purified phospholamban polyclonal antibody and indirect immunogold, using preembedding techniques. The sarcoplasmic reticulum of smooth muscle cells was specifically labeled with patches of immunogold distributed in a nonuniform fashion, while the sarcolemma did not appear to contain any phospholamban. The outer nuclear envelopes were also observed to be heavily labeled with the affinity- purified phospholamban polyclonal antibody. These findings suggest that phospholamban may play a role in the regulation of cytoplasmic and intranuclear calcium levels in smooth muscle cells. PMID:3417762

  14. Tobacco constituents are mitogenic for arterial smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Hefton, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP) purified from flue-cured tobacco leaves, tar-derived material (TAR), the water soluble, nondialyzable, delipidized extract of cigarette smoke condensate, rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, but not adventitial fibroblasts. The mitogenicity appears to depend on polyphenol epitopes on carrier molecules. Ellagic acid, another plant polyphenol, inhibited arterial smooth-muscle proliferation. These results suggest that a number of ubiquitous, plant-derived substances may influence smooth-muscle cell proliferation in the arterial wall.

  15. Vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells: building and repairing blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Majesky, Mark W; Dong, Xiu Rong; Regan, Jenna N; Hoglund, Virginia J

    2011-02-01

    Molecular pathways that control the specification, migration, and number of available smooth muscle progenitor cells play key roles in determining blood vessel size and structure, capacity for tissue repair, and progression of age-related disorders. Defects in these pathways produce malformations of developing blood vessels, depletion of smooth muscle progenitor cell pools for vessel wall maintenance and repair, and aberrant activation of alternative differentiation pathways in vascular disease. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that uniquely specify and maintain vascular smooth muscle cell precursors is essential if we are to use advances in stem and progenitor cell biology and somatic cell reprogramming for applications directed to the vessel wall.

  16. Caffeine relaxes smooth muscle through actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Tazzeo, Tracy; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Khasnis, Mukta D; Eto, Masumi; Janssen, Luke J

    2012-08-15

    Caffeine is sometimes used in cell physiological studies to release internally stored Ca(2+). We obtained evidence that caffeine may also act through a different mechanism that has not been previously described and sought to examine this in greater detail. We ruled out a role for phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, since the effect was 1) not reversed by inhibiting PKA or adenylate cyclase; 2) not exacerbated by inhibiting PDE4; and 3) not mimicked by submillimolar caffeine nor theophylline, both of which are sufficient to inhibit PDE. Although caffeine is an agonist of bitter taste receptors, which in turn mediate bronchodilation, its relaxant effect was not mimicked by quinine. After permeabilizing the membrane using β-escin and depleting the internal Ca(2+) store using A23187, we found that 10 mM caffeine reversed tone evoked by direct application of Ca(2+), suggesting it functionally antagonizes the contractile apparatus. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we found that caffeine did not affect phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by MLC kinase, actin-filament motility catalyzed by MLC kinase, phosphorylation of CPI-17 by either protein kinase C or RhoA kinase, nor the activity of MLC-phosphatase. However, we did obtain evidence that caffeine decreased actin filament binding to phosphorylated myosin heads and increased the ratio of globular to filamentous actin in precontracted tissues. We conclude that, in addition to its other non-RyR targets, caffeine also interferes with actin function (decreased binding by myosin, possibly with depolymerization), an effect that should be borne in mind in studies using caffeine to probe excitation-contraction coupling in smooth muscle.

  17. Neuroblastoma cell lines showing smooth muscle cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, T; Mine, H; Horii, Y; Takahashi, K; Nagai, R; Morishita, R; Komada, M; Asada, Y; Sawada, T

    2000-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is a tumor that is derived from the neural crest. Recent studies demonstrated that several human neuroblastoma cell lines exhibit at least three morphologic types: neuroblastic (N)-type, substrate-adhesive (S)-type and intermediate (I)-type cells. However, the origin of the S-type cells has not been clearly identified. In this study, the expressions of smooth muscle-specific proteins (desmin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, basic calponin and the smooth muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms of SM1 and SM2) in three parent and four cloned neuroblastoma cell lines, composed of S-type cells, were examined by indirect immunofluorescence, Western blot and/or by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Desmin was found in two of the seven cell lines, and alpha-smooth muscle actin and basic calponin were detected in all of seven of the cell lines. In three parent cell lines and one cloned cell line composed of N-type cells, none of three smooth muscle-specific proteins were detected. In smooth muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms, SM1 was detected in two parent cell lines composed of S-type cells (MP-N-MS and KP-N-YS) by immunofluorescence, Western blot and/or by RT-PCR, whereas the SM2 isoform was detected in one parent cell line (MP-N-MS) by RT-PCR. These findings indicate that S-type cells have either the immature or mature smooth muscle cell phenotype, and neural crest cells very likely have the ability of to differentiate into smooth muscle cells in the human system.

  18. Anisotropic Smoothing Improves DT-MRI-Based Muscle Fiber Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Amanda K. W.; Ding, Zhaohua; Elder, Christopher P.; Towse, Theodore F.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of anisotropic smoothing on fiber tracking measures, including pennation angle, fiber tract length, and fiber tract number in the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle in healthy subjects using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI). Materials and Methods 3T DW-MRI data were used for muscle fiber tractography in the MG of healthy subjects. Anisotropic smoothing was applied at three levels (5%, 10%, 15%), and pennation angle, tract length, fiber tract number, fractional anisotropy, and principal eigenvector orientation were quantified for each smoothing level. Results Fiber tract length increased with pre-fiber tracking smoothing, and local heterogeneities in fiber direction were reduced. However, pennation angle was not affected by smoothing. Conclusion Modest anisotropic smoothing (10%) improved fiber-tracking results, while preserving structural features. PMID:26010830

  19. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  20. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice.

  1. Benzydamine Oral Spray Inhibiting Parasympathetic Function of Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Benzydamine is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents agent with anti-inflammatory and local anesthesia properties that is available in the entire world as an oral spray for oral mucositis patients who are suffering from radiation effects. The effect of benzydamine on oral mucositis in vivo is well known; however, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has rarely been explored. During administration of the benzydamine for oral symptoms, it might affect the trachea via oral intake or inhalation. Methods We examined the effectiveness of benzydamine on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle. The following assessments of benzydamine were performed: effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; effect on contraction caused by 10-6M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; and effect of the drug on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Results Addition of methacholine to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of benzydamine at doses of 10-5M or above elicited a significant relaxation response to 10-6M methacholine-induced contraction. Benzydamine could inhibit electrical field stimulation-induced spike contraction. It alone had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. Conclusion This study indicated that high concentrations of benzydamine might actually inhibit parasympathetic function of the trachea. Benzydamine might reduce asthma attacks in oral mucositis patients because it could inhibit parasympathetic function and reduce methacholine-induced contraction of tracheal smooth muscle. PMID:25729498

  2. Piperine Congeners as Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mair, Christina E; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Wimmer, Laurin; Nemetz-Fiedler, Daniel; Sider, Nadine; Heiss, Elke H; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-08-01

    Successful vascular healing after percutaneous coronary interventions is related to the inhibition of abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and efficient re-endothelialization. In the search for vascular smooth muscle cell anti-proliferative agents from natural sources we identified piperine (1), the main pungent constituent of the fruits from Piper nigrum (black pepper). Piperine inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 21.6 µM, as quantified by a resazurin conversion assay. Investigations of ten piperamides isolated from black pepper fruits and 15 synthesized piperine derivatives resulted in the identification of three potent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibitors: the natural alkaloid pipertipine (4), and the two synthetic derivatives (2E,4E)-N,N-dibutyl-5-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dienamide (14) and (E)-N,N-dibutyl-3-(naphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)acrylamide (20). They showed IC50 values of 3.38, 6.00, and 7.85 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the synthetic compound (2E,4E)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (12) was found to be cell type selective, by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 11.8 µM without influencing the growth of human endothelial cells. PMID:26132851

  3. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  4. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  5. Role of ROCK expression in gallbladder smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Ding, You-Ming; Wang, Chun-Tao; Wang, Wei-Xing

    2015-08-01

    Cholelithiasis is a common medical condition whose incidence rate is increasing yearly, while its pathogenesis has yet to be elucidated. The present study assessed the expression of Rho-kinase (ROCK) in gallbladder smooth muscles and its effect on the contractile function of gallbladder smooth muscles during gallstone formation. Thirty male guinea pigs were randomly divided into three groups: The control group, the gallstone model group and the fasudil interference group. The fasting volume (FV) and bile capacity of the gallbladder (FB) as well as the total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) contents of the gallbladder bile were determined. In addition, the gallbladder was dissected to identify whether any gallstones had formed. Part of the gallbladder tissue specimens were used for immunohistochemical analysis of ROCK expression in gallbladder smooth muscles. The results showed that four guinea pigs in the model group and eight in the fasudil group displayed gallstone formation, while there was no gallstone formation in the control group. The FV and FB were significantly increased in the model and fasudil groups. Similarly, the TC and TG contents of gallbladder bile were increased in these groups. The positive expression rate of ROCK in gallbladder smooth muscles in the model and fasudil groups was significantly reduced compared with that in the control group (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicated that the reduction of ROCK expression in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscles weakened gallbladder contraction and thereby promoted gallstone formation.

  6. Smooth Muscle Enriched Long Noncoding RNA (SMILR) Regulates Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Margaret D.; Pinel, Karine; Dakin, Rachel; Vesey, Alex T.; Diver, Louise; Mackenzie, Ruth; Garcia, Raquel; Welsh, Paul; Sattar, Naveed; Hamilton, Graham; Joshi, Nikhil; Dweck, Marc R.; Miano, Joseph M.; McBride, Martin W.; Newby, David E.; McDonald, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Phenotypic switching of vascular smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state is implicated in diverse vascular pathologies, including atherogenesis, plaque stabilization, and neointimal hyperplasia. However, very little is known about the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during this process. Here, we investigated a role for lncRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cell biology and pathology. Methods and Results— Using RNA sequencing, we identified >300 lncRNAs whose expression was altered in human saphenous vein vascular smooth muscle cells following stimulation with interleukin-1α and platelet-derived growth factor. We focused on a novel lncRNA (Ensembl: RP11-94A24.1), which we termed smooth muscle–induced lncRNA enhances replication (SMILR). Following stimulation, SMILR expression was increased in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was detected in conditioned media. Furthermore, knockdown of SMILR markedly reduced cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we noted that expression of genes proximal to SMILR was also altered by interleukin-1α/platelet-derived growth factor treatment, and HAS2 expression was reduced by SMILR knockdown. In human samples, we observed increased expression of SMILR in unstable atherosclerotic plaques and detected increased levels in plasma from patients with high plasma C-reactive protein. Conclusions— These results identify SMILR as a driver of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suggest that modulation of SMILR may be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce vascular pathologies. PMID:27052414

  7. Congenital smooth muscle hamartoma of the palpebral conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Mora, L Evelyn; Rodríguez-Reyes, Abelardo A; Vera, Ana M; Rubio, Rosa Isela; Mayorquín-Ruiz, Mariana; Salcedo, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Smooth muscle hamartoma is defined as a disorganized focus or an overgrowth of mature smooth muscle, generally with low capacity of autonomous growth and benign behavior. The implicated tissues are mature and proliferate in a disorganized fashion. A healthy 5-day-old Mexican boy was referred to the authors' hospital in México city for evaluation of a "cystic" lesion of the right eye that had been noted since birth. The pregnancy and delivery were unremarkable. On physical examination, there was a reddish-pink soft lesion with a tender "cystic" appearance, which was probably emerging from the upper eyelid conjunctiva, which measured 2.7 cm in its widest diameter and transilluminated. Ultrasound imaging revealed an anterior "cystic" lesion with normally formed phakic eye. An excisional biopsy was performed, and the lesion was dissected from the upper tarsal subconjunctival space. Subsequent histologic and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with the diagnosis of congenital smooth muscle hamartoma (CSMH) of the tarsal conjunctiva. The authors' research revealed that only one case of CSMH localized in the conjunctiva (Roper GJ, Smith MS, Lueder GT. Congenital smooth muscle hamartoma of the conjunctival fornix. Am J Ophthalmol. 1999;128:643-4) has been reported to date in the literature. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this current case would be the second case reported of CSMH in this anatomic location. Therefore, the authors' recommendation is to include CSMH in the differential diagnosis of a cystic mass that presents in the fornix and palpebral conjunctiva.

  8. Airway smooth muscle in the pathophysiology and treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays an integral part in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is responsible for acute bronchoconstriction, which is potentiated by constrictor hyperresponsiveness, impaired relaxation and length adaptation. ASM also contributes to airway remodeling and inflammation in asthma. In light of this, ASM is an important target in the treatment of asthma. PMID:23305987

  9. Carbon monoxide effects on calcium levels in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.; McGrath, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Previously the authors showed that carbon monoxide (CO) relaxes vascular smooth muscle in the working heart and thoracic aorta preparation perfused with hemoglobin-free, Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution. The CO-induced relaxation was not caused by hypoxia, nor was it mediated by adrenergic influences, adenosine, or prostaglandins. In these studies the effect of CO on calcium (Ca/sup + +/) concentrations in vascular smooth muscle was determined using /sup 45/Ca as a tracer. Isolated rat thoracic aorta segments were incubated with /sup 45/Ca and gassed with O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, or CO for 60 min. Verapamil was used to verify the effectiveness of the test system. Ca/sup + +/ concentrations were 488 /+ -/ 35 and 515 /+ -/ 26 mM/g tissue (X /+ -/ SE) in aortic rings gassed with O/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/, respectively. CO reduced Ca/sup + +/ concentrations significantly (P<0.01) by 29% to 369 /+ -/ 18 mM/g tissue. Verapamil treatment reduced Ca/sup + +/ concentrations by 40% to 314 /+ -/ 23 mM/g tissue. These results suggest that CO relaxes vascular smooth muscle and dilates blood vessels by decreasing Ca/sup + +/ concentrations in vascular smooth muscle.

  10. New insights in endothelial and smooth muscle cell communication.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Víctor Arana; De Haro, Roberto; Sosa-Melgarejo, Jorge; Méndez, José D

    2007-01-01

    Based on immunohistochemical techniques against connexins and the intercellular flux of staining molecules, it has previously been shown that electrotonic communication occurs among endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, this due to the presence of myoendothelial gap junctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the density of myoendothelial contacts in the left coronary and internal mammary arteries as well as in the left saphenous vein by means of electron microscopy, the distance between both cells participating in an myoendothelial contact with a semi-automatic image analysis system and the presence of homocellular and heterocellular gap junctions between endothelial and smooth muscle cells by using the immunohistochemical technique and confocal microscopy in thoracic aorta were also analyzed. The results are that all blood vessels studied present myoendothelial contacts, while density studies show that they are more abundant in the saphenous vein. The myoendothelial contact distance is constant and in no case the cytoplasmic processes reach the plasma membrane of the partner cell toward which they are advanced. Homocellular gap junctions were found between smooth muscle cells and between endothelial cells. Heterocellular gap junctions were absent, evidencing the possibility that signaling molecules between endothelial and smooth muscle cells may be transferred through plasma membranes as was once thought and not necessarily by electrotonic communication. PMID:17383847

  11. Targeting the airway smooth muscle for asthma treatment.

    PubMed

    Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca

    2009-10-01

    Asthma is a complex respiratory disease whose incidence has increased worldwide in the last decade. Currently there is no cure for asthma. Although bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory medications are effective medicines in some asthmatic patients, it is clear that an unmet therapeutic need persists for a subpopulation of individuals with severe asthma. This chronic lung disease is characterized by airflow limitation, lung inflammation, and remodeling that includes increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. In addition to its contractile properties, the ASM also contributes to the inflammatory process by producing active mediators, which modify the extracellular matrix composition and interact with inflammatory cells. These undesirable functions make interventions aimed at reducing ASM abundance an attractive strategy for novel asthma therapies. The following three mechanisms could limit the accumulation of smooth muscle: decreased cell proliferation, augmented cell apoptosis, and reduced cell migration into the smooth muscle layer. Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway or statins hold promise for asthma treatment, because they exhibit anti-inflammatory, antimigratory, and antiproliferative effects in preclinical and clinical studies, and they can target the smooth muscle. This review will discuss current knowledge of ASM biology and identify gaps in the field to stimulate future investigations of the cellular mechanisms that control ASM overabundance in asthma. Targeting ASM has the potential to be an innovative venue of treatment for patients with asthma.

  12. The pharmacology of a molluscan smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    TWAROG, B M

    1959-09-01

    The effects of a number of pharmacologically active substances on contraction and on membrane polarization of the anterior byssal retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis, L., have been studied. Tetramethylammonium bromide, trimethyl(4-oxopentyl)ammonium chloride and nicotine, like acetylcholine, produced depolarization and sustained contraction. Nicotine, on repeated application, lost acetylcholine-like activity and effectively blocked acetylcholine. In order of decreasing potency, methanthelinium, tubocurarine, benzoquinonium, tetraethylammonium, atropine, pentamethonium, and decamethonium blocked acetylcholine action. These agents did not show initial acetylcholine-like action and did not relax sustained contractions. Adrenaline, noradrenaline, tyramine, dibenamine, phentolamine, and lysergic acid diethylamide relaxed sustained contractions without reducing initial depolarization and tension development in response to acetylcholine or electrical stimuli. Adrenaline and noradrenaline often caused depolarization and contraction when first applied, and displayed relaxing action on subsequent application.

  13. Mechanical state of airway smooth muscle at very short lengths.

    PubMed

    Meiss, Richard A; Pidaparti, Ramana M

    2004-02-01

    Although the shortening of smooth muscle at physiological lengths is dominated by an interaction between external forces (loads) and internal forces, at very short lengths, internal forces appear to dominate the mechanical behavior of the active tissue. We tested the hypothesis that, under conditions of extreme shortening and low external force, the mechanical behavior of isolated canine tracheal smooth muscle tissue can be understood as a structure in which the force borne and exerted by the cross bridge and myofilament array is opposed by radially disposed connective tissue in the presence of an incompressible fluid matrix (cellular and extracellular). Strips of electrically stimulated tracheal muscle were allowed to shorten maximally under very low afterload, and large longitudinal sinusoidal vibrations (34 Hz, 1 s in duration, and up to 50% of the muscle length before vibration) were applied to highly shortened (active) tissue strips to produce reversible cross-bridge detachment. During the vibration, peak muscle force fell exponentially with successive forced elongations. After the episode, the muscle either extended itself or exerted a force against the tension transducer, depending on external conditions. The magnitude of this effect was proportional to the prior muscle stiffness and the amplitude of the vibration, indicating a recoil of strained connective tissue elements no longer opposed by cross-bridge forces. This behavior suggests that mechanical behavior at short lengths is dominated by tissue forces within a tensegrity-like structure made up of connective tissue, other extracellular matrix components, and active contractile elements.

  14. Effect of potassium and acetylcholine on canine intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hara, Y; Szurszewski, J H

    1986-03-01

    Mechanical and intracellular electrical activity were recorded simultaneously from small intestinal smooth muscle of the dog. Tonic and phasic contractions due to exogenous acetylcholine and elevated external K+ concentration were spike-dependent in longitudinal and inner circular muscle layers and spike-independent in the outer circular muscle layer. Voltage-tension curves were generated by graded depolarization of the membrane. In spike-dependent longitudinal and inner circular muscle layers the threshold voltage for initiation of spikes and contraction was approximately --53 mV. In spike-independent outer circular muscle layer the voltage threshold for contraction was approximately -42 mV. The resting membrane potential in longitudinal and inner circular muscle layers was close to the voltage threshold for initiation of spikes and contraction. In contrast, in the outer circular muscle it was approximately 20 mV more negative to the voltage threshold for contraction. In the outer circular muscle layer of whole-thickness preparations an increase in the amplitude of phasic contractions caused by acetylcholine was associated with an increase in the amplitude of the slow waves. Tone was related to the resting membrane potential. In preparations of isolated outer circular muscle acetylcholine caused depolarization of the membrane potential, slow waves and phasic contractions; comparable depolarization by increases in external K+ concentration did not induce slow waves or phasic contractions. Comparison of the effect of acetylcholine on outer circular muscle with the voltage-tension curve for this muscle layer showed that the top of the slow wave was associated with just the contractile force predicted by the voltage-tension curve. This suggests that acetylcholine altered the force of phasic contraction of the outer circular muscle through a voltage-dependent mechanism. In non-neural cells located on the serosal side of the outer circular muscle layer of the dog, cat

  15. Reflex tracheal smooth muscle contraction and bronchial vasodilation evoked by airway cooling in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pisarri, T E; Giesbrecht, G G

    1997-05-01

    Cooling intrathoracic airways by filling the pulmonary circulation with cold blood alters pulmonary mechanoreceptor discharge. To determine whether this initiates reflex changes that could contribute to airway obstruction, we measured changes in tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial arterial flow evoked by cooling. In nine chloralose-anesthetized open-chest dogs, the right pulmonary artery was cannulated and perfused; the left lung, ventilated separately, provided gas exchange. With the right lung phasically ventilated, filling the right pulmonary circulation with 5 degrees C blood increased smooth muscle tension in an innervated upper tracheal segment by 23 +/- 6 (SE) g from a baseline of 75 g. Contraction began within 10 s of injection and was maximal at approximately 30s. The response was abolished by cervical vagotomy. Bronchial arterial flow increased from 8 +/- 1 to 13 +/- 2 ml/min, with little effect on arterial blood pressure. The time course was similar to that of the tracheal response. This response was greatly attenuated after cervical vagotomy. Blood at 20 degrees C also increased tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial flow, whereas 37 degrees C blood had little effect. The results suggested that alteration of airway mechanoreceptor discharge by cooling can initiate reflexes that contribute to airway obstruction. PMID:9134906

  16. Motilin receptors on isolated gastric smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Louie, D S; Owyang, C

    1988-02-01

    Motilin has a stimulating effect on gastrointestinal motility. The mechanism of its action is not known. Direct and neuronal effects have been postulated. To determine if receptors are present on smooth muscle cells we investigated the effect of synthetic porcine motilin and its interaction with acetylcholine on isolated guinea pig gastric smooth muscle cells. Motilin elicited a dose-dependent contraction of gastric smooth muscle cells. Minimal (8.3 +/- 1.3%) and maximal (33.9 +/- 2.4%) responses were observed at 10(-12) and 10(-6) M, respectively. The ED50 of motilin was 10(-9) M. Acetylcholine also elicited a dose-response muscle contraction with a maximal response observed at 10(-7) M. Atropine (10(-7) M) completely inhibited the maximal response to acetylcholine but did not have any effect on the contractile response to motilin. In addition, dibutyryl guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (10(-3) M) and substance P antagonist, spantide (10(-4) M), also did not inhibit the action of motilin. Acetylcholine (10(-11) M) shifted the dose-response curve of motilin to the left by 1.5 log units. The maximal response to the combination of motilin (10(-6) M) and acetylcholine (10(-11) M) was 32 +/- 3.2%, which was similar to the maximal response to motilin alone. It is concluded that distinct motilin and muscarinic receptors are present on guinea pig gastric smooth muscle cells. The interaction between motilin and acetylcholine is additive and not potentiative.

  17. Insulin NO-dependent action on airways smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Papayianni, M; Gourgoulianis, K I; Molyvdas, P A

    2001-02-01

    In order to find out how insulin acts on airway smooth muscle and which mechanisms could be involved, we studied the effect of insulin on contraction induced, first, by KCl and, second, by Acetylcholine (Ach), before and after epithelium removal, and finally in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Tracheal smooth muscle strips from 24 rabbits, 6 being used for each experiment. Each muscle strip was pretreated with a solution containing either 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) Ach and increasing doses of insulin (range 10(-10)--10(-5) M) in the presence or absence of 10(-4) M L-NAME. A reference curve for contraction evoked by 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) M Ach in the presence or absence of 10(-4) M L-NAME was recorded each time before the pretreatment mentioned above. Insulin evoked a concentration-dependent inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction, induced by 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) M Ach. After epithelium removal, insulin (10(-8), 10(-7) M) evoked statistically significant increases to the contractions induced by 10(-5) M Ach compared to the contractions induced by 10(-5) M Ach and insulin in the presence of epithelium (P < 0.05). These increases were higher when 10(-4) M l-NAME was added to the bath (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these results indicate that insulin inhibits tracheal smooth muscle contraction by acting on epithelium and releasing NO.

  18. Cross-bridge elasticity in single smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    In smooth muscle, a cross-bridge mechanism is believed to be responsible for active force generation and fiber shortening. In the present studies, the viscoelastic and kinetic properties of the cross- bridge were probed by eliciting tension transients in response to small, rapid, step length changes (delta L = 0.3-1.0% Lcell in 2 ms). Tension transients were obtained in a single smooth muscle cell isolated from the toad (Bufo marinus) stomach muscularis, which was tied between a force transducer and a displacement device. To record the transients, which were of extremely small magnitude (0.1 microN), a high-frequency (400 Hz), ultrasensitive force transducer (18 mV/microN) was designed and built. The transients obtained during maximal force generation (Fmax = 2.26 microN) were characterized by a linear elastic response (Emax = 1.26 X 10(4) mN/mm2) coincident with the length step, which was followed by a biphasic tension recovery made up of two exponentials (tau fast = 5-20 ms, tau slow = 50-300 ms). During the development of force upon activation, transients were elicited. The relationship between stiffness and force was linear, which suggests that the transients originate within the cross-bridge and reflect the cross-bridge's viscoelastic and kinetic properties. The observed fiber elasticity suggests that the smooth muscle cross-bridge is considerably more compliant than in fast striated muscle. A thermodynamic model is presented that allows for an analysis of the factors contributing to the increased compliance of the smooth muscle cross-bridge. PMID:6413640

  19. Effects of oxymetazoline on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Wu, Chi-Chung

    2008-06-01

    Oxymetazoline is often used as a decongestant in rhinitis patients who are suffering from nasal obstruction. It is used as a nasal drop or spray solution. The effect on nasal mucosa in vitro or in vivo is well known. However, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has rarely been explored. During administration of the drug to the nose, it might affect the trachea via inhalation. We used our preparation to test the effectiveness of oxymetazoline on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle. A 5 mm long portion of rat trachea was submersed in 30 ml Kreb's solution in a muscle bath at 37 degrees C. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of parasympathetic mimetic agents were measured using a transducer connected to a Pentium III computer equipped with polygraphy software. The following assessments were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6)M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of oxymetazoline on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Addition of parasympathetic mimetics to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of oxymetazoline induced a significant relaxation response when the preparation was up to 10(-4) M. At the same concentration, the drug also could inhibit EFS induced spike contraction. Oxymetazoline had negligible effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. The degree of drug-induced tracheal contraction or relaxation was dose-dependent. The study indicated that high concentrations of oxymetazoline might actually antagonize cholinergic receptors of the trachea.

  20. Action on ileal smooth muscle of synthetic detergents and pardaxin.

    PubMed

    Primor, N

    1986-01-01

    Pardaxin (PX), a toxic and repellent substance isolated from the Red Sea flatfish, causes a sharp ball-like profile of drop of saline placed on a hydrophobic film to turn into a flattened one. This effect results with a decrease of the contact angle (theta) from 96 degrees to a maximum of 42 degrees at 10(-4) M of PX. The action of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), a synthetic anionic detergent, benzalkonium chloride (BAC) cationic detergent and pardaxin (PX) a toxic protein with detergent properties, were studied in the ileal guinea-pig longitudinal smooth muscle preparation. SDS (4 X 10(-4) M) and PX (5 X 10(-6) M) diminished the muscle contractile response to field stimulation (0.1 Hz, 1 msec) and to acetylcholine (Ach) and to histamine and elicited a prolonged (4-6 min) TTX-insensitive muscle contraction. The dose dependence of muscle contraction to SDS and PX was found to be sigmoidal and occurred over a narrow range of concentrations. The SDS- but not PX-induced muscle contraction could be reduced by diphenhydramine (H1 antihistamine). BAC (10(-5)-10(-4) M) suppressed the muscle's contractile response to electrical stimulation (0.1 Hz, 1 msec), to Ach, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine but did not produce muscle contraction. PX at concentrations higher than 5 X 10(-6) M is a potent detergent and at this concentration shares several pharmacological similarities with SDS.

  1. Clonogenic multipotent stem cells in human adipose tissue differentiate into functional smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Larissa V.; Alfonso, Zeni; Zhang, Rong; Leung, Joanne; Wu, Benjamin; Ignarro, Louis J.

    2006-01-01

    Smooth muscle is a major component of human tissues and is essential for the normal function of a multitude of organs including the intestine, urinary tract and the vascular system. The use of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering and regeneration strategies represents a promising alternative for smooth muscle repair. For such strategies to succeed, a reliable source of smooth muscle precursor cells must be identified. Adipose tissue provides an abundant source of multipotent cells. In this study, the capacity of processed lipoaspirate (PLA) and adipose-derived stem cells to differentiate into phenotypic and functional smooth muscle cells was evaluated. To induce differentiation, PLA cells were cultured in smooth muscle differentiation medium. Smooth muscle differentiation of PLA cells induced genetic expression of all smooth muscle markers and further confirmed by increased protein expression of smooth muscle cell-specific α actin (ASMA), calponin, caldesmon, SM22, myosin heavy chain (MHC), and smoothelin. Clonal studies of adipose derived multipotent cells demonstrated differentiation of these cells into smooth muscle cells in addition to trilineage differentiation capacity. Importantly, smooth muscle-differentiated cells, but not their precursors, exhibit the functional ability to contract and relax in direct response to pharmacologic agents. In conclusion, adipose-derived cells have the potential to differentiate into functional smooth muscle cells and, thus, adipose tissue can be a useful source of cells for treatment of injured tissues where smooth muscle plays an important role. PMID:16880387

  2. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  3. Ultrastructural Changes of the Smooth Muscle in Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shraim, Mubarak M; Eid, Refaat A; Musalam, Adel Osman; Radad, Khaled; Ibrahim, Ashraf H M; Malki, Talal A

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) is a relatively rare congenital anomaly. Despite the advances in the management techniques and neonatal intensive care, esophageal dysmotility remains a very common problem following EA/TEF repair. Our current study aimed to describe the most significant ultrastructural changes of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) trying to highlight some of the underlying mechanisms of esophageal dysmotility following EA/TEF repair. Twenty-three biopsies were obtained from the tip of the lower esophageal pouch (LEP) of 23 patients during primary repair of EA/TEF. Light microscopic examination was performed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), and Van Gieson's stains. Ultrastructural examination was done using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histopathological examination showed distortion of smooth muscle layer and deposition of an abundant amount of fibrous tissue in-between smooth muscles. Using TEM, SMCs exhibited loss of the cell-to-cell adhesion, mitochondrial vacuolation, formation of myelin figures, and apoptotic fragmentation. There were also plasmalemmal projections and formation of ghost bodies. Interestingly, SMCs were found extending pseudopodia-like projections around adjacent collagen fibers. Engulfed collagen fibers by SMCs underwent degradation within autophagic vacuoles. Degeneration of SMCs and deposition of abundant extracellular collagen fibers are prominent pathological changes in LEP of EA/TEF. These changes might contribute to the pathogenesis of esophageal dysmotility in patients who have survived EA/TEF. PMID:26548437

  4. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction. PMID:26874281

  5. Aortic smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis in relation to atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are implicated in atherogenesis by their effects on tissue permeability and cell proliferation and their interaction with plasma low density lipoproteins. Using the pigeon model in which an atherosclerosis-susceptible (WC) and -resistant (SR) breed can be compared, PG synthesis by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells was examined by the use of ({sup 35}S)-sodium sulfate and ({sup 3}H)-serine or ({sup 3}H)-glucosamine as labeling precursors. In both SR and WC cells, the majority of newly synthesized PG were secreted into the media. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) PG and dermatan sulfate (DS) PG were the major PG produced. Total PG production was consistently lower in WC compared to SR cultures due in part to reduce PG synthesis but also to degradation of newly synthesized PG. Since increased DS-PG accompanines atherosclerosis progression, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that macrophages modulate smooth muscle cell metabolism to cause increase DS-PG production. Cultured WC aortic smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1 and the production of PG examined. Increasing concentration of conditioned media from both types of macrophages caused increased incorporation of {sup 35}S-sulfate into secreted PG, but no change in cell-associated PG. Lipopolysaccharide activation of P388D1 cells enhanced the effect.

  6. Regulatory and Catalytic Domain Dynamics of Smooth Muscle Myosin Filaments†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Chun; Song, Likai; Salzameda, Bridget; Cremo, Christine R.; Fajer, Piotr G.

    2016-01-01

    Domain dynamics of the chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin catalytic domain (heavy chain Cys-717) and regulatory domain (regulatory light chain Cys-108) were determined in the absence of nucleotides using saturation-transfer electron paramagnetic resonance. In unphosphorylated synthetic filaments, the effective rotational correlation times, τr, were 24 ± 6 μs and 441 ± 79 μs for the catalytic and regulatory domains, respectively. The corresponding amplitudes of motion were 42 ± 4° and 24 ± 9° as determined from steady-state phosphorescence anisotropy. These results suggest that the two domains have independent mobility due to a hinge between the two domains. Although a similar hinge was observed for skeletal myosin (Adhikari and Fajer (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 94, 9643–9647. Brown et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 8283–8291), the latter displayed higher regulatory domain mobility, τr = 40 ± 3 μs, suggesting a smooth muscle specific mechanism of constraining regulatory domain dynamics. In the myosin monomers the correlation times for both domains were the same (~4 μs) for both smooth and skeletal myosin, suggesting that the motional difference between the two isoforms in the filaments was not due to intrinsic variation of hinge stiffness. Heavy chain/regulatory light chain chimeras of smooth and skeletal myosin pinpointed the origin of the restriction to the heavy chain and established correlation between the regulatory domain dynamics with the ability of myosin to switch off but not to switch on the ATPase and the actin sliding velocity. Phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin filaments caused a small increase in the amplitude of motion of the regulatory domain (from 24 ± 4° to 36 ± 7°) but did not significantly affect the rotational correlation time of the regulatory domain (441 to 408 μs) or the catalytic domain (24 to 17 μs). These data are not consistent with a stable interaction between the two catalytic domains in

  7. Serotonin induces pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Agyeman, Abena S.; Segel, Michael J.; Chévere, Rubén D.; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Suzuki, Yuichiro J.; Fanburg, Barry L.

    2007-01-01

    The chronic phase of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with vascular remodeling, especially thickening of the smooth muscle layer of large pulmonary arteries and muscularization of small pulmonary vessels, which normally have no associated smooth muscle. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been shown to induce proliferation and hypertrophy of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), and may be important for in vivo pulmonary vascular remodeling. Here, we show that 5-HT stimulates migration of pulmonary artery PASMC. Treatment with 5-HT for 16 h increased migration of PASMC up to four-fold as monitored in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Increased migratory responses were associated with cellular morphological changes and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. 5-HT-induced alterations in morphology were previously shown in our laboratory to require cAMP [Lee SL, Fanburg BL. Serotonin produces a configurational change of cultured smooth muscle cells that is associated with elevation of intracellular cAMP. J Cell Phys 1992;150(2):396–405], and the 5-HT4 receptor was pharmacologically determined to be the primary activator of cAMP in bovine PASMC [Becker BN, Gettys TW, Middleton JP, Olsen CL, Albers FJ, Lee SL, et al. 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin-responsive 5-hydroxytryptamine4-like receptor expressed in bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Mol Pharmacol 1992;42(5):817–25]. We examined the role of the 5-HT4 receptor and cAMP in 5-HT-induced bovine PASMC migration. PASMC express 5-HT4 receptor mRNA, and a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist and a cAMP antagonist completely blocked 5-HT-induced cellular migration. Consistent with our previous report that a cAMP-dependent Cl− channel is required for 5-HT-induced morphological changes in PASMC, phenylanthranilic acid, a Cl− channel blocker, inhibited actin cytoskeletal reorganization and migration produced by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT stimulates PASMC migration and

  8. Mediators and mechanisms of relaxation in rabbit urethral smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, Kristian; Ny, Lars; Persson, Katarina; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    1998-01-01

    Electrophysiological and mechanical experiments were performed to investigate whether the nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxation of rabbit urethral smooth muscle is associated with a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. In addition, a possible role for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and carbon monoxide (CO) as relaxant agents in rabbit urethra was investigated. Immunohistochemical experiments were performed to characterize the NO-synthase (NOS) and VIP innervation. Possible target cells for NO were studied by using antisera against cyclic GMP. The cyclic GMP-immunoreactivity was investigated on tissues pretreated with 1 mM IBMX, 0.1 mM zaprinast and 1 mM sodium nitroprusside. Intracellular recordings of the membrane potential in the circular smooth muscle layer revealed two types of spontaneous depolarizations, slow waves with a duration of 3–4 s and an amplitude of 30–40 mV, and faster (0.5–1 s), more irregular depolarizations with an amplitude of 5–15 mV. The resting membrane potential was 39±1 mV (n=12). Application of NO (30 μM), CO (30 μM) or VIP (1 μM) did not change the resting membrane potential. Both NO (1–100 μM) and VIP (1 nM–1 μM) produced concentration-dependent relaxations amounting to 87±4% and 97±2% (n=6), respectively. The relaxant effect of CO (1–30 μM) amounted to 27±4% (n=5) at the highest concentration used. Immunohistochemical experiments revealed a rich supply of NOS-immunoreactive nerve fibres in the smooth muscle layers. Numerous spinous cyclic GMP-immunoreactive cells were found interspersed between the smooth muscle bundles, mainly localized in the outer layer. These cells had long processes forming a network surrounding the smooth muscle bundles. VIP-immunoreactivity was sparse in comparison to NOS-immunoreactive nerves. The rich supply of NOS-immunoreactive nerve fibres supports the view that NO is an important NANC-mediator in the rabbit urethra. In contrast to several

  9. Circulating micrornas as potential biomarkers of muscle atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei

    2016-07-01

    Noninvasive biomarkers with diagnostic value and prognostic applications have long been desired to replace muscle biopsy for muscle atrophy patients. Growing evidence indicates that circulating microRNAs are biomarkers to assess pathophysiological status. Here, we show that the medium levels of six muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1/23a/206/133/499/208b, also known as myomiRs) were all elevated in the medium of starved C2C12 cell (P < 0.01). And, the level of miR-1 and miR-23a were all elevated in the serum of hindlimb unloaded mice (P < 0.01). miR-23a levels were negatively correlated with both muscle mass and muscle fiber cross section area in muscle atrophy patients, indicating that they might represent the degree of muscle atrophy. Collectively, our data indicated that circulating myomiRs could serve as promising biomarkers for muscle atrophy.

  10. Adaptive response of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle to length change.

    PubMed

    Syyong, Harley; Cheung, Christine; Solomon, Dennis; Seow, Chun Y; Kuo, Kuo H

    2008-04-01

    Hypervasoconstriction is associated with pulmonary hypertension and dysfunction of the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle (PASM) is implicated. However, relatively little is known about the mechanical properties of PASM. Recent advances in our understanding of plastic adaptation in smooth muscle may shed light on the disease mechanism. In this study, we determined whether PASM is capable of adapting to length changes (especially shortening) and regain its contractile force. We examined the time course of length adaptation in PASM in response to step changes in length and to length oscillations mimicking the periodic stretches due to pulsatile arterial pressure. Rings from sheep pulmonary artery were mounted on myograph and stimulated using electrical field stimulation (12-16 s, 20 V, 60 Hz). The length-force relationship was determined at L(ref) to 0.6 L(ref), where L(ref) was a reference length close to the in situ length of PASM. The response to length oscillations was determined at L(ref), after the muscle was subjected to length oscillation of various amplitudes for 200 s at 1.5 Hz. Release (or stretch) of resting PASM from L(ref) to 0.6 (and vice versa) was followed by a significant force recovery (73 and 63%, respectively), characteristic of length adaptation. All recoveries of force followed a monoexponential time course. Length oscillations with amplitudes ranging from 5 to 20% L(ref) caused no significant change in force generation in subsequent contractions. It is concluded that, like many smooth muscles, PASM possesses substantial capability to adapt to changes in length. Under pathological conditions, this could contribute to hypervasoconstriction in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:18218913

  11. Gene transfer by adenovirus in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, M F; Ewaskiewicz, J I; Adda, S; Bailey, K; Harris, V; Sosnoski, D; Tomasic, M; Wilson, J; Kotlikoff, M I

    1996-08-01

    We report adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into airway smooth muscle cells in cultured cells and organ-cultured tracheal segments. Incubation of cultured rat tracheal myocytes with virus (5 x 10(8) pfu/ml) for 6 h resulted in beta-galactosidase expression in 94.8 +/- 2.5% of cells (n = 4). Following incubation of thin (less than 200 microns diameter) equine trachealis muscle segments with virus in organ culture (5 x 10(8)-5 x 10(10) pfu/ml) the average expression of the Lac Z gene was approximately 19 +/- 10% (n = 9). Expression was markedly improved, however, in segments from neonatal rats (13-21 days). In two experiments in which the mucosa and serosa were removed, nearly all cells expressed beta-galactosidase, whereas in a third experiment in which the tissue was not dissected, about 40% of cells were stained. Viral infection had no effect on tension development of strips following organ culture. In vitro gene transfer may provide a useful method to alter protein expression and examine the effect of this alteration on excitation/contraction coupling in smooth muscle.

  12. STIMULANT ACTIONS OF VOLATILE ANAESTHETICS ON SMOOTH MUSCLE.

    PubMed

    RANG, H P

    1964-04-01

    A number of volatile anaesthetics, and some compounds synthesized in the search for new anaesthetics, have been tested on guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle in vitro. All the compounds produced a contractile response. This effect did not correlate well with convulsant activity in vivo among the compounds tested. Two kinds of stimulant effect were distinguishable: (1) Rapid, transient contractions, abolished by cocaine or lachesine; most of the anaesthetics in clinical use had this action. (2) Slow, sustained contractions, unaffected by cocaine or lachesine; this effect predominated among the fluorinated ring compounds. Hexamethonium and mepyramine did not affect the contractile response to any of the compounds. The first type of effect presumably represents excitation of postganglionic nerve cells, while the second type is a direct action on the muscle cell. The action of perfluorobenzene, which is of the latter kind, was studied further. Adrenaline and lack of calcium diminished the contraction in parallel with the contraction to histamine, which suggests that the cell membrane was the site of action; in contrast to the stimulant action of histamine or acetylcholine, the effect was highly temperature-sensitive, being almost abolished by cooling to 32 degrees C, and enhanced at 40 degrees C. The depressant action of anaesthetics on smooth muscle is affected very little by temperature changes. These findings are discussed in relation to other observations which suggest a stimulant action of volatile anaesthetics on excitable tissues. Protein denaturation is tentatively suggested as a mechanism of action.

  13. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  14. Mechanics of smooth muscle in isolated single microvessels.

    PubMed

    Gore, R W; Davis, M J

    1984-01-01

    In vivo studies on frog mesenteric arterioles (4) indicate that segmental differences in the response of microvessels to physical and chemical stimuli can be explained simply in terms of the length-tension characteristics of vascular smooth muscle at different points along the vascular tree. Studies on single, isolated arterioles in vitro were initiated to examine more closely the validity of this explanation for regional response differences. This paper reports some of the results. First-, second-, and third-order arterioles (18-60 micron i.d.) were dissected from hamster cheek pouches. The vessels were cannulated with a modified Burg microperfusion system, and their mechanical properties studied using the methods described by Duling and Gore. Vessels were activated in four stages with K+ and norepinephrine. During activation, transmural pressures were adjusted to minimize vascular smooth-muscle shortening. Active pressure-diameter curves were recorded while adjusting transmural pressure through the range 5 to 400 cm H20 in 5-25 cm steps. Vessel dimensions were measured with a videomicrometer. Passive curves were obtained after equilibration overnight in Ca2+-free medium. The vessels were then fixed and prepared for histologic sectioning, and measurements of vessel-wall composition were made. The Laplace relationship was used to construct length-tension diagrams, and the histologic data were used to normalize the dimensional data to smooth-muscle lengths. Maximum active tension of second-order arterioles (1,170 dynes/cm) was two times previous values reported by Gore et al. This was due presumably to refinements in techniques and dissection procedures. Maximum active stress averaged 3.9 X 10(+6) dynes/cm2 for second-order arterioles. This number is identical to data obtained from hog carotid strips by Dillon et al.

  15. Novel treatment strategies for smooth muscle disorders: Targeting Kv7 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Byron, Kenneth L

    2016-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells provide crucial contractile functions in visceral, vascular, and lung tissues. The contractile state of smooth muscle is largely determined by their electrical excitability, which is in turn influenced by the activity of potassium channels. The activity of potassium channels sustains smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization, reducing cellular excitability and thereby promoting smooth muscle relaxation. Research over the past decade has indicated an important role for Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of the excitability of smooth muscle cells. Expression of multiple Kv7 channel subtypes has been demonstrated in smooth muscle cells from viscera (gastrointestinal, bladder, myometrial), from the systemic and pulmonary vasculature, and from the airways of the lung, from multiple species, including humans. A number of clinically used drugs, some of which were developed to target Kv7 channels in other tissues, have been found to exert robust effects on smooth muscle Kv7 channels. Functional studies have indicated that Kv7 channel activators and inhibitors have the ability to relax and contact smooth muscle preparations, respectively, suggesting a wide range of novel applications for the pharmacological tool set. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the physiological functions of Kv7 channels in smooth muscle, and highlights potential therapeutic applications based on pharmacological targeting of smooth muscle Kv7 channels throughout the body.

  16. Pericytes are progenitors for coronary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Katharina S; Jacobs, Andrew H; Chen, Heidi I; Poduri, Aruna; McKay, Andrew S; Riordan, Daniel P; Kofler, Natalie; Kitajewski, Jan; Weissman, Irving; Red-Horse, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial cells on the heart’s surface give rise to coronary artery smooth muscle cells (caSMCs) located deep in the myocardium. However, the differentiation steps between epicardial cells and caSMCs are unknown as are the final maturation signals at coronary arteries. Here, we use clonal analysis and lineage tracing to show that caSMCs derive from pericytes, mural cells associated with microvessels, and that these cells are present in adults. During development following the onset of blood flow, pericytes at arterial remodeling sites upregulate Notch3 while endothelial cells express Jagged-1. Deletion of Notch3 disrupts caSMC differentiation. Our data support a model wherein epicardial-derived pericytes populate the entire coronary microvasculature, but differentiate into caSMCs at arterial remodeling zones in response to Notch signaling. Our data are the first demonstration that pericytes are progenitors for smooth muscle, and their presence in adult hearts reveals a new potential cell type for targeting during cardiovascular disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10036.001 PMID:26479710

  17. Contractile properties of isolated vascular smooth muscle after photoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Freas, W.; Hart, J.L.; Golightly, D.; McClure, H.; Muldoon, S.M.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the responses of various types of vascular smooth muscle to conditions that would be encountered during photodynamic therapy, namely laser illumination of photosensitizer-pretreated tissue. Vascular smooth muscle obtained from representative canine, rodent, and rabbit vascular beds was cut into rings and placed in organ baths (37 degrees C, aerated with 95% O2-5% CO2). These vessels were pretreated for 30 min with the photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD, 3-30 micrograms/ml) washed, and then exposed to red laser light (633 nm, 1-3.5 mW) for up to 20 min. Under basal tension conditions laser illumination of HpD-pretreated vessels resulted in an increase in tension, whereas laser illumination of vessels not exposed to HpD did not contract. This sustained contraction was not reversed by washing the tissue with fresh Krebs-Ringer solution. Responses to norepinephrine, transmural electrical stimulation, and elevated concentrations of KCl were reduced in blood vessels tested after HpD laser illumination. Laser-induced contractions of canine carotid arteries did not require the presence of an intact vascular endothelium. Vascular effect of these photosensitizers appears to involve the formation of oxygen-derived radicals. This preparation could provide a good model for examining the effects of free radicals on vascular physiology.

  18. Biophysical Induction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Podosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Young; Kohn, Julie C.; Huynh, John; Carey, Shawn P.; Mason, Brooke N.; Vouyouka, Ageliki G.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and matrix degradation occurs with intimal hyperplasia associated with atherosclerosis, vascular injury, and restenosis. One proposed mechanism by which VSMCs degrade matrix is through the use of podosomes, transient actin-based structures that are thought to play a role in extracellular matrix degradation by creating localized sites of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion. To date, podosomes in VSMCs have largely been studied by stimulating cells with phorbol esters, such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), however little is known about the physiological cues that drive podosome formation. We present the first evidence that physiological, physical stimuli mimicking cues present within the microenvironment of diseased arteries can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. Both microtopographical cues and imposed pressure mimicking stage II hypertension induce podosome formation in A7R5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Moreover, wounding using a scratch assay induces podosomes at the leading edge of VSMCs. Notably the effect of each of these biophysical stimuli on podosome stimulation can be inhibited using a Src inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that physical cues can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. PMID:25785437

  19. Abnormal tracheal smooth muscle function in the CF mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Helen L; Southern, Kevin W; Connell, Marilyn G; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, Theodor

    2013-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility is thought to underlie symptoms of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In the cystic fibrosis (CF) airway, ASM anomalies have been reported, but have not been fully characterized and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We examined ASM in an adult CF mouse tracheal ring preparation, and determined whether changes in contractility were associated with altered ASM morphology. We looked for inherent changes in the cellular pathways involved in contractility, and characterized trachea morphology in the adult trachea and in an embryonic lung culture model during development. Results showed that that there was a reduction in tracheal caliber in CF mice as indicated by a reduction in the number of cartilage rings; proximal cross-sectional areas of cftr−/− tracheas and luminal areas were significantly smaller, but there was no difference in the area or distribution of smooth muscle. Morphological differences observed in adult trachea were not evident in the embryonic lung at 11.5 days gestation or after 72 h in culture. Functional data showed a significant reduction in the amplitude and duration of contraction in response to carbachol (CCh) in Ca-free conditions. The reduction in contraction was agonist specific, and occurred throughout the length of the trachea. These data show that there is a loss in the contractile capacity of the CF mouse trachea due to downregulation of the pathway specific to acetylcholine (ACh) activation. This reduction in contraction is not associated with changes in the area or distribution of ASM. PMID:24400140

  20. Myocardin Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Inflammatory Activation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ackers-Johnson, Matthew; Talasila, Amarnath; Sage, Andrew P; Long, Xiaochun; Bot, Ilze; Morrell, Nicholas W; Bennett, Martin R; Miano, Joseph M.; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis, the cause of 50% of deaths in westernised societies, is widely regarded as a chronic vascular inflammatory disease. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) inflammatory activation in response to local pro-inflammatory stimuli contributes to disease progression and is a pervasive feature in developing atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, it is of considerable therapeutic importance to identify mechanisms that regulate the VSMC inflammatory response. Approach and Results We report that myocardin, a powerful myogenic transcriptional coactivator, negatively regulates VSMC inflammatory activation and vascular disease. Myocardin levels are reduced during atherosclerosis, in association with phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells. Myocardin deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in hypercholesterolemic ApoE−/− mice. Conversely, increased myocardin expression potently abrogates the induction of an array of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in VSMCs. Expression of myocardin in VSMCs reduces lipid uptake, macrophage interaction, chemotaxis and macrophage-endothelial tethering in vitro, and attenuates monocyte accumulation within developing lesions in vivo. These results demonstrate that endogenous levels of myocardin are a critical regulator of vessel inflammation. Conclusions We propose myocardin as a guardian of the contractile, non-inflammatory VSMC phenotype, with loss of myocardin representing a critical permissive step in the process of phenotypic transition and inflammatory activation, at the onset of vascular disease. PMID:25614278

  1. Isolation of human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells (HUASMC).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maximiano P; Relvas, Ricardo; Chiquita, Samuel; Correia, Ilídio J

    2010-07-03

    The human umbilical cord (UC) is a biological sample that can be easily obtained just after birth. This biological sample is, most of the time, discarded and their collection does not imply any added risk to the newborn or mother s health. Moreover no ethical concerns are raised. The UC is composed by one vein and two arteries from which both endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), two of the main cellular components of blood vessels, can be isolated. In this project the SMCs were obtained after enzymatic treatment of the UC arteries accordingly the experimental procedure previously described by Jaffe et al. After cell isolation they were kept in t-flash with DMEM-F12 supplemented with 5% of fetal bovine serum and were cultured for several passages. Cells maintained their morphological and other phenotypic characteristics in the different generations. The aim of this study was to isolate smooth muscle cells in order to use them as models for future assays with constrictor drugs, isolate and structurally characterize L-type calcium channels, to study cellular and molecular aspects of the vascular function and to use them in tissue engineering.

  2. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  3. MURC deficiency in smooth muscle attenuates pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ogata, Takehiro; Naito, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Takuya; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Naoki; Kasahara, Takeru; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that caveolin-1 (Cav1) is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. MURC (also called Cavin-4) is a member of the cavin family, which regulates caveolar formation and functions together with caveolins. Here, we show that hypoxia increased Murc mRNA expression in the mouse lung, and that Murc-null mice exhibited attenuation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) accompanied by reduced ROCK activity in the lung. Conditional knockout mice lacking Murc in smooth muscle also resist hypoxia-induced PH. MURC regulates the proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through Rho/ROCK signalling. Cav1 suppresses RhoA activity in PASMCs, which is reversed by MURC. MURC binds to Cav1 and inhibits the association of Cav1 with the active form of Gα13, resulting in the facilitated association of the active form of Gα13 with p115RhoGEF. These results reveal that MURC has a function in the development of PH through modulating Rho/ROCK signalling. PMID:27546070

  4. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles regulate smooth muscle cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Angelopoulos, Ioannis; Southern, Paul; Pankhurst, Quentin A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are used for an increasing range of biomedical applications, from imaging to mechanical actuation of cells and tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the loading of smooth muscle cells (SMC) with SPION and to explore what effect this has on the phenotype of the cells. Adherent human SMC were loaded with ∼17 pg of unconjugated, negatively charged, 50 nm SPION. Clusters of the internalized SPION particles were held in discrete cytoplasmic vesicles. Internalized SPION did not cause any change in cell morphology, proliferation, metabolic activity, or staining pattern of actin and calponin, two of the muscle contractile proteins involved in force generation. However, internalized SPION inhibited the increased gene expression of actin and calponin normally observed when cells are incubated under differentiation conditions. The observed change in the control of gene expression of muscle contractile apparatus by SPION has not previously been described. This finding could offer novel approaches for regulating the phenotype of SMC and warrants further investigation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2412–2419, 2016. PMID:27176658

  5. A theoretical analysis of the effect of airway smooth muscle load on airway narrowing.

    PubMed

    Macklem, P T

    1996-01-01

    We used published data for the elastic properties of a 2-mm outer-diameter canine bronchus and assumed values for the thickness of the wall components and lung parenchymal shear modulus to estimate the load on airway smooth muscle and its effect on airway narrowing. The following relationships were calculated: (1) luminal and smooth muscle radii of curvature and transmural pressure; (2) the isovolume, transmural pressures developed by the smooth muscle to narrow the lumen at distending pressures of 20, 10, 5, and 2 cm H2O; (3) the equilibrium tension developed by, and thus the load on, the airway smooth muscle as a function of smooth muscle length during isovolume bronchoconstriction. From these calculations a smooth muscle length-tension diagram was drawn allowing the interactions between submucosal thickening, peribronchial thickening, load, and smooth muscle contractility to be analyzed. The analysis indicates that: (1) the load on smooth muscle decreases by more than an order of magnitude between a distending pressure of 20 and 2 cm H2O; (2) increasing smooth muscle contractility has more effect at large rather than at small distending pressures; (3) peribronchial inflammation decreases both load and the slope of the relationship between peribronchial and pleural pressures. Decreases in load may be an important mechanism producing excessive bronchoconstriction in asthma. PMID:8542167

  6. Voltage-Clamp Studies on Uterine Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nels C.

    1969-01-01

    These studies have developed and tested an experimental approach to the study of membrane ionic conductance mechanisms in strips of uterine smooth muscle. The experimental and theoretical basis for applying the double sucrose-gap technique is described along with the limitations of this system. Nonpropagating membrane action potentials were produced in response to depolarizing current pulses under current-clamp conditions. The stepwise change of membrane potential under voltage-clamp conditions resulted in a family of ionic currents with voltage- and time-dependent characteristics. In sodium-free solution the peak transient current decreased and its equilibrium potential shifted along the voltage axis toward a more negative internal potential. These studies indicate a sodium-dependent, regenerative excitation mechanism. PMID:5796366

  7. Smooth muscle relaxing flavonoids and terpenoids from Conyza filaginoides.

    PubMed

    Mata, R; Rojas, A; Acevedo, L; Estrada, S; Calzada, F; Rojas, I; Bye, R; Linares, E

    1997-02-01

    Activity-guided fractionation of the smooth muscle relaxing, chloroform-methanol (1:1) extract of Conyza filaginoides (D.C.) Hieron (Asteraceae) led to the isolation of three flavonoids (quercetin 3-glucoside, rutin, and pinostrobin), one sterol (alpha-spinasterol), a sesquiterpenoid (beta-caryophyllene 4,5-alpha-oxide), and two triterpenoids (erythrodiol and 3-beta-tridecanoyloxy-28-hydroxyolean-12-ene). 3-beta-Tridecanoyloxy-28-hydroxy-olean-12-ene is a new naturally occurring terpenoid. All the isolated compounds induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous contractions of rat ileum. The spasmolytic activity exhibited by the extract and active principles tends to support the traditional use of C filaginoides as an antispasmodic agent. PMID:9063094

  8. Smooth muscle pseudotumours: a potentially confusing artefact of rectal biopsy.

    PubMed Central

    Dankwa, E K; Davies, J D

    1988-01-01

    An artefactual smooth muscle lesion was found in seven of 500 consecutive rectal biopsy specimens. The lesions had the deceptive appearance of a genuine tumour although none of the patients with the lesion had presented with a rectal mucosal swelling. The morphology of the lesion and its poor reproducibility under experimental conditions suggested that it was an artefact of the biopsy procedure: it was easily reproduced in resected specimens of large bowel using punch or basket forceps but not when using flat forceps. The presence of the lesion seems to depend on the type of forceps used rather than on differences in deployment and seems to be caused by avulsion of the superficial part of the muscularis propria and its incorporation into the tissues included in rectal biopsy specimens. Images Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 1 Fig 4 PMID:3045159

  9. Smooth muscle relaxing flavonoids and terpenoids from Conyza filaginoides.

    PubMed

    Mata, R; Rojas, A; Acevedo, L; Estrada, S; Calzada, F; Rojas, I; Bye, R; Linares, E

    1997-02-01

    Activity-guided fractionation of the smooth muscle relaxing, chloroform-methanol (1:1) extract of Conyza filaginoides (D.C.) Hieron (Asteraceae) led to the isolation of three flavonoids (quercetin 3-glucoside, rutin, and pinostrobin), one sterol (alpha-spinasterol), a sesquiterpenoid (beta-caryophyllene 4,5-alpha-oxide), and two triterpenoids (erythrodiol and 3-beta-tridecanoyloxy-28-hydroxyolean-12-ene). 3-beta-Tridecanoyloxy-28-hydroxy-olean-12-ene is a new naturally occurring terpenoid. All the isolated compounds induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous contractions of rat ileum. The spasmolytic activity exhibited by the extract and active principles tends to support the traditional use of C filaginoides as an antispasmodic agent.

  10. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  11. Circular smooth muscle contributes to esophageal shortening during peristalsis

    PubMed Central

    Vegesna, Anil K; Chuang, Keng-Yu; Besetty, Ramashesai; Phillips, Steven J; Braverman, Alan S; Barbe, Mary F; Ruggieri, Michael R; Miller, Larry S

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the angle between the circular smooth muscle (CSM) and longitudinal smooth muscle (LSM) fibers in the distal esophagus. METHODS: In order to identify possible mechanisms for greater shortening in the distal compared to proximal esophagus during peristalsis, the angles between the LSM and CSM layers were measured in 9 cadavers. The outer longitudinal layer of the muscularis propria was exposed after stripping the outer serosa. The inner circular layer of the muscularis propria was then revealed after dissection of the esophageal mucosa and the underlying muscularis mucosa. Photographs of each specimen were taken with half of the open esophagus folded back showing both the outer longitudinal and inner circular muscle layers. Angles were measured every one cm for 10 cm proximal to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) by two independent investigators. Two human esophagi were obtained from organ transplant donors and the angles between the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers were measured using micro-computed tomography (micro CT) and Image J software. RESULTS: All data are presented as mean ± SE. The CSM to LSM angle at the SCJ and 1 cm proximal to SCJ on the autopsy specimens was 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 74.9 ± 3.09 degrees, P = 0.32. The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ were statistically significantly lower than at 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ, 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 82.58 ± 1.34 degrees, 84.04 ± 1.64 degrees, 84.87 ± 1.04 degrees and 83.72 ± 1.42 degrees, P = 0.013, P = 0.008, P = 0.004, P = 0.009 respectively. The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ was also statistically significantly lower than the angles at 6, 7 and 8 cm proximal to the SCJ, 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 80.18 ± 2.09 degrees, 81.81 ± 1.75 degrees and 80.96 ± 2.04 degrees, P = 0.05, P = 0.02, P = 0.03 respectively. The CSM to LSM angle at 1 cm proximal to SCJ was statistically significantly lower than at 3, 4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ, 74.94 ± 3.09 degrees vs 84.04 ± 1

  12. IP3 receptors regulate vascular smooth muscle contractility and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingsong; Zhao, Guiling; Fang, Xi; Peng, Xiaohong; Tang, Huayuan; Wang, Hong; Jing, Ran; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu

    2016-01-01

    Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptor–mediated (IP3R-mediated) calcium (Ca2+) release has been proposed to play an important role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction for decades. However, whether and how IP3R regulates blood pressure in vivo remains unclear. To address these questions, we have generated a smooth muscle–specific IP3R triple-knockout (smTKO) mouse model using a tamoxifen-inducible system. In this study, the role of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in adult VSMCs on aortic vascular contractility and blood pressure was assessed following tamoxifen induction. We demonstrated that deletion of IP3Rs significantly reduced aortic contractile responses to vasoconstrictors, including phenylephrine, U46619, serotonin, and endothelin 1. Deletion of IP3Rs also dramatically reduced the phosphorylation of MLC20 and MYPT1 induced by U46619. Furthermore, although the basal blood pressure of smTKO mice remained similar to that of wild-type controls, the increase in systolic blood pressure upon chronic infusion of angiotensin II was significantly attenuated in smTKO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate an important role for IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in VSMCs in regulating vascular contractility and hypertension. PMID:27777977

  13. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  14. HB-EGF-Promoted Airway Smooth Muscle Cells and Their Progenitor Migration Contribute to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling in Asthmatic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Li, Hequan; Yao, Yinan; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Yuehong; Xia, Dajing; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-03-01

    The airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells' proliferation, migration, and their progenitor's migration are currently regarded as causative factors for ASM remodeling in asthma. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), a potent mitogen and chemotactic factor, could promote ASM cell proliferation through MAPK pathways. In this study, we obtained primary ASM cells and their progenitors from C57BL/6 mice and went on to explore the role of HB-EGF in these cells migration and the underlying mechanisms. We found that recombinant HB-EGF (rHB-EGF) intratracheal instillation accelerated ASM layer thickening in an OVA-induced asthmatic mouse. Modified Boyden chamber assay revealed that rHB-EGF facilitate ASM cell migration in a dose-dependent manner and ASM cells from asthmatic mice had a greater migration ability than that from normal counterparts. rHB-EGF could stimulate the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 in ASM cells but further migration assay showed that only epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (AG1478) or p38 inhibitor (SB203580), but not ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), could inhibit rHB-EGF-mediated ASM cells migration. Actin cytoskeleton experiments exhibited that rHB-EGF could cause actin stress fibers disassembly and focal adhesions formation of ASM cells through the activation of p38. Finally, airway instillation of rHB-EGF promoted the recruitment of bone marrow-derived smooth muscle progenitor cells, which were transferred via caudal vein, migrating into the airway from the circulation. These observations demonstrated that ASM remodeling in asthma might have resulted from HB-EGF-mediated ASM cells and their progenitor cells migration, via p38 MAPK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling.

  15. Pasteur effect in vascular and intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, G; Lundholm, L

    1985-01-01

    The increase in lactate production on changing from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, i.e. the Pasteur effect, has been reported to be small in vascular muscle and especially in aorta. It has been suggested that this may be an artefact caused by damage to the intimal endothelium. We have compared the Pasteur effect in different kinds of pig arteries, but also in rabbit colon. The aerobic lactate production in 60 min was 11-15 mumol/g in the aorta and the carotid artery, but 3 mumol/g in the mesenteric and renal arteries and 4 mumol/g in the rabbit colon. The increase in lactate production under anaerobic conditions was 12-20 mumol/g/60 min in the carotid artery, aorta and rabbit colon and 10 mumol/g/60 min in the mesenteric and renal arteries. When calculated in per cent, the Pasteur effect was greater in the mesenteric artery than in the aorta, but the actual rise in lactate production in mumol/g was higher in the aorta and carotid artery. The high aerobic lactate production of smooth muscle in vitro may be related to its low ability to oxidize glucose; some other substrates may be preferentially oxidized when present in vitro or in vivo.

  16. Differentiation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Is Regulated by PDGF-BB and Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Clifford; Yuan, Yifan; Courtman, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are key regulators of vascular disease and circulating smooth muscle progenitor cells may play important roles in vascular repair or remodelling. We developed enhanced protocols to derive smooth muscle progenitors from murine bone marrow and tested whether factors that are increased in atherosclerotic plaques, namely platelet-derived growth factor—BB (PDGF-BB) and monomeric collagen, can influence the smooth muscle specific differentiation, proliferation, and survival of mouse bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. During a 21 day period of culture, bone marrow cells underwent a marked increase in expression of the SMC markers α-SMA (1.93 ± 0.15 vs. 0.0008 ± 0.0003 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d), SM22-α (1.50 ± 0.27 vs. 0.005 ± 0.001 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d) and SM-MHC (0.017 ± 0.004 vs. 0.001 ± 0.001 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation experiments showed that in early culture, the smooth muscle progenitor subpopulation could be identified by high proliferative rates prior to the expression of smooth muscle specific markers. Culture of fresh bone marrow or smooth muscle progenitor cells with PDGF-BB suppressed the expression of α-SMA and SM22-α, in a rapidly reversible manner requiring PDGF receptor kinase activity. Progenitors cultured on polymerized collagen gels demonstrated expression of SMC markers, rates of proliferation and apoptosis similar to that of cells on tissue culture plastic; in contrast, cells grown on monomeric collagen gels displayed lower SMC marker expression, lower growth rates (319 ± 36 vs. 635 ± 97 cells/mm2), and increased apoptosis (5.3 ± 1.6% vs. 1.0 ± 0.5% (Annexin 5 staining)). Our data shows that the differentiation and survival of smooth muscle progenitors are critically affected by PDGF-BB and as well as the substrate collagen structure. PMID:27258003

  17. Differentiation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Is Regulated by PDGF-BB and Collagen.

    PubMed

    Lin, Clifford; Yuan, Yifan; Courtman, David W

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are key regulators of vascular disease and circulating smooth muscle progenitor cells may play important roles in vascular repair or remodelling. We developed enhanced protocols to derive smooth muscle progenitors from murine bone marrow and tested whether factors that are increased in atherosclerotic plaques, namely platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and monomeric collagen, can influence the smooth muscle specific differentiation, proliferation, and survival of mouse bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. During a 21 day period of culture, bone marrow cells underwent a marked increase in expression of the SMC markers α-SMA (1.93 ± 0.15 vs. 0.0008 ± 0.0003 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d), SM22-α (1.50 ± 0.27 vs. 0.005 ± 0.001 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d) and SM-MHC (0.017 ± 0.004 vs. 0.001 ± 0.001 (ng/ng GAPDH) at 0 d). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation experiments showed that in early culture, the smooth muscle progenitor subpopulation could be identified by high proliferative rates prior to the expression of smooth muscle specific markers. Culture of fresh bone marrow or smooth muscle progenitor cells with PDGF-BB suppressed the expression of α-SMA and SM22-α, in a rapidly reversible manner requiring PDGF receptor kinase activity. Progenitors cultured on polymerized collagen gels demonstrated expression of SMC markers, rates of proliferation and apoptosis similar to that of cells on tissue culture plastic; in contrast, cells grown on monomeric collagen gels displayed lower SMC marker expression, lower growth rates (319 ± 36 vs. 635 ± 97 cells/mm2), and increased apoptosis (5.3 ± 1.6% vs. 1.0 ± 0.5% (Annexin 5 staining)). Our data shows that the differentiation and survival of smooth muscle progenitors are critically affected by PDGF-BB and as well as the substrate collagen structure.

  18. BMP promotes motility and represses growth of smooth muscle cells by activation of tandem Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Perez, Vinicio A.; Ali, Ziad; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Sawada, Hirofumi; Lai, Ying-Ju; Kleisli, Thomas; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Qu, Xiumei; Rubinos, Laura H.; Ashley, Euan; Amieva, Manuel; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel cell-signaling paradigm in which bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) consecutively and interdependently activates the wingless (Wnt)–β-catenin (βC) and Wnt–planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathways to facilitate vascular smooth muscle motility while simultaneously suppressing growth. We show that BMP-2, in a phospho-Akt–dependent manner, induces βC transcriptional activity to produce fibronectin, which then activates integrin-linked kinase 1 (ILK-1) via α4-integrins. ILK-1 then induces the Wnt–PCP pathway by binding a proline-rich motif in disheveled (Dvl) and consequently activating RhoA-Rac1–mediated motility. Transfection of a Dvl mutant that binds βC without activating RhoA-Rac1 not only prevents BMP-2–mediated vascular smooth muscle cell motility but promotes proliferation in association with persistent βC activity. Interfering with the Dvl-dependent Wnt–PCP activation in a murine stented aortic graft injury model promotes extensive neointima formation, as shown by optical coherence tomography and histopathology. We speculate that, in response to injury, factors that subvert BMP-2–mediated tandem activation of Wnt–βC and Wnt–PCP pathways contribute to obliterative vascular disease in both the systemic and pulmonary circulations. PMID:21220513

  19. Immune/Inflammatory Response and Hypocontractility of Rabbit Colonic Smooth Muscle After TNBS-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonggang; Li, Fang; Wang, Hong; Yin, Chaoran; Huang, JieAn; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The contractility of colonic smooth muscle is dysregulated due to immune/inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel diseases. Inflammation in vitro induces up-regulation of regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4) expression in colonic smooth muscle cells. Aims To characterize the immune/inflammatory responses and RGS4 expression pattern in colonic smooth muscle after induction of colitis. Methods Colitis was induced in rabbits by intrarectal instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Innate/adaptive immune response RT-qPCR array was performed using colonic circular muscle strips. At 1–9 weeks after colonic intramuscular microinjection of lentivirus, the distal and proximal colons were collected, and muscle strips and dispersed muscle cells were prepared from circular muscle layer. Expression levels of RGS4 and NFκB signaling components were determined by Western blot analysis. The biological consequences of RGS4 knockdown were assessed by measurement of muscle contraction and phospholipase C (PLC)-β activity in response to acetylcholine (ACh). Results Contraction in response to ACh was significantly inhibited in the inflamed colonic circular smooth muscle cells. RGS4, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, CCL3, CD1D, and ITGB2 were significantly up-regulated, while IL-18, CXCR4, CD86, and C3 were significantly down-regulated in the inflamed muscle strips. RGS4 protein expression in the inflamed smooth muscles was dramatically increased. RGS4 stable knockdown in vivo augmented ACh-stimulated PLC-β activity and contraction in colonic smooth muscle cells. Conclusion Inflamed smooth muscle exhibits up-regulation of IL-1-related signaling components, Th1 cytokines and RGS4, and inhibition of contraction. Stable knockdown of endogenous RGS4 in colonic smooth muscle increases PLC-β activity and contractile responses. PMID:26879904

  20. Effect of antigenic exposure on airway smooth muscle remodeling in an equine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Leclere, Mathilde; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Gélinas-Lymburner, Emilie; David, Florent; Martin, James G; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that airway smooth muscle remodeling is an early event in asthma, but whether it remains a dynamic process late in the course of the disease is unknown. Moreover, little is known about the effects of an antigenic exposure on chronically established smooth muscle remodeling. We measured the effects of antigenic exposure on airway smooth muscle in the central and peripheral airways of horses with heaves, a naturally occurring airway disease that shares similarities with chronic asthma. Heaves-affected horses (n = 6) and age-matched control horses (n = 5) were kept on pasture before being exposed to indoor antigens for 30 days to induce airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. Peripheral lung and endobronchial biopsies were collected before and after antigenic exposure by thoracoscopy and bronchoscopy, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and enzymatic labeling were used for morphometric analyses of airway smooth muscle mass and proliferative and apoptotic myocytes. In the peripheral airways, heaves-affected horses had twice as much smooth muscle as control horses. Remodeling was associated with smooth muscle hyperplasia and in situ proliferation, without reduced apoptosis. Further antigenic exposure had no effect on the morphometric data. In central airways, proliferating myocytes were increased compared with control horses only after antigenic exposure. Peripheral airway smooth muscle mass is stable in chronically affected animals subjected to antigenic exposure. This increased mass is maintained in a dynamic equilibrium by an elevated cellular turnover, suggesting that targeting smooth muscle proliferation could be effective at decreasing chronic remodeling.

  1. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  2. Calcium ion-regulated thin filaments from vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Marston, S B; Trevett, R M; Walters, M

    1980-01-01

    Myosin and actin competition tests indicated the presence of both thin-filament and myosin-linked Ca2+-regulatory systems in pig aorta and turkey gizzard smooth-muscle actomyosin. A thin-filament preparation was obtained from pig aortas. The thin filaments had no significant ATPase activity [1.1 +/- 2.6 nmol/mg per min (mean +/- S.D.)], but they activated skeletal-muscle myosin ATPase up to 25-fold [500 nmol/mg of myosin per min (mean +/- S.D.)] in the presence of 10(-4) M free Ca2+. At 10(-8) M-Ca2+ the thin filaments activated myosin ATPase activity only one-third as much. Thin-filament activation of myosin ATPase activity increased markedly in the range 10(-6)-10(-5) M-Ca2+ and was half maximal at 2.7 x 10(-6) M (pCa2+ 5.6). The skeletal myosin-aorta-thin-filament mixture gave a biphasic ATPase-rate-versus-ATP-concentration curve at 10(-8) M-Ca2+ similar to the curve obtained with skeletal-muscle thin filaments. Thin filaments bound up to 9.5 mumol of Ca2+/g in the presence of MgATP2-. In the range 0.06-27 microM-Ca2+ binding was hyperbolic with an estimated binding constant of (0.56 +/- 0.07) x 10(6) M-1 (mean +/- S.D.) and maximum binding of 8.0 +/- 0.8 mumol/g (mean +/- S.D.). Significantly less Ca2+ bound in the absence of ATP. The thin filaments contained actin, tropomyosin and several other unidentified proteins. 6 M-Urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis at pH 8.3 showed proteins that behaved like troponin I and troponin C. This was confirmed by forming interspecific complexes between radioactive skeletal-muscle troponin I and troponin C and the aorta thin-filament proteins. The thin filaments contained at least 1.4 mumol of a troponin C-like protein/g and at least 1.1 mumol of a troponin I-like protein/g. PMID:6446898

  3. Acetylcholine activates an inward current in single mammalian smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Benham, C D; Bolton, T B; Lang, R J

    Acetylcholine, the major excitatory neurotransmitter to the smooth muscle of mammalian intestine, is known to depolarize smooth muscle cells with an apparent increase in membrane conductance. However, the ionic mechanisms that are triggered by muscarinic receptor activation and underlie this response are poorly understood, due in part to the technical problems associated with the electrophysiological study of smooth muscle. The muscarinic action of acetylcholine in certain neurones has been shown to involve the switching off of a resting K+ current (M-current) and a similar mechanism has recently also been identified in smooth muscle of amphibian stomach. We have now applied the patch-clamp technique to single smooth muscle cells of rabbit jejunum and find that muscarinic receptor activation switches on a nonselective, voltage-sensitive inward current. In addition, acetylcholine activates and then suppresses spontaneous K+ current transients, which are probably triggered by rises in intracellular Ca2+ in these cells.

  4. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-01

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains.

  5. Endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) activity in human vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Janet J; Johnson, Christopher M; Mockridge, James W; Davenport, Anthony P

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the human smooth muscle endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) present in the media of the endothelium-denuded human umbilical vein preparation. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET-2 were potent constrictors of umbilical vein with EC50 values of 9.2 nM and 29.6 nM, respectively. ET-1 was at least 30 times more potent than ET-3 suggesting the presence of constrictor ETA receptors. Little or no response was obtained to the ETB-selective agonist sarafotoxin 6c. These data suggest that endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction is via ETA receptors in this preparation. Autoradiographical visualization of endothelin receptors with subtype selective ligands confirmed the predominance of the ETA receptor in the media of umbilical vein. High density of binding was obtained with the ETA selective [125I]-PD151242, with much lower levels detected with the ETB selective [125I]-BQ3020. Big ET-1 (EC50=42.7 nM) and big ET-2(1-38) (EC50=99.0 nM) were less potent than ET-1 and ET-2, respectively. Big ET-2(1-38) was more potent than its isoform big ET-2(1-37) with concentration–response curves to big ET-2(1-37) incomplete at 300 nM. No response was obtained to big ET-3 at concentrations up to 700 nM. The C-terminal fragments, big ET-1(22-38) and big ET-2(22-38) were inactive. Responses to ET-1 were unaffected by either the neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor thiorphan (10−5 M) or by the dual NEP/ECE inhibitor phosphoramidon (10−5 M). Big ET-1 was also unaffected by thiorphan but antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by phosphoramidon (10−5 M and 10−4 M). Addition of all four big endothelin peptides to human umbilical vein preparations resulted in detectable amounts of ET-IR in the bathing medium. Therefore, although big ET-3 was functionally inactive this reflects the low potency of ET-3 at the ETA receptor rather than the lack of ability of this smooth muscle ECE to convert big ET-3 to ET-3. To conclude we have demonstrated the presence

  6. The comparative effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics and muscle relaxants on electrical field stimulation response in rat bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang Ho; Min, Young Sil; Lee, Sang Joon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that several aminoglycoside antibiotics have a potential of prolonging the action of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants by drug interactions acting pre-synaptically to inhibit acetylcholine release, but antibiotics itself also have a strong effect on relaxing the smooth muscle. In this study, four antibiotics of aminoglycosides such as gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin and neomycin were compared with skeletal muscle relaxants baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine, and a smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine. The muscle strips isolated from the rat bladder were stimulated with pulse trains of 40 V in amplitude and 10 s in duration, with pulse duration of 1 ms at the frequency of 1-8 Hz, at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 Hz respectively. To test the effect of four antibiotics on bladder smooth muscle relaxation, each of them was treated cumulatively from 1 μM to 0.1 mM with an interval of 5 min. Among the four antibiotics, gentamicin and neomycin inhibited the EFS response. The skeletal muscle relaxants (baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine) and inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA and glycine) did not show any significant effect. However, papaverine, had a significant effect in the relaxation of the smooth muscle. It was suggested that the aminoglycoside antibiotics have inhibitory effect on the bladder smooth muscle.

  7. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Citrate synthase (CS) activity, an index of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (222 ± 13, 115 ± 2, and 48 ± 2 μmol·g(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, when respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, although oxidative phosphorylation capacity per mitochondrial content in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting respiratory control ratio and nonphosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  8. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  9. Monoamine sensitivity of smooth muscle in vivo in nociception disorders.

    PubMed

    Del Bianco, P L; Franchi, G; Anselmi, B; Sicuteri, F

    1982-01-01

    A significant degree of supersensitivity to 5-HT and DA was detected when carrying out the computerized venotest on migraine patients during an attack. A similar supersensitivity was observed during morphine abstinence and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in addicts. Mild abstinence after slight and short morphine treatment provoked monoamine supersensitivity in volunteers. In these conditions, the administration of morphine inhibited the 5-HT and DA supersensitivity. In spontaneous central panalgesia, monoamine supersensitivity is detectable, as well as in panalgesia induced in headache sufferers by means of PCPA 5-HT deprivation. By means of the venotest, the ergot derivatives were confirmed as being partial 5-HT agonists. These drugs can also carry out their therapeutic activity by potentiating 5-HT at a central level in 5-HT-deficient neurons. The presence of opiate receptors in the human vein is stressed. The high supersensitivity of the venous smooth muscle to 5-HT and DA both in headache and systemic pain sufferers and during morphine withdrawal suggests a pathophysiological analogy between these conditions.

  10. Smooth muscle tissue engineering in crosslinked electrospun gelatin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Yahya; Lekakou, Constantina; Labeed, Fatima; Tomlins, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Crosslinked, multi-layer electrospun gelatin fiber scaffolds with generally ±45 degree fiber orientation have been used to grow human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs) to create a vascular tunica media graft. Scaffolds of different fiber diameter (2-5 μm in wet state), pore size, and porosity (16-21% in wet state) were assessed in terms of cell adherence and viability, cell proliferation, and migration in both in-plane and transverse directions through the scaffold as a function of time under static cell culture conditions. HUVSMC cell viability reached between 80 and 92% for all scaffolds after 9 days in culture. HUVSMCs adhered, elongated, and orientated in the fiber direction, and migrated through a scaffold thickness of 200-235 μm 9 days post-seeding under static conditions. The best scaffold was then used to assess the tissue engineering of HUVSMCs under dynamic conditions for a rotating, cell seeded, tubular scaffold in the bioreactor containing the culture medium. Dynamic conditions almost doubled the rate of cell proliferation through the scaffold, forming full tissue throughout a scaffold of 250-300 μm thickness 6 days post-seeding.

  11. Contraction of gut smooth muscle cells assessed by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Yohei; Akiho, Hirotada; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Here we discuss the development of a novel cell imaging system for the evaluation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. SMCs were isolated from the circular and longitudinal muscular layers of mouse small intestine by enzymatic digestion. SMCs were stimulated by test agents, thereafter fixed in acrolein. Actin in fixed SMCs was stained with phalloidin and cell length was determined by measuring diameter at the large end of phalloidin-stained strings within the cells. The contractile response was taken as the decrease in the average length of a population of stimulated-SMCs. Various mediators and chemically identified compounds of daikenchuto (DKT), pharmaceutical-grade traditional Japanese prokinetics, were examined. Verification of the integrity of SMC morphology by phalloidin and DAPI staining and semi-automatic measurement of cell length using an imaging analyzer was a reliable method by which to quantify the contractile response. Serotonin, substance P, prostaglandin E2 and histamine induced SMC contraction in concentration-dependent manner. Two components of DKT, hydroxy-α-sanshool and hydroxy-β-sanshool, induced contraction of SMCs. We established a novel cell imaging technique to evaluate SMC contractility. This method may facilitate investigation into SMC activity and its role in gastrointestinal motility, and may assist in the discovery of new prokinetic agents. PMID:25837933

  12. Epigenetic Control of Smooth Muscle Cell Identity and Lineage Memory.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Delphine; Swiatlowska, Pamela; Owens, Gary K

    2015-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), like all cells, acquire a cell-specific epigenetic signature during development that includes acquisition of a unique repertoire of histone and DNA modifications. These changes are postulated to induce an open chromatin state (referred to as euchromatin) on the repertoire of genes that are expressed in differentiated SMC, including SMC-selective marker genes like Acta2 and Myh11, as well as housekeeping genes expressed by most cell types. In contrast, genes that are silenced in differentiated SMC acquire modifications associated with a closed chromatin state (ie, heterochromatin) and transcriptional silencing. Herein, we review mechanisms that regulate epigenetic control of the differentiated state of SMC. In addition, we identify some of the major limitations in the field and future challenges, including development of innovative new tools and approaches, for performing single-cell epigenetic assays and locus-selective editing of the epigenome that will allow direct studies of the functional role of specific epigenetic controls during development, injury repair, and disease, including major cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and microvascular disease, associated with diabetes mellitus.

  13. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  14. Does atorvastatin induce aortic smooth muscle cell apoptosis in vivo?

    PubMed

    Doyon, Marielle; Hale, Taben Mary; Huot-Marchand, Julie-Emilie; Wu, Rong; de Champlain, Jacques; DeBlois, Denis

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors such as atorvastatin induce vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis in vitro. However, this effect remains to be demonstrated in vivo. The present studies were designed to test the ability of atorvastatin to induce SMC apoptosis in vivo, using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) as a well-known reference model of SMC apoptosis induction in vivo by cardiovascular drugs including the calcium channel blocker amlodipine. Atorvastatin was administered to SHR for 3 or 6 weeks either alone or together with amlodipine, a drug combination clinically available to patients. Primary endpoints included aortic medial hypertrophy and aortic SMC hyperplasia, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and expression of the apoptosis regulatory proteins Bax and Bcl-2. The SHR aorta showed no evidence of SMC apoptosis induction by atorvastatin, even at the high dose of 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1), although the statin significantly reduced oxidative stress after 3 weeks and blood pressure after 6 weeks of administration. Amlodipine-induced regression of aortic hypertophy and aortic SMC hyperplasia were dose- and time-dependent, but there was no interaction between atorvastatin and amlodipine in modulating the primary endpoints. These results do not support the notion that atorvastatin induces SMC apoptosis in the aortic media in vivo.

  15. Identification of possible adenosine receptors in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine is a vasodilator and has been implicated in increased blood flow in tissues that undergo energy deficiency. During conditions such as hypoxia and ischemia, adenosine is produced and is said to increase blood flow by relaxing the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) lining the resistance vessels. The goal of this research was to identify receptors that might be responsible for adenosine-mediated VSM relaxation. When an insoluble fraction from calf aortic VSM was incubated with /sup 32/P-ATP, two components were phosphorylated. One was identified as myosin light chain by MW, pl, and immunoprecipitation. The other product was identified as phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) by tic. Both phosphorylations were inhibited by adenosine and by 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine (Cl-Ado). DPI production was much more sensitive to the nucleosides than was myosin phosphorylation. Neither inhibition involved change in cAMP production. Phosphatidylinositol (Pl) kinase in the VSM membranes required magnesium, was activated and solubilized by Triton X-100, and phosphorylated both endogenous and exogenous Pl. Cl-Ado inhibited Pl kinase in a manner competitive with respect to ATP and noncompetitive with respect to Pl. Adenosine and adenosine analogs modified in the ribose ring were inhibitors with potencies comparable to that of Cl-Ado. Adenine nucleotides and purine-modified adenosine analogs were weaker inhibitors than Cl-Ado.

  16. Upregulation of decorin by FXR in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    He Fengtian; Zhang Qiuhong; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Gao Xiang; Li Jiang; Li Yong; Gong Wei; Jiang, Yu; Xie Wen; Li Song

    2008-08-08

    Decorin is a member of the family of small leucine-rich proteoglycans that are present in blood vessels and synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Decorin plays complex roles in both normal vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of various types of vascular disorders. However, the mechanisms of regulation of decorin expression in vasculature are not clearly understood. Particularly little information is available about a role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of decorin expression. In the present study, we report that activation of vascular FXR by a specific ligand resulted in upregulation of decorin at the levels of both mRNA and protein. FXR appears to induce decorin expression at a transcriptional level because (1) upregulation of decorin mRNA expression was abolished by the treatment of a transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D; and (2) decorin promoter activity was significantly increased by activation of FXR. Functional analysis of human decorin promoter identified an imperfect inverted repeat DNA motif, IR8 (-2313TGGTCAtagtgtcaTGACCT-2294), as a likely FXR-responsive element that is involved in decorin regulation.

  17. Airway smooth muscle and bronchospasm: fluctuating, fluidizing, freezing

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Trepat, Xavier; Nguyen, Trang T. B.; Lenormand, Guillaume; Oliver, Madavi; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    We review here four recent findings that have altered in a fundamental way our understanding of airways smooth muscle (ASM), its dynamic responses to physiological loading, and their dominant mechanical role in bronchospasm. These findings highlight ASM remodeling processes that are innately out-of-equilibrium and dynamic, and bring to the forefront a striking intersection between topics in condensed matter physics and ASM cytoskeletal biology. By doing so, they place in a new light the role of enhanced ASM mass in airway hyper-responsiveness as well as in the failure of a deep inspiration to relax the asthmatic airway. These findings have established that (i) ASM length is equilibrated dynamically, not statically; (ii) ASM dynamics closely resemble physical features exhibited by so-called soft glassy materials; (iii) static force-length relationships fail to describe dynamically contracted ASM states; (iv) stretch fluidizes the ASM cytoskeleton. Taken together, these observations suggest that at the origin of the bronchodilatory effect of a deep inspiration, and its failure in asthma, may lie glassy dynamics of the ASM cell. PMID:18514592

  18. Transcriptional regulation of cytokine function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Deborah; Damera, Gautam; Sukkar, Maria B.; Tliba, Omar

    2009-01-01

    The immuno-modulatory properties of airway smooth muscle have become of increasing importance in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and structural remodeling of the airway wall in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ASM cells respond to many cytokines, growth factors and lipid mediators to produce a wide array of immuno-modulatory molecules which may in turn orchestrate and perpetuate the disease process in asthma and COPD. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured ASM, few have identified intracellular signaling pathways by which cytokines modulate or induce these cellular responses. In this review we provide an overview of the transcriptional mechanisms as well as intracellular signaling pathways regulating cytokine functions in ASM cells. The recent discovery of toll-like receptors in ASM cells represents a significant development in our understanding of the immuno-modulatory capabilities of ASM cells. Thus, we also review emerging evidence of the inflammatory response to toll-like receptor activation in ASM cells. PMID:19393330

  19. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya . E-mail: sfukumoto@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  20. Arterial Myogenic Activation through Smooth Muscle Filamin A.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Arhatte, Malika; Demolombe, Sophie; Peyronnet, Rémi; Baudrie, Véronique; Jodar, Martine; Bourreau, Jennifer; Henrion, Daniel; Offermanns, Stefan; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Feng, Yuanyi; Patel, Amanda; Duprat, Fabrice; Honoré, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in the filamin A (FlnA) gene are frequently associated with severe arterial abnormalities, although the physiological role for this cytoskeletal element remains poorly understood in vascular cells. We used a conditional mouse model to selectively delete FlnA in smooth muscle (sm) cells at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knockout. Basal blood pressure was significantly reduced in conscious smFlnA knockout mice. Remarkably, pressure-dependent tone of the resistance caudal artery was lost, whereas reactivity to vasoconstrictors was preserved. Impairment of the myogenic behavior was correlated with a lack of calcium influx in arterial myocytes upon an increase in intraluminal pressure. Notably, the stretch activation of CaV1.2 was blunted in the absence of smFlnA. In conclusion, FlnA is a critical upstream element of the signaling cascade underlying the myogenic tone. These findings allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of arterial autoregulation and associated disease states. PMID:26923587

  1. Mechanisms of BDNF regulation in asthmatic airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin produced by airway smooth muscle (ASM), enhances inflammation effects on airway contractility, supporting the idea that locally produced growth factors influence airway diseases such as asthma. We endeavored to dissect intrinsic mechanisms regulating endogenous, as well as inflammation (TNF-α)-induced BDNF secretion in ASM of nonasthmatic vs. asthmatic humans. We focused on specific Ca(2+) regulation- and inflammation-related signaling cascades and quantified BDNF secretion. We find that TNF-α enhances BDNF release by ASM cells, via several mechanisms relevant to asthma, including transient receptor potential channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 (but not TRPC1), ERK 1/2, PI3K, PLC, and PKC cascades, Rho kinase, and transcription factors cAMP response element binding protein and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Basal BDNF expression and secretion are elevated in asthmatic ASM and increase further with TNF-α exposure, involving many of these regulatory mechanisms. We conclude that airway BDNF secretion is regulated at multiple levels, providing a basis for autocrine effects of BDNF under conditions of inflammation and disease, with potential downstream influences on contractility and remodeling. PMID:27317689

  2. PDT-induced apoptosis in arterial smooth muscles cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamekye, Isaac; Renick, R.; Gilbert, C.; McEwan, Jean R.; Evan, G.; Bishop, Christopher C. R.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    PDT kills smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vivo and thus prevents intimal hyperplasia after angioplasty. It causes little inflammation and structural integrity of the artery is not compromised. We have studied the process of the SMC death in vitro. Cultured rat SMC (cell line sv40 ATCC) were sensitized with aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc), and then irradiated with 675 nm laser light (2.5 J/cm2). Controls were studied using only sensitizer or laser for treatment. The cells were incubated and the dying process observed with a time lapse video and microscope system. PDT caused a characteristic pattern of death. Cells lost contact with neighbors, shrank, and showed hyperactivity and membrane ruffling. The cells imploded into active and condensed membrane bound vesicles which were terminally reduced to residual bodies. These are the morphological changes of apoptosis. The control cells which were given AlS2Pc alone or laser alone showed no death. PDT induced cultured arterial SMC death by apoptosis rather than necrosis. An apoptotic mechanism of cell death in vivo would explain the relative lack of inflammation and local tissue destruction in the face of massive death.

  3. Sequential activation of alpha-actin genes during avian cardiogenesis: vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin gene transcripts mark the onset of cardiomyocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The expression of cytoplasmic beta-actin and cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle alpha-actins during early avian cardiogenesis was analyzed by in situ hybridization with mRNA-specific single-stranded DNA probes. The cytoplasmic beta-actin gene was ubiquitously expressed in the early chicken embryo. In contrast, the alpha-actin genes were sequentially activated in avian cardiac tissue during the early stages of heart tube formation. The accumulation of large quantities of smooth muscle alpha-actin transcripts in epimyocardial cells preceded the expression of the sarcomeric alpha-actin genes. The accumulation of skeletal alpha-actin mRNAs in the developing heart lagged behind that of cardiac alpha-actin by several embryonic stages. At Hamburger- Hamilton stage 12, the smooth muscle alpha-actin gene was selectively down-regulated in the heart such that only the conus, which subsequently participates in the formation of the vascular trunks, continued to express this gene. This modulation in smooth muscle alpha- actin gene expression correlated with the beginning of coexpression of sarcomeric alpha-actin transcripts in the epimyocardium and the onset of circulation in the embryo. The specific expression of the vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin gene marks the onset of differentiation of cardiac cells and represents the first demonstration of coexpression of both smooth muscle and striated alpha-actin genes within myogenic cells. PMID:3204121

  4. Histone deacetylase 8 regulates cortactin deacetylation and contraction in smooth muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Chen, Shu; Cleary, Rachel A; Wang, Ruping; Gannon, Olivia J; Seto, Edward; Tang, Dale D

    2014-08-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that mediate nucleosomal histone deacetylation and gene expression. Some members of the HDAC family have also been implicated in nonhistone protein deacetylation, which modulates cell-cycle control, differentiation, and cell migration. However, the role of HDACs in smooth muscle contraction is largely unknown. Here, HDAC8 was localized both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of mouse and human smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of HDAC8 by lentivirus-encoding HDAC8 shRNA inhibited force development in response to acetylcholine. Treatment of smooth muscle tissues with HDAC8 inhibitor XXIV (OSU-HDAC-44) induced relaxation of precontracted smooth muscle tissues. In addition, cortactin is an actin-regulatory protein that undergoes deacetylation during migration of NIH 3T3 cells. In this study, acetylcholine stimulation induced cortactin deacetylation in mouse and human smooth muscle tissues, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis using antibody against acetylated lysine. Knockdown of HDAC8 by RNAi or treatment with the inhibitor attenuated cortactin deacetylation and actin polymerization without affecting myosin activation. Furthermore, expression of a charge-neutralizing cortactin mutant inhibited contraction and actin dynamics during contractile activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. In response to contractile stimulation, HDAC8 may mediate cortactin deacetylation, which subsequently promotes actin filament polymerization and smooth muscle contraction.

  5. Voltage-gated potassium+ channel expression in coronary artery smooth muscle cells of SHR and WKY.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi; Ma, Aiqun; Zhang, Yushun; Xi, Yutao; Fan, Lihong; Wang, Tingzhong; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to compare the expression of genes and the molecular characteristic of voltage-gated K(+) channels, which make great effort in maintaining and controlling smooth muscle contraction, cellular membrane potential, and intracellular calcium ion currents in artery smooth muscle cells of SHR and WKY. Expression of potassium ions family in coronary artery was detected through reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction quantitatively. Significant levels of voltage-gated K(+) channels α1.2, α1.5, and β1.1 expression were all proved to be significantly higher in smooth muscles of SHR than WKY. Whole-cell voltage-gated K(+) channel currents were larger in SHR artery smooth muscles than the ones of WKY. Moreover, the voltage dependence of voltage-gated potassium channel activation was more negative in artery smooth muscle of SHR than that of WKY, while voltage dependence of availability was not different. The above diversity of voltage-gated potassium channel detected in gene expression and electrical character in coronary artery smooth muscle of SHR than that of WKY might be an underling mechanism associated with the membrane potential depolarization in artery smooth muscle of SHR.

  6. Smooth muscle in the wall of the developing human urinary bladder and urethra.

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A

    1983-01-01

    A series of human fetal and neonatal specimens ranging in age from the second month of intrauterine development to 4 1/2 years after birth has been examined using histological and histochemical techniques. In both sexes histologically differentiated smooth muscle cells were evident in the bladder wall from the 52 mm crown-rump length stage onwards--urethral smooth muscle was not distinguishable until 119 mm crown-rump length. In addition to relatively late differentiation, urethral smooth muscle was histochemically distinct from the urinary bladder detrusor muscle. Sex differences in the arrangement and innervation of smooth muscle in the proximal urethra have also been observed, and these findings lend support to the presence of a pre-prostatic urethra sphincter. It seems likely that this sphincter acts principally to prevent reflux of ejaculate into the bladder during seminal emission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6654742

  7. T lymphocytes adhere to airway smooth muscle cells via integrins and CD44 and induce smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity that is associated with a lymphocytic infiltrate in the bronchial submucosa. The interactions between infiltrating T lymphocytes with cellular and extracellular matrix components of the airway and the consequences of these interactions have not been defined. We demonstrate the constitutive expression of CD44 on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in culture as well as in human bronchial tissue transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. In contrast, basal levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression are minimal but are induced on ASM by inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Activated, but not resting T cells, adhere to cultured ASM; stimulation of the ASM with TNF-alpha enhanced this adhesion. Adhesion was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) on T cells and ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on ASM cells. The observed integrin-independent adhesion was mediated by CD44/hyaluronate interactions as it was inhibited by anti-CD44 mAb 5F12 and by hyaluronidase. Furthermore, the adhesion of activated T lymphocytes induced DNA synthesis in growth-arrested ASM cells. Thus, the interaction between T cells and ASM may provide insight into the mechanisms that induce bronchial inflammation and possibly ASM cell hyperplasia seen in asthma. PMID:7520473

  8. Vasculo-smooth muscle hamartomatous structure is linked to morphogenesis of colorectal polypoid adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hirofumi; Enzan, Hideaki; Yasui, Wataru

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the difference of surrounding stromal structure between the polypoid and flat adenomas in the colorectum, we performed microscopic study including immunohistochemistry in a total of 32 colorectal adenomas (typical 24 polypoid and eight flat adenomas), especially focusing on vessels around muscularis mucosa. All 24 polypoid adenomas accompanied vasculo-smooth muscle hamartomatous structure in association with muscularis mucosa and submucosal vessels, whereas none of eight flat adenomas had vasculo-smooth muscle hamartomatous structure; surrounding muscularis mucosa and submucosa of the flat adenomas are identical to those of normal colorectal tissue. Vasculo-smooth muscle hamartomatous structure is linked to the morphogenesis of colorectal polypoid adenomas.

  9. Effect of histamine on contractile activity of smooth muscles in bovine mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2012-02-01

    The effects of histamine and mechanisms of its action on the capsular smooth muscle cells of mesenteric lymph nodes were examined on isolated capsular strips under isometric conditions. Histamine (1×10(-8)-5×10(-7) M) decreased the tone of capsular smooth muscle cells and the frequency of phasic contractions. At high concentrations (more than 5×10(-6) M), histamine increased the amplitude and frequency of phasic contractions against the background of increased tonic stress. The effects of histamine were dose-dependent and were realized via direct stimulation of H(1)- and H(2)-receptors on the membrane of smooth muscle cells.

  10. Lead acetate action on anaphylactic response of guinea pig smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gijón, E; Cartas, L; García, X

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were performed to evaluate lead acetate effects on the anaphylactic contraction in guinea pigs smooth muscles. Aortic rings from guinea pigs exposed to lead acetate developed an anaphylactic contraction significantly lower than the contraction induced by the antigen in controls. In the smooth muscle of the intestine, lead acetate did not modify the anaphylactic response. Lead induced immunosuppression of the anaphylactic response of aortic rings, whereas sodium acetate had no effect on the anaphylactic reaction of the guinea pig smooth muscle. The amplitude of the norepinephrine contraction was not modified by lead nor by sodium acetate.

  11. Regulation of smooth muscle cell phenotype by glycosaminoglycan identity.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xin; Jimenez-Vergara, Andrea Carolina; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; Ortiz, Diana; McMahon, Rebecca E; Cristancho, Deissy; Becerra-Bayona, Silvia; Guiza-Arguello, Viviana; Grande-Allen, K Jane; Hahn, Mariah S

    2011-03-01

    The retention of lipoproteins in the arterial intima is an initial event in early atherosclerosis and occurs, in part, through interactions between negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and the positively charged residues of apolipoproteins. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) which infiltrate into the lipoprotein-enriched intima have been observed to transform into lipid-laden foam cells. This phenotypic switch is associated with SMC acquisition of a macrophage-like capacity to phagocytose lipoproteins and/or of an adipocyte-like capacity to synthesize fatty acids de novo. The aim of the present work was to explore the impact of GAG identity on SMC foam cell formation using a scaffold environment intended to be mimetic of early atherosclerosis. In these studies, we focused on chondroitin sulfate C (CSC), dermatan sulfate (DS), and an intermediate molecular weight hyaluronan (HAIMW, ∼400 kDa), the levels and/or distribution of each of which are significantly altered in atherosclerosis. DS hydrogels were associated with greater SMC phagocytosis of apolipoprotein B than HAIMW gels. Similarly, only SMCs in DS constructs maintained increased expression of the adipocyte marker A-FABP relative to HAIMW gels over 35 days of culture. The increased SMC foam cell phenotype in DS hydrogels was reflected in a corresponding decrease in SMC myosin heavy chain expression in these constructs relative to HAIMW gels at day 35. In addition, this DS-associated increase in foam cell formation was mirrored in an increased SMC synthetic phenotype, as evidenced by greater levels of collagen type I and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in DS gels than in HAIMW gels. Combined, these results support the increasing body of literature that suggests a critical role for DS-bearing proteoglycans in early atherosclerosis. PMID:21094702

  12. Interaction of smooth muscle caldesmon with calmodulin mutants.

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, M V; Bushueva, T L; Shirinsky, V P; Lukas, T J; Watterson, D M; Gusev, N B

    1995-02-20

    The interaction of avian smooth muscle caldesmon with calmodulin (CaM) was investigated by studying the ability of selected mutant calmodulins to induce fluorescence changes in caldesmon. Different types of CaM mutants were used including point charge mutants, cluster mutations, and mutations which alter the calcium binding of CaM. The caldesmon binding properties were only slightly affected by E84K-CaM or by the double mutation E84Q/E120Q-CaM. Affinity of calmodulin to caldesmon was decreased 2-4 times by point mutation G33V-CaM, double mutation E84K/E120K-CaM, deletion of residues 82-84, and by cluster mutations DEE118-120-->KKK or EEE82-84-->KKK. Mutations of the first (E31A-CaM) and the second (E67A-CaM) calcium binding sites reduced the affinity of calmodulin to caldesmon by at least 5-fold; in addition these calmodulin mutants exhibited smaller changes in the fluorescence spectra of caldesmon. Simultaneous mutation of the two negatively charged clusters of calmodulin EEE82-84-->KKK and DEE118-120-->KKK resulted in a more than 15-fold decrease in the affinity of calmodulin for caldesmon. The data indicate that charged and uncharged amino acids in both halves of CaM play an important role in the binding of calmodulin to caldesmon, and that Ca2+ binding must be maintained in the amino-terminal sites for maximal interaction with caldesmon.

  13. Cooling-induced contraction in ovine airways smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, S M; Pilcher, C W; Williams, K I

    1999-02-01

    The mechanism of cold-induced bronchoconstriction is poorly understood. This prompted the present study whose aim was to determine the step-wise direct effect of cooling on smooth muscle of isolated ovine airways and analyse the role of calcium in the mechanisms involved. Isolated tracheal strips and bronchial segments were suspended in organ baths containing Krebs' solution for isometric tension recording. Tissue responses during stepwise cooling from 37 to 5 degrees C were examined. Cooling induced a rapid and reproducible contraction proportional to cooling temperature in ovine tracheal and bronchial preparations which was epithelium-independent. On readjustment to 37 degrees C the tone returned rapidly to basal level. Maximum contraction was achieved at a temperature of 5 degrees C for trachea and 15 degrees C for bronchiole. Cooling-induced contractions (CIC) was resistant to tetrodotoxin (1; 10 micrometer), and not affected by the muscarinic antagonist atropine (1 micrometer) or the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (1 micrometer), or the histamine H1-antagonist mepyramine (1 micrometer) or indomethacin (1 micrometer). Ca2+ antagonists (nifedipine and verapamil) and Mn2+ raised tracheal but not bronchiolar tone and augmented CIC. Incubation in Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing Krebs' solution for 5 min had no effect on CIC, although it significantly reduced KCl-induced contraction by up to 75%. Cooling inhibited Ca2+ influx measured using 45Ca2+ uptake. Caffeine (100 micrometer) significantly inhibited CIC. The results show that cooling-induced contractions do not appear to involve activation of nerve endings, all surface reception systems or Ca2+ influx. However, CIC is mainly dependent on release of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:10072702

  14. Caveolin-3 Promotes a Vascular Smooth Muscle Contractile Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Pajares, Jorge L.; Iturrieta, Jeannette; Dulam, Vipin; Wang, Yu; Pavlides, Stephanos; Malacari, Gabriella; Lisanti, Michael P.; Frank, Philippe G.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the importance of cardiovascular diseases in Western countries. Among the cell types associated with a dysfunctional vasculature, smooth muscle (SM) cells are believed to play an essential role in the development of these illnesses. Vascular SM cells are key regulators of the vascular tone and also have an important function in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis. While in the normal vasculature, contractile SM cells are predominant, in atherosclerotic vascular lesions, synthetic cells migrate toward the neointima, proliferate, and synthetize extracellular matrix proteins. In the present study, we have examined the role of caveolin-3 in the regulation of SM cell phenotype. Caveolin-3 is expressed in vivo in normal arterial SM cells, but its expression appears to be lost in cultured SM cells. Our data show that caveolin-3 expression in the A7r5 SM cell line is associated with increased expression of contractility markers such as SM α-actin, SM myosin heavy chain but decreased expression of the synthetic phenotype markers such as p-Elk and Klf4. Moreover, we also show that caveolin-3 expression can reduce proliferation upon treatment with LDL or PDGF. Finally, we show that caveolin-3-expressing SM cells are less sensitive to apoptosis than control cells upon treatment with oxidized LDL. Taken together, our data suggest that caveolin-3 can regulate the phenotypic switch between contractile and synthetic SM cells. A better understanding of the factors regulating caveolin-3 expression and function in this cell type will permit the development of a better comprehension of the factors regulating SM function in atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:26664898

  15. Distribution of a lanthanide (147 Pm) in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Weiss, G B; Goodman, F R

    1976-08-01

    In order to ascertain whether trivalent rare earth ions such as lanthanum (La+++) penetrate the cell membrane under physiological conditions, the extracellular and cellular distribution of promethium (147 Pm), a carrier-free rare earth radioisotope, was examined in rabbit aortic smooth muscle. As the duration of incubation was lengthened, uptake of 147Pm continued to increase; it was inhibited by La+++ and other rare earth ions (Nd+++, Lu+++) only when the 147 Pm/rare earth concentration ratio exceeded 1:10(6). However, equally high concentrations of Ca++ had no effect on 147Pm uptake. Efflux of 147Pm was only transiently increased by 1.5 mM La+++, and exposure to 0.05 mM EDTA elicited an increased 147Pm efflux with both transient and maintained components. The magnitude of the EDTA-induced increase in 147 Pm efflux was similar over a 30-fold range of EDTA concentration (0.05-1.5 mM); the limiting factor for 147Pm efflux is the rate of 147Pm desorption from the tissue rather than the extracellular concentration of EDTA. Loss of 147Pm in the presence of 0.05 mM EDTA could be described in terms of two specific washout components (the more rapid of which included 147Pm within the extracellular space and the slower of which had half-times of washout of approximately 7-10 minutes). Uptake of 147Pm was inhibited by lowering the incubation solution temperature to 0 degrees C or by procaine. However, concentrations of metabolic inhibitors (iodoacetate and dinitrophenol) which diminish loss of Ca++ from the cell did not decrease either the uptake or efflux of 147Pm. Thus, significant quantities of 147Pm do not appear to be accumulated within the cell or transported out of the cell; distribution of 147Pm can be most simply described in terms of a binding at and desorption from surface acessible fiber sites.

  16. Platelet membranes induce airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Grenegård, Magnus; Lindström, Eva G

    2011-01-01

    The role of platelets in airway disease is poorly understood although they have been suggested to influence on proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). Platelets have been found localized in the airways in autopsy material from asthmatic patients and have been implicated in airway remodeling. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of various platelet fractions on proliferation of ASMC obtained from guinea pigs (GP-ASMC) and humans (H-ASMC). Proliferation of ASMC was measured by the MTS assay and the results confirmed by measurements of the DNA content. A key observation was that the platelet membrane preparations induced a significant increase in the proliferation of both GP-ASMC (129.9 ± 3.0 %) and H-ASMC (144.8 ± 12.2). However, neither supernatants from lysed or filtrated thrombin stimulated platelets induced ASMC proliferation to the same extent as the membrane preparation. We have previously shown that platelet-induced proliferation is dependent on 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathways. In the present work we established that platelet membrane-induced ASMC proliferation was reduced in the presence of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI and the 5-LOX inhibitor AA-861. In conclusion, our results showed that platelet membranes significantly induced ASMC proliferation, demonstrating that the mitogenic effect of platelets and platelet membranes on ASMC is mainly due to membrane-associated factors. The effects of platelet membranes were evident on both GP-ASMC and H-ASMC and involved 5-LOX and ROS. These new findings are of importance in understanding the mechanisms contributing to airway remodeling and may contribute to the development of new pharmacological tools in the treatment of inflammatory airway diseases.

  17. Structural and functional changes in the airway smooth muscle of asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Seow, C Y; Schellenberg, R R; Paré, P D

    1998-11-01

    It has been recognized since the early 1920s that the amount of smooth muscle in asthmatic subjects' airways is markedly increased. More recent studies have confirmed that in fatal asthma there is a significant increase in the thickness of airway smooth muscle. For subjects who have had asthma and who died for other reasons or had a lobectomy, the increase in muscle layer thickness is less striking. An increase in smooth muscle mass could have a dual effect on airway narrowing: one due to the thickening of airway wall, the other due to a concomitant increase in force generation. However, it is not known whether the increased muscle mass, due either to hypertrophy or hyperplasia, is accompanied by an increase in force. Proliferation of smooth muscle cells often produces noncontractile cells in vitro. Comparison of force generation by muscle preparations from asthmatic and control airways shows conflicting results, with some studies demonstrating an increase in force in asthmatic muscle preparations and others showing no increase. The discrepancy could be due to a failure to take into account the length-tension relationship of the muscle preparations in some studies. No force velocity data are available for human airway smooth muscle. However, there is some evidence for an increased amount of shortening in airway smooth muscle preparations from patients with asthma. This could be due to an increase in force generation and/or a decrease in tissue elastance in asthmatic airways. Muscle contractility and tissue elastance are in turn influenced by cytokines, matrix-degrading enzymes, and other inflammatory mediators present in the airways of asthmatic subjects. Data from in vitro studies of a canine "asthma model" indicate an increase in both shortening velocity and amount of shortening compared with littermate control animals. An increase in the compliance of the parallel elastic element of the sensitized airway preparation could account for the mechanical alterations

  18. Length adaptation of smooth muscle contractile filaments in response to sustained activation.

    PubMed

    Stålhand, Jonas; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2016-05-21

    Airway and bladder smooth muscles are known to undergo length adaptation under sustained contraction. This adaptation process entails a remodelling of the intracellular actin and myosin filaments which shifts the peak of the active force-length curve towards the current length. Smooth muscles are therefore able to generate the maximum force over a wide range of lengths. In contrast, length adaptation of vascular smooth muscle has attracted very little attention and only a handful of studies have been reported. Although their results are conflicting on the existence of a length adaptation process in vascular smooth muscle, it seems that, at least, peripheral arteries and arterioles undergo such adaptation. This is of interest since peripheral vessels are responsible for pressure regulation, and a length adaptation will affect the function of the cardiovascular system. It has, e.g., been suggested that the inward remodelling of resistance vessels associated with hypertension disorders may be related to smooth muscle adaptation. In this study we develop a continuum mechanical model for vascular smooth muscle length adaptation by assuming that the muscle cells remodel the actomyosin network such that the peak of the active stress-stretch curve is shifted towards the operating point. The model is specialised to hamster cheek pouch arterioles and the simulated response to stepwise length changes under contraction. The results show that the model is able to recover the salient features of length adaptation reported in the literature.

  19. Real-time in vivo proteomic identification of novel kinase substrates in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Anne A; Haystead, Timothy A

    2007-01-01

    Relaxation of smooth muscle can occur through agonists (such as nitric oxide) that activate guanylyl cyclase and stimulate the production of cGMP, activating its target, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). This kinase can raise the Ca2+ threshold for contraction, thus causing Ca2+ desensitization, but the mechanism for this event is not completely understood. Ca2+ sensitization/desensitization pathways are essential for maintenance of normal smooth muscle tone, and abnormalities in these pathways have been shown to be key components in the pathogenesis of diseases such as hypertension and asthma in humans. Our laboratory has devised a proteomic method to specifically address the question of what proteins are early phosphorylation targets in calcium desensitization. Using ileum smooth muscle, we metabolically labeled the muscle with (32P)-orthophosphate, permeabilized the muscle, established constant calcium concentrations, and stimulated with 8-bromo-cGMP, which activates PKG. Proteins whose phosphorylation state changed in response to cGMP at constant levels of calcium were separated with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, identified by autoradiography, and sequenced with nanospray mass spectrometry. Using this technique, we identified a previously uncharacterized PKG phosphoprotein, which we have termed CHASM (Calponin Homology Smooth Muscle protein). Using physiological muscle bath contraction studies, we have validated CHASM as a component of calcium desensitization pathways in smooth muscle.

  20. Investigation of the mechanism of lead toxicity in avian crop smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, I.J.

    1985-01-01

    There are definite toxic responses attributable to smooth muscle changes in humans and other animals exposed to lead. The mechanisms for such effects are not understood. Lead poisoning is manifested by crop dysfunction in pigeons. The effect may be the result of toxicity at sites associated with lead-induced ataxia, such as the cerebellum, or at sites on the smooth muscle structure and the associated nerve plexuses. The author found that lead-induced ataxia is separable from lead-induced crop dysfunction depending on the route of lead exposure and the dosage regimen. This suggests that crop stasis is not the indirect result of toxic effects in the cerebellum or other sites associated with ataxia. A bathing medium was devised for working with muscle strips in vitro which accommodates the solubility characteristics of lead and supports the activity of crop smooth muscle. Lead concentrations on the order of 0.1 mM in this medium cause relaxation of crop smooth muscle. Circular muscle is more sensitive to Pb/sup 2 +/ than is longitudinal muscle, in agreement with the effects of other smooth muscle agonists.

  1. Segregation of striated and smooth muscle lineages by a Notch-dependent regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lineage segregation from multipotent epithelia is a central theme in development and in adult stem cell plasticity. Previously, we demonstrated that striated and smooth muscle cells share a common progenitor within their epithelium of origin, the lateral domain of the somite-derived dermomyotome. However, what controls the segregation of these muscle subtypes remains unknown. We use this in vivo bifurcation of fates as an experimental model to uncover the underlying mechanisms of lineage diversification from bipotent progenitors. Results Using the strength of spatio-temporally controlled gene missexpression in avian embryos, we report that Notch harbors distinct pro-smooth muscle activities depending on the duration of the signal; short periods prevent striated muscle development and extended periods, through Snail1, promote cell emigration from the dermomyotome towards a smooth muscle fate. Furthermore, we define a Muscle Regulatory Network, consisting of Id2, Id3, FoxC2 and Snail1, which acts in concert to promote smooth muscle by antagonizing the pro-myogenic activities of Myf5 and Pax7, which induce striated muscle fate. Notch and BMP closely regulate the network and reciprocally reinforce each other’s signal. In turn, components of the network strengthen Notch signaling, while Pax7 silences this signaling. These feedbacks augment the robustness and flexibility of the network regulating muscle subtype segregation. Conclusions Our results demarcate the details of the Muscle Regulatory Network, underlying the segregation of muscle sublineages from the lateral dermomyotome, and exhibit how factors within the network promote the smooth muscle at the expense of the striated muscle fate. This network acts as an exemplar demonstrating how lineage segregation occurs within epithelial primordia by integrating inputs from competing factors. PMID:25015411

  2. Characterization of human aortic smooth muscle cells expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 open reading frames.

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, S. C.; Hart, C. E.; Perez-Reyes, N.; Giachelli, C. M.; Schwartz, S. M.; McDougall, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    A comparative study of human papillomavirus type 16 E6E7-transfected and normal human aortic smooth muscle cells by morphological, electron microscopic, immunofluorescent, and biochemical analyses demonstrated that the E6E7-expressing cells retained much of the phenotype of normal aortic smooth muscle cells, including expression of smooth muscle markers and appropriate growth responses to PDGF and heparin. These cells differed from normal vascular smooth muscle cells in that they had slightly altered morphology and a higher growth rate that was not due to an autocrine response to secreted PDGF, and they contained more polyribosomes than normal smooth muscle cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7677186

  3. MED12 mutations occurring in benign and malignant mammalian smooth muscle tumors.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Huhle, Sonja; Nimzyk, Rolf; Stenman, Göran; Löning, Thomas; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2013-03-01

    Mutations of the mediator subcomplex 12 gene (MED12) recently have been described in a large group of uterine leiomyomas (UL) but only in a single malignant uterine smooth muscle tumor. To further address the occurrence of fibroid-type MED12 mutations in smooth muscle tumors, we have analyzed samples from 34 leiomyosarcomas (LMS), 21 UL, two extrauterine leiomyomas (EL), and 10 canine genital leiomyomas for the presence of MED12 mutations of the UL-type. Interestingly, besides UL MED12 mutations were found in one uterine LMS, one EL, and two canine vaginal leiomyomas. The results confirm the occurrence of fibroid-type MED12 mutations in malignant uterine smooth muscle tumors thus suggesting a rare but existing leiomyoma-LMS sequence. In addition, for the first time MED12 mutations are reported in smooth muscle tumors in a non-primate mammalian species. PMID:23225304

  4. Muscarinic M2 receptors in bovine tracheal smooth muscle: discrepancies between binding and function.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Van Amsterdam, R G; De Zeeuw, R A; Zaagsma, J

    1988-08-01

    Previous work showing that AF-DX 116, a cardioselective muscarinic antagonist in functional experiments, does not discriminate between muscarinic receptors in bovine cardiac and tracheal membranes has been extended. In addition to AF-DX 116 we used the muscarinic antagonists, atropine, pirenzepine, 4-DAMP methobromide, gallamine, hexahydrosiladifenidol and methoctramine, in radioligand binding experiments on bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes. The functional antagonism of the methacholine-induced contraction of bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips was also evaluated. An excellent correlation was found for all compounds between the binding affinities for muscarinic receptors in cardiac and tracheal smooth muscle membranes; moreover, the affinities found in cardiac membranes correspond with the pA2 values reported for atrial preparations of rat and guinea pig. However, significant and occasionally marked discrepancies were found between binding and functional affinities of these muscarinic antagonists on bovine tracheal smooth muscle. PMID:3215279

  5. Nitric oxide from vascular smooth muscle cells: regulation of platelet reactivity and smooth muscle cell guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Mollace, V.; Salvemini, D.; Anggard, E.; Vane, J.

    1991-01-01

    1. Incubation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) from bovine aorta for 3 min with human washed platelets treated with indomethacin (10 microM) promoted a cell number-related inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by thrombin (40 mu ml-1). This inhibition was not attributable to products of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway for the SMC were also treated with indomethacin (10 microM). 2. The inhibitory activity of the SMC on platelet aggregation was enhanced by incubating the SMC with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.5 micrograms ml-1) for a period of 9 to 24 h. This effect was attenuated when cycloheximide (10 micrograms ml-1) was incubated together with LPS. Cycloheximide did not prevent the inhibitory activity of the non-treated cells. 3. The inhibition of platelet aggregation obtained with non-treated or LPS-treated SMC was potentiated by superoxide dismutase (SOD, 60 u ml-1) and ablated by oxyhaemoglobin (OxyHb, 10 microM). Preincubation of the SMC with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 30-300 microM) for 60 min prevented their antiaggregatory activity. This effect was reversed by concurrent incubation with L-arginine (L-Arg, 100 microM) but not with D-arginine (D-Arg, 100 microM). 4. Exposure of the non-treated SMC (5 x 10(5) cells) to stirring (1000 r.p.m., 37 degrees C) for 10 min led to a significant increase in their levels of guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) but not adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP). L-NMMA (300 microM) attenuated the increase in cyclic GMP induced by stirring but did not affect the basal levels of cyclic GMP in the cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1724627

  6. A Critical Role for Proinflammatory Behavior of Smooth Muscle Cells in Hemodynamic Initiation of Intracranial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Mandelbaum, Max; Kolega, John; Dolan, Jennifer M.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Meng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracranial aneurysm initiation is poorly understood, although hemodynamic insult is believed to play an important role in triggering the pathology. It has recently been found in a rabbit model that while macrophages are absent during hemodynamic aneurysm initiation, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are elevated and co-localize with smooth muscle cells (SMCs). This study investigates whether SMCs play a mechanistic role in aneurysm initiation triggered by hemodynamics. Methods Aneurysmal damage was induced at the basilar terminus via bilateral common carotid artery ligation in rabbits (n = 45, plus 7 sham controls). 16 ligated rabbits were treated with doxycycline to inhibit MMPs, 7 received clodronate liposomes to deplete circulating monocytes, and the rest received no drug. Effects of the treatments on aneurysm development were assessed histologically 5 days and 6 months after ligation. MMP production and expression of inflammatory markers by SMCs was monitored by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Results Treatment with doxycycline attenuated aneurysmal development examined at 5 days and 6 months, suggesting that MMPs contribute to aneurysm initiation. However, systemic depletion of macrophages did not decrease MMPs or suppress aneurysmal development. Immunofluorescence showed that during aneurysm initiation MMP-2 and MMP-9 were distributed in SMCs, and in situ hybridization indicated that they were transcribed by SMCs. In regions of early aneurysmal lesion, SMCs exhibited decreased expression of smooth muscle actin and increased NF-κB and MCP-1 expressions. Conclusions During aneurysm initiation triggered by hemodynamics, SMCs rather than macrophages are responsible for MMP production that is critical for aneurysmal lesion development. These SMCs exhibit proinflammatory behavior. PMID:24023941

  7. An α-smooth muscle actin (acta2/αsma) zebrafish transgenic line marking vascular mural cells and visceral smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Whitesell, Thomas R; Kennedy, Regan M; Carter, Alyson D; Rollins, Evvi-Lynn; Georgijevic, Sonja; Santoro, Massimo M; Childs, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma), which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels.

  8. Previously differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells contribute to neointima formation following vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The origins of neointimal smooth muscle cells that arise following vascular injury remains controversial. Studies have suggested that these cells may arise from previously differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells, resident stem cells or blood born progenitors. In the current study we examined the contribution of the previously differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells to the neointima that forms following carotid artery ligation. Methods We utilized transgenic mice harboring a cre recombinase-dependent reporter gene (mTmG). These mice express membrane targeted tandem dimer Tomato (mTomato) prior to cre-mediated excision and membrane targeted EGFP (mEGFP) following excision. The mTmG mice were crossed with transgenic mice expressing either smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (Myh11) or smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) driven tamoxifen regulated cre recombinase. Following treatment of adult mice with tamoxifen these mice express mEGFP exclusively in differentiated smooth muscle cells. Subsequently vascular injury was induced in the mice by carotid artery ligation and the contribution of mEGFP positive cells to the neointima determined. Results Analysis of the cellular composition of the neointima that forms following injury revealed that mEGFP positive cells derived from either Mhy11 or Acta2 tagged medial vascular smooth muscle cells contribute to the majority of neointima formation (79 ± 17% and 81 ± 12%, respectively). Conclusion These data demonstrate that the majority of the neointima that forms following carotid ligation is derived from previously differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:25309723

  9. Distinct apolipoprotein E isoform preference for inhibition of smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeleny, Michelle; Swertfeger, Debi K; Weisgraber, Karl H; Hui, David Y

    2002-10-01

    The current study compared the effectiveness of the various human apolipoprotein E (apoE) isoforms in inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor- (PDGF-) stimulated smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. The incubation of primary mouse aortic smooth muscle cells with apoE3 resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of smooth muscle cells stimulated by 10 ng/mL PDGF. Greater than 50% inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation was observed at 15 microg/mL of human apoE3. Human apoE2 was less effective, requiring a higher concentration to achieve inhibition comparable to that of apoE3. Human apoE4 was the least effective of the apoE isoforms with no significant inhibition of cell proliferation observed at concentrations up to 15 microg/mL. Interestingly, apoE inhibition of PDGF-directed smooth muscle cell migration did not show preference for any apoE isoforms. Human apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4 were equally effective in inhibiting smooth muscle cell migration toward PDGF. These results are consistent with previous data showing that apoE inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation is mediated through its binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, whereas its inhibition of cell migration is mediated via binding to the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein. The low efficiency of apoE4 to inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation also suggested another mechanism to explain the association between the apolipoprotein epsilon4 allele with increased risk of coronary artery disease. PMID:12269825

  10. Chemerin Stimulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Carotid Neointimal Hyperplasia by Activating Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Luo, Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Huadong; Li, Jianghua; Liao, Bihong; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular neointimal hyperplasia and remodeling arising from local inflammation are characteristic pathogeneses of proliferative cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and post angioplasty restenosis. The molecular mechanisms behind these pathological processes have not been fully determined. The adipokine chemerin is associated with obesity, metabolism, and control of inflammation. Recently, chemerin has gained increased attention as it was found to play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemerin on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and carotid neointimal formation after angioplasty. We found that circulating chemerin levels increased after carotid balloon injury, and that knockdown of chemerin significantly inhibited the proliferative aspects of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vitro as well as prohibited carotid neointimal hyperplasia and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vivo after angioplasty. Additionally, inhibition of chemerin down-regulated the expression of several proteins, including phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B p65, and proliferation cell nuclear antigen. The novel finding of this study is that chemerin stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and carotid intimal hyperplasia through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, which may lead to vascular inflammation and remodeling, and is relevant to proliferative cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27792753

  11. Functional significance of increased airway smooth muscle in asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Lambert, R K; Wiggs, B R; Kuwano, K; Hogg, J C; Paré, P D

    1993-06-01

    Using a computational model, we investigated the effect of the morphologically determined increased airway smooth muscle mass, adventitial mass, and submucosal mass observed in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on the increase in airway resistance in response to a bronchoconstricting stimulus. The computational model of Wiggs et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 69: 849-860, 1990) was modified in such a way that smooth muscle shortening was limited by the maximal stress that the muscle could develop at the constricted length. Increased adventitial thickness was found to increase constriction by reducing parenchymal interdependence. Increased submucosal thickness led to greater luminal occlusion for any degree of smooth muscle shortening. Increased muscle thickness allowed greater smooth muscle shortening against the elastic loads provided by parenchymal interdependence and airway wall stiffness. We found that for constant airway mechanics, as reflected by the passive area-pressure curves of the airways, the increased muscle mass is likely to be the most important abnormality responsible for the increased resistance observed in response to bronchoconstricting stimuli in asthma and COPD. For a given maximal muscle stress, greater muscle thickness allows the development of greater tension and thus more constriction of the lumen. PMID:8365980

  12. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell’s initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9μm, 4.6±0.6μm and 6.2±1.8μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. Conclusions A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function. PMID:26882342

  13. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  14. Loss of Notch2 and Notch3 in vascular smooth muscle causes patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Baeten, Jeremy T; Jackson, Ashley R; McHugh, Kirk M; Lilly, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    The overlapping roles of the predominant Notch receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells, Notch2 and Notch3, have not been clearly defined in vivo. In this study, we use a smooth muscle-specific deletion of Notch2 together with a global Notch3 deletion to produce mice with combinations of mutant and wild-type Notch2/3 alleles in vascular smooth muscle cells. Mice with complete loss of Notch3 and smooth muscle-expressed Notch2 display late embryonic lethality and subcutaneous hemorrhage. Mice without smooth muscle-Notch2 and only one wild-type copy of Notch3 die within one day of birth and present with vascular defects, most notably patent ductus arteriosus (DA) and aortic dilation. These defects were associated with decreased expression of contractile markers in both the DA and aorta. These results demonstrate that Notch2 and Notch3 have overlapping roles in promoting development of vascular smooth muscle cells, and together contribute to functional closure of the DA.

  15. Recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin is necessary for smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ruping; Cleary, Rachel A; Gannon, Olivia J; Tang, Dale D

    2015-04-01

    β-Catenin is a key component that connects transmembrane cadherin with the actin cytoskeleton at the cell-cell interface. However, the role of the β-catenin/cadherin interaction in smooth muscle has not been well characterized. Here stimulation with acetylcholine promoted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Knockdown of β-catenin by lentivirus-mediated shRNA attenuated smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, myosin light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 and actin polymerization in response to contractile activation were not reduced by β-catenin knockdown. In addition, the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain disrupted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin. Force development, but not myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin polymerization, was reduced by the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain. Furthermore, actin polymerization and microtubules have been implicated in intracellular trafficking. In this study, the treatment with the inhibitor latrunculin A diminished the interaction of β-catenin with N-cadherin in smooth muscle. In contrast, the exposure of smooth muscle to the microtubule depolymerizer nocodazole did not affect the protein-protein interaction. Together, these findings suggest that smooth muscle contraction is mediated by the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin, which may facilitate intercellular mechanotransduction. The association of β-catenin with N-cadherin is regulated by actin polymerization during contractile activation.

  16. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  17. Regulation of smooth muscle cell growth by endothelium-derived factors.

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Burden, T; Vanhoutte, P M

    1994-01-01

    The endothelium is a source of molecules that either stimulate or inhibit the proliferation of the underlying smooth muscle cells. In the normal, healthy vessel wall the smooth muscle cells are quiescent, but they proliferate when damage to the endothelium occurs. The implication of such observations is that although the endothelium provides a source of growth factors, their stimulatory activity on smooth muscle cells is countered by endothelium-derived growth inhibitors. The inhibitors appear to comprise at least 3 distinct types of molecules: heparin/heparan sulfate; transforming growth factor beta; and nitric oxide. Each molecule inhibits growth of cultured smooth muscle cells by mechanisms that remain to be elucidated and are discussed in this communication. Heparin/heparan sulfate is the most thoroughly characterized of the 3, and has been used for clinical intervention to prevent restenosis. Transforming growth factor beta exhibits bimodal activity on growth, acting as a stimulant at low levels and as an inhibitor at elevated concentrations. Nitric oxide mediated vasorelaxation is dependent upon activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. Because elevation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate in smooth muscle cells depresses their proliferation, nitric oxide would appear to possess the properties necessary to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. PMID:8180516

  18. Smooth Muscle-Like Tissue Constructs with Circumferentially Oriented Cells Formed by the Cell Fiber Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Amy Y.; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  19. Vascular smooth muscle cell functional contractility depends on extracellular mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Steucke, Kerianne E.; Tracy, Paige V.; Hald, Eric S.; Hall, Jennifer L.; Alford, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells’ primary function is to maintain vascular homeostasis through active contraction and relaxation. In diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, this function is inhibited concurrent to changes in the mechanical environment surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. It is well established that cell function and extracellular mechanics are interconnected; variations in substrate modulus affect cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. To date, it is unknown how the evolving extracellular mechanical environment of vascular smooth muscle cells affects their contractile function. Here, we have built upon previous vascular muscular thin film technology to develop a variable-modulus vascular muscular thin film that measures vascular tissue functional contractility on substrates with a range of pathological and physiological moduli. Using this modified vascular muscular thin film, we found that vascular smooth muscle cells generated greater stress on substrates with higher moduli compared to substrates with lower moduli. We then measured protein markers typically thought to indicate a contractile phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells and found that phenotype is unaffected by substrate modulus. These data suggest that mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells’ extracellular environment directly influence their functional behavior and do so without inducing phenotype switching. PMID:26283412

  20. Original Research: Combined model of bladder detrusor smooth muscle and interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Josef; Byrtus, Miroslav; Stengl, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Although patients with lower urinary tract symptoms constitute a large and still growing population, understanding of bladder detrusor muscle physiology remains limited. Understanding the interactions between the detrusor smooth muscle cells and other bladder cell types (e.g. interstitial cells, IC) that may significantly contribute to coordinating and modulating detrusor contractions represents a considerable challenge. Computer modeling could help to elucidate some properties that are difficult to address experimentally; therefore, we developed in silico models of detrusor smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells, coupled through gap junctions. The models include all of the major ion conductances and transporters described in smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells in the literature. The model of normal detrusor muscle (smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells coupled through gap junctions) completely reproduced the experimental results obtained with detrusor strips in the presence of several pharmacological interventions (ryanodine, caffeine, nimodipine), whereas the model of smooth muscle cell alone (without interstitial cells) failed to reproduce the experimental results. Next, a model of overactive bladder, a highly prevalent clinical condition in both men and women with increasing incidence at older ages, was produced by modifying several processes as reported previously: a reduction of Ca(2+)-release through ryanodine receptors and a reduction of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-conductance with augmented gap junctional coupling. This model was also able to reproduce the pharmacological modulation of overactive bladder. In conclusion, a model of bladder detrusor muscle was developed that reproduced experimental results obtained in both normal and overactive bladder preparations. The results indicate that the non-smooth muscle cells of the detrusor (interstitial cells) contribute significantly to the contractile behavior of bladder detrusor muscle and should not be

  1. OUABAIN- AND MARINOBUFAGENIN-INDUCED PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS AND A RAT VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL LINE, A7R5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the growth-promoting effects of 2 sodium pump-selective cardiotonic steroids, ouabain and marinobufagenin, on cultured cells from vascular smooth muscle (VSMCs) from human umbilical vein and a rat VSMC line, A7r5. Both ouabain and marinobufagenin activated proliferation of these cells in...

  2. From depolarization-dependent contractions in gastrointestinal smooth muscle to aortic pulse-synchronized contractions

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Sarah B; Mangel, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    For decades, it was believed that the diameter of gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells is sufficiently narrow, and that the diffusion of calcium across the plasma membrane is sufficient, to support contractile activity. Thus, depolarization-triggered release of intracellular calcium was not believed to be operative in gastrointestinal smooth muscle. However, after the incubation of muscle segments in solutions devoid of calcium and containing the calcium chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid, an alternative electrical event occurred that was distinct from normal slow waves and spikes. Subsequently, it was demonstrated in gastrointestinal smooth muscle segments that membrane depolarization associated with this alternative electrical event triggered rhythmic contractions by release of intracellular calcium. Although this concept of depolarization-triggered calcium release was iconoclastic, it has now been demonstrated in multiple gastrointestinal smooth muscle preparations. On the basis of these observations, we investigated whether a rhythmic electrical and mechanical event would occur in aortic smooth muscle under the same calcium-free conditions. The incubation of aortic segments in a solution with no added calcium plus ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid induced a fast electrical event without corresponding tension changes. On the basis of the frequency of these fast electrical events, we pursued, contrary to what has been established dogma for more than three centuries, the question of whether the smooth muscle wall of the aorta undergoes rhythmic activation during the cardiac cycle. As with depolarization-triggered contractile activity in gastrointestinal smooth muscle, it was “well known” that rhythmic activation of the aorta does not occur in synchrony with the heartbeat. In a series of experiments, however, it was demonstrated that rhythmic contractions occur in the aortic wall in synchrony with the heartbeat and share a common pacemaker with the heart

  3. Smooth muscle NOS, colocalized with caveolin-1, modulates contraction in mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Cho, Woo Jung; Cena, Jonathan; Schulz, Richard; Daniel, Edwin E

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in myenteric neurons is activated during peristalsis to produce nitric oxide which relaxes intestinal smooth muscle. A putative nNOS is also found in the membrane of intestinal smooth muscle cells in mouse and dog. In this study we studied the possible functions of this nNOS expressed in mouse small intestinal smooth muscle colocalized with caveolin-1(Cav-1). Cav-1 knockout mice lacked nNOS in smooth muscle and provided control tissues. 60 mM KCl was used to increase intracellular [Ca2+] through L-type Ca2+ channel opening and stimulate smooth muscle NOS activity in intestinal tissue segments. An additional contractile response to LNNA (100 μM, NOS inhibitor) was observed in KCl-contracted tissues from control mice and was almost absent in tissues from Cav-1 knockout mice. Disruption of caveolae with 40 mM methyl-β cyclodextrin in tissues from control mice led to the loss of Cav-1 and nNOS immunoreactivity from smooth muscle as shown by immunohistochemistry and a reduction in the response of these tissues to N-ω-nitro-L-arginine (LNNA). Reconstitution of membrane cholesterol using water soluble cholesterol in the depleted segments restored the immunoreactivity and the response to LNNA added after KCl. Nicardipine (1 μM) blocked the responses to KCl and LNNA confirming the role of L-type Ca2+ channels. ODQ (1 μM, soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor) had the same effect as inhibition of NOS following KCl. We conclude that the activation of nNOS, localized in smooth muscle caveolae, by calcium entering through L-type calcium channels triggers nitric oxide production which modulates muscle contraction by a cGMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:18400048

  4. A Simple, Inexpensive Model to Demonstrate How Contraction of GI Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Promotes Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Peristalis is a propulsive activity that involves both circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus, distal stomach, and small and large intestines. During peristalsis, the circular smooth muscle contracts behind (on the orad side) the bolus and relaxes in front (on the aborad side) of the bolus. At the same time, the longitudinal…

  5. Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma showing smooth-muscle and fibrohistiocytic differentiation: a single case report.

    PubMed

    Eyden, Brian

    2010-02-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma has traditionally been subclassified into alveolar, embryonal, and pleomorphic variants. Less commonly, spindle-cell, neuroendocrine, sclerosing, and lipid-rich or clear-cell subtypes are seen. The author recently encountered a myogenic sarcoma, with all the common markers of rhabdomyosarcoma, but expressing the unusual features of alpha-smooth-muscle actin and abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER). This myogenic sarcoma, therefore, exhibited four lines of differentiation, and is documented here. The patient was a 65-year-old man with an inguinal soft tissue mass. Following surgical excision, the patient was given radiotherapy and was well without disease after 6 years. The tumor was positive for vimentin, desmin, alpha-smooth-muscle actin, alpha-sarcomeric actin, myogenin, MyoD1, and CD68. Cytoplasm was dominated by abundant rER intermingled with lipid droplets and lysosomes. Cell surfaces exhibited microvillous processes and focal adhesions, but no lamina. Subplasmalemmal smooth-muscle-type myofilaments with focal densities and rare sarcomeric filaments were seen. The low level of expression of some markers was interpreted as consistent with a poorly differentiated tumor. Given the four lines of differentiation--striated muscle, smooth muscle, fibroblastic, and histiocytic--a name reflecting its phenotype would be pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma showing smooth-muscle and fibrohistiocytic differentiation. PMID:20070153

  6. The Effects of Diuretics on Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics of Arteriole Smooth Muscles as Revealed by Laser Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tamagawa, Yasunori; Saino, Tomoyuki; Matsuura, Makoto; Satoh, Yoh-ichi

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis is essential for cells, including vascular smooth muscle cells. Arterial tone, which underlies the maintenance of peripheral resistance in the circulation, is a major contributor to the control of blood pressure. Diuretics may regulate intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and have an effect on vascular tone. In order to investigate the influence of diuretics on peripheral resistance in circulation, we investigated the alteration of [Ca2+]i in testicular arterioles with respect to several categories of diuretics using real-time confocal laser scanning microscopy. In this study, hydrochlorothiazide (100 µM) and furosemide (100 µM) had no effect on the [Ca2+]i dynamics. However, when spironolactone (300 µM) was applied, the [Ca2+]i of smooth muscles increased. The response was considerably inhibited under either extracellular Ca2+-free conditions, the presence of Gd3+, or with a treatment of diltiazem. After the thapsigargin-induced depletion of internal Ca2+ store, the spironolactone-induced [Ca2+]i dynamics was slightly inhibited. Therefore, the spironolactone-induced dynamics of [Ca2+]i can be caused by either a Ca2+ influx from extracellular fluid or Ca2+ mobilization from internal Ca2+ store, with the former being dominant. As tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of the K+ channel, slightly inhibited the spironolactone-induced [Ca2+]i dynamics, the K+ channel might play a minor role in those dynamics. Tetrodotoxin, a neurotoxic Na+ channel blocker, had no effect, therefore the spironolactone-induced dynamics is a direct effect to smooth muscles, rather than an indirect effect via vessel nerves. PMID:19759873

  7. Participation of bivalent ions in the acetylcholine-provoked gastric smooth-muscle phasis contractions.

    PubMed

    Boev, K; Papasova, M

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on muscle strips from cat antrum. Acetylcholine added to Ca++ -free medium containing EDTA (10-5M) exerted no effect on the phasic contractions of the gastric smooth muscle. Ba++at low concentrations (0,1 to 0,5mM) replaced Ca++with respect to the acetylcholine effect. On the background of blocked cholinergic (atropine 10-5M) and adrenergic (phentolamine 10-5 M and propranolol 10-5M) structures Ba++ provoked slow potentials and cotractions with a frequency of 9 to 10 cpm. delta600 (10-5M) blocked the Ba++-induced myogenic electrical and contractile activities of the smooth muscle. The role of the cholinergic structures for synchronizing the electrical and contractile activities of the smooth muscle is considered.

  8. Sarcoplasmic reticulum and excitation-contraction coupling in mammalian smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Devine, C E; Somlyo, A V; Somlyo, A P

    1972-03-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in the smooth muscles of rabbit main pulmonary artery, mesenteric vein, aorta, mesenteric artery, taenia coli, guinea pig mesenteric artery, and human uterus, and correlated with contractions of the smooth muscles in Ca-free media. SR volumes were determined in main pulmonary artery (5.1%), aorta (5%), portal-anterior mesenteric vein (2.2%), taenia coli (2%), and mesenteric artery (1.8%): because of tangentially sectioned membranes these estimates are subject to a correction factor of up to +50% of the values measured. Smooth muscles that contained a relatively large volume of SR maintained significant contractile responses to drugs in the virtual absence of extracellular calcium at room temperatures, while smooth muscles that had less SR did not. The unequal maximal contractions of main pulmonary artery elicited by different drugs were also observed in Ca-free, high potassium-depolarizing solution, indicating that they were secondary to some mechanism independent of changes in membrane potential or calcium influx. Longitudinal tubules of SR run between and are fenestrated about groups of surface vesicles separated from each other by intervening dense bodies. Extracellular markers (ferritin and lanthanum) entered the surface vesicles, but not the SR. The peripheral SR formed couplings with the surface membrane: the two membranes were separated by gaps of approximately 10 nm traversed by electron-opaque connections suggestive of a periodicity of approximately 20-25 nm. These couplings are considered to be the probable sites of electromechanical coupling in twitch smooth muscles. Close contacts between the SR and the surface vesicles may have a similar function, or represent sites of calcium extrusion. The presence of both thick and thin myofilaments and of rough SR in smooth muscles supports the dual, contractile and morphogenetic, function of smooth muscle.

  9. Cell shape and the presentation of adhesion ligands guide smooth muscle myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Douglas; Sun, Michael B; Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2016-05-01

    The reliable generation of smooth muscle cells is important for a number of tissue engineering applications. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising progenitor of smooth muscle, with high expression of smooth muscle markers observed in a fraction of isolated cells, which can be increased by introduction of soluble supplements that direct differentiation. Here we demonstrate a new micropatterning technique, where peptides of different ligand affinity can be microcontact printed onto an inert background, to explore MSC differentiation to smooth muscle through controlled biochemical and biophysical cues alone. Using copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC), we patterned our surfaces with RGD peptide ligands-both a linear peptide with low integrin affinity and a cyclic version with high integrin affinity-for the culture of MSCs in shapes with various aspect ratios. At low aspect ratio, ligand affinity is a prime determinant for smooth muscle differentiation, while at high aspect ratio, ligand affinity has less of an effect. Pathway analysis reveals a role for focal adhesion turnover, Rac1, RhoA/ROCK, and calpain during smooth muscle differentiation of MSCs in response to cell shape and the affinity of the cell adhesion interface. Controlling integrin-ligand affinity at the biomaterials interface is important for mediating adhesion but may also prove useful for directing smooth muscle myogenesis. Peptide patterning enables the systematic investigation of single to multiple peptides derived from any protein, at different densities across a biomaterials surface, which has the potential to direct multiple MSC differentiation outcomes without the need for soluble supplements.

  10. Pentosan polysulfate decreases prostate smooth muscle proliferation and extracellular matrix turnover.

    PubMed

    Elliot, S J; Zorn, B H; McLeod, D G; Moul, J W; Nyberg, L; Striker, L J; Striker, G E

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) involves proliferation of smooth muscle cells and increased deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). We recently found that pentosan polysulfate (PPS) has marked effects on growth and ECM of smooth muscle cells derived from vascular tissues. We examined smooth muscle cells cultured from human prostates and the effects of PPS on their growth and ECM production. Fragments of surgical prostatectomy specimens were diced, digested with collagenase (0.01%), and placed in culture medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum. Outgrowths of elongated cells were characterized by light microscopic examination and immunohistochemical techniques by the presence of F-actin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and myosin, which is a characteristic of smooth muscle cells. Two independent isolates were propagated, and growth curves and ECM production were assessed in the presence and absence of PPS (10 or 100 microg/ml). PPS decreased cell number beginning at day 1 and throughout the incubation period, up to 4 days. The amount of the ECM degradative enzymes, metallo-proteinases MMP-9 and MMP-2, was examined by zymography. PPS did not alter the amount of MMP-2 in the supernatants but MMP-9 was increased 234.4 +/- 17.23-fold over control cells. Tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMPS), examined by reverse zymography, increased 200% over control. The amount of alpha I type (IV) and alpha I type (I) collagen released in the supernatant, measured by ELISA, significantly decreased in PPS-treated cultures. In conclusion, we found that the administration of PPS decreased proliferation as well as ECM production in prostate smooth muscle. Since smooth muscle proliferation and ECM are involved in the pathophysiology of BPH, PPS may have therapeutic potential.

  11. Inhibition of the Ca sup 2+ -ATPase of vascular smooth muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuichiro; Ford, G.D. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of oxygen free radicals generated by hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase on the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum from bovine aortic smooth muscle were studied. Exogenous hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase produced an hypoxanthine concentration dependent inhibition of the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. The inhibition could be completely blocked by superoxide dismutase but not by either mannitol or deferoxamine. Direct addition of reagent hydrogen peroxide in the {mu}M range did not cause significant inhibition. These results suggest that superoxide is the primary damaging species. Additionally, 1.16 {plus minus} 0.17 mU/g wet wt of xanthine oxidase activity were detected in the post-nuclear supernatant of bovine aortic smooth muscle, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular source of superoxide. This value was calculated to be approximately 5 mU/ml by using a usual value of vascular smooth muscle cellular volume. Thus the level of endogenous xanthine oxidase resident in vascular smooth muscle is comparable with the level of exogenous xanthine oxidase used in the present study. These findings suggest a potential role of xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide in free radical injury to vascular smooth muscle.

  12. Role of SM22 in the differential regulation of phasic vs. tonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish; Ali, Mehboob

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary proteomics studies between tonic vs. phasic smooth muscles identified three distinct protein spots identified to be those of transgelin (SM22). The latter was found to be distinctly downregulated in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) vs. rectal smooth muscle (RSM) SMC. The major focus of the present studies was to examine the differential molecular control mechanisms by SM22 in the functionality of truly tonic smooth muscle of the IAS vs. the adjoining phasic smooth muscle of the RSM. We monitored SMC lengths before and after incubation with pFLAG-SM22 (for SM22 overexpression), and SM22 small-interfering RNA. pFLAG-SM22 caused concentration-dependent and significantly greater relaxation in the IAS vs. the RSM SMCs. Conversely, temporary silencing of SM22 caused contraction in both types of the SMCs. Further studies revealed a significant reverse relationship between the levels of SM22 phosphorylation and the amount of SM22-actin binding in the IAS and RSM SMC. Data showed higher phospho-SM22 levels and decreased SM22-actin binding in the IAS, and reverse to be the case in the RSM SMCs. Experiments determining the mechanism for SM22 phosphorylation in these smooth muscles revealed that Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor) but not Gö-6850 (protein kinase C inhibitor) caused concentration-dependent decreased phosphorylation of SM22. We speculate that SM22 plays an important role in the regulation of basal tone via Rho kinase-induced phosphorylation of SM22.

  13. Axl modulates immune activation of smooth muscle cells in vein graft remodeling.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Sri N; Xia, Jixiang; Ko, Kyung Ae; Doyley, Marvin M; Abe, Jun-Ichi; Morrell, Craig N; Korshunov, Vyacheslav A

    2015-09-15

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of the immune activation of smooth muscle cells are not well understood. Increased expression of Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, was recently found in arteries from patients after coronary bypass grafts. In the present study, we hypothesized that Axl-dependent immune activation of smooth muscle cells regulates vein graft remodeling. We observed a twofold decrease in intimal thickening after vascular and systemic depletion of Axl in vein grafts. Local depletion of Axl had the greatest effect on immune activation, whereas systemic deletion of Axl reduced intima due to an increase in apoptosis in vein grafts. Primary smooth muscle cells isolated from Axl knockout mice had reduced proinflammatory responses by prevention of the STAT1 pathway. The absence of Axl increased suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 expression in smooth muscle cells, a major inhibitory protein for STAT1. Ultrasound imaging suggested that vascular depletion of Axl reduced vein graft stiffness. Axl expression determined the STAT1-SOCS1 balance in vein graft intima and progression of the remodeling. The results of this investigation demonstrate that Axl promotes STAT1 signaling via inhibition of SOCS1 in activated smooth muscle cells in vein graft remodeling.

  14. Urinary Bladder Smooth Muscle Engineered from Adipose Stem Cells and a Three Dimensional Synthetic Composite

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Gregory S.; Zhang, Rong; Lee, Min; Xu, Yuhan; Wu, Ben; Rodríguez, Larissa V.

    2009-01-01

    Human adipose stem cells were cultured in smooth muscle inductive media and seeded into synthetic bladder composites to tissue engineer bladder smooth muscle. 85:15 poly-lactic-glycolic acid bladder dome composites were cast using an electropulled microfiber luminal surface combined with an outer porous sponge. Cell seeded bladders expressed smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, calponinin, and caldesmon via RT-PCR and immunoflourescence. Nude rats (n=45) underwent removal of half their bladder and repair using: (i) augmentation with the adipose stem cell seeded composites, (ii) augmentation with a matched acellular composite, or (iii) suture closure. Animals were followed for 12 weeks post-implantation and bladders were explanted serially. Results showed that bladder capacity and compliance were maintained in the cell seeded group throughout the 12 weeks, but deteriorated in the acellular scaffold group sequentially with time. Control animals repaired with sutures regained their baseline bladder capacities by week 12, demonstrating a long term limitation of this model. Histological analysis of explanted materials demonstrated viable adipose stem cells and increasing smooth muscle mass in the cell seeded scaffolds with time. Tissue bath stimulation demonstrated smooth muscle contraction of the seeded implants but not the acellular implants after 12 weeks in vivo. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and short term physical properties of bladder tissue engineered from adipose stem cells. PMID:19345408

  15. Influences on vascular wall smooth muscle cells with novel short-duration thermal angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunio, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.; Sakurada, M.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the influences on smooth muscle cells after our novel short-duration thermal angioplasty, Photo-thermo Dynamic Balloon Angioplasty (PTDBA), to reveal the mechanism that can suppress neo-intimal hyperplasia after PTDBA. We obtained the sufficient arterial dilatations by short-duration heating (<=15 s, <70°C) and low dilatation pressure (<0.4 MPa) without arterial injuries in our previous in vivo studies. Smooth muscle cells, which play most important role in chronic treatment effects, were heated during PTDBA and stretch-fixed after PTDBA. The dead cell rate by heating, estimated by Arrhenius equation with A=2.5x1016 s-1 and Ea=1.17×105 J mol-1, was 15.7+/-2.2% after PTDBA. The measured deformation rate of smooth muscle cells' nuclei was 1.6+/-0.1 after PTDBA in vivo. We found that the expression of smooth muscle cells' growth factor after PTDBA was inhibited 0.52 fold compared to that after the conventional balloon angioplasty in vivo. The measured neo-intimal hyperplasia occupancy rate was less than 20% after PTDBA in vivo. We prospect that the inhibition of the growth factor's expression by stretch-fixing may result to suppress the neo-intimal hyperplasia. In addition, the decrease of smooth muscle cells' density in the vessel media by heating might be another reason for the neo-intimal hyperplasia suppression.

  16. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy. PMID:27468462

  17. Calcium distribution in aortic smooth muscle cells of deoxycorticosterone-hypertensive rats. A quantitative cytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, P A; Yang, F

    1988-04-01

    The effect of deoxycorticosterone (DOC)-induced hypertension on the calcium content within the aorta was studied before the increase in pressure (one week) and after the pressure had reached hypertensive levels (4 weeks). The volume density of free calcium detected ultrastructurally by pyroantimonate precipitation was quantitated by stereological techniques in aortic smooth muscle cells. An increase in the volume density of electron opaque precipitate was observed in the cytoplasm at one week of DOC treatment when neither the systolic blood pressure, the thickness of the media nor volume fraction of medial smooth muscle as compared to the extracellular space was increased significantly. The total aortic calcium as measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy was not increased at one week. By 4 weeks when the rats were hypertensive, the cytoplasmic free calcium in the smooth muscle cells and the number of peripherally-located cytoplasmic vesicles with precipitate was increased significantly. Total aortic calcium was also increased significantly in the DOC-saline group but not in the DOC group drinking tap water or in the saline drinking controls. An elevation of calcium within the cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cells may precede the development of hypertension and play a role in the pathogenesis of the increased blood pressure, increased medial thickness and hypertrophy of the vascular smooth muscle cells.

  18. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease. PMID:20809708

  19. Vascular smooth muscle, endothelial regulation and effects of aspirin in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, M A

    1998-04-27

    Dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) is at the center of occlusive disorders of the cardiovascular system such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease and hypoxia. In addition to circulating biogenic amines and various neurotransmitters originating from the central nervous system and endocrine system, various autocoids of arachidonic acid metabolism in the blood as well as in the endothelium play an important regulatory role in the maintenance of the tone and the contractile function of VSM. A monolayer of endothelial cells lining the heart and large blood vessels is responsible for producing and releasing both endocrine and paracrine substances such as endothelins, nitric oxide, prostaglandins and prostacyclins. Aspirin, (acetylsalicylic acid/ASA) an ancient remedy against fever and pain, is emerging as an effective drug not only against occlusive disorders but also against various cancers and the AIDs virus. During pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) and in occlusive disorders, aspirin provides relief through inhibition of cyclooxygenase, an enzyme required for the metabolism of arachidonic acid to produce prostaglandins and prostacyclins in platelets and in endothelial cells. Because of its unique molecular constitution, synergistic ability and solubility in the lipidic environment, various mechanisms of aspirin's actions are being currently investigated. In this review, the effect of aspirin on the regulation of VSM in the presence and absence of endothelium are discussed.

  20. Isolation and characterization of the inositol trisphosphate receptor from smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, C.C.; Saito, A.; Fleischer, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The release of Ca{sup 2+} from internal stores is requisite to muscle contraction. In skeletal muscle and heart, the Ca{sup 2+} release channels (ryanodine receptor) of sarcoplasmic reticulum, involved in excitation-contraction coupling, have recently been isolated and characterized. In smooth muscle, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) is believed to mobilize Ca{sup 2+} from internal stores and thereby modulate contraction. The authors describe the isolation of an IP{sub 3} receptor from smooth muscle. Bovine aorta smooth muscle microsomes were solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate, and the IP{sub 3} receptor was purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation and column chromatography with heparin-agarose and wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. The receptor is an oligomer of a single polypeptide with a M{sub r} of 224,000 as determined by SDS/PAGE. Negative-staining electron microscopy reveals that the receptor is a large pinwheel-like structure having surface dimensions of {approx}250 {times} 250 {angstrom} with fourfold symmetry. The IP{sub 3} receptor from smooth muscle is similar to the ryanodine receptor with regard to its large size and fourfold symmetry, albeit distinct with regard to appearance, protomer size, and ligand binding.

  1. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  2. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine.

  3. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data. PMID:17406550

  4. Bilateral adrenal EBV-associated smooth muscle tumors in a child with a natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rachel K.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Fraser, Robert; Schmit, Pierre; Morash, Barb; Monaco-Shawver, Linda; Orange, Jordan S.

    2012-01-01

    EBV-associated smooth muscle tumors are found in immunocompromised patients, most commonly HIV/AIDS. We present a 12-year-old girl with the first documented case of EBV-related smooth muscle tumors in the presence of a rare classic NK cell deficiency. This sheds light on the role of NK cells in controlling EBV-related smooth muscle tumors. PMID:22427204

  5. Relaxation of uterine and aortic smooth muscle by glaucolides D and E from Vernonia liatroides.

    PubMed

    Campos, María; Oropeza, Martha; Ponce, Héctor; Fernández, Jaquelina; Jimenez-Estrada, Manuel; Torres, Héctor; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Vernonia spp. (Asteraceae) are used in herbolaria in Latin America in menstrual and stomach disorders, suggesting smooth muscle relaxing properties of some of their chemical constituents. For pharmacological support for this belief, sesquiterpene lactones glaucolides D and E were assayed on isolated rat smooth muscle. Glaucolide E proved more potent than glaucolide D to relax high KCl- or noradrenaline-induced contractions in aorta and to relax the high KCl-contraction in uterus. Hirsutinolide-type sesquiterpene lactone also was tested but displayed no effect. Relaxation of smooth muscle by structurally related sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide has been attributed mainly to the alpha-methylene gamma-lactone moiety; because glaucolides D and E lack this functional group, their relaxant properties may rely on other alkylating sites such as C10 of the germacra-1(10),4-diene-4-epoxide skeleton.

  6. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents: possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) are also reviewed. PMID:26468456

  7. Cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor inhibition decreases vascular smooth muscle migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Hasko, Gyoergy; Pacher, Pal

    2008-12-26

    Vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration triggered by inflammatory stimuli and chemoattractants such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are key events in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Cannabinoids may modulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types through cannabinoid receptors. Here we investigated the effects of CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A), which has recently been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic effects both in mice and humans, on PDGF-induced proliferation, migration, and signal transduction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). PDGF induced Ras and ERK 1/2 activation, while increasing proliferation and migration of HCASMCs, which were dose dependently attenuated by CB{sub 1} antagonist, rimonabant. These findings suggest that in addition to improving plasma lipid alterations and decreasing inflammatory cell migration and inflammatory response, CB{sub 1} antagonists may exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and restenosis by decreasing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

  8. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  9. [Influence of prostatilen on smooth muscle organs functional activity in surgical patients (clinical and experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Al'-Shukri, S Kh; Aĭvazian, A I; Barabanov, S V; Barabanova, V V; Bobkov, Iu A; Gorbachev, A G; Parastaeva, M M

    1999-01-01

    The action of prostatilen on contractile activity of smooth muscles of isolated line slices of urine bladder of Wistar rats (myography) and arterial vessels of cat kidneys (resistography) was studied. On the basis of clinical cases effectiveness of prostatilen was analysed as a treatment restorting urine bladder function in acute reflex urinary retention after operations in the area of rectal sphincter, as well as in treatment of patients with chronic prostatitis. It is shown, that prostatilen produces contractile action on smooth muscles of renal blood vessels in cats and urine bladder walls in rats and it raises contractile activity of smooth muscles of human urine bladder. The results of experimental and clinical investigations make it possible to recommend the application of this bioregulating preparation for treatment and prophylaxis of disturbances in urination.

  10. Heterogeneity in vascular smooth muscle cell embryonic origin in relation to adult structure, physiology, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.; Bader, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in vascular physiology and disease response exist throughout the vascular tree. While these differences in physiology and disease correspond to regional vascular environmental conditions, there is also compelling evidence that the embryonic origins of the smooth muscle inherent to the vessels may play a role. Here we review what is known regarding the role of embryonic origin of vascular smooth muscle cells during vascular development. The focus of this review is to highlight the heterogeneity in the origins of vascular smooth muscle cells and the resulting regional physiologies of the vessels. Our goal is to stimulate future investigation into this area and provide a better understanding of vascular organogenesis and disease. PMID:25546231

  11. Smooth muscle architecture within cell-dense vascular tissues influences functional contractility.

    PubMed

    Win, Zaw; Vrla, Geoffrey D; Steucke, Kerianne E; Sevcik, Emily N; Hald, Eric S; Alford, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    The role of vascular smooth muscle architecture in the function of healthy and dysfunctional vessels is poorly understood. We aimed at determining the relationship between vascular smooth muscle architecture and contractile output using engineered vascular tissues. We utilized microcontact printing and a microfluidic cell seeding technique to provide three different initial seeding conditions, with the aim of influencing the cellular architecture within the tissue. Cells seeded in each condition formed confluent and aligned tissues but within the tissues, the cellular architecture varied. Tissues with a more elongated cellular architecture had significantly elevated basal stress and produced more contractile stress in response to endothelin-1 stimulation. We also found a correlation between the contractile phenotype marker expression and the cellular architecture, contrary to our previous findings in non-confluent tissues. Taken with previous results, these data suggest that within cell-dense vascular tissues, smooth muscle contractility is strongly influenced by cell and tissue architectures.

  12. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  13. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) are also reviewed.

  14. An In Vitro Murine Model of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kelynack, Kristen J; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is seen ubiquitously in aging blood vessels and prematurely in disease states like renal failure. It is thought to be driven by a number of systemic and local factors that lead to extra-osseous deposition of mineral in the vascular wall and valves as a common endpoint. The response of resident vascular smooth muscle cell to these dystrophic signals appears to be important in this process. Whilst in vivo models allow the observation of global changes in a pro-calcific environment, identifying the specific cells and mechanisms involved has been largely garnered from in vitro experiments, which provide added benefits in terms of reproducibility, cost, and convenience. Here we describe a 7-21 day cell culture model of calcification developed using immortalized murine vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVAS-1). This model provides a method by which vascular smooth muscle cell involvement and manipulation within a mineralizing domain can be studied.

  15. Value of counting positive PHH3 cells in the diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Shu-Jie; Li, Cheng-Cheng; Shen, Yan; Liu, Yian-Zhu; Shi, Yi-Quan; Liu, Yi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors including leiomyosarcomas (LMS), smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP), bizarre (atypical) leiomyoma (BLM), mitotically active leiomyoma (MAL) and leiomyoma (LM) depends on a combination of microscopic features, such as mitoses, cytologic atypia, and coagulative tumor cell necrosis. However, a small number of these tumors still pose difficult diagnostic challenges. The assessment of accurate mitotic figures (MF) is one of the major parameters in the proper classification of uterine smooth muscle tumors. This assessment can be hampered by the presence of increased number of apoptotic bodies or pyknotic nuclei, which frequently mimic mitoses. Phospho-histone H3 (PHH3) is a recently described immunomarker specific for cells undergoing mitoses. In our study, we collected 132 cases of uterine smooth muscle tumors, including 26 LMSs, 16 STUMPs, 30 BLMs, 30 MALs and 30 LMs. We used mitosis specific marker PHH3 to count mitotic indexes (MI) of uterine smooth muscle tumors and compared with the mitotic indexes of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). There is a positive correlation with the number of mitotic figures in H&E-stained sections and PHH3-stained sections (r=0.944, P<0.05). The ratio of PHH3-MI to H&E-MI has no statistically significant difference in each group except for LMs (P>0.05). The counting value of PHH3 in LMSs have significantly higher than STUMPs, BLMs, MALs and LMs (P<0.001) and the counting value of PHH3 is 1.5±0.5 times of the number of mitotic indexes in H&E. To conclude, our results show that counting PHH3 is a useful index in the diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors and it can provide a more accurate index instead of the time-honored mitotic figure counts at a certain ratio. PMID:26191133

  16. Value of counting positive PHH3 cells in the diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shu-Jie; Li, Cheng-Cheng; Shen, Yan; Liu, Yian-Zhu; Shi, Yi-Quan; Liu, Yi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors including leiomyosarcomas (LMS), smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP), bizarre (atypical) leiomyoma (BLM), mitotically active leiomyoma (MAL) and leiomyoma (LM) depends on a combination of microscopic features, such as mitoses, cytologic atypia, and coagulative tumor cell necrosis. However, a small number of these tumors still pose difficult diagnostic challenges. The assessment of accurate mitotic figures (MF) is one of the major parameters in the proper classification of uterine smooth muscle tumors. This assessment can be hampered by the presence of increased number of apoptotic bodies or pyknotic nuclei, which frequently mimic mitoses. Phospho-histone H3 (PHH3) is a recently described immunomarker specific for cells undergoing mitoses. In our study, we collected 132 cases of uterine smooth muscle tumors, including 26 LMSs, 16 STUMPs, 30 BLMs, 30 MALs and 30 LMs. We used mitosis specific marker PHH3 to count mitotic indexes (MI) of uterine smooth muscle tumors and compared with the mitotic indexes of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). There is a positive correlation with the number of mitotic figures in H&E-stained sections and PHH3-stained sections (r=0.944, P<0.05). The ratio of PHH3-MI to H&E-MI has no statistically significant difference in each group except for LMs (P>0.05). The counting value of PHH3 in LMSs have significantly higher than STUMPs, BLMs, MALs and LMs (P<0.001) and the counting value of PHH3 is 1.5±0.5 times of the number of mitotic indexes in H&E. To conclude, our results show that counting PHH3 is a useful index in the diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors and it can provide a more accurate index instead of the time-honored mitotic figure counts at a certain ratio.

  17. In vitro differentiation of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells to endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Andrea; Bernardini, Chiara; Bertocchi, Martina; Zannoni, Augusta; Bianchi, Francesca; Avallone, Giancarlo; Mangano, Chiara; Sarli, Giuseppe; Calzà, Laura; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2015-09-01

    Recent findings suggest that progenitor and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are associated with vascular niches. Cells displaying mesenchymal properties and differentiating to whole components of a functional blood vessel, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells, can be defined as vascular stem cells (VSCs). Recently, we isolated a population of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells (pAVPCs), which have MSC- and pericyte-like properties. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether pAVPCs possess VSC-like properties and assess their differentiation potential toward endothelial and smooth muscle lineages. pAVPCs, maintained in a specific pericyte growth medium, were cultured in high-glucose DMEM + 10% FBS (long-term medium, LTM) or in human endothelial serum-free medium + 5% FBS and 50 ng/ml of hVEGF (endothelial differentiation medium, EDM). After 21 days of culture in LTM, pAVPCs showed an elongated fibroblast-like morphology, and they seem to organize in cord-like structures. qPCR analysis of smooth muscle markers [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and smooth muscle myosin (SMM) heavy chain] showed a significant increment of the transcripts, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of α-SMA and SMM proteins. After 21 days of culture in EDM, pAVPCs displayed an endothelial cell-like morphology and revealed the upregulation of the expression of endothelial markers (CD31, vascular endothelial-cadherin, von Willebrand factor, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase) showing the CD31-typical pattern. In conclusion, pAVPCs could be defined as a VSC-like population considering that, if they are maintained in a specific pericyte medium, they express MSC markers, and they have, in addition to the classical mesenchymal trilineage differentiation potential, the capacity to differentiate in vitro toward the smooth muscle and the endothelial cell phenotypes.

  18. Intestinal smooth muscle phenotype determines enteric neuronal survival via GDNF expression.

    PubMed

    Han, T Y; Lourenssen, S; Miller, K G; Blennerhassett, M G

    2015-04-01

    Intestinal inflammation causes initial axonal degeneration and neuronal death, as well as the proliferation of intestinal smooth muscle cells (ISMC), but subsequent axonal outgrowth leads to re-innervation. We recently showed that expression of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), the critical neurotrophin for the post-natal enteric nervous system (ENS) is upregulated in ISMC by inflammatory cytokines, leading us to explore the relationship between ISMC growth and GDNF expression. In co-cultures of myenteric neurons and ISMC, GDNF or fetal calf serum (FCS) was equally effective in supporting neuronal survival, with neurons forming extensive axonal networks among the ISMC. However, only GDNF was effective in low-density cultures where neurons lacked contact with ISMC. In early-passage cultures of colonic circular smooth muscle cells (CSMC), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting showed that proliferation was associated with expression of GDNF, and the successful survival of neonatal neurons co-cultured on CSMC was blocked by vandetanib or siGDNF. In tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, immunocytochemistry showed the selective expression of GDNF in proliferating CSMC, suggesting that smooth muscle proliferation supports the ENS in vivo as well as in vitro. However, high-passage CSMC expressed significantly less GDNF and failed to support neuronal survival, while expressing reduced amounts of smooth muscle marker proteins. We conclude that in the inflamed intestine, smooth muscle proliferation supports the ENS, and thus its own re-innervation, by expression of GDNF. In chronic inflammation, a compromised smooth muscle phenotype may lead to progressive neural damage. Intestinal stricture formation in human disease, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), may be an endpoint of failure of this homeostatic mechanism.

  19. A Novel Selectable Islet 1 Positive Progenitor Cell Reprogrammed to Expandable and Functional Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizabeth C; Huang, Chien-Ling; Sawhney, Neha; Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; Clover, Anthony J P; Martin, Kenneth; Browne, Tara C; Whelan, Derek; Kumar, Arun H S; Mackrill, John J; Wang, Shaohua; Schmeckpeper, Jeffrey; Stocca, Alessia; Pierce, William G; Leblond, Anne-Laure; Cai, Liquan; O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Buneker, Chirlei K; Choi, Janet; MacSharry, John; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Caplice, Noel M

    2016-05-01

    Disorders affecting smooth muscle structure/function may require technologies that can generate large scale, differentiated and contractile smooth muscle cells (SMC) suitable for cell therapy. To date no clonal precursor population that provides large numbers of differentiated SMC in culture has been identified in a rodent. Identification of such cells may also enhance insight into progenitor cell fate decisions and the relationship between smooth muscle precursors and disease states that implicate differentiated SMC.  In this study, we used classic clonal expansion techniques to identify novel self-renewing Islet 1 (Isl-1) positive primitive progenitor cells (PPC) within rat bone marrow that exhibited canonical stem cell markers and preferential differentiation towards a smooth muscle-like fate. We subsequently used molecular tagging to select Isl-1 positive clonal populations from expanded and de novo marrow cell populations. We refer to these previously undescribed cells as the PPC given its stem cell marker profile, and robust self-renewal capacity. PPC could be directly converted into induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) using single transcription factor (Kruppel-like factor 4) knockdown or transactivator (myocardin) overexpression in contrast to three control cells (HEK 293, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) where such induction was not possible. iSMC exhibited immuno- and cytoskeletal-phenotype, calcium signaling profile and contractile responses similar to bona fide SMC. Passaged iSMC could be expanded to a scale sufficient for large scale tissue replacement.  PPC and reprogramed iSMC so derived may offer future opportunities to investigate molecular, structure/function and cell-based replacement therapy approaches to diverse cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary diseases that have as their basis smooth muscle cell functional aberrancy or numerical loss. Stem Cells 2016;34:1354-1368.

  20. Low density lipoprotein uptake by an endothelial-smooth muscle cell bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1991-03-01

    To study the interaction of endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and the means by which such interaction may affect lipid permeability of the arterial wall, cell bilayers were established by use of a transwell culture system. After confluent growth of both cell types had been achieved, iodine 125 bound to low-density lipoprotein (10 ng protein/ml) was added to the media of the upper well. After a 3-hour incubation period, the iodine 125-bound low-density lipoprotein content of the upper and lower media demonstrated an impedance to lipoprotein movement across the endothelial cell monolayer as compared to the bare porous polycarbonate filter of the transwell (p less than 10(-6)). The presence of smooth muscle cells in the bottom well significantly enhanced the permeability of the endothelial cell layer (p less than 10(-60)). This effect remained unchanged over a 9-day time course. Membrane binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells was not altered by smooth muscle cells, indicating that this change in permeability could not be easily attributed to changes in receptor-mediated transport or transcytosis. Membrane binding (p less than 0.02) and cellular uptake (p less than 10(-6)) of low-density lipoprotein by smooth muscle cells in the bilayer, when adjusted for counts available in the smooth muscle cell media, were both reduced in the early incubation period as compared to isolated smooth muscle cells. The disproportionate reduction in uptake as compared to binding would suggest that this was not entirely a receptor-dependent process.

  1. Inhibitory effect of beta3-adrenoceptor agonist in lower esophageal sphincter smooth muscle: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Sarma, D N K; Banwait, Kuldip; Basak, Ashim; DiMarino, Anthony J; Rattan, Satish

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effects of (R,R)-5-[2-[2-3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl] - amino]propyl] - 1,3 - benzodioxole - 2, 2 - dicarboxylate (CL 316243) (a typical beta3-agonist) on the spontaneously tonic smooth muscle of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Studies were carried out in smooth muscle strips and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of opossum LES. Isometric tension was recorded in the basal state and after CL 316243, and before and after beta3-antagonist (S)-N-[4-[2-[[3-[-(acetamidomethyl)phenoxy]-2-hydroxypropyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]benzenesulfonamide (L 748337) and nonselective antagonist propranolol. In some experiments, the effects of nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) nerve activation by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also examined. The effects of CL 316243 were compared with those of nonselective beta-agonist isoproterenol. CL 316243 caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the LES smooth muscle. The relaxant action of CL 316243 was determined to be directly at the smooth muscle because it remained unmodified by the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin and other neurohumoral antagonists, and also was observed in the SMCs. L 748337 selectively antagonized the relaxant effect of CL 316243 and, conversely, had no significant effect on the inhibitory actions of isoproterenol. CL 316243 (1 x 10(-8) M) caused an augmentation of NANC relaxation in the LES. Another beta3-agonist, (S)-4-[hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl)-phenoxyacetamide (ZD 7114), also caused concentration-dependent full relaxation of the LES that was selectively antagonized by beta3-anatagonist 3-(2-ethylphenoxy)-1-[(1S)1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphth-1-ylaminol]-(2S)-2-propanol oxalate (SR 59230A). These studies defined the effects of characteristic inhibitory beta3-adrenoceptors in the spontaneously tonic LES smooth muscle and suggested a potential therapeutic role in the esophageal motility disorders characterized by hypertensive LES. PMID:12490574

  2. Accumulation of ceroid in smooth muscle indicates severe malabsorption and vitamin E deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Stamp, G W; Evans, D J

    1987-01-01

    Four patients had accumulation of ceroid in smooth muscle (lipofuscinosis), which indicated severe or uncontrolled malabsorption, with confirmed vitamin E deficiency in three cases. The distribution of the pigment was systematic, and there seemed to be an association between malabsorption syndrome and vitamin E deficiency. Vitamin E supplementation seems to be indicated in such patients, and it is suggested that studies of smooth muscle function should be made in cases of heavy accumulation of ceroid. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:3624501

  3. Isolation and Culture of Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells and In Vitro Calcification Assay.

    PubMed

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Hamczyk, Magda R

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum phosphorus is a major risk factor for vascular calcification, which is characterized by the presence of calcium phosphate deposits, mainly hydroxyapatite crystals. In vitro studies of phosphate-induced calcification show that vascular smooth muscle cells undergo calcification with features similar to those observed in pathological vascular calcification in vivo, including the presence of hydroxyapatite crystals. Here, we describe the double-collagenase digestion method for isolating vascular smooth muscle cells from aorta, and a method for inducing calcification in vitro using high phosphate concentration.

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Methods and Application

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Biraja C.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Suh, Carol; Qyang, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and their capability to differentiation into virtually every cell type in the human body make this field a ray of hope for vascular regenerative therapy and for understanding disease mechanism. In this review, we first discuss the recent iPSC technology and vascular smooth muscle development from embryo and then examine different methodology to derive VSMCs from iPSCs and their applications in regenerative therapy and disease modeling. PMID:25559088

  5. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-11-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  6. Smooth muscle overexpression of IGF-I induces a novel adaptive response to small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Knott, Andrew W; Juno, Russell J; Jarboe, Marcus D; Profitt, Sherri A; Erwin, Christopher R; Smith, Eric P; Fagin, James A; Warner, Brad W

    2004-09-01

    Prior studies of intestinal adaptation after massive small bowel resection (SBR) have focused on growth factors and their effects on amplification of the gut mucosa. Because adaptive changes have also been described in intestinal smooth muscle, we sought to determine the effect of targeted smooth muscle growth factor overexpression on resection-induced intestinal adaptation. Male transgenic mice with smooth muscle cell overexpression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) by virtue of an alpha-smooth muscle actin promoter were obtained. SMP8 IGF-I transgenic (IGF-I TG) and nontransgenic (NT) littermates underwent 50% proximal SBR or sham operation and were then killed after 3 or 28 days. NT mice showed the expected alterations in mucosal adaptive parameters after SBR, such as increased wet weight and villus height. The IGF-I TG mice had inherently taller villi, which did not increase significantly after SBR. In addition, IGF-I TG mice had a 50% postresection persistent increase in remnant intestinal length, which was associated with an early decline and later increase in relative mucosal surface area. These results indicate that growth factor overexpression within the muscularis layer of the bowel wall induces significant postresection adaptive intestinal lengthening and a unique mucosal response. IGF-I signaling within the muscle wall may play an important role in the pathogenesis of resection-induced adaptation.

  7. Orai1 forms a signal complex with SK3 channel in gallbladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Zhong, Xing-Guo; Xia, Xian-Ming; Huang, Jun-Hao; Fan, Yi-Fei; Yuan, Ren-Xiang; Xue, Nai-Rui; Du, Juan; Han, Wen-Xiu; Xu, A-Man; Shen, Bing

    2015-10-23

    Orai1 is one of the key components of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) involved in diverse physiological functions. Orai1 may associate with other proteins to form a signaling complex. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between Orai1 and small conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3). With the use of RNA interference technique, we found that the SOCE and its associated membrane hyperpolarization were reduced while Orai1 was knocked down by a specific Orai1 siRNA in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle. However, with the use of isometric tension measurements, our results revealed that agonist-induced muscle contractility was significantly enhanced after Orai1 protein was knocked down or the tissue was treated by SK3 inhibitor apamin, but not affected by larger conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel inhibitor iberiotoxin or intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel inhibitor TRAM-34. In addition, in the presence of apamin, Orai1 siRNA had no additional effect on agonist-induced contraction. In coimmunoprecipitation experiment, SK3 and Orai1 pulled down each other. These data suggest that, Orai1 physically associated with SK3 to form a signaling complex in gallbladder smooth muscle. Ca(2+) entry via Orai1 activates SK3, resulting in membrane hyperpolarization in gallbladder smooth muscle. This hyperpolarizing effect of Orai1-SK3 coupling could serve to prevent excessive contraction of gallbladder smooth muscle in response to contractile agonists.

  8. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylated Light Chain Domain of Scallop Smooth-Muscle Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.S.; Robinson, H.; O-Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Brown, J. H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-11-02

    We have determined the crystal structure of a phosphorylated smooth-muscle myosin light chain domain (LCD). This reconstituted LCD is of a sea scallop catch muscle myosin with its phosphorylatable regulatory light chain (RLC SmoA). In the crystal structure, Arg{sup 16}, an arginine residue that is present in this isoform but not in vertebrate smooth-muscle RLC, stabilizes the phosphorylation site. This arginine interacts with the carbonyl group of the phosphorylation-site serine in the unphosphorylated LCD (determined previously), and with the phosphate group when the serine is phosphorylated. However, the overall conformation of the LCD is essentially unchanged upon phosphorylation. This result provides additional evidence that phosphorylation of the RLC is unlikely to act as an on-switch in regulation of scallop catch muscle myosin.

  9. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A.; Neumayer, Katharina M. H.; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1–2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  10. Action of the calcium antagonists cocaine and ethanol on contraction and potassium efflux of smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    HURWITZ, L; BATTLE, F; WEISS, G B

    1962-11-01

    Isolated longitudinal smooth muscle from guinea pig ileum exposed to a high potassium depolarizing medium exhibited a sustained increase in muscle tone and an increase in potassium efflux. When the concentration of calcium ion in the medium was elevated the increase in muscle tone was enhanced, but the change in potassium efflux was reduced slightly. Lowering the calcium concentration diminished the increase in muscle tone. Both cocaine and ethanol completely inhibited the sustained contraction of potassium-depolarized fibers. Addition of excess calcium ion reversed these inhibitions. Cocaine acted primarily like a competitive antagonist; and ethanol, like an indirect antagonist of calcium, ion. Under certain conditions acetylcholine potentiated the reversal by calcium ion of the drug-induced inhibitions. The two inhibitory drugs had dissimilar effects on potassium efflux from smooth muscle fibers immersed in Tyrode solution. Cocaine depressed and ethanol enhanced this membrane process. However, the increase in potassium efflux induced by acetylcholine was inhibited by ethanol. This inhibition also was reversed by increasing the concentration of calcium ion in the medium. The data suggested that calcium activates and cocaine and ethanol inhibit a cellular reaction which occurs beyond the point of membrane depolarization and is essential for smooth muscle contraction. Furthermore, calcium serves to depress membrane excitability, but appears to have a specific stimulatory role in the acetylcholine-induced increase in potassium efflux from longitudinal fibers.

  11. Conditional deletion of the relaxin receptor gene in cells of smooth muscle lineage affects lower reproductive tract in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Huang, Zaohua; Lopez, Carolina; Conrad, Kirk; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2015-04-01

    Relaxin hormone secreted into the circulation during pregnancy was discovered through its effects on pubic symphysis relaxation and parturition. Genetic inactivation of the relaxin gene or its cognate relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) in mice caused failure of parturition and mammary nipple enlargement, as well as increased collagen fiber density in the cervix and vagina. However, the relaxin effect on discrete cells and tissues has yet to be determined. Using transgenic mice with a knockin LacZ reporter in the Rxfp1 allele, we showed strong expression of this gene in vaginal and cervical stromal cells, as well as pubic ligament cells. We produced a floxed Rxfp1 allele that was used in combination with the Tagln-cre transgene to generate mice with a smooth muscle-specific gene knockout. In pregnant females, the ROSA26 reporter activated by Tagln-cre was detected in smooth muscle cells of the cervix, vagina, uterine artery, and in cells of the pubic symphysis. In late pregnant females with conditional gene ablation, the length of pubic symphysis was significantly reduced compared with wild-type or heterozygous Rxfp1(+/-) females. Denser collagen content was revealed by Masson trichrome staining in reproductive tract organs, uterine artery, and pubic symphysis. The cervical and vaginal epithelium was less developed than in heterozygous or wild-type females, although nipple size was normal and the dams were able to nurse their pups. In summary, our data indicate that relaxin/RXFP1 signaling in smooth muscle cells is important for normal collagen turnover and relaxation of the pubic symphysis during pregnancy.

  12. [Myxoid mesenchymal tumors of uterus: endometrial stromal and smooth muscle tumors, myxoid variant].

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Anne-Laure; Watkin, Emmanuel; Beurton, Daniel; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan

    2011-06-01

    Four myxoid variant of uterine mesenchymal tumors are reported. One was a low grade stromal sarcoma with infiltrative margins and the others were well circumscribed tumors corresponding to an endometrial stromal nodule and two leiomyomas. They were hypocellular neoplasms composed of stellated cells with an abundant Alcian Blue positive myxoid matrix. The myxoid nature of the neoplasms obscured their cellular nature and made the distinction between smooth muscle and endometrial stromal tumors difficult. Endometrial stromal tumors, showed very focal areas of small basophilic cells, characteristic of endometrial stroma. The diagnosis was based on the presence of a spiral arteriolar network, a CD10 positivity as well as the absence of h-caldesmon and desmin expression. The two myxoid leiomyomas showed more spindle cells and a desmin expression while h-caldesmon was negative and CD10 focally positive in both cases. Myxoid variant of endometrial stromal tumors does not necessarily exhibit the typical morphology of endometrial stroma. They may demonstrate morphological features of smooth muscle tumors in the uterus. Also, myxoid changes in uterin smooth muscle tumors may modify the classical immunoreactivity of smooth muscle markers in these tumors and make it difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant neoplasms. An immunohistochemical panel of antibodies including CD10, h-caldesmon and desmin may help in establishing the correct diagnosis.

  13. Smooth Muscle Cell Contraction Increases the Critical Buckling Pressure of Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Danika M.; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Yangming; Han, Hai-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Recent in vitro experiments demonstrated that arteries under increased internal pressure or decreased axial stretch may buckle into the tortuous pattern that is commonly observed in aging or diseased arteries in vivo. It suggests that buckling is a possible mechanism for the development of artery tortuosity. Vascular tone has significant effects on arterial mechanical properties but its effect on artery buckling is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of smooth muscle cell contraction on the critical buckling pressure of arteries. Porcine common carotid arteries were perfused in an ex vivo organ culture system overnight under physiological flow and pressure. The perfusion pressure was adjusted to determine the critical buckling pressure of these arteries at in vivo and reduced axial stretch ratios (1.5 and 1.3) at baseline and after smooth muscle contraction and relaxation stimulated by norepinephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the critical buckling pressure was significantly higher when the smooth muscle was contracted compared with relaxed condition (97.3mmHg versus 72.9mmHg at axial stretch ratio of 1.3 and 93.7mmHg vs 58.6mmHg at 1.5, p<0.05). These results indicate that arterial smooth muscle cell contraction increased artery stability. PMID:23261241

  14. Fibronectin promotes differentiation of neural crest progenitors endowed with smooth muscle cell potential

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Silva, Bruno; Coelho da Costa, Meline; Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Neves, Cynara Mendes; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Calloni, Giordano Wosgrau; Trentin, Andrea Goncalves

    2009-04-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a model system used to investigate multipotency during vertebrate development. Environmental factors control NC cell fate decisions. Despite the well-known influence of extracellular matrix molecules in NC cell migration, the issue of whether they also influence NC cell differentiation has not been addressed at the single cell level. By analyzing mass and clonal cultures of mouse cephalic and quail trunk NC cells, we show for the first time that fibronectin (FN) promotes differentiation into the smooth muscle cell phenotype without affecting differentiation into glia, neurons, and melanocytes. Time course analysis indicated that the FN-induced effect was not related to massive cell death or proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Finally, by comparing clonal cultures of quail trunk NC cells grown on FN and collagen type IV (CLIV), we found that FN strongly increased both NC cell survival and the proportion of unipotent and oligopotent NC progenitors endowed with smooth muscle potential. In contrast, melanocytic progenitors were prominent in clonogenic NC cells grown on CLIV. Taken together, these results show that FN promotes NC cell differentiation along the smooth muscle lineage, and therefore plays an important role in fate decisions of NC progenitor cells.

  15. Smooth muscle cell contraction increases the critical buckling pressure of arteries.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Danika M; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Yangming; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-02-22

    Recent in vitro experiments demonstrated that arteries under increased internal pressure or decreased axial stretch may buckle into the tortuous pattern that is commonly observed in aging or diseased arteries in vivo. It suggests that buckling is a possible mechanism for the development of artery tortuosity. Vascular tone has significant effects on arterial mechanical properties but its effect on artery buckling is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of smooth muscle cell contraction on the critical buckling pressure of arteries. Porcine common carotid arteries were perfused in an ex vivo organ culture system overnight under physiological flow and pressure. The perfusion pressure was adjusted to determine the critical buckling pressure of these arteries at in vivo and reduced axial stretch ratios (1.5 and 1.3) at baseline and after smooth muscle contraction and relaxation stimulated by norepinephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the critical buckling pressure was significantly higher when the smooth muscle was contracted compared with relaxed condition (97.3mmHg vs 72.9mmHg at axial stretch ratio of 1.3 and 93.7mmHg vs 58.6mmHg at 1.5, p<0.05). These results indicate that arterial smooth muscle cell contraction increased artery stability.

  16. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction.

  17. Cross-bridge regulation by Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation in amphibian smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wingard, C J; Nowocin, J M; Murphy, R A

    2001-12-01

    A covalent regulatory mechanism involving Ca(2+)-dependent cross-bridge phosphorylation determines both the number of cycling cross bridges and cycling kinetics in mammalian smooth muscle. Our objective was to determine whether a similar regulatory mechanism governed smooth muscle contraction from a poikilothermic amphibian in a test of the hypothesis that myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) phosphorylation could modulate shortening velocity. We measured MRLC phosphorylation of Rana catesbiana urinary bladder strips at 25 degrees C in tonic contractions in response to K+ depolarization, field stimulation, or carbachol stimulation. The force-length relationship was characterized by a steep ascending limb and a shallow descending limb. There was a rapid rise in unloaded shortening velocity early in a contraction, which then fell and was maintained at low rates while high force was maintained. In support of the hypothesis, we found a positive correlation of the level of myosin phosphorylation and an estimate of tissue shortening velocity. These results suggest that MRLC phosphorylation in amphibian smooth muscle modulates both the number of attached cross bridges (force) and the cross-bridge cycling kinetics (shortening velocity) as in mammalian smooth muscle. PMID:11705760

  18. Myocardin restores erectile function in diabetic rats: phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    He, S; Zhang, T; Liu, Y; Liu, L; Zhang, H; Chen, F; Wei, A

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether gene transfer of myocardin to the penis of diabetic rats can modulate corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM) cells phenotype and restore erectile function. Five normal control rats, and 22 diabetic rats were randomly divided into four groups: rats transfected with adCMV-myocardin (N = 6), treated with empty vector (N = 6), injected with medium (N = 5), and sham-operated rats (N = 5). The erectile response was measured 7 days after transfection. The percent of smooth muscle and the expressions of SMα-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC), calponin were evaluated. The increases in intracorporal pressure(ICP)/mean arterial pressure and total ICP in response to nerve stimulation in the adCMV-myocardin treated rats were significantly greater than those in the empty vector (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), medium only (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), and sham-operated rats (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). The suppressed expressions of SMα-actin, SMMHC and calponin were completely restored, and the amount of smooth muscle in diabetic rats were not restored after treatment. It is concluded that myocardin ameliorated erectile responses in diabetic rats mainly via promoting phenotypic modulation of CCSM cells from a proliferative to a contractile state.

  19. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  20. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  1. Effects of sumatriptan nasal spray (Imigran) on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Hsiang; Wu, Pei-Chuan; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chiu, Feng-Shiang; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Ying-Nan; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2015-10-01

    Sumatriptan (Imigran) is a potent and highly selective 5-HT1 receptor agonist often used in treating acute migraine. Intranasal sumatriptan is well absorbed and is generally effective in relieving headache. However, the effects of Imigran given intratracheally have rarely been well explored. We aimed to verify the effect of Imigran, which acts on the tracheal smooth muscle directly in vitro. We examined the effectiveness of Imigran on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle by testing: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of the drugs on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The results indicated that the addition of methacholine to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of Imigran at doses of 10(-5) M or above elicited a significant relaxation response to 10(-6) M methacholine-induced contraction. Imigran could inhibit electrical field stimulation-induced spike contraction. It also had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. The study indicated high concentrations of Imigran could cause bronchodilation to reduce asthma attacks not only by blocking parasympathetic tone, but also by directly antagonizing the effect of cholinergic receptors.

  2. Circumferential alignment of vascular smooth muscle cells in a circular microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Seob; Piao, Yunxian; Seo, Tae Seok

    2014-01-01

    The circumferential alignment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in an orthogonally micropatterned circular microfluidic channel is reported to form an in vivo-like smooth muscle cell layer. To construct a biomimetic smooth muscle cell layer which is aligned perpendicular to the axis of blood vessel, a half-circular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel is first fabricated by soft lithography using a convex PDMS mold. Then, the orthogonally microwrinkle patterns are generated inside the half-circular microchannel by a strain responsive wrinkling method. During the UV treatment on a PDMS substrate with uniaxial 40% stretch and a subsequent strain releasing step, the microwrinkle patterns perpendicular to the axial direction of the circular microchannel are generated, which can guide the circumferential alignment of HASMCs during cultivation. The analysis of orientation angle, shape index, and contractile protein marker expression indicates that the cultured HASMCs reveal the in vivo-like cell phenotype. Finally, a fully circular microchannel is produced by bonding two half-circular microchannels, and the HASMCs are cultured circumferentially inside the channels with high alignment and viability for 5 days. These results demonstrated the creation of an in vivo-like 3D smooth muscle cell layer in the circular microfluidic channel which can provide a bioassay platforms for in-depth study of HASMC biology and vascular function.

  3. Swine confinement buildings: effects of airborne particles and settled dust on airway smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Demanche, Annick; Bonlokke, Jakob; Beaulieu, Marie-Josee; Assayag, Evelyne; Cormier, Yvon

    2009-01-01

    Swine confinement workers are exposed to various contaminants. These agents can cause airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. This study was undertaken to evaluate if the bronchoconstrictive effects of swine barn air and settled dust are mediated by endotoxin, and if these effects are directly mediated on airway smooth muscles. Mouse tracheas where isolated and mounted isometrically in organ baths. Tracheas, with or without epithelium, were attached to a force transducer and tension was recorded. Concentrated swine building air at 68 EU/ml or settled dust extract at 0.01 g/ml were added for 20 minutes and tracheal smooth muscle contraction was measured. Direct role of LPS was assessed by removing it from air concentrates with an endotoxin affinity resin. Swine barn air and settled dust extract caused contraction of tracheal smooth muscle by 26 and 20%, respectively, of the maximal induced by methacholine. Removal of epithelium did not affect the contractile effects. LPS alone and LPS with peptidoglycans did not induce contraction. However, when endotoxin was removed from swine barn air concentrates, it lost 24% of its contractile effect. Concentrated swine barn air and settled dust have direct effects on airway smooth muscles. This effect is partially due to LPS but a synergy with other components of the environment of swine confinement buildings is required. PMID:20047256

  4. Intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Quijano, J C; Raynaud, F; Nguyen, D; Piacentini, N; Meister, J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca(2+) waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca(2+) wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca(2+) wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca(2+) dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca(2+), cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca(2+) wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca(2+) wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca(2+) wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  5. Circumferential alignment of vascular smooth muscle cells in a circular microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Seob; Piao, Yunxian; Seo, Tae Seok

    2014-01-01

    The circumferential alignment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in an orthogonally micropatterned circular microfluidic channel is reported to form an in vivo-like smooth muscle cell layer. To construct a biomimetic smooth muscle cell layer which is aligned perpendicular to the axis of blood vessel, a half-circular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel is first fabricated by soft lithography using a convex PDMS mold. Then, the orthogonally microwrinkle patterns are generated inside the half-circular microchannel by a strain responsive wrinkling method. During the UV treatment on a PDMS substrate with uniaxial 40% stretch and a subsequent strain releasing step, the microwrinkle patterns perpendicular to the axial direction of the circular microchannel are generated, which can guide the circumferential alignment of HASMCs during cultivation. The analysis of orientation angle, shape index, and contractile protein marker expression indicates that the cultured HASMCs reveal the in vivo-like cell phenotype. Finally, a fully circular microchannel is produced by bonding two half-circular microchannels, and the HASMCs are cultured circumferentially inside the channels with high alignment and viability for 5 days. These results demonstrated the creation of an in vivo-like 3D smooth muscle cell layer in the circular microfluidic channel which can provide a bioassay platforms for in-depth study of HASMC biology and vascular function. PMID:24120039

  6. Access of blood-borne vasoconstrictors to the arteriolar smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lew, M J; Duling, B R

    1992-01-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that luminally applied water-soluble vasoactive materials have limited access to arteriolar smooth muscle cells, and as a result, the responses to such agents applied luminally are less than the responses to those applied adventitially. To determine the extent to which this 'compartmentation' influences arteriolar responsiveness to blood-borne water-soluble vasoconstrictors in vivo, we applied phenylephrine, vasopressin and angiotension II to arterioles in the hamster cheek pouch both by luminal perfusion, and by topical application to the arteriolar smooth muscle via micropipettes. The arterioles were about 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive to these water-soluble vasoconstrictors when they were applied topically than when they were applied luminally. In contrast, the arterioles were almost equally sensitive to the lipid-soluble alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist SKF 89748-A applied by either route. The venular wall appears to be much less effective as a barrier than the arteriolar endothelium. Phenylephrine and vasopressin both elicited large arteriolar constrictions when perfused through venules in close proximity to the arteriole, and these constrictions were larger than those observed when the drug was applied to the arteriole's own lumen. Our observations confirm that the arteriolar endothelium can inhibit the direct access of water-soluble blood-borne agents to the arteriolar smooth muscle in vivo, and they suggest that the capillaries and venules could be the primary routes of access for water-soluble agents from the blood to the arteriolar smooth muscle. PMID:1391555

  7. FosB regulates stretch-induced expression of extracellular matrix proteins in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Aruna; Gong, Edward M; Pelton, Kristine; Ranpura, Sandeep A; Mulone, Michelle; Seth, Abhishek; Gomez, Pablo; Adam, Rosalyn M

    2011-12-01

    Fibroproliferative remodeling in smooth muscle-rich hollow organs is associated with aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) production. Although mechanical stimuli regulate ECM protein expression, the transcriptional mediators of this process remain poorly defined. Previously, we implicated AP-1 as a mediator of smooth muscle cell (SMC) mechanotransduction; however, its role in stretch-induced ECM regulation has not been explored. Herein, we identify a novel role for the AP-1 subunit FosB in stretch-induced ECM expression in SMCs. The DNA-binding activity of AP-1 increased after stretch stimulation of SMCs in vitro. In contrast to c-Jun and c-fos, which are also activated by the SMC mitogen platelet-derived growth factor, FosB was only activated by stretch. FosB silencing attenuated the expression of the profibrotic factors tenascin C (TNC) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), whereas forced expression of Jun~FosB stimulated TNC and CTGF promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of AP-1 at the TNC and CTGF promoters. Bladder distension in vivo enhanced nuclear localization of c-jun and FosB. Finally, the distension-induced expression of TNC and CTGF in the detrusor smooth muscle of bladders from wild-type mice was significantly attenuated in FosB-null mice. Together, these findings identify FosB as a mechanosensitive regulator of ECM production in smooth muscle. PMID:21996678

  8. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Is Sufficient for Airway Smooth Muscle Hypertrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huan; Dokshin, Gregoriy A.; Lei, Jing; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Bitar, Khalil N.; Fingar, Diane C.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Bentley, J. Kelley

    2008-01-01

    We examined the role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibition in airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, a structural change found in patients with severe asthma. LiCl, SB216763, and specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) against GSK-3β, each of which inhibit GSK-3β activity or expression, increased human bronchial smooth muscle cell size, protein synthesis, and expression of the contractile proteins α-smooth muscle actin, myosin light chain kinase, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, and SM22. Similar results were obtained following treatment of cells with cardiotrophin (CT)-1, a member of the interleukin-6 superfamily, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a proasthmatic cytokine. GSK-3β inhibition increased mRNA expression of α-actin and transactivation of nuclear factors of activated T cells and serum response factor. siRNA against eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2Bε (eIF2Bε) attenuated LiCl- and SB216763-induced protein synthesis and expression of α-actin and SM22, indicating that eIF2B is required for GSK-3β-mediated airway smooth muscle hypertrophy. eIF2Bε siRNA also blocked CT-1- but not TGF-β-induced protein synthesis. Infection of human bronchial smooth muscle cells with pMSCV GSK-3β-A9, a retroviral vector encoding a constitutively active, nonphosphorylatable GSK-3β, blocked protein synthesis and α-actin expression induced by LiCl, SB216763, and CT-1 but not TGF-β. Finally, lungs from ovalbumin-sensitized and -challenged mice demonstrated increased α-actin and CT-1 mRNA expression, and airway myocytes isolated from ovalbumin-treated mice showed increased cell size and GSK-3β phosphorylation. These data suggest that inhibition of the GSK-3β/eIF2Bε translational control pathway contributes to airway smooth muscle hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, TGF-β-induced hypertrophy does not depend on GSK-3β/eIF2B signaling. PMID:18252708

  9. Modeling smooth muscle cell proliferation of coronary artery expanded with a drug eluting stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Suping

    2010-03-01

    The drug eluting coronary stent is for the treatment of narrowed coronary artery. A high strength balloon is used to open the narrowed vessel and leave behind a tiny metal mesh, or stent, to mechanically prevent the vessel from re-narrowing and biologically slow down proliferation of the smooth muscle cells. However, the drug eluting stents that had better performance also more seriously prevented the healing processes of the vessels, which could cause serious thrombotic reactions. In this study, we assume the healing process is controlled by proper proliferation of smooth cells. We also assume that the inflammation reactions and mechanical traction drive the smooth muscle cells to proliferate while the drug loaded in the stents drives the processes at the opposite direction. Numerical calculation was applied to the system. The drug distribution and elution durations, inflammation reactions and mechanical traction were discussed.

  10. [Effect of adrenaline on the proliferation of the tunica media smooth muscle cells of rat aorta in culture].

    PubMed

    Blaes, N; Bourdillon, M C; Crouzet, B; Suplisson, A; Boissel, J P

    1980-03-24

    The proliferation of Rat medial aortic smooth muscle cells in secondary cultures is increased with adrenalin. The maximal effect is obtained after 3 days and the increase is dose-dependent. Thus adrenalin might be one of the factors responsible for the proliferation of smooth muscle cells that could play a key role in the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque in vivo.

  11. The induction of YAP expression following arterial injury is crucial for smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and neointima formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobo; Hu, Guoqing; Gao, Xiangwei; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Wei; Harmon, Erin Yund; Zhi, Xu; Xu, Zhengping; Lennartz, Michelle R.; Barroso, Margarida; Trebak, Mohamed; Chen, Ceshi; Zhou, Jiliang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the key events in the progression of neointima formation in response to vascular injury. The goal of this study is to investigate the functional role of a potent oncogene YAP in smooth muscle phenotypic modulation in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results In vitro in cell culture and in vivo in both mouse and rat arterial injury models YAP expression is significantly induced and correlated with the vascular SMC synthetic phenotype. Over-expression of YAP promotes SMC migration and proliferation while attenuating smooth muscle contractile gene expression. Conversely, knocking-down endogenous YAP in SMCs up-regulates smooth muscle gene expression but attenuates SMC proliferation and migration. Consistent with this, knocking-down YAP expression in a rat carotid balloon injury model and genetic deletion of YAP specifically in vascular SMCs in mouse after carotid artery ligation injury attenuates injury-induced smooth muscle phenotypic switch and neointima formation. Conclusions YAP plays a novel integrative role in smooth muscle phenotypic modulation by inhibiting smooth muscle-specific gene expression while promoting smooth muscle proliferation and migration in vitro and in vivo. Blocking the induction of YAP would be a potential therapeutic approach for ameliorating vascular occlusive diseases. PMID:22922963

  12. Assembly of smooth muscle myosin minifilaments: effects of phosphorylation and nucleotide binding

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Small bipolar filaments, or "minifilaments," are formed when smooth muscle myosin is dialyzed against low ionic strength pyrophosphate or citrate/Tris buffers. Unlike synthetic filaments formed at approximately physiological ionic conditions, minifilaments are homogeneous as indicated by their hypersharp boundary during sedimentation velocity. Electron microscopy and hydrodynamic techniques were used to show that 20-22S smooth muscle myosin minifilaments are 380 nm long and composed of 12-14 molecules. By varying solvents, a continuum of different size polymers in the range of 15-30S could be obtained. Skeletal muscle myosin, in contrast, preferentially forms a stable 32S minifilament (Reisler, E., P. Cheung, and N. Borochov. 1986. Biophys. J. 49:335-342), suggesting underlying differences in the assembly properties of the two myosins. Addition of salt to the smooth muscle myosin minifilaments caused unidirectional growth into a longer "side-polar" type of filament, whereas bipolar filaments were consistently formed by skeletal muscle myosin. As with synthetic filaments, addition of 1 mM MgATP caused dephosphorylated minifilaments to dissociate to a mixture of folded monomers and dimers. Phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain prevented disassembly by nucleotide, even though it had no detectable effect on the structure of the minifilament. These results suggest that differences in filament stability as a result of phosphorylation are due largely to conformational changes occurring in the myosin head, and are not due to differences in filament packing. PMID:2826495

  13. Augmented vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion when hypertension is superimposed on aging.

    PubMed

    Sehgel, Nancy L; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C; Hill, Michael A; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F; Meininger, Gerald A

    2015-02-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most previous studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter the mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells when compared with the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16-week-old) and old (64-week-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats versus Wistar-Kyoto rats. were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. These findings support the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging.

  14. Regulation of collagen biosynthesis in cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stepp, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Aortic smooth muscles cells have been implicated in the etiology of lesions which occur in atherosclerosis and hypertension. Both diseases involve proliferation of smooth muscle cells and accumulation of excessive amounts of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen type I and type III produced by the smooth muscle cells. To better understand the sites of regulation of collagen biosynthesis and to correlate these with the growth rate of the cells, cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells were studied as a function of the number of days (3 to 14) in second passage. Cells grew rapidly up to day 6 when confluence was reached. The total incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-proline into proteins was highest at day 3 and decreased to a constant level after the cultures reached confluence. In contrast, collagen protein production was lowest before confluence and continued to increase over the entire time course of the experiments. cDNA clones for the ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains of type I and the ..cap alpha..1 chain of type III collagen were used to quantitate the steady state level of collagen mRNAs. RNA was tested in a cell-free translation system. Changes in the translational activity of collagen mRNAs parallelled the observed increases in collagen protein production. Thus, at later time points, collagen mRNAs are more active in directing synthesis of preprocollagens, even though less collagen mRNA is present. The conclusion is that the site of regulation of the expression of collagen genes is a function of the growth rate of cultured smooth muscle cells.

  15. Collagen degradation and platelet-derived growth factor stimulate the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Stringa, E; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Gavrilovic, J

    2000-06-01

    Cell migration is a key event in many biological processes and depends on signals from both extracellular matrix and soluble motogenic factors. During atherosclerotic plaque development, vascular smooth muscle cells migrate from the tunica media to the intima through a basement membrane and interstitial collagenous matrix and proliferate to form a neointima. Matrix metalloproteinases have previously been implicated in neointimal formation and in this study smooth muscle cell adhesion and migration on degraded collagen have been evaluated. Vascular smooth muscle cells adhered to native intact collagen type I and to its first degradation by-product, 3/4 fragment (generated by collagenase-3 cleavage), unwound at 35 degrees C to mimic physiological conditions. PDGF-BB pre-treatment induced a fourfold stimulation of smooth muscle cell motility on the collagen 3/4 fragment whereas no increase in smooth muscle cell motility on collagen type I was observed. Cell migration on collagen type I was mediated by alpha2 integrin, whereas PDGF-BB-stimulated migration on the 3/4 collagen fragment was dependent on alphavbeta3 integrin. alphavbeta3 integrin was organised in clusters concentrated at the leading and trailing edges of the cells and was only expressed when cells were exposed to the 3/4 collagen fragment. Tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of PDGF receptor-beta tyrosine kinase activity, resulted in complete abolition of migration of PDGF-BB treated cells on collagen type I and 3/4 fragment. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the cellular migratory response to soluble motogens can be regulated by proteolytic modification of the extracellular matrix. PMID:10806116

  16. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  17. AMPK Dilates Resistance Arteries via Activation of SERCA and BKCa Channels in Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Holger; Schubert, Kai Michael; Blodow, Stephanie; Kreutz, Claus-Peter; Erdogmus, Serap; Wiedenmann, Margarethe; Qiu, Jiehua; Fey, Theres; Ruth, Peter; Lubomirov, Lubomir T; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Mederos Y Schnitzler, Michael; Hardie, D Grahame; Gudermann, Thomas; Pohl, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The protective effects of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) on the metabolic syndrome may include direct effects on resistance artery vasomotor function. However, the precise actions of AMPK on microvessels and their potential interaction are largely unknown. Thus, we set to determine the effects of AMPK activation on vascular smooth muscle tone and the underlying mechanisms. Resistance arteries isolated from hamster and mouse exhibited a pronounced endothelium-independent dilation on direct pharmacological AMPK activation by 2 structurally unrelated compounds (PT1 and A769662). The dilation was associated with a decrease of intracellular-free calcium [Ca(2+)]i in vascular smooth muscle cell. AMPK stimulation induced activation of BKCa channels as assessed by patch clamp studies in freshly isolated hamster vascular smooth muscle cell and confirmed by direct proof of membrane hyperpolarization in intact arteries. The BKCa channel blocker iberiotoxin abolished the hyperpolarization but only partially reduced the dilation and did not affect the decrease of [Ca(2+)]i. By contrast, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin largely reduced these effects, whereas combined inhibition of SERCA and BKCa channels virtually abolished them. AMPK stimulation significantly increased the phosphorylation of the SERCA modulator phospholamban at the regulatory T17 site. Stimulation of smooth muscle AMPK represents a new, potent vasodilator mechanism in resistance vessels. AMPK directly relaxes vascular smooth muscle cell by a decrease of [Ca(2+)]i. This is achieved by calcium sequestration via SERCA activation, as well as activation of BKCa channels. There is in part a mutual compensation of both calcium-lowering mechanisms. However, SERCA activation which involves an AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of phospholamban is the predominant mechanism in resistance vessels.

  18. Small intestinal submucosa seeded with intestinal smooth muscle cells in a rodent jejunal interposition model

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Harry H.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a porcine-derived, acellular, collagen-based matrix that has been tested without seeded smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for intestinal tissue engineering. We examined the expression patterns of contractile proteins of SIS with SMCs implanted in an in vivo rodent model. Materials and methods Intestinal SMCs were isolated from Lewis rat pups. Four-ply tubular SMCs-seeded SIS or blank SIS scaffolds were implanted in an adult rat jejunal interposition model. Recipients were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the implantation. The retrieved specimens were examined using antibodies against contractile proteins of SMCs. Results Cultured intestinal SMCs expressed α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and less smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC) in vitro. Cell-seeded SIS scaffolds contracted significantly over 8 weeks of implantation but were comparable to SIS scaffolds without cell seeding. Implanted cell-seeded SIS scaffolds at 2 weeks expressed extensive α-SMA, some calponin, and minimal SM-MHC. At 4 weeks, α-SMA-expressing cells decreased significantly, whereas calponin or SM-MHC expressing cells were rarely detected. A small number of α-SMA-expressing cells were present at 8 weeks, whereas more calponin or SM-MHC expressing cells emerged in proximity with the anastomotic interface. Conclusions Cell-seeded SIS contracted significantly after implantation, but the expressions of contractile proteins were present at the site of SIS interposition. No organized smooth muscle was formed at the site of implantation. A better scaffold design is needed to produce structured smooth muscle. PMID:21937060

  19. Bumetanide-sensitive sodium-22 transport in vascular smooth muscle cell of the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Tokushige, A.; Kino, M.; Tamura, H.; Hopp, L.; Searle, B.M.; Aviv, A.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of bumetanide, a known probe of Na+, K+ cotransport, on /sup 22/Na+ uptake and washout was examined in serially passed cultured vascular smooth muscle cells of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), and Wistar rats. In Ca2+-deficient medium, the drug exerted the greatest effect on /sup 22/Na+ washout in vascular smooth muscle cells from SHR and the least effect on cells from WKY. The respective mean values for the apparent bumetanide-sensitive /sup 22/Na+ washout rate constants (Ke; X 10(-2)/min) were 7.2, 4.3, and 1.7 for cells from SHR, WKY, and Wistar rats. In both 1 mM Ca2+ and Ca2+-deficient medium, in the presence of 1 mM ouabain, vascular smooth muscle cells from SHR had the highest plateau phase of /sup 22/Na+ uptake among the three cell preparations. All cells exhibited higher /sup 22/Na+ uptake in Ca2+-deficient medium than in 1 mM Ca2+ medium. Under this condition, bumetanide caused an additional rise in steady state /sup 22/Na+ uptake that was most pronounced in cells from SHR (21.3% versus 16.6% for Wistar rats and 4.8% for WKY). This finding indicates that a quantitatively greater inhibition of washout than of the uptake component of the bumetanide-sensitive /sup 22/Na+ transport occurs in Ca2+-deficient medium. It is concluded that, in Ca2+-deficient medium, the bumetanide-sensitive /sup 22/Na+ washout is higher in vascular smooth muscle cells of SHR than in those of normotensive controls and that this phenomenon reflects a higher Na+ turnover in vascular smooth muscle cell in the hypertensive rat strain.

  20. Electrical properties of purinergic transmission in smooth muscle of the guinea-pig prostate.

    PubMed

    Lam, Michelle; Mitsui, Retsu; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic smooth muscle develops spontaneous myogenic tone which is modulated by autonomic neuromuscular transmission. This study aimed to investigate the role of purinergic transmission in regulating electrical activity of prostate smooth muscle and whether its contribution may be altered with age. Intracellular recordings were simultaneously made with isometric tension recordings in smooth muscle preparations of the guinea-pig prostate. Immunostaining for P2X1 receptors on whole mount preparations was also performed. In prostate preparations which generated spontaneous slow waves, electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) which were abolished by guanethidine (10 μM), α-β-methylene ATP (10 μM) or pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2,4-disulfonic acid (PPADS, 10 μM) but not phentolamine (1 μM). Consistently, immunostaining revealed the expression of P2X1 receptors on prostatic smooth muscle. EJPs themselves did not cause contractions, but EJPs could sum to trigger a slow wave and associated contraction. Yohimbine (1 μM) and 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX, 10 μM) but not propranolol (1 μM) potentiated EJPs. Although properties of EJPs were not different between young and aging guinea-pig prostates, ectoATPase inhibitor ARL 67156 (100 μM) augmented EJP amplitudes by 64.2 ± 29.6% in aging animals, compared to 22.1 ± 19.9% in young animals. These results suggest that ATP released from sympathetic nerves acts on P2X1 purinoceptors located on prostate smooth muscle to evoke EJPs, while pre-junctional α2-adrenergic and adenosine A2 receptors may play a role in preventing excessive transmitter release. Age-related up-regulation of enzymatic ATP breakdown may be a compensatory mechanism for the enhanced purinergic transmission which would cause hypercontractility arising from increased ATP release in older animals.

  1. Cytoplasmic free calcium, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and force in phasic and tonic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The time course of [Ca2+]i, tension, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were determined during prolonged depolarization with high K+ in intact tonic (rabbit pulmonary artery) and phasic (longitudinal layer of guinea pig ileum) smooth muscles. [Ca2+]i was monitored with the 340 nm/380 nm signal ratio of the fluorescent indicator fura-2. The fluorescence ratio had a similar time course in both muscle types during depolarization with 109 mM [K+]o; after a transient peak, there was a decline to 70% of its peak value in tonic smooth muscle, and to 60% in phasic smooth muscle. Tension, however, continued to increase in the pulmonary artery, while in the ileum it declined in parallel with the [Ca2+]i. On changing [K+]o from 109 to 20 mM, tension and [Ca2+]i either remained unchanged or declined in parallel in the pulmonary artery. Phosphorylation of the 20-kD myosin light chain, measured during stimulation of muscle strips with 109 mM [K+]o in another set of experiments, increased from 3% to a peak of 50% in the intact pulmonary artery, and then declined to a steady state value of 23%. In the intact ileum, a very rapid, early transient phosphorylation (up to 50%) at 2-3 s was seen. This transient declined by 30 s to a value that was close to the resting level (7%), while tension remained at 55% of its peak force. A quick release during maintained stimulation induced no detectable change in the [Ca2+]i in either type of smooth muscle. We discuss the possibility that the slowly rising tonic tension in pulmonary artery could be due to cooperativity between phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated crossbridges. PMID:3216188

  2. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell endothelin-1 expression modulates the pulmonary vascular response to chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Francis Y.; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Ying, Lihua; Chen, Chihhsin; Lee, Lori; Alvira, Cristina M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) increases pulmonary vascular tone through direct effects on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) via membrane-bound ET-1 receptors. Circulating ET-1 contributes to vascular remodeling by promoting SMC proliferation and migration and inhibiting SMC apoptosis. Although endothelial cells (EC) are the primary source of ET-1, whether ET-1 produced by SMC modulates pulmonary vascular tone is unknown. Using transgenic mice created by crossbreeding SM22α-Cre mice with ET-1 flox/flox mice to selectively delete ET-1 in SMC, we tested the hypothesis that PASMC ET-1 gene expression modulates the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia. ET-1 gene deletion and selective activity of SM22α promoter-driven Cre recombinase were confirmed. Functional assays were performed under normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxic (5% O2) conditions using murine PASMC obtained from ET-1+/+ and ET-1−/− mic and in human PASMC (hPASMC) after silencing of ET-1 using siRNA. Under baseline conditions, there was no difference in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) between SM22α-ET-1−/− and SM22α-ET-1+/+ (control) littermates. After exposure to hypoxia (10% O2, 21–24 days), RVSP was and vascular remodeling were less in SM22α-ET-1−/− mice compared with control littermates (P < 0.01). Loss of ET-1 decreased PASMC proliferation and migration and increased apoptosis under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Exposure to selective ET-1 receptor antagonists had no effect on either the hypoxia-induced hPASMC proliferative or migratory response. SMC-specific ET-1 deletion attenuates hypoxia-induced increases in pulmonary vascular tone and structural remodeling. The observation that loss of ET-1 inhibited SMC proliferation, survival, and migration represents evidence that ET-1 derived from SMC plays a previously undescribed role in modulating the response of the pulmonary circulation to hypoxia. Thus PASMC ET-1 may modulate vascular tone independently of ET-1 produced by EC

  3. A new level of plasticity: Drosophila smooth-like testes muscles compensate failure of myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Kuckwa, Jessica; Fritzen, Katharina; Buttgereit, Detlev; Rothenbusch-Fender, Silke; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2016-01-15

    The testis of Drosophila resembles an individual testis tubule of mammals. Both are surrounded by a sheath of smooth muscles, which in Drosophila are multinuclear and originate from a pool of myoblasts that are set aside in the embryo and accumulate on the genital disc later in development. These muscle stem cells start to differentiate early during metamorphosis and give rise to all muscles of the inner male reproductive system. Shortly before the genital disc and the developing testes connect, multinuclear nascent myotubes appear on the anterior tips of the seminal vesicles. Here, we show that adhesion molecules are distinctly localized on the seminal vesicles; founder cell (FC)-like myoblasts express Dumbfounded (Duf) and Roughest (Rst), and fusion-competent myoblast (FCM)-like cells mainly express Sticks and stones (Sns). The smooth but multinuclear myotubes of the testes arose by myoblast fusion. RNAi-mediated attenuation of Sns or both Duf and Rst severely reduced the number of nuclei in the testes muscles. Duf and Rst probably act independently in this context. Despite reduced fusion in all of these RNAi-treated animals, myotubes migrated onto the testes, testes were shaped and coiled, muscle filaments were arranged as in the wild type and spermatogenesis proceeded normally. Hence, the testes muscles compensate for fusion defects so that the myofibres encircling the adult testes are indistinguishable from those of the wild type and male fertility is guaranteed. PMID:26657767

  4. A new level of plasticity: Drosophila smooth-like testes muscles compensate failure of myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kuckwa, Jessica; Fritzen, Katharina; Buttgereit, Detlev; Rothenbusch-Fender, Silke; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2016-01-01

    The testis of Drosophila resembles an individual testis tubule of mammals. Both are surrounded by a sheath of smooth muscles, which in Drosophila are multinuclear and originate from a pool of myoblasts that are set aside in the embryo and accumulate on the genital disc later in development. These muscle stem cells start to differentiate early during metamorphosis and give rise to all muscles of the inner male reproductive system. Shortly before the genital disc and the developing testes connect, multinuclear nascent myotubes appear on the anterior tips of the seminal vesicles. Here, we show that adhesion molecules are distinctly localized on the seminal vesicles; founder cell (FC)-like myoblasts express Dumbfounded (Duf) and Roughest (Rst), and fusion-competent myoblast (FCM)-like cells mainly express Sticks and stones (Sns). The smooth but multinuclear myotubes of the testes arose by myoblast fusion. RNAi-mediated attenuation of Sns or both Duf and Rst severely reduced the number of nuclei in the testes muscles. Duf and Rst probably act independently in this context. Despite reduced fusion in all of these RNAi-treated animals, myotubes migrated onto the testes, testes were shaped and coiled, muscle filaments were arranged as in the wild type and spermatogenesis proceeded normally. Hence, the testes muscles compensate for fusion defects so that the myofibres encircling the adult testes are indistinguishable from those of the wild type and male fertility is guaranteed. PMID:26657767

  5. Airway smooth muscle changes in the nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model.

    PubMed

    Belik, Jaques; Davidge, Sandra T; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Jingyi; Greer, John J

    2003-05-01

    In the fetal rat, nitrofen induces congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and pulmonary vascular remodeling similar to what is observed in the human condition. Airway hyperactivity is common in infants with CDH and attributed to the ventilator-induced airway damage. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that airway smooth muscle mechanical properties are altered in the nitrofen-induced CDH rat model. Lungs from nitrofen-exposed fetuses with hernias (CDH) or intact diaphragm (nitrofen) and untreated fetuses (control) were studied on gestation d 21. The left intrapulmonary artery and bronchi were removed and mounted on a wire myograph, and lung expression, content, and immunolocalization of cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated. Pulmonary artery muscle in the CDH group had significantly (p < 0.01) lower force generation compared with control and nitrofen groups. In contrast, the same generation bronchial smooth muscle of the CDH and nitrofen groups developed higher force compared with control. Whereas no differences were found in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vascular muscle tone, the epithelium-dependent airway muscle relaxation was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in the CDH and nitrofen groups. The lung mRNA levels of COX-1 and COX-2 were increased in the CDH and nitrofen groups. COX-1 vascular and airway immunostaining, as well as COX-1 and COX-2 lung protein content, were increased in the CDH group. This is the first report of airway smooth muscle abnormalities in the nitrofen-induced fetal rat model of CDH. We speculate that congenital airway muscle changes may be present in the human form of this disease. PMID:12612200

  6. Inhibitory action of acetylcholine on the smooth muscle from the lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Velkova, V; Papasova, M; Boev, K; Bonev, A

    1979-01-01

    The effect of acetylcholine (Ach) on smooth-muscle strips isolated along the transversal axis of cat lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is studied. Ach in low concentrations (10(-11)--10(-9) g/ml) causes contraction of the muscle strips. Increase of the concentration to 10(-8) g/ml leads to biphasic effect: contraction with relaxation. Inhibitory response predominates at Ach 10(-6) and 10(-5) g/ml. Atropine (10(-6) M) eliminates the excitatory phase but it has no effect on the second relaxation phase. Propranolol (10(-6), 2 X 10(-6) M) as well as phentolamine turn the inhibitory response to Ach into contraction. Noradrenaline leads to LES contraction while isoprenaline induces relaxation. In smooth-muscle LES strips from cats pretreated with reserpine (1 mg/kg for 3 days), Ach in the concentrations used (10(-5), 10(-6) g/ml) leads to contraction. The changes observed are membrane-dependent -- the contraction is accompanied by depolarization, relaxation by hyperpolarization. The inhibitory effect of Ach on LES smooth muscle is discussed in the light of the hypothesis of Burn and Rand (1960) about the release of noradrenaline under the effect of Ach.

  7. beta. -adrenergic relaxation of smooth muscle: differences between cells and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Scheid, C.R.

    1987-09-01

    The present studies were carried out in an attempt to resolve the controversy about the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation in smooth muscle. Previous studies on isolated smooth muscle cells from the toad stomach had suggested that at least some of the actions of ..beta..-adrenergic agents, including a stimulatory effect on /sup 45/Ca efflux, were dependent on the presence of a normal transmembrane Na/sup +/ gradient. Studies by other investigators using tissues derived from mammalian sources had suggested that the relaxing effect of ..beta..-adrenergic agents was Na/sup +/ independent. Uncertainty remained as to whether these discrepancies reflected differences between cells and tissues or differences between species. Thus, in the present studies, the authors utilized both tissues and cells from the same source, the stomach muscle of the toad Bufo marinus, and assessed the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation. They found that elimination of a normal Na/sup +/ gradient abolished ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation of isolated cells. In tissues, however, similar manipulations had no effect on relaxation. The reasons for this discrepancy are unclear but do not appear to be attributable to changes in smooth muscle function following enzymatic dispersion. Thus the controversy concerning the mechanisms of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation may reflect inherent differences between tissues and cells.

  8. Steroids and antihistamines synergize to inhibit rat's airway smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Wu, Chi-Chung; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2015-06-01

    Both glucocorticoids and H1-antihistamines were widely used on patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and obstructive airway diseases. However, their direct effects on airway smooth muscle were not fully explored. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of prednisolone (Kidsolone) and levocetirizine (Xyzal) on isolated rat trachea submersed in Kreb's solution in a muscle bath. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of parasympathetic mimetic agents were measured. The following assessments of the drug were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M methacholine; (3) effect of the drug on electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The result revealed sole use of Kidsolone or Xyzal elicited no significant effect or only a little relaxation response on tracheal tension after methacholine treatment. The tension was 90.5 ± 7.5 and 99.5 ± 0.8 % at 10(-4) M for Xyzal and 10(-5) M for Kidsolone, respectively. However, a dramatically spasmolytic effect was observed after co-administration of Kidsolone and Xyzal and the tension dropped to 67.5 ± 13.6 %, with statistical significance (p < 0.05). As for EFS-induced contractions, Kidsolone had no direct effect but Xyzal could inhibit it, with increasing basal tension. In conclusion, using glucocorticoids alone had no spasmolytic effect but they can be synergized with antihistamines to dramatically relax the trachea smooth muscle within minutes. Therefore, for AR patients with acute asthma attack, combined use of those two drugs is recommended. PMID:25115316

  9. [The effect of prostatilen on the contractile activity of the smooth-muscle cells of the blood vessels and bladder in cats].

    PubMed

    al-Shchukri, S Kh; Barabanov, S V; Barabanova, V V; Bobkov, Iu A; Gorbachev, A G; Parastaeva, M M

    1996-07-01

    Prostatilene enhanced the functional activity of the bladder and blood vessels' smooth muscle cells. A possibility of activation of the smooth muscle cells contractility with prostatilene by a pharmaco-mechanical association, is discussed.

  10. A preliminary study of the effect of essential oils on skeletal and smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lis-Balchin, M; Hart, S

    1997-11-01

    The pharmacological activity of nine commercial essential oils was studied on the rat isolated phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation and compared with activity on field-stimulated guinea-pig ileum preparations. The essential oils at final bath concentrations of 2 x 10(-5) and 2 x 10(-4) g/ml produced four different effects on skeletal muscle, whilst only a contracture with or without a decrease in response to field stimulation in smooth muscle. The first type of effect on skeletal muscle involved a contracture and inhibition of the twitch response to nerve stimulation shown by a sample of clary sage, dill, fennel, frankincense and nutmeg; a second, shown by thyme produced a contracture without a change in the twitch response; a third, shown by lavender reduced the twitch response alone and the fourth, shown by camphor, increased the size of the twitch response. Angelica root oil at the highest concentration studied showed no response on skeletal muscle. PMID:9421254

  11. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A.; Penheiter, Alan R.; Burghardt, Thomas P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  12. Photoaffinity labelling of smooth-muscle myosin by methylanthraniloyl-8-azido-ATP.

    PubMed

    Maruta, S; Ikebe, M

    1993-06-01

    Methylanthraniloyl-8-azido-ATP (Mant-8-N3-ATP), which binds to the 20 kDa C-terminal tryptic fragment of skeletal-muscle myosin subfragment-1 [Maruta, Miyanishi and Matsuda (1989) Eur. J. Biochem. 184, 213-221], was synthesized and used as a probe of the conformational change of smooth-muscle myosin. Mant-8-N3-ATP, like ATP, induced the formation of the 10 S conformation at low ionic strength. In the presence of vanadate, smooth-muscle myosin formed a stable complex with Mant-8-N3-ADP, and this complex showed the 10 S-->6 S transition of myosin. ATP-binding sites for 6 S (extended state) and 10 S (folded state) myosin were studied by photolabelling of myosin with Mant-8-N3-ADP. For both 6 S and 10 S myosin, Mant-8-N3-ATP was incorporated into the 29 kDa N-terminal tryptic fragment of myosin heavy chain. This is unlike the labelling of skeletal-muscle myosin, in which the 20 kDa C-terminal fragment is labelled. The labelling of 29 kDa fragment was diminished significantly by addition of ATP. These results suggest that the conformation of the ATP-binding site of smooth-muscle myosin is different from that of skeletal-muscle myosin. To examine further the possible differences in the labelling site between 6 S and 10 S myosin, the affinity-labelled 29 kDa fragment was subjected to complete proteolysis by lysylendo-peptidase. The fluorescent-labelled-peptide map suggested that the Mant-8-N3-ADP-binding sites for 6 S and 10 S myosin were identical.

  13. Effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and smooth muscle contraction in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman; Mustafa, Ayman

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that both Rho kinase signaling and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle Rho kinase pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and muscle contraction in rat stomach. The peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite were used to induce oxidative stress. Rho kinase II expression and ACh-induced activity were measured in control and oxidant-treated cells via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activity assay kits, respectively. Single smooth muscle cell contraction was measured via scanning micrometry in the presence or absence of the Rho kinase blocker, Y-27632 dihydrochloride. All oxidant agents significantly increased ACh-induced Rho kinase II activity without affecting its expression level. Most important, oxidative stress induced by all three agents augmented ACh-stimulated muscle cell contraction, which was significantly inhibited by Y-27632. In conclusion, oxidative stress activates Rho kinase II and enhances contraction in rat gastric muscle, suggesting an important role in GI motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  14. Se Enhances MLCK Activation by Regulating Selenoprotein T (SelT) in the Gastric Smooth Muscle of Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Jing-Xuan; Wang, Qi; Gu, Gao-Qin; Yang, Shi-Jin; Li, Cheng-Ye; Qiu, Chang-Wei; Deng, Gan-Zhen; Guo, Meng-Yao

    2016-09-01

    Selenium (Se), a nutritionally essential trace element, is associated with health and disease. Selenoprotein T (SelT) was identified as a redoxin protein with a selenocystein, localizing in the endoplasmic reticulum. The myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin light chain (MLC) play key roles in the contraction process of smooth muscle. The present study was to detect the effect and mechanism of SelT on the contraction process of gastric smooth muscle. The WT rats were fed with different Se concentration diets, and Se and Ca(2+) concentrations were detected in the gastric smooth muscle. Western blot and qPCR were performed to determine SelT, CaM, MLCK, and MLC expressions. MLCK activity was measured by identifying the rates of [γ-32P]ATP incorporated into the MLC. The results showed Se and Ca(2+) concentrations were enhanced with Se intake in gastric smooth muscle tissues. With increasing Se, SelT, CaM, MLCK and MLC expressions increased, and MLCK and MLC activation improved in gastric smooth muscle tissue. The SelT RNA interference experiments showed that Ca(2+) release, MLCK activation, and MLC phosphorylation were regulated by SelT. Se affected the gastric smooth muscle constriction by regulating Ca(2+) release, MLCK activation, and MLC phosphorylation through SelT. Se plays a major role in regulating the contraction processes of gastric smooth muscle with the SelT.

  15. Smooth Muscle-Targeted Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-γ Disrupts Vascular Wall Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhenz, Jennifer M.; Murphy, Tamara C.; Pokutta-Paskaleva, Anastassia P.; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Taylor, W. Robert; Blount, Mitsi A.; Cheng, Juan; Yang, Qinglin; Sutliff, Roy L.; Hart, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the nuclear hormone receptor, PPARγ, with pharmacological agonists promotes a contractile vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype and reduces oxidative stress and cell proliferation, particularly under pathological conditions including vascular injury, restenosis, and atherosclerosis. However, pharmacological agonists activate both PPARγ-dependent and -independent mechanisms in multiple cell types confounding efforts to clarify the precise role of PPARγ in smooth muscle cell structure and function in vivo. We, therefore, designed and characterized a mouse model with smooth muscle cell-targeted PPARγ overexpression (smPPARγOE). Our results demonstrate that smPPARγOE attenuated contractile responses in aortic rings, increased aortic compliance, caused aortic dilatation, and reduced mean arterial pressure. Molecular characterization revealed that compared to littermate control mice, aortas from smPPARγOE mice expressed lower levels of contractile proteins and increased levels of adipocyte-specific transcripts. Morphological analysis demonstrated increased lipid deposition in the vascular media and in smooth muscle of extravascular tissues. In vitro adenoviral-mediated PPARγ overexpression in human aortic smooth muscle cells similarly increased adipocyte markers and lipid uptake. The findings demonstrate that smooth muscle PPARγ overexpression disrupts vascular wall structure and function, emphasizing that balanced PPARγ activity is essential for vascular smooth muscle homeostasis. PMID:26451838

  16. [Ionic mechanisms of endothelium-dependent relaxation of vascular smooth muscle under the action of acetylcholine].

    PubMed

    Taranenko, V M; Talaeva, T V; Bratus', V V

    1988-04-01

    Acetylcholine and nitroglycerin were shown to induce relaxation in muscles of the ring vascular segments of canine coronary arteries and rabbit aortic archs, the magnitude of the reaction depending on the level of initial tonic tension. Methylene blue abolished the relaxation. Mechanical removal of endothelium abolished the reaction to acetylcholine but not to nitroglycerin. Verapamil decreased the relaxation by 70%. The endothelium-dependent relaxation seems to be connected mainly with a decrease in the calcium entering vascular smooth muscle cells through voltage-dependent channels.

  17. TRA2β controls Mypt1 exon 24 splicing in the developmental maturation of mouse mesenteric artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoxu; Reho, John J; Wirth, Brunhilde; Fisher, Steven A

    2015-02-15

    Diversity of smooth muscle within the vascular system is generated by alternative splicing of exons, yet there is limited understanding of its timing or control mechanisms. We examined splicing of myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit (Mypt1) exon 24 (E24) in relation to smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (Smmhc) and smoothelin (Smtn) alternative exons (Smmhc E6 and Smtn E20) during maturation of mouse mesenteric artery (MA) smooth muscle. The role of transformer 2β (Tra2β), a master regulator of splicing in flies, in maturation of arterial smooth muscle was tested through gene inactivation. Splicing of alternative exons in bladder smooth muscle was examined for comparative purposes. MA smooth muscle maturation began after postnatal week 2 and was complete at maturity, as indicated by switching to Mypt1 E24+ and Smtn E20- splice variants and 11-fold induction of Smmhc. Similar changes in bladder were complete by postnatal day 3. Splicing of Smmhc E6 was temporally dissociated from Mypt1 E24 and Smtn E20 and discordant between arteries and bladder. Tamoxifen-induced smooth muscle-specific inactivation of Tra2β within the first week of life but not in maturity reduced splicing of Mypt1 E24 in MAs. Inactivation of Tra2β causing a switch to the isoform of MYPT1 containing the COOH-terminal leucine zipper motif (E24-) increased arterial sensitivity to cGMP-mediated relaxation. In conclusion, maturation of mouse MA smooth muscle begins postnatally and continues until sexual maturity. TRA2β is required for specification during this period of maturation, and its inactivation alters the contractile properties of mature arterial smooth muscle.

  18. HEF-19-induced relaxation of colonic smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Lu-Lu; Fu, Shou-Ting

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relaxant effect of chromane HEF-19 on colonic smooth muscles isolated from rabbits, and the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: The relaxant effect and action mechanisms of HEF-19 were investigated using descending colon smooth muscle of the rabbits. Preparations 1 cm long were mounted in 15-mL tissue baths containing Tyrode’s solution, maintained at 37 ± 0.5 °C and aerated with a mixture of 5% CO2 in oxygen (Carbogen). The tension and amplitude of the smooth muscle strips were recorded after adding HEF-19 (10-6, 10-5 and 10-4 mol/L). After cumulative administration of four antispasmodic agents, including acetylcholine chloride (Ach) (10-4 mol/L), histamine (10-4 mol/L), high-K+ (60 mmol/L) and BaCl2 (8.2 mmol/L), HEF-19 (3 × 10-7-3 × 10-4 mol/L) was added to investigate the relaxant effect of HEF-19. CaCl2 (10-4-2.5 × 10-3 mol/L) was added cumulatively to the smooth muscle preparations pretreated with and without HEF-19 (1 × 10-6 or 3 × 10-6 mol/L) and verapamil (1 × 10-7 mol/L) to study the mechanisms involved. Finally, phasic contraction was induced with ACh (15 × 10-6 mol/L), and CaCl2 (4 × 10-3 mol/L) was added to the smooth muscle preparations pretreated with and without HEF-19 (3 × 10-6 mol/L or 1 × 10-5 mol/L) and verapamil (1 × 10-7 mol/L) in calcium-free medium to further study the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS: HEF-19 (1 × 10-6, 1 × 10-5 and 1 × 10-4 mol/L) suppressed spontaneous contraction of rabbit colonic smooth muscles. HEF-19 (3 × 10-7-3 × 10-4 mol/L) relaxed in a concentration-dependent manner colonic smooth muscle preparations pre-contracted with BaCl2, high-K+ solution, Ach or histamine with respective EC50 values of 5.15 ± 0.05, 5.12 ± 0.08, 5.58 ± 0.16 and 5.25 ± 0.24, thus showing a spasmolytic activity. HEF-19 (1 × 10-6 mol/L and 3 × 10-6 mol/L) shifted the concentration-response curves of CaCl2 to the right and depressed the maximum response to CaCl2. The two components contracted by Ach were

  19. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  20. Active substance from the serum of laying hens and its effect on uterine smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, A

    1989-01-01

    Blood serum from laying hens has an excitatory effect on isolated uterine smooth muscles of laying hens. This excitatory effect is not observed for the blood serum of pullets and cocks. After ultrafiltration and gel filtration on Sephadex G25, it was found that the excitatory effect of the blood serum was due to a low-molecular substance (m.w. below 5000 Da). The effect of this active substance was found to be inhibited by indomethacin, brufen and SC 19220. The presence of this substance in the serum of laying hens and its contractile effects, which are probably associated with prostaglandin mechanisms of regulation in the uterine smooth muscles, suggests that it is associated in the processes of oviposition in hens.

  1. Substance P, like acetylcholine, augments one type of Ca2+ current in isolated smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Clapp, L H; Vivaudou, M B; Singer, J J; Walsh, J V

    1989-03-01

    Electrophysiological recordings from freshly-dissociated smooth muscle cells from toad stomach revealed that substance P enhances one of two types of Ca2+ currents. That is, substance P enhances the slowly inactivating, high-threshold current but not the fast inactivating, low-threshold current. Acetylcholine has the same effect, but the acetylcholine action is blocked by atropine whereas the substance P action is not, indicating that the two agents act at different receptor sites. Thus, substance P, like acetylcholine, has a dual excitatory action on the smooth muscle cells employed in these studies, enhancing a specific type of Ca2+ current, as demonstrated here, and suppressing a voltage-sensitive K+ conductance, as previously described [Sims, S.M., Walsh, J.V., Jr. & Singer, J.J. (1986) Am. J. Physiol. 251, C580-C587].

  2. Vasopressin induced production of inositol trisphosphate and calcium efflux in a smooth muscle cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, V.M.; Rueegg, U.T.

    1985-08-30

    Phosphatidylinositol metabolism and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were examined in a vascular smooth muscle cell line (A7r5). (Arg 8)Vasopressin stimulated the rapid formation (measurable at 1 sec) of inositol phosphates in a concentration-dependent manner. The time course for formation of inositol phosphates was similar to that for /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from preloaded cells. The efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in response to (Arg8)vasopressin could be inhibited by a vasopressin antagonist. This supports the hypothesis that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate plays a role in vasopressin stimulated calcium mobilization from an intracellular source in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

  3. Single Nisoldipine-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Smooth Muscle Cells Isolated from Rabbit Mesenteric Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Jennings F.; Deitmer, Joachim W.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1986-08-01

    Single smooth muscle cells were enzymatically isolated from the rabbit mesenteric artery. At physiological levels of external Ca, these cells were relaxed and contracted on exposure to norepinephrine, caffeine, or high levels of potassium. The patch-clamp technique was used to measure unitary currents through single channels in the isolated cells. Single channels were selective for divalent cations and exhibited two conductance levels, 8 pS and 15 pS. Both types of channels were voltage-dependent, and channel activity occurred at potentials positive to -40 mV. The activity of both channel types was almost completely inhibited by 50 nM nisoldipine. These channels appear to be the pathways for voltage-dependent Ca influx in vascular smooth muscle and may be the targets of the clinically used dihydropyridines.

  4. Atrial natriuretic factor inhibits mitogen-induced growth in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Baldini, P M; De Vito, P; Fraziano, M; Mattioli, P; Luly, P; Di Nardo, P

    2002-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a polypeptide able to affect cardiovascular homeostasis exhibiting diuretic, natriuretic, and vasorelaxant activities. ANF shows antimitogenic effects in different cell types acting through R(2) receptor. Excessive proliferation of smooth muscle cells is a common phenomenon in diseases such as atherosclerosis, but the role of growth factors in the mechanism which modulate this process has yet to be clarified. The potential antimitogenic role of ANF on the cell growth induced by growth factors appears very intriguing. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of ANF on rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells proliferation induced by known mitogens and the mechanism involved. Our data show that ANF, at physiological concentration range, inhibits RASM cell proliferation induced by known mitogens such as PDGF and insulin, and the effect seems to be elicited through the modulation of phosphatidic acid (PA) production and MAP kinases involvement.

  5. Smooth Muscle Tumor Originating in the Pleura: A Case Report and Updated Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zarubin, Vadim; Zarineh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle tumors (SMTs) of the pleura are exceptionally rare. At present and to the best of these authors' knowledge, there are only 17 cases reported in the literature. We describe a case of a 51-year-old woman who complained of left sided pleuritic chest pain. Further, computed tomography (CT) revealed a left sided localized pleural-based mass involving the 9th rib. She underwent an interventional radiology guided percutaneous core biopsy of the lesion, which disclosed a “Smooth Muscle Tumor of Undetermined Malignant Potential (SMT-UMP).” A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) was performed for diagnosis and treatment purposes. Resections of the pleural-based mass and 9th rib were performed. SMT-UMP was the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27747117

  6. Stimulatory effect of lysophosphatidic acids on uterine smooth muscles of non-pregant rats.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, A; Fukuzawa, K; Yamada, S; Tsukatani, H

    1980-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids stimulated isolated uterine smooth muscle dose-dependently. The contractions were not reduced by pretreatment with atropine or an anti-5-hydroxytryptaminic agent. The potency depended on the nature of the acyl chain in the molecule. Of the compounds with a saturated fatty acyl group tested, the most effective were myristoyl- and lauroyl-lysophosphatidic acid. In a series of unsaturated lysophosphatidic acids, the potency increased with the number of cis double bonds in the acyl chain, and linolenoyl-lysophosphatidic acid was the most active. When injected intravenously, these compounds induced an immediate rise in blood pressure and intrauterine pressure, like prostaglandin F2 alpha: The order of potency of their effects on the intact uterus was consistent with that of their effects on isolated uterine smooth muscle, but not with that of their hypertensive effects in rats.

  7. Prediction of peak forces for a shortening smooth muscle tissue subjected to vibration.

    PubMed

    Pidaparti, Ramana M; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Meiss, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the peak forces for a tracheal smooth muscle tissue subjected to an applied longitudinal vibration following isotonic shortening. A non-linear finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the vibratory response under experimental conditions that corresponds to forced length oscillations at 33 Hz for 1 second. The stiffness change and hysteresis estimated from the experimental data was used in the analysis. The finite element results of peak forces are compared to the experimental data obtained. The comparison of results indicate that the approach and the vibratory response obtained may be useful for describing the cross-bridge de-attachments within the cells as well as connective tissue connections characteristic of tracheal smooth muscle tissue.

  8. The relaxant effect of Nigella sativa on smooth muscles, its possible mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Keyhanmanesh, Rana; Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossien

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) is a spice plant which has been traditionally used for culinary and medicinal purposes. Different therapeutic properties including the beneficial effects on asthma and dyspnea, digestive and gynecology disorders have been described for the seeds of N. sativa. There is evidence of the relaxant effects of this plant and some of its constituents on different types of smooth muscle including rabbit aorta, rabbit jejunum and trachea. The relaxant effect of N. sativa could be of therapeutic importance such as bronchodilation in asthma, vasodilation in hypertension and therapeutic effect on digestive or urogenital disorders. Therefore in the present article, the relaxant effects of N. sativa and its constituents on smooth muscles and its possible mechanisms as well as clinical application of this effect were reviewed. PMID:25859297

  9. Characterization of bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice expressing mCherry fluorescent protein substituted for the murine smooth muscle-alpha-actin gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smooth muscle a actin (SMA) is a cytoskeletal protein expressed by mesenchymal and smooth muscle cell types, including mural cells(vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes). Using Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) recombineering technology, we generated transgenic reporter mice that express a ...

  10. BMP-2 gene expression and effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Willette, R N; Gu, J L; Lysko, P G; Anderson, K M; Minehart, H; Yue, T

    1999-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their serine/threonine kinase receptors have been identified in atherosclerotic arteries and vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Thus, BMPs (the largest subfamily of the TGF-beta superfamily) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the origins of BMP biosynthesis and the functional roles of BMP in blood vessels are unclear. The present study explored BMP-2 gene expression in various human blood vessels and vascular cell types. Functional in vitro studies were also performed to determine the effects of recombinant human BMP-2 on migration (transwell assay) and proliferation ([3H]-thymidine incorporation) of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HASMC). RT-PCR experiments revealed BMP-2 gene expression in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries as well as cultured human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human macrophages. In cellular migration studies, incubation with BMP-2 produced efficacious (smooth muscle cell response to vascular injury. PMID:10213907

  11. Strain history and TGF-β1 induce urinary bladder wall smooth muscle remodeling and elastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Rebecca L.; Parekh, Aron; Joyce, Erinn M.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical cues that trigger pathological remodeling in smooth muscle tissues remain largely unknown and are thought to be pivotal triggers for strain-induced remodeling. Thus, an understanding of the effects mechanical stimulation is important to elucidate underlying mechanisms of disease states and in the development of methods for smooth muscle tissue regeneration. For example, the urinary bladder wall (UBW) adaptation to spinal cord injury (SCI) includes extensive hypertrophy as well as increased collagen and elastin, all of which profoundly alter its mechanical response. In addition, the pro-fibrotic growth factor TGF-β1 is upregulated in pathologies of other smooth muscle tissues and may contribute to pathological remodeling outcomes. In the present study, we utilized an ex vivo organ culture system to investigate the response of UBW tissue under various strain-based mechanical stimuli and exogenous TGF-β1 to assess extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis, mechanical responses, and bladder smooth muscle cell (BSMC) phenotype. Results indicated that a 0.5-Hz strain frequency triangular waveform stimulation at 15% strain resulted in fibrillar elastin production, collagen turnover, and a more compliant ECM. Further, this stretch regime induced changes in cell phenotype while the addition of TGF-β1 altered this phenotype. This phenotypic shift was further confirmed by passive strip biomechanical testing, whereby the bladder groups treated with TGF-β1 were more compliant than all other groups. TGF-β1 increased soluble collagen production in the cultured bladders. Overall, the 0.5-Hz strain-induced remodeling caused increased compliance due to elastogenesis, similar to that seen in early SCI bladders. Thus, organ culture of bladder strips can be used as an experimental model to examine ECM remodeling and cellular phenotypic shift and potentially elucidate BMSCs ability to produce fibrillar elastin using mechanical stretch either alone or in combination with

  12. Strain history and TGF-β1 induce urinary bladder wall smooth muscle remodeling and elastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heise, Rebecca L; Parekh, Aron; Joyce, Erinn M; Chancellor, Michael B; Sacks, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical cues that trigger pathological remodeling in smooth muscle tissues remain largely unknown and are thought to be pivotal triggers for strain-induced remodeling. Thus, an understanding of the effects mechanical stimulation is important to elucidate underlying mechanisms of disease states and in the development of methods for smooth muscle tissue regeneration. For example, the urinary bladder wall (UBW) adaptation to spinal cord injury (SCI) includes extensive hypertrophy as well as increased collagen and elastin, all of which profoundly alter its mechanical response. In addition, the pro-fibrotic growth factor TGF-β1 is upregulated in pathologies of other smooth muscle tissues and may contribute to pathological remodeling outcomes. In the present study, we utilized an ex vivo organ culture system to investigate the response of UBW tissue under various strain-based mechanical stimuli and exogenous TGF-β1 to assess extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis, mechanical responses, and bladder smooth muscle cell (BSMC) phenotype. Results indicated that a 0.5-Hz strain frequency triangular waveform stimulation at 15% strain resulted in fibrillar elastin production, collagen turnover, and a more compliant ECM. Further, this stretch regime induced changes in cell phenotype while the addition of TGF-β1 altered this phenotype. This phenotypic shift was further confirmed by passive strip biomechanical testing, whereby the bladder groups treated with TGF-β1 were more compliant than all other groups. TGF-β1 increased soluble collagen production in the cultured bladders. Overall, the 0.5-Hz strain-induced remodeling caused increased compliance due to elastogenesis, similar to that seen in early SCI bladders. Thus, organ culture of bladder strips can be used as an experimental model to examine ECM remodeling and cellular phenotypic shift and potentially elucidate BMSCs ability to produce fibrillar elastin using mechanical stretch either alone or in combination with

  13. Identification of functionally segregated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jill H; Kinnear, Nicholas P; Kalujnaia, Svetlana; Cramb, Gordon; Fleischer, Sidney; Jeyakumar, Loice H; Wuytack, Frank; Evans, A Mark

    2010-04-30

    In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle, Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) may induce constriction and dilation in a manner that is not mutually exclusive. We show here that the targeting of different sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCA) and RyR subtypes to discrete SR regions explains this paradox. Western blots identified protein bands for SERCA2a and SERCA2b, whereas immunofluorescence labeling of isolated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells revealed striking differences in the spatial distribution of SERCA2a and SERCA2b and RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3, respectively. Almost all SERCA2a and RyR3 labeling was restricted to a region within 1.5 microm of the nucleus. In marked contrast, SERCA2b labeling was primarily found within 1.5 microm of the plasma membrane, where labeling for RyR1 was maximal. The majority of labeling for RyR2 lay in between these two regions of the cell. Application of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 induced global Ca(2+) waves in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, which were markedly attenuated upon depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores by preincubation of cells with the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin but remained unaffected after preincubation of cells with a second SERCA antagonist, cyclopiazonic acid. We conclude that functionally segregated SR Ca(2+) stores exist within pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. One sits proximal to the plasma membrane, receives Ca(2+) via SERCA2b, and likely releases Ca(2+) via RyR1 to mediate vasodilation. The other is located centrally, receives Ca(2+) via SERCA2a, and likely releases Ca(2+) via RyR3 and RyR2 to initiate vasoconstriction.

  14. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  15. Antimuscarinic action of liriodenine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, in canine tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lin, C H; Yang, C M; Ko, F N; Wu, Y C; Teng, C M

    1994-12-01

    1. The antimuscarinic properties of liriodenine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, were compared with methoctramine (cardioselective M2 antagonist) and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP, smooth muscle selective M3 antagonist) by radioligand binding tests, functional tests and measurements of second messenger generation in canine cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells. 2. Liriodenine, pirenzepine, methoctramine and 4-DAMP displaced [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) binding in a concentration-dependent manner with Ki values of 2.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(-6), 3.3 +/- 0.7 x 10(-7), 8.9 +/- 2.3 x 10(-8) and 2.3 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M, respectively. The curves for competitive inhibition of [3H]-NMS with liriodenine, methoctramine and 4-DAMP were best fitted according to a two site model of binding, but pirenzepine was best fitted according to a model with one site. 3. Liriodenine and 4-DAMP displayed a high affinity for blocking tracheal contraction (pKB = 5.9 and 9.1, respectively) and inositol phosphate formation (pKB = 6.0 and 8.9, respectively), but a low affinity for antagonism of cyclic AMP inhibition (pKB = 4.7 and 7.8, respectively). 4. Methoctramine blocked cyclic AMP inhibition with a high affinity (pKB = 7.4), but it antagonized tracheal contraction and inositol phosphate formation with a low affinity (pKB = 6.1 and 6.0, respectively). 5. In conclusion, both M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes coexist in canine tracheal smooth muscle and are coupled to the inhibition of cyclic AMP formation and phosphoinositide breakdown, respectively. The antimuscarinic characteristics of liriodenine are similar to those of 4-DAMP. It may act as a selective M3 receptor antagonist in canine tracheal smooth muscle.

  16. Antimuscarinic action of liriodenine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, in canine tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C H; Yang, C M; Ko, F N; Wu, Y C; Teng, C M

    1994-01-01

    1. The antimuscarinic properties of liriodenine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, were compared with methoctramine (cardioselective M2 antagonist) and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP, smooth muscle selective M3 antagonist) by radioligand binding tests, functional tests and measurements of second messenger generation in canine cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells. 2. Liriodenine, pirenzepine, methoctramine and 4-DAMP displaced [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) binding in a concentration-dependent manner with Ki values of 2.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(-6), 3.3 +/- 0.7 x 10(-7), 8.9 +/- 2.3 x 10(-8) and 2.3 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) M, respectively. The curves for competitive inhibition of [3H]-NMS with liriodenine, methoctramine and 4-DAMP were best fitted according to a two site model of binding, but pirenzepine was best fitted according to a model with one site. 3. Liriodenine and 4-DAMP displayed a high affinity for blocking tracheal contraction (pKB = 5.9 and 9.1, respectively) and inositol phosphate formation (pKB = 6.0 and 8.9, respectively), but a low affinity for antagonism of cyclic AMP inhibition (pKB = 4.7 and 7.8, respectively). 4. Methoctramine blocked cyclic AMP inhibition with a high affinity (pKB = 7.4), but it antagonized tracheal contraction and inositol phosphate formation with a low affinity (pKB = 6.1 and 6.0, respectively). 5. In conclusion, both M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes coexist in canine tracheal smooth muscle and are coupled to the inhibition of cyclic AMP formation and phosphoinositide breakdown, respectively. The antimuscarinic characteristics of liriodenine are similar to those of 4-DAMP. It may act as a selective M3 receptor antagonist in canine tracheal smooth muscle. PMID:7889303

  17. Digital Imaging Fluorescence Microscopy Reveals Intracellular Calcium Ions In Living Cardiac And Smooth Muscle Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil Wier, W.; Goldman, William F.

    1988-06-01

    We have used digital video microscopy to study the relationship of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) to the function of living cardiac and vascular smooth muscle cells. The technical goal of our work is to obtain, with high spatial and temporal resolution, "maps" of [Ca2+]i inside single living cells. To relate [Ca2+]i to cell function, such "maps" can be used in conjunction with measurements of cell electrical activity, contractile activity or biochemical assays.

  18. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.; Wagner, W.D.; Owens, R.T. )

    1990-03-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with (35S)sulfate and (3H)serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in (35S)sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of (3H)serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion.

  19. Calcifying nanoparticles promote mineralization in vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Larry W; Charlesworth, Jon E; Yu, Sam; Lieske, John C; Miller, Virginia M

    2014-01-01

    Background Nano-sized complexes of calcium phosphate mineral and proteins (calcifying nanoparticles [CNPs]) serve as mineral chaperones. Thus, CNPs may be both a result and cause of soft tissue calcification processes. This study determined if CNPs could augment calcification of arterial vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. Methods CNPs 210 nm in diameter were propagated in vitro from human serum. Porcine aortic smooth muscle cells were cultured for up to 28 days in medium in the absence (control) or presence of 2 mM phosphate ([P] positive calcification control) or after a single 3-day exposure to CNPs. Transmission electron-microscopy was used to characterize CNPs and to examine their cellular uptake. Calcium deposits were visualized by light microscopy and von Kossa staining and were quantified by colorimetry. Cell viability was quantified by confocal microscopy of live-/dead-stained cells and apoptosis was examined concurrently by fluorescent labeling of exposed phosphatidylserine. Results CNPs, as well as smaller calcium crystals, were observed by transmission electron-microscopy on day 3 in CNP-treated but not P-treated cells. By day 28, calcium deposits were visible in similar amounts within multicellular nodules of both CNP- and P-treated cells. Apoptosis increased with cell density under all treatments. CNP treatment augmented the density of apoptotic bodies and cellular debris in association with mineralized multicellular nodules. Conclusion Exogenous CNPs are taken up by aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro and potentiate accumulation of smooth-muscle-derived apoptotic bodies at sites of mineralization. Thus, CNPs may accelerate vascular calcification. PMID:24920905

  20. Immunolocalization of BMP-6, a novel TGF-beta-related cytokine, in normal and atherosclerotic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Schluesener, H J; Meyermann, R

    1995-03-01

    We have analyzed expression of a novel transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta)-related cytokine, bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) in normal and atherosclerotic brain arteries. BMP-6 immunoreactivity was detected in smooth muscle cells of normal cerebral blood vessels. It is also expressed by smooth muscle cells of intimal plaques in atherosclerotically changed blood vessels. The BMPs regulate tissue modeling and remodeling and aberrant expression of BMPs might contribute to smooth muscle cell migration, proliferation, tissue reorganization and macrophage attraction, which are known mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque formation. PMID:7605353

  1. Long-Term Expression of Human Adenosine Deaminase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats: A Model for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Carmel M.; Clowes, Monika M.; Osborne, William R. A.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Dusty Miller, A.

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli β-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  2. Hippo signaling is required for Notch-dependent smooth muscle differentiation of neural crest

    PubMed Central

    Manderfield, Lauren J.; Aghajanian, Haig; Engleka, Kurt A.; Lim, Lillian Y.; Liu, Feiyan; Jain, Rajan; Li, Li; Olson, Eric N.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling has well-defined roles in the assembly of arterial walls and in the development of the endothelium and smooth muscle of the vasculature. Hippo signaling regulates cellular growth in many tissues, and contributes to regulation of organ size, in addition to other functions. Here, we show that the Notch and Hippo pathways converge to regulate smooth muscle differentiation of the neural crest, which is crucial for normal development of the aortic arch arteries and cranial vasculature during embryonic development. Neural crest-specific deletion of the Hippo effectors Yap and Taz produces neural crest precursors that migrate normally, but fail to produce vascular smooth muscle, and Notch target genes such as Jagged1 fail to activate normally. We show that Yap is normally recruited to a tissue-specific Jagged1 enhancer by directly interacting with the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). The Yap-NICD complex is recruited to chromatin by the DNA-binding protein Rbp-J in a Tead-independent fashion. Thus, Hippo signaling can modulate Notch signaling outputs, and components of the Hippo and Notch pathways physically interact. Convergence of Hippo and Notch pathways by the mechanisms described here might be relevant for the function of these signaling cascades in many tissues and in diseases such as cancer. PMID:26253400

  3. Globular adiponectin reduces vascular calcification via inhibition of ER-stress-mediated smooth muscle cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Yueru; Bai, Rui; Wang, Jiapu; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the mechanism of globular adiponectin inhibiting vascular calcification. Methods: We established drug-induced rat vascular calcification model, globular adiponectin was given to observe the effect of globular Adiponectin on the degree of calcification. The markers of vascular calcification and apoptosis were also investigated. Meanwhile, the in vitro effect of globular Adiponectin on vascular calcification was also evaluated using primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Results: We found that globular adiponectin could inhibit drug-induced rat vascular calcification significantly in vivo. The apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was also reduced. The possible mechanism could be the down-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by globular adiponectin. Experiments in primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells also confirmed that globular adiponectin could reduce cell apoptosis to suppress vascular calcification via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusions: This study confirmed that globular adiponectin could suppress vascular calcification; one of the mechanisms could be inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress to reduce cell apoptosis. It could provide an effective method in the therapy of vascular calcification-associated diseases. PMID:26045760

  4. Endothelin B receptors on human endothelial and smooth-muscle cells show equivalent binding pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M A; Haleen, S J; Welch, K M; Cheng, X M; Reynolds, E E

    1998-07-01

    We have described the pharmacologic profiles of endothelin B receptors in human endothelial cells and vascular and nonvascular smooth-muscle cells. First, by amplifying endothelin B receptor numbers through the use of phosphoramidon and intact cell-binding techniques, we demonstrated the presence of these receptors in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (100% endothelin B receptors), human aortic smooth-muscle cells (22% endothelin B, 78% endothelin A receptors), and human bronchial smooth-muscle cells (55% endothelin B, 45% endothelin A receptors) by using [125I]-endothelin-1 radioligand binding. The typical binding profiles of the endothelin B receptors were established through competition binding curve analysis with endothelin-1, endothelin-3, sarafotoxin 6c, and the endothelin A receptor-selective antagonist BQ-123. In the presence of BQ-123, a diverse group of antagonists, including PD 142893, BQ-788, SB 209670, and Ro 47-0203, were used to probe for binding differences indicative of multiple endothelin B-receptor subtypes. The results indicate a rank order of potency for the antagonists of BQ-788 > SB 209670 > PD 142893 > Ro 47-0203 for each cell line, and that between any of these human cell lines, measurements of [125I]-endothelin-1-binding antagonism for each of the four test compounds differed by less than twofold. Although this study cannot discount the possibility of more than one endothelin B-receptor subtype in humans, it does indicate that these tissues express receptors that show equivalent binding pharmacology. PMID:9676729

  5. Smooth muscle BK channel activity influences blood pressure independent of vascular tone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Gregor; Faulhaber, Jörg; Seniuk, Anika; Ehmke, Heimo; Pongs, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is an important determinant of vascular tone and contributes to blood pressure regulation. Both activities depend on the ancillary BKβ1 subunit. To determine the significance of smooth muscle BK channel activity for blood pressure regulation, we investigated the potential link between changes in arterial tone and altered blood pressure in BKβ1 knockout (BKβ1−/−) mice from three different genetically defined strains. While vascular tone was consistently increased in all BKβ1−/− mice independent of genetic background, BKβ1−/− strains exhibited increased (strain A), unaltered (strain B) or decreased (strain C) mean arterial blood pressures compared to their corresponding BKβ1+/+ controls. In agreement with previous data on aldosterone regulation by renal/adrenal BK channel function, BKβ1−/− strain A mice have increased plasma aldosterone and increased blood pressure. Consistently, blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors by spironolactone treatment reversibly restored the elevated blood pressure to the BKβ1+/+ strain A level. In contrast, loss of BKβ1 did not affect plasma aldosterone in strain C mice. Smooth muscle-restricted restoration of BKβ1 expression increased blood pressure in BKβ1−/− strain C mice, implying that impaired smooth muscle BK channel activity lowers blood pressure in these animals. We conclude that BK channel activity directly affects vascular tone but influences blood pressure independent of this effect via different pathways. PMID:24687584

  6. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Sai, Wen-Bo; Yu, Meng-Fei; Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  7. Orai1 forms a signal complex with BKCa channel in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meihua; Li, Jie; Jiang, Feifei; Fu, Jie; Xia, Xianming; Du, Juan; Hu, Min; Huang, Junhao; Shen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Orai1, a specific nonvoltage-gated Ca(2+) channel, has been found to be one of key molecules involved in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Orai1 may associate with other proteins to form a signaling complex, which is essential for regulating a variety of physiological functions. In this study, we studied the possible interaction between Orai1 and large conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel (BKC a). Using RNA interference technique, we demonstrated that the SOCE and its associated membrane hyperpolarization were markedly suppressed after knockdown of Orai1 with a specific Orai1 siRNA in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle. Moreover, isometric tension measurements showed that agonist-induced vasocontraction was increased after Orai1 was knocked down or the tissue was incubated with BKC a blocker iberiotoxin. Coimmunoprecipitation data revealed that BKC a and Orai1 could reciprocally pull down each other. In situ proximity ligation assay further demonstrated that Orai1 and BKC a are in close proximity. Taken together, these results indicate that Orai1 physically associates with BKC a to form a signaling complex in the rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle. Ca(2+) influx via Orai1 stimulates BKC a, leading to membrane hyperpolarization. This hyperpolarizing effect of Orai1-BKC a coupling could contribute to reduce agonist-induced membrane depolarization, therefore preventing excessive contraction of the rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle in response to contractile agonists.

  8. Extracellular matrix of smooth muscle cells: interaction of collagen type V with heparan sulfate proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, S.; Hoeoek, M.; Gay, R.E.; Magargal, W.W.; Reynertson, R.H.

    1986-03-05

    Alteration in the extracellular matrix produced by smooth muscle cells may play a role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Consequently the authors have initiated studies on the structural organization of the extracellular matrix produced by cultured smooth muscle cells. Immunohisotological examination of this matrix using well-characterized mono- and polyclonal antibodies showed a partial codistribution of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans with a number of different matrix components including collagen types I, III, IV, V and VI, laminin and fibronectin. Subsequent binding studies between isolated matrix proteins and HS showed that the polysaccharide interacts strongly with type V collagen and to a lesser extent with fibronectin as well as collagen types III and VI. The interaction between type V and HS was readily inhibited by heparin and highly sulfated HS but not be dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate or HS with a low sulfate content. Furthermore, (/sup 35/S)-HS proteoglycans isolated from cultured smooth muscle cells could be adsorbed on a column of sepharose conjugated with native type V collagen and eluted in a salt gradient. Hence, the interaction between type V and HS may play a major part in stabilizing the extracellular matrix of the vessel wall.

  9. Guiding the orientation of smooth muscle cells on random and aligned polyurethane/collagen nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Qin, Xiaohong; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-09-01

    Fabricating scaffolds that can simulate the architecture and functionality of native extracellular matrix is a huge challenge in vascular tissue engineering. Various kinds of materials are engineered via nano-technological approaches to meet the current challenges in vascular tissue regeneration. During this study, nanofibers from pure polyurethane and hybrid polyurethane/collagen in two different morphologies (random and aligned) and in three different ratios of polyurethane:collagen (75:25; 50:50; 25:75) are fabricated by electrospinning. The fiber diameters of the nanofibrous scaffolds are in the range of 174-453 nm and 145-419 for random and aligned fibers, respectively, where they closely mimic the nanoscale dimensions of native extracellular matrix. The aligned polyurethane/collagen nanofibers expressed anisotropic wettability with mechanical properties which is suitable for regeneration of the artery. After 12 days of human aortic smooth muscle cells culture on different scaffolds, the proliferation of smooth muscle cells on hybrid polyurethane/collagen (3:1) nanofibers was 173% and 212% higher than on pure polyurethane scaffolds for random and aligned scaffolds, respectively. The results of cell morphology and protein staining showed that the aligned polyurethane/collagen (3:1) scaffold promote smooth muscle cells alignment through contact guidance, while the random polyurethane/collagen (3:1) also guided cell orientation most probably due to the inherent biochemical composition. Our studies demonstrate the potential of aligned and random polyurethane/collagen (3:1) as promising substrates for vascular tissue regeneration.

  10. Phenotypic heterogeneity influences the behavior of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in collagen lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandi, Augusto . E-mail: orlandi@uniroma2.it; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Gabbiani, Giulio; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Ehrlich, Paul H.

    2005-12-10

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in atherosclerosis and restenosis involves responses to the surrounding microenvironment. SMCs obtained by enzymatic digestion from tunica media of newborn, young adult (YA) and old rats and from the thickened intima (TI) and underlying media of young adult rat aortas 15 days after ballooning were entrapped in floating populated collagen lattice (PCL). TI-SMCs elongated but were poor at PCL contraction and remodeling and expressed less {alpha}2 integrin compared to other SMCs that appeared more dendritic. During early phases of PCL contraction, SMCs showed a marked decrease in the expression of {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. SMCs other than TI-SMCs required 7 days to re-express {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. Only TI-SMCs in PCL were able to divide in 48 h, with a greater proportion in S and G2-M cell cycle phases compared to other SMCs. Anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibody markedly inhibited contraction but not proliferation in YA-SMC-PLCs; anti-{alpha}1 and anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibodies induced a similar slight inhibition in TI-SMC-PCLs. Finally, TI-SMCs rapidly migrated from PCL on plastic reacquiring their epithelioid phenotype. Heterogeneity in proliferation and cytoskeleton as well the capacity to remodel the extracellular matrix are maintained, when SMCs are suspended in PCLs.

  11. Laminin alpha5 chain is required for intestinal smooth muscle development.

    PubMed

    Bolcato-Bellemin, Anne Laure; Lefebvre, Olivier; Arnold, Christiane; Sorokin, Lydia; Miner, Jeffrey H; Kedinger, Michèle; Simon-Assmann, Patricia

    2003-08-15

    Laminins (comprised of alpha, beta, and gamma chains) are heterotrimeric glycoproteins integral to all basement membranes. The function of the laminin alpha5 chain in the developing intestine was defined by analysing laminin alpha5(-/-) mutants and by grafting experiments. We show that laminin alpha5 plays a major role in smooth muscle organisation and differentiation, as excessive folding of intestinal loops and delay in the expression of specific markers are observed in laminin alpha5(-/-) mice. In the subepithelial basement membrane, loss of alpha5 expression was paralleled by ectopic or accelerated deposition of laminin alpha2 and alpha4 chains; this may explain why no obvious defects were observed in the villous form and enterocytic differentiation. This compensation process is attributable to mesenchyme-derived molecules as assessed by chick/mouse alpha5(-/-) grafted associations. Lack of the laminin alpha5 chain was accompanied by a decrease in epithelial alpha3beta1 integrin receptor expression adjacent to the epithelial basement membrane and of Lutheran blood group glycoprotein in the smooth muscle cells, indicating that these receptors are likely mediating interactions with laminin alpha5-containing molecules. Taken together, the data indicate that the laminin alpha5 chain is essential for normal development of the intestinal smooth muscle and point to possible mesenchyme-derived compensation to promote normal intestinal morphogenesis when laminin alpha5 is absent.

  12. Smooth Muscle Cells of Penis in the Rat: Noninvasive Quantification with Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Jie; Qiao, Xiao-Hui; Gao, Feng; Bai, Ming; Li, Fan; Du, Lian-Fang; Xing, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of cavernosum play an important role in erection. It is of great significance to quantitatively analyze the level of SMCs in penis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of shear wave elastography (SWE) on evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively. Materials and Methods. Twenty healthy male rats were selected. The SWE imaging of penis was carried out and then immunohistochemistry analysis of penis was performed to analyze the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin in penis. The measurement index of SWE examination was tissue stiffness (TS). The measurement index of immunohistochemistry analysis was positive area percentage of alpha smooth muscle actin (AP). Results. Sixty sets of data of TS and AP were obtained. The results showed that TS was significantly correlated with AP and the correlation coefficient was −0.618 (p < 0.001). The result of TS had been plotted against the AP measurements. The relation between the two results has been fitted with quadric curve; the goodness-of-fit index was 0.364 (p < 0.001). Conclusions. The level of SMCs in penis was successfully quantified in vivo with SWE. SWE can be used clinically for evaluating the level of SMCs in penis quantitatively. PMID:26550573

  13. Changes in neuroreceptor function of tracheal smooth muscle following acute ozone exposure of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    van Hoof, H J; Voss, H P; Kramer, K; Boere, A J; Dormans, J A; van Bree, L; Bast, A

    1997-07-11

    We studied the effect of in vivo ozone inhalation (3 ppm, 2 h) on neuroreceptor function in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle in vitro and the role of the epithelial layer in this process. Changes in smooth muscle tension after stimulation of the muscarinic- and beta-adrenergic receptor were recorded isometrically and stained tracheal tissue sections were histologically evaluated for changes in the epithelial and smooth muscle layer. Ozone exposure resulted in an increase in maximal contraction following stimulation of the muscarinic receptor, whereas pD2 values remained unchanged. After stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor no increase in maximal relaxation but only an increase in pD2 value was observed after correction for differences in precontraction level in control- and ozone-exposed situations. Mechanical removal of the epithelial layer resulted in a slight increase of the maximal contraction level after stimulation with methacholine in the control situation, whereas exposure to ozone resulted in a strong decrease of the maximal contraction level under these conditions. Histological stainings showed a slight and focal influx of neutrophilic granulocytes in the epithelial layer, submucosal layer and airway lumen after exposure to ozone. These data support the idea that ozone is able to increase the maximal degree of airway narrowing upon muscarinergic stimulation, i.e. a hyperreactivity response. The results also suggest that functionally altered epithelium plays an important role in the process of ozone-induced hyperreactivity, possibly linked with an early inflammatory response.

  14. Surface modifications of photocrosslinked biodegradable elastomers and their influence on smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ilagan, Bernadette G; Amsden, Brian G

    2009-09-01

    Photocrosslinked, biodegradable elastomers based on aliphatic polyesters have many desirable features as scaffolds for smooth muscle tissue engineering. However, they lack cell adhesion motifs. To address this shortcoming, two different modification procedures were studied utilizing a high and a low crosslink density elastomer: base etching and the incorporation of acryloyl-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) into the elastomer network during photocrosslinking. Base etching improved surface hydrophilicity without altering surface topography, but did not improve bovine aortic smooth muscle cell adhesion. Incorporation of PEG-GRGDS into the elastomer network significantly improved cell adhesion for both high and low crosslink density elastomers, with a greater effect with the higher crosslink density elastomer. Incorporation of GRGDS into the high crosslink density elastomer also enhanced smooth muscle cell proliferation, while proliferation on the low crosslink density unmodified, base etched, and PEG-GRGDS incorporated elastomers was significantly greater than on the high crosslink density unmodified and base etched elastomer. PMID:19375999

  15. Angiotensin II induces monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Tummala, P E; Olbrych, M T; Alexander, R W; Medford, R M

    1998-11-01

    Monocyte infiltration into the vessel wall, a key initial step in the process of atherosclerosis, is mediated in part by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Hypertension, particularly in the presence of an activated renin-angiotensin system, is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate a potential molecular basis for a link between hypertension and atherosclerosis, we studied the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on MCP-1 gene expression in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Rat smooth muscle cells treated with Ang II exhibited a dose-dependent increase in MCP-1 mRNA accumulation that was prevented by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan. Ang II also activated MCP-1 gene transcription. Inhibition of NADH/NADPH oxidase, which generates superoxide and H2O2, with diphenylene iodonium or apocynin decreased Ang II-induced MCP-1 mRNA accumulation. Induction of MCP-1 gene expression by Ang II was inhibited by catalase, suggesting a second messenger role for H2O2. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD098059 inhibited Ang II-induced MCP-1 gene expression, consistent with a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling mechanism. Ang II may thus promote atherogenesis by direct activation of MCP-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  16. Allosteric interactions of three muscarine antagonists at bovine tracheal smooth muscle and cardiac M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of [3H]dexetimide dissociation from muscarine receptors in bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes were studied in the absence and presence of three muscarine antagonists. It was found that [3H]dexetimide dissociation from cardiac muscarine receptors was monophasic and very fast (half life less than 1 min) and was slowed by the cardioselective muscarine antagonists, gallamine, methoctramine and AF-DX 116, concentration dependently. [3H]Dexetimide dissociation from tracheal muscarine receptors was biphasic, with a fast phase (half-life less than 1 min) followed after 4-5 min by a slow phase (half-life = 38.5 min). The fast component, but not the slow component, was slowed by the muscarine antagonists with concentration dependencies very similar to those found in the heart. We conclude from these data that the major population of tracheal smooth muscle muscarine receptors resembles the cardiac M2 type not only with respect to equilibrium binding affinities but also with respect to the secondary, allosteric binding site on the muscarine receptor. The results also imply that the cardiac receptor subtype is much more sensitive to allosteric modulation than the glandular/smooth muscle receptor subtype. PMID:2714370

  17. Smooth Muscle Precursor Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Yan Hui; Wei, Yi; Green, Morgaine; Wani, Prachi; Zhang, Pengbo; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in using stem cells (SC) to regenerate a deficient urethral sphincter in patients with urinary incontinence. The smooth muscle component of the sphincter is a significant contributor to sphincter function. However, current translational efforts for sphincter muscle restoration focus only on skeletal muscle regeneration because they rely on adult mesenchymal SC as cell source. These adult SC do not yield sufficient smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for transplantation. We may be able to overcome this limitation by using pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to derive SMCs. Hence, we sought to investigate whether smooth muscle precursor cells (pSMCs) derived from human PSCs can restore urethral function in an animal model generated by surgical urethrolysis and ovariectomy. Rats were divided into four groups: control (no intervention), sham saline (surgery + saline injection), bladder SMC (surgery + human bladder SMC injection), and treatment (surgery + pSMC injection, which includes human embryonic stem cell (hESC) H9-derived pSMC, episomal reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived pSMC, or viral reprogrammed iPSC-derived pSMC). pSMCs (2 × 106 cells/rat) were injected periurethrally 3 weeks postsurgery. Leak point pressure (LPP) and baseline external urethral sphincter electromyography were measured 5 weeks postinjection. Both iPSC-derived pSMC treatment groups showed significantly higher LPP compared to the sham saline group, consistent with restoration of urethral sphincter function. While the difference between the H9-derived pSMC treatment and sham saline group was not significant, it did show a trend toward restoration of the LPP to the level of intact controls. Our data indicate that pSMCs derived from human PSCs (hESC and iPSC) can restore sphincter function. PMID:26785911

  18. Roles of protein kinase C on the mechanical activity of vascular smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Itoh, T; Fujiwara, T; Kubota, Y; Nishiye, E; Kuriyama, H

    1990-08-01

    We investigated the role of protein kinase C in the mechanical responses evoked by high K or by acetylcholine (ACh) in intact vascular smooth muscle tissues, and by Ca in skinned vascular smooth muscle tissues. To activate protein kinase C, the phorbol ester 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent tumor promoter, or 1,2-diolein, plus phosphatidylserine (PS) was used. TPA enhanced or reduced the amplitude of the contraction evoked by increased concentrations of K below 39 mmol/L or over 90 mmol/L, respectively, but consistently enhanced the resting tension at any given concentration of high K. Similar effects of TPA were observed on the Ca-induced contraction in saponin skinned muscle tissues. The enhancing action of TPA on the K-induced contraction was not related to activation of either the voltage-dependent Ca channel or the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and did not occur in the case of Ca-independent contraction in skinned muscle tissues. During the enhancement of the contraction induced by TPA, the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and the shortening velocity of contraction as measured using the slack test, were enhanced with no remarkable change in the free Ca concentration in the cytosol. TPA consistently inhibited the ACH-induced contraction accompanied by a marked reduction in free Ca due to inhibition of the hydrolysis of phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Under the assumption that TPA possesses the same action as DG, activation of protein kinase C increased the Ca sensitivity of contractile proteins in vascular smooth muscles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Modulation of canine antral circular smooth muscle by acetylcholine, noradrenaline and pentagastrin.

    PubMed

    el-Sharkawy, T Y; Szurszewski, J H

    1978-06-01

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, noradrenaline and pentagastrin on the action potential of canine antral circular muscle were determined using the intracellular micro-electrode technique. 2. Acetylcholine increased the amplitude and duration of the plateau potential of the action potential. Since these effects were blocked by atropine but not by hexamethonium, the effects of acetylcholine were on muscarinic receptors, probably located on the smooth muscle cell. 3. Pentagastrin 2 x 10(-10) M increased the size of the plateau potential and the frequency of the action potential; pentagastrin 1 x 10(-9) M increased the frequency of the action potential complex and produced a marked diastolic depolarization between action potentials. The effect on the size of the plateau potential was biphasic. The amplitude and half-time duration of the plateau potential increased in the first 3 min, but thereafter, during steady-state conditions, they were the same as or slightly greater than those obtained in Krebs solution. 4. All the effects produced by pentagastrin were due to a direct action on the smooth muscle cell. 5. Noradrenaline decreased the size of the plateau potential but increased its frequency; high concentrations (greater than 10(-5) M) additionally produced a diastolic depolarization between action potentials. These effects were mediated primarily by alpha-adrenoceptors presumably located on the smooth muscle cell. 6. It was concluded that the substances studied primarily alter the size of the plateau potential in antral circular muscle. Since phasic contractions are associated with the plateau potential, it is suggested that agents which increase the size of the plateau potential increase the force of the contraction whereas agents which decrease the size of the plateau potential have the opposite effect.

  20. Characteristics of Ca2+- and Mg2+-induced tension development in chemically skinned smooth muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Chemically skinned fibers from guinea pig taenia caecum were prepared by saponin treatment to study the smooth muscle contractile system in a state as close to the living state as posible. The skinned fibers showed tension development with an increase of Ca2+ in the solution, the threshold tension occurring as 5 X 10(-7) M Ca2+. The maximal tension induced with 10(-4) M Ca2+ was as large and rapid as the potassium-induced contracture in the intact fibers. The slope of the pCa tension curve was less steep than that of skeletal muscle fibers and shifted in the direction of lower pCa with an increase of MgATP. The presence of greater than 1 mM Mg2+ was required for Ca2+-induced contraction in the skinned fibers as well as for the activation of ATPase and superprecipitation in smooth muscle myosin B. Mg2+ above 2 mM caused a slow tension development by itself in the absence of Ca2+. Such a Mg2+-induced tension showed a linear relation to concentrations up to 8 mM in the presence of MgATP. Increase of MgATP concentration revealed a monophasic response without inhibition of Ca2+-induced tension development, unlike the biphasic response in striated muscle. When MgATP was removed from the relaxing solution, the tension developed slowly and slightly, even though the Mg2+ concentrations was fixed at 2 mM. These results suggest a substantial difference in the mode of actin-myosin interaction between smooth and skeletal muscle. PMID:151731

  1. Inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction and myosin phosphorylation by ryanodine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerthoffer, W.T.; Murphey, K.A.; Khoyi, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that muscarinic activation of airway smooth muscle in low Ca++ solutions increases myosin phosphorylation without increasing tension. Blocking Ca++ influx reduced phosphorylation, but not to basal levels. It was proposed that release of intracellular Ca++ contributed to dissociation of phosphorylation and contraction. To test this hypothesis the effects of ryanodine were studied under similar conditions. Ryanodine (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) antagonized caffeine-induced contraction of canine tracheal smooth muscle. Ryanodine also reduced carbachol-induced contractions and carbachol-induced myosin phosphorylation. The effect of ryanodine on potassium and serotonin-induced contractions was also investigated to test for a nonspecific inhibitory effect. In contrast to the effect on carbachol responses, ryanodine (10(-5) M) potentiated the contractile response to low concentrations of serotonin and potassium, but had no effect on the maximum response to either stimulant. Carbachol (10(-6) M) and ryanodine (10(-5) M) both significantly decreased /sup 45/Ca++ content of tracheal muscle. The effect of ryanodine and carbachol together on /sup 45/Ca++ content was not greater than either drug alone suggesting that ryanodine reduces the caffeine and carbachol responses by depleting releaseable Ca++ stores. Ryanodine significantly reduced Ca++-induced contraction and myosin phosphorylation in carbachol-stimulated muscle, suggesting that some of the Ca++ responsible for elevated phosphorylation is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  2. Interference with PPARγ Function in Smooth Muscle Causes Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Carmen M.; Beyer, Andreas M.; de Lange, Willem J.; Keen, Henry L.; Baumbach, Gary L.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand activated transcription factor playing a critical role in metabolism. Thiazolidinediones, high affinity PPARγ ligands used clinically to treat type-II diabetes, have been reported to lower blood pressure and provide other cardiovascular benefits. Some mutations in PPARγ cause type-II diabetes and severe hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that PPARγ in vascular muscle plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. Transgenic mice expressing dominant negative mutations in PPARγ under the control of a smooth muscle-specific promoter exhibit a loss of responsiveness to nitric oxide and striking alterations in contractility in the aorta, hypertrophy and inward remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation, and systolic hypertension. These results identify PPARγ as pivotal in vascular muscle as a regulator of vascular structure, vascular function and blood pressure, potentially explaining some of the cardioprotective effects of thiazolidinediones. PMID:18316027

  3. Calcium ion requirement for acetylcholine-stimulated breakdown of triphosphoinositide in rabbit iris smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, R A; Abdel-Latif, A A

    1978-03-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have established that addition of acetylcholine (ACh) or norepinephrine to 32P-labeled rabbit iris smooth muscle increases significantly the breakdown of triphosphoinositide (TPI) and that these stimulatory effects are blocked by atropine and phentolamine, respectively. The present studies were undertaken in order to show the effect of Ca++ on the ACh-stimulated breakdown of TPI ("TPI effect") in this tissue. Paired iris smooth muscles were prelabeled with 32Pi for 30 minutes at 37 degrees C in Ca++-free iso-osmotic salt medium. The prelabeled irises were then washed and incubated for 10 minutes in nonradioactive Ca++-free medium which contained 10 mM 2-deoxyglucose under various conditions. The phospholipids were isolated by means of two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography and their radioactivities were determined. In the absence of Ca++, 50 micrometer ACh increased TPI breakdown and phosphatidic acid (PA) labeling by 16 and 38%, respectively. In the absence of ACh, 0.75 micrometer Ca++ increased TPI breakdown and PA labeling by 11 and 20%, respectively. When both ACh and Ca++ were added, the increase in TPI breakdown and PA labeling rose to 32 and 74%, respectively. The labeling of phosphatidylinositol was found to be insensitive to the presence of Ca++. Ca++ was determined in the iris smooth muscle and it was found to contain 3.13 mumol of Ca++ per g of tissue. This was reduced by 80% after the muscle was washed and incubated in a medium which contained 0.25 micrometer ethyleneglycol bis (beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). The TPI effect was abolished by 0.25 micrometer EGTA and restored when excess Ca++ (1.25 micrometer) was added. Concentrations of Ca++ as low as 50 micrometer provoked a TPI effect. Sr++ (2 micrometer), but not Ba++ or Mn++, was found to substitute partially for Ca++. Ionophore A-23187 (20 micrometer) was found to increase the breakdown of TPI and labeling of PA by 11 and 24

  4. Effects of magnesium chloride on smooth muscle actomyosin adenosine-5'-triphosphatase activity, myosin conformation, and tension development in glycerinated smooth muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, M; Barsotti, R J; Hinkins, S; Hartshorne, D J

    1984-10-01

    The contractile system of smooth muscle exhibits distinctive responses to varying Mg2+ concentrations in that maximum adenosine-5'-triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of actomyosin requires relatively high concentrations of Mg2+ and also that tension in skinned smooth muscle fibers can be induced in the absence of Ca2+ by high Mg2+ concentrations. We have examined the effects of MgCl2 on actomyosin ATPase activity and on tension development in skinned gizzard fibers and suggest that the MgCl2-induced changes may be correlated to shifts in myosin conformation. At low concentrations of free Mg2+ (less than or equal to 1 mM) the actin-activated ATPase activity of phosphorylated turkey gizzard myosin is reduced and is increased as the Mg2+ concentration is raised. The increase in Mg2+ (over a range of 1-10 mM added MgCl2) induces the conversion of 10S phosphorylated myosin to the 6S form, and it was found that the proportion of myosin as 10S is inversely related to the level of actin-activated ATPase activity. Activation of the actin-activated ATPase activity also occurs with dephosphorylated myosin but at higher MgCl2 concentrations, between 10 and 40 mM added MgCl2. Viscosity and fluorescence measurements indicate that increasing Mg2+ levels over this concentration range favor the formation of the 6S conformation of dephosphorylated myosin, and it is proposed that the 10S to 6S transition is a prerequisite for the observed activation of ATPase activity. With glycerinated chicken gizzard fibers high MgCl2 concentrations (6-20 mM) promote tension in the absence of Ca2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. [The effect of prostatic peptides on the contractile activity of smooth-muscle cells from the bladder].

    PubMed

    Barabanova, V V; Gorbachev, A G; Parastaeva, M M; Khavinson, V Kh

    1993-02-01

    Prostatilene (PST) enhanced the functional activity of the bladder smooth-muscle cells (SMC). The possibility of activation of the SMC contractility by the PST through pharmacomechanical associations, is discussed.

  6. [The effect of caldesmon and tropomyosin from smooth muscles on the motility of myosin head in ghost muscle fibers].

    PubMed

    Borovikov, Iu S; Novak, E; Dabrowska, R

    1990-08-01

    The effects of caldesmon and smooth muscle tropomyosin on the motility of myosin subfragment I (SI) modified by N-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(1-naphtyl-5-sulfo)-ethylenediamine (1.5-IAEDANS) was studied in myosin-, troponin- and tropomyosin-free rabbit ghost muscle fibers using the polarized microphotometry technique. It was found that the fluorescence anisotropy initiated by the 1.5-IAEDANS-SI arrangement in the fibers is higher in the presence of tropomyosin than in its absence. Caldesmon diminishes the fluorescence anisotropy of the fibers. Data from a kinetic analysis suggest that the motility of fluorophores in the presence of tropomyosin in thin filaments is markedly decreased. Caldesmon weakens the effect of tropomyosin on the fluorescent label motility. It was supposed that caldesmon and tropomyosin initiate conformational changes in myosin heads which are accompanied by loosening or strengthening of their bonds with F-actin, respectively. Caldesmon inhibits the effect induced by tropomyosin.

  7. The Beta-1-Receptor Blocker Nebivolol Elicits Dilation of Cerebral Arteries by Reducing Smooth Muscle [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    Cseplo, Peter; Vamos, Zoltan; Ivic, Ivan; Torok, Orsolya; Toth, Attila; Koller, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Nebivolol is known to have beta-1 blocker activity, but it was also suggested that it elicits relaxation of the peripheral arteries in part via release of nitric oxide (NO). However, the effect of nebivolol on the vasomotor tone of cerebral arteries is still unclear. Objective To assess the effects of nebivolol on the diameter of isolated rat basilar arteries (BA) in control, in the presence of inhibitors of vasomotor signaling pathways of know action and hemolysed blood. Methods and Results Vasomotor responses were measured by videomicroscopy and the intracellular Ca2+ by the Fura-2 AM ratiometric method. Under control conditions, nebivolol elicited a substantial dilation of the BA (from 216±22 to 394±20 μm; p<0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner (10−7 to 10−4 M). The dilatation was significantly reduced by endothelium denudation or by L-NAME (inhibitor of NO synthase) or by SQ22536 (adenylyl cyclase blocker). Dilatation of BA was also affected by beta-2 receptor blockade with butoxamine, but not by the guanylate cyclase blocker ODQ. Interestingly, beta-1 blockade by atenolol inhibited nebivolol-induced dilation. Also, the BKCa channel blocker iberiotoxin and KCa channel inhibitor TEA significantly reduced nebivolol-induced dilation. Nebivolol significantly reduced smooth muscle Ca2+ level, which correlated with the increases in diameters and moreover it reversed the hemolysed blood-induced constriction of BA. Conclusions Nebivolol seems to have an important dilator effect in cerebral arteries, which is mediated via several vasomotor mechanisms, converging on the reduction of smooth muscle Ca2+ levels. As such, nebivolol may be effective to improve cerebral circulation in various diseased conditions, such as hemorrhage. PMID:27716772

  8. Proofs concerning the existence, in the blood of hypertensive patients, of some serum factors influencing the vascular smooth muscle and the myocardium physiology.

    PubMed

    Mocanu, M; Botea, S; Dragomir, C T

    1991-01-01

    Starting from the existence of some autoimmune diseases (i.e. bronchial asthma or miastenia gravis) we asked ourselves if some plasmatic factors do exist, influencing the receptor--mediator relations in cardiovascular system during some illnesses having unknown etiology, as arterial hypertension. For this reason, in this work was tested the hypothesis that, in some chronic cardiovascular diseases would exist factors circulating and affecting the functions of the cellular membranes of the arterial wall, particularly of the smooth muscle cells and myocardial cells. Our results show a significant modification of the calcium fluxes and of some neuromediators uptake at the hypertensive patients.

  9. The role of K+ conductances in regulating membrane excitability in human gastric corpus smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Ko, Eun-ju; Ahn, Ki Duck; Kim, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) regulate membrane excitability. K+ conductance(s) are one of the main factors in regulating RMP. The functional role of K+ conductances has not been studied the in human gastric corpus smooth muscles (HGCS). To examine the role of K+ channels in regulation of RMP in HGCS we employed microelectrode recordings, patch-clamp, and molecular approaches. Tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin did not affect the RMP, suggesting that BK channels are not involved in regulating RMP. Apamin, a selective small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel (SK) blocker, did not show a significant effect on the membrane excitability. 4-Aminopyridine, a Kv channel blocker, caused depolarization and increased the duration of slow wave potentials. 4-Aminopyridine also inhibited a delayed rectifying K+ current in isolated smooth muscle cells. End-product RT-PCR gel detected Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 in human gastric corpus muscles. Glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) blocker, did not induce depolarization, but nicorandil, a KATP opener, hyperpolarized HGCS, suggesting that KATP are expressed but not basally activated. Kir6.2 transcript, a pore-forming subunit of KATP was expressed in HGCS. A low concentration of Ba2+, a Kir blocker, induced strong depolarization. Interestingly, Ba2+-sensitive currents were minimally expressed in isolated smooth muscle cells under whole-cell patch configuration. KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) transcript was expressed in HGCS. Unique K+ conductances regulate the RMP in HGCS. Delayed and inwardly rectifying K+ channels are the main candidates in regulating membrane excitability in HGCS. With the development of cell dispersion techniques of interstitial cells, the cell-specific functional significance will require further analysis. PMID:25591864

  10. The Modulation of Potassium Channels in the Smooth Muscle as a Therapeutic Strategy for Disorders of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of smooth muscle contractility contribute to the pathophysiology of important functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. Consequently, drugs that decrease smooth muscle contractility are effective treatments for these diseases. Smooth muscle contraction is mainly triggered by Ca(2+) influx through voltage-dependent channels located in the plasma membrane. Thus, the modulation of the membrane potential results in the regulation of Ca(2+) influx and cytosolic levels. K(+) channels play fundamental roles in these processes. The open probability of K(+) channels increases in response to various stimuli, including membrane depolarization (voltage-gated K(+) [K(V)] channels) and the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels (Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) [K(Ca)] channels). K(+) channel activation is mostly associated with outward K(+) currents that hyperpolarize the membrane and reduce cell excitability and contractility. In addition, some K(+) channels are open at the resting membrane potential values of the smooth muscle cells in some gut segments and contribute to set the resting membrane potential itself. The closure of these channels induces membrane depolarization and smooth muscle contraction. K(V)1.2, 1.5, 2.2, 4.3, 7.4 and 11.1, K(Ca)1.1 and 2.3, and inwardly rectifying type 6K(+) (K(ir)6) channels play the most important functional roles in the gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Activators of all these channels may theoretically relax the gastrointestinal smooth muscle and could therefore be promising new therapeutic options for FGID. The challenge of future drug research and development in this area will be to synthesize molecules selective for the channel assemblies expressed in the gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

  11. Effect of pinaverium bromide on stress-induced colonic smooth muscle contractility disorder in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yun; Liu, Jian-Xiang; Li, Jun-Xia; Xu, Yun-Feng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of pinaverium bromide, a L-type calcium channel blocker with selectivity for the gastrointestinal tract on contractile activity of colonic circular smooth muscle in normal or cold-restraint stressed rats and its possible mechanism. METHODS: Cold-restraint stress was conducted on rats to increase fecal pellets output. Each isolated colonic circular muscle strip was suspended in a tissue chamber containing warm oxygenated Tyrode-Ringer solution. The contractile response to ACh or KCl was measured isometrically on ink-writing recorder. Incubated muscle in different concentrations of pinaverium and the effects of pinaverium were investigated on ACh or KCl-induced contraction. Colon smooth muscle cells were cultured from rats and [Ca2+]i was measured in cell suspension using the Ca2+ fluorescent dye fura-2/AM. RESULTS: During stress, rats fecal pellet output increased 61% (P < 0.01). Stimulated with ACh or KCl, the muscle contractility was higher in stress than that in control. Pinaverium inhibited the increment of [Ca2+]i and the muscle contraction in response to ACh or KCl in a dose dependent manner. A significant inhibition of pinaverium to ACh or KCl induced [Ca2+]i increment was observed at 10-6 mol/L. The IC50 values for inhibition of ACh induced contraction for the stress and control group were 1.66 × 10-6 mol/L and 0.91 × 10-6 mol/L, respectively. The IC50 values for inhibition of KCl induced contraction for the stress and control group were 8.13 × 10-7 mol/L and 3.80 × 10-7 mol/L, respectively. CONCLUSION: Increase in [Ca2+]i of smooth muscle cells is directly related to the generation of contraction force in colon. L-type Ca2+ channels represent the main route of Ca2+ entry. Pinaverium inhibits the calcium influx through L-type channels; decreases the contractile response to many kinds of agonists and regulates the stress-induced colon hypermotility. PMID:12632518

  12. Role played by Prx1-dependent extracellular matrix properties in vascular smooth muscle development in embryonic lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Juliana; Chokshi, Mithil; Aiad, Norman; Sanyal, Sonali; Kawabata, Kimihito C.; Levental, Ilya; Sundararaghavan, Harini G.; Burdick, Jason A.; Janmey, Paul; Miyazono, Kohei; Wells, Rebecca G.; Jones, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although there are many studies focusing on the molecular pathways underlying lung vascular morphogenesis, the extracellular matrix (ECM)–dependent regulation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in vascular smooth muscle development needs better understanding. In this study, we demonstrate that the paired related homeobox gene transcription factor Prx1 maintains the elastic ECM properties, which are essential for vascular smooth muscle precursor cell differentiation. We have found that Prx1null mouse lungs exhibit defective vascular smooth muscle development, downregulated elastic ECM expression, and compromised transforming growth factor (TGF)–β localization and signaling. Further characterization of ECM properties using decellularized lung ECM scaffolds derived from Prx1 mice demonstrated that Prx1 is required to maintain lung ECM stiffness. The results of cell culture using stiffness-controlled 2-D and 3-D synthetic substrates confirmed that Prx1-dependent ECM stiffness is essential for promotion of smooth muscle precursor differentiation for effective TGF-β stimulation. Supporting these results, both decellularized Prx1null lung ECM and Prx1WT (wild type) ECM scaffolds with blocked TGF-β failed to support mesenchymal cell to 3-D smooth muscle cell differentiation. These results suggest a novel ECM-dependent regulatory pathway of lung vascular development wherein Prx1 regulates lung vascular smooth muscle precursor development by coordinating the ECM biophysical and biochemical properties. PMID:26064466

  13. Peroxynitrite resistance of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump in pig coronary artery endothelium and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tracey; Zaib, Farhah; Samson, Sue E; Kwan, Chiu-Yin; Grover, Ashok K

    2004-07-01

    We examined the effects of peroxynitrite pre-treatment on sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) (SERCA) pump in pig coronary artery smooth muscle and endothelium. In saponin-permeabilized cells, smooth muscle showed much greater rates of the SERCA Ca(2+) pump-dependent (45)Ca(2+) uptake/mg protein than did the endothelial cells. Peroxynitrite treatment of cells inhibited the SERCA pump more severely in smooth muscle cells than in endothelial cells. To determine implications of this observation, we next examined the effect of the SERCA pump inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of intact cultured cells. CPA produced cytosolic Ca(2+) transients in cultured endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Pre-treatment with peroxynitrite (200 microM) inhibited the Ca(2+) transients in the smooth muscle but not in the endothelial cells. CPA contracts de-endothelialized artery rings and relaxes precontracted arteries with intact endothelium. Peroxynitrite (250 microM) pre-treatment inhibited contraction in the de-endothelialized artery rings, but not the endothelium-dependent relaxation. Thus, endothelial cells appear to be more resistant than smooth muscle to the effects of peroxynitrite at the levels of SERCA pump activity, CPA-induced Ca(2+) transients in cultured cells, and the effects of CPA on contractility. The greater resistance of endothelium to peroxynitrite may play a protective role in pathological conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion when excess free radicals are produced.

  14. A network of 2-4 nm filaments found in sea urchin smooth muscle. Protein constituents and in situ localization.

    PubMed

    Pureur, R P; Coffe, G; Soyer-Gobillard, M O; de Billy, F; Pudles, J

    1986-01-01

    In this report the coisolation of two proteins from sea urchin smooth muscle of apparent molecular weights (Mr) 54 and 56 kD respectively, as determined on SDS-PAGE, is described. Like the intermediate filament proteins, these two proteins are insoluble in high ionic strength buffer solution. On two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and by immunological methods it is shown that these proteins are not related (by these criteria) to rat smooth muscle desmin (54 kD) or vimentin (56 kD). Furthermore, in conditions where both desmin and vimentin assemble in vitro into 10 nm filaments, the sea urchin smooth muscle proteins do not assemble into filaments. Ultrastructural studies on the sea urchin smooth muscle cell show that the thin and thick filaments organization resembles that described in the vertebrate smooth muscle. However, instead of 10 nm filaments, a network of filaments, 2-4 nm in diameter, is revealed, upon removal of the thin and thick filaments by 0.6 M KCl treatment. By indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and in particular by immunocytochemical electron microscopy studies on the sea urchin smooth muscle cell, it is shown that the antibodies raised against both 54 and 56 kD proteins appear to specifically label these 2-4 nm filaments. These findings indicate that both the 54 and 56 kD proteins might be constituents of this category of filaments. The possible significance of this new cytoskeletal element, that we have named echinonematin filaments, is discussed. PMID:3509996

  15. Muscarinic receptors: evidence for a nonuniform distribution in tracheal smooth muscle and exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Basbaum, C.B.; Grillo, M.A.; Widdicombe, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    Muscarinic receptor distribution in smooth muscle, exocrine glands, and epithelium of the ferret trachea was determined using (3H)propylbenzilylcholine mustard ((3H)PrBCM) binding and autoradiography. Specific, atropine-sensitive (3H)PrBCM binding was quantified autoradiographically in the trachealis muscle (approximately 21 binding sites/microns2), surface epithelium (approximately 6 binding sites/microns2), and submucosal glands (approximately 5 binding sites/microns2). Serous and mucous cells in the glands did not differ in receptor density. Binding sites on gland and epithelial cells were associated with basolateral membranes. In the trachealis muscle, a gradient in receptor density was observed, with outer layers of muscle containing 3 to 10 times more receptors per unit area than inner layers. Receptor distribution in both glands and muscle paralleled the distribution of cholinergic axons. However, at the light microscope level, there was no evidence for the presence of receptor ''hot spots'' related to the position of individual axons. The parallelism in the distribution of axons and receptors suggests the possibility of neural control of the genesis and/or maintenance of receptor distribution in these tissues.

  16. RFamide neuropeptide actions on molluscan proboscis smooth muscle: interactions with primary neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Moulis, A; Huddart, H

    2004-07-01

    The potency (muscle force-generated) of a number of long-chain RFamide neuropeptides was examined in mechanical experiments with the radular-retractor and radular-sac muscles of gastropods Buccinum undatum and Neptunea antiqua. Many of the heptapeptides, octapeptides and the decapeptide LMS were found to induce greater contraction than FMRFamide in both smooth muscles and in both species. RFamide neuropeptides interacted with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in an additive way and RFamide-induced contractions were inhibited by the neuromodulator serotonin. Pre-treatment with a calcium-free saline completely abolished acetylcholine-induced responses but only partially inhibited RFamide responses in the muscles, suggesting that acetylcholine acts to cause influx of extracellular calcium for contraction. In contrast, RFamide neuropeptides may mobilise intracellular calcium to maintain sustained tonic force in calcium-free conditions. This suggests that an additional involvement of a fast calcium channel may be present in the RFamide responses, since loss of the usual superimposed twitch activity is observed. Force regulation in these muscles appears to result from a complex interaction of RFamide neuropeptides with the primary transmitter acetylcholine and the neuromodulator serotonin.

  17. A low-molecular-weight inhibitor of the neutral proteinase from rat intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Carney, I T; Curtis, C G; Kay, J K; Birket, N

    1980-01-01

    1. Rat intestinal smooth muscle was shown to contain endogenous inhibitory activity towards the neutral trypsin-like muscle proteinase described previously [Beynon & Kay (1978) Biochem. J. 173, 291--298]. 2. Comtamination of the muscle tissue by mucosal, blood and pancreatic inhibitors was shown to be unlikely. 3. The inhibitory activity was resolved into high- and low-molecular-weight components. 4. The low-molecular-weight component was purified to homogeneity. It has a molecular weight of approx. 9000 and was stable over the pH range 3--11. 5. It inhibited the muscle proteinase competitively (Ki congruent to t microM), but had no effect on any of the other proteinases tested. 6. Leupeptin also inhibited the muscle proteinase competitively (Ki congruent to 0.3 microM), whereas the low-molecular weight proteins gastrin, glucagon and insulin B-chain had very little effect. 7. A role for a weakly binding inhibitor in modulating the influence of the neutral proteinase on intracellular protein degradation is considered. Images Fig. 4. PMID:7396824

  18. AIDS-Related EBV-Associated Smooth Muscle Tumors: A Review of 64 Published Cases

    PubMed Central

    Purgina, Bibianna; Rao, Uma N. M.; Miettinen, Markku; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The number of reported cases of smooth muscle tumor (SMT) arising in patients with AIDS has been increasing since the mid-1990s. The aim of this study is to characterize the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, pathologic features, prognosis and, management of Epstein-Barr virus-related SMT (EBV-SMT) in patients with AIDS. An English language literature search identified 53 articles including 64 reported cases of EBV-SMT. The majority of these reports involved patients who were young, severely immunosuppressed, and had multifocal tumors. The central nervous system was the most common site to be involved. Histologically, tumors had smooth muscle features and were immunoreactive for muscle markers and all but two tumors demonstrated the presence of EBV by either immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and/or PCR. While mitoses and/or necrosis were used to separate leiomyoma from leiomyosarcoma, these features did not correlate with clinical outcome. Treatment included primarily resection, and less often radiotherapy, chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Overall, EBV-SMTs appear to have variable aggressiveness and clinical outcome and may exhibit a more favorable prognosis compared to conventional leiomyosarcoma. Tumor-related death from EBV-SMT occurred in only 4 of 51 patients. PMID:21437186

  19. A role of stretch-activated potassium currents in the regulation of uterine smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Iain L O; Heyman, Nathanael; Wu, Yi-ying; Barnett, Scott; Ulrich, Craig

    2011-06-01

    Rates of premature birth are alarming and threaten societies and healthcare systems worldwide. Premature labor results in premature birth in over 50% of cases. Preterm birth accounts for three-quarters of infant morbidity and mortality. Children that survive birth before 34 weeks gestation often face life-long disability. Current treatments for preterm labor are wanting. No treatment has been found to be generally effective and none are systematically evaluated beyond 48 h. New approaches to the treatment of preterm labor are desperately needed. Recent studies from our laboratory suggest that the uterine muscle is a unique compartment with regulation of uterine relaxation unlike that of other smooth muscles. Here we discuss recent evidence that the mechanically activated 2-pore potassium channel, TREK-1, may contribute to contraction-relaxation signaling in uterine smooth muscle and that TREK-1 gene variants associated with human labor and preterm labor may lead to a better understanding of preterm labor and its possible prevention. PMID:21642947

  20. [Morphological study of muscle fibers stained red by modified Gomori trichrome staining with special reference to smooth red fibers].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K

    1997-03-01

    The modified Gomori trichrome stain of muscles can demonstrate ragged red fibers which are irregular in outline and display a thick and irregular red subsarcolemmal layer and intermyofibrillar red deposits. Typical ragged red fibers are often encountered in mitochondrial myopathy. On the other hand, we have noticed fibers outlined by a thin red subsarcolemmal layer. These fibers are smooth in outline. The sarcoplasm shows normal intermyofibrillar network. We defined these fibers as "smooth red fibers". To investigate the pathological significance of the smooth red fibers, we studied morphological differences between the smooth red fibers and ragged red fibers by light and electron microscopy and evaluated the occurrence and characteristics of the both abnormal muscle fibers in several neuromuscular diseases. Muscle specimens from 738 patients who were seen or consulted at the Department of Neurology, Hokkaido University, from January 1980 to October 1994 were examined. The smooth red fibers were classified into two types, type I and type II. Type I smooth red fibers were hypertrophied and showed a thin smooth red margin. Electron microscopy of the type I smooth red fibers showed no mitochondrial abnormality, being different from ragged red fibers which have abnormal mitochondria. Type I smooth red fibers were observed in chronic denervation process; they were specially frequent in Kugelberg-Welander syndrome. Hypertrophy of type I smooth red fibers were considered to be a compensative reaction in chronic denervation. Type II smooth red fibers were observed with or without ragged red fibers in mitochondrial myopathy. Type II smooth red fibers showed a thin smooth red margin, spreading red deposits from the margin into sarcoplasm. The fibers showed mitochondrial abnormality in electron microscopy. It could be posturated that type II smooth red fibers were transformed into ragged red fibers. The findings suggest 1) type I and type II smooth red fibers are different in

  1. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical studies of smooth muscle cells in iris arterioles of rats with experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Essner, E; Shichi, H

    1994-12-01

    In this study, we report on the ultrastructural and immunocytochemical changes that occur in smooth muscle cells of iris arterioles in S-antigen-induced experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). The inflammatory phase (8-10 days postimmunization) was marked by infiltration of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes in the iris stroma and perivascular tissue. Smooth muscle cells became hypertrophic with an 11.5-fold average increase in cell volume compared with control cells. In some of the cells, there was a marked increase in endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, and Golgi elements and a concomitant decrease in myofilaments, similar to that reported previously (Wang et al., Curr. Eye Res. 13, 747-754, 1994). However, the majority of hypertrophic smooth muscle cells showed only a slight increase in these synthetic organelles while retaining large amounts of myofilaments. There was no evidence for the migration or mitosis of the hypertrophic cells. Immunogold (IG) labeling of hypertrophic smooth muscle cells revealed changes in the immunoreactivity of several antigens. Labeling density for type I collagen increased progressively between 8 and 10 days, while that of decorin was slightly increased at 8 days and decreased at 10 days postimmunization. IG labeling for an alpha-actin isoform was significantly increased during the 8-10 day period, while that of beta-actin isoform was decreased. The results suggest that hypertrophic smooth muscle cells do not fully modulate to the kind of synthetic phenotype described in aortic smooth muscle cells. The significance of the transition in immunoreactivity from alpha- to beta-actin isoform is not known although it may reflect an increased synthetic state of muscle cells. The increased immunoreactivity of type I collagen and the changes in decorin, on the other hand, suggest that smooth muscle cells in EAU may be involved in remodeling of the extracellular matrix.

  2. Evolving mechanisms of action of alverine citrate on phasic smooth muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hayase, M; Hashitani, H; Suzuki, H; Kohri, K; Brading, A F

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have investigated the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical ability of the antispasmodic, alverine, to enhance spontaneous activity in smooth muscles while suppressing evoked activity. Experimental approach: The effects of alverine on spontaneous and induced contractile activity were examined in preliminary experiments with various smooth muscles. More detailed effects were also investigated by recording membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension from single-bundle detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) of the guinea-pig urinary bladder. Key results: Alverine (10 μM) increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous action potentials, transient increases in [Ca2+]i and associated contractions. Alverine also decreased action potential rate of decay, suggesting inhibition of L-type Ca channel inactivation. Charybdotoxin (50 nM) but neither cyclopiazonic acid (10 μM) nor Bay K 8644 (10 μM) attenuated alverine-induced enhancement of spontaneous contractions. Alverine suppressed contractions produced by high K (40 mM) or ACh (10 μM), without affecting electrical responses and with little suppression of increases in [Ca2+]i. This feature was very similar to that of the effects of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (10 μM). Conclusions and implications: Alverine may increase Ca influx during action potentials due to inhibition of the inactivation of L-type Ca channels, but may also suppress evoked activity by inhibiting the sensitivity of contractile proteins to Ca2+. The proportional contribution of Ca-dependent and Ca-independent contractions in DSM may differ between spontaneous and evoked activity, necessitating further investigations into the interactions between these pathways for assessing the therapeutic potential of alverine to treat DSM dysfunction. PMID:17934514

  3. Uterine smooth muscle tumor analysis by comparative genomic hybridization: a useful diagnostic tool in challenging lesions.

    PubMed

    Croce, Sabrina; Ribeiro, Agnes; Brulard, Celine; Noel, Jean-Christophe; Amant, Frederic; Stoeckle, Eberhard; Devouassoux-Shisheborah, Mojgan; Floquet, Anne; Arnould, Laurent; Guyon, Frederic; Mishellany, Florence; Garbay, Delphine; Cuppens, Tine; Zikan, Michal; Leroux, Agnès; Frouin, Eric; Duvillard, Pierre; Terrier, Philippe; Farre, Isabelle; Valo, Isabelle; MacGrogan, Gaetan M; Chibon, Frederic

    2015-07-01

    The diagnosis and management of uterine smooth muscle tumors with uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) is often challenging, and genomic data on these lesions as well as on uterine smooth muscle lesions are limited. We tested the hypothesis that genomic profile determination by array-CGH could split STUMP into a benign group with scarce chromosomal alterations akin to leiomyoma and a malignant group with high chromosomal instability akin to leiomyosarcoma. Array-CGH genomic profile analysis was conducted for a series of 29 cases of uterine STUMP. A group of ten uterine leiomyomas and ten uterine leiomyosarcomas served as controls. The mean age was 50 years (range, 24-85) and the follow-up ranged from 12 to 156 months (average 70 months). Since STUMP is a heterogenous group of tumors with genomic profiles that can harbor few to many chromosomal alterations, we compared genomic indices in leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas and set a genomic index=10 threshold. Tumors with a genomic index <10 were classified as nonrecurring STUMPs and those with a genomic index >10 represented STUMPs with recurrences and unfavorable outcomes. Hence, the genomic index threshold splits the STUMP category into two groups of tumors with different outcomes: a group comparable to leiomyomas and another similar to leiomyosarcomas, but more indolent. In our STUMP series, genomic analysis by array-CGH is an innovative diagnostic tool for problematic smooth muscle uterine lesions, complementary to the morphological evaluation approach. We provide an improved classification method for distinguishing truly malignant tumors from benign lesions within the category of STUMP, especially those with equivocal morphological features.

  4. Acrolein relaxes mouse isolated tracheal smooth muscle via a TRPA1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Esther Y; Burcham, Philip C; Mann, Tracy S; Henry, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Airway sensory C-fibres express TRPA1 channels which have recently been identified as a key chemosensory receptor for acrolein, a toxic and highly prevalent component of smoke. TRPA1 likely plays an intermediary role in eliciting a range of effects induced by acrolein including cough and neurogenic inflammation. Currently, it is not known whether acrolein-induced activation of TRPA1 produces other airway effects including relaxation of mouse airway smooth muscle. The aims of this study were to examine the effects of acrolein on airway smooth muscle tone in mouse isolated trachea, and to characterise the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the effects of acrolein. Isometric tension recording studies were conducted on mouse isolated tracheal segments to characterise acrolein-induced relaxation responses. Release of the relaxant PGE₂ was measured by EIA to examine its role in the response. Use of selective antagonists/inhibitors permitted pharmacological characterisation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this relaxation response. Acrolein induced dose-dependent relaxation responses in mouse isolated tracheal segments. Importantly, these relaxation responses were significantly inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonists AP-18 and HC-030031, an NK₁ receptor antagonist RP-67580, and the EP₂ receptor antagonist PF-04418948, whilst completely abolished by the non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin. Acrolein also caused rapid PGE₂ release which was suppressed by HC-030031. In summary, acrolein induced a novel bronchodilator response in mouse airways. Pharmacologic studies indicate that acrolein-induced relaxation likely involves interplay between TRPA1-expressing airway sensory C-fibres, NK₁ receptor-expressing epithelial cells, and EP₂-receptor expressing airway smooth muscle cells.

  5. Chronic stimulation of farnesoid X receptor impairs nitric oxide sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Kida, Taiki; Murata, Takahisa; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is highly expressed in enterohepatic tissue, is implicated in bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolisms. Although recent studies showed that FXR is also expressed in vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, its physiological and/or pathological roles in vasculature tissue remain unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the chronic effect of synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 on vascular contraction and endothelium-dependent relaxation using tissue culture procedure. In cultured rabbit mesenteric arteries, the treatment with 0.1-10 microM GW4064 for 7 days did not influence vascular contractility induced by high K(+) (15-65 mM), norepinephrine (0.1-100 microM), and endothelin-1 (0.1-100 nM). However, the chronic treatment with GW4064 (1-10 microM for 7 days) dose dependently impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by substance P (0.1-30 nM). In hematoxylin-eosin cross sectioning and en face immunostaining, GW4064 had no effects on the morphology of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In endothelium-denuded arteries treated with GW4064 (1-10 microM) for 7 days, 3 nM-100 microM sodium nitroprusside-induced vasorelaxation, but not membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromoguanosine-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; 1-100 microM)-induced vasorelaxation, was significantly impaired. In these GW4064-treated arteries, 1 muM sodium nitroprusside-induced intracellular cGMP elevations were impaired. In RT-PCR, any changes were detected in mRNA expression level of alpha(1)- and beta(1)-subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These results suggest that chronic stimulation of FXR impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation, which is due to decreased sensitivity of smooth muscle cells to nitric oxide.

  6. Cultured rat mesangial cells contain smooth muscle alpha-actin not found in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Elger, M.; Drenckhahn, D.; Nobiling, R.; Mundel, P.; Kriz, W.

    1993-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody against smooth muscle alpha-actin (SM alpha-actin) was used to study the expression of SM alpha-actin in kidney sections and mesangial cell (MC) cultures. In the tissue sections, indirect immunofluorescence revealed intense labeling of vascular smooth muscle cells and precapillary pericytes for SM alpha-actin. Glomerular cells including MC were negative, with the exception of scattered smooth muscle cells in the wall of the intraglomerular segment of the efferent arteriole. In contrast, in MC cultures 50 to 95% of the cells displayed bright fluorescence. Immunoreactivity for SM alpha-actin first appeared 3 days after explanation of glomeruli and increased until the primary culture reached subconfluence. In each subculture (1 to 10) expression of SM alpha-actin was weak on day 1 and pronounced at subconfluence. Growth arrest of subconfluent cultures for 1 to 7 days in serum-free medium did not alter the percentage of cells positive for SM alpha-actin. However, exposure of MC to serum-free medium beginning on the first day of subculture curtailed expression of SM alpha-actin. Double-labeling with antibodies against proliferating cell nuclear antigen and SM alpha-actin revealed SM alpha-actin-positive filaments in both replicating and resting cells. In summary, our results demonstrate that some process or processes associated with cell proliferation and cell growth of MC are accompanied by de novo expression of SM alpha-actin. The relevance to the contractile behavior of the difference in SM alpha-actin expression under in vitro and in vivo conditions is unknown. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:8434645

  7. Guiding the orientation of smooth muscle cells on random and aligned polyurethane/collagen nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Qin, Xiaohong; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-09-01

    Fabricating scaffolds that can simulate the architecture and functionality of native extracellular matrix is a huge challenge in vascular tissue engineering. Various kinds of materials are engineered via nano-technological approaches to meet the current challenges in vascular tissue regeneration. During this study, nanofibers from pure polyurethane and hybrid polyurethane/collagen in two different morphologies (random and aligned) and in three different ratios of polyurethane:collagen (75:25; 50:50; 25:75) are fabricated by electrospinning. The fiber diameters of the nanofibrous scaffolds are in the range of 174-453 nm and 145-419 for random and aligned fibers, respectively, where they closely mimic the nanoscale dimensions of native extracellular matrix. The aligned polyurethane/collagen nanofibers expressed anisotropic wettability with mechanical properties which is suitable for regeneration of the artery. After 12 days of human aortic smooth muscle cells culture on different scaffolds, the proliferation of smooth muscle cells on hybrid polyurethane/collagen (3:1) nanofibers was 173% and 212% higher than on pure polyurethane scaffolds for random and aligned scaffolds, respectively. The results of cell morphology and protein staining showed that the aligned polyurethane/collagen (3:1) scaffold promote smooth muscle cells alignment through contact guidance, while the random polyurethane/collagen (3:1) also guided cell orientation most probably due to the inherent biochemical composition. Our studies demonstrate the potential of aligned and random polyurethane/collagen (3:1) as promising substrates for vascular tissue regeneration. PMID:24682037

  8. Comparison of gel contraction mediated by airway smooth muscle cells from patients with and without asthma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hisako; Moir, Lyn M; Oliver, Brian G G; Burgess, Janette K; Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L; McParland, Brent E

    2007-01-01

    Backgrounds Exaggerated bronchial constriction is the most significant and life threatening response of patients with asthma to inhaled stimuli. However, few studies have investigated the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) from these patients. The purpose of this study was to establish a method to measure contraction of ASM cells by embedding them into a collagen gel, and to compare the contraction between subjects with and without asthma. Methods Gel contraction to histamine was examined in floating gels containing cultured ASM cells from subjects with and without asthma following overnight incubation while unattached (method 1) or attached (method 2) to casting plates. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase protein levels were also examined. Results Collagen gels containing ASM cells reduced in size when stimulated with histamine in a concentration‐dependent manner and reached a maximum at a mean (SE) of 15.7 (1.2) min. This gel contraction was decreased by inhibitors for phospholipase C (U73122), myosin light chain kinase (ML‐7) and Rho kinase (Y27632). When comparing the two patient groups, the maximal decreased area of gels containing ASM cells from patients with asthma was 19 (2)% (n = 8) using method 1 and 22 (3)% (n = 6) using method 2, both of which were greater than that of cells from patients without asthma: 13 (2)% (n = 9, p = 0.05) and 10 (4)% (n = 5, p = 0.024), respectively. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase levels were not different between the two groups. Conclusion The increased contraction of asthmatic ASM cells may be responsible for exaggerated bronchial constriction in asthma. PMID:17412779

  9. Loss of neurotrophin-3 from smooth muscle disrupts vagal gastrointestinal afferent signaling and satiation

    PubMed Central

    Biddinger, Jessica E.; Baquet, Zachary C.; Jones, Kevin R.; McAdams, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of vagal afferents are dependent on neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) for survival. NT-3 is expressed in developing gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle, a tissue densely innervated by vagal mechanoreceptors, and thus could regulate their survival. We genetically ablated NT-3 from developing GI smooth muscle and examined the pattern of loss of NT-3 expression in the GI tract and whether this loss altered vagal afferent signaling or feeding behavior. Meal-induced c-Fos activation was reduced in the solitary tract nucleus and area postrema in mice with a smooth muscle-specific NT-3 knockout (SM-NT-3KO) compared with controls, suggesting a decrease in vagal afferent signaling. Daily food intake and body weight of SM-NT-3KO mice and controls were similar. Meal pattern analysis revealed that mutants, however, had increases in average and total daily meal duration compared with controls. Mutants maintained normal meal size by decreasing eating rate compared with controls. Although microstructural analysis did not reveal a decrease in the rate of decay of eating in SM-NT-3KO mice, they ate continuously during the 30-min meal, whereas controls terminated feeding after 22 min. This led to a 74% increase in first daily meal size of SM-NT-3KO mice compared with controls. The increases in meal duration and first meal size of SM-NT-3KO mice are consistent with reduced satiation signaling by vagal afferents. This is the first demonstration of a role for GI NT-3 in short-term controls of feeding, most likely involving effects on development of vagal GI afferents that regulate satiation. PMID:24068045

  10. Myosin light chain kinase controls voltage-dependent calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, A; Schakman, O; Yerna, X; Dessy, C; Morel, N

    2014-07-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent kinase myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is the activator of smooth muscle contraction. In addition, it has been reported to be involved in Ca(2+) channel regulation in cultured cells, and we previously showed that the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 decreases arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat aorta. This study was designed to investigate whether MLCK is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in resistance artery smooth muscle cell, which plays a major role in the control of blood pressure. As ML compounds were shown to have off-target effects, MLCK was downregulated by transfection with a small interfering RNA targeting MLCK (MLCK-siRNA) in rat small resistance mesenteric artery (RMA) and in the rat embryonic aortic cell line A7r5. Noradrenaline-induced contraction and Ca(2+) signal were significantly depressed in MLCK-siRNA compared to scramble-siRNA-transfected RMA. Contraction and Ca(2+) signal induced by high KCl and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were also significantly decreased in MLCK-siRNA-transfected RMA, suggesting that MLCK depletion modifies voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. KCl- and AVP-induced Ca(2+) signals and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were decreased in MLCK-depleted A7r5 cells. Eventually, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that in A7r5, MLCK controlled mRNA expression of CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.1 (T-type) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Our results suggest that MLCK controls the transcription of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:24162233

  11. Hydrogen peroxide mediates oxidant-dependent stimulation of arterial smooth muscle L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Nathan L; Amberg, Gregory C

    2012-05-01

    Changes in calcium and redox homeostasis influence multiple cellular processes. Dysregulation of these signaling modalities is associated with pathology in cardiovascular, neuronal, endocrine, and other physiological systems. Calcium and oxidant signaling mechanisms are frequently inferred to be functionally related. To address and clarify this clinically relevant issue in the vasculature we tested the hypothesis that the ubiquitous reactive oxygen molecule hydrogen peroxide mediates oxidant-dependent stimulation of cerebral arterial smooth muscle L-type calcium channels. Using a combinatorial approach including intact arterial manipulations, electrophysiology, and total internal reflection fluorescence imaging, we found that application of physiological levels of hydrogen peroxide to isolated arterial smooth muscle cells increased localized calcium influx through L-type calcium channels. Similarly, oxidant-dependent stimulation of L-type calcium channels by the vasoconstrictor ANG II was abolished by intracellular application of catalase. Catalase also prevented ANG II from increasing localized subplasmalemmal sites of increased oxidation previously associated with colocalized calcium influx through L-type channels. Furthermore, catalase largely attenuated the contractile response of intact cerebral arterial segments to ANG II. In contrast, enhanced dismutation of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide with SOD had no effect on ANG II-dependent stimulation of L-type calcium channels. From these data we conclude that hydrogen peroxide is important for oxidant-dependent regulation of smooth muscle L-type calcium channels and arterial function. These data also support the emerging concept of hydrogen peroxide as a biologically relevant oxidant second messenger in multiple cell types with a diverse array of physiological functions.

  12. Loss of Notch3 Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Promotes Severe Heart Failure Upon Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ragot, Hélène; Monfort, Astrid; Baudet, Mathilde; Azibani, Fériel; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Régine; Polidano, Evelyne; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Delcayre, Claude; Vodovar, Nicolas; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Samuel, Jane-Lise

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension, which is a risk factor of heart failure, provokes adaptive changes at the vasculature and cardiac levels. Notch3 signaling plays an important role in resistance arteries by controlling the maturation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Notch3 deletion is protective in pulmonary hypertension while deleterious in arterial hypertension. Although this latter phenotype was attributed to renal and cardiac alterations, the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. To investigate the role of Notch3 signaling in the cardiac adaptation to hypertension, we used mice with either constitutive Notch3 or smooth muscle cell-specific conditional RBPJκ knockout. At baseline, both genotypes exhibited a cardiac arteriolar rarefaction associated with oxidative stress. In response to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, the heart of Notch3 knockout and SM-RBPJκ knockout mice did not adapt to pressure overload and developed heart failure, which could lead to an early and fatal acute decompensation of heart failure. This cardiac maladaptation was characterized by an absence of media hypertrophy of the media arteries, the transition of smooth muscle cells toward a synthetic phenotype, and an alteration of angiogenic pathways. A subset of mice exhibited an early fatal acute decompensated heart failure, in which the same alterations were observed, although in a more rapid timeframe. Altogether, these observations indicate that Notch3 plays a major role in coronary adaptation to pressure overload. These data also show that the hypertrophy of coronary arterial media on pressure overload is mandatory to initially maintain a normal cardiac function and is regulated by the Notch3/RBPJκ pathway. PMID:27296994

  13. Control of stomach smooth muscle development and intestinal rotation by transcription factor BARX1.

    PubMed

    Jayewickreme, Chenura D; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2015-09-01

    Diverse functions of the homeodomain transcription factor BARX1 include Wnt-dependent, non-cell autonomous specification of the stomach epithelium, tracheo-bronchial septation, and Wnt-independent expansion of the spleen primordium. Tight spatio-temporal regulation of Barx1 levels in the mesentery and stomach mesenchyme suggests additional roles. To determine these functions, we forced constitutive BARX1 expression in the Bapx1 expression domain, which includes the mesentery and intestinal mesenchyme, and also examined Barx1(-/)(-) embryos in further detail. Transgenic embryos invariably showed intestinal truncation and malrotation, in part reflecting abnormal left-right patterning. Ectopic BARX1 expression did not affect intestinal epithelium, but intestinal smooth muscle developed with features typical of the stomach wall. BARX1, which is normally restricted to the developing stomach, drives robust smooth muscle expansion in this organ by promoting proliferation of myogenic progenitors at the expense of other sub-epithelial cells. Undifferentiated embryonic stomach and intestinal mesenchyme showed modest differences in mRNA expression and BARX1 was sufficient to induce much of the stomach profile in intestinal cells. However, limited binding at cis-regulatory sites implies that BARX1 may act principally through other transcription factors. Genes expressed ectopically in BARX1(+) intestinal mesenchyme and reduced in Barx1(-/-) stomach mesenchyme include Isl1, Pitx1, Six2 and Pitx2, transcription factors known to control left-right patterning and influence smooth muscle development. The sum of evidence suggests that potent BARX1 functions in intestinal rotation and stomach myogenesis occur through this small group of intermediary transcription factors.

  14. A(2B) receptors mediate antimitogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dubey, R K; Gillespie, D G; Shue, H; Jackson, E K

    2000-01-01

    Adenosine inhibits growth of vascular smooth muscle cells. The goals of this study were to determine which adenosine receptor subtype mediates the antimitogenic effects of adenosine and to investigate the signal transduction mechanisms involved. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) (25 ng/mL) stimulated DNA synthesis ([(3)H]thymidine incorporation), cellular proliferation (cell number), collagen synthesis ([(3)H]proline incorporation), total protein synthesis ([(3)H]leucine incorporation), and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. The adenosine receptor agonists 2-chloroadenosine and 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, but not N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine or CGS21680, inhibited the growth effects of PDGF-BB, an agonist profile consistent with an A(2B) receptor-mediated effect. The adenosine receptor antagonists KF17837 and 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine, but not 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine, blocked the growth-inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine and 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, an antagonist profile consistent with an A(2) receptor-mediated effect. Antisense, but not sense or scrambled, oligonucleotides to the A(2B) receptor stimulated basal and PDGF-induced DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and MAP kinase activity. Moreover, the growth-inhibitory effects of 2-chloroadenosine, 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine, and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine plus iodotubericidin (inhibitors of adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase, respectively) were abolished by antisense, but not scrambled or sense, oligonucleotides to the A(2B) receptor. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that adenosine causes inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell growth by activating A(2B) receptors coupled to inhibition of MAP kinase activity. Pharmacological or molecular biological activation of A(2B) receptors may prevent vascular remodeling associated with hypertension, atherosclerosis, and restenosis

  15. Apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular remodelling and atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R

    1999-02-01

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) has recently been identified as an important process in a variety of human vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, arterial injury, and restenosis after angioplasty. VSMC apoptosis is regulated by interactions between the local cell-cell and cytokine environment within the arterial wall, and the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins by the cell, including death receptors, proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. This review summarises our current knowledge of the occurrence and mechanisms underlying VSMC apoptosis in atherosclerosis and arterial remodelling.

  16. Capsaicin from chili ( Capsicum spp.) inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongxia; Heiss, Elke H; Guo, Dean; Dirsch, Verena M; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is implied in cardiovascular disease and significantly contributes to vessel lumen reduction following surgical interventions such as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or bypass surgery. Therefore, identification and characterization of compounds and mechanisms able to counteract VSMC proliferation is of potential therapeutic relevance. This work reveals the anti-proliferative effect of the natural product capsaicin from Capsicum spp. by quantification of metabolic activity and DNA synthesis in activated VSMC. The observed in vitro activity profile of capsaicin warrants further research on its mechanism of action and potential for therapeutic application. PMID:25685327

  17. Effect of some smooth muscle relaxant drugs on calcium-related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Ronca-Testoni, S; Hrelia, S; Hakim, G; Ronca, G; Rossi, C A

    1984-04-30

    Some smooth muscle relaxant drugs devoid of anticholinergic action have been tested for their interaction with calmodulin, calmodulin-stimulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity, and uterine membrane binding sites for nitrendipine and adenosine. The myolytic activity of octylonium bromide and pinaverium bromide may be due to their interaction with calmodulin-dependent systems. Trimebutine maleate does not bind either to calmodulin or to nitrendipine and adenosine receptors. Tiropramide has no effect on calmodulin-dependent systems and on Ca2+ channels but it shows a competition for the A2-type adenosine receptors. PMID:6329247

  18. Interaction of smooth muscle relaxant drugs with calmodulin and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Ronca-Testoni, S; Hrelia, S; Hakim, G; Rossi, C A

    1985-01-15

    Some smooth muscle relaxant drugs with an unknown mechanism of action have been tested for their interaction with calmodulin and with calmodulin-induced cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. The affinity of these drugs for calmodulin does not parallel their inhibitory effect on the calmodulin activation of PDE. The lack of parallelism could be due to a binding of the drugs to different sites on calmodulin; furthermore a binding of papaverine, octylonium bromide and felodipine to PDE molecule might also be considered to explain their inhibitory effect on PDE basal activity. The myolytic effect of octylonium bromide and pinaverium bromide may be due to their interaction with calmodulin-dependent systems. PMID:2981701

  19. [The protective effect of Hippophae rhamnoides L. on hyperlipidemic serum cultured smooth muscle cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Lu, Y; Liu, X; Gou, Z; Hu, J

    1992-10-01

    The effect of Hippophae rhamnoides on hyperlipidemic rabbit serum (HRS) cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC) was observed in comparison with vitamin E(VE). The results show that Hippophae rhamnoides, much like VE, is also a potent antioxidant. It strongly decreases the MDA content in HRS cultured SMC and protect the cells from the injury of lipid peroxidation, and thus keeps the SMC growing and proliferating health. The results implicate that Hippophae rhamnoides is an effective antioxidant, and one of the important mechanisms of Hippophae rhamnoides in anti-atherosclerosis reported recently may be closely related to the action of anti-lipid peroxidation. PMID:1294183

  20. Airway mechanics and methods used to visualize smooth muscle dynamics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cooper, P R; McParland, B E; Mitchell, H W; Noble, P B; Politi, A Z; Ressmeyer, A R; West, A R

    2009-10-01

    Contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by the physiological, structural and mechanical environment in the lung. We review two in vitro techniques, lung slices and airway segment preparations, that enable in situ ASM contraction and airway narrowing to be visualized. Lung slices and airway segment approaches bridge a gap between cell culture and isolated ASM, and whole animal studies. Imaging techniques enable key upstream events involved in airway narrowing, such as ASM cell signalling and structural and mechanical events impinging on ASM, to be investigated.

  1. POTENTIATION OF THE ACTION OF BRADYKININ ON SMOOTH MUSCLE BY CHYMOTRYPSIN, CHYMOTRYPSINOGEN AND TRYPSIN.

    PubMed

    EDERY, H

    1964-04-01

    Chymotrypsin, chymotrypsinogen and trypsin sensitized the guinea-pig isolated ileum and rat isolated uterus preparations to the action of bradykinin, whilst the responses to histamine, acetylcholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine were unaffected. Chymotrypsin caused a quick contraction of the guinea-pig ileum which was abolished by mepyramine and therefore probably mediated by histamine. Trypsin contracted the rat uterus as well as the guinea-pig ileum; the latter contraction was slow, resistant to mepyramine and gave rise to tachyphylaxis. It is suggested that isolated smooth muscle preparations should be treated with chymotrypsin for use in the estimation of minute amounts of bradykinin.

  2. Phorbol Ester Effects on Neurotransmission: Interaction with Neurotransmitters and Calcium in Smooth Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Jay M.; Gould, Robert J.; Peroutka, Stephen J.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Stimulation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle by neurotransmitters generates diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, which may regulate some forms of neurotransmission. Phorbol esters, potent inflammatory and tumorpromoting compounds, also activate protein kinase C. We demonstrate potent and selective effects of phorbol esters on smooth muscle, indicating a role for protein kinase C in neurotransmission. In rat vas deferens and dog basilar artery, phorbol esters synergize with calcium to mimic the contractile effects of neurotransmitters that act through the phosphatidylinositol cycle. In guinea pig ileum and rat uterus, phorbol esters block contractions produced by these neurotransmitters.

  3. Resveratrol causes cell cycle arrest, decreased collagen synthesis, and apoptosis in rat intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Patricia; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Mathias, Jason S; Tang, Huaijing; Christman, Gregory M; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2012-02-01

    One of the most difficult and treatment-resistant complications of Crohn's disease is the development of fibrotic intestinal strictures due to mesenchymal cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in berries, peanuts, grapes, and red wine, has been shown to inhibit fibrosis in vasculature, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and esophagus in animal models. Resveratrol has also been shown to inhibit oxidation, inflammation, and cell proliferation and to decrease collagen synthesis in several cell types or animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether resveratrol has antifibrotic effects on intestinal smooth muscle cells. Responses to resveratrol by cultured smooth muscle cells isolated from colons of untreated Lewis rats were examined; this rat strain is used in a model of Crohn's disease with prominent intestinal fibrosis. A relative decrease in cell numbers following treatment with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol was evident at 24 h (P ≤ 0.005). This effect was largely due to cell cycle arrest, with an increase in the percent of cells in S phase from 8 to 25-35% (P < 0.05). Cell viability was unchanged until 2-3 days of treatment when there was a 1.2- to 5.0-fold increase in the percent of apoptotic cells, depending on the assay (P < 0.05). Expression of collagen type I protein was decreased following treatment with resveratrol for 24 h (to 44 and 25% of control levels with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol, respectively; P < 0.05). Expression of procollagen types I and III mRNA was also decreased with resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol (50 μM) diminished the proliferative response to TGF-β₁ (P = 0.02) as well as IGF-I-stimulated collagen production (P = 0.02). Thus resveratrol decreases intestinal smooth muscle cell numbers through its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and also decreases collagen synthesis by the cells. These effects could be useful in preventing the smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and collagen

  4. Signaling and regulation of G protein-coupled receptors in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Charlotte K; Penn, Raymond B

    2003-01-01

    Signaling through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediates numerous airway smooth muscle (ASM) functions including contraction, growth, and "synthetic" functions that orchestrate airway inflammation and promote remodeling of airway architecture. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the GPCRs that have been identified in ASM cells, and discuss the extent to which signaling via these GPCRs has been characterized and linked to distinct ASM functions. In addition, we examine the role of GPCR signaling and its regulation in asthma and asthma treatment, and suggest an integrative model whereby an imbalance of GPCR-derived signals in ASM cells contributes to the asthmatic state. PMID:12648290

  5. Myosin light chain kinase steady-state kinetics: comparison of smooth muscle myosin II and nonmuscle myosin IIB as substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Diego B.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Brizendine, Richard K.; Krenc, Agata K.; Baker, Josh E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates S19 of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), which is required to activate myosin's ATPase activity and contraction. Smooth muscles are known to display plasticity in response to factors such as inflammation, developmental stage, or stress, which lead to differential expression of nonmuscle and smooth muscle isoforms. Here, we compare steady-state kinetics parameters for phosphorylation of different MLCK substrates: (1) nonmuscle RLC, (2) smooth muscle RLC, and heavy meromyosin subfragments of (3) nonmuscle myosin IIB, and (4) smooth muscle myosin II. We show that MLCK has a ~2-fold higher kcat for both smooth muscle myosin II substrates compared with nonmuscle myosin IIB substrates, whereas Km values were very similar. Myosin light chain kinase has a 1.6-fold and 1.5-fold higher specificity (kcat/Km) for smooth versus nonmuscle-free RLC and heavy meromyosin, respectively, suggesting that differences in specificity are dictated by RLC sequences. Of the 10 non-identical RLC residues, we ruled out 7 as possible underlying causes of different MLCK kinetics. The remaining 3 residues were found to be surface exposed in the N-terminal half of the RLC, consistent with their importance in substrate recognition. These data are consistent with prior deletion/chimera studies and significantly add to understanding of MLCK myosin interactions. PMID:27528075

  6. Decreasing effects of glycerol-fractions extracted from ox diaphragm muscles on acetylcholine-induced contractions of smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Kimura, I

    1979-04-01

    Extracts of 5% glycerol obtained from ox diaphragm muscles were fractionated into four (A, B, C and D) with (NH4)2SO4. The activity as acetylcholine (ACh) receptor-like substance containing fraction was evidenced as follows; the ACh-induced contraction of tracheal muscles decreased with addition of the fraction, and such could not be attributed to the reaction with ACh receptors of tracheal smooth muscles. Fraction D had the most potent activity in the presence of neostigmine. This reaction induced by fraction D was reversed by addition of d-tubocurarine (d-TC). Fraction D was fractionated into three (I, II and III) by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 with 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). The purified fraction III was identified by electrophoresis, UV and visible absorption spectrum, and ion-exchange chromatography to be myoglobin. Pure myoglobin also proved to have a decreasing effect on ACh-induced contraction. PMID:537248

  7. [Regulation of the differentiation and proliferation of smooth muscle cells by the sex hormones].

    PubMed

    Guiochon-Mantel, A

    2000-06-01

    Steroids effects are mediated by their receptors. These proteins define the large family of steroid hormone receptors, characterized by the presence of 3 functional domains: a transactivation domain, a DNA-binding domain and a ligand-binding domain. Receptor activation induces the modulation of transcription of specific genes, and as a consequence, the modulation of production of specific proteins. Sex steroid receptors are located in the nucleus. This nuclear localization is in fact a dynamic situation, resulting from a continuous shuttling of the receptor between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The recent discovery that an additional estrogen receptor is present in various tissues has advanced our understanding of the mechanism underlying estrogen signalling. Non genomic effects of steroids have also been described. Sex steroids inhibit proliferation of smooth muscle cells. On the contrary, they stimulate proliferation of tumoral muscle cells. The mechanisms of sex steroid effects on cellular proliferation are complex, and may involve transcriptional or non transcriptional phenomena. PMID:10939122

  8. Anticholinergic action of pirenzepine (Gastrozepin) on isolated gastrointestinal tract smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, J A

    1983-01-01

    The effects of pirenzepine, a new anti-ulcer drug, have been examined on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractions of the guinea-pig isolated ileum, rat colon, rainbow lizard rectum, and chick isolated oesophagus. Pirenzepine (10(-9)-10(-6) M), like atropine (2.5 x 10(-10)-10(-6) M) competitively blocked the contractile effects of acetylcholine on all the isolated gastrointestinal tract smooth muscles examined. The pA2 values for pirenzepine and atropine against acetylcholine on all the muscle preparations were not significantly different (P greater than 0.05). It is concluded that the anti-ulcer action of pirenzepine might be due, at least in part, to its (anticholinergic) muscarinic cholinoceptor blocking activity.

  9. Antagonism of acetylcholine action in guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle and epithelium by pirenzepine, 4-DAMP and atropine.

    PubMed

    Orer, H S; Guc, M O; Rezaki, Y E; Ilhan, M; Kayaalp, S O

    1990-01-01

    Acetylcholine-induced guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle contraction and epithelium-derived relaxant factor release were evaluated using guinea-pig open tracheal rings and rat anococcygeus muscle bioassay to get insight into the participation of muscarinic receptor subtypes in these responses. There was a significant difference between the two pA2 values obtained in contraction and relaxation experiments for pirenzepine, but no difference was found either for atropine or for 4-DAMP. This difference seems to be due to the participation of M1-receptors in smooth muscle contraction.

  10. Phorbol 12,13-Dibutyrate-Induced, Protein Kinase C-Mediated Contraction of Rabbit Bladder Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tanchun; Kendig, Derek M.; Trappanese, Danielle M.; Smolock, Elaine M.; Moreland, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Contraction of bladder smooth muscle is predominantly initiated by M3 muscarinic receptor-mediated activation of the Gq/11-phospholipase C β-protein kinase C (PKC) and the G12/13-RhoGEF-Rho kinase (ROCK) pathways. However, these pathways and their downstream effectors are not well understood in bladder smooth muscle. We used phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), and 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (DOG), activators of PKC, in this investigation. We were interested in dissecting the role(s) of PKC and to clarify the signaling pathways in bladder smooth muscle contraction, especially the potential cross-talk with ROCK and their downstream effectors in regulating myosin light chain phosphatase activity and force. To achieve this goal, the study was performed in the presence or absence of the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide-1 (Bis) or the ROCK inhibitor H-1152. Phosphorylation levels of Thr38-CPI-17 and Thr696/Thr850 myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) were measured during PDBu or DOG stimulation using site specific antibodies. PDBu-induced contraction in bladder smooth muscle involved both activation of PKC and PKC-dependent activation of ROCK. CPI-17 as a major downstream effector, is phosphorylated by PKC and ROCK during PDBu and DOG stimulation. Our results suggest that Thr696 and Thr850-MYPT1 phosphorylation are not involved in the regulation of a PDBu-induced contraction. The results also demonstrate that bladder smooth muscle contains a constitutively active isoform of ROCK that may play an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle basal tone. Together with the results from our previous study, we developed a working model to describe the complex signaling pathways that regulate contraction of bladder smooth muscle. PMID:22232602

  11. Novel identification of the free fatty acid receptor FFAR1 that promotes contraction in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Kentaro; Zhang, Yi; Mizuta, Fumiko; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Shiga, Toshiya; Masaki, Eiji; Emala, Charles W

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for asthma. Previous studies have demonstrated that free fatty acid levels are elevated in the plasma of obese individuals. Medium- and long-chain free fatty acids act as endogenous ligands for the free fatty acid receptors FFAR1/GPR40 and FFAR4/GPR120, which couple to Gq proteins. We investigated whether FFAR1 and FFAR4 are expressed on airway smooth muscle and whether they activate Gq-coupled signaling and modulate airway smooth muscle tone. We detected the protein expression of FFAR1 and FFAR4 in freshly dissected native human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle and cultured human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The long-chain free fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) and GW9508 (FFAR1/FFAR4 dual agonist) dose-dependently stimulated transient intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increases and inositol phosphate synthesis in HASM cells. Downregulation of FFAR1 or FFAR4 in HASM cells by small interfering RNA led to a significant inhibition of the long-chain free fatty acids-induced transient [Ca(2+)]i increases. Oleic acid, linoleic acid, or GW9508 stimulated stress fiber formation in HASM cells, potentiated acetylcholine-contracted guinea pig tracheal rings, and attenuated the relaxant effect of isoproterenol after an acetylcholine-induced contraction. In contrast, TUG-891 (FFAR4 agonist) did not induce the stress fiber formation or potentiate acetylcholine-induced contraction. These results suggest that FFAR1 is the functionally dominant free fatty acid receptor in both human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle. The free fatty acid sensors expressed on airway smooth muscle could be an important modulator of airway smooth muscle tone.

  12. Affinity for MgADP and force of unbinding from actin of myosin purified from tonic and phasic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Govindaraju, Karuthapillai; Fong, Laura M.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle is unique in its ability to maintain force at low MgATP consumption. This property, called the latch state, is more prominent in tonic than phasic smooth muscle. Studies performed at the muscle strip level have suggested that myosin from tonic muscle has a greater affinity for MgADP and therefore remains attached to actin longer than myosin from phasic muscle, allowing for cross-bridge dephosphorylation and latch-bridge formation. An alternative hypothesis is that after dephosphorylation, myosin reattaches to actin and maintains force. We investigated these fundamental properties of smooth muscle at the molecular level. We used an in vitro motility assay to measure actin filament velocity (νmax) when propelled by myosin purified from phasic or tonic muscle at increasing [MgADP]. Myosin was 25% thiophosphorylated and 75% unphosphorylated to approximate in vivo conditions. The slope of νmax versus [MgADP] was significantly greater for tonic (−0.51 ± 0.04) than phasic muscle myosin (−0.15 ± 0.04), demonstrating the greater MgADP affinity of myosin from tonic muscle. We then used a laser trap assay to measure the unbinding force from actin of populations of unphosphorylated tonic and phasic muscle myosin. Both myosin types attached to actin, and their unbinding force (0.092 ± 0.022 pN for phasic muscle and 0.084 ± 0.017 pN for tonic muscle) was not statistically different. We conclude that the greater affinity for MgADP of tonic muscle myosin and the reattachment of dephosphorylated myosin to actin may both contribute to the latch state. PMID:18614813

  13. A potential gravity-sensing role of vascular smooth muscle cell glycocalyx in altered gravitational stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Liu, Meili; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2013-07-01

    Previously, we have shown that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exhibit varied physiological responses when exposed to altered gravitational conditions. In the present study, we focused on elucidating whether the cell surface glycocalyx could be a potential gravity sensor. For this purpose, a roller culture apparatus was used with the intent to provide altered gravitational conditions to cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). Heparinase III (Hep.III) was applied to degrade cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) selectively. Sodium chlorate was used to suppress new synthesis of HSPG. Glycocalyx remodeling, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation, and F-actin expression induced by gravity alteration were assessed by flow cytometry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. Results indicate that the exposure of cultured RASMCs to altered gravitational conditions led to a reduction in cell surface HSPG content and the activation of NOS. It also down-regulated the expression of glypican-1, constitutive NOS (NOSI and NOSIII), and F-actin. On the other hand, Hep.III followed by sodium chlorate treatment of HSPG attenuated the aforementioned NOS and F-actin modulation under altered gravitational conditions. All these findings suggest that the glycocalyx, and HSPG in particular, may be an important sensor of gravitational changes. This may play an important role in the regulation of NOS activation, F-actin modulation, and HSPG remodeling in VSMCs.

  14. High-density collagen gel tubes as a matrix for primary human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Micol, Lionel A; Ananta, Michael; Engelhardt, Eva-Maria; Mudera, Vivek C; Brown, Robert A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Frey, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Tissue-engineered grafts for the urinary tract are being investigated for the potential treatment of several urologic diseases. These grafts, predominantly tubular-shaped, usually require in vitro culture prior to implantation to allow cell engraftment on initially cell-free scaffolds. We have developed a method to produce tubular-shaped collagen scaffolds based on plastic compression. Our approach produces a ready cell-seeded graft that does not need further in vitro culture prior to implantation. The tubular collagen scaffolds were in particular investigated for their structural, mechanical and biological properties. The resulting construct showed an especially high collagen density, and was characterized by favorable mechanical properties assessed by axial extension and radial dilation. Young modulus in particular was greater than non-compressed collagen tubes. Seeding densities affected proliferation rate of primary human bladder smooth muscle cells. An optimal seeding density of 10(6) cells per construct resulted in a 25-fold increase in Alamar blue-based fluorescence after 2 wk in culture. These high-density collagen gel tubes, ready seeded with smooth muscle cells could be further seeded with urothelial cells, drastically shortening the production time of graft for urinary tract regeneration.

  15. Complex I dysfunction underlies the glycolytic switch in pulmonary hypertensive smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Rafikova, Olga; Meadows, Mary Louise; Desai, Ankit A; Khalpey, Zain; Yuan, Jason X-J; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    ATP is essential for cellular function and is usually produced through oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial dysfunction is now being recognized as an important contributing factor in the development cardiovascular diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension (PH). In PH there is a metabolic change from oxidative phosphorylation to mainly glycolysis for energy production. However, the mechanisms underlying this glycolytic switch are only poorly understood. In particular the role of the respiratory Complexes in the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with PH is unresolved and was the focus of our investigations. We report that smooth muscle cells isolated from the pulmonary vessels of rats with PH (PH-PASMC), induced by a single injection of monocrotaline, have attenuated mitochondrial function and enhanced glycolysis. Further, utilizing a novel live cell assay, we were able to demonstrate that the mitochondrial dysfunction in PH-PASMC correlates with deficiencies in the activities of Complexes I-III. Further, we observed that there was an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial membrane potential in the PASMC isolated from rats with PH. We further found that the defect in Complex I activity was due to a loss of Complex I assembly, although the assembly of Complexes II and III were both maintained. Thus, we conclude that loss of Complex I assembly may be involved in the switch of energy metabolism in smooth muscle cells to glycolysis and that maintaining Complex I activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of PH. PMID:26298201

  16. Calcium-activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 promote murine uterine smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kyra; Vink, Joy Y; Fu, Xiao Wen; Wakita, Hiromi; Danielsson, Jennifer; Wapner, Ronald; Gallos, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence of calcium activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 in human and murine uterine smooth muscle and evaluate the physiologic role for these ion channels in murine myometrial contractility. Study Design We performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine if anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine uterine tissue to validate the study of this protein in mouse models. Immunohistochemical staining of anoctamin 1 and 2 was then performed to determine protein expression in murine myometrial tissue. The function of anoctamin 1 and 2 in murine uterine tissue was evaluated using electrophysiological studies, organ bath, and calcium flux experiments. Results Anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine USM cells. Functional studies show that selective antagonism of these channels promotes relaxation of spontaneous murine uterine smooth muscle contractions. Blockade of anoctamin 1 and 2 inhibits both agonist-induced and spontaneous transient inward currents and abolishes G-protein coupled receptor (oxytocin) mediated elevations in intracellular calcium. Conclusion The calcium activated chloride channels ANO 1 and 2 are present in human and murine myometrial tissue and may provide novel potential therapeutic targets to achieve effective tocolysis. PMID:24928056

  17. The effect of deuterium oxide (D sub 2 O) on in vitro vascular smooth muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliam, T.M.; Liepins, A.; Rankin, A.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O), a stable nonradioactive isotope of water, has been demonstrated to reduce L-type calcium channel conductance in isolated myocytes. Since the concentration of intracellular free calcium has been implicated in the mechanism of vascular smooth muscle contraction, the authors investigated whether it inhibits contraction of vascular smooth muscle. Phenylephrine concentration-contraction curves were carried out in the rat aortic ring preparation to determine whether D{sub 2}O inhibits contraction of rat aorta induced through activation of receptor-operated calcium channels. D{sub 2}O depressed these response curves in a concentration dependent manner with 50% inhibition of maximum contraction observed with 60% D{sub 2}O; this effect proved to be reversible and non-toxic. D{sub 2}O also depressed potassium chloride curves, demonstrating an effect on voltage-operated calcium channels. Since vascular endothelium releases endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) when stimulated by a range of pharmacological agents, it was examined whether the endothelium has a role in these actions of D{sub 2}O on vascular contraction. Mechanical disruption of the endothelium had no effect.

  18. Physiological functions of transient receptor potential channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Lin, Mo-Jun; Sham, James S K

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) gene superfamily, which consists of 7 subfamilies with at least 28 mammalian homologues, is known to encode a wide variety of cation channels with diverse biophysical properties, activation mechanisms, and physiological functions. Recent studies have identified multiple TRP channel subtypes, belonging to the canonical (TRPC), melastatin-related (TRPM), and vanilloid-related (TRPV) subfamilies, in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). They operate as specific Ca(2+) pathways responsive to stimuli, including Ca(2+) store depletion, receptor activation, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and mechanical stress. Increasing evidence suggests that these channels play crucial roles in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular remodeling, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. This chapter highlighted and discussed these putative physiological functions of TRP channels in pulmonary vasculatures. Since Ca(2+) ions regulate many cellular processes via specific Ca(2+) signals, future investigations of these novel channels will likely uncover more important regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary vascular functions in health and in disease states. PMID:20204726

  19. Free radicals release vasodilator(s) from endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Hu, Y.C.; Gillis, C.N. )

    1991-03-15

    Electrolysis-generated free radicals (ES-FR) injure the endothelium (EC) of rabbit lungs perfused in situ. The authors now report that ES-FR release EDRF-like substance(s) from both vascular EC and smooth muscle sources. Rabbit aortic segments with or without endothelium or columns of bovine aortic EC grown on biosilon beads were perfused with Krebs solution containing 6 uM indomethacin and 10 units/ml SOD. Effluent passed over two endothelial-denuded aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine. Electrolysis of perfusion medium, released a vasodilator substance(s) from both. Vasodilatation was directly related to the current used and had t{sub 1/2} similar to that of EDRF released from EC columns by ADP. Release was attenuated by N-{omega}-nitro-L-arginine or sodium salicylate perfused through the cell column or aortic segments, or by 0.5% hemoglobin passed over the bioassay aortic rings. Finally, prompt transfer of 0.3-0.5 ml of medium, subjected to ES off-line, also relaxed pre-contracted aortic rings. Thus ES-FR can release EDRF-like substance(s) from both aortic EC and EC-denuded aortic smooth muscle. Since release was attenuated by salicylate, a specific trapping agent for hydroxyl radicals, the authors suggest that the latter is related to release of the vasodilator.

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 in Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Restrains Atherogenesis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Soon Yew; Monslow, James; Todd, Leslie; Lawson, John; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placebo controlled trials of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for inhibition of COX-2 reveal an emergent cardiovascular hazard in patients selected for low risk of heart disease. Postnatal global deletion of COX-2 accelerates atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, a process delayed by selective enzyme deletion in macrophages. Methods and Results Here, selective depletion of COX-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) depressed biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGE2, elevated blood pressure and accelerated atherogenesis in Ldlr knockout (KO) mice. Deletion of COX-2 in VSMCs and ECs coincided with an increase in COX-2 expression in lesional macrophages and increased biosynthesis of thromboxane. Increased accumulation of less organized intimal collagen, laminin, α-smooth muscle actin and matrix-rich fibrosis was also apparent in lesions of the mutants. Conclusions Although atherogenesis is accelerated in global COX-2 KOs, consistent with evidence of risk transformation during chronic NSAID administration, this masks the contrasting effects of enzyme depletion in macrophages versus VSMCs and ECs. Targeting delivery of COX-2 inhibitors to macrophages may conserve their efficacy while limiting cardiovascular risk. PMID:24519928

  1. Propylthiouracil, independent of its antithyroid effect, promotes vascular smooth muscle cells differentiation via PTEN induction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Kwang-Huei; Lee, Dany-Young; Hsu, Lung-An; Kuo, Chi-Tai

    2010-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU), independent of its antithyroid effect, is recently found to have an antiatherosclerotic effect. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of PTU on phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), as phenotypic modulation may contribute to the growth of atherosclerotic lesions and neointimal formation after arterial injury. Propylthiouracil reduced neointimal formation in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. In vitro, PTU may convert VSMCs from a serum-induced dedifferentiation state to a differentiated state, as indicated by a spindle-shaped morphology and an increase in the expression of SMC differentiation marker contractile proteins, including calponin and smooth muscle (SM)-myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). Transient transfection studies in VSMCs demonstrated that PTU induced the activity of SMC marker genes (calponin and SM-MHC) promoters, indicating that PTU up-regulates these genes expression predominantly at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, PTU enhanced the expression of PTEN and inhibition of PTEN by siRNA knockdown blocked PTU-induced activation of contractile proteins expression and promoter activity. In the rat carotid injury model, PTU reversed the down-regulation of contractile proteins and up-regulated PTEN in the neointima induced by balloon injury. Propylthiouracil promotes VSMC differentiation, at lest in part, via induction of the PTEN-mediated pathway. These findings suggest a possible mechanism by which PTU may contribute to its beneficial effects on atherogenesis and neointimal formation after arterial injury.

  2. Peptides PHI and VIP: comparison between vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle effect in rabbit uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Bardrum, B.; Ottesen, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    1986-07-01

    The distribution and effects of the two neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI), on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle in the urogenital tract of nonpregnant rabbit female, were investigated. Immunoreactive VIP and PHI were present in all regions except the ovary with the highest concentration in the uterin cervix. By using in vitro tension recordings of myometrial specimens, it was demonstrated that both peptides displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of the mechanical activity. The dose-response curves of VIP and PHI were superimposable with and ID50 of 3 x 10 Y mol/l, and their combined effect was additive. In addition, the influence of the two peptides on myometrial blood flow (MBF) was investigated by the xenon-133 washout technique. Both peptides were found to increase MBF with the same potency and efficacy. Their combined effect was additive. In conclusion VIP and PHI are present in the rabbit urogenital tract, and the two peptides are equipotent inhibitors of mechanical nonvascular and vascular smooth muscle activity in the uterus.

  3. Complex actions of protein kinase A inhibitors on mitogenesis of bovine coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Osinski, M T; Weber, A; Schrör, K

    2000-05-01

    This study investigates the possible modulation of platelet-derived growth factor-(PDGF, 20 ng/ml)-induced DNA synthesis in bovine coronary artery smooth muscle cells by the protein kinase A inhibitors Rp-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic phosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPS, 0. 03-10 microM) and ¿N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, HCl¿ (H-89, 0.01-1 microM). Rp-cAMPS concentration dependently enhanced PDGF-induced DNA synthesis. In contrast, no potentiation of PDGF-induced DNA synthesis was seen with H-89. However, H-89 but not Rp-cAMPS, inhibited p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Thus, Rp-cAMPS, but not H-89, unmasks inhibitory actions of protein kinase A on PDGF-induced mitogenesis of vascular smooth muscle cells. Low specificity may limit the use of H-89 as protein kinase A inhibitor. PMID:10812046

  4. Smooth Muscle α Actin (Acta2) and Myofibroblast Function during Hepatic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Rockey, Don C.; Weymouth, Nate; Shi, Zengdun

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle α actin (Acta2) expression is largely restricted to smooth muscle cells, pericytes and specialized fibroblasts, known as myofibroblasts. Liver injury, associated with cirrhosis, induces transformation of resident hepatic stellate cells into liver specific myofibroblasts, also known as activated cells. Here, we have used in vitro and in vivo wound healing models to explore the functional role of Acta2 in this transformation. Acta2 was abundant in activated cells isolated from injured livers but was undetectable in quiescent cells isolated from normal livers. Both cellular motility and contraction were dramatically increased in injured liver cells, paralleled by an increase in Acta2 expression, when compared with quiescent cells. Inhibition of Acta2 using several different techniques had no effect on cytoplasmic actin isoform expression, but led to reduced cellular motility and contraction. Additionally, Acta2 knockdown was associated with a significant reduction in Erk1/2 phosphorylation compared to control cells. The data indicate that Acta2 is important specifically in myofibroblast cell motility and contraction and raise the possibility that the Acta2 cytoskeleton, beyond its structural importance in the cell, could be important in regulating signaling processes during wound healing in vivo. PMID:24204762

  5. Proteomic network analysis of human uterine smooth muscle in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in human uterine quiescence during gestation and the induction of labor at term or preterm are not completely known. Preterm delivery is associated with major morbidity and mortality and current efforts to prevent delivery until term are largely ineffective. Identification and semi-quantification of proteomic changes in uterine smooth muscle during pregnancy will allow for targeted research into how quiescence is maintained and what changes are associated with induction of labor. Examining preterm labor in this context will provide potential therapeutic targets for the management of preterm labor. We have recently performed two dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on myometrial proteins isolated from pregnant patients in labor, pregnant patients not in labor, and pregnant patients in labor preterm. Using a conservative false discovery rate of 1% we have identified 2132 protein groups using this method and semi-quantitative spectral counting shows 201 proteins that have disparate levels of expression in preterm laboring samples. To our knowledge this is the first large scale proteomic study examining human uterine smooth muscle and this initial work has provided a target list for future experiments that can address how changing protein levels are involved in the induction of labor at term and preterm. PMID:26413312

  6. Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome”—Revisiting the Structural Basis of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the pervasiveness of increased arterial stiffness in patients with cardiovascular disease has become increasingly apparent. Though, this phenomenon has been well documented in humans and animal models of disease for well over a century, there has been surprisingly limited development in a deeper mechanistic understanding of arterial stiffness. Much of the historical literature has focused on changes in extracellular matrix proteins—collagen and elastin. However, extracellular matrix changes alone appear insufficient to consistently account for observed changes in vascular stiffness, which we observed in our studies of aortic stiffness in aging monkeys. This led us to examine novel mechanisms operating at the level of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)—that include increased cell stiffness and adhesion to extracellular matrix—which that may be interrelated with other mechanisms contributing to arterial stiffness. We introduce these observations as a new concept—the Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome (SMCSS)—within the field of arterial stiffness and posit that stiffening of vascular cells impairs vascular function and may contribute stiffening to the vasculature with aging and cardiovascular disease. Importantly, this review article revisits the structural basis of arterial stiffness in light of these novel findings. Such classification of SMCSS and its contextualization into our current understanding of vascular mechanics may be useful in the development of strategic therapeutics to directly target arterial stiffness. PMID:26635621

  7. May Sonic Hedgehog proteins be markers for malignancy in uterine smooth muscle tumors?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalia; Bozzini, Nilo; Baiocchi, Glauco; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes; Soares Junior, José Maria; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Carvalho, Katia Candido

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway (SHH) plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cellular differentiation. We analyzed the protein expression of SHH pathway components and evaluated whether their profile could be useful for the diagnosis, prognosis, or prediction of the risk of malignancy for uterine smooth muscle tumors (USMTs). A total of 176 samples (20 myometrium, 119 variants of leiomyoma, and 37 leiomyosarcoma) were evaluated for the protein expression of the SHH signaling components, HHIP1 (SHH inhibitor), and BMP4 (SHH target) by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis was performed to verify the specificity of the antibodies. We grouped leiomyoma samples into conventional leiomyomas and unusual leiomyomas that comprise atypical, cellular, mitotically active leiomyomas and uterine smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that SMO, SUFU, GLI1, GLI3, and BMP4 expression gradually increased depending on to the histologic tissue type. The protein expression of SMO, SUFU, and GLI1 was increased in unusual leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma samples compared to normal myometrium. The inhibitor HHIP1 showed higher expression in myometrium, whereas only negative or basal expression of SMO, SUFU, GLI1, and GLI3 was detected in these samples. Strong expression of SHH was associated with poorer overall survival. Our data suggest that the expression of SHH proteins can be useful for evaluating the potential risk of malignancy for USMTs. Moreover, GLI1 and SMO may serve as future therapeutic targets for women with USMTs. PMID:26997437

  8. Differentiation of Human Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells into Smooth-Muscle Cells: Two Novel Protocols.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libang; Geng, Zhaohui; Nickel, Thomas; Johnson, Caitlin; Gao, Lin; Dutton, James; Hou, Cody; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protocols for differentiating human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can be inefficient and generally fail to yield cells with a specific SMC phenotype (i.e., contractile or synthetic SMCs). Here, we present two novel hiPSC-SMC differentiation protocols that yield SMCs with predominantly contractile or synthetic phenotypes. Flow cytometry analyses of smooth-muscle actin (SMA) expression indicated that ~45% of the cells obtained with each protocol assumed an SMC phenotype, and that the populations could be purified to ~95% via metabolic selection. Assessments of cellular mRNA and/or protein levels indicated that SMA, myosin heavy chain II, collagen 1, calponin, transgelin, connexin 43, and vimentin expression in the SMCs obtained via the Contractile SMC protocol and in SMCs differentiated via a traditional protocol were similar, while SMCs produced via the Sythetic SMC protocol expressed less calponin, more collagen 1, and more connexin 43. Differences were also observed in functional assessments of the two SMC populations: the two-dimensional surface area of Contractile SMCs declined more extensively (to 12% versus 44% of original size) in response to carbachol treatment, while quantification of cell migration and proliferation were greater in Synthetic SMCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that our novel differentiation protocols can efficiently generate SMCs from hiPSCs. PMID:26771193

  9. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P.; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  10. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  11. Increased activity of chondroitin sulfate-synthesizing enzymes during proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, J.; Thiel, J.; Schmidt, A.; Buddecke, E.

    1986-12-01

    Cultured arterial smooth muscle cells incorporate (/sup 35/S)sulfate into the extracellular chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate containing proteoglycans at a higher rate in the phase of logarithmic growth than do non-dividing cells. The cell growth-dependent decrease in /sup 35/S incorporation with increasing cell density is accompanied by a decrease in the activity of chondroitin sulfate-synthesizing enzymes. The specific activity of xylosyl transferase, N-acetylgalactosaminyl transferase I and chondroitin sulfotransferase declines as the cells proceed from low to high densities. The corresponding correlation coefficients are 0.86, 0.91 and 0.89. The ratio of C-60H/C-40H sulfation of chondroitin shows a cell proliferation-dependent decrease indicating an inverse correlation of chondroitin 6-sulfotransferase and chondroitin 4-sulfotransferase activity. The observed changes in the expression of enzyme activities are thought to have some implications in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis, the initial stages of which are characterized by proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells.

  12. Purification and partial characterization of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans from cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatino, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans synthesized by cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells were isolated after incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into glycosaminoglycans in the presence or absence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Glycosaminoglycans were quantitated by two-dimensional electrophoresis after proteolytic digestion of the cell layers and media. The results show that the presence of serum has no effect on the chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate content of the cell layers. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid of the cell layers was three times higher in the presence of serum. In the medium , the quantity of hyaluronic was two times higher in the presence of serum while the other glycosaminoglycans remained unchanged. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid was unaffected by the presence of serum. Specific proteoglycans were isolated from medium after with (/sup 35/S)-sulfate and (/sup 3/H)-serine by isopycnic ultracentrifugation and chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B and DEAE-cellulose. Preparations contained a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, a condroitin sulfate-dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans synthesized by rabbit aorta smooth muscle cells are similar to those from human aorta.

  13. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    An, S.S.; Bai, T.R.; Bates, J.H.T.; Black, J.L.; Brown, R.H.; Brusasco, V.; Chitano, P.; Deng, L.; Dowell, M.; Eidelman, D.H.; Fabry, B.; Fairbank, N.J.; Ford, L.E.; Fredberg, J.J.; Gerthoffer, W.T.; Gilbert, S.H.; Gosens, R.; Gunst, S.J.; Halayko, A.J.; Ingram, R.H.; Irvin, C.G.; James, A.L.; Janssen, L.J.; King, G.G.; Knight, D.A.; Lauzon, A.M.; Lakser, O.J.; Ludwig, M.S.; Lutchen, K.R.; Maksym, G.N.; Martin, J.G.; Mauad, T.; McParland, B.E.; Mijailovich, S.M.; Mitchell, H.W.; Mitchell, R.W.; Mitzner, W.; Murphy, T.M.; Paré, P.D.; Pellegrino, R.; Sanderson, M.J.; Schellenberg, R.R.; Seow, C.Y.; Silveira, P.S.P.; Smith, P.G.; Solway, J.; Stephens, N.L.; Sterk, P.J.; Stewart, A.G.; Tang, D.D.; Tepper, R.S.; Tran, T.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not “cure” asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored. PMID:17470619

  14. Substance P and acetylcholine both suppress the same K+ current in dissociated smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sims, S M; Walsh, J V; Singer, J J

    1986-10-01

    The effect of substance P on freshly dissociated gastric smooth muscle cells was examined electrophysiologically. Substance P caused depolarization, associated with a membrane conductance decrease, which led to the generation of action potentials and contraction. When the membrane potential was held constant under voltage clamp, substance P induced a net inward current, also associated with a conductance decrease. The net inward current resulted from suppression of an outward K+ current, one which resembled the acetylcholine-sensitive M-current in these cells. When substance P maximally suppressed this outward K+ current, acetylcholine (ACh) had no additional effect. Conversely, when ACh fully suppressed the M-current, substance P was without additional effect. These results indicate that substance P suppresses the same outward K+ current affected by ACh. Suppression of M-current by substance P was observed in approximately half (44 of 85) of the cells studied in these experiments. In those cells that did not respond to substance P, ACh was nevertheless capable of suppressing the M-current. Thus both substance P and cholinergic agonists appear to exert their excitatory effects on smooth muscle cells by inhibiting a common K+ current.

  15. Acetylcholine release elicited by electrical stimulation and its sites of action in smooth muscle of Mytilus.

    PubMed

    Murakami, H; Ishikawa, T; Watanabe, H

    1984-01-01

    The effects of strychnine (ST), BTM-1042, hexamethonium (Hexa), tetraethylammonium (TEA), atropine (AT), benactyzine ( Bena ) and dithiothreitol (DTT) on phasic contraction in response to electrical pulses in Mytilus smooth muscle ( ABRM ) have been examined. ST (10(-7) to 5 X 10(-5) M), BTM-1042 (10(-5) to 10(-3) M), Hexa (10(-5) to 10(-3) M) and TEA (10(-5) to 10(-3) M) dose-dependently depressed the contraction. AT (10(-5) to 10(-3) M) had a little influence on the depression of the contraction, while Bena (5 X 10(-6) to 5 X 10(-4) M) dose-dependently depressed the contraction. DTT (10(-4) to 3 X 10(-3) M) depressed the contraction. These findings suggest that the mechanism of acetylcholine-release from excitatory nerve endings is partly similar to its release in the mammalian smooth muscle, and that the cholinergic receptors in ABRM are more like nicotinic receptors than muscarinic ones.

  16. Matrine inhibits the expression of adhesion molecules in activated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Lihua; Ren, Yingang; Gao, Yanli; Kang, Li; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Matrine is a main active ingredient of Sophora flavescens roots, which are used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in VSMCs have largely remained elusive. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The results showed that matrine inhibited the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. Matrine markedly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB p65 and prevented the TNF‑α‑caused degradation of inhibitor of NF‑κB; it also inhibited TNF‑α‑induced activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, matrine inhibited the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that matrine inhibited the expression of VCAM‑1 and ICAM‑1 in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs via the suppression of ROS production as well as NF‑κB and MAPK pathway activation. Therefore, matrine may have a potential therapeutic use for preventing the advancement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  17. Effects of nitrendipine on growth activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Absher, M P; Baldor, L; Warshaw, D M

    1988-01-01

    Proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the arterial wall may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and hypertension. If cell migration and proliferation are dependent on extracellular calcium, then treatment with calcium channel blockers such as nitrendipine may alter these cellular responses. In the studies reported here, proliferation and migration activities were assessed in cultured bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells exposed to nitrendipine. SMCs in long-term culture are characterized by periods of either stable or enhanced proliferative activity. During the stable periods, 1 microM nitrendipine has no effect on proliferation, but during periods of enhanced proliferation, 1 microM nitrendipine augments growth by approximately 20%. SMC migration rates and interdivision times were determined from analysis of time-lapse cinematography films. During stable periods of growth, cell migration rate was inversely related to interdivision time (i.e., fast migrating cells had the shortest interdivision times). Treatment with 1 microM nitrendipine abolished the relationship between migration rate and interdivision time and prolonged interdivision times. These data suggest that the ability of nitrendipine to alter SMC proliferation, interdivision time, and migration is dependent upon the overall proliferative state of the culture.

  18. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  19. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening.

  20. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an active topic of debate. WNT-5A is increasingly expressed in asthmatic ASM and has been linked with Th2-high asthma. Due to its link with calcium and cytoskeletal remodelling, we propose that WNT-5A may modulate ASM contractility. We demonstrated that WNT-5A can increase maximum isometric tension in bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. In addition, we show that WNT-5A is preferentially expressed in contractile human airway myocytes compared to proliferative cells, suggesting an active role in maintaining contractility. Furthermore, WNT-5A treatment drives actin polymerisation, but has no effect on intracellular calcium flux. Next, we demonstrated that WNT-5A directly regulates TGF-β1-induced expression of α-SMA via ROCK-mediated actin polymerization. These findings suggest that WNT-5A modulates fundamental mechanisms that affect ASM contraction and thus may be of relevance for AHR in asthma. PMID:27468699

  1. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  2. Thin-film dielectric elastomer sensors to measure the contraction force of smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araromi, O.; Poulin, A.; Rosset, S.; Favre, M.; Giazzon, M.; Martin-Olmos, C.; Liley, M.; Shea, H.

    2015-04-01

    The development of thin-film dielectric elastomer strain sensors for the characterization of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is presented here. Smooth muscle disorders are an integral part of diseases such as asthma and emphysema. Analytical tools enabling the characterization of SMC function i.e. contractile force and strain, in a low-cost and highly parallelized manner are necessary for toxicology screening and for the development of new and more effective drugs. The main challenge with the design of such tools is the accurate measurement of the extremely low contractile cell forces expected as a result of SMC monolayer contraction (as low as ~ 100 μN). Our approach utilizes ultrathin (~5 μm) and soft elastomer membranes patterned with elastomer-carbon composite electrodes, onto which the SMCs are cultured. The cell contraction induces an in-plane strain in the elastomer membrane, predicted to be in the order 1 %, which can be measured via the change in the membrane capacitance. The cell force can subsequently be deduced knowing the mechanical properties of the elastomer membrane. We discuss the materials and fabrication methods selected for our system and present preliminary results indicating their biocompatibility. We fabricate functional capacitive senor prototypes with good signal stability over the several hours (~ 0.5% variation). We succeed in measuring in-plane strains of 1 % with our fabricated devices with good repeatability and signal to noise ratio.

  3. Invasive Trophoblasts Stimulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis by a Fas Ligand-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lynda K.; Keogh, Rosemary J.; Wareing, Mark; Baker, Philip N.; Cartwright, Judith E.; Aplin, John D.; Whitley, Guy St J.

    2006-01-01

    During pregnancy, trophoblasts migrate from the placenta into uterine spiral arteries, transforming them into wide channels that lack vasoconstrictive properties. In pathological pregnancies, this process is incomplete. To define the fundamental events involved in spiral artery remodeling, we have studied the effect of trophoblasts on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Here we demonstrate for the first time that apoptosis of SMCs can be initiated by invading trophoblasts. When trophoblasts isolated from normal placenta (primary trophoblasts) or conditioned medium was perfused into spiral or umbilical artery segments, apoptosis of SMCs resulted. Culture of human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) with primary trophoblasts, primary trophoblast-conditioned medium, or a trophoblast-derived cell line (SGHPL-4) also significantly increased SMC apoptosis. Fas is expressed by spiral artery SMCs, and a Fas-activating antibody triggered HASMC apoptosis. Furthermore, a Fas ligand (FasL)-blocking antibody significantly inhibited HASMC apoptosis induced by primary trophoblasts, SGHPL-4, or trophoblast-conditioned medium. Depleting primary trophoblast-conditioned medium of FasL also abrogated SMC apoptosis in vessels in situ. These results suggest that apoptosis triggered by the release of soluble FasL from invading trophoblasts contributes to the loss of smooth muscle from the walls of spiral arteries during pregnancy. PMID:17071607

  4. Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma: a problem of limited smooth muscle relaxation with inspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Skloot, G; Permutt, S; Togias, A

    1995-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperresponsiveness in asthma is caused by an impairment in the ability of inspiration to stretch airway smooth muscle. If the hypothesis was correct, we reasoned that the sensitivity to inhaled methacholine in normal and asthmatic subjects should be the same if the challenge was carried out under conditions where deep inspirations were prohibited. 10 asthmatic and 10 normal subjects received increasing concentrations of inhaled methacholine under conditions where forced expirations from a normal end-tidal inspiration were performed. When no deep inspirations were allowed, the response to methacholine was similar in the normal and asthmatic subjects, compatible with the hypothesis we propose. Completely contrary to our expectations, however, was the marked responsivity to methacholine that remained in the normal subjects after deep breaths were initiated. 6 of the 10 normal subjects had > 20% reduction in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1) at doses of methacholine < 8 mg/ml, whereas there was < 15% reduction with 75 mg/ml during routine challenge. The ability of normal subjects to develop asthmatic responses when the modulating effects of increases in lung volume was voluntarily suppressed suggests that an intrinsic impairment of the ability of inspiration to stretch airway smooth muscle is a major feature of asthma. PMID:7593627

  5. Vasopressin induces release of arachidonic acid from vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grillone, L.R.; Clark, M.A.; Heckman, G.; Schmidt, D.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Cultured smooth muscle cells (A-10), derived from rat thoracic aorta, have vascular (V/sub 1/) vasopressin receptors. They have previously shown that these receptors mediate phosphatidylinositol turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and inhibition of isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP. Here they studied the effect of vasopressin on arachidonic acid metabolism of A-10 cells. Cells were incubated for 18-20 hr with (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid (80 Ci/mmol). Vasopressin stimulated release of arachidonic acid in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Significant release of arachidonic acid was observed after 4 min with 10/sup -9/ M vasopressin. Maximum release was reached 4 min after addition of 10/sup -7/ M vasopressin (1100 dpm/10/sup 6/ cells). About 800 dmp were released after 1 and 4 min with 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin, respectively. The vasopressin-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was blocked by the specific V/sub 1//V/sub 2/ vasopressin antagonist d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)VAVP. These data indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells increase arachidonic acid release in response to vasopressin. This response is likely mediated by V/sub 1/ receptors.

  6. Airway responsiveness: role of inflammation, epithelium damage and smooth muscle tension.

    PubMed

    Gourgoulianis, K I; Domali, A; Molyvdas, P A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the effect of epithelium damage on mechanical responses of airway smooth muscles under different resting tension. We performed acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-5) M)-induced contraction on tracheal strips from 30 rabbits in five groups (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) before and after epithelium removal. At low resting tension (0.5-1.5 g), the epithelium removal decreased the ACh-induced contractions. At 2 g resting tension, the epithelium removal increased the ACh-induced contractions of airways with intact epithelium about 20%. At 2.5 g resting tension, the elevation of contraction is about 25% (P<0.01). Consequently, after epithelium loss, the resting tension determines the airway smooth muscles responsiveness. In asthma, mediators such as ACh act on already contracted inflammatory airways, which results in additional increase of contraction. In contrast, low resting tension, a condition that simulates normal tidal breathing, protects from bronchoconstriction even when the epithelium is damaged. PMID:10704081

  7. Effects of trimebutine on cytosolic Ca2+ and force transitions in intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Kobayashi, T; Tamaki, H

    1991-04-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on cytosolic free Ca2+ and force transitions in the guinea-pig taenia cecum were studied by fura-2 fluorometry and tension recording. The addition of 80 mM K+ induced a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension, followed by a sustained increase. Trimebutine (10 microM) suppressed both [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development. The tonic responses were more potently inhibited than the phasic responses. Phasic components gradually increased as the added K+ increased (10-40 mM). The relationship between the peak increases in [Ca2+]i and tension was not affected by trimebutine (10 microM). This means that trimebutine does not affect the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile elements. In a high K+ and Ca(2+)-free medium, carbachol (10 microM) or caffeine (30 mM) caused transient [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development in the smooth muscle. Trimebutine (10 microM) decreased the amplitude of both responses. Trimebutine (10 microM) inhibited the spontaneous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and motility of taenia cecum in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.3 microM). These results suggest that trimebutine has two types of inhibitory actions on intestinal smooth muscle; one, the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels, and the other, the inhibition of Ca2+ release from intracellular storage sites. PMID:1868878

  8. Tianeptine's effects on spontaneous and Ca2+-induced uterine smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Oreščanin-Dušić, Zorana; Miljević, C D; Slavić, M; Nikolić-Kokić, A; Paskulin, R; Blagojević, D; Lečić-Toševski, D; Spasić, M B

    2012-06-01

    Tianeptine is a novel anti-depressant with an efficacy equivalent to that of classical anti-depressants. Additional beneficial effects include neuroprotection, anti-stress and anti-ulcer properties whose molecular mechanisms are still not completely understood but may involve changes in the anti-oxidant defence system. Herein, we have studied the effects of tianeptine on both contractile activity of isolated rat uteri and components of the endogenous anti-oxidative defence system. Tianeptine-induced dose-dependent inhibition of both spontaneous and Ca2+-induced contraction of uterine smooth muscle. The effect was more pronounced in the latter. Tianeptine treatment increased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) activities in spontaneous and Ca2+-stimulated uteri. A significant decrease in glutathione-reductase (GR) activity in both spontaneous and Ca2+-induced uterine contractions after tianeptine treatment indicated a reduction in reduced glutathione and consequently a shift toward a more oxidised state in the treated uteri. In spontaneously contracting uteri, tianeptine caused a decrease in copper-zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) activity. Tianeptine's anti-depressant effects may be accomplished by triggering a cascade of cellular adaptations including inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and an adequate anti-oxidative protection response. PMID:22849838

  9. A new scoring system using multiple immunohistochemical markers for diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rath-Wolfson, Lea; Rosenblat, Yevgenia; Halpern, Marisa; Herbert, M; Hammel, I; Gal, Rivka; Leabu, M; Koren, Rumelia

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of uterine smooth muscle neoplasms by light microscopy is difficult. Multiple classification schemes have been proposed based on mitotic rate, nuclear atypia, and the presence or absence of necrosis. None of these classification systems has been entirely successful. This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of selected immunohistochemical and histochemical markers in differentiating these tumors, in addition to accepted morphologic criteria. Ten cases of each of the following: leiomyosarcomas (LMS), atypical leiomyomas (AL), cellular leiomyomas (CL) and usual leiomyomas (UL), were classically evaluated for histological diagnosis and were stained for Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2 and p53 using monoclonal antibodies and the avidin-biotin peroxidase method, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNORs). The number of stained cells was counted in the most positively stained region in a 4 mm2 square cover glass mounted on each slide. The mean value was calculated for each group of tumors. The data for Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2, p53 and AgNOR staining respectively, were significantly higher in LMS by comparison to UL, CL or AL. Because many singular cases had superimposed data being difficult to diagnose, a new scoring system for pathological evaluation was created. The results obtained by this scoring system suggest that immunohistochemical markers Ki-67 (MIB-1), bcl-2, p53 together with the AgNOR staining could be useful, by the scoring system, as an adjunct to the current accepted morphologic criteria in differentiating smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. PMID:16563231

  10. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation. PMID:24079969

  11. Hypercholesterolemic diet induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in sympathectomized rats via intrinsic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hachani, Rafik; Dab, Houcine; Feriani, Anouar; Saber, Sami; Sakly, Mohsen; Vicaut, Eric; Callebert, Jacques; Sercombe, Richard; Kacem, Kamel

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we intend to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemic diet, a high risk factor for atherosclerosis, on vascular cell apoptosis in rats that have been previously sympathectomized. Thus, newborn male Wistar rats received injections of guanethidine for sympathectomy. Sham received injections of vehicle. The two groups were fed 1% cholesterol diet for 3months. Sympathectomy alone group was also exploited. Apoptosis in abdominal aortic tissue was identified by TUNEL method and conventional agarose gel electrophoresis to detect specific DNA fragmentation. Caspases 3 and 9, Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c were examined by immunoblotting. Oil Red O staining was used to reveal lipid in the arterial wall. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages were identified by immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin and rat macrophage marker (ED1), respectively. The efficacy of sympathectomy was evaluated by analysis of perivascular sympathetic fibers. Our study showed that hypercholesterolemic diet, when performed in rats with neonatal sympathectomy, 1) increased aortic TUNEL-positive cells compared to sham and sympathectomy alone groups, 2) illustrated a typical apoptotic DNA ladder on agarose gel electrophoresis, 3) induced Bax translocation from cytosol to mitochondria, 4) enhanced cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, 5) increased expression of active caspases 3 and 9, and 6) decreased Bcl-2 expression. VSMCs are identified as the major cell type exhibiting apoptosis in this model. Taken together, it can be concluded that hypercholesterolemic diet, when performed in rats with neonatal sympathectomy, induces vascular cell apoptosis in an intrinsic pathway.

  12. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation.

  13. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells.

  14. Azelnidipine inhibits Msx2-dependent osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Iso, Tatsuya; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active and regulated process that is similar to bone formation. While calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have been shown to improve outcomes in atherosclerotic vascular disease, it remains unknown whether CCBs have an effect on the process of vascular calcification. Here we investigated whether CCBs inhibit osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by Msx2, a key factor of vascular calcification. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) were transduced with adenovirus expressing MSX2 and were treated with 3 distinct CCBs. Azelnidipine, a dihydropyridine subclass of CCBs, significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of Msx2-overexpressed HASMCs, whereas verapamil and diltiazem had no effect. Furthermore, azelnidipine, but not verapamil and diltiazem, significantly decreased matrix mineralization of Msx2-overexpressing HASMCs. Azelnidipine significantly attenuated the induction of ALP gene expression by Msx2, a key transcription factor in osteogenesis, while it did not reduce enzymatic activity of ALP. Furthermore, azelnidipine inhibited the ability of Msx2 to activate the ALP gene, but had no effect on Notch-induced Msx2 expression. Given that L-type calcium channels are equally blocked by these CCBs, our results suggest that azelnidipine inhibits the Msx2-dependent process of vascular calcification by mechanisms other than inhibition of calcium channel activity.

  15. A Synthetic Chloride Channel Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Kwok-hei; Mak, Judith Choi-wo; Leung, Susan Wai-sum; Yang, Dan; Vanhoutte, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic ion channels may have potential therapeutic applications, provided they possess appropriate biological activities. The present study was designed to examine the ability of small molecule-based synthetic Cl– channels to modulate airway smooth muscle responsiveness. Changes in isometric tension were measured in rat tracheal rings. Relaxations to the synthetic chloride channel SCC-1 were obtained during sustained contractions to KCl. The anion dependency of the effect of SCC-1 was evaluated by ion substitution experiments. The sensitivity to conventional Cl– transport inhibitors was also tested. SCC-1 caused concentration-dependent relaxations during sustained contractions to potassium chloride. This relaxing effect was dependent on the presence of extracellular Cl– and HCO3−. It was insensitive to conventional Cl– channels/transport inhibitors that blocked the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium-activated Cl– channels. SCC-1 did not inhibit contractions induced by carbachol, endothelin-1, 5-hydroxytryptamine or the calcium ionophore A23187. SCC-1 relaxes airway smooth muscle during contractions evoked by depolarizing solutions. The Cl– conductance conferred by this synthetic compound is distinct from the endogenous transport systems for chloride anions. PMID:23049786

  16. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  17. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  18. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization. PMID:14660552

  19. The effects of cannabidiol on the antigen-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Dudášová, A; Keir, S D; Parsons, M E; Molleman, A; Page, C P

    2013-06-01

    (-)-Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the airways, but its psychoactive effects preclude its therapeutic use for the treatment of airways diseases. In the present study we have investigated the effects of (-)-cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis for its actions on bronchial smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo. Guinea-pig bronchial smooth muscle contractions induced by exogenously applied spasmogens were measured isometrically. In addition, contractile responses of bronchial smooth muscle from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were investigated in the absence or presence of (-)-cannabidiol. Furthermore, the effect of (-)-cannabidiol against ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction was investigated in vivo in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs. (-)-Cannabidiol did not influence the bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol, histamine or neurokinin A. In contrast, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited anandamide- and virodhamine-induced responses of isolated bronchi. A fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride reversed the inhibitory effect of (-)-cannabidiol on anandamide-induced contractions. In addition, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited the contractile response of bronchi obtained from allergic guinea-pigs induced by ovalbumin. In vivo, (-)-cannabidiol reduced ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction. In conclusion, our results suggest that cannabidiol can influence antigen-induced airway smooth muscle tone suggesting that this molecule may have beneficial effects in the treatment of obstructive airway disorders.

  20. Human airway smooth muscle maintain in situ cell orientation and phenotype when cultured on aligned electrospun scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G. E.; Bridge, J. C.; Eltboli, O. M. I.; Lewis, M. P.; Knox, A. J.; Aylott, J. W.; Brightling, C. E.; Ghaemmaghami, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) contraction plays a central role in regulating airway resistance in both healthy and asthmatic bronchioles. In vitro studies that investigate the intricate mechanisms that regulate this contractile process are predominantly conducted on tissue culture plastic, a rigid, 2D geometry, unlike the 3D microenvironment smooth muscle cells are exposed to in situ. It is increasingly apparent that cellular characteristics and responses are altered between cells cultured on 2D substrates compared with 3D topographies. Electrospinning is an attractive method to produce 3D topographies for cell culturing as the fibers produced have dimensions within the nanometer range, similar to cells' natural environment. We have developed an electrospun scaffold using the nondegradable, nontoxic, polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composed of uniaxially orientated nanofibers and have evaluated this topography's effect on HASM cell adhesion, alignment, and morphology. The fibers orientation provided contact guidance enabling the formation of fully aligned sheets of smooth muscle. Moreover, smooth muscle cells cultured on the scaffold present an elongated cell phenotype with altered contractile protein levels and distribution. HASM cells cultured on this scaffold responded to the bronchoconstrictor bradykinin. The platform presented provides a novel in vitro model that promotes airway smooth muscle cell development toward a more in vivo-like phenotype while providing topological cues to ensure full cell alignment. PMID:24793171

  1. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  2. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B; Sweeney, H Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  3. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization.

  4. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  5. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  6. Cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells are resistant to methylamine toxicity: no correlation to semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, S. D.; Trent, M. B.; Boor, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Methylamine (MA), a component of serum and a metabolite of nicotine and certain insecticides and herbicides, is metabolized by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). MA is toxic to cultured human umbilical vein and calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Endothelial cells, which do not exhibit endogenous SSAO activity, are exposed to SSAO circulating in serum. In contrast, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) do exhibit innate SSAO activity both in vivo and in vitro. This property, together with the critical localization of VSMC within the arterial wall, led us to investigate the potential toxicity of MA to VSMC. Cultured rat VSMC were treated with MA (10-5 to 1 M). In some cultures, SSAO was selectively inhibited with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 [(E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-fluoroallylamine]. Cytotoxicity was measured via MTT, vital dye exclusion, and clonogenic assays. MA proved to be toxic to VSMC only at relatively high concentrations (LC(50) of 0.1 M). The inhibition of SSAO with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 did not increase MA toxicity, suggesting that the production of formaldehyde via tissue-bound, SSAO-mediated MA metabolism does not play a role in the minimal toxicity observed in isolated rat VSMC. The omission of fetal calf serum (FCS), which contains high SSAO activity, from media similarly showed little effect on cytotoxicity. We conclude that VSMC--in contrast to previous results in endothelial cells--are relatively resistant to MA toxicity, and SSAO does not play a role in VSMC injury by MA.

  7. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases. PMID:23084979

  8. Receptors for substance P on isolated intestinal smooth muscle cells of the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Souquet, J.C.; Bitar, K.N.; Grider, J.R.; Makhlouf, G.M.

    1987-11-01

    Two radioligands, /sup 125/I-labeled substance P (/sup 125/I-SP) and /sup 125/I-labeled substance K (/sup 125/I-SK), were used to characterize the kinetics and stoichiometry of binding of mammalian tachykinins (substance P (SP), substance K (SK), and neuromedin K (NK)) to smooth muscle cells isolated from the longitudinal muscle layer of guinea pig intestine. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-SP and /sup 125/I-SK was rapid, saturable, reversible, and temperature dependent. Binding attained 63-70% of steady-state binding within 1 min, coincidentally with the time of optimal contraction. The order of potency with which mammalian tachykinins and the SP antagonist, (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP, inhibited the binding of both radioligands was identical: SP greater than SK greater than NK greater than (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP, implying preferential interaction with a site that had highest affinity for SP. SK was 2-3 times, NK 3-4 times, and (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP 7-23 times less potent than SP (IC50 0.36 nM). Except for NK, the order of potency was similar to that for contraction of isolated muscle cells. The existence of binding sites with even higher affinity was suggested by the ability of muscle cells to contract in response to concentrations as low as 10(-13) M. These binding sites were not detectable at the concentration of radioligands used. It was concluded that a SP receptor is the only tachykinin receptor subtype present on intestinal muscle cells of the guinea pig.

  9. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  10. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  11. Cholinergic neuromodulation by prostaglandin D2 in canine airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, J; Sekizawa, K; Graf, P D; Nadel, J A

    1987-10-01

    To determine whether prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) modulates cholinergic neurotransmission in airway smooth muscle and, if so, what the mechanism of action is, we studied bronchial segments from dogs under isometric conditions in vitro. PGD2 (10(-8)-10(-5) M) elicited dose-dependent muscle contraction, which was reduced after blockade of muscarinic receptors, so that 50% effective dose (ED50) increased from 1.3 +/- 0.3 X 10(-6) to 3.9 +/- 1.0 X 10(-6) M by atropine (10(-6) M) (mean +/- SE, P less than 0.05). Physostigmine, at a concentration insufficient to alter base-line tension (10(-8) M), enhanced the PGD2-induced contraction and decreased ED50 to 6.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M (P less than 0.05). When added at the highest doses that did not cause spontaneous contraction (1.9 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M), PGD2 increased the contractile response to electrical field stimulation (1-50 Hz) by 21.9 +/- 6.6% (P less than 0.001). In contrast to this effect, the response to administered acetylcholine was not affected by PGD2. On the other hand, PGD2-induced augmentation of the response to electrical field stimulation (5 Hz) was further increased from 23.6 +/- 3.0 to 70.4 +/- 8.8% in the presence of physostigmine (10(-8) M) and was abolished by atropine but not affected by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine or the histamine H1-blocker pyrilamine. These results suggest that the contraction of airway smooth muscle induced by PGD2 is in in part mediated by a cholinergic action and that PGD2 prejunctionally augments the parasympathetic contractile response, likely involving the accelerated release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction.

  12. Differential effects of inhaled methacholine on circumferential wall and vascular smooth muscle of third-generation airways in awake sheep.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Damian; Parsons, Gibbe; Gunther, Robert; Quail, Anthony; Cottee, David; White, Saxon

    2012-10-15

    Evolution and natural selection ensure that specific mechanisms exist for selective airway absorption of inhaled atmospheric molecules. Indeed, nebulized cholinoceptor agonists used in asthma-challenge tests may or may not enter the systemic circulation. We examined the hypothesis that inhaled cholinoceptor agonists have selective access. Six sheep were instrumented under general anesthesia (propofol 5 mg/kg iv, 2-3% isoflurane-oxygen), each with pulsed-Doppler blood flow transducers mounted on the single bronchial artery and sonomicrometer probes mounted on the intrapulmonary third-generation lingula lobe bronchus. Continuous measurements were made of bronchial blood flow (Q(br)), Q(br) conductance (C(br)), bronchial hemicircumference (CIRC(br)), and bronchial wall thickness (WALL TH(br)) in recovered, standing, awake sheep. Methacholine (MCh; 0.125-2.0 μg/kg iv), at the highest dose, caused a 233% rise in Q(br) (P < 0.05) and a 286% rise in C(br) (P < 0.05). CIRC(br) fell to 90% (P < 0.05); WALL TH(br) did not change. In contrast, nebulized MCh (1-32 mg/ml), inhaled through a mask at the highest dose, caused a rise in ventilation and a rise in Q(br) proportional to aortic pressure without change in C(br). CIRC(br) fell to 91% (P < 0.01), and WALL TH(br) did not change. Thus inhaled MCh has access to cholinoceptors of bronchial circumferential smooth muscle to cause airway lumen narrowing but effectively not to those of the systemic bronchovascular circulation. It is speculated that the mechanism is selective neuroparacrine inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M3 bronchovascular cholinoceptors) by prostanoids released by intense MCh activation of epithelial and mucosal cells lining the airway. PMID:22898550

  13. Platelet-activating factor induces ovine fetal pulmonary venous smooth muscle cell proliferation: role of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weilin; Ibe, Basil O; Raj, J Usha

    2007-06-01

    We have previously reported that platelet-activating factor (PAF) is present in very high levels in the ovine fetal lung and circulation and that PAF serves as an important physiological vasoconstrictor of the pulmonary circulation in utero. However, it is not known whether PAF stimulates pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation. In this study, we used ovine fetal pulmonary venous SMCs as our model system to study the effects and mechanisms of action of PAF on SMC proliferation. We found that PAF induced SMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAF also stimulated activation of both ERK and p38 but not c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways. PAF (10 nM) induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Specific inhibition of EGFR by AG-1478 and by the expression of a dominant-negative EGFR mutant in SMCs attenuated PAF-stimulated cell proliferation. Inhibition of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) release by CRM-197 and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) by GM-6001 abolished PAF-induced MAP kinase activation and cell proliferation. Increased alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity after PAF treatment in AP-HB-EGF fusion construct-transfected SMCs indicated that PAF induced the release of HB-EGF within 1 min. Gelatin zymography data showed that PAF stimulated MMP-2 activity and MMP-9 activity within 1 min. These results suggest that PAF promotes pulmonary vascular SMC proliferation via transactivation of EGFR through MMP activation and HB-EGF, resulting in p38 and ERK activation and that EGFR transactivation is essential for the mitogenic effect of PAF in pulmonary venous SMC. PMID:17322418

  14. Effects of hypoxia and glucose-removal condition on muscle contraction of the smooth muscles of porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuta; Kaneda, Takeharu; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki; Nuruki, Takaomi; Kanda, Hidenori; Urakawa, Norimoto; Shimizu, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the dependence of aerobic energy metabolism and utilization of glucose in contraction of urinary bladder smooth muscle, we investigated the changes in the reduced pyridine nucleotide (PNred) fluorescence, representing glycolysis activity, and determined the phosphocreatine (PCr) and ATP contents of the porcine urinary bladder during contractions induced by high K(+) or carbachol (CCh) and with and without hypoxia (achieved by bubbling N2 instead of O2) or in a glucose-free condition. Hyperosmotic addition of 65 mM KCl (H-65K(+)) and 1 µM CCh induced a phasic contraction followed by a tonic contraction. A glucose-free physiological salt solution (PSS) did not change the subsequent contractile responses to H-65K(+) and CCh. However, hypoxia significantly attenuated H-65K(+)- and CCh-induced contraction. H-65K(+) and CCh induced a sustained increase in PNred fluorescence, representing glycolysis activity. Hypoxia enhanced H-65K(+)- and CCh-induced increases in PNred fluorescence, whereas glucose-free PSS decreased these increases, significantly. In the presence of H-65K(+), hypoxia decreased the PCr and ATP contents; however, the glucose-free PSS did not change the PCr contents. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high K(+)- and CCh-induced contractions depend on aerobic metabolism and that an endogenous substrate may be utilized to maintain muscle contraction in a glucose-free PSS in the porcine urinary bladder.

  15. Evidence for two isoforms of the endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+ pump in pig smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, J A; Wuytack, F; De Jaegere, S; Nelles, L; Casteels, R

    1989-01-01

    cDNA clones coding for the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-transport ATPase have been cloned from a pig smooth-muscle cDNA library. The transcripts can be divided into two classes which differ in their 3' ends due to alternative splicing of the primary gene transcript. The class 1 cDNA encodes a protein of 997 amino acids (Mr 110,000). The class 2 protein (1042 amino acids; Mr 115,000) is completely identical to the class 1 protein except that the four C-terminal amino acids of the class 1 protein are replaced in the class 2 protein with a tail of 49 amino acids. Comparison of these sequences with other Ca2+ pump sequences reveals that the class 1 isoform corresponds to the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump of slow-twitch skeletal/cardiac muscle, whereas the class 2 protein corresponds to a Ca2+ pump recently detected in non-muscle tissues. PMID:2527496

  16. Development and maintenance of force and stiffness in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lan, Bo; Norris, Brandon A; Liu, Jeffrey C-Y; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Deng, Linhong

    2015-03-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays a central role in the excessive narrowing of the airway that characterizes the primary functional impairment in asthma. This phenomenon is known as airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR). Emerging evidence suggests that the development and maintenance of ASM force involves dynamic reorganization of the subcellular filament network in both the cytoskeleton and the contractile apparatus. In this review, evidence is presented to support the view that regulation of ASM contraction extends beyond the classical actomyosin interaction and involves processes within the cytoskeleton and at the interfaces between the cytoskeleton, the contractile apparatus, and the extracellular matrix. These processes are initiated when the muscle is activated, and collectively they cause the cytoskeleton and the contractile apparatus to undergo structural transformation, resulting in a more connected and solid state that allows force generated by the contractile apparatus to be transmitted to the extracellular domain. Solidification of the cytoskeleton also serves to stiffen the muscle and hence the airway. Oscillatory strain from tidal breathing and deep inspiration is believed to be the counter balance that prevents hypercontraction and stiffening of ASM in vivo. Dysregulation of this balance could lead to AHR seen in asthma.

  17. Differences in time to peak carbachol-induced contractions between circular and longitudinal smooth muscles of mouse ileum.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Samezawa, Nanako; Nishiyama, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The muscular layer in the GI tract consists of an inner circular muscular layer and an outer longitudinal muscular layer. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the representative neurotransmitter that causes contractions in the gastrointestinal tracts of most animal species. There are many reports of muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction of longitudinal muscles, but few studies discuss circular muscles. The present study detailed the contractile response in the circular smooth muscles of the mouse ileum. We used small muscle strips (0.2 mm × 1 mm) and large muscle strips (4 × 4 mm) isolated from the circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the mouse ileum to compare contraction responses in circular and longitudinal smooth muscles. The time to peak contractile responses to carbamylcholine (CCh) were later in the small muscle strips (0.2 × 1 mm) of circular muscle (5.7 min) than longitudinal muscles (0.4 min). The time to peak contractile responses to CCh in the large muscle strips (4 × 4 mm) were also later in the circular muscle (3.1 min) than the longitudinal muscle (1.4 min). Furthermore, a muscarinic M2 receptor antagonist and gap junction inhibitor significantly delayed the time to peak contraction of the large muscle strips (4 × 4 mm) from the circular muscular layer. Our findings indicate that muscarinic M2 receptors in the circular muscular layer of mouse ileum exert a previously undocumented function in gut motility via the regulation of gap junctions.

  18. Glucose and glucosamine regulate growth factor gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    McClain, D A; Paterson, A J; Roos, M D; Wei, X; Kudlow, J E

    1992-09-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the expression of two growth factors found in vascular smooth muscle, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Cells cultured in medium containing 30 mM glucose exhibited a 2-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA and a 3-fold increase in bFGF mRNA compared with cells grown in normal (5.5 mM) glucose. Glucosamine was more potent than glucose, leading to a 6-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA. TGF alpha protein levels were also increased by glucosamine treatment, and the predominant species present was the membrane-bound precursor form of TGF alpha. To examine further the regulation of growth factors by sugars, cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were transfected with a plasmid construct consisting of a 1.2-kilobase-pair fragment of the TGF alpha promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Increasing the concentration of glucose in the culture medium from 5.5 mM to 30 mM led to a rapid, 1.7-fold increase in the activity of the TGF alpha promoter. Glucosamine was much more potent than glucose in this stimulation, with 2 mM glucosamine causing a 12-fold increase in TGF alpha promoter activity. Insulin had no effect on luciferase activity in either the presence or the absence of added sugars. The glucose response element of the TGF alpha gene maps to a 130-base-pair segment that includes three potential binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1. We conclude that high glucose concentrations such as are reached in diabetes mellitus can stimulate the transcription of the genes for growth factors in vascular smooth muscle cells. This signaling pathway apparently involves the metabolism of glucose to glucosamine. This effect could be representative of nutritional regulation of a family of genes and could contribute to the toxicity of hyperglycemia and the vascular complications of diabetes. PMID:1518840

  19. Glucose and glucosamine regulate growth factor gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, D A; Paterson, A J; Roos, M D; Wei, X; Kudlow, J E

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the expression of two growth factors found in vascular smooth muscle, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Cells cultured in medium containing 30 mM glucose exhibited a 2-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA and a 3-fold increase in bFGF mRNA compared with cells grown in normal (5.5 mM) glucose. Glucosamine was more potent than glucose, leading to a 6-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA. TGF alpha protein levels were also increased by glucosamine treatment, and the predominant species present was the membrane-bound precursor form of TGF alpha. To examine further the regulation of growth factors by sugars, cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were transfected with a plasmid construct consisting of a 1.2-kilobase-pair fragment of the TGF alpha promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Increasing the concentration of glucose in the culture medium from 5.5 mM to 30 mM led to a rapid, 1.7-fold increase in the activity of the TGF alpha promoter. Glucosamine was much more potent than glucose in this stimulation, with 2 mM glucosamine causing a 12-fold increase in TGF alpha promoter activity. Insulin had no effect on luciferase activity in either the presence or the absence of added sugars. The glucose response element of the TGF alpha gene maps to a 130-base-pair segment that includes three potential binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1. We conclude that high glucose concentrations such as are reached in diabetes mellitus can stimulate the transcription of the genes for growth factors in vascular smooth muscle cells. This signaling pathway apparently involves the metabolism of glucose to glucosamine. This effect could be representative of nutritional regulation of a family of genes and could contribute to the toxicity of hyperglycemia and the vascular complications of diabetes. Images PMID:1518840

  20. Pharmacological study of atypical beta-adrenoceptors in rat esophageal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lezama, E J; Konkar, A A; Salazar-Bookaman, M M; Miller, D D; Feller, D R

    1996-07-11

    The chemical specificity for the beta-adrenoceptor mediated relaxation of rat esophageal smooth muscle was evaluated using selective and non-selective beta-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists. Pindolol, ICI 89,406, ICI 118551 [erythro-1-(7-methylindan-4-yloxy)-3-(isopropylamine)-but an-2-ol] and the beta-adrenoceptor alkylating agent, pindobind, produced only small rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves of (-)-isoprenaline and (-)-trimetoquinol in this preparation. Rank order potency (pD2 values) of agonists was: (+/-)-trimetoquinol [1-(3',4',5'-trimethoxybenzyl)-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3, 4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (8.34) = (-)-trimetoquinol (8.26) = BRL 37344 [(R* R*)-(+/-)-4-[2'-2-hydroxy 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethylamino]propyl] phenoxyacetic acid] (8.16) = ICID7114 [(S)-4-(2-hydroxy- 3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy)-N-(2-methoxyethyl) phenoxyacetamide] (8.03) > or = (-)-isoprenaline (7.82) > 3',5'-diiodotrimetoquinol [1-(3',5'-diiodo-4'-methoxybenzyl)-6, 7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (7.28) > 3'-iodotrimetoquinol [1-(3'-iodo-4',5'-dimethoxybenzyl)-6, 7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (7.04) > ractopamine (6.84) = 5,8-difluorotrimetoquinol [5,8-difluoro-6,7-dihydroxy-1- (3',4',5'-trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (6.82) > 8-fluorotrimetoquinol [6,7-dihydroxy-8-fluoro-1-(3',4',5'- trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (6.56) > or = (-)-noradrenaline (6.46) > or = (-)-adrenaline (6.36) > (+/-)-noradrenaline (6.24) > (+/-)-adrenaline (6.00) > clenbuterol (5.83) > (-)-1-benzyl-6, 7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (5.75). Isomeric activity ratios of trimetoquinol isomers [(-)-(S)- > > (+)-(R)-] in esophageal smooth muscle in the presence and absence of 1 microM pindolol were 1995- and 2951-fold, respectively; and were much greater than those in rat atria (282-fold) and rat trachea (107-fold). The atypical beta/beta 3-adrenoceptor partial agonist, ICI D7114, produced concentration-dependent rightward

  1. [Effects of cell-binding protein A of Staphylococcus aureus on the level of intracellular calcium ions and actomyosin ATP-ase activity in the smooth muscles].

    PubMed

    Melenevs'ka, N V; Miroshnychenko, M S; Filippov, I B; Artemenko, O Iu; Shuba, M F

    2006-01-01

    Immune-active substance of Staphylococcus aureus, cell-bound protein A (CBPA), enhances the acetylcholine- or hyperpotassium (K+) Krebs solution-evoked excitation in Taenia coli smooth muscles. CBPA increases caffeine- and carbachole-evoked Ca2+ signals in smooth muscle cells suspension, loaded with indo-1, and also caffeine- and acetylcholine-evoked contraction in smooth muscles slices. Against a background of CBPA-suppressed action of sodium nitroprusside, ATP evokes the membrane depolarization. CBPA in small concentrations potentiates ATPase (Mg2+,Ca2+-; Mg2+- and Mg2+- in the presence of EGTA) activity of actomyosin in the smooth muscles.

  2. Elevated Glucose Levels Promote Contractile and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle via Rho/Protein Kinase C and Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hien, Tran Thi; Turczyńska, Karolina M; Dahan, Diana; Ekman, Mari; Grossi, Mario; Sjögren, Johan; Nilsson, Johan; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Stenkula, Karin; Swärd, Karl; Gomez, Maria F; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-02-12

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is in part attributed to the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In diabetic animal models, hyperglycemia results in hypercontractility of vascular smooth muscle possibly due to increased activation of Rho-kinase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of contractile smooth muscle markers by glucose and to determine the signaling pathways that are activated by hyperglycemia in smooth muscle cells. Microarray, quantitative PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein expression of contractile smooth muscle markers were increased in isolated smooth muscle cells cultured under high compared with low glucose conditions. This effect was also observed in hyperglycemic Akita mice and in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose activated the protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathways and stimulated actin polymerization. Glucose-induced expression of contractile smooth muscle markers in cultured cells could be partially or completely repressed by inhibitors of advanced glycation end products, L-type calcium channels, protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, actin polymerization, and myocardin-related transcription factors. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the miR-143/145 cluster prevented the effects of glucose on smooth muscle marker expression. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a possible link between hyperglycemia and vascular disease states associated with smooth muscle contractility.

  3. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells as a Source of Smooth Muscle Cells in the Regeneration of Muscular Layer of Urinary Bladder Wall

    PubMed Central

    SALEM, Salah Abood; HWIE, Angela Ng Min; SAIM, Aminuddin; CHEE KONG, Christopher Ho; SAGAP, Ismail; SINGH, Rajesh; YUSOF, Mohd Reusmaazran; MD ZAINUDDIN, Zulkifili; HJ IDRUS, Ruszymah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adipose tissue provides an abundant source of multipotent cells, which represent a source of cell-based regeneration strategies for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. Our objective was to confirm that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can be differentiated into smooth muscle cells. Methods: In this study, adipose tissue samples were digested with 0.075% collagenase, and the resulting ADSCs were cultured and expanded in vitro. ADSCs at passage two were differentiated by incubation in smooth muscle inductive media (SMIM) consisting of MCDB I31 medium, 1% FBS, and 100 U/mL heparin for three and six weeks. ADSCs in non-inductive media were used as controls. Characterisation was performed by cell morphology and gene and protein expression. Result: The differentiated cells became elongated and spindle shaped, and towards the end of six weeks, sporadic cell aggregation appeared that is typical of smooth muscle cell culture. Smooth muscle markers (i.e. alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA), calponin, and myosin heavy chain (MHC)) were used to study gene expression. Expression of these genes was detected by PCR after three and six weeks of differentiation. At the protein expression level, ASMA, MHC, and smoothelin were expressed after six weeks of differentiation. However, only ASMA and smoothelin were expressed after three weeks of differentiation. Conclusion: Adipose tissue provides a possible source of smooth muscle precursor cells that possess the potential capability of smooth muscle differentiation. This represents a promising alternative for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. PMID:24044001

  4. Prostanoid receptors EP2, EP4, and FP are regulated by estradiol in bovine oviductal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Huang, Na; Liu, Bo; Dong, Zhiheng; Mao, Wei; Zhang, Nan; Li, Changyou; Cao, Jinshan

    2015-09-01

    Gamete and embryo transport is an important function of the oviduct. This transport involves both smooth muscle contraction and epithelial cell secretions, the former of which is mediated by prostaglandins (PGs) and their receptors. Our aim was to study the regulation of prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2α receptors (EP2, EP4, and FP receptor) by estradiol in bovine oviduct smooth muscle. EP2, EP4, and FP receptor mRNA and protein expression was investigated using real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses, respectively. To evaluate the contraction or relaxation of cultured bovine oviductal smooth muscle tissue, peristalsis was used to assess contractile activity. EP2, EP4, and FP receptor mRNA and protein expression was increased in oviductal smooth muscle tissue after treatment with different concentrations of estradiol for various durations. The expression of all receptors peaked at an estradiol concentration of 10(-11)mol/L after 8h of treatment, whereas no increase in expression was observed after fulvestrant (a selective antagonist of E2 receptor) treatment, indicating that E2 interacts with specific E2 nuclear receptors to regulate EP2, EP4, and FP receptor expression. Although PGF2α and PGE2 induced both contraction and relaxation, no significant differences were found in contractility between the estradiol-treated and control groups, with both groups of cultured smooth muscle strips showing similar vitality. In conclusion, estradiol increases EP2, EP4, and FP receptor mRNA and protein expression in bovine oviductal smooth muscle when added for different periods of time and at different concentrations. Additionally, E2 is transported intracellularly and interacts with specific E2 nuclear receptors to regulate their expression.

  5. Estradiol increases IP3 by a nongenomic mechanism in the smooth muscle cells from the rat oviduct.

    PubMed

    Reuquén, Patricia; Oróstica, María L; Rojas, Israel; Díaz, Patricia; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Orihuela, Pedro A

    2015-10-01

    Estradiol (E2) accelerates egg transport by a nongenomic action, requiring activation of estrogen receptor (ER) and successive cAMP and IP3 production in the rat oviduct. Furthermore, E2 increases IP3 production in primary cultures of oviductal smooth muscle cells. As smooth muscle cells are the mechanical effectors for the accelerated oocyte transport induced by E2 in the oviduct, herein we determined the mechanism by which E2 increases IP3 in these cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis by Actinomycin D did not affect the E2-induced IP3 increase, although this was blocked by the ER antagonist ICI182780 and the inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC) ET-18-OCH3. Immunoelectron microscopy for ESR1 or ESR2 showed that these receptors were associated with the plasma membrane, indicating compatible localization with E2 nongenomic actions in the smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ESR1 but not ESR2 agonist mimicked the effect of E2 on the IP3 level. Finally, E2 stimulated the activity of a protein associated with the contractile tone, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), in the smooth muscle cells. We conclude that E2 increases IP3 by a nongenomic action operated by ESR1 and that involves the activation of PLC in the smooth muscle cells of the rat oviduct. This E2 effect is associated with CaMKII activation in the smooth muscle cells, suggesting that IP3 and CaMKII are involved in the contractile activity necessary to accelerate oviductal egg transport. PMID:26159830

  6. Estradiol increases IP3 by a nongenomic mechanism in the smooth muscle cells from the rat oviduct.

    PubMed

    Reuquén, Patricia; Oróstica, María L; Rojas, Israel; Díaz, Patricia; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Orihuela, Pedro A

    2015-10-01

    Estradiol (E2) accelerates egg transport by a nongenomic action, requiring activation of estrogen receptor (ER) and successive cAMP and IP3 production in the rat oviduct. Furthermore, E2 increases IP3 production in primary cultures of oviductal smooth muscle cells. As smooth muscle cells are the mechanical effectors for the accelerated oocyte transport induced by E2 in the oviduct, herein we determined the mechanism by which E2 increases IP3 in these cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis by Actinomycin D did not affect the E2-induced IP3 increase, although this was blocked by the ER antagonist ICI182780 and the inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC) ET-18-OCH3. Immunoelectron microscopy for ESR1 or ESR2 showed that these receptors were associated with the plasma membrane, indicating compatible localization with E2 nongenomic actions in the smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ESR1 but not ESR2 agonist mimicked the effect of E2 on the IP3 level. Finally, E2 stimulated the activity of a protein associated with the contractile tone, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), in the smooth muscle cells. We conclude that E2 increases IP3 by a nongenomic action operated by ESR1 and that involves the activation of PLC in the smooth muscle cells of the rat oviduct. This E2 effect is associated with CaMKII activation in the smooth muscle cells, suggesting that IP3 and CaMKII are involved in the contractile activity necessary to accelerate oviductal egg transport.

  7. Bronchodilatory and B-adrenergic effects of methanolic and aqueous extracts of Althaea root on isolated tracheobronchial smooth rat muscle

    PubMed Central

    Alani, Behrang; Zare, Mohammad; Noureddini, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The smooth muscle contractions of the tracheobronchial airways are mediated through the balance of adrenergic, cholinergic and peptidergic nervous mechanisms. This research was designed to determine the bronchodilatory and B-adrenergic effects of methanolic and aqueous extracts of root Althaea on the isolated tracheobronchial smooth muscle of the rat. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 116 tracheobronchial sections (5 mm) from 58 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were dissected and divided into 23 groups. The effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts of the root Althaea was assayed at different concentrations (0.2, 0.6, 2.6, 6.6, 14.6 μg/ml) and epinephrine (5 μm) in the presence and absence of propranolol (1 μM) under one g tension based on the isometric method. This assay was recorded in an organ bath containing Krebs-Henseleit solution for tracheobronchial smooth muscle contractions using potassium chloride (KCl) (60 mM) induction. Results: Epinephrine (5 μm) alone and root methanolic and aqueous extract concentrations (0.6-14.6 μg/ml) reduced tracheobronchial smooth muscle contractions induced using KCl (60 mM) in a dose dependent manner. Propranolol inhibited the antispasmodic effect of epinephrine on tracheobronchial smooth muscle contractions, but could not reduce the antispasmodic effect of the root extract concentrations. Conclusion: The methanolic and aqueous extracts of Althaea root inhibited the tracheobronchial smooth muscle contractions of rats in a dose dependent manner, but B-adrenergic receptors do not appear to engage in this process. Understanding the mechanism of this process can be useful in the treatment of pulmonary obstructive diseases like asthma. PMID:25879003

  8. Marker profile for the evaluation of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell quality obtained by different isolation and culture methods.

    PubMed

    Mazza, G; Roßmanith, E; Lang-Olip, I; Pfeiffer, D

    2016-08-01

    Even though umbilical cord arteries are a common source of vascular smooth muscle cells, the lack of reliable marker profiles have not facilitated the isolation of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMC). For accurate characterization of HUASMC and cells in their environment, the expression of smooth muscle and mesenchymal markers was analyzed in umbilical cord tissue sections. The resulting marker profile was then used to evaluate the quality of HUASMC isolation and culture methods. HUASMC and perivascular-Wharton's jelly stromal cells (pv-WJSC) showed positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), desmin, vimentin and CD90. Anti-CD10 stained only pv-WJSC. Consequently, HUASMC could be characterized as α-SMA+ , SM-MHC+ , CD10- cells, which are additionally negative for endothelial markers (CD31 and CD34). Enzymatic isolation provided primary HUASMC batches with 90-99 % purity, yet, under standard culture conditions, contaminant CD10+ cells rapidly constituted more than 80 % of the total cell population. Contamination was mainly due to the poor adhesion of HUASMC to cell culture plates, regardless of the different protein coatings (fibronectin, collagen I or gelatin). HUASMC showed strong attachment and long-term viability only in 3D matrices. The explant isolation method achieved cultures with only 13-40 % purity with considerable contamination by CD10+ cells. CD10+ cells showed spindle-like morphology and up-regulated expression of α-SMA and SM-MHC upon culture in smooth muscle differentiation medium. Considering the high contamination risk of HUASMC cultures by CD10+ neighboring cells and their phenotypic similarities, precise characterization is mandatory to avoid misleading results.

  9. Polyamines transduce the nongenomic, androgen-induced calcium sensitization in intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    González-Montelongo, María C; Marín, Raquel; Pérez, José A; Gómez, Tomás; Díaz, Mario

    2013-10-01

    Androgens regulate body development and differentiation through a variety of genotropic mechanisms, mostly in reproductive organs. In recent years a different scenario for sex hormone actions has emerged: the intestinal muscle. Thus, although estrogens relax intestinal muscle, androgens are powerful inducers of mechanical potentiation. This effect of androgens was intriguing because it is observed at physiological concentrations, is mediated by nongenomic mechanisms, and involves a phenomenon of calcium sensitization of contractile machinery by stimulating phosphorylation of 20 kDa myosin light chain by Rho-associated kinase. Here we have deciphered the molecular mechanisms underlying calcium sensitization and mechanical potentiation by androgens in male intestinal muscle as well as its tight relationship to polyamine metabolism. Thus, androgens stimulate polyamine synthesis, and the inhibition of polyamine synthesis abolishes androgen-induced calcium sensitization and 20 kDa myosin light chain phosphorylation. We demonstrate that the first molecular step in the induction of calcium sensitization is a nonconventional activation of the adaptor protein RhoA, triggered by a transglutaminase-catalyzed polyamination of RhoA, which is then targeted to the membrane to activate Rho-associated kinase. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the physiological levels of androgens, through the modulation of polyamine metabolism and posttanslational modification of RhoA, activate a new signal transduction pathway in the intestinal smooth muscle to induce calcium sensitization. Furthermore, apart from being one of the few physiologically relevant nongenomic effects of androgens, these results might underlie the well-known gender differences in intestinal transits, thus expanding the nature's inventory of sex hormones effects.

  10. Antitubulin antibody in healthy adults and patients with infectious mononucleosis and its relationship to smooth muscle antibody (SMA).

    PubMed Central

    Mead, G M; Cowin, P; Whitehouse, J M

    1980-01-01

    Antibody to tubulin in man has been studied using a specific radioimmunoassay, affinity chromatography radioimmunoassay but markedly increased levels were noted in patients with infectious mononucleosis where the antibody was predominantly IgM in type. This finding was confirmed on fluorescence microscopy. Affinity chromatography purified antibody produced characteristic microtubular staining of fixed 3T3 cells, but in addition, produced weak staining of cryostat sections of rat tissue, similar in distribution to that of smooth muscle antibody. Our studies indicate that the IgM smooth muscle antibody found in infectious mononucleosis by IF techniques is at least in part due to an antitubulin antibody. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6993069

  11. Activation of protein kinase C accelerates contraction kinetics of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Peiper, U; Knipp, S C; Thies, B; Henke, R

    1996-01-01

    Contraction kinetics of isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle were studied by analysing the increase of force subsequent to force-inhibiting passive length changes lasting 1 s (100 Hz, sinus, 5% of muscle length). Compared with carbachol activation, phorboldibutyrate (PDBu)-induced stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) demonstrated no significant difference in the extent of force development in the polarized preparation [mean peak force 9.16 +/- 0.37 mN (carbachol) vs. 9.12 +/- 0.37 mN (PDBu)]. However, the time constant calculated for the slow component of post-vibration force recovery was 6.40 +/- 0.29 s after addition of PDBu vs. 22.39 +/- 1.40 s during carbachol activation, indicating a significant phorbol ester-induced acceleration of the cross-bridge cycling rate. In the K-depolarized preparation, treatment with 26.4 microM indolactam (IL) to activate PKC produced muscle relaxation (9.94 +/- 0.16 mN measured 0-30 min after the onset of depolarization vs. 4.13 +/- 0.05 mN measured during 30-60 min of IL treatment). Again, even in the presence of high sarcoplasmic Ca2+ resulting from tonic depolarization, PKC activation was associated with a distinct diminution of the time constant (25.99 +/- 0.79 s during the first 30 min of depolarization vs. 10.32 +/- 0.21 s during 30-60 min of IL treatment). In contrast, addition of 0.035 microM verapamil, 1.5 microM isoproterenol, and 32 microM dibutyryl-cAMP to the bathing medium induced relaxation without affecting the rate of post-vibration force recovery. The results suggest that the calcium-dependent signal cascade (agonist receptor/inositol trisphosphate/ Ca(2+)-calmodulin/myosin light chain kinase) hardly affects the regulation of contraction kinetics in the tonically activated intact smooth muscle preparation. PKC stimulation, however, accelerates actin/myosin interaction kinetics, possibly by inhibition of phosphatase(s).

  12. Effect of 45 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) upon the smooth muscle of rat trachea: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    González, Carmen; Salazar-García, Samuel; Palestino, Gabriela; Martínez-Cuevas, Pedro P; Ramírez-Lee, Manuel A; Jurado-Manzano, Brenda B; Rosas-Hernández, Héctor; Gaytán-Pacheco, Noemí; Martel, Guadalupe; Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; Biris, Alexandru S; Ali, Syed F

    2011-12-15

    AgNPs have been used to manufacture nanomaterials with new biophysical properties and functions. However, few experimental approaches have been used to assess their potential toxic or beneficial effects on human health, in association with the size, concentration, and biological target. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of the AgNPs on the smooth muscle of rat trachea. A single administration of AgNPs did not modify the smooth muscle tone, but, when the trachea rings were pre-treated with acetylcholine (ACh), AgNPs produced a contractile effect. Simultaneous administration of AgNPs and ACh resulted in a slight increase of smooth muscle contractility induced by ACh. AgNPs pretreatment followed by ACh administration showed that AgNPs exerted an important contraction effect induced by ACh after which muscle tone did not return to the basal level. This effect was associated with an increase in the production of nitric oxide (NO). The contractile response of the AgNPs induced by ACh was completely blocked when the rings were incubated, after the ACh but before the AgNPs administration, with 1400 W (NO blocker). The contractile effect was also abolished by atropine, which suggests that AgNPs alter ACh muscarinic receptor signaling. These data also show that AgNPs modify the contractile action of ACh through NO production and possibly induce hyper-reactivity of tracheal smooth muscle.

  13. Orthogonally oriented scaffolds with aligned fibers for engineering intestinal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masae; Lei, Nan Ye; Wang, Qianqian; Wu, Benjamin M.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling cellular alignment is critical in engineering intestines with desired structure and function. Although previous studies have examined the directional alignment of cells on the surface (x-y plane) of parallel fibers, quantitative analysis of the cellular alignment inside implanted scaffolds with oriented fibers has not been reported. This study examined the cellular alignment in the x-z and y-z planes of scaffolds made with two layers of orthogonally oriented fibers. The cellular orientation inside implanted scaffolds was evaluated with immunofluorescence. Quantitative analysis of coherency between cell orientation and fiber direction confirmed that cells aligned along the fibers not only on the surface (x-y plane) but also inside the scaffolds (x-z & y-z planes). Our study demonstrated that two layers of orthogonally aligned scaffolds can generate the histological organization of cells similar to that of intestinal circular and longitudinal smooth muscle. PMID:26001072

  14. Mutations in smooth muscle alpha-actin (ACTA2) lead to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Papke, Christina L; Yu, Robert K; Avidan, Nili; Bourgeois, Scott; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Sparks, Elizabeth; Amor, David; Ades, Lesley; McConnell, Vivienne; Willoughby, Colin E; Abuelo, Dianne; Willing, Marcia; Lewis, Richard A; Kim, Dong H; Scherer, Steve; Tung, Poyee P; Ahn, Chul; Buja, L Maximilian; Raman, C S; Shete, Sanjay S; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2007-12-01

    The major function of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is contraction to regulate blood pressure and flow. SMC contractile force requires cyclic interactions between SMC alpha-actin (encoded by ACTA2) and the beta-myosin heavy chain (encoded by MYH11). Here we show that missense mutations in ACTA2 are responsible for 14% of inherited ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). Structural analyses and immunofluorescence of actin filaments in SMCs derived from individuals heterozygous for ACTA2 mutations illustrate that these mutations interfere with actin filament assembly and are predicted to decrease SMC contraction. Aortic tissues from affected individuals showed aortic medial degeneration, focal areas of medial SMC hyperplasia and disarray, and stenotic arteries in the vasa vasorum due to medial SMC proliferation. These data, along with the previously reported MYH11 mutations causing familial TAAD, indicate the importance of SMC contraction in maintaining the structural integrity of the ascending aorta.

  15. Direct effect of croton oil on intestinal epithelial cells and colonic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Lan, Mei; Wu, Han-Ping; Shi, Yong-Quan; Lu, Ju; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kai-Cun; Jin, Jian-Ping; Fan, Dai Ming

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the direct effect of croton oil (CO) on human intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) and guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells in vitro. METHODS: Growth curves of HIEC were drawn by MTT colorimetry. The dynamics of cell proliferation was analyzed with flow cytometry, and morphological changes were observed under light and electron microscopy after long-term (6 weeks) treatment with CO.Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA was detected by dot blot in HIEC treated with CO. Genes related to CO were screened by DD-PCR, and the direct effect of CO on the contractility of isolated guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells was observed. RESULTS: High concentration (20-40 mg·L-1) CO inhibited cell growth significantly (1, 3, 5, 7 d OD sequence: (20 mg·L-1 ) 0.040 ± 0.003, 0.081 ± 0.012, 0.147 ± 0.022,0.024 ± 0.016; (40 mg·L-1) 0.033 ± 0.044, 0.056 ± 0.012, 0.104 ± 0.010, 0.189 ± 0.006; OD control 0.031 ± 0.008, 0.096 ± 0.012, 0.173 ± 0.009, 0.300 ± 0.016, P < 0.01), which appeared to be related directly to the dosage. Compared with the control, the fraction number of cells in G1 phase decreased from 0.60 to 0.58, while that in S phase increased from 0.30 to 0.34 and DNA index also increased after 6 weeks of treatment with CO (the dosage was increased gradually from 4 to 40 mg·L-1). Light microscopic observation revealed that cells had karyomegaly, less plasma and karyoplasm lopsidedness. Electron microscopy also showed an increase in cell proliferation and in the quantity of abnormal nuclei with pathologic mitosis. Expression of COX-2 mRNA decreased significantly in HIEC treated with CO. Thirteen differential cDNA fragments were cloned from HIEC treated with CO, one of which was 100 percent homologous with human mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit II. The length of isolated guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells was significantly shortened after treatment with CO (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: At a high CO concentration ( > 20 mg·L-1

  16. Functional role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Munehisa, Yoshiko; Koyama, Takashi; Nobori, Kiyoshi; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2007-10-05

    We investigated the functional role of STIM1, a Ca{sup 2+} sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that regulates store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). STIM1 was mainly localized at the ER and plasma membrane. The knockdown of STIM1 expression by small interfering (si) RNA drastically decreased SOCE. In contrast, an EF-hand mutant of STIM1, STIM1{sup E87A}, produced a marked increase in SOCE, which was abolished by co-transfection with siRNA to transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). In addition, transfection with siRNA against STIM1 suppressed phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and cell growth. These results suggest that STIM1 is an essential component of SOCE and that it is involved in VSMC proliferation.

  17. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail the potential for vascular disease modeling using iPSC-derived SMCs and consider the pathological implications of heterogeneous embryonic origins. Finally, we touch upon the role of human ESC-derived SMCs in therapeutic revascularization and the challenges remaining before regenerative medicine using ESC- or iPSC-derived cells comes of age.

  18. Mesenchymal tumors of the mouse urinary bladder with vascular and smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Butler, W H; Cohen, S H; Squire, R A

    1997-01-01

    Bifenthrin, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide/miticide, has been fed to male and female Swiss Webster mice at levels of 0, 50, 200, 500, and 600 ppm in the diet for between 604 and 644 days. Tumors of the urinary bladder were observed and initially reported as leiomyosarcomas. Subsequently, the bladders were reviewed and the tumors showed a pattern of both epithelioid cells and spindle cells forming irregular vascular channels. The tumors appeared to arise from the trigone of the bladder and, in some cases, invaded the bladder wall. No metastases were recorded. The tumor is usually considered rare; however, in this study, it was commonly observed in all groups but predominantly in males. The histogenesis of the tumor is uncertain, but from its pleomorphic histological features, including smooth muscle and vascularity, it is probably derived from vascular mesenchyme.

  19. Adipocytokines in Atherothrombosis: Focus on Platelets and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anfossi, Giovanni; Russo, Isabella; Doronzo, Gabriella; Pomero, Alice; Trovati, Mariella

    2010-01-01

    Visceral obesity is a relevant pathological condition closely associated with high risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease including myocardial infarction and stroke. The increased vascular risk is related also to peculiar dysfunction in the endocrine activity of adipose tissue responsible of vascular impairment (including endothelial dysfunction), prothrombotic tendency, and low-grade chronic inflammation. In particular, increased synthesis and release of different cytokines, including interleukins and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and adipokines—such as leptin—have been reported as associated with future cardiovascular events. Since vascular cell dysfunction plays a major role in the atherothrombotic complications in central obesity, this paper aims at focusing, in particular, on the relationship between platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the impaired secretory pattern of adipose tissue. PMID:20652043

  20. Thrombospondin-1, -2 and -5 have differential effects on vascular smooth muscle cell physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Helkin, Alex; Maier, Kristopher G.; Gahtan, Vivian

    2015-09-04

    Introduction: The thrombospondins (TSPs) are matricellular proteins that exert multifunctional effects by binding cytokines, cell-surface receptors and other proteins. TSPs play important roles in vascular pathobiology and are all expressed in arterial lesions. The differential effects of TSP-1, -2, and -5 represent a gap in knowledge in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) physiology. Our objective is to determine if structural differences of the TSPs imparted different effects on VSMC functions critical to the formation of neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesize that TSP-1 and -2 induce similar patterns of migration, proliferation and gene expression, while the effects of TSP-5 are different. Methods: Human aortic VSMC chemotaxis was tested for TSP-2 and TSP-5 (1–40 μg/mL), and compared to TSP-1 and serum-free media (SFM) using a modified Boyden chamber. Next, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2 or TSP-5 (0.2–40 μg/mL). Proliferation was assessed by MTS assay. Finally, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2, TSP-5 or SFM for 3, 6 or 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on 96 genes using a microfluidic card. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA or t-test, with p < 0.05 being significant. Results: TSP-1, TSP-2 and TSP-5 at 20 μg/mL all induce chemotaxis 3.1 fold compared to serum-free media. TSP-1 and TSP-2 induced proliferation 53% and 54% respectively, whereas TSP-5 did not. In the gene analysis, overall, cardiovascular system development and function is the canonical pathway most influenced by TSP treatment, and includes multiple growth factors, cytokines and proteases implicated in cellular migration, proliferation, vasculogenesis, apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Conclusions and relevance: The results of this study indicate TSP-1, -2, and -5 play active roles in VSMC physiology and gene expression. Similarly to TSP-1, VSMC chemotaxis to TSP-2 and -5 is dose-dependent. TSP-1 and -2 induces VSMC proliferation, but TSP-5 does not, likely

  1. Inhibitory Effects and Mechanisms of Luteolin on Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dehua; Li, Dongye; Wu, Wanling

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is a complicated progress, involving many types of cells. Although the exact mechanisms of progression of atherosclerosis are uncertain, the balance of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation and apoptosis appears to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, and much discussion has been undertaken to elucidate the detailed mechanisms, relevant gene expression and transduction pathways. Drug treatment has focused on ameliorating atherosclerosis. Some researchers have indicated that inhibiting VSMCs proliferation is involved in attenuating atherosclerosis. Luteolin is a kind of flavonoids naturally occurring in many plants and possesses beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Luteolin can reduce VSMCs’ proliferation and migration and this reduction is stimulated by several factors. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing inhibitory effects and mechanisms of luteolin on proliferation and migration of VSMCs, and consider whether luteolin may be a potential candidate for preventing and treating atherosclerosis. PMID:23686014

  2. Epidermal growth factor-mediated effects on equine vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grosenbaugh, D.A.; Amoss, M.S.; Hood, D.M.; Morgan, S.J.; Williams, J.D. )

    1988-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding kinetics and EGF-mediated stimulation of DNA synthesis and cellular proliferation were studied in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from the equine thoracic aorta. Binding studies, using murine {sup 125}I-labeled EGF, indicate the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites, with an estimated maximal binding capacity of 5,800 sites/cells. EGF stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake in confluent quiescent monolayers in a dose-dependent fashion, half-maximal stimulation occurring at 7.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M. Likewise, EGF-mediated cellular proliferation was dose dependent under reduced serum concentrations. Equine VSMC contain specific receptors for EGF, and EGF can stimulate DNA synthesis and proliferation in these cultured cells, which suggests that EGF may participate in the proliferative changes observed in equine distal digital peripheral vascular disease.

  3. Measurement of PLGA-NP interaction with single smooth muscle cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Mondal, Argha; Homayoni, Homa; Nguyen, Kytai; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-10-01

    For intervention of cardiovascular diseases, biodegradable and biocompatible, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) are emerging as agents of choice for controlled and targeted drug delivery. Therefore development of PLGA-NP with optimal physico-chemical properties will allow efficient binding and thus delivery of drug to targeted cells under various patho-physiological conditions. The force kinetics and its dependence on size of the NPs will be crucial for designing the NPs. Since optical tweezers allow non-contact, highly sensitive force measurement with high spatial and temporal resolution, we utilized it for studying interaction forces between magnetic PLGA nanoparticles with smooth muscle cells (SMC). In order to investigate effect of size, interaction force for 200 to 1100nm PLGA NP was measured. For similar interaction duration, the force was found to be higher with increase in size. The rupture force was found to depend on time of interaction of SMC with NPs.

  4. MicroRNA-141 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through targeting PAPP-A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Chen, Bainan; Ming, Liu; Qin, Hongsong; Zheng, Liu; Yue, Zhang; Cheng, Zhixin; Wang, Yannan; Zhang, Dawei; Liu, Chunmei; Bin, Wang; Hao, Qingzhi; Song, Fuchen; Ji, Bo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that ox-LDL plays key roles in the development of atherosclerosis, partly by inducing vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation. Recent findings have revealed that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, could regulate cell proliferation in many physiological and pathological conditions. However, the role and function of miRNAs on ox-LDL induced VSMC proliferation are not fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that ox-LDL could suppress miR-141 expression and inhibition of miR-141 could promote VSMCs proliferation. Moreover, we found that PAPPA was the direct target gene of miR-141. Overexpression of PAPPA impaired the miR-141-induced inhibition of proliferation in the VSMCs. Taken together; miR-141 may play important roles in ox-LDL-induced abnormal proliferation of the VSMC. PMID:26823756

  5. Rare Presentations of Epstein-Barr Virus--Associated Smooth Muscle Tumor in Children.

    PubMed

    Arva, Nicoleta C; Schafernak, Kristian T

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has oncogenic potential and has been implicated in the etiology of a wide range of malignancies. Certain EBV-driven neoplasms, such as smooth muscle tumors (SMTs), manifest typically in immunocompromised patients. In children, these neoplasms have been encountered in the setting of primary immune disorders, specifically severe combined and common variable immunodeficiency syndromes. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and posttransplant immunosuppression, in particular liver and kidney transplantation, likewise increase the risk in the pediatric population. The location of these neoplasms appears related to the type of immunodeficiency: in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome they are frequently located intracranially or intraspinally, whereas after transplant they usually involve the liver or lung. We report 2 distinct cases of EBV-related SMT, unique through their coassociated immunosuppressive state or location: the 1st occurred in a patient with immunodeficiency secondary to NEMO gene mutation following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; the 2nd developed in the orbit after heart transplant.

  6. Aortic smooth muscle cells migration and the role of metalloproteinases and hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Vigetti, Davide; Moretto, Paola; Viola, Manuela; Genasetti, Anna; Rizzi, Manuela; Karousou, Evgenia; Clerici, Moira; Bartolini, Barbara; Pallotti, Francesco; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) change their extracellular matrix composition during aging, with direct effects on cellular events and cell migration. For example, active matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is synthesized only by young AoSMCs, whereas aged cells produce only the inactive zymogen form. The pro-MMP-2 activation in young cells depends on an increase in membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase content. Furthermore, transcripts coding for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were upregulated in aged cells, and the increase of TIMPs also could prevent pro-MMP-2 activation. As consequence of these situations, young AoSMCs possess a higher migratory capability than aged cells on gelatin support. These data are confirmed by adding TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 to young cells which reproduces aged AoSMCs migratory behavior. The opposite effect was obtained in young cells silencing MMP-2 and TIMP-2. PMID:18661340

  7. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation from human stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Sarah K; Husain, Mansoor

    2016-05-15

    Transplantation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a promising cellular therapy to promote angiogenesis and wound healing. However, VSMCs are derived from diverse embryonic sources which may influence their role in the development of vascular disease and in its therapeutic modulation. Despite progress in understanding the mechanisms of VSMC differentiation, there remains a shortage of robust methods for generating lineage-specific VSMCs from pluripotent and adult stem/progenitor cells in serum-free conditions. Here we describe a method for differentiating pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as skin-derived precursors, into lateral plate-derived VSMCs including 'coronary-like' VSMCs and neural crest-derived VSMC, respectively. We believe this approach will have broad applications in modeling origin-specific disease vulnerability and in developing personalized cell-based vascular grafts for regenerative medicine. PMID:26678794

  8. Inhibiting Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation via Immobilization of Heparin/Fibronectin Complexes on Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui Cai; Xu, Qi Fei; Yang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of heparin/fibronectin (Hep/Fn) complexes on neointimal hyperplasia following endovascular intervention. Hep/Fn complexes were immobilized onto titanium (Ti) surfaces, with subsequent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Toluidine Blue O (TBO) and immunohistochemistry methods were used to characterize surface properties. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) cultures were used to evaluate the effect of Hep/Fn complexes on SMC proliferation. Results showed that Hep/Fn complexes successfully immobilized onto Ti surfaces and resulted in an inhibition of SMC proliferation. This study suggests that Hep/Fn surface-immobilized biomaterials develop as a new generation of biomaterials to prevent neointimal hyperplasia, particularly for use in cardiovascular implants. PMID:26055566

  9. Dual effects of trimebutine on electrical responses of gastric smooth muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Xue, L; Fukuta, H; Yamamoto, Y; Suzuki, H

    1995-12-27

    The effects of trimebutine on the electrical properties of smooth muscle membranes were studied in the isolated rat stomach, the objective being to elucidate the dual actions of this drug on gastric motility. Transmural nerve stimulation elicited a cholinergic excitatory junction potential (e.j.p.) and a nonadrenergic noncholinergic inhibitory junction potential (i.j.p.), and trimebutine inhibited the e.j.p. more than the i.j.p., with no significant change in the acetylcholine-induced depolarization. Trimebutine reduced the interval and, at high concentrations, the amplitude of slow waves. In enzymatically dispersed single cells, the Ca2+ current elicited by depolarization of the membrane was also inhibited by trimebutine. Thus, trimebutine increases slow wave frequency and inhibits cholinergic transmission and Ca2+ influx. The former would enhance while the latter two would depress gastric motility. PMID:8788418

  10. Biomechanical regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell functions: from in vitro to in vivo understanding

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Hu, Jianjun; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Guixue

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) have critical functions in vascular diseases. Haemodynamic factors are important regulators of VSMC functions in vascular pathophysiology. VSMCs are physiologically active in the three-dimensional matrix and interact with the shear stress sensor of endothelial cells (ECs). The purpose of this review is to illustrate how haemodynamic factors regulate VSMC functions under two-dimensional conditions in vitro or three-dimensional co-culture conditions in vivo. Recent advances show that high shear stress induces VSMC apoptosis through endothelial-released nitric oxide and low shear stress upregulates VSMC proliferation and migration through platelet-derived growth factor released by ECs. This differential regulation emphasizes the need to construct more actual environments for future research on vascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis and hypertension) and cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:24152813

  11. Involvement of phospholipase D in store-operated calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Tepel, M; Nofer, J R; Neusser, M; Assmann, G; Zidek, W

    2000-08-11

    In non-excitable cells, sustained intracellular Ca2+ increase critically depends on influx of extracellular Ca2+. Such Ca2+ influx is thought to occur by a 'store-operated' mechanism, i.e. the signal for Ca2+ entry is believed to result from the initial release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular stores. Here we show that the depletion of cellular Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin or bradykinin is functionally linked to a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase D (PLD) activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), and that phosphatidic acid formed via PLD enhances sustained calcium entry in this cell type. These results suggest a regulatory role for PLD in store-operated Ca2+ entry in VSMC.

  12. Peach (Prunus persica) extract inhibits angiotensin II-induced signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ryohei; Okuno, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Misa; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tokuda, Akihiko; Yamashita, Miki; Hidaka, Ryu; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a vasoactive hormone that has been implicated in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the effect of peach, Prunus persica L. Batsch, pulp extract on Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and signal transduction events in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Pretreatment of peach ethyl acetate extract inhibited Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in VSMCs. Furthermore, Ang II-induced ROS generation, essential for signal transduction events, was diminished by the peach ethyl acetate extract. The peach ethyl acetate extract also attenuated the Ang II-induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, both of which are associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension. These results suggest that peach ethyl acetate extract may have clinical potential for preventing cardiovascular diseases by interfering with Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, the generation of ROS, and then blocking signal transduction events.

  13. The induction of atherosclerotic plaque-like mounds in cultures of aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    May, J F; Paule, W J; Rounds, D E; Blankenhorn, D H; Zemplenyi, T

    1975-07-18

    Smooth muscle cells harvested from the tunica media of piglet aortae were maintained in continous culture for 10 months. When grown in the presence of 95% air and 5% CO2 they maintained a mature morphology as evaluated ultrastructurally. As these populations became confluent, the cells became oriented parallel to each other. When grown in the presence of 4% O2, 91% N2, and 5% CO2, this polarized pattern was disrupted. Focal areas of lipid accumulation were observed, succeeded by mound formation at these sites. The mound stained positive with PAS, aldehyde fuchsin, and oil red O. They were surrounded by 2-4 layers of intact cells. The centers of the mound were composed of extracellular material and cell debris.

  14. Alpha smooth muscle actin distribution in cytoplasm and nuclear invaginations of connective tissue fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Storch, Kirsten N; Taatjes, Douglas J; Bouffard, Nicole A; Locknar, Sarah; Bishop, Nicole M; Langevin, Helene M

    2007-05-01

    Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) was recently shown to be present in mouse subcutaneous tissue fibroblasts in the absence of tissue injury. In this study, we used a combination of immunohistochemistry and correlative confocal scanning laser and electron microscopy to investigate the structural organization of alpha-SMA in relation to the nucleus. Furthermore, we explored colocalization analysis as a method for quantifying the amount of alpha-SMA in close approximation to the nucleic acid marker, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl-indole, dihydrochloride. Our findings indicate the presence of alpha-SMA within nuclear invaginations in close proximity to the nuclear membrane, but not in the nucleoplasm. Although the function of these alpha-SMA-rich nuclear invaginations is at present unknown, the morphology of these structures suggests their possible involvement in cellular and nuclear mechanotransduction as well as nuclear transport.

  15. Nitric oxide directly activates calcium-dependent potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bolotina, V M; Najibi, S; Palacino, J J; Pagano, P J; Cohen, R A

    1994-04-28

    Nitric oxide is the major endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), and it is thought to relax smooth muscle cells by stimulation of guanylate cyclase, accumulation of its product cyclic GMP, and cGMP-dependent modification of several intracellular processes, including activation of potassium channels through cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Here we present evidence that both exogenous nitric oxide and native EDRF can directly activate single Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels (K+Ca) in cell-free membrane patches without requiring cGMP. Under conditions when guanylate cyclase was inhibited by methylene blue, considerable relaxation of rabbit aorta to nitric oxide persisted which was blocked by charybdotoxin, a specific inhibitor of K+Ca channels. These studies demonstrate a novel direct action of nitric oxide on K+Ca channels. PMID:7512692

  16. Pathophysiological role of vascular smooth muscle alkaline phosphatase in medial artery calcification.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Campbell R; Kuss, Pia; Narisawa, Sonoko; Yadav, Manisha C; Nigro, Jessica; Wang, Wei; Chhea, T Nicole; Sergienko, Eduard A; Kapoor, Kapil; Jackson, Michael R; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Pinkerton, Anthony B; O'Neill, W Charles; Millán, José Luis

    2015-05-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is a pathological phenomenon that causes vascular stiffening and can lead to heart failure; it is common to a variety of conditions, including aging, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, obesity, and a variety of rare genetic diseases. These conditions share the common feature of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) upregulation in the vasculature. To evaluate the role of TNAP in MVC, we developed a mouse model that overexpresses human TNAP in vascular smooth muscle cells in an X-linked manner. Hemizygous overexpressor male mice (Tagln-Cre(+/-) ; Hprt(ALPL) (/Y) or TNAP-OE) show extensive vascular calcification, high blood pressure, and cardiac hypertrophy, and have a median age of death of 44 days, whereas the cardiovascular phenotype is much less pronounced and life expectancy is longer in heterozygous (Tagln-Cre(+/-) ; Hprt(ALPL) (/-) ) female TNAP-OE mice. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation of osteoblast and chondrocyte markers and decreased expression of vascular smooth muscle markers in the aortas of TNAP-OE mice. Through medicinal chemistry efforts, we developed inhibitors of TNAP with drug-like pharmacokinetic characteristics. TNAP-OE mice were treated with the prototypical TNAP inhibitor SBI-425 or vehicle to evaluate the feasibility of TNAP inhibition in vivo. Treatment with this inhibitor significantly reduced aortic calcification and cardiac hypertrophy, and extended lifespan over vehicle-treated controls, in the absence of secondary effects on the skeleton. This study shows that TNAP in the vasculature contributes to the pathology of MVC and that it is a druggable target.

  17. Pinaverium acts as L-type calcium channel blocker on smooth muscle of colon.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Farraway, L A; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1997-08-01

    The effect of pinaverium was electrophysiologically characterized and compared with the established L-type calcium channel blockers diltiazem, D600, and nitrendipine on canine colonic circular smooth muscle. Effects were studied on the electrical activity of the smooth muscle cells, in particular the spontaneously occurring slow wave. In addition, effects were examined on spontaneous contraction patterns and contractile activities generated by stimulation of cholinergic nerves or directly by stimulating muscarinic receptors. Effects were also examined on excitation of NO-releasing intrinsic nerves. Pinaverium bromide affected the slow wave by selectively inhibiting the plateau potential that is associated with generation of contractile activity. Pinaverium, similar to diltiazem and D600, produced reductions in cholinergic responses as well as spontaneous contractions. The IC50 values for inhibition of cholinergic responses for pinaverium, diltiazem, and D600 were 1.0 x 10(-6), 4.1 x 10(-7), and 5.3 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The IC50 values for inhibition of spontaneous contractile activity for pinaverium, diltiazem, and D600 were 3.8 x 10(-6), 9.7 x 10(-7), and 8.0 x 10(-7) M, respectively. Increases in contractility by carbachol were abolished by pretreatment with either pinaverium or D600. In addition, neither pinaverium nor D600 had any effects on the inhibitory NO-mediated relaxations. These data provide a rationale for the use of pinaverium in the treatment of colonic motor disorders where excessive contraction has to be suppressed. PMID:9360010

  18. Serum can overcome contact inhibition in confluent human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Solodushko, Victor; Khader, Heba A; Fouty, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC) in an intact vessel are continually exposed to serum, but unless injured, do not proliferate, constrained by confluence. In contrast, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) attain, and maintain, confluence in the presence of minimal serum, protected from serum's stimulatory effects except when the endothelial barrier becomes more permeable. We hypothesized therefore, that confluent PASMC may be less constrained by contact inhibition in the presence of serum than PAEC and tested this idea by exposing confluent non-transformed human PAEC and PASMC to media containing increasing concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and determining cell growth over 7 days. PAEC that had attained confluence in low serum did not proliferate even when exposed to 5% serum, the highest concentration tested. In contrast, PASMC that attained confluence in low serum did proliferate once serum levels were increased, an effect that was dose dependent. Consistent with this observation, PASMC had more BrdU incorporation and a greater percentage of cells in S phase in 5% compared to 0.2% FBS, whereas no such difference was seen in PAEC. These results suggest that confluent human PAEC are resistant to the stimulatory effects of serum, whereas confluent PASMC can proliferate when serum levels are increased, an effect mediated in part by differences in phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation. This observation may be relevant to understanding the PASMC hyperplasia observed in humans and animals with pulmonary hypertension in which changes in endothelial permeability due to hypoxia or injury expose the underlying smooth muscle to serum.

  19. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hya