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Sample records for circulating smooth muscle

  1. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  2. INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dale D.

    2008-01-01

    The intermediate filament (IF) network is one of the three cytoskeletal systems in smooth muscle. The type III IF proteins vimentin and desmin are major constituents of the network in smooth muscle cells and tissues. Lack of vimentin or desmin impairs contractile ability of various smooth muscle preparations, implying their important role for smooth muscle force development. The IF framework has long been viewed as a fixed cytostructure that solely provides mechanical integrity for the cell. However, recent studies suggest that the IF cytoskeleton is dynamic in mammalian cells in response to various external stimulation. In this review, the structure and biological properties of IF proteins in smooth muscle are summarized. The role of IF proteins in the modulation of smooth muscle force development and redistribution/translocation of signaling partners (such as p130 Crk-associated substrate, CAS) is depicted. This review also summarizes our latest understanding on how the IF network may be regulated in smooth muscle. PMID:18256275

  3. Ryanodine receptors in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Rueda, Angélica

    2002-07-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle is endowed with two different types of Ca2+ release channels, i.e. inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In general, both release channels mobilize Ca2+ from the same internal store in smooth muscle. While the importance of IP3Rs in agonist-induced contraction is well established, the role of RyRs in excitation-contraction coupling of smooth muscle is not clear. The participation of smooth muscle RyRs in the amplification of Ca2+ transients induced by either opening of Ca2+-permeable channels or IP3-triggered Ca2+ release has been studied. The efficacy of both processes to activate RyRs by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is highly variable and not widely present in smooth muscle. Although RyRs in smooth muscle generate Ca2+ sparks that are similar to those observed in striated muscles, the contribution of these local Ca2+ events to depolarization-induced global rise in [Ca2+]i is rather limited. Recent data suggest that RyRs are involved in regulating the luminal [Ca2+] of SR and also in smooth muscle relaxation. This review summarizes studies that were carried out mainly in muscle strips or in freshly isolated myocytes, and that were aimed to determine the physiological role of RyRs in smooth muscle.

  4. Myosin filament structure in vertebrate smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The in vivo structure of the myosin filaments in vertebrate smooth muscle is unknown. Evidence from purified smooth muscle myosin and from some studies of intact smooth muscle suggests that they may have a nonhelical, side-polar arrangement of crossbridges. However, the bipolar, helical structure characteristic of myosin filaments in striated muscle has not been disproved for smooth muscle. We have used EM to investigate this question in a functionally diverse group of smooth muscles (from the vascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, and visual systems) from mammalian, amphibian, and avian species. Intact muscle under physiological conditions, rapidly frozen and then freeze substituted, shows many myosin filaments with a square backbone in transverse profile. Transverse sections of fixed, chemically skinned muscles also show square backbones and, in addition, reveal projections (crossbridges) on only two opposite sides of the square. Filaments gently isolated from skinned smooth muscles and observed by negative staining show crossbridges with a 14.5-nm repeat projecting in opposite directions on opposite sides of the filament. Such filaments subjected to low ionic strength conditions show bare filament ends and an antiparallel arrangement of myosin tails along the length of the filament. All of these observations are consistent with a side-polar structure and argue against a bipolar, helical crossbridge arrangement. We conclude that myosin filaments in all smooth muscles, regardless of function, are likely to be side-polar. Such a structure could be an important factor in the ability of smooth muscles to contract by large amounts. PMID:8698822

  5. The Smooth Muscle of the Artery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    to keep up with inter- national standards. The German Cancer Research Center as well as the Hax-Planck Inntitutes of Heidelberg are well equipped to...SOMLYO: I plan to briefly review some of the aspects of normal function of vascular smooth muscle with particular ---- I SMOOTH MUSCLE STRUCTURE 35...schematic review of the data on catabolism in connective tissue cells smooth muscle cells. The increasing number of electron microscopic studies of

  6. Mechanics of Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Paul H

    2015-12-15

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM; see Table 1 for a list of abbreviations) is a heterogeneous biomaterial comprised of cells and extracellular matrix. By surrounding tubes of endothelial cells, VSM forms a regulated network, the vasculature, through which oxygenated blood supplies specialized organs, permitting the development of large multicellular organisms. VSM cells, the engine of the vasculature, house a set of regulated nanomotors that permit rapid stress-development, sustained stress-maintenance and vessel constriction. Viscoelastic materials within, surrounding and attached to VSM cells, comprised largely of polymeric proteins with complex mechanical characteristics, assist the engine with countering loads imposed by the heart pump, and with control of relengthening after constriction. The complexity of this smart material can be reduced by classical mechanical studies combined with circuit modeling using spring and dashpot elements. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of VSM requires a more complete understanding of the mechanics and regulation of its biochemical parts, and ultimately, an understanding of how these parts work together to form the machinery of the vascular tree. Current molecular studies provide detailed mechanical data about single polymeric molecules, revealing viscoelasticity and plasticity at the protein domain level, the unique biological slip-catch bond, and a regulated two-step actomyosin power stroke. At the tissue level, new insight into acutely dynamic stress-strain behavior reveals smooth muscle to exhibit adaptive plasticity. At its core, physiology aims to describe the complex interactions of molecular systems, clarifying structure-function relationships and regulation of biological machines. The intent of this review is to provide a comprehensive presentation of one biomachine, VSM.

  7. Leiomodin and tropomodulin in smooth muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that actin filament remodeling is critical for smooth muscle contraction, which implicates actin filament ends as important sites for regulation of contraction. Tropomodulin (Tmod) and smooth muscle leiomodin (SM-Lmod) have been found in many tissues containing smooth muscle by protein immunoblot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both proteins cofractionate with tropomyosin in the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of rabbit stomach smooth muscle and are solubilized by high salt. SM-Lmod binds muscle tropomyosin, a biochemical activity characteristic of Tmod proteins. SM-Lmod staining is present along the length of actin filaments in rat intestinal smooth muscle, while Tmod stains in a punctate pattern distinct from that of actin filaments or the dense body marker alpha-actinin. After smooth muscle is hypercontracted by treatment with 10 mM Ca(2+), both SM-Lmod and Tmod are found near alpha-actinin at the periphery of actin-rich contraction bands. These data suggest that SM-Lmod is a novel component of the smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, that the pointed ends of actin filaments in smooth muscle may be capped by Tmod in localized clusters.

  8. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  9. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components.

  10. Vascular smooth muscle phenotypic diversity and function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The control of force production in vascular smooth muscle is critical to the normal regulation of blood flow and pressure, and altered regulation is common to diseases such as hypertension, heart failure, and ischemia. A great deal has been learned about imbalances in vasoconstrictor and vasodilator signals, e.g., angiotensin, endothelin, norepinephrine, and nitric oxide, that regulate vascular tone in normal and disease contexts. In contrast there has been limited study of how the phenotypic state of the vascular smooth muscle cell may influence the contractile response to these signaling pathways dependent upon the developmental, tissue-specific (vascular bed) or disease context. Smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle lineages are traditionally classified into fast or slow sublineages based on rates of contraction and relaxation, recognizing that this simple dichotomy vastly underrepresents muscle phenotypic diversity. A great deal has been learned about developmental specification of the striated muscle sublineages and their phenotypic interconversions in the mature animal under the control of mechanical load, neural input, and hormones. In contrast there has been relatively limited study of smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity. This is surprising given the number of diseases in which smooth muscle contractile dysfunction plays a key role. This review focuses on smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity in the vascular system, how it is generated, and how it may determine vascular function in developmental and disease contexts. PMID:20736412

  11. Skeletal muscle-smooth muscle interaction: an unusual myoelastic system.

    PubMed

    Hikida, R S; Peterson, W J

    1983-09-01

    The serratus superficialis metapatagialis (SSM) of pigeons is a skeletal muscle with unusual properties. It lies between the ribs and the trailing edge of the wing, where it is attached to the skin by a system of smooth muscles having elastic tendons. Wing movements during flight induce marked changes in this muscle's length. The SSM inserts onto the deep fascia, and at its termination the skeletal muscle contains large numbers of microtubules. Many myofibrils attach to leptomeric organelles, which then attach to the terminal end of the skeletal muscle fiber. The deep fascia next connects to the dermis of the skin by bundles of smooth muscles that have elastic tendons at both ends. This system allows large movements of the muscle while preventing its fibers from overstretching. The movements and presumed forces acting at this muscle make the presence of sensory receptors such as muscle spindles unlikely. Spindles are absent in this muscle.

  12. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  13. Interstitial cells: regulators of smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-07-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα(+) cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues.

  14. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  15. Effects of hydrogen sulphide in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Ralevic, Vera; Roberts, Richard E

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the gaseous pollutant, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) can be synthesised in the body and has a multitude of biological actions. This review summarizes some of the actions of this 'gasotransmitter' in influencing the smooth muscle that is responsible for controlling muscular activity of hollow organs. In the vasculature, while H2S can cause vasoconstriction by complex interactions with other biologically important gases, such as nitric oxide, the prevailing response is vasorelaxation. While most vasorelaxation responses occur by a direct action of H2S on smooth muscle cells, it has recently been proposed to be an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S also promotes relaxation in other smooth muscle preparations including bronchioles, the bladder, gastrointestinal tract and myometrium, opening up the opportunity of exploiting the pharmacology of H2S in the treatment of conditions where smooth muscle tone is excessive. The original concept, that H2S caused smooth muscle relaxation by activating ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, has been supplemented with observations that H2S can also modify the activity of other potassium channels, intracellular pH, phosphodiesterase activity and transient receptor potential channels on sensory nerves. While the enzymes responsible for generating endogenous H2S are widely expressed in smooth muscle preparations, it is much less clear what the physiological role of H2S is in determining smooth muscle contractility. Clarification of this requires the development of potent and selective inhibitors of H2S-generating enzymes.

  16. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  17. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  18. Autonomic modification of intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Laura E A; Tansey, Etain A; Johnson, Chris D; Roe, Sean M; Quinn, Joe G

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe this spontaneous activity and its modification by agents associated with parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activity. A section of the rabbit small intestine is suspended in an organ bath, and the use of a pressure transducer and data-acquisition software allows the measurement of tension generated by the smooth muscle of intestinal walls. The application of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter ACh at varying concentrations allows students to observe an increase in intestinal smooth muscle tone with increasing concentrations of this muscarinic receptor agonist. Construction of a concentration-effect curve allows students to calculate an EC50 value for ACh and consider some basic concepts surrounding receptor occupancy and activation. Application of the hormone epinephrine to the precontracted intestine allows students to observe the inhibitory effects associated with sympathetic nerve activation. Introduction of the drug atropine to the preparation before a maximal concentration of ACh is applied allows students to observe the inhibitory effect of a competitive antagonist on the physiological response to a receptor agonist. The final experiment involves the observation of the depolarizing effect of K(+) on smooth muscle. Students are also invited to consider why the drugs atropine, codeine, loperamide, and botulinum toxin have medicinal uses in the management of gastrointestinal problems.

  19. Endothelial and smooth muscle histamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, R.S.; Hollis, T.M.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine is produced within the vascular wall and mediates a variety of normal and pathologic vascular responses. The interaction of histamine with its vascular cell receptors has been shown to affect factors such as actin cable formation, cyclase activities, prostacyclin synthesis, cell motility, and proliferation. In addition, abundant evidence exists to implicate an arterial nascent histamine pool in the control of vessel wall permeability under conditions of stress and injury. However, endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors have been only incompletely characterized. The authors report here the time-dependent, saturable, and trypsin sensitive binding of /sup 3/H-histamine to the endothelial cell surface. The K/sub d/ for endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors are 0.70 and 2.80 ..mu..M respectively. Histamine binding to smooth muscle cells also exhibited saturation with concentrations of /sup 3/H-histamine up to 4 ..mu..M. While the smooth muscle cell H/sub 1/ receptor binding was negligible, the H/sub 2/ receptor appeared to represent a relatively low affinity, high capacity site for histamine binding. The uptake of /sup 3/H-histamine in both cell types displayed kinetics consistent with that of fluid-phase pinocytosis.

  20. Resting calcium influx in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Luis M; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca

    2005-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ leak remains the most uncertain of the cellular Ca2+ regulation pathways. During passive Ca2+ influx in non-stimulated smooth muscle cells, basal activity of constitutive Ca2+ channels seems to be involved. In vascular smooth muscle, the 3 following Ca2+ entry pathways contribute to this phenomenon: (i) via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, (ii) receptor gated Ca2+ channels, and (iii) store operated Ca2+ channels, although, in airway smooth muscle it seems only 2 passive Ca2+ influx pathways are implicated, one sensitive to SKF 96365 (receptor gated Ca2+ channels) and the other to Ni2+ (store operated Ca2+ channels). Resting Ca2+ entry could provide a sufficient amount of Ca2+ and contribute to resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), maintenance of the resting membrane potential, myogenic tone, and sarcoplasmic reticulum-Ca2+ refilling. However, further research, especially in airway smooth muscle, is required to better explore the physiological role of this passive Ca2+ influx pathway as it could be involved in airway hyperresponsiveness.

  1. On the thermodynamics of smooth muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stålhand, Jonas; McMeeking, Robert M.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2016-09-01

    Cell function is based on many dynamically complex networks of interacting biochemical reactions. Enzymes may increase the rate of only those reactions that are thermodynamically consistent. In this paper we specifically treat the contraction of smooth muscle cells from the continuum thermodynamics point of view by considering them as an open system where matter passes through the cell membrane. We systematically set up a well-known four-state kinetic model for the cross-bridge interaction of actin and myosin in smooth muscle, where the transition between each state is driven by forward and reverse reactions. Chemical, mechanical and energy balance laws are provided in local forms, while energy balance is also formulated in the more convenient temperature form. We derive the local (non-negative) production of entropy from which we deduce the reduced entropy inequality and the constitutive equations for the first Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor, the heat flux, the ion and molecular flux and the entropy. One example for smooth muscle contraction is analyzed in more detail in order to provide orientation within the established general thermodynamic framework. In particular the stress evolution, heat generation, muscle shorting rate and a condition for muscle cooling are derived.

  2. Calcium Sensitization Mechanisms in Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscles.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Brian A

    2016-04-30

    An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) is the primary trigger of contraction of gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscles. However, increasing the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the myofilaments by elevating myosin light chain phosphorylation also plays an essential role. Inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase activity with protein kinase C-potentiated phosphatase inhibitor protein-17 kDa (CPI-17) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation is considered to be the primary mechanism underlying myofilament Ca(2+) sensitization. The relative importance of Ca(2+) sensitization mechanisms to the diverse patterns of GI motility is likely related to the varied functional roles of GI smooth muscles. Increases in CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in response to agonist stimulation regulate myosin light chain phosphatase activity in phasic, tonic, and sphincteric GI smooth muscles. Recent evidence suggests that MYPT1 phosphorylation may also contribute to force generation by reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms responsible for maintaining constitutive CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in GI smooth muscles are still largely unknown. The characteristics of the cell-types comprising the neuroeffector junction lead to fundamental differences between the effects of exogenous agonists and endogenous neurotransmitters on Ca(2+) sensitization mechanisms. The contribution of various cell-types within the tunica muscularis to the motor responses of GI organs to neurotransmission must be considered when determining the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) sensitization pathways are activated. The signaling pathways regulating Ca(2+) sensitization may provide novel therapeutic strategies for controlling GI motility. This article will provide an overview of the current understanding of the biochemical basis for the regulation of Ca(2+) sensitization, while also discussing the functional importance to different smooth muscles of the GI tract.

  3. Vascular Calcification: Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent and, when present, is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. Vascular smooth muscle cells play an integral role in mediating vessel calcification by undergoing differentiation to osteoblast-like cells and generating matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for calcium-phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Once believed to be a passive process, it is now recognized that vascular calcification is a complex and highly regulated process that involves activation of cellular signaling pathways, circulating inhibitors of calcification, genetic factors, and hormones. This review will examine several of the key mechanisms linking vascular smooth muscle cells to vessel calcification that may be targeted to reduce vessel wall mineralization and, thereby, reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:25435520

  4. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  5. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  6. Smooth muscle differentiation in scleroderma fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sappino, A. P.; Masouyé, I.; Saurat, J. H.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    Using antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin and desmin on paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue sections, the authors demonstrate that fibroblastic cells of localized and systemic scleroderma lesions express features of smooth muscle differentiation. Eleven of eleven skin specimens of systemic sclerosis patients and two of four skin specimens of localized scleroderma displayed the presence of fibroblasts expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin, a cell population that predominated in areas of prominent collagen deposition. A similar fibroblastic phenotype was found in the esophagus, the liver, and the lung specimens obtained from four patients who died of progressive systemic sclerosis. Immunostaining for desmin, performed on adjacent tissue sections, demonstrated that a minority of these fibroblastic cells present in skin and visceral lesions contained this protein. The authors' observations indicate that scleroderma fibroblasts are phenotypically related to the stromal cells previously identified in hypertrophic scars, fibromatoses, and desmoplasia; they might provide novel criteria for the characterization of scleroderma lesions and help to identify the factors responsible for phenotypic modulations in fibroblastic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698026

  7. Airway smooth muscle growth in asthma: proliferation, hypertrophy, and migration.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narrowing are not known. This review will consider the evidence for airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and hypertrophy in asthma, potential functional effects, and biochemical mechanisms.

  8. Smooth muscle-selective CPI-17 expression increases vascular smooth muscle contraction and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen; Xie, Zhongwen; Liu, Shu; Calderon, Lindsay E.; Guo, Zhenheng

    2013-01-01

    Recent data revealed that protein kinase C-potentiated myosin phosphatase inhibitor of 17 kDa (CPI-17), a myosin phosphatase inhibitory protein preferentially expressed in smooth muscle, is upregulated/activated in several diseases but whether this CPI-17 increase plays a causal role in pathologically enhanced vascular smooth muscle contractility and blood pressure remains unclear. To address this possibility, we generated a smooth muscle-specific CPI-17 transgenic mouse model (CPI-17-Tg) and demonstrated that the CPI-17 transgene was selectively expressed in smooth muscle-enriched tissues, including mesenteric arteries. The isometric contractions in the isolated second-order branch of mesenteric artery helical strips from CPI-17-Tg mice were significantly enhanced compared with controls in response to phenylephrine, U-46619, serotonin, ANG II, high potassium, and calcium. The perfusion pressure increases in isolated perfused mesenteric vascular beds in response to norepinephrine were also enhanced in CPI-17-Tg mice. The hypercontractility was associated with increased phosphorylation of CPI-17 and 20-kDa myosin light chain under basal and stimulated conditions. Surprisingly, the protein levels of rho kinase 2 and protein kinase Cα/δ were significantly increased in CPI-17-Tg mouse mesenteric arteries. Radiotelemetry measurements demonstrated that blood pressure was significantly increased in CPI-17-Tg mice. However, no vascular remodeling was detected by morphometric analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that increased CPI-17 expression in smooth muscle promotes vascular smooth muscle contractility and increases blood pressure, implicating a pathological significant role of CPI-17 upregulation. PMID:23604714

  9. Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction and the Basis for Pharmacologic Treatment of Smooth Muscle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brozovich, F.V.; Nicholson, C.J.; Degen, C.V.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Aggarwal, M.

    2016-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell directly drives the contraction of the vascular wall and hence regulates the size of the blood vessel lumen. We review here the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which agonists, therapeutics, and diseases regulate contractility of the vascular smooth muscle cell and we place this within the context of whole body function. We also discuss the implications for personalized medicine and highlight specific potential target molecules that may provide opportunities for the future development of new therapeutics to regulate vascular function. PMID:27037223

  10. Regulation of Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Function by Interstitial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Kito, Yoshihiko; Hwang, Sung Jin; Ward, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin form gap junctions with smooth muscle cells in visceral smooth muscles and provide important regulatory functions. In gastrointestinal (GI) muscles, there are two distinct classes of interstitial cells, c-Kit(+) interstitial cells of Cajal and PDGFRα(+) cells, that regulate motility patterns. Loss of these cells may contribute to symptoms in GI motility disorders.

  11. Sympathetic innervation promotes vascular smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Damon, Deborah H

    2005-06-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is an important modulator of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) growth and function. Several lines of evidence suggest that the SNS also promotes VSM differentiation. The present study tests this hypothesis. Expression of smooth muscle myosin (SM2) and alpha-actin were assessed by Western analysis as indexes of VSM differentiation. SM2 expression (normalized to alpha-actin) in adult innervated rat femoral and tail arteries was 479 +/- 115% of that in noninnervated carotid arteries. Expression of alpha-actin (normalized to GAPDH or total protein) in 30-day-innervated rat femoral arteries was greater than in corresponding noninnervated femoral arteries from guanethidine-sympathectomized rats. SM2 expression (normalized to alpha-actin) in neonatal femoral arteries grown in vitro for 7 days in the presence of sympathetic ganglia was greater than SM2 expression in corresponding arteries grown in the absence of sympathetic ganglia. In VSM-endothelial cell cultures grown in the presence of dissociated sympathetic neurons, alpha-actin (normalized to GAPDH) was 300 +/- 66% of that in corresponding cultures grown in the absence of neurons. This effect was inhibited by an antibody that neutralized the activity of transforming growth factor-beta2. All of these data indicate that sympathetic innervation increased VSM contractile protein expression and thereby suggest that the SNS promotes and/or maintains VSM differentiation.

  12. Anoctamins and gastrointestinal smooth muscle excitability.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Zhu, Mei Hong; Britton, Fiona; Koh, Sang Don; Ward, Sean M

    2012-02-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) generate electrical pacemaker activity in gastrointestinal smooth muscles. We investigated whether Tmem16a, which encodes anoctamin 1 (ANO1), a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel, might be involved in pacemaker activity in ICC. The Tmem16a transcripts and ANO1 were expressed robustly in GI muscles, specifically in ICC in murine, non-human primate (Macaca fascicularis) and human GI tracts. Splice variants of Tmem16a, as well as other paralogues of the Tmem16 family, were expressed in gastrointestinal muscles. Calcium-activated Cl(-) channel blocking drugs, niflumic acid and DIDS blocked slow waves in intact muscles of mouse, primate and human small intestine and stomach. Slow waves failed to develop in Tmem16a knock-out mice (Tmem16a(tm1Bdh/tm1Bdh)). The pacemaker mechanism was investigated in isolated ICC from transgenic mice with constitutive expression of copepod super green fluorescent protein (copGFP). Depolarization of ICC activated inward currents due to a Cl(-)-selective conductance. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+), replacement of Ca(2+) with Ba(2+), or extracellular Ni(2+) (30 μM) blocked the inward current. Single Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels with a unitary conductance of 7.8 pS were resolved in excised patches from ICC. The inward current was blocked in a concentration-dependent manner by niflumic acid (IC(50) = 4.8 μM). The role of ANO1 in cholinergic responses in ICC was also investigated. Carbachol activated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents in ICC, and responses to cholinergic nerve stimulation were blocked by niflumic acid in intact muscles. Anoctamin 1 is a prominent conductance in ICC, and these channels appear to be involved in pacemaker activity and in responses to enteric excitatory neurotransmitters.

  13. Smooth Muscle Titin Zq Domain Interaction with the Smooth Muscle α-Actinin Central Rod*

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard J.; Simon, Alanna R.; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Felix, Augustine; Keller, Thomas C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Actin-myosin II filament-based contractile structures in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and nonmuscle cells contain the actin filament-cross-linking protein α-actinin. In striated muscle Z-disks, α-actinin interacts with N-terminal domains of titin to provide a structural linkage crucial for the integrity of the sarcomere. We previously discovered a long titin isoform, originally smitin, hereafter sm-titin, in smooth muscle and demonstrated that native sm-titin interacts with C-terminal EF hand region and central rod R2-R3 spectrin-like repeat region sites in α-actinin. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of RNA from human adult smooth muscles and cultured rat smooth muscle cells and Western blot analysis with a domain-specific antibody presented here revealed that sm-titin contains the titin gene-encoded Zq domain that may bind to the α-actinin R2-R3 central rod domain as well as Z-repeat domains that bind to the EF hand region. We investigated whether the sm-titin Zq domain binds to α-actinin R2 and R3 spectrin repeat-like domain loops that lie in proximity with two-fold symmetry on the surface of the central rod. Mutations in α-actinin R2 and R3 domain loop residues decreased interaction with expressed sm-titin Zq domain in glutathione S-transferase pull-down and solid phase binding assays. Alanine mutation of a region of the Zq domain with high propensity for α-helix formation decreased apparent Zq domain dimer formation and decreased Zq interaction with the α-actinin R2-R3 region in surface plasmon resonance assays. We present a model in which two sm-titin Zq domains interact with each other and with the two R2-R3 sites in the α-actinin central rod. PMID:18519573

  14. Modulation of the Cholinergic Mechanisms in the Bronchial Smooth Muscle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    STANDARDS 16r A CD in UMODULATION OF THE CHOLINERGICMECHANISMS IN THE BRONCHIAL SMOOTH MUSCLE A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN FOR THE DOCTOR...MECHANISMS IN THE BRONCHIAL SMOOTH MUSCLE A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN FOR THE DOCTOR SCIENTIARUM DEGREE by Pi1 An E% LECTE3 NORE/PUBL-84...DECLASSIFICATION/DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 118 FFITOX/465/001 4) TITLE MODULATION OF THE CHOLINERGIC MECHANISMS IN THE BRONCHIAL SMOOTH MUSCLE (A thesis submitted to

  15. Cobalt contraction of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Dominiczak, A.; Clyde, E.; Bohr, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Although it has been reported that cobalt causes contraction of vascular smooth muscle, the mechanism responsible for this contraction has not been defined. The authors studied these contractions in rat aortic rings. Concentration-response studies indicated that the threshold for contraction was 10{sup {minus}8}M, maximum contraction occurred at 3 {times} 10{sup 7}M and relaxation began at 10{sup {minus}6}M. No contraction occurred in a calcium-free physiological salt solution and the contraction was not inhibited by H-7, a protein kinase C inhibitor. The authors conclude the cobalt in low concentrations causes contraction by activating calcium channels and that in high concentrations it causes relaxation by inactivating these same channels.

  16. Regeneration and Maintenance of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walthers, Christopher M.

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical engineering that involves growing artificial organs to replace those lost to disease or injury. Within tissue engineering, there is a demand for artificial smooth muscle to repair tissues of the digestive tract, bladder, and vascular systems. Attempts to develop engineered smooth muscle tissues capable of contracting with sufficient strength to be clinically relevant have so far proven unsatisfactory. The goal of this research was to develop and sustain mature, contractile smooth muscle. Survival of implanted SMCs is critical to sustain the benefits of engineered smooth muscle. Survival of implanted smooth muscle cells was studied with layered, electrospun polycaprolactone implants with lasercut holes ranging from 0--25% porosity. It was found that greater angiogenesis was associated with increased survival of implanted cells, with a large increase at a threshold between 20% and 25% porosity. Heparan sulfate coatings improved the speed of blood vessel infiltration after 14 days of implantation. With these considerations, thicker engineered tissues may be possible. An improved smooth muscle tissue culture technique was utilized. Contracting smooth muscle was produced in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle tissue organization, specifically by sustaining intact smooth muscle strips rather than dissociating tissue in to isolated smooth muscle cells. Isolated cells showed a decrease in maturity and contained fewer enteric neural and glial cells. Muscle strips also exhibited periodic contraction and regular fluctuation of intracellular calclium. The muscle strip maturity persisted after implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds. A low-cost, disposable bioreactor was developed to further improve maturity of cultured smooth muscle cells in an environment of controlled cyclical stress.The bioreactor consistently applied repeated mechanical strain with controllable inputs for strain

  17. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  18. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion.

  19. Smooth muscle alpha-actinin interaction with smitin.

    PubMed

    Chi, Richard J; Olenych, Scott G; Kim, Kyoungtae; Keller, Thomas C S

    2005-07-01

    Actin-myosin II filament-based contractile structures in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and nonmuscle cells also contain the actin filament-crosslinking protein alpha-actinin. In striated muscle sarcomeres, interactions between the myosin-binding protein titin and alpha-actinin in the Z-line provide an important structural linkage. We previously discovered a titin-like protein, smitin, associated with the contractile apparatus of smooth muscle cells. Purified native smooth muscle alpha-actinin binds with nanomolar affinity to smitin in smitin-myosin coassemblies in vitro. Smooth muscle alpha-actinin also interacts with striated muscle titin. In contrast to striated muscle alpha-actinin interaction with titin and smitin, which is significantly enhanced by PIP2, smooth muscle alpha-actinin interacts with smitin and titin equally well in the presence and absence of PIP2. Using expressed regions of smooth muscle alpha-actinin, we have demonstrated smitin-binding sites in the smooth muscle alpha-actinin R2-R3 spectrin-like repeat rod domain and a C-terminal domain formed by cryptic EF-hand structures. These smitin-binding sites are highly homologous to the titin-binding sites of striated muscle alpha-actinin. Our results suggest that direct interaction between alpha-actinin and titin or titin-like proteins is a common feature of actin-myosin II contractile structures in striated muscle and smooth muscle cells and that the molecular bases for alpha-actinin interaction with these proteins are similar, although regulation of these interactions may differ according to tissue.

  20. Regulation of gastrointestinal motility--insights from smooth muscle biology.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don; Ro, Seungil; Ward, Sean M

    2012-11-01

    Gastrointestinal motility results from coordinated contractions of the tunica muscularis, the muscular layers of the alimentary canal. Throughout most of the gastrointestinal tract, smooth muscles are organized into two layers of circularly or longitudinally oriented muscle bundles. Smooth muscle cells form electrical and mechanical junctions between cells that facilitate coordination of contractions. Excitation-contraction coupling occurs by Ca(2+) entry via ion channels in the plasma membrane, leading to a rise in intracellular Ca(2+). Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin activates myosin light chain kinase; subsequent phosphorylation of myosin initiates cross-bridge cycling. Myosin phosphatase dephosphorylates myosin to relax muscles, and a process known as Ca(2+) sensitization regulates the activity of the phosphatase. Gastrointestinal smooth muscles are 'autonomous' and generate spontaneous electrical activity (slow waves) that does not depend upon input from nerves. Intrinsic pacemaker activity comes from interstitial cells of Cajal, which are electrically coupled to smooth muscle cells. Patterns of contractile activity in gastrointestinal muscles are determined by inputs from enteric motor neurons that innervate smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells. Here we provide an overview of the cells and mechanisms that generate smooth muscle contractile behaviour and gastrointestinal motility.

  1. Neuroeffector apparatus in gastrointestinal smooth muscle organs.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Hwang, Sung Jin; Ward, Sean M

    2010-12-01

    Control of gastrointestinal (GI) movements by enteric motoneurons is critical for orderly processing of food, absorption of nutrients and elimination of wastes. Work over the past several years has suggested that motor neurotransmission is more complicated than simple release of transmitter from nerve terminals and binding of receptors on smooth muscle cells. In fact the 'neuro-effector' junction in the tunica muscularis might consist of synaptic-like connectivity with specialized cells, and contributions from multiple cell types in integrated post-junctional responses. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were proposed as potential mediators in motor neurotransmission based on reduced post-junctional responses observed in W mutants that have reduced populations of ICC. More recent studies on W mutants have contradicted the original findings, and suggested that ICC may not be significant players in motor neurotransmission. This review examines the evidence for and against the role of ICC in motor neurotransmission and outlines areas for additional investigation that would help further resolve this controversy.

  2. Cl− channels in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bulley, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In smooth muscle cells (SMCs), the intracellular chloride ion (Cl−) concentration is high due to accumulation by Cl−/HCO3− exchange and Na+, K+, Cl− cotransportation. The equilibrium potential for Cl− (ECl) is more positive than physiological membrane potentials (Em), with Cl− efflux inducing membrane depolarization. Early studies used electrophysiology and non-specific antagonists to study the physiological relevance of Cl− channels in SMCs. More recent reports have incorporated molecular biological approaches to identify and determine the functional significance of several different Cl− channels. Both “classic” and cGMP-dependent calcium (Ca2+)-activated (ClCa) channels and volume-sensitive Cl− channels are present, with TMEM16A/ANO1, bestrophins and ClC-3, respectively, proposed as molecular candidates for these channels. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has also been described in SMCs. This review will focus on discussing recent progress made in identifying each of these Cl− channels in SMCs, their physiological functions, and contribution to diseases that modify contraction, apoptosis and cell proliferation. PMID:24077695

  3. Programming smooth muscle plasticity with chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Oliver G; Owens, Gary K

    2007-05-25

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) possess remarkable phenotypic plasticity that allows rapid adaptation to fluctuating environmental cues. For example, vascular SMCs undergo profound changes in their phenotype during neointimal formation in response to vessel injury or within atherosclerotic plaques. Recent studies have shown that interaction of serum response factor (SRF) and its numerous accessory cofactors with CArG box DNA sequences within promoter chromatin of SMC genes is a nexus for integrating signals that influence SMC differentiation in development and disease. During development, SMC-restricted sets of posttranslational histone modifications are acquired within the CArG box chromatin of SMC genes. These modifications in turn control the chromatin-binding properties of SRF. The histone modifications appear to encode a SMC-specific epigenetic program that is used by extracellular cues to influence SMC differentiation, by regulating binding of SRF and its partners to the chromatin template. Thus, SMC differentiation is dynamically regulated by the interplay between SRF accessory cofactors, the SRF-CArG interaction, and the underlying histone modification program. As such, the inherent plasticity of the SMC lineage offers unique glimpses into how cellular differentiation is dynamically controlled at the level of chromatin within the context of changing microenvironments. Further elucidation of how chromatin regulates SMC differentiation will undoubtedly yield valuable insights into both normal developmental processes and the pathogenesis of several vascular diseases that display detrimental SMC phenotypic behavior.

  4. Smooth muscle phenotypic modulation--a personal experience.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Julie H; Campbell, Gordon R

    2012-08-01

    The idea that smooth muscle cells can exist in multiple phenotypic states depending on the functional demands placed upon them has been around for >5 decades. However, much of the literature today refers to only recent articles, giving the impression that it is a new idea. At the same time, the current trend is to delve deeper and deeper into transcriptional regulation of smooth muscle genes, and much of the work describing the change in biology of the cells in the different phenotypic states does not appear to be known. This loss of historical perspective regarding the biology of smooth muscle phenotypic modulation is what the current article has tried to mitigate.

  5. Tobacco constituents are mitogenic for arterial smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Hefton, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP) purified from flue-cured tobacco leaves, tar-derived material (TAR), the water soluble, nondialyzable, delipidized extract of cigarette smoke condensate, rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, but not adventitial fibroblasts. The mitogenicity appears to depend on polyphenol epitopes on carrier molecules. Ellagic acid, another plant polyphenol, inhibited arterial smooth-muscle proliferation. These results suggest that a number of ubiquitous, plant-derived substances may influence smooth-muscle cell proliferation in the arterial wall.

  6. Nonparametric Model of Smooth Muscle Force Production During Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cole, Marc; Eikenberry, Steffen; Kato, Takahide; Sandler, Roman A; Yamashiro, Stanley M; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z

    2017-03-01

    A nonparametric model of smooth muscle tension response to electrical stimulation was estimated using the Laguerre expansion technique of nonlinear system kernel estimation. The experimental data consisted of force responses of smooth muscle to energy-matched alternating single pulse and burst current stimuli. The burst stimuli led to at least a 10-fold increase in peak force in smooth muscle from Mytilus edulis, despite the constant energy constraint. A linear model did not fit the data. However, a second-order model fit the data accurately, so the higher-order models were not required to fit the data. Results showed that smooth muscle force response is not linearly related to the stimulation power.

  7. Anisotropic Smoothing Improves DT-MRI-Based Muscle Fiber Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Amanda K. W.; Ding, Zhaohua; Elder, Christopher P.; Towse, Theodore F.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effect of anisotropic smoothing on fiber tracking measures, including pennation angle, fiber tract length, and fiber tract number in the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle in healthy subjects using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI). Materials and Methods 3T DW-MRI data were used for muscle fiber tractography in the MG of healthy subjects. Anisotropic smoothing was applied at three levels (5%, 10%, 15%), and pennation angle, tract length, fiber tract number, fractional anisotropy, and principal eigenvector orientation were quantified for each smoothing level. Results Fiber tract length increased with pre-fiber tracking smoothing, and local heterogeneities in fiber direction were reduced. However, pennation angle was not affected by smoothing. Conclusion Modest anisotropic smoothing (10%) improved fiber-tracking results, while preserving structural features. PMID:26010830

  8. Airway smooth muscle in exercise-induced bronchospasm: some speculations.

    PubMed

    Middleton, E

    1975-11-01

    Some possible neurophysiological, biochemical, and pharmacological pathways affecting the state of contractility if airway smooth muscle in exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) are described. No unifying hypothesis can be set forth at this time. Indeed, it is likely that the heterogeneous nature of EIB is a reflection of the numerous biochemical loci in smooth muscle cells that could be affected by the various metabolic changes accompanying heavy exertion.

  9. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  10. Intestinal smooth muscle cell maintenance by basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M; Stelzner, Matthias; Reichardt, Holger M; Dunn, James C Y

    2008-08-01

    Intestinal tissue engineering is a potential therapy for patients with short bowel syndrome. Tissue engineering scaffolds that promote smooth muscle cell proliferation and angiogenesis are essential toward the regeneration of functional smooth muscles for peristalsis and motility. Since basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) can stimulate smooth muscle proliferation and angiogenesis, the delivery of bFGF was employed to stimulate proliferation and survival of primary intestinal smooth muscle cells. Two methods of local bFGF delivery were examined: the incorporation of bFGF into the collagen coating and the encapsulation of bFGF into poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. Cell-seeded scaffolds were implanted into the omentum and were retrieved after 4, 14, and 28 days. The seeded cells proliferated from day 4 to day 14 in all implants; however, at 28 days, significantly higher density of implanted cells and blood vessels was observed, when 10 microg of bFGF was incorporated into the collagen coating of scaffolds as compared to scaffolds with either no bFGF or 1 microg of bFGF in collagen. Microsphere encapsulation of 1 microg of bFGF produced similar effects as 10 microg of bFGF mixed in collagen and was more effective than the delivery of 1 microg of bFGF by collagen incorporation. The majority of the implanted cells also expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin. Scaffolds coated with microsphere-encapsulated bFGF and seeded with smooth muscle cells may be a useful platform for the regeneration of the intestinal smooth muscle.

  11. Muscarinic receptor size on smooth muscle cells and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.M.; Jung, C.Y.; Grover, A.K.

    1986-08-01

    The loss of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) binding following high-energy radiation was used to compare the muscarinic receptor size on single smooth muscle cells isolated by collagenase digestion from the canine stomach and on plasma membranes derived from intact gastric smooth muscle without exposure to exogenous proteolysis. Radiation inactivation of galactose oxidase (68 kdaltons), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (160 kdaltons), and pyruvate kinase (224 kdaltons) activities were used as molecular-weight standards. Radiation inactivation of (/sup 3/H)QNB binding to rat brain membranes, which gave a target size of 86 kdaltons, served as an additional control. In isolated smooth muscle cells, the calculated size of the muscarinic receptor was 80 +/- 8 kdaltons. In contrast, in a smooth muscle enriched plasma membrane preparation, muscarinic receptor size was significantly smaller at 45 +/- 3 kdaltons. Larger molecular sizes were obtained either in the presence of protease inhibitors (62 +/- 4 kdaltons) or by using a crude membrane preparation of gastric smooth muscle 86 +/- 7 kdaltons).

  12. [Electrophysiology and calcium signalling in human bronchial smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Marthan, R; Hyvelin, J M; Roux, E; Savineau, J P

    1999-01-01

    Recently, cells isolated from airways have been used to characterize precisely the electrophysiological properties of this smooth muscle and to describe the changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) occurring upon agonist stimulation. Although most studies have produced consistent results in terms of types of ion channel and pathways of calcium signalling implicated in the mechanical activity of airways, there are differences according to (i) the site along the bronchial tree (trachea vs. bronchi); (ii) the proliferating status of the cells (freshly isolated vs. cultured) and (iii) the species (human vs. animals). With regard to the electrophysiological properties of airway smooth muscle, the contribution to [Ca2+]i rise of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels depends on the balance between depolarization related to non-specific cation channel and/or chloride channel activation and hyperpolarization related to activation of a variety of potassium channels. Most of the above-mentioned channels appear to be controlled, directly or indirectly, by agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle. With regard to calcium signalling, the pattern of agonist-induced [Ca2+]i responses, the so-called [Ca2+]i oscillations, has been observed recently in freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells. The role and the calcium sources involved in these oscillations in human bronchial smooth muscle are currently being investigated.

  13. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  14. Current spread in the smooth muscle of the rabbit aorta

    PubMed Central

    Mekata, F.

    1974-01-01

    1. The electrical responses of the smooth muscle cells of the rabbit aorta to both extracellular and intracellular stimulation were studied using the partitioned chamber and Wheatstone bridge method. 2. No spontaneous electrical activity was recorded when the tissue was soaked in either isotonic or hypertonic Krebs solutions, and strong depolarizing currents also failed to trigger action potentials in either solution. 3. The circular muscle of the aorta has cable properties. Mean values in isotonic Krebs solution were 2·1 mm for space constant and 433 msec for time constant. 4. The input resistance (mean 12 MΩ) measured with the Wheatstone bridge method was considerably smaller than that calculated from values measured with the partitioned chamber method. 5. Electrotonic potentials could be recorded from the smooth muscle of `injury bundles' although their amplitude was smaller than that from the intact bundle. 6. High concentrations of noradrenaline readily induce oscillatory potentials from the aorta in both isotonic and hypertonic Krebs solutions. It was estimated by simultaneous recording with two micro-electrodes that noradrenaline-induced oscillatory potential can conduct in both longitudinal and transverse directions of the smooth muscle. 7. These results suggest that the smooth muscle of the aorta behaves like a syncytium or single unit muscle and activation of cells on the inner surface of the media can be induced both by electrotonic current spread and by propagation of oscillatory potentials from the outer cells directly activated by the transmitter. PMID:4436818

  15. Smooth Muscle Endothelin B Receptors Regulate Blood Pressure but Not Vascular Function or Neointimal Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eileen; Czopek, Alicja; Duthie, Karolina M; Kirkby, Nicholas S; van de Putte, Elisabeth E Fransen; Christen, Sibylle; Kimmitt, Robert A; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Castellan, Raphael F P; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Kuc, Rhoda E; Davenport, Anthony P; Dhaun, Neeraj; Webb, David J; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    2017-02-01

    The role of smooth muscle endothelinB (ETB) receptors in regulating vascular function, blood pressure (BP), and neointimal remodeling has not been established. Selective knockout mice were generated to address the hypothesis that loss of smooth muscle ETB receptors would reduce BP, alter vascular contractility, and inhibit neointimal remodeling. ETB receptors were selectively deleted from smooth muscle by crossing floxed ETB mice with those expressing cre-recombinase controlled by the transgelin promoter. Functional consequences of ETB deletion were assessed using myography. BP was measured by telemetry, and neointimal lesion formation induced by femoral artery injury. Lesion size and composition (day 28) were analyzed using optical projection tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Selective deletion of ETB was confirmed by genotyping, autoradiography, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. ETB-mediated contraction was reduced in trachea, but abolished from mesenteric veins, of knockout mice. Induction of ETB-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries was also abolished in these mice. Femoral artery function was unaltered, and baseline BP modestly elevated in smooth muscle ETB knockout compared with controls (+4.2±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.0001), but salt-induced and ETB blockade-mediated hypertension were unaltered. Circulating endothelin-1 was not altered in knockout mice. ETB-mediated contraction was not induced in femoral arteries by incubation in culture medium or lesion formation, and lesion size was not altered in smooth muscle ETB knockout mice. In the absence of other pathology, ETB receptors in vascular smooth muscle make a small but significant contribution to ETB-dependent regulation of BP. These ETB receptors have no effect on vascular contraction or neointimal remodeling.

  16. Smooth Muscle Endothelin B Receptors Regulate Blood Pressure but Not Vascular Function or Neointimal Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eileen; Czopek, Alicja; Duthie, Karolina M.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; van de Putte, Elisabeth E. Fransen; Christen, Sibylle; Kimmitt, Robert A.; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Castellan, Raphael F.P.; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V.; Kuc, Rhoda E.; Davenport, Anthony P.; Dhaun, Neeraj; Webb, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The role of smooth muscle endothelinB (ETB) receptors in regulating vascular function, blood pressure (BP), and neointimal remodeling has not been established. Selective knockout mice were generated to address the hypothesis that loss of smooth muscle ETB receptors would reduce BP, alter vascular contractility, and inhibit neointimal remodeling. ETB receptors were selectively deleted from smooth muscle by crossing floxed ETB mice with those expressing cre-recombinase controlled by the transgelin promoter. Functional consequences of ETB deletion were assessed using myography. BP was measured by telemetry, and neointimal lesion formation induced by femoral artery injury. Lesion size and composition (day 28) were analyzed using optical projection tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Selective deletion of ETB was confirmed by genotyping, autoradiography, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. ETB-mediated contraction was reduced in trachea, but abolished from mesenteric veins, of knockout mice. Induction of ETB-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries was also abolished in these mice. Femoral artery function was unaltered, and baseline BP modestly elevated in smooth muscle ETB knockout compared with controls (+4.2±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.0001), but salt-induced and ETB blockade–mediated hypertension were unaltered. Circulating endothelin-1 was not altered in knockout mice. ETB-mediated contraction was not induced in femoral arteries by incubation in culture medium or lesion formation, and lesion size was not altered in smooth muscle ETB knockout mice. In the absence of other pathology, ETB receptors in vascular smooth muscle make a small but significant contribution to ETB-dependent regulation of BP. These ETB receptors have no effect on vascular contraction or neointimal remodeling. PMID:28028193

  17. Smooth Muscle Enriched Long Noncoding RNA (SMILR) Regulates Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Margaret D.; Pinel, Karine; Dakin, Rachel; Vesey, Alex T.; Diver, Louise; Mackenzie, Ruth; Garcia, Raquel; Welsh, Paul; Sattar, Naveed; Hamilton, Graham; Joshi, Nikhil; Dweck, Marc R.; Miano, Joseph M.; McBride, Martin W.; Newby, David E.; McDonald, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Phenotypic switching of vascular smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state is implicated in diverse vascular pathologies, including atherogenesis, plaque stabilization, and neointimal hyperplasia. However, very little is known about the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during this process. Here, we investigated a role for lncRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cell biology and pathology. Methods and Results— Using RNA sequencing, we identified >300 lncRNAs whose expression was altered in human saphenous vein vascular smooth muscle cells following stimulation with interleukin-1α and platelet-derived growth factor. We focused on a novel lncRNA (Ensembl: RP11-94A24.1), which we termed smooth muscle–induced lncRNA enhances replication (SMILR). Following stimulation, SMILR expression was increased in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, and was detected in conditioned media. Furthermore, knockdown of SMILR markedly reduced cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we noted that expression of genes proximal to SMILR was also altered by interleukin-1α/platelet-derived growth factor treatment, and HAS2 expression was reduced by SMILR knockdown. In human samples, we observed increased expression of SMILR in unstable atherosclerotic plaques and detected increased levels in plasma from patients with high plasma C-reactive protein. Conclusions— These results identify SMILR as a driver of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suggest that modulation of SMILR may be a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce vascular pathologies. PMID:27052414

  18. Inhibitory action of relaxin on human cervical smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I; Wiqvist, N; Sahni, S; Lindblom, B

    1984-09-01

    The influence of purified porcine relaxin on contractility of human cervical smooth muscle was investigated in vitro. Strips of cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy from pregnant and nonpregnant women and were mounted in a superfused organ chamber for isometric measurement of contractile activity. Relaxin (0.005-25 micrograms/ml) inhibited the spontaneous contractions in cervical strips from 18% of nonpregnant, 68% of early pregnant, and in 100% of term pregnant women. These results indicate that relaxin has an inhibitory action on cervical smooth muscle and that this effect is more constantly detected as pregnancy proceeds.

  19. Calcium diffusion in uterine smooth muscle sheets

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The potassium contracture in the longitudinal muscle of estrogen- treated rat uterus was kinetically investigated. The rates of tension development after Ca addition and relaxation after Ca removal were measured under the high-potassium depolarization. Both rates decreased with an increase in preparation thickness. The relaxation rate had only a slight dependence on temperature. On the contrary, both relaxation and contraction rates in a contraction induced by an electrical stimulation strongly depended on temperature, but not on preparation size. These results suggest that the Ca diffusion process in the extracellular space is the rate-limiting step in relaxation of Ca- dependent contracture under potassium depolarization. The diffusion model, in which the effect of the unstirred layer was considered, could quantitatively explain the experimental results. The apparent diffusion coefficient in the muscle sheet was estimated to be approximately 3 x 10(-7) cm2/s. The difference from that in aqueous solution is discussed. PMID:7119732

  20. Bronchospasm and its biophysical basis in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2004-01-01

    Airways hyperresponsiveness is a cardinal feature of asthma but remains unexplained. In asthma, the airway smooth muscle cell is the key end-effector of bronchospasm and acute airway narrowing, but in just the past five years our understanding of the relationship of responsiveness to muscle biophysics has dramatically changed. It has become well established, for example, that muscle length is equilibrated dynamically rather than statically, and that non-classical features of muscle biophysics come to the forefront, including unanticipated interactions between the muscle and its time-varying load, as well as the ability of the muscle cell to adapt rapidly to changes in its dynamic microenvironment. These newly discovered phenomena have been described empirically, but a mechanistic basis to explain them is only beginning to emerge. PMID:15084229

  1. Caveolin-1 regulates contractility in differentiated vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyun-Dong; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2004-01-01

    Caveolin is a principal component of caveolar membranes. In the present study, we utilized a decoy peptide approach to define the degree of involvement of caveolin in PKC-dependent regulation of contractility of differentiated vascular smooth muscle. The primary isoform of caveolin in ferret aorta vascular smooth muscle is caveolin-1. Chemical loading of contractile vascular smooth muscle tissue with a synthetic caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide inhibited PKC-dependent increases in contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha agonist. Peptide loading also resulted in a significant inhibition of phorbol ester-induced adducin Ser662 phosphorylation, an intracellular monitor of PKC kinase activity, ERK1/2 activation, and Ser789 phosphorylation of the actin binding protein caldesmon. alpha-Agonist-induced ERK1-1/2 activation was also inhibited by the caveolin-1 peptide. Scrambled peptide-loaded tissues or sham-loaded tissues were unaffected with respect to both contractility and signaling. Depolarization-induced activation of contraction was not affected by caveolin peptide loading. Similar results with respect to contractility and ERK1/2 activation during exposure to the phorbol ester or the alpha-agonist were obtained with the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. These results are consistent with a role for caveolin-1 in the coordination of signaling leading to the regulation of contractility of smooth muscle.

  2. Congenital smooth muscle hamartoma of the palpebral conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Mora, L Evelyn; Rodríguez-Reyes, Abelardo A; Vera, Ana M; Rubio, Rosa Isela; Mayorquín-Ruiz, Mariana; Salcedo, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Smooth muscle hamartoma is defined as a disorganized focus or an overgrowth of mature smooth muscle, generally with low capacity of autonomous growth and benign behavior. The implicated tissues are mature and proliferate in a disorganized fashion. A healthy 5-day-old Mexican boy was referred to the authors' hospital in México city for evaluation of a "cystic" lesion of the right eye that had been noted since birth. The pregnancy and delivery were unremarkable. On physical examination, there was a reddish-pink soft lesion with a tender "cystic" appearance, which was probably emerging from the upper eyelid conjunctiva, which measured 2.7 cm in its widest diameter and transilluminated. Ultrasound imaging revealed an anterior "cystic" lesion with normally formed phakic eye. An excisional biopsy was performed, and the lesion was dissected from the upper tarsal subconjunctival space. Subsequent histologic and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with the diagnosis of congenital smooth muscle hamartoma (CSMH) of the tarsal conjunctiva. The authors' research revealed that only one case of CSMH localized in the conjunctiva (Roper GJ, Smith MS, Lueder GT. Congenital smooth muscle hamartoma of the conjunctival fornix. Am J Ophthalmol. 1999;128:643-4) has been reported to date in the literature. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this current case would be the second case reported of CSMH in this anatomic location. Therefore, the authors' recommendation is to include CSMH in the differential diagnosis of a cystic mass that presents in the fornix and palpebral conjunctiva.

  3. Fractalkine-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, F; Dorfmüller, P; Souza, R; Durand-Gasselin, I; Godot, V; Capel, F; Adnot, S; Eddahibi, S; Mazmanian, M; Fadel, E; Hervé, P; Simonneau, G; Emilie, D; Humbert, M

    2007-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial resistance due to endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation resulting in chronic obstruction of small pulmonary arteries. There is evidence that inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of human and experimental pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the study was to address the role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in the inflammatory responses and pulmonary vascular remodelling of a monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension model. The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension by means of immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR on laser-captured microdissected pulmonary arteries. It was demonstrated that CX3CL1 was expressed by inflammatory cells surrounding pulmonary arterial lesions and that smooth muscle cells from these vessels had increased CX3CR1 expression. It was then shown that cultured rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressed CX3CR1 and that CX3CL1 induced proliferation but not migration of these cells. In conclusion, the current authors proposed that fractalkine may act as a growth factor for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Chemokines may thus play a role in pulmonary artery remodelling.

  4. Smoothing Forecasting Methods for Academic Library Circulations: An Evaluation and Recommendation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Terrence A.; Forys, John W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Circulation time-series data from 50 midwest academic libraries were used to test 110 variants of 8 smoothing forecasting methods. Data and methodologies and illustrations of two recommended methods--the single exponential smoothing method and Brown's one-parameter linear exponential smoothing method--are given. Eight references are cited. (EJS)

  5. Airway epithelial-derived factor relaxes pulmonary vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Farah, Omar R; Li, Dongge; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2009-01-01

    The factors controlling the pulmonary vascular resistance under physiological conditions are poorly understood. We have previously reported on an apparent cross talk between the airway and adjacent pulmonary arterial bed where a factor likely derived from the bronchial epithelial cells reduced the magnitude of agonist-stimulated force in the vascular smooth muscle. The main purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether bronchial epithelial cells release a pulmonary arterial smooth muscle relaxant factor. Conditioned media from SPOC-1 or BEAS-2B, a rat- and a human-derived bronchial epithelial cell line, respectively, were utilized. This media significantly relaxed precontracted adult but not fetal pulmonary arterial muscle in an oxygen tension-dependent manner. This response was mediated via soluble guanylate cyclase, involving AKT/PI3-kinase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Airway epithelial cell-conditioned media increased AKT phosphorylation in pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMC) and reduced intracellular calcium change following ATP stimulation to a significantly greater extent than observed for bronchial SMC. The present data strongly support the evidence for bronchial epithelial cells releasing a stable and soluble factor capable of inducing pulmonary arterial SMC relaxation. We speculate that under physiological conditions, the maintenance of a low pulmonary vascular resistance, postnatally, is in part modulated by the airway epithelium.

  6. Menthol inhibiting parasympathetic function of tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Menthol is used as a constituent of food and drink, tobacco and cosmetics nowadays. This cold receptor agonist has been used as a nasal inhalation solution in the daily life. The effect of menthol on nasal mucosa in vivo is well known; however, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has been rarely explored. Therefore, during administration of the drug for nasal symptoms, it might also affect the trachea via oral intake or inhalation. We used our preparation to test the effectiveness of menthol on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle. A 5 mm long portion of rat trachea was submersed in 30 ml Krebs solution in a muscle bath at 37ºC. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of a parasympathetic mimetic agent were measured using a transducer connected to a Pentium III computer equipped with polygraph software. The following assessments of menthol were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10-6 M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of the drug on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Results indicated that addition of a parasympathetic mimetic to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of menthol at doses of 10-5 M or above elicited a relaxation response to 10-6 M methacholine-induced contraction. Menthol could also inhibit electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced spike contraction. However, it alone had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. We concluded that the degree of drug-induced tracheal contraction or relaxation was dose-dependent. In addition, this study indicated that high concentrations of menthol might actually inhibit parasympathetic function of the trachea. PMID:27994497

  7. Structural limits on force production and shortening of smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Siegman, Marion J; Davidheiser, Sandra; Mooers, Susan U; Butler, Thomas M

    2013-02-01

    This study determined the factors that limit force production and shortening in two smooth muscles having very different relationships between active and passive force as a function of muscle length. The rat anococcygeus muscle develops active force over the range of lengths 0.2-2.0× the optimum length for force production (Lo). Passive tension due to extension of the resting muscle occurs only at lengths exceeding Lo. In contrast, the rabbit taenia coli develops force in the range of lengths 0.4-1.1 Lo, and passive force which is detectable at 0.56 Lo, increases to ~0.45 maximum active force at Lo, and increases sharply with further extension. The anococcygeus muscle can shorten to 0.2 Lo and the taenia coli to 0.4 Lo. Dynamic stiffness and energy usage at short muscle lengths suggest that the limit of shortening in the taenia coli, in contrast to the anococcygeus muscle, is not due to a failure of cross bridge interaction. Phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chains in intact muscles decreased to a small extent at short lengths compared to the decrease in force production. The differences in force production and the extent of shortening in the two muscles was maintained even when, following permeabilization, the myosin light chains were irreversibly phosphorylated with ATPγS, indicating that differences in activation played little, if any role. Ultrastructural studies on resting and activated muscles show that the taenia coli, which is rich in connective tissue (unlike the anococcygeus muscle) undergoes marked cellular twisting and contractile filament misalignment at short lengths with compression of the extracellular matrix. As a result, force is not transmitted in the longitudinal axis of the muscle, but is dissipated against an internal load provided by the compressed extracellular matrix. These observations on two very different normal smooth muscles reveal how differences in the relative contribution of active and passive structural elements

  8. Effects of (-)-desmethoxyverapamil on heart and vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrath, H.; Raschack, M.

    1987-09-01

    (-)-Desmethoxyverapamil (also known as (-)-devapamil or (-)-D888) has been developed as a verapamil type radioligand for the study of calcium channels. In the present investigation, the effects of (-)-desmethoxyverapamil on action potential (AP) and force of contraction in heart muscle preparations and on tension and /sup 45/Ca influx in vascular smooth muscle are described. In part, the effects were compared with the (+)-isomer of desmethoxyverapamil and the isomers of both verapamil and methoxyverapamil. In atrial and/or ventricular heart muscle preparations from guinea pigs, cats and man, (-)-desmethoxyverapamil decreased the force of contraction and shortened the AP duration. Slow response APs were depressed, whereas dV/dtmax of phase 0 of the AP remained unchanged. The rank order of potency of the (-)-isomers was as follows: desmethoxyverapamil greater than methoxyverapamil greater than verapamil. Potassium-induced contractures and /sup 45/Ca influx were depressed by the (-)-isomers of desmethoxyverapamil, methoxyverapamil and verapamil in the same potency rank order as observed in heart muscle. The (+)-isomers exerted qualitatively similar effects at about 10 to 200 times higher concentrations. Correspondingly, the increase in potency of the racemic mixtures of the drugs was accompanied by increases in stereoselectivity. It is concluded that (-)-desmethoxyverapamil is the most potent stereoselective calcium antagonist of the verapamil type with respect to its effects on heart and vascular smooth muscle.

  9. Contractile proteins of endothelial cells, platelets and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Becker, C G; Nachman, R L

    1973-04-01

    In experiments described herein it was observed, by direct and indirect immunofluorescence technics, that rabbit antisera to human platelet actomyosin (thrombosthenin) stained mature megakaryocytes, blood platelets, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells of arteries and veins, endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and certain capillaries, uterine smooth muscle cells, myoepithelial cells, perineurial cells of peripheral nerves and "fibroblastic" cells of granulation tissue. The specificity of immunohistologic staining was confirmed by appropriate absorption and blocking studies and immunodiffusional analysis in agarose gel. It was also observed by immunodiffusional analysis in agarose gel, electrophoresis of actomyosin fragments in polyacrylamide gels, immune inhibition of actomyosin ATPase activity and immune aggregation of platelets that uterine and platelet actomyosin are partially, but not completely, identical.

  10. Effects of sodium selenite on vascular smooth muscle reactivity.

    PubMed

    Togna, G; Russo, P; Pierconti, F; Caprino, L

    2000-02-01

    The effects of sodium selenite (Na(2)SeO(3)) on the vascular smooth muscle reactivity of rabbit aorta were studied. In isolated rabbit aorta, Na(2)SeO(3) inhibited contractile response to phenylephrine and developed a lasting contracture in the vascular tissue. Relaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted aortic rings induced by sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-guanosine 3':5'-cyclic-monophosphate was also inhibited. Preliminary data obtained with ascorbic acid suggested a partial involvement of an oxidative mechanism. Excluding the possibility that Se damages actin or modifies its distribution (immunohistochemical evaluation), results indicate that Se alters vascular smooth muscle reactivity by inhibiting both its contracting and relaxing properties. Calcium-dependent mechanisms appear to be primarily involved and an interference with calcium re-uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum as a possible site of Se vascular action could be hypothesized.

  11. Action on ileal smooth muscle of synthetic detergents and pardaxin.

    PubMed

    Primor, N

    1986-01-01

    Pardaxin (PX), a toxic and repellent substance isolated from the Red Sea flatfish, causes a sharp ball-like profile of drop of saline placed on a hydrophobic film to turn into a flattened one. This effect results with a decrease of the contact angle (theta) from 96 degrees to a maximum of 42 degrees at 10(-4) M of PX. The action of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), a synthetic anionic detergent, benzalkonium chloride (BAC) cationic detergent and pardaxin (PX) a toxic protein with detergent properties, were studied in the ileal guinea-pig longitudinal smooth muscle preparation. SDS (4 X 10(-4) M) and PX (5 X 10(-6) M) diminished the muscle contractile response to field stimulation (0.1 Hz, 1 msec) and to acetylcholine (Ach) and to histamine and elicited a prolonged (4-6 min) TTX-insensitive muscle contraction. The dose dependence of muscle contraction to SDS and PX was found to be sigmoidal and occurred over a narrow range of concentrations. The SDS- but not PX-induced muscle contraction could be reduced by diphenhydramine (H1 antihistamine). BAC (10(-5)-10(-4) M) suppressed the muscle's contractile response to electrical stimulation (0.1 Hz, 1 msec), to Ach, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine but did not produce muscle contraction. PX at concentrations higher than 5 X 10(-6) M is a potent detergent and at this concentration shares several pharmacological similarities with SDS.

  12. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction.

  13. Aortic smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis in relation to atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are implicated in atherogenesis by their effects on tissue permeability and cell proliferation and their interaction with plasma low density lipoproteins. Using the pigeon model in which an atherosclerosis-susceptible (WC) and -resistant (SR) breed can be compared, PG synthesis by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells was examined by the use of ({sup 35}S)-sodium sulfate and ({sup 3}H)-serine or ({sup 3}H)-glucosamine as labeling precursors. In both SR and WC cells, the majority of newly synthesized PG were secreted into the media. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) PG and dermatan sulfate (DS) PG were the major PG produced. Total PG production was consistently lower in WC compared to SR cultures due in part to reduce PG synthesis but also to degradation of newly synthesized PG. Since increased DS-PG accompanines atherosclerosis progression, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that macrophages modulate smooth muscle cell metabolism to cause increase DS-PG production. Cultured WC aortic smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1 and the production of PG examined. Increasing concentration of conditioned media from both types of macrophages caused increased incorporation of {sup 35}S-sulfate into secreted PG, but no change in cell-associated PG. Lipopolysaccharide activation of P388D1 cells enhanced the effect.

  14. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  15. Smooth muscle FGF/TGFβ cross talk regulates atherosclerosis progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Tellides, George; Simons, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative phenotype is thought to play an important role in atherosclerosis. However, the contribution of this process to plaque growth has never been fully defined. In this study, we show that activation of SMC TGFβ signaling, achieved by suppression of SMC fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling input, induces their conversion to a contractile phenotype and dramatically reduces atherosclerotic plaque size. The FGF/TGFβ signaling cross talk was observed in vitro and in vivo In vitro, inhibition of FGF signaling increased TGFβ activity, thereby promoting smooth muscle differentiation and decreasing proliferation. In vivo, smooth muscle-specific knockout of an FGF receptor adaptor Frs2α led to a profound inhibition of atherosclerotic plaque growth when these animals were crossed on Apoe(-/-) background and subjected to a high-fat diet. In particular, there was a significant reduction in plaque cellularity, increase in fibrous cap area, and decrease in necrotic core size. In agreement with these findings, examination of human coronary arteries with various degrees of atherosclerosis revealed a strong correlation between the activation of FGF signaling, loss of TGFβ activity, and increased disease severity. These results identify SMC FGF/TGFβ signaling cross talk as an important regulator of SMC phenotype switch and document a major contribution of medial SMC proliferation to atherosclerotic plaque growth.

  16. TARGETING THE AIRWAY SMOOTH MUSCLE FOR ASTHMA TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a complex respiratory disease whose incidence has increased worldwide in the last decade. There is currently no cure for asthma. While bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory medications are effective medicines in some asthmatic patients, it is clear that an unmet therapeutic need persists for a subpopulation of individuals with severe asthma. This chronic lung disease is characterized by airflow limitation and lung inflammation and remodeling that includes increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. In addition to its contractile properties, the ASM also contributes to the inflammatory process by producing active mediators, modifying the extracellular matrix composition, and interacting with inflammatory cells. These undesirable functions make interventions aimed at reducing ASM abundance an attractive strategy for novel asthma therapies. There are at least three mechanisms that could limit the accumulation of smooth muscle – decreased cell proliferation, augmented cell apoptosis, and reduced cell migration into the smooth muscle layer. Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway or statins hold promise for asthma because they exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-migratory, and anti-proliferative effects in pre-clinical and clinical studies, and they can target the SM. This review will discuss current knowledge of ASM biology and identify gaps in the field in order to stimulate future investigations of the cellular mechanisms controlling ASM overabundance in asthma. Targeting ASM has the potential to be an innovative venue of treatment for patients with asthma. PMID:19766960

  17. Sensitized airway smooth muscle plasticity and hyperreactivity: a review.

    PubMed

    Stephens, N L; Cheng, Z-Q; Fust, A

    2007-07-01

    To help elucidate the mechanisms underlying asthmatic bronchospasm, the goal of our research has been to determine whether airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperreactivity was the responsible factor. We reported that in a canine model of asthma, the shortening capacity (DeltaLmax) and velocity (Vo) of in vitro sensitized muscle were significantly increased. This increase was of sufficient magnitude to account for 75% narrowing of the in vivo airway, but maximal isometric force was unchanged. This last feature has been reported by others. Under lightly loaded conditions, ASM completes 75% of its isotonic shortening within the first 2 s. Furthermore, 90% of the increased shortening of ragweed pollen-sensitized ASM (SASM), compared with control (CASM), is complete within the first 2 s. The study of shortening beyond this period will apparently not yield much useful information, and studies of isotonic shortening should be focused on this interval. Although both CASM and SASM showed plasticity and adaptation with respect to isometric force, neither muscle type showed a difference in the force developed in these phases. During isotonic shortening, no evidence of plasticity was seen, but the equilibrated SASM showed increased DeltaLmax and Vo of shortening. Molecular mechanisms of changes in Vo could result from changes in the kinetics of the myosin heavy chain ATPase. Motility assay, however, showed no changes between CASM and SASM in the ability of the purified myosin molecule (SF1) to translocate a marker actin filament. On the other hand, we found that the state of activation of the ATPase by phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin light chain (molecular mass 20,000 Da) was greater in the SASM. This would account for the increased Vo. Investigating the signalling pathway, we found that whereas [Ca2+]i increased in both isometric and isotonic contraction, there was no significant difference between CASM and SASM. The content and activity of calmodulin were also not

  18. Spontaneously tonic smooth muscle has characteristically higher levels of RhoA/ROK compared with the phasic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag A; Rattan, Satish

    2006-11-01

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) tone is important for the rectoanal continence. The RhoA/Rho kinase (ROK) pathway has been associated with the agonist-induced sustained contraction of the smooth muscle, but its role in the spontaneously tonic smooth muscle is not known. Present studies compared expression of different components of the RhoA/ROK pathway between the IAS (a truly tonic SM), the rectal smooth muscle (RSM) (a mixture of phasic and tonic), and anococcygeus smooth muscle (ASM) (a purely phasic SM) of rat. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to determine RhoA, ROCK-II, CPI-17, MYPT1, and myosin light-chain 20 (MLC20). Phosphorylated CPI-17 at threonine-38 residue (p(Thr38)-CPI-17), MYPT1 at threonine-696 residue (p(Thr696)-MYPT1), and MLC20 at threonine-18/serine-19 residues (p(Thr18/Ser19)-MLC20) were also determined in the basal state and after pretreatment with the ROK inhibitor Y 27632. In addition, we compared the effect of Y 27632 on the basal isometric tension and ROK activity in the IAS vs. the RSM. Our data show the highest levels of RhoA, ROCK-II, CPI-17, MLC20, and of phospho-MYPT1, -CPI-17, and -MLC20 in the IAS followed by in the RSM and ASM. Conversely, MYPT1 levels were lowest in the IAS and highest in the ASM. In the IAS, Y 27632 caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the basal tone, levels of phospho-MYPT1, -CPI-17, and -MLC20, and ROK activity. We conclude that RhoA/ROK plays a critical role in the basal tone in the IAS by the inhibition of MLC phosphatase via the phosphorylation of MYPT1 and CPI-17.

  19. Circulating micrornas as potential biomarkers of muscle atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei

    2016-07-01

    Noninvasive biomarkers with diagnostic value and prognostic applications have long been desired to replace muscle biopsy for muscle atrophy patients. Growing evidence indicates that circulating microRNAs are biomarkers to assess pathophysiological status. Here, we show that the medium levels of six muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1/23a/206/133/499/208b, also known as myomiRs) were all elevated in the medium of starved C2C12 cell (P < 0.01). And, the level of miR-1 and miR-23a were all elevated in the serum of hindlimb unloaded mice (P < 0.01). miR-23a levels were negatively correlated with both muscle mass and muscle fiber cross section area in muscle atrophy patients, indicating that they might represent the degree of muscle atrophy. Collectively, our data indicated that circulating myomiRs could serve as promising biomarkers for muscle atrophy.

  20. Complimentary endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell co-culture systems with alternate smooth muscle cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rose, Stacey L; Babensee, Julia E

    2007-08-01

    Development of in vitro models of native and injured vasculature is crucial for better understanding altered wound healing in disease, device implantation, or tissue engineering. Conditions were optimized using polyethyleneteraphalate transwell filters for human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC)/smooth muscle cell (HASMC) co-cultures with divergent HASMC phenotypes ('more or less secretory') while maintaining quiescent HAECs. Resulting HASMC phenotype was studied at 48 and 72 h following co-culture initiation, and compared to serum and growth factor starved monocultured 'forced contractile' HASMCs. Forced contractile HASMCs demonstrated organized alpha-smooth muscle actin filaments, minimal interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) secretion, and low intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and tissue factor expression. Organization of alpha-smooth muscle actin was lost in 'more secretory' HASMCs in co-culture with HAECs, and IL-8 and MCP-1 secretion, as well as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and tissue factor expression were significantly upregulated at both time points. Alternately, 'less secretory' HASMCs in co-culture with HAECs showed similar characteristics to forced contractile HASMCs at the 48 h time point, while by the 72 h time point they behaved similarly to 'more secretory' HASMCs. These co-culture systems could be useful in better understanding vascular healing, however there remain time constraint considerations for maintaining culture integrity/cell phenotype.

  1. Angiogenesis is induced by airway smooth muscle strain.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Lin, Richard Z; Vaday, Gayle G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2007-10-01

    Angiogenesis is an important feature of airway remodeling in both chronic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airways in those conditions are exposed to excessive mechanical strain during periods of acute exacerbations. We recently reported that mechanical strain of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) led to an increase in their proliferation and migration. Sustained growth in airway smooth muscle in vivo requires an increase in the nutritional supply to these muscles, hence angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that cyclic mechanical strain of HASM produces factors promoting angiogenic events in the surrounding vascular endothelial cells. Our results show: 1) a significant increase in human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) proliferation, migration, and tube formation following incubation in conditioned media (CM) from HASM cells exposed to mechanical strain; 2) mechanical strain of HASM cells induced VEGF expression and release; 3) VEGF neutralizing antibodies inhibited the proliferation, migration, and tube formations of HMVEC-L induced by the strained airway smooth muscle CM; 4) mechanical strain of HASM induced a significant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) mRNA and protein, a transcription factor required for VEGF gene transcription; and 5) mechanical strain of HASM induced HIF-1alpha/VEGF through dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ERK pathways. In conclusion, exposing HASM cells to mechanical strain induces signal transduction pathway through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERK pathways that lead to an increase in HIF-1alpha, a transcription factor required for VEGF expression. VEGF release by mechanical strain of HASM may contribute to the angiogenesis seen with repeated exacerbation of asthma and COPD.

  2. The magnetic field of gastrointestinal smooth muscle activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Alan; Ladipo, Jk; Richards, William; Wikswo, John

    1997-11-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract controls the absorption and transport of ingested materials. Its function is determined largely by the electrical activity of the smooth muscle that lines the GI tract. GI electrical activity consists of an omnipresent slowly oscillating wave known as the basic electrical rhythm (BER) that modulates a higher-frequency spiking activity associated with muscle contraction. The BER has been shown to be a reliable indicator of intestinal viability, and thus, recording of smooth muscle activity may have clinical value. The BER is difficult to measure with cutaneous electrodes because layers of low-conductivity fat between the GI tract and the abdominal surface attenuate the potential. On the other hand, the magnetic field associated with GI electrical activity is mostly unaffected by intervening fat layers. We recorded the magnetic fields from GI activity in 12 volunteers using a multichannel Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer. Characteristics typical of gastric and intestinal BER were apparent in the data. Channels near the epigastrium recorded gastric BER, and channels in intestinal areas recorded small bowel BER. These results suggest that a single multichannel SQUID magnetometer is able to measure gastrointestinal electrical activity from multiple locations around the abdomen simultaneously.

  3. Stimulant actions of volatile anaesthetics on smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rang, H. P.

    1964-01-01

    A number of volatile anaesthetics, and some compounds synthesized in the search for new anaesthetics, have been tested on guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle in vitro. All the compounds produced a contractile response. This effect did not correlate well with convulsant activity in vivo among the compounds tested. Two kinds of stimulant effect were distinguishable: (1) Rapid, transient contractions, abolished by cocaine or lachesine; most of the anaesthetics in clinical use had this action. (2) Slow, sustained contractions, unaffected by cocaine or lachesine; this effect predominated among the fluorinated ring compounds. Hexamethonium and mepyramine did not affect the contractile response to any of the compounds. The first type of effect presumably represents excitation of postganglionic nerve cells, while the second type is a direct action on the muscle cell. The action of perfluorobenzene, which is of the latter kind, was studied further. Adrenaline and lack of calcium diminished the contraction in parallel with the contraction to histamine, which suggests that the cell membrane was the site of action; in contrast to the stimulant action of histamine or acetylcholine, the effect was highly temperature-sensitive, being almost abolished by cooling to 32° C, and enhanced at 40° C. The depressant action of anaesthetics on smooth muscle is affected very little by temperature changes. These findings are discussed in relation to other observations which suggest a stimulant action of volatile anaesthetics on excitable tissues. Protein denaturation is tentatively suggested as a mechanism of action. PMID:14190470

  4. Ionic conductances regulating the excitability of colonic smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Koh, Sang Don; Ward, S M; Sanders, K M

    2012-08-01

    The tunica muscularis of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract contains two layers of smooth muscle cells (SMC) oriented perpendicular to each other. SMC express a variety of voltage-dependent and voltage-independent ionic conductance(s) that develop membrane potential and control excitability. Resting membrane potentials (RMP) vary through the GI tract but generally are within the range of -80 to -40 mV. RMP sets the 'gain' of smooth muscle and regulates openings of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. A variety of K(+) channels contribute to setting RMP of SMC. In most regions, RMP is considerably less negative than the K(+) equilibrium potential, due to a finely tuned balance between background K(+) channels and non-selective cation channels (NSCC). Variations in expression patterns and openings of K(+) channels and NSCC account for differences of the RMP in different regions of the GI tract. Smooth muscle excitability is also regulated by interstitial cells (interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα(+) cells) that express additional conductances and are electrically coupled to SMC. Thus, 'myogenic' activity results from the integrated behavior of the SMC/ICC/PDGFRα(+) cell (SIP) syncytium. Inputs from excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons are required to produce the complex motor patterns of the gut. Motor neurons innervate three cell types in the SIP, and receptors, second messenger pathways, and ion channels in these cells mediate postjunctional responses. Studies of isolated SIP cells have begun to unravel the mechanisms responsible for neural responses. This review discusses ion channels that set and regulate RMP of SIP cells and how neurotransmitters regulate membrane potential.

  5. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  6. Vascular smooth muscle cell culture in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Y. C.; Chen, F.; Zhang, T.; Chen, D. Y.; Jia, X.; Wang, J. B.; Guo, W.; Chen, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device enabling culture of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) where extracellular matrix coating, VSMC seeding, culture, and immunostaining are demonstrated in a tubing-free manner. By optimizing droplet volume differences between inlets and outlets of micro channels, VSMCs were evenly seeded into microfluidic devices. Furthermore, the effects of extracellular matrix (e.g., collagen, poly-l-Lysine (PLL), and fibronectin) on VSMC proliferation and phenotype expression were explored. As a platform technology, this microfluidic device may function as a new VSMC culture model enabling VSMC studies. PMID:25379109

  7. Smooth muscle relaxing activity of gentiopicroside isolated from Gentiana spathacea.

    PubMed

    Rojas, A; Bah, M; Rojas, J I; Gutiérrez, D M

    2000-12-01

    Bioassay directed fractionation of the (1:1) chloroform-methanol extract of Gentiana spathacea H.B.K (Gentianaceae) led to the isolation of gentiopicroside (gentiopricrin) (1), the major spasmolytic component of the plant. Gentiopicroside inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the spontaneous contractions of isolated guinea pig ileum. Contractions induced by histamine, acetylcholine, BaCl2 and KCl on the ileum were also significantly blocked by this monoterpene glucoside, which suggests that this compound might be interfering with calcium influx into the smooth muscle cells.

  8. Pharmacological characterisation of the smooth muscle antispasmodic agent tiropramide.

    PubMed

    Setnikar, I; Cereda, R; Pacini, M A; Revel, L; Makovec, F

    1989-09-01

    (+/-) Tiropramide hydrochloride, its D and L optical isomers and some of its metabolites were characterized in a number of in vitro pharmacological tests. Tiropramide showed broad spectrum antispasmodic activities on the isolated stomach of guinea pig electrically stimulated; on the longitudinal muscles of the ileum of guinea pig stimulated by electrical impulses, BaCl2, acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin, substance P and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8); on the spontaneous contractions and on the electrical inhibition of the jejunum of rabbit; on the spontaneous contractions and on the contractions provoked by BaCl2 and acetylcholine of the ascending colon of the rat; on the contractions provoked by BaCl2, acetylcholine, histamine and cerulein of the circular muscles of the gall bladder of the guinea pig; on the spontaneous contractions of the pyel-ureter preparation of the guinea pig; on the contractions of the uterus of the rat provoked by oxitocin, serotonin, acetylcholine, PGF2; on the spontaneous contraction of the portal vein of the rat; on the constriction of the tail artery of the rat provoked by electrical stimulation, epinephrine and ergotamine; on the contractions of the aortic strip of the rabbit stimulated by norepinephrine; on the contractions of the strip of bovine coronary artery depolarized by HCl. In general tiropramide had antispasmodic effect at 5-60 mumol/l concentration. It was more potent than papaverine on contractions provoked by electrical or chemical stimuli, and was less potent or ineffective on spontaneous and "physiological" contractions of the different smooth muscle preparations. Tiropramide had small effects on vascular smooth muscles and showed very small calcium channel blocking activity.

  9. Novel treatment strategies for smooth muscle disorders: Targeting Kv7 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Byron, Kenneth L

    2016-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells provide crucial contractile functions in visceral, vascular, and lung tissues. The contractile state of smooth muscle is largely determined by their electrical excitability, which is in turn influenced by the activity of potassium channels. The activity of potassium channels sustains smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization, reducing cellular excitability and thereby promoting smooth muscle relaxation. Research over the past decade has indicated an important role for Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of the excitability of smooth muscle cells. Expression of multiple Kv7 channel subtypes has been demonstrated in smooth muscle cells from viscera (gastrointestinal, bladder, myometrial), from the systemic and pulmonary vasculature, and from the airways of the lung, from multiple species, including humans. A number of clinically used drugs, some of which were developed to target Kv7 channels in other tissues, have been found to exert robust effects on smooth muscle Kv7 channels. Functional studies have indicated that Kv7 channel activators and inhibitors have the ability to relax and contact smooth muscle preparations, respectively, suggesting a wide range of novel applications for the pharmacological tool set. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the physiological functions of Kv7 channels in smooth muscle, and highlights potential therapeutic applications based on pharmacological targeting of smooth muscle Kv7 channels throughout the body.

  10. [Biomechanics and bio-energetics of smooth muscle contraction. Relation to bronchial hyperreactivity].

    PubMed

    Coirault, C; Blanc, F X; Chemla, D; Salmeron, S; Lecarpentier, Y

    2000-06-01

    Mechanical studies of isolated muscle and analysis of molecular actomyosin interactions have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of airway smooth muscle. Mechanical properties of airway smooth muscle are similar to those of other smooth muscles. Airway smooth muscle exhibits spontaneous intrinsic tone and its maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) is 10-30 fold lower than in striated muscle. Smooth muscle myosin generates step size and elementary force per crossbridge interaction approximately similar to those of skeletal muscle myosin. Special slow cycling crossbridges, termed latch-bridges, have been attributed to myosin light chain dephosphorylation. From a mechanical point of view, it has been shown that airway hyperresponsiveness is characterized by an increased Vmax and an increased shortening capacity, with no significant change in the force-generating capacity.

  11. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Aisenberg, William H.; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K.; Liggett, Stephen B.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.; An, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma. PMID:27905542

  12. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, John J.; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p < 0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues. PMID:16095685

  13. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, William H; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K; Liggett, Stephen B; Pluznick, Jennifer L; An, Steven S

    2016-12-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma.

  14. Smooth muscle archvillin is an ERK scaffolding protein.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Kengni, Edouard; Appel, Sarah; Gallant, Cynthia; Kim, Hak Rim; Leavis, Paul; DeGnore, Jon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2009-06-26

    ERK influences a number of pathways in all cells, but how ERK activities are segregated between different pathways has not been entirely clear. Using immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments with domain-specific recombinant fragments, we show that smooth muscle archvillin (SmAV) binds ERK and members of the ERK signaling cascade in a domain-specific, stimulus-dependent, and pathway-specific manner. MEK binds specifically to the first 445 residues of SmAV. B-Raf, an upstream regulator of MEK, constitutively interacts with residues 1-445 and 446-1250. Both ERK and 14-3-3 bind to both fragments, but in a stimulus-specific manner. Phosphorylated ERK is associated only with residues 1-445. An ERK phosphorylation site was determined by mass spectrometry to reside at Ser132. A phospho-antibody raised to this site shows that the site is phosphorylated during alpha-agonist-mediated ERK activation in smooth muscle tissue. Phosphorylation of SmAV by ERK decreases the association of phospho-ERK with SmAV. These results, combined with previous observations, indicate that SmAV serves as a new ERK scaffolding protein and provide a mechanism for regulation of ERK binding, activation, and release from the signaling complex.

  15. MicroRNAs dynamically remodel gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanjae; Yan, Wei; Ward, Sean M; Hwang, Sung Jin; Wu, Qiuxia; Hatton, William J; Park, Jong Kun; Sanders, Kenton M; Ro, Seungil

    2011-04-14

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) express a unique set of microRNAs (miRNAs) which regulate and maintain the differentiation state of SMCs. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs during the development of gastrointestinal (GI) SMCs in a transgenic animal model. We generated SMC-specific Dicer null animals that express the reporter, green fluorescence protein, in a SMC-specific manner. SMC-specific knockout of Dicer prevented SMC miRNA biogenesis, causing dramatic changes in phenotype, function, and global gene expression in SMCs: the mutant mice developed severe dilation of the intestinal tract associated with the thinning and destruction of the smooth muscle (SM) layers; contractile motility in the mutant intestine was dramatically decreased; and SM contractile genes and transcriptional regulators were extensively down-regulated in the mutant SMCs. Profiling and bioinformatic analyses showed that SMC phenotype is regulated by a complex network of positive and negative feedback by SMC miRNAs, serum response factor (SRF), and other transcriptional factors. Taken together, our data suggest that SMC miRNAs are required for the development and survival of SMCs in the GI tract.

  16. Pericytes are progenitors for coronary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Katharina S; Jacobs, Andrew H; Chen, Heidi I; Poduri, Aruna; McKay, Andrew S; Riordan, Daniel P; Kofler, Natalie; Kitajewski, Jan; Weissman, Irving; Red-Horse, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial cells on the heart’s surface give rise to coronary artery smooth muscle cells (caSMCs) located deep in the myocardium. However, the differentiation steps between epicardial cells and caSMCs are unknown as are the final maturation signals at coronary arteries. Here, we use clonal analysis and lineage tracing to show that caSMCs derive from pericytes, mural cells associated with microvessels, and that these cells are present in adults. During development following the onset of blood flow, pericytes at arterial remodeling sites upregulate Notch3 while endothelial cells express Jagged-1. Deletion of Notch3 disrupts caSMC differentiation. Our data support a model wherein epicardial-derived pericytes populate the entire coronary microvasculature, but differentiate into caSMCs at arterial remodeling zones in response to Notch signaling. Our data are the first demonstration that pericytes are progenitors for smooth muscle, and their presence in adult hearts reveals a new potential cell type for targeting during cardiovascular disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10036.001 PMID:26479710

  17. Biophysical Induction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Podosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Young; Kohn, Julie C.; Huynh, John; Carey, Shawn P.; Mason, Brooke N.; Vouyouka, Ageliki G.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and matrix degradation occurs with intimal hyperplasia associated with atherosclerosis, vascular injury, and restenosis. One proposed mechanism by which VSMCs degrade matrix is through the use of podosomes, transient actin-based structures that are thought to play a role in extracellular matrix degradation by creating localized sites of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion. To date, podosomes in VSMCs have largely been studied by stimulating cells with phorbol esters, such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), however little is known about the physiological cues that drive podosome formation. We present the first evidence that physiological, physical stimuli mimicking cues present within the microenvironment of diseased arteries can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. Both microtopographical cues and imposed pressure mimicking stage II hypertension induce podosome formation in A7R5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Moreover, wounding using a scratch assay induces podosomes at the leading edge of VSMCs. Notably the effect of each of these biophysical stimuli on podosome stimulation can be inhibited using a Src inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that physical cues can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. PMID:25785437

  18. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Smooth Muscle Tumor.

    PubMed

    Dekate, Jyoti; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-07-01

    Immunodeficient individuals are prone to develop a number of opportunistic infections and unique neoplasms. Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumor is an uncommon neoplasm associated with immunodeficiency. It has been described in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, in the posttransplant setting, and in those with congenital immunodeficiency. Different anatomic sites can be involved by Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumor, and even multiple locations can contain these unique lesions within the same patient. The presence of variable numbers of intratumoral lymphocytes and primitive round cell areas are the unique defining features for this tumor. Histopathologic features may vary considerably in terms of cellular atypia, mitotic activity, and necrosis, with no correlation to the clinical behavior. Demonstration of Epstein-Barr virus infection by in situ hybridization within tumor cell remains critical for the diagnosis. The mechanism for Epstein-Barr virus infection of progenitor cells and neoplastic transformation has been an area of interest and conjecture. Different treatment strategies are proposed according to underlying disease status. This paper reviews the clinicopathologic features of this uncommon neoplasm with detailed discussion of the role of Epstein-Barr virus in the pathogenesis.

  19. Flavonoid galangin prevents smooth muscle fatigue of pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dambros, Miriam; de Jongh, Rik; van Koeveringe, Gommert A; Bast, Aalt; Heijnen, C G M; van Kerrebroeck, Philip E V

    2005-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that the generation of free radicals plays a role in the development of bladder dysfunction. Flavonoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds with broad pharmacological activity. In the present study, the protective effects of the flavonoid galangin on the progressive decrease of bladder smooth muscle contractile responses during repetitive field stimulation (RFS; a model for muscular fatigue) were demonstrated. Pig detrusor strips were mounted for tension recording in organ baths aand were subjected to RFS for 90 min at 32 Hz for 15 s every 5 min. The strips were then washed four times with fresh buffer and allowed a period of recovery for 90 min. The 90 min of RFS caused a progressive decrease in maximal contractile response to electrical field stimulation and to muscarinic agonist-induced contractions (34% and 46% decrease, respectively). Galangin (10(-7) M) prevented the decrease in contractile smooth muscle response of strips to electrical field stimulation during RFS compared with untreated tissues. The antioxidant activity of galangin was assessed by measuring its ability to inhibit the lipid peroxidation induced by iron and ascorbate in rat liver microsomes (IC50 1.7+0.12x10(-6) M). If the data are confirmed in-vivo, exogenously administered galangin may be a new approach in the prevention and/or treatment of bladder dysfunction.

  20. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix.

    PubMed

    Stankus, John J; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R

    2006-02-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p<0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1,700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues.

  1. MURC deficiency in smooth muscle attenuates pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ogata, Takehiro; Naito, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Takuya; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Naoki; Kasahara, Takeru; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that caveolin-1 (Cav1) is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. MURC (also called Cavin-4) is a member of the cavin family, which regulates caveolar formation and functions together with caveolins. Here, we show that hypoxia increased Murc mRNA expression in the mouse lung, and that Murc-null mice exhibited attenuation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) accompanied by reduced ROCK activity in the lung. Conditional knockout mice lacking Murc in smooth muscle also resist hypoxia-induced PH. MURC regulates the proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through Rho/ROCK signalling. Cav1 suppresses RhoA activity in PASMCs, which is reversed by MURC. MURC binds to Cav1 and inhibits the association of Cav1 with the active form of Gα13, resulting in the facilitated association of the active form of Gα13 with p115RhoGEF. These results reveal that MURC has a function in the development of PH through modulating Rho/ROCK signalling. PMID:27546070

  2. Effects of lubiprostone on human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cuppoletti, John; Malinowska, Danuta H; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Ueno, Ryuji

    2008-06-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid derivative and member of a new class of compounds called prostones, locally activates ClC-2 Cl(-) channels without activation of prostaglandin receptors. The present study was specifically designed to test and compare lubiprostone and prostaglandin effects at the cellular level using human uterine smooth muscle cells. Effects on [Ca(2+)](i), membrane potential and [cAMP](i) in human uterine smooth muscle cells were measured. 10 nM lubiprostone significantly decreased [Ca(2+)](i) from 188 to 27 nM, which was unaffected by 100 nM SC-51322, a prostaglandin EP receptor antagonist. In contrast 10nM PGE(2) and PGE(1) both increased [Ca(2+)](i) 3-5-fold which was blocked by SC-51322. Similarly, lubiprostone and prostaglandins had opposite/different effects on membrane potential and [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone caused SC-51322-insensitive membrane hyperpolarization and no effect on [cAMP](i). PGE(2) and PGE(1) both caused SC-51322-sensitive membrane depolarization and increased [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone has fundamentally different cellular effects from prostaglandins that are not mediated by EP receptors.

  3. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; Martos, F; Bellido, I; Marquez, E; Garcia, A J; Pavia, J; Sanchez de la Cuesta, F

    1992-06-09

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle homogenates were characterized with [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) by ligand binding studies. [3H]NMS saturation experiments show the existence of a homogeneous population of non-interacting binding sites with similar affinity (KD values of 1.38 +/- 0.20 nM in human colon smooth muscle and 1.48 +/- 0.47 nM in rat colon smooth muscle) and with Hill slopes close to unity in both samples of tissue. However, a significant (P less than 0.01) increase in muscarinic receptor density (Bmax) is found in human colon (29.9 +/- 2.9 fmol/mg protein) compared with rat colon (17.2 +/- 1.5 fmol/mg protein). Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by non-labelled compounds shows the following order in human colon: atropine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than pirenzepine. Whereas in rat colon the rank order obtained is atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Atropine and pirenzepine bind to a homogeneous population of binding sites, although pirenzepine shows higher affinity to bind to the sites present in rat colon (Ki = 1.08 +/- 0.08 microM) than those in human colon (Ki = 1.74 +/- 0.02 microM) (P less than 0.05). Similarly, IC50 values obtained in AF-DX 116 competition experiments were significantly different (P less than 0.01) in human colon (IC50 = 1.69 +/- 0.37 microM) than in rat colon (IC50 = 3.78 +/- 0.75 microM). Unlike atropine and pirenzepine, the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by AF-DX 116 did not yield a simple mass-action binding curve (nH less than 1, P less than 0.01) suggesting the presence of more than one subtype of muscarinic receptor in both species. Computer analysis of these curves with a two binding site model suggests the presence of two populations of receptor. The apparent Ki1 value for the high affinity binding site is 0.49 +/- 0.07 microM for human colon smooth muscle and 0.33 +/- 0.05 microM for rat colon smooth muscle. The apparent Ki2 for the low affinity binding site is 8

  4. Phosphate and ADP Differently Inhibit Coordinated Smooth Muscle Myosin Groups

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Mackey, Michael C.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo—suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state. PMID:25650929

  5. Phosphate and ADP differently inhibit coordinated smooth muscle myosin groups.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B; Mackey, Michael C; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-03

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo--suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state.

  6. Fibronectin matrix polymerization regulates smooth muscle cell phenotype through a Rac1 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Long, Xiaochun; Hendershot, Allison; Miano, Joseph M; Sottile, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are maintained in a differentiated state in the vessel wall, but can be modulated to a synthetic phenotype following injury. Smooth muscle phenotypic modulation is thought to play an important role in the pathology of vascular occlusive diseases. Phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells exhibit increased proliferative and migratory properties that accompany the downregulation of smooth muscle cell marker proteins. Extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, can regulate the smooth muscle phenotype when used as adhesive substrates. However, cells produce and organize a 3-dimensional fibrillar extracellular matrix, which can affect cell behavior in distinct ways from the protomeric 2-dimensional matrix proteins that are used as adhesive substrates. We previously showed that the deposition/polymerization of fibronectin into the extracellular matrix can regulate the deposition and organization of other extracellular matrix molecules in vitro. Further, our published data show that the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor results in increased expression of smooth muscle cell differentiation proteins and inhibits vascular remodeling in vivo. In this manuscript, we used an in vitro cell culture system to determine the mechanism by which fibronectin polymerization affects smooth muscle phenotypic modulation. Our data show that fibronectin polymerization decreases the mRNA levels of multiple smooth muscle differentiation genes, and downregulates the levels of smooth muscle α-actin and calponin proteins by a Rac1-dependent mechanism. The expression of smooth muscle genes is transcriptionally regulated by fibronectin polymerization, as evidenced by the increased activity of luciferase reporter constructs in the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor. Fibronectin polymerization also promotes smooth muscle cell growth, and decreases the levels of actin stress fibers. These data define a Rac1-dependent pathway wherein

  7. Smooth Muscle Hgs Deficiency Leads to Impaired Esophageal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jicheng; Hou, Ning; Zhang, Chong; Teng, Yan; Cheng, Xuan; Li, Zhenhua; Ren, Jie; Zeng, Jian; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Yang, Xiao; Lan, Yu

    2015-01-01

    As a master component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport proteins, hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hgs) participates multiple cellular behaviors. However, the physiological role of Hgs in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is by far unknown. Here we explored the in vivo function of Hgs in SMCs by using a conditional gene knockout strategy. Hgs deficiency in SMCs uniquely led to a progressive dilatation of esophagus with a remarkable thinning muscle layer. Of note, the mutant esophagus showed a decreased contractile responsiveness to potassium chloride and acetylcholine stimulation. Furthermore, an increase in the inhibitory neurites along with an intense infiltration of T lymphocytes in the mucosa and muscle layer were observed. Consistently, Hgs deficiency in SMCs resulted in a disturbed expression of a set of genes involved in neurotrophin and inflammation, suggesting that defective SMC might be a novel source for excessive production of cytokines and chemokines which may trigger the neuronal dysplasia and ultimately contribute to the compromised esophageal motility. The data suggest potential implications in the pathogenesis of related diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:26078721

  8. Rho-kinase mediated cytoskeletal stiffness in skinned smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Bo; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jenny; Pascoe, Chris D.; Norris, Brandon A.; Liu, Jeffrey C.-Y.; Solomon, Dennis; Paré, Peter D.; Deng, Linhong

    2013-01-01

    The structurally dynamic cytoskeleton is important in many cell functions. Large gaps still exist in our knowledge regarding what regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and what underlies the structural plasticity. Because Rho-kinase is an upstream regulator of signaling events leading to phosphorylation of many cytoskeletal proteins in many cell types, we have chosen this kinase as the focus of the present study. In detergent skinned tracheal smooth muscle preparations, we quantified the proteins eluted from the muscle cells over time and monitored the muscle's ability to respond to acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation to produce force and stiffness. In a partially skinned preparation not able to generate active force but could still stiffen upon ACh stimulation, we found that the ACh-induced stiffness was independent of calcium and myosin light chain phosphorylation. This indicates that the myosin light chain-dependent actively cycling crossbridges are not likely the source of the stiffness. The results also indicate that Rho-kinase is central to the ACh-induced stiffness, because inhibition of the kinase by H1152 (1 μM) abolished the stiffening. Furthermore, the rate of relaxation of calcium-induced stiffness in the skinned preparation was faster than that of ACh-induced stiffness, with or without calcium, suggesting that different signaling pathways lead to different means of maintenance of stiffness in the skinned preparation. PMID:24072407

  9. The Structure of Mytilus Smooth Muscle and the Electrical Constants of the Resting Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Twarog, Betty M.; Dewey, Maynard M.; Hidaka, Tohoru

    1973-01-01

    The individual muscle fibers of the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis L. are uninucleate, 1.2–1.8 mm in length, 5 µm in diameter, and organized into bundles 100–200 µm in diameter, surrounded by connective tissue. Some bundles run the length of the whole muscle. Adjacent muscle cell membranes are interconnected by nexuses at frequent intervals. Specialized attachments exist between muscle fibers and connective tissue. Electrical constants of the resting muscle membrane were measured with intracellular recording electrodes and both extracellular and intracellular current-passing electrodes. With an intracellular current-passing electrode, the time constant τ, was 4.3 ± 1.5 ms. With current delivered via an extracellular electrode τ was 68.3 ± 15 ms. The space constant, λ, was 1.8 mm ± 0.4. The membrane input resistance, Reff, ranged from 23 to 51 MΩ. The observations that values of τ depend on the method of passing current, and that the value of λ is large relative to fiber length and diameter are considered evidence that the individual muscle fibers are electrically interconnected within bundles in a three-dimensional network. Estimations are made of the membrane resistance, Rm, to compare the values to fast and slow striated muscle fibers and mammalian smooth muscles. The implications of this study in reinterpreting previous mechanical and electrical studies are discussed. PMID:4688321

  10. Neo-innervation of a bioengineered intestinal smooth muscle construct around chitosan scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zakhem, Elie; Raghavan, Shreya; Bitar, Khalil N

    2014-02-01

    Neuromuscular disorders of the gut result in disturbances in gastrointestinal transit. The objective of this study was to evaluate the neo-innervation of smooth muscle in an attempt to restore lost innervation. We have previously shown the potential use of composite chitosan scaffolds as support for intestinal smooth muscle constructs. However, the constructs lacked neuronal component. Here, we bioengineered innervated colonic smooth muscle constructs using rabbit colon smooth muscle and enteric neural progenitor cells. We also bioengineered smooth muscle only tissue constructs using colonic smooth muscle cells. The constructs were placed next to each other around tubular chitosan scaffolds and left in culture. Real time force generation conducted on the intrinsically innervated smooth muscle constructs showed differentiated functional neurons. The bioengineered smooth muscle only constructs became neo-innervated. The neo-innervation results were confirmed by immunostaining assays. Chitosan supported (1) the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in the constructs and (2) the neo-innervation of non-innervated smooth muscle around the same scaffold.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum of Airway Smooth Muscle. Implications for Airway Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel P.; Rector, Michael V.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Li, Xiaopeng; Stroik, Mallory R.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Meyerholz, David K.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: An asthma-like airway phenotype has been described in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Whether these findings are directly caused by loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function or secondary to chronic airway infection and/or inflammation has been difficult to determine. Objectives: Airway contractility is primarily determined by airway smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that CFTR is expressed in airway smooth muscle and directly affects airway smooth muscle contractility. Methods: Newborn pigs, both wild type and with CF (before the onset of airway infection and inflammation), were used in this study. High-resolution immunofluorescence was used to identify the subcellular localization of CFTR in airway smooth muscle. Airway smooth muscle function was determined with tissue myography, intracellular calcium measurements, and regulatory myosin light chain phosphorylation status. Precision-cut lung slices were used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CFTR modulation on airway reactivity. Measurements and Main Results: We found that CFTR localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum compartment of airway smooth muscle and regulates airway smooth muscle tone. Loss of CFTR function led to delayed calcium reuptake following cholinergic stimulation and increased myosin light chain phosphorylation. CFTR potentiation with ivacaftor decreased airway reactivity in precision-cut lung slices following cholinergic stimulation. Conclusions: Loss of CFTR alters porcine airway smooth muscle function and may contribute to the airflow obstruction phenotype observed in human CF. Airway smooth muscle CFTR may represent a therapeutic target in CF and other diseases of airway narrowing. PMID:26488271

  12. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  13. Smooth muscle relaxing flavonoids and terpenoids from Conyza filaginoides.

    PubMed

    Mata, R; Rojas, A; Acevedo, L; Estrada, S; Calzada, F; Rojas, I; Bye, R; Linares, E

    1997-02-01

    Activity-guided fractionation of the smooth muscle relaxing, chloroform-methanol (1:1) extract of Conyza filaginoides (D.C.) Hieron (Asteraceae) led to the isolation of three flavonoids (quercetin 3-glucoside, rutin, and pinostrobin), one sterol (alpha-spinasterol), a sesquiterpenoid (beta-caryophyllene 4,5-alpha-oxide), and two triterpenoids (erythrodiol and 3-beta-tridecanoyloxy-28-hydroxyolean-12-ene). 3-beta-Tridecanoyloxy-28-hydroxy-olean-12-ene is a new naturally occurring terpenoid. All the isolated compounds induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous contractions of rat ileum. The spasmolytic activity exhibited by the extract and active principles tends to support the traditional use of C filaginoides as an antispasmodic agent.

  14. Nuclear reprogramming and its role in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zaina, Silvio; del Pilar Valencia-Morales, Maria; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E; Lund, Gertrud

    2013-09-01

    In general terms, "nuclear reprogramming" refers to a change in gene expression profile that results in a significant switch in cellular phenotype. Nuclear reprogramming was first addressed by pioneering studies of cell differentiation during embryonic development. In recent years, nuclear reprogramming has been studied in great detail in the context of experimentally controlled dedifferentiation and transdifferentiation of mammalian cells for therapeutic purposes. In this review, we present a perspective on nuclear reprogramming in the context of spontaneous, pathophysiological phenotypic switch of vascular cells occurring in the atherosclerotic lesion. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of epigenetic mechanisms participating in the extraordinary flexibility of the gene expression profile of vascular smooth muscle cells and other cell types participating in atherogenesis. Understanding how epigenetic changes participate in vascular cell plasticity may lead to effective therapies based on the remodelling of the vascular architecture.

  15. Aging impairs Ca2+ sensitization pathways in gallbladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Macias, Beatriz; Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Camello-Almaraz, Cristina; Pascua, Patricia; Tresguerres, Jesus Af; Camello, Pedro J; Pozo, Maria J

    2012-08-01

    Calcium sensitization is an important physiological process in agonist-induced contraction of smooth muscle. In brief, calcium sensitization is a pathway that leads to smooth muscle contraction independently of changes in [Ca(2+)](i) by mean of inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase. Aging has negative impacts on gallbladder contractile response due to partial impairment in calcium signaling and alterations in the contractile machinery. However, information regarding aging-induced alterations in calcium sensitization is scanty. We hypothesized that the calcium sensitization system is negatively affected by age. To investigate this, gallbladders were collected from adult (4 months old) and aged (22-24 months old) guinea pigs. To evaluate the contribution of calcium sensitization pathways we assayed the effect of the specific inhibitors Y-27632 and GF109203X on the "in vitro" isometric gallbladder contractions induced by agonist challenges. In addition, expression and phosphorylation (as activation index) of proteins participating in the calcium sensitization pathways were quantified by Western blotting. Aging reduced bethanechol- and cholecystokinin-evoked contractions, an effect associated with a reduction in MLC20 phosphorylation and in the effects of both Y-27632 and GF109203X. In addition, there was a drop in ROCK I, ROCK II, MYPT-1 and PKC expression and in the activation/phosphorylation of MYPT-1, PKC and CPI-17 in response to agonists. Interestingly, melatonin treatment for 4 weeks restored gallbladder contractile responses due to re-establishment of calcium sensitization pathways. These results demonstrate that age-related gallbladder hypocontractility is associated to alterations of calcium sensitization pathways and that melatonin treatment exerts beneficial effects in the recovery of gallbladder contractility.

  16. Vascular smooth muscle cell response on thin films of collagen.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John T; Woodward, John T; Langenbach, Kurt J; Tona, Alex; Jones, Peter L; Plant, Anne L

    2005-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) cultured on gels of fibrillar type I collagen or denatured collagen (gelatin) comprise a model system that has been widely used for studying the role of the extracellular matrix in vascular diseases such as hypertension, restenosis and athrosclerosis. Despite the wide use of this model system, there are several disadvantages to using collagen gels for cellular studies. These include poor optical characteristics for microscopy, difficulty in verifying that the properties of the preparations are identical from experiment to experiment, heterogeneity within the gels, and difficulty in handling the gels because they are fragile. Previously, we developed an alternative collagen matrix by forming thin films of native fibrillar collagen or denatured collagen on self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols [Elliott, J.T., Tona, A., Woodward, J., Jones,P., Plant, A., 2003a. Thin films of collagen affect smooth muscle cell morphology. Langmuir 19, 1506-1514.]. These substrates are robust and can be characterized by surface analytical techniques that allow both verification of the reproducibility of the preparation and high-resolution analysis of collagen structure. In addition, they have excellent optical properties that allow more details of the cell-matrix interactions to be observed by microscopy. In this study, we performed a side-by-side structural and functional comparison of collagen gels with thin films of collagen. Our results indicate that vSMC on thin films of collagen are nearly identical to vSMC on thick gels as determined by morphology, proliferation rate, integrin ligation, tenascin-C expression and intracellular signaling events. These results suggest that the features of collagen gels that direct the observed vSMC responses are adequately reconstituted in the thin films of collagen. These thin films will be useful for elucidating the features of the collagen matrix that regulate vSMC response and may be applicable to high

  17. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Martin, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway. PMID:26998246

  18. IP3 receptors regulate vascular smooth muscle contractility and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingsong; Zhao, Guiling; Fang, Xi; Peng, Xiaohong; Tang, Huayuan; Wang, Hong; Jing, Ran; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu

    2016-01-01

    Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptor–mediated (IP3R-mediated) calcium (Ca2+) release has been proposed to play an important role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction for decades. However, whether and how IP3R regulates blood pressure in vivo remains unclear. To address these questions, we have generated a smooth muscle–specific IP3R triple-knockout (smTKO) mouse model using a tamoxifen-inducible system. In this study, the role of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in adult VSMCs on aortic vascular contractility and blood pressure was assessed following tamoxifen induction. We demonstrated that deletion of IP3Rs significantly reduced aortic contractile responses to vasoconstrictors, including phenylephrine, U46619, serotonin, and endothelin 1. Deletion of IP3Rs also dramatically reduced the phosphorylation of MLC20 and MYPT1 induced by U46619. Furthermore, although the basal blood pressure of smTKO mice remained similar to that of wild-type controls, the increase in systolic blood pressure upon chronic infusion of angiotensin II was significantly attenuated in smTKO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate an important role for IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in VSMCs in regulating vascular contractility and hypertension. PMID:27777977

  19. Circular smooth muscle contributes to esophageal shortening during peristalsis

    PubMed Central

    Vegesna, Anil K; Chuang, Keng-Yu; Besetty, Ramashesai; Phillips, Steven J; Braverman, Alan S; Barbe, Mary F; Ruggieri, Michael R; Miller, Larry S

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the angle between the circular smooth muscle (CSM) and longitudinal smooth muscle (LSM) fibers in the distal esophagus. METHODS: In order to identify possible mechanisms for greater shortening in the distal compared to proximal esophagus during peristalsis, the angles between the LSM and CSM layers were measured in 9 cadavers. The outer longitudinal layer of the muscularis propria was exposed after stripping the outer serosa. The inner circular layer of the muscularis propria was then revealed after dissection of the esophageal mucosa and the underlying muscularis mucosa. Photographs of each specimen were taken with half of the open esophagus folded back showing both the outer longitudinal and inner circular muscle layers. Angles were measured every one cm for 10 cm proximal to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) by two independent investigators. Two human esophagi were obtained from organ transplant donors and the angles between the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers were measured using micro-computed tomography (micro CT) and Image J software. RESULTS: All data are presented as mean ± SE. The CSM to LSM angle at the SCJ and 1 cm proximal to SCJ on the autopsy specimens was 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 74.9 ± 3.09 degrees, P = 0.32. The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ were statistically significantly lower than at 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ, 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 82.58 ± 1.34 degrees, 84.04 ± 1.64 degrees, 84.87 ± 1.04 degrees and 83.72 ± 1.42 degrees, P = 0.013, P = 0.008, P = 0.004, P = 0.009 respectively. The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ was also statistically significantly lower than the angles at 6, 7 and 8 cm proximal to the SCJ, 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 80.18 ± 2.09 degrees, 81.81 ± 1.75 degrees and 80.96 ± 2.04 degrees, P = 0.05, P = 0.02, P = 0.03 respectively. The CSM to LSM angle at 1 cm proximal to SCJ was statistically significantly lower than at 3, 4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ, 74.94 ± 3.09 degrees vs 84.04 ± 1

  20. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  1. High pulsatility flow stimulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and contractile protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Devon; Tan, Yan; Shandas, Robin; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2013-01-01

    Proximal arterial stiffening is an important predictor of events in systemic and pulmonary hypertension, partly through its contribution to downstream vascular abnormalities. However, much remains undetermined regarding the mechanisms involved in the vascular changes induced by arterial stiffening. We therefore addressed the hypothesis that high pulsatility flow, caused by proximal arterial stiffening, induces downstream pulmonary artery endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction that in turn leads to phenotypic change of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To test the hypothesis, we employed a model pulmonary circulation in which upstream compliance regulates the pulsatility of flow waves imposed onto a downstream vascular mimetic coculture composed of pulmonary ECs and SMCs. The effects of high pulsatility flow on SMCs were determined both in the presence and absence of ECs. In the presence of ECs, high pulsatility flow increased SMC size and expression of the contractile proteins, smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), without affecting proliferation. In the absence of ECs, high pulsatility flow decreased SMC expression of SMA and SM-MHC, without affecting SMC size or proliferation. To identify the molecular signals involved in the EC-mediated SMC responses, mRNA and/or protein expression of vasoconstrictors [angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and endothelin (ET)-1], vasodilator (eNOS), and growth factor (TGF-β1) in EC were examined. Results showed high pulsatility flow decreased eNOS and increased ACE, ET-1, and TGF-β1 expression. ACE inhibition with ramiprilat, ET-1 receptor inhibition with bosentan, and treatment with the vasodilator bradykinin prevented flow-induced, EC-dependent SMC changes. In conclusion, high pulsatility flow stimulated SMC hypertrophy and contractile protein expression by altering EC production of vasoactive mediators and cytokines, supporting the idea of a coupling between proximal vascular stiffening, flow

  2. Modeling the impairment of airway smooth muscle force by stretch

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Imposed length changes of only a small percent produce transient reductions in active force in strips of airway smooth muscle (ASM) due to the temporary detachment of bound cross-bridges caused by the relative motion of the actin and myosin fibers. More dramatic and sustained reductions in active force occur following large changes in length. The Huxley two-state model of skeletal muscle originally proposed in 1957 and later adapted to include a four-state description of cross-bridge kinetics has been widely used to model the former phenomenon, but is unable to account for the latter unless modified to include mechanisms by which the contractile machinery in the ASM cell becomes appropriately rearranged. Even so, the Huxley model itself is based on the assumption that the contractile proteins are all aligned precisely in the direction of bulk force generation, which is not true for ASM. The present study derives a coarse-grained version of the Huxley model that is free of inherent assumptions about cross-bridge orientation. This simplified model recapitulates the key features observed in the force-length behavior of activated strips of ASM and, in addition, provides a mechanistically based way of accounting for the sustained force reductions that occur following large stretch. PMID:25571992

  3. Modeling the impairment of airway smooth muscle force by stretch.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T

    2015-03-15

    Imposed length changes of only a small percent produce transient reductions in active force in strips of airway smooth muscle (ASM) due to the temporary detachment of bound cross-bridges caused by the relative motion of the actin and myosin fibers. More dramatic and sustained reductions in active force occur following large changes in length. The Huxley two-state model of skeletal muscle originally proposed in 1957 and later adapted to include a four-state description of cross-bridge kinetics has been widely used to model the former phenomenon, but is unable to account for the latter unless modified to include mechanisms by which the contractile machinery in the ASM cell becomes appropriately rearranged. Even so, the Huxley model itself is based on the assumption that the contractile proteins are all aligned precisely in the direction of bulk force generation, which is not true for ASM. The present study derives a coarse-grained version of the Huxley model that is free of inherent assumptions about cross-bridge orientation. This simplified model recapitulates the key features observed in the force-length behavior of activated strips of ASM and, in addition, provides a mechanistically based way of accounting for the sustained force reductions that occur following large stretch.

  4. Excitation-contraction coupling in voltage clamped uterine smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mironneau, Jean

    1973-01-01

    1. The relationship between ionic currents and contraction has been investigated in uterine strips of pregnant rat by means of a double sucrose gap apparatus combined with an optical method which permits the measurement of the contraction of the small muscular bundle where potential and current are recorded. 2. Effects of duration, size and frequency of imposed potentials upon contraction have been studied. The uterine muscle shows summation and tetanus phenomena. Tension elicited by depolarizing pulses of different durations and amplitudes can be considered as made of two components. 3. The first component of the contraction evoked by short depolarizing steps (about 50 ms) depends on the slow inward current. This contraction is abolished by manganese and lanthanum ions and by compound D 600. The amplitude of the tension can be related to the external calcium concentration and consequently to the calcium influx. The slow inward current is supposed to release a part of the bound calcium without excluding, however, a direct activation of myofibrils. 4. The second component of the contraction is observed in manganese containing solution with depolarizations longer than 200 ms and without inward current. Such a component of tension suggests the possibility of release of calcium from intracellular stores which could be located in the sarcoplasmic membrane of the uterine smooth muscle. PMID:4796671

  5. BMP promotes motility and represses growth of smooth muscle cells by activation of tandem Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Perez, Vinicio A.; Ali, Ziad; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Sawada, Hirofumi; Lai, Ying-Ju; Kleisli, Thomas; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Qu, Xiumei; Rubinos, Laura H.; Ashley, Euan; Amieva, Manuel; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel cell-signaling paradigm in which bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) consecutively and interdependently activates the wingless (Wnt)–β-catenin (βC) and Wnt–planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathways to facilitate vascular smooth muscle motility while simultaneously suppressing growth. We show that BMP-2, in a phospho-Akt–dependent manner, induces βC transcriptional activity to produce fibronectin, which then activates integrin-linked kinase 1 (ILK-1) via α4-integrins. ILK-1 then induces the Wnt–PCP pathway by binding a proline-rich motif in disheveled (Dvl) and consequently activating RhoA-Rac1–mediated motility. Transfection of a Dvl mutant that binds βC without activating RhoA-Rac1 not only prevents BMP-2–mediated vascular smooth muscle cell motility but promotes proliferation in association with persistent βC activity. Interfering with the Dvl-dependent Wnt–PCP activation in a murine stented aortic graft injury model promotes extensive neointima formation, as shown by optical coherence tomography and histopathology. We speculate that, in response to injury, factors that subvert BMP-2–mediated tandem activation of Wnt–βC and Wnt–PCP pathways contribute to obliterative vascular disease in both the systemic and pulmonary circulations. PMID:21220513

  6. Mathematical description of geometric and kinematic aspects of smooth muscle plasticity and some related morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Lambert, R K; Paré, P D; Seow, C Y

    2004-02-01

    Despite considerable investigation, the mechanisms underlying the functional properties of smooth muscle are poorly understood. This can be attributed, at least in part, to a lack of knowledge about the structure and organization of the contractile apparatus inside the muscle cell. Recent observations of the plasticity of smooth muscle and of morphometry of the cell have provided enough information for us to propose a quantitative, although highly simplified, model for the geometric arrangement of contractile units and their collective kinematic functions in smooth muscle, particularly airway smooth muscle. We propose that, to a considerable extent, contractile machinery restructures upon activation of the muscle and adapts to cell geometry at the time of activation. We assume that, under steady-state conditions, the geometric arrangement of contractile units and the filaments within these units determines the kinematic characteristics of the muscle. The model successfully predicts the results of experiments on airway smooth muscle plasticity relating to maximal force generation, maximal velocity of shortening, and the variation of compliance with adapted length. The model is also concordant with morphometric observations that show an increase in myosin filament density when muscle is adapted to a longer length. The model provides a framework for design of experiments to quantitatively test various aspects of smooth muscle plasticity in terms of geometric arrangement of contractile units and the muscle's mechanical properties.

  7. Contractile reactions of guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum oxide nanosized particles.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Zaytseva, T N; Nosarev, A V; Agev, B G; Dyakova, E Yu; Ogorodova, L M; Magaeva, A A; Terecova, O G; Itin, V I

    2012-05-01

    Contractile reactions of the guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum dioxide nanosized particles were studied. Contractile reactions to cholinergic and histaminergic stimulation were potentiated by inhalations of nanoparticle aerosol and by exposure of isolated smooth muscle segments to nanoparticle suspension.

  8. SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM AND THE TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT CONTRACTION OF SMOOTH MUSCLE IN CALCIUM-FREE SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Somlyo, Andrew P.; Devine, Carrick E.; Somlyo, Avril V.; North, Stanley R.

    1971-01-01

    The contractile response of turtle oviduct smooth muscle to acetylcholine after 30 min of incubation of muscles in Ca-free, 4 mM ethylene (bis) oxyethylenenitrilotetraacetic acid (EGTA) solutions at room temperature was greater than the contractile response after 30 min of incubation in the Ca-free medium at 37°C. Incubation in Ca-free solution at 37°C before stimulation with acetylcholine in Ca-free solutions at room temperature also reduced the contractile response, suggesting that activator calcium was lost from the fibers at a faster rate at higher temperatures. Electron micrographs of turtle oviduct smooth muscle revealed a sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) occupying approximately 4% of the nucleus- and mitochondria-free cell volume. Incubation of oviduct smooth muscle with ferritin confirmed that the predominantly longitudinally oriented structures described as the SR did not communicate with the extracellular space. The SR formed fenestrations about the surface vesicles, and formed close contacts (couplings) with the surface membrane and surface vesicles in oviduct and vena caval smooth muscle; it is suggested that these are sites of electromechanical coupling. Calculation of the calcium requirements for smooth muscle contraction suggest that the amount of SR observed in the oviduct smooth muscle could supply the activator calcium for the contractions observed in Ca-free solutions. Incubation of oviduct smooth muscle in hypertonic solutions increased the electron opacity of the fibers. A new feature of some of the surface vesicles observed in oviduct, vena caval, and aortic smooth muscle was the presence of approximately 10 nm striations running approximately parallel to the openings of the vesicles to the extracellular space. Thick, thin, and intermediate filaments were observed in turtle oviduct smooth muscle, although the number of thick filaments seen in the present study appeared less than that previously found in mammalian smooth muscles. PMID:4331503

  9. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-09

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains.

  10. Some properties of the smooth muscle of mouse vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Holman, M E; Taylor, G S; Tomita, T

    1977-04-01

    1. Contractions of the mouse vas deferens in response to electrical stimulation differ form those recorded form the guinea-pig vas deferens in that they are abolished by tetrodotoxin. 2. Changes in membrane potentials were recorded form the smooth muscle of both preparations in response to stimulation with current pulses applied by an intracellular electrode and by alrge extracellular plate electrodes. 3. Both preparations behaved similarly in response to intracellular stimulation. Electrotonic potentials in response to extracellular current pulses spread in a longitudinal direction in the guinea-pig vas deferens in accordance with the cable-like properties of this preparation. In contrast, no longitudinal spread of eletrotonus was observed in the mouse vas deferens. 4. Responses to nerve stimulation differed in the two preparations. In the guinea-pig, single stimuli caused excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) which gave rise to action potentials. Some cells from the mouse vas deferens showed similar e.j.p.s and action potentials, although the threshold for the initiation of action potentials was lower and more variable. 5. The majority of cells in the mouse vas deferens failed to show action potentials in response to a single stimuli even though the amplitude of e.j.p.s was from 35 to 40 mV. This was probably due to the large resting membrane potentials of these cells, as all-or-nothing action potentials could be evoked if successive e.j.p.s were allowed to sum with each other or if a depolarizing current pulse was applied at the peak of an e.j.p. 6. The nature of the response to nerve stimulation recorded from differnt cells in the mouse vas deferens could be correlated with the amplitude and time course of the response of the same cell to intracellular stimulation. 7. It is concluded that individual smooth muscle cells in both preparations are probably coupled electrically but that there are few, if any, low resistance pathways in the longitudinal direction

  11. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Citrate synthase (CS) activity, an index of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (222 ± 13, 115 ± 2, and 48 ± 2 μmol·g(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, when respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, although oxidative phosphorylation capacity per mitochondrial content in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting respiratory control ratio and nonphosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  12. The comparative effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics and muscle relaxants on electrical field stimulation response in rat bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang Ho; Min, Young Sil; Lee, Sang Joon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that several aminoglycoside antibiotics have a potential of prolonging the action of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants by drug interactions acting pre-synaptically to inhibit acetylcholine release, but antibiotics itself also have a strong effect on relaxing the smooth muscle. In this study, four antibiotics of aminoglycosides such as gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin and neomycin were compared with skeletal muscle relaxants baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine, and a smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine. The muscle strips isolated from the rat bladder were stimulated with pulse trains of 40 V in amplitude and 10 s in duration, with pulse duration of 1 ms at the frequency of 1-8 Hz, at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 Hz respectively. To test the effect of four antibiotics on bladder smooth muscle relaxation, each of them was treated cumulatively from 1 μM to 0.1 mM with an interval of 5 min. Among the four antibiotics, gentamicin and neomycin inhibited the EFS response. The skeletal muscle relaxants (baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine) and inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA and glycine) did not show any significant effect. However, papaverine, had a significant effect in the relaxation of the smooth muscle. It was suggested that the aminoglycoside antibiotics have inhibitory effect on the bladder smooth muscle.

  13. Depolarization-stimulated contractility of gastrointestinal smooth muscle in calcium-free solution: a review.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emily D; Mangel, Allen W

    2011-01-01

    The membrane of most gastrointestinal smooth muscles shows slow waves, slow rhythmic changes in membrane potential. Slow waves serve to bring the membrane potential of smooth muscle cells to a threshold level that elicits a second electrical event known as the spike or action potential. The inward current of the spike, in most gastrointestinal smooth muscle preparations, is carried, at least in part, by calcium. Indeed, considering the narrow diameter of smooth muscle cells, some have hypothesized that the influx of calcium during the spike is sufficient for activation of the contractile machinery. Findings consistent with this include marked reduction in contractility during exposure of muscle segments to blockers of L-type calcium channels or following reductions in external calcium levels. However, it has also been observed that following exposure of muscle segments to external bathing solutions containing no added calcium plus 5 mM EGTA to remove any remaining extracellular calcium, contractions can be triggered following membrane depolarization. It is noteworthy that in isolated smooth muscle cells or in small muscle segments, during incubation in calcium-free solution, depolarization does not induce contractions. The present paper discusses the evidence in support of depolarization-mediated contractions occurring in gastrointestinal smooth muscle segments during incubation in solutions devoid of calcium.

  14. Epigenetic Control of Smooth Muscle Cell Identity and Lineage Memory.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Delphine; Swiatlowska, Pamela; Owens, Gary K

    2015-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), like all cells, acquire a cell-specific epigenetic signature during development that includes acquisition of a unique repertoire of histone and DNA modifications. These changes are postulated to induce an open chromatin state (referred to as euchromatin) on the repertoire of genes that are expressed in differentiated SMC, including SMC-selective marker genes like Acta2 and Myh11, as well as housekeeping genes expressed by most cell types. In contrast, genes that are silenced in differentiated SMC acquire modifications associated with a closed chromatin state (ie, heterochromatin) and transcriptional silencing. Herein, we review mechanisms that regulate epigenetic control of the differentiated state of SMC. In addition, we identify some of the major limitations in the field and future challenges, including development of innovative new tools and approaches, for performing single-cell epigenetic assays and locus-selective editing of the epigenome that will allow direct studies of the functional role of specific epigenetic controls during development, injury repair, and disease, including major cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and microvascular disease, associated with diabetes mellitus.

  15. Smooth Muscle Cell–targeted RNA Aptamer Inhibits Neointimal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H; Esposito, Carla L; Dickey, David D; Dassie, Justin P; Long, Matthew E; Adam, Joshua; Streeter, Jennifer; Schickling, Brandon; Takapoo, Maysam; Flenker, Katie S; Klesney-Tait, Julia; Franciscis, Vittorio de; Miller, Francis J; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation by drug eluting stents has markedly reduced intimal hyperplasia and subsequent in-stent restenosis. However, the effects of antiproliferative drugs on endothelial cells (EC) contribute to delayed re-endothelialization and late stent thrombosis. Cell-targeted therapies to inhibit VSMC remodeling while maintaining EC health are necessary to allow vascular healing while preventing restenosis. We describe an RNA aptamer (Apt 14) that functions as a smart drug by preferentially targeting VSMCs as compared to ECs and other myocytes. Furthermore, Apt 14 inhibits phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase-B (PI3K/Akt) and VSMC migration in response to multiple agonists by a mechanism that involves inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-β phosphorylation. In a murine model of carotid injury, treatment of vessels with Apt 14 reduces neointimal formation to levels similar to those observed with paclitaxel. Importantly, we confirm that Apt 14 cross-reacts with rodent and human VSMCs, exhibits a half-life of ~300 hours in human serum, and does not elicit immune activation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We describe a VSMC-targeted RNA aptamer that blocks cell migration and inhibits intimal formation. These findings provide the foundation for the translation of cell-targeted RNA therapeutics to vascular disease. PMID:26732878

  16. Traction in smooth muscle cells varies with cell spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Changes in cell shape regulate cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. It has been suggested that the regulation of cell function by the cell shape is a result of the tension in the cytoskeleton and the distortion of the cell. Here we explore the association between cell-generated mechanical forces and the cell morphology. We hypothesized that the cell contractile force is associated with the degree of cell spreading, in particular with the cell length. We measured traction fields of single human airway smooth muscle cells plated on a polyacrylamide gel, in which fluorescent microbeads were embedded to serve as markers of gel deformation. The traction exerted by the cells at the cell-substrate interface was determined from the measured deformation of the gel. The traction was measured before and after treatment with the contractile agonist histamine, or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The relative increase in traction induced by histamine was negatively correlated with the baseline traction. On the contrary, the relative decrease in traction due to isoproterenol was independent of the baseline traction, but it was associated with cell shape: traction decreased more in elongated than in round cells. Maximum cell width, mean cell width, and projected area of the cell were the parameters most tightly coupled to both baseline and histamine-induced traction in this study. Wide and well-spread cells exerted larger traction than slim cells. These results suggest that cell contractility is controlled by cell spreading.

  17. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  18. Contraction of gut smooth muscle cells assessed by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Yohei; Akiho, Hirotada; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Here we discuss the development of a novel cell imaging system for the evaluation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. SMCs were isolated from the circular and longitudinal muscular layers of mouse small intestine by enzymatic digestion. SMCs were stimulated by test agents, thereafter fixed in acrolein. Actin in fixed SMCs was stained with phalloidin and cell length was determined by measuring diameter at the large end of phalloidin-stained strings within the cells. The contractile response was taken as the decrease in the average length of a population of stimulated-SMCs. Various mediators and chemically identified compounds of daikenchuto (DKT), pharmaceutical-grade traditional Japanese prokinetics, were examined. Verification of the integrity of SMC morphology by phalloidin and DAPI staining and semi-automatic measurement of cell length using an imaging analyzer was a reliable method by which to quantify the contractile response. Serotonin, substance P, prostaglandin E2 and histamine induced SMC contraction in concentration-dependent manner. Two components of DKT, hydroxy-α-sanshool and hydroxy-β-sanshool, induced contraction of SMCs. We established a novel cell imaging technique to evaluate SMC contractility. This method may facilitate investigation into SMC activity and its role in gastrointestinal motility, and may assist in the discovery of new prokinetic agents.

  19. Studies on the soluble phosphodiesterases of chicken gizzard smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, R J; Head, J F

    1983-01-01

    In this study we describe the identification of four soluble forms of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase from chicken gizzard smooth muscle. These isoenzymes were separated from one another by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and by calmodulin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Each form migrates as a single discrete band when it is electrophoresed on non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels and stained for phosphodiesterase activity. Each form is also eluted as a single peak on gel-permeation chromatography, giving apparent Mr values of 114 000, 116 000, 122 000 and 59 000. All four enzymes have apparent Km values in the 0-20 microM range, although their relative specificities for cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP differ. Two of the forms bind to calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner; however, only one is activated by calmodulin. The interaction of the second calmodulin-binding form with calmodulin is disrupted by the papaverine derivative verapamil without significantly altering the hydrolytic activity of the enzyme. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6318728

  20. Upregulation of decorin by FXR in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    He Fengtian; Zhang Qiuhong; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Gao Xiang; Li Jiang; Li Yong; Gong Wei; Jiang, Yu; Xie Wen; Li Song

    2008-08-08

    Decorin is a member of the family of small leucine-rich proteoglycans that are present in blood vessels and synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Decorin plays complex roles in both normal vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of various types of vascular disorders. However, the mechanisms of regulation of decorin expression in vasculature are not clearly understood. Particularly little information is available about a role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of decorin expression. In the present study, we report that activation of vascular FXR by a specific ligand resulted in upregulation of decorin at the levels of both mRNA and protein. FXR appears to induce decorin expression at a transcriptional level because (1) upregulation of decorin mRNA expression was abolished by the treatment of a transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D; and (2) decorin promoter activity was significantly increased by activation of FXR. Functional analysis of human decorin promoter identified an imperfect inverted repeat DNA motif, IR8 (-2313TGGTCAtagtgtcaTGACCT-2294), as a likely FXR-responsive element that is involved in decorin regulation.

  1. The importance of the smooth muscle cytoskeleton to preterm labour.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kathleen G

    2014-03-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been shown to regulate the onset of labour in a co-operative and complex manner. One factor, myometrial stretch and associated increases in wall tension, has been implicated clinically in the initiation of labour and especially the aetiology of preterm labour. Recent work on the mechanisms involved has led to the finding that the intracellular Ca(2+) requirement for activation of the myometrial contractile filaments increases during gestation. The decreased Ca(2+) sensitivity correlates with an increase in the expression of caldesmon, an actin-binding protein and inhibitor of myosin activation, during pregnancy. In late pregnancy, an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase-mediated caldesmon phosphorylation occurs, which appears to reverse the inhibitory action of caldesmon during labour. Force generated by the myometrial contractile filaments is communicated across the plasmalemma to the uterine wall through focal adhesions. Phospho-tyrosine screening and mass spectrometry of stretched myometrial samples identified several stretch-activated focal adhesion proteins. This Src-mediated focal adhesion signalling appears to provide a tunable, i.e. regulated, tension sensor and force transmitter in the myometrial cell. In other parallel studies, biophysical measurements of smooth muscle compliance at both the cellular and tissue levels suggest that decreases in cellular compliance due to changing interactions of the actin cytoskeleton with the focal adhesions may also promote increases in uterine wall tension. These results, taken together, suggest that focal adhesion proteins and their interaction with the cytoskeleton may present a new mode of regulation of uterine contractility.

  2. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya . E-mail: sfukumoto@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  3. Ageing induced vascular smooth muscle cell senescence in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna K; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-04-15

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of ageing in that its incidence and prevalence increase with age. However, atherosclerosis is also associated with biological ageing, manifest by a number of typical hallmarks of ageing in the atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, accelerated biological ageing may be superimposed on the effects of chronological ageing in atherosclerosis. Tissue ageing is seen in all cells that comprise the plaque, but particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hallmarks of ageing include evidence of cell senescence, DNA damage (including telomere attrition), mitochondrial dysfunction, a pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype, defects in proteostasis, epigenetic changes, deregulated nutrient sensing, and exhaustion of progenitor cells. In this model, initial damage to DNA (genomic, telomeric, mitochondrial and epigenetic changes) results in a number of cellular responses (cellular senescence, deregulated nutrient sensing and defects in proteostasis). Ultimately, ongoing damage and attempts at repair by continued proliferation overwhelm reparative capacity, causing loss of specialised cell functions, cell death and inflammation. This review summarises the evidence for accelerated biological ageing in atherosclerosis, the functional consequences of cell ageing on cells comprising the plaque, and the causal role that VSMC senescence plays in atherogenesis.

  4. Arterial Myogenic Activation through Smooth Muscle Filamin A.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Arhatte, Malika; Demolombe, Sophie; Peyronnet, Rémi; Baudrie, Véronique; Jodar, Martine; Bourreau, Jennifer; Henrion, Daniel; Offermanns, Stefan; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Feng, Yuanyi; Patel, Amanda; Duprat, Fabrice; Honoré, Eric

    2016-03-08

    Mutations in the filamin A (FlnA) gene are frequently associated with severe arterial abnormalities, although the physiological role for this cytoskeletal element remains poorly understood in vascular cells. We used a conditional mouse model to selectively delete FlnA in smooth muscle (sm) cells at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knockout. Basal blood pressure was significantly reduced in conscious smFlnA knockout mice. Remarkably, pressure-dependent tone of the resistance caudal artery was lost, whereas reactivity to vasoconstrictors was preserved. Impairment of the myogenic behavior was correlated with a lack of calcium influx in arterial myocytes upon an increase in intraluminal pressure. Notably, the stretch activation of CaV1.2 was blunted in the absence of smFlnA. In conclusion, FlnA is a critical upstream element of the signaling cascade underlying the myogenic tone. These findings allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of arterial autoregulation and associated disease states.

  5. Oligoclonal immunoglobulins and smooth muscle antibodies in arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Mellbye, O J; Fyrand, O; Brath, H K; Olsen, E

    1980-04-01

    In twelve synovial fluid/serum pairs from patients with various types of seronegative polyarthritis, homogeneous gamma-bands by agarose gel electrophoresis were found in seven of the synovial fluids and in only one of the sera. In six of the fluids with gamma-bands, smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) were also present, usually in a titre identical to that in serum. In fluids with no gamma-bands, no SMA were detected. In forty synovial fluid/serum pairs from paitients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, no gamma-bands were detected in the synovial fluids, and SMA were present in only three pairs. Absorption and inhibition experiments did not give evidence that the SMA activity in seronegative polyarthritis was confined to the gamma-bands in the synovial fluids. The SMA activity in the fluids seemed to be directed against both actin and 'non-actin' muscular antigens. The association between locally produced oligoclonal immunoglobulins and possible locally produced SMA with differnet electrophoretic mobility suggests that in some of thes patients there is a local synovial production of oligoclonal antibodies with different specificities. Thus, even if the results may indicate a local virus infection in some arthritic joints, they may also be dur to an unspecific local stimulation of B cells or to a specific antigen stimulation combined with an unspecific co-activation of other antibody-producing cells.

  6. PDT-induced apoptosis in arterial smooth muscles cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamekye, Isaac; Renick, R.; Gilbert, C.; McEwan, Jean R.; Evan, G.; Bishop, Christopher C. R.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    PDT kills smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vivo and thus prevents intimal hyperplasia after angioplasty. It causes little inflammation and structural integrity of the artery is not compromised. We have studied the process of the SMC death in vitro. Cultured rat SMC (cell line sv40 ATCC) were sensitized with aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc), and then irradiated with 675 nm laser light (2.5 J/cm2). Controls were studied using only sensitizer or laser for treatment. The cells were incubated and the dying process observed with a time lapse video and microscope system. PDT caused a characteristic pattern of death. Cells lost contact with neighbors, shrank, and showed hyperactivity and membrane ruffling. The cells imploded into active and condensed membrane bound vesicles which were terminally reduced to residual bodies. These are the morphological changes of apoptosis. The control cells which were given AlS2Pc alone or laser alone showed no death. PDT induced cultured arterial SMC death by apoptosis rather than necrosis. An apoptotic mechanism of cell death in vivo would explain the relative lack of inflammation and local tissue destruction in the face of massive death.

  7. Nervous factors influencing the membrane activity of intestinal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, H.; Osa, T.; Toida, N.

    1967-01-01

    The effects of various chemical agents on the spontaneous membrane activities and those electrically elicited in the smooth muscles of small intestine were investigated. 1. The effects of various chemicals on the spontaneously active membrane might be summarized as follows. (a) Cholinergic agents; atropine slightly hyperpolarized the membrane and reduced the amplitude of slow potential changes even in aged preparations. Prostigmine depolarized the membrane, and enhanced the amplitude and prolonged the duration of the slow potential changes. Atropine prevented the actions of prostigmine on the membrane. (b) Ba2+ depolarized the membrane, and enhanced the amplitude and prolonged the duration of the slow potential changes. The spike frequency was initially increased, then reduced. Atropine and tetrodotoxin partially prevented the action of Ba2+ on the membrane activities. 2. Effects of chemical agents on the membrane activity elicited by electrical stimulation might be summarized as follows. (a) Short pulse stimulation (0·5-1 msec) generated the spike as a direct response of the muscle cell membrane, then it was followed by slow depolarization, delayed hyperpolarization, i.e. the `inhibitory potential', and post-inhibitory rebound successively. (b) The slow depolarization and the post-inhibitory rebound were reduced in amplitude by treatment with atropine, and enhanced by treatments with prostigmine and Ba2+. Tetrodotoxin blocked all activities except the spike. 3. When repetitive stimulation (20 c/s) was applied to the membrane, the membrane hyperpolarized; then, after 3-5 sec, it gradually depolarized even if the stimulation was continued, and triggered spikes. The hyperpolarization always preceded depolarization. The duration and the amplitude of the delayed depolarization was proportionally increased by the increased intensity and duration of stimulation. Atropine and tetrodotoxin blocked the generation of the post-inhibitory rebound. 4. Effects of repetitive

  8. Diversity and plasticity in signaling pathways that regulate smooth muscle responsiveness: Paradigms and paradoxes for the myosin phosphatase, the master regulator of smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Masumi; Kitazawa, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of smooth muscle cells is their ability to adapt their functions to meet temporal and chronic fluctuations in their demands. These functions include force development and growth. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the functional plasticity of smooth muscles, the major constituent of organ walls, is fundamental to elucidating pathophysiological rationales of failures of organ functions. Also, the knowledge is expected to facilitate devising innovative strategies that more precisely monitor and normalize organ functions by targeting individual smooth muscles. Evidence has established a current paradigm that the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) is a master regulator of smooth muscle responsiveness to stimuli. Cellular MLCP activity is negatively and positively regulated in response to G-protein activation and cAMP/cGMP production, respectively, through the MYPT1 regulatory subunit and an endogenous inhibitor protein named CPI-17. In this article we review the outcomes from two decade of research on the CPI-17 signaling and discuss emerging paradoxes in the view of signaling pathways regulating smooth muscle functions through MLCP. PMID:28260704

  9. Histone deacetylase 8 regulates cortactin deacetylation and contraction in smooth muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Chen, Shu; Cleary, Rachel A; Wang, Ruping; Gannon, Olivia J; Seto, Edward; Tang, Dale D

    2014-08-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that mediate nucleosomal histone deacetylation and gene expression. Some members of the HDAC family have also been implicated in nonhistone protein deacetylation, which modulates cell-cycle control, differentiation, and cell migration. However, the role of HDACs in smooth muscle contraction is largely unknown. Here, HDAC8 was localized both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of mouse and human smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of HDAC8 by lentivirus-encoding HDAC8 shRNA inhibited force development in response to acetylcholine. Treatment of smooth muscle tissues with HDAC8 inhibitor XXIV (OSU-HDAC-44) induced relaxation of precontracted smooth muscle tissues. In addition, cortactin is an actin-regulatory protein that undergoes deacetylation during migration of NIH 3T3 cells. In this study, acetylcholine stimulation induced cortactin deacetylation in mouse and human smooth muscle tissues, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis using antibody against acetylated lysine. Knockdown of HDAC8 by RNAi or treatment with the inhibitor attenuated cortactin deacetylation and actin polymerization without affecting myosin activation. Furthermore, expression of a charge-neutralizing cortactin mutant inhibited contraction and actin dynamics during contractile activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. In response to contractile stimulation, HDAC8 may mediate cortactin deacetylation, which subsequently promotes actin filament polymerization and smooth muscle contraction.

  10. Smooth muscle in the wall of the developing human urinary bladder and urethra.

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A

    1983-01-01

    A series of human fetal and neonatal specimens ranging in age from the second month of intrauterine development to 4 1/2 years after birth has been examined using histological and histochemical techniques. In both sexes histologically differentiated smooth muscle cells were evident in the bladder wall from the 52 mm crown-rump length stage onwards--urethral smooth muscle was not distinguishable until 119 mm crown-rump length. In addition to relatively late differentiation, urethral smooth muscle was histochemically distinct from the urinary bladder detrusor muscle. Sex differences in the arrangement and innervation of smooth muscle in the proximal urethra have also been observed, and these findings lend support to the presence of a pre-prostatic urethra sphincter. It seems likely that this sphincter acts principally to prevent reflux of ejaculate into the bladder during seminal emission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6654742

  11. Isolation of Endothelial Cells and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Internal Mammary Artery Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Stephanie C.; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E.; Woods, T. Cooper

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell function through tissue culture techniques are often employed to investigate the underlying mechanisms regulating cardiovascular disease. As diseases such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease increase a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of methods for examining the effects of these diseases on vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells is needed. Commercial sources of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells generally provide minimal donor information and are in limited supply. This study was designed to determine if vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells could be isolated from human internal mammary arteries obtained from donors undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. As coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a commonly performed procedure, this method would provide a new source for these cells that when combined with the donor's medical history will greatly enhance our studies of the effects of complicating diseases on vascular biology. Internal mammary artery tissue was obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Through a simple method employing two separate tissue digestions, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were isolated and characterized. The isolated vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells exhibited the expected morphology and were able to be passaged for further analysis. The vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin and the endothelial cells exhibited positive staining for CD31. The overall purity of the isolations was > 95%. This method allows for the isolation of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells from internal mammary arteries, providing a new tool for investigations into the interplay of vascular diseases and complicating diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease. PMID:21603530

  12. Synthetic smooth muscle in the outer blood plexus of the rhinarium skin of Lemur catta L.

    PubMed Central

    Elofsson, Rolf; Kröger, Ronald H H

    2017-01-01

    The skin of the lemur nose tip (rhinarium) has arterioles in the outer vascular plexus that are endowed with an unusual coat of smooth muscle cells. Comparison with the arterioles of the same area in a number of unrelated mammalians shows that the lemur pattern is unique. The vascular smooth muscle cells belong to the synthetic type. The function of synthetic smooth muscles around the terminal vessels in the lemur rhinarium is unclear but may have additional functions beyond regulation of vessel diameter. PMID:28260706

  13. Interaction of chicken gizzard smooth muscle calponin with brain microtubules.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Hiromori, T; Hamamoto, M; Suzuki, T

    1997-08-01

    Calponin, a major actin-, tropomyosin-, and calmodulin-binding protein in smooth muscle, interacted with tubulin, a main constituent of microtubules, in a concentration-dependent fashion in vitro. The apparent K(d) value of calponin to tubulin was calculated to be 5.2 microM with 2 mol of calponin maximally bound per 1 mol of tubulin. At low ionic strength, tubulin bound to calponin immobilized on Sepharose 4B, and the bound protein was released at about 270 mM NaCl. Chemical cross-linking experiments showed that a 1:1 molar covalent complex of calponin and tubulin was produced. The amount of calponin bound to microtubules decreased with increasing ionic strength or Ca2+ concentration. The addition of calmodulin or S100 to the mixture of calponin and microtubule proteins caused the removal of calponin from microtubules in the presence of Ca2+, but not in the presence of EGTA. Calponin-related proteins including tropomyosin, SM22, and caldesmon had little effect on the calponin binding to microtubules, whereas MAP2 inhibited the binding. Interestingly, there was little, if any, effect of mycalolide B-treated actin on the binding of calponin to microtubules. Furthermore, only about 20% of calponin-F-actin interaction was inhibited in the presence of an excess amount of tubulin (4 mol per mol of calponin), indicating that tubulin binds to calponin at a different site from that of actin. Compared with MAP2, calponin had little effect on microtubule polymerization.

  14. A coculture system of cavernous endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, H; Lin, G; Lue, T F; Lin, C-S

    2013-01-01

    In erectile dysfunction (ED) research, monocultures of cavernous endothelial cells (CECs) and smooth muscle cells (CSMCs) have been reported, but a CEC-CSMC coculture system is still lacking. In the present study, we wished to investigate the feasibility of setting up such a system and test whether it can be used for diabetic ED research. Cavernous tissues were obtained from patients undergoing surgery for penile prosthesis. CSMCs were isolated by explant culture and verified by calponin staining. CECs were isolated by binding to CD31 antibody, followed by magnetic capture. These CECs were nearly 100% pure endothelial cells as determined by flow cytometric analysis for endothelial markers CD31, vWF and eNOS. Functional analyses, that is, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake and capillary tube formation, also confirmed their endothelial phenotype. When cocultured with CSMCs, CECs formed capillary-like structures, and based on the extent of this capillary-like network, it was determined that a ratio of 1:4 in cell number between CECs and CSMCs was better than ratios of 1:1 and 1:9. It was also found that direct contact between CECs and CSMCs was necessary and a coculture period of 3 weeks was optimal. Autologous CSMCs were better than allogeneic CSMCs, and fibroblasts were completely incompetent. When treated with high glucose (25 mM), the CEC-CSMC coculture expressed significantly lower level of CD31 but significantly higher level of collagen-IV (Col-IV), and the diameter of the capillaries increased significantly, when compared with normal glucose (5 mM)-treated cocultures. These data are consistent with previously observed changes in the cavernous tissues of diabetic patients and thus suggest that the coculture system could be utilized for diabetic ED research.

  15. Troglitazone inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell growth and intimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Law, R E; Meehan, W P; Xi, X P; Graf, K; Wuthrich, D A; Coats, W; Faxon, D; Hsueh, W A

    1996-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration are responses to arterial injury that are highly important to the processes of restenosis and atherosclerosis. In the arterial balloon injury model in the rat, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are induced in the vessel wall and regulate these VSMC activities. Novel insulin sensitizing agents, thiazolidinediones, have been demonstrated to inhibit insulin and epidermal growth factor-induced growth of VSMCs. We hypothesized that these agents might also inhibit the effect of PDGF and bFGF on cultured VSMCs and intimal hyperplasia in vivo. Troglitazone (1 microM), a member of the thiazolidinedione class, produced a near complete inhibition of both bFGF-induced DNA synthesis as measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation (6.5+/-3.9 vs. 17.6+/-4.3% cells labeled, P < 0.05) and c-fos induction. This effect was associated with an inhibition (by 73+/-4%, P < 0.01) by troglitazone of the transactivation of the serum response element, which regulates c-fos expression. Inhibition of c-fos induction by troglitazone appeared to occur via a blockade of the MAP kinase pathway at a point downstream of MAP kinase activation by MAP kinase kinase. At this dose, troglitazone also inhibited PDGF-BB-directed migration of VSMC (by 70+/-6%, P < 0.01). These in vitro effects were operative in vivo. Quantitative image analysis revealed that troglitazone-treated rats had 62% (P < 0.001) less neointima/media area ratio 14 d after balloon injury of the aorta compared with injured rats that received no troglitazone. These results suggest troglitazone is a potent inhibitor of VSMC proliferation and migration and, thus, may be a useful agent to prevent restenosis and possibly atherosclerosis. PMID:8878442

  16. Distribution of a lanthanide (147 Pm) in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Weiss, G B; Goodman, F R

    1976-08-01

    In order to ascertain whether trivalent rare earth ions such as lanthanum (La+++) penetrate the cell membrane under physiological conditions, the extracellular and cellular distribution of promethium (147 Pm), a carrier-free rare earth radioisotope, was examined in rabbit aortic smooth muscle. As the duration of incubation was lengthened, uptake of 147Pm continued to increase; it was inhibited by La+++ and other rare earth ions (Nd+++, Lu+++) only when the 147 Pm/rare earth concentration ratio exceeded 1:10(6). However, equally high concentrations of Ca++ had no effect on 147Pm uptake. Efflux of 147Pm was only transiently increased by 1.5 mM La+++, and exposure to 0.05 mM EDTA elicited an increased 147Pm efflux with both transient and maintained components. The magnitude of the EDTA-induced increase in 147 Pm efflux was similar over a 30-fold range of EDTA concentration (0.05-1.5 mM); the limiting factor for 147Pm efflux is the rate of 147Pm desorption from the tissue rather than the extracellular concentration of EDTA. Loss of 147Pm in the presence of 0.05 mM EDTA could be described in terms of two specific washout components (the more rapid of which included 147Pm within the extracellular space and the slower of which had half-times of washout of approximately 7-10 minutes). Uptake of 147Pm was inhibited by lowering the incubation solution temperature to 0 degrees C or by procaine. However, concentrations of metabolic inhibitors (iodoacetate and dinitrophenol) which diminish loss of Ca++ from the cell did not decrease either the uptake or efflux of 147Pm. Thus, significant quantities of 147Pm do not appear to be accumulated within the cell or transported out of the cell; distribution of 147Pm can be most simply described in terms of a binding at and desorption from surface acessible fiber sites.

  17. Atorvastatin inhibits myocardin expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Jiang, Jixin; Yin, Hao; Wang, Lifeng; Tian, Ruijuan; Li, Haijie; Wang, Zengyong; Li, Dong; Wang, Yuebing; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P; Zheng, Xi-Long

    2012-07-01

    Atorvastatin (ATV), an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, is widely prescribed as a lipid-lowering drug. It also inhibits the RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway in vascular smooth muscle (SM) cells and critically inhibits SM function. Myocardin is a coactivator of serum response factor, which upregulates SM contractile proteins. The RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway, which directly triggers SM contraction, also increases myocardin gene expression. Therefore, we investigated whether ATV inhibits myocardin gene expression in SM cells. In mice injected with ATV (IP 20 μg/g per day) for 5 days, myocardin gene expression was significantly downregulated in aortic and carotid arterial tissues with decreased expression of myocardin target genes SM α-actin and SM22. Correspondingly, the contractility of aortic rings in mice treated with ATV or the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was reduced in response to treatment with either KCl or phenylephrine. In cultured mouse and human aortic SM cells, KCl treatment stimulated the expression of myocardin, SM α-actin, and SM22. These stimulatory effects were prevented by ATV treatment. ATV-induced inhibition of myocardin expression was prevented by pretreatment with either mevalonate or geranylgeranylpyrophosphate but not farnesylpyrophosphate. Treatment with Y-27632 mimicked ATV effects on the gene expression of myocardin, SM α-actin, and SM22, further suggesting a role for the RhoA-Rho-associated kinase pathway in ATV effects. Furthermore, ATV treatment inhibited RhoA membrane translocation and activation; these effects were prevented by pretreatment with mevalonate. We conclude that ATV inhibits myocardin gene expression in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a novel mechanism for ATV inhibition of vascular contraction.

  18. Role of Telokin in Regulating Murine Gastric Fundus Smooth Muscle Tension.

    PubMed

    An, Changlong; Bhetwal, Bhupal P; Sanders, Kenton M; Somlyo, Avril V; Perrino, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Telokin phosphorylation by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase facilitates smooth muscle relaxation. In this study we examined the relaxation of gastric fundus smooth muscles from basal tone, or pre-contracted with KCl or carbachol (CCh), and the phosphorylation of telokin S13, myosin light chain (MLC) S19, MYPT1 T853, T696, and CPI-17 T38 in response to 8-Bromo-cGMP, the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), or nitrergic neurotransmission. We compared MLC phosphorylation and the contraction and relaxation responses of gastric fundus smooth muscles from telokin-/- mice and their wild-type littermates to KCl or CCh, and 8-Bromo-cGMP, SNP, or nitrergic neurotransmission, respectively. We compared the relaxation responses and telokin phosphorylation of gastric fundus smooth muscles from wild-type mice and W/WV mice which lack ICC-IM, to 8-Bromo-cGMP, SNP, or nitrergic neurotransmission. We found that telokin S13 is basally phosphorylated and that 8-Bromo-cGMP and SNP increased basal telokin phosphorylation. In muscles pre-contracted with KCl or CCh, 8-Bromo-cGMP and SNP had no effect on CPI-17 or MYPT1 phosphorylation, but increased telokin phosphorylation and reduced MLC phosphorylation. In telokin-/- gastric fundus smooth muscles, basal tone and constitutive MLC S19 phosphorylation were increased. Pre-contracted telokin-/- gastric fundus smooth muscles have increased contractile responses to KCl, CCh, or cholinergic neurotransmission and reduced relaxation to 8-Bromo-cGMP, SNP, and nitrergic neurotransmission. However, basal telokin phosphorylation was not increased when muscles were stimulated with lower concentrations of SNP or when the muscles were stimulated by nitrergic neurotransmission. SNP, but not nitrergic neurotransmission, increased telokin Ser13 phosphorylation in both wild-type and W/WV gastric fundus smooth muscles. Our findings indicate that telokin may play a role in attenuating constitutive MLC phosphorylation and provide an additional mechanism to

  19. Characterization of signaling pathways coupled to melatonin receptors in gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rashad; Mahavadi, Sunila; Al-Shboul, Othman; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2013-06-10

    Melatonin, a close derivative of serotonin, is involved in physiological regulation of circadian rhythms. In the gastrointestinal (GI) system, melatonin exhibits endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions and is implicated in the regulation of GI motility. However, it is not known whether melatonin can also act directly on GI smooth muscle cells. The aim of the present study was to determine the expression of melatonin receptors in smooth muscle and identify their signaling pathways. MT1, but not MT2 receptors are expressed in freshly dispersed and cultured gastric smooth muscle cells. Melatonin selectively activated Gq and stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in freshly dispersed and cultured muscle cells. PI hydrolysis was blocked by the expression of Gq, but not Gi minigene in cultured muscle cells. Melatonin also caused rapid increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) as determined by epifluorescence microscopy in fura-2 loaded single smooth muscle cells, and induced rapid contraction. Melatonin-induced PI hydrolysis and contraction were blocked by a non-selective MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole (1 μM), but not by a selective MT2 antagonist 4P-PDOT (100 nM), and by the PLC inhibitor U73122. MT2 selective agonist IIK7 (100 nM) had no effect on PI hydrolysis and contraction. We conclude that rabbit gastric smooth muscle cells express melatonin MT1 receptors coupled to Gq. Activation of these receptors causes stimulation of PI hydrolysis and increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), and elicits muscle contraction.

  20. MED12 mutations occurring in benign and malignant mammalian smooth muscle tumors.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Huhle, Sonja; Nimzyk, Rolf; Stenman, Göran; Löning, Thomas; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2013-03-01

    Mutations of the mediator subcomplex 12 gene (MED12) recently have been described in a large group of uterine leiomyomas (UL) but only in a single malignant uterine smooth muscle tumor. To further address the occurrence of fibroid-type MED12 mutations in smooth muscle tumors, we have analyzed samples from 34 leiomyosarcomas (LMS), 21 UL, two extrauterine leiomyomas (EL), and 10 canine genital leiomyomas for the presence of MED12 mutations of the UL-type. Interestingly, besides UL MED12 mutations were found in one uterine LMS, one EL, and two canine vaginal leiomyomas. The results confirm the occurrence of fibroid-type MED12 mutations in malignant uterine smooth muscle tumors thus suggesting a rare but existing leiomyoma-LMS sequence. In addition, for the first time MED12 mutations are reported in smooth muscle tumors in a non-primate mammalian species.

  1. Intestinal smooth muscle cells locally enhance stem cell factor (SCF) production against gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells can produce stem cell factor (SCF) in the normal state for the preservation of mast cells, but it is still unknown whether smooth muscle cells can enhance SCF production in response to the pathological stimuli. The present study showed that smooth muscle cells in mast cell-increased regions around worm cysts of intestinal nematodes significantly enhanced SCF gene expression compared with mast cell non-increased regions in same sample. SCF gene expression in mast cell non-increased regions in nematode-infected mice showed almost the same level as in non-infected control groups. These results indicate that smooth muscle cells can locally enhance SCF gene expression, and may have a role in local immunological reactions as growth factor-producing cells.

  2. Segregation of striated and smooth muscle lineages by a Notch-dependent regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lineage segregation from multipotent epithelia is a central theme in development and in adult stem cell plasticity. Previously, we demonstrated that striated and smooth muscle cells share a common progenitor within their epithelium of origin, the lateral domain of the somite-derived dermomyotome. However, what controls the segregation of these muscle subtypes remains unknown. We use this in vivo bifurcation of fates as an experimental model to uncover the underlying mechanisms of lineage diversification from bipotent progenitors. Results Using the strength of spatio-temporally controlled gene missexpression in avian embryos, we report that Notch harbors distinct pro-smooth muscle activities depending on the duration of the signal; short periods prevent striated muscle development and extended periods, through Snail1, promote cell emigration from the dermomyotome towards a smooth muscle fate. Furthermore, we define a Muscle Regulatory Network, consisting of Id2, Id3, FoxC2 and Snail1, which acts in concert to promote smooth muscle by antagonizing the pro-myogenic activities of Myf5 and Pax7, which induce striated muscle fate. Notch and BMP closely regulate the network and reciprocally reinforce each other’s signal. In turn, components of the network strengthen Notch signaling, while Pax7 silences this signaling. These feedbacks augment the robustness and flexibility of the network regulating muscle subtype segregation. Conclusions Our results demarcate the details of the Muscle Regulatory Network, underlying the segregation of muscle sublineages from the lateral dermomyotome, and exhibit how factors within the network promote the smooth muscle at the expense of the striated muscle fate. This network acts as an exemplar demonstrating how lineage segregation occurs within epithelial primordia by integrating inputs from competing factors. PMID:25015411

  3. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    PubMed

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  4. Chemerin Stimulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Carotid Neointimal Hyperplasia by Activating Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Luo, Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Huadong; Li, Jianghua; Liao, Bihong; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular neointimal hyperplasia and remodeling arising from local inflammation are characteristic pathogeneses of proliferative cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and post angioplasty restenosis. The molecular mechanisms behind these pathological processes have not been fully determined. The adipokine chemerin is associated with obesity, metabolism, and control of inflammation. Recently, chemerin has gained increased attention as it was found to play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemerin on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and carotid neointimal formation after angioplasty. We found that circulating chemerin levels increased after carotid balloon injury, and that knockdown of chemerin significantly inhibited the proliferative aspects of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vitro as well as prohibited carotid neointimal hyperplasia and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vivo after angioplasty. Additionally, inhibition of chemerin down-regulated the expression of several proteins, including phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B p65, and proliferation cell nuclear antigen. The novel finding of this study is that chemerin stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and carotid intimal hyperplasia through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, which may lead to vascular inflammation and remodeling, and is relevant to proliferative cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27792753

  5. Vascular Smooth Muscle Sirtuin-1 Protects Against Aortic Dissection During Angiotensin II–Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Jessica L; Shiraishi, Yasunaga; Turcotte, Raphaël; Yu, Xunjie; Gao, Yuan Z; Akiki, Rachid; Bachschmid, Markus; Zhang, Yanhang; Morgan, Kathleen G; Cohen, Richard A; Seta, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Background Sirtuin-1 (SirT1), a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide+–dependent deacetylase, is a key enzyme in the cellular response to metabolic, inflammatory, and oxidative stresses; however, the role of endogenous SirT1 in the vasculature has not been fully elucidated. Our goal was to evaluate the role of vascular smooth muscle SirT1 in the physiological response of the aortic wall to angiotensin II, a potent hypertrophic, oxidant, and inflammatory stimulus. Methods and Results Mice lacking SirT1 in vascular smooth muscle (ie, smooth muscle SirT1 knockout) had drastically high mortality (70%) caused by aortic dissection after angiotensin II infusion (1 mg/kg per day) but not after an equipotent dose of norepinephrine, despite comparable blood pressure increases. Smooth muscle SirT1 knockout mice did not show any abnormal aortic morphology or blood pressure compared with wild-type littermates. Nonetheless, in response to angiotensin II, aortas from smooth muscle SirT1 knockout mice had severely disorganized elastic lamellae with frequent elastin breaks, increased oxidant production, and aortic stiffness compared with angiotensin II–treated wild-type mice. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity were increased in the aortas of angiotensin II–treated smooth muscle SirT1 knockout mice and were prevented in mice overexpressing SirT1 in vascular smooth muscle or with use of the oxidant scavenger tempol. Conclusions Endogenous SirT1 in aortic smooth muscle is required to maintain the structural integrity of the aortic wall in response to oxidant and inflammatory stimuli, at least in part, by suppressing oxidant-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity. SirT1 activators could potentially be a novel therapeutic approach to prevent aortic dissection and rupture in patients at risk, such as those with hypertension or genetic disorders, such as Marfan’s syndrome. PMID:26376991

  6. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Hai; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xin; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2014-01-01

    Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV) was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV) to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  7. A functional role for the 'fibroblast-like cells' in gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Masaaki; Zheng, Haifeng; Dwyer, Laura; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2011-02-01

    Smooth muscles, as in the gastrointestinal tract, are composed of several types of cells. Gastrointestinal muscles contain smooth muscle cells, enteric neurons, glial cells, immune cells, and various classes of interstitial cells. One type of interstitial cell, referred to as 'fibroblast-like cells' by morphologists, are common, but their function is unknown. These cells are found near the terminals of enteric motor neurons, suggesting they could have a role in generating neural responses that help control gastrointestinal movements. We used a novel mouse with bright green fluorescent protein expressed specifically in the fibroblast-like cells to help us identify these cells in the mixture of cells obtained when whole muscles are dispersed with enzymes. We isolated these cells and found they respond to a major class of inhibitory neurotransmitters - purines. We characterized these responses, and our results provide a new hypothesis about the role of fibroblast-like cells in smooth muscle tissues.

  8. Substance P Regulates Environmental Tobacco Smoke-Enhanced Tracheal Smooth Muscle Responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Wu, Zhong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is an environmental trigger that leads to airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in susceptible individuals and animals, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Substance P (SP) release from sensory nerve fibers has been linked to AHR. The present experiments characterize the role of SP in tracheal smooth muscle on ETS-increased airway responses. The mice were exposed to either sidestream tobacco smoke (SS), a surrogate to ETS, or filtered air (FA) for 1 day or 5 consecutive days. Contractions of tracheal smooth muscle to SP and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were not significantly altered in 1 of day SS-exposed mice. However, 5 of days SS exposure significantly increased airway smooth muscle contractions to SP and EFS. Administration of CP-99994, an antagonist of the neurokinin (NK)1 receptor, attenuates the SS exposure-enhanced tracheal smooth muscle responses to EFS. Furthermore, the immunohistochemistry showed that SP nerve fibers were increased in tracheal smooth muscle after 5 of days SS exposure. These results suggest that the increased SP production may contribute to SS-enhanced smooth muscle responsiveness in mice trachea. PMID:22927867

  9. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  10. Emodin augments calcium activated chloride channel in colonic smooth muscle cells by Gi/Go protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Ting-Lou; Lv, Nonghua; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Youxiang; Yang, Jing

    2009-08-01

    Emodin is a natural anthraquinone in rhubarb. It has been identified as a prokinetic drug for gastrointestinal motility in Chinese traditional medicine. Emodin contracts smooth muscle by increasing the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+). In many smooth muscles, increasing intracellular Ca(2+) activates Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (ClCA). The study was aimed to investigate the effects of emodin on ClCA channels in colonic smooth muscle. 4 channel physiology signal acquire system was used to measure isometric contraction of smooth muscle strips. ClCA currents were recorded by EPC10 with perforated whole cell model. Emodin contracted strips and cells in colonic smooth muscle and augmented ClCA currents. Niflumic acid (NFA) and 4', 4'-diisothiostilbene-2, 2-disulfonic acid (DIDS) blocked the effects. Gi/Go protein inhibits protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC), and PKA and PKC reduced ClCA currents. Pertussis toxin (PTX, a special inhibitor of Gi/Go protein), 8-bromoadenosine 38, 58-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, a membrane-permeant protein kinase A activator) and Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a membrane-permeant protein kinase C activator) inhibited the effects on ClCA currents significantly. Our findings suggest that emodin augments ClCA channels to contract smooth muscle in colon, and the effect is induced mostly by enhancement of membrane Gi/Go protein signal transducer pathway.

  11. Smooth Muscle-Like Tissue Constructs with Circumferentially Oriented Cells Formed by the Cell Fiber Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Amy Y.; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  12. Effect of cigarette smoke exposure in vivo on bronchial smooth muscle contractility in vitro in rats.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoshihiko; Murata, Masahiko; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Yoshikawa, Yuji; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Kamei, Junzo; Misawa, Miwa

    2005-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Little is known concerning the effect of cigarette smoking on the contractility of airway smooth muscle. The current study was performed to determine the responsiveness of bronchial smooth muscles isolated from rats that were subacutely exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke in vivo. Male Wistar rats were exposed to diluted mainstream cigarette smoke for 2 h/d every day for 2 wk. Twenty-four hours after the last cigarette smoke exposure, a marked airway inflammation (i.e., increases in numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peribronchial tissues) was observed. In these subacutely cigarette smoke-exposed animals, the responsiveness of isolated intact (nonpermeabilized) bronchial smooth muscle to acetylcholine, but not to high K+ -depolarization, was significantly augmented when compared with the air-exposed control group. In alpha-toxin-permeabilized bronchial smooth muscle strips, the acetylcholine-induced Ca2+ sensitization of contraction was significantly augmented in rats exposed to cigarette smoke, although the contraction induced by Ca2+ was control level. Immunoblot analyses revealed an increased expression of RhoA protein in the bronchial smooth muscle of rats that were exposed to cigarette smoke. Taken together, these findings suggest that the augmented agonist-induced, RhoA-mediated Ca2+ sensitization may be responsible for the enhanced bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by cigarette smoking, which has relevance to airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. Vascular smooth muscle cell functional contractility depends on extracellular mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Steucke, Kerianne E.; Tracy, Paige V.; Hald, Eric S.; Hall, Jennifer L.; Alford, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells’ primary function is to maintain vascular homeostasis through active contraction and relaxation. In diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, this function is inhibited concurrent to changes in the mechanical environment surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. It is well established that cell function and extracellular mechanics are interconnected; variations in substrate modulus affect cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. To date, it is unknown how the evolving extracellular mechanical environment of vascular smooth muscle cells affects their contractile function. Here, we have built upon previous vascular muscular thin film technology to develop a variable-modulus vascular muscular thin film that measures vascular tissue functional contractility on substrates with a range of pathological and physiological moduli. Using this modified vascular muscular thin film, we found that vascular smooth muscle cells generated greater stress on substrates with higher moduli compared to substrates with lower moduli. We then measured protein markers typically thought to indicate a contractile phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells and found that phenotype is unaffected by substrate modulus. These data suggest that mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells’ extracellular environment directly influence their functional behavior and do so without inducing phenotype switching. PMID:26283412

  14. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell’s initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9μm, 4.6±0.6μm and 6.2±1.8μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. Conclusions A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function. PMID:26882342

  15. Original Research: Combined model of bladder detrusor smooth muscle and interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Josef; Byrtus, Miroslav; Stengl, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Although patients with lower urinary tract symptoms constitute a large and still growing population, understanding of bladder detrusor muscle physiology remains limited. Understanding the interactions between the detrusor smooth muscle cells and other bladder cell types (e.g. interstitial cells, IC) that may significantly contribute to coordinating and modulating detrusor contractions represents a considerable challenge. Computer modeling could help to elucidate some properties that are difficult to address experimentally; therefore, we developed in silico models of detrusor smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells, coupled through gap junctions. The models include all of the major ion conductances and transporters described in smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells in the literature. The model of normal detrusor muscle (smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells coupled through gap junctions) completely reproduced the experimental results obtained with detrusor strips in the presence of several pharmacological interventions (ryanodine, caffeine, nimodipine), whereas the model of smooth muscle cell alone (without interstitial cells) failed to reproduce the experimental results. Next, a model of overactive bladder, a highly prevalent clinical condition in both men and women with increasing incidence at older ages, was produced by modifying several processes as reported previously: a reduction of Ca(2+)-release through ryanodine receptors and a reduction of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-conductance with augmented gap junctional coupling. This model was also able to reproduce the pharmacological modulation of overactive bladder. In conclusion, a model of bladder detrusor muscle was developed that reproduced experimental results obtained in both normal and overactive bladder preparations. The results indicate that the non-smooth muscle cells of the detrusor (interstitial cells) contribute significantly to the contractile behavior of bladder detrusor muscle and should not be

  16. Smoothelin is a specific marker for smooth muscle neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Coco, Dominique P; Hirsch, Michelle S; Hornick, Jason L

    2009-12-01

    Smoothelin is a smooth muscle-specific cytoskeletal protein exclusively found in differentiated smooth muscle cells. This contrasts with other smooth muscle proteins (eg, h-caldesmon, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin), which are expressed in proliferative (early) stages of smooth muscle development and occasionally in other cell types (striated muscle, myofibroblasts, myoepithelial cells, pericytes). Smoothelin has been shown to be expressed predominantly in visceral smooth muscle and to a lesser extent in vascular smooth muscle. Smoothelin expression in mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract has not been evaluated earlier. The purpose of this study was to determine whether immunostaining for smoothelin could help distinguish smooth muscle neoplasms from their morphologic mimics, particularly KIT-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), desmin-positive GISTs, and desmoid fibromatosis. A total of 150 mesenchymal neoplasms of the GI tract, abdominal cavity, and retroperitoneum were retrieved from consult and surgical pathology archives, including 54 GISTs (8 KIT-negative; 13 desmin-positive), 17 GI leiomyosarcomas (LMS), 11 GI mural leiomyomas, 13 leiomyomas of the muscularis mucosae, 12 gastric schwannomas, 15 inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, 9 cases of mesenteric desmoid fibromatosis, 10 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, and 9 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Immunostaining for smoothelin was performed on all cases. Cytoplasmic and nuclear staining was recorded. Cytoplasmic expression of smoothelin was present in all 24 (100%) benign smooth muscle tumors (mural leiomyomas and leiomyomas of the muscularis mucosae). In contrast, only 4 (24%) GI LMS showed cytoplasmic staining for smoothelin. None of the GISTs, desmoid tumors, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, schwannomas, dedifferentiated liposarcomas, or malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors showed cytoplasmic reactivity for smoothelin. Interestingly, 7

  17. Correlation between the distribution of smooth muscle or non muscle myosins and alpha-smooth muscle actin in normal and pathological soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Benzonana, G; Skalli, O; Gabbiani, G

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of smooth muscle (SM) and non muscle myosins was compared with that of alpha-SM actin in various normal and pathological tissues and in cultured cells by means of indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal antibody specific for alpha-SM actin [anti-alpha sm-1, Skalli et al., 1986b] and two polyclonal antibodies raised against bovine aortic myosin (ABAM) and human platelet myosin (AHPM), respectively. In normal tissues ABAM stained vascular and parenchymal smooth muscle cells (SMC), myoepithelial cells and myoid cells of the testis in a pattern similar to that reported by other authors with antisera raised against non vascular SM myosin. Cells stained with ABAM were always positive for anti-alpha sm-1. In human and experimental atheromatous plaques, most cells were positive for AHPM; a variable proportion was also stained for ABAM plus anti-alpha sm-1. Myofibroblasts from rat granulation tissue, Dupuytren's nodule and stroma from breast carcinoma were constantly positive for AHPM and negative for ABAM; however, myofibroblasts from Dupuytren's nodule and breast carcinoma were anti-alpha sm-1 positive. Early primary cultures of rat aortic SMC were positive for ABAM and anti-alpha sm-1 and became negative for ABAM and positive for AHPM after a few days in culture. They remained positive for AHPM and anti-alpha sm-1 after passages; the staining of AHPM and anti-alpha sm-1 appeared to be colocalized along the same stress fibers. These results may be relevant for the understanding of SMC function and adaptation, and show that in non malignant SMC proliferation, alpha-SM actin represents a more general marker of SM origin than SM myosin.

  18. From depolarization-dependent contractions in gastrointestinal smooth muscle to aortic pulse-synchronized contractions.

    PubMed

    Marion, Sarah B; Mangel, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    For decades, it was believed that the diameter of gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells is sufficiently narrow, and that the diffusion of calcium across the plasma membrane is sufficient, to support contractile activity. Thus, depolarization-triggered release of intracellular calcium was not believed to be operative in gastrointestinal smooth muscle. However, after the incubation of muscle segments in solutions devoid of calcium and containing the calcium chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid, an alternative electrical event occurred that was distinct from normal slow waves and spikes. Subsequently, it was demonstrated in gastrointestinal smooth muscle segments that membrane depolarization associated with this alternative electrical event triggered rhythmic contractions by release of intracellular calcium. Although this concept of depolarization-triggered calcium release was iconoclastic, it has now been demonstrated in multiple gastrointestinal smooth muscle preparations. On the basis of these observations, we investigated whether a rhythmic electrical and mechanical event would occur in aortic smooth muscle under the same calcium-free conditions. The incubation of aortic segments in a solution with no added calcium plus ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid induced a fast electrical event without corresponding tension changes. On the basis of the frequency of these fast electrical events, we pursued, contrary to what has been established dogma for more than three centuries, the question of whether the smooth muscle wall of the aorta undergoes rhythmic activation during the cardiac cycle. As with depolarization-triggered contractile activity in gastrointestinal smooth muscle, it was "well known" that rhythmic activation of the aorta does not occur in synchrony with the heartbeat. In a series of experiments, however, it was demonstrated that rhythmic contractions occur in the aortic wall in synchrony with the heartbeat and share a common pacemaker with the heart. We

  19. Smooth muscle adaptation and recovery of contractility after massive small bowel resection in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wen, Jie; Cai, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that massive small bowel resection (mSBR) compromises the normal intestinal processes of digestion and absorption, and requires an adaptive response to regain full function and reinstate coordinated contractile activity of the circular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate spontaneous contractile activity of circular smooth muscle using the mSBR rat model and to determine the functional role of M(2) and M(3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in this process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent an 80% proximal SBR or sham operation. Markers of adaptation, including villus and microvillus height, were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. Contractility was measured by attaching the distal ileum strips to strain gauge transducers and exposing the tissue to varying doses of the cholinergic agonist carbachol. Protein expressions of M(2)- and M(3)-mAChR in intestinal smooth muscle (ISM) were detected by Western blot. Following mSBR, the ISM showed perturbed spontaneous rhythmic contraction, irregular amplitude and slow frequency by muscle strip test. However, by two weeks after mSBR, the contractile function of circular smooth muscle was found to have returned to normal levels. Protein expression of M(2)-mAChR was down-regulated following mSBR but up-regulated during the adaptive process when contractile activity of circular smooth muscle was regained. These results indicate that smooth muscle contractility was spontaneously restored in rats following mSBR, and involved the acetylcholine receptors M(2) and M(3). Thus, the disrupted contractile response of smooth muscle in short bowel syndrome may be corrected by therapeutic intervention to restore the expressions of M(2)- and M(3)-mAChR to pre-mSBR levels.

  20. A Simple, Inexpensive Model to Demonstrate How Contraction of GI Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Promotes Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Peristalis is a propulsive activity that involves both circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus, distal stomach, and small and large intestines. During peristalsis, the circular smooth muscle contracts behind (on the orad side) the bolus and relaxes in front (on the aborad side) of the bolus. At the same time, the longitudinal…

  1. Influence of micropattern width on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tomoko; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, various approaches have been taken to generate functional muscle tissue by tissue engineering. However, in vitro methods to generate smooth muscle with physiologically aligned structure remains limited. In order to mimic the in vivo highly organized structure of smooth muscle cells, we used micropatterning technology for engineering parallel aligned cells. In this study, a gradient micropattern of different width of cell-adhesive polystyrene stripes (5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000μm) was prepared and the effects of micropattern width on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation were investigated. The width of micropattern stripes showed obvious effect on cell orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation. The cells showed higher degree of orientation when the micropattern stripes became narrower. Higher expression of calponin and smooth muscle actin was observed among the narrow micropatterns ranging from 200μm to 20μm, compared to the non-patterned area and wide micropattern areas which showed similar levels of expression.

  2. The evolutionarily conserved RNA binding protein SMOOTH is essential for maintaining normal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Draper, Isabelle; Tabaka, Meg E; Jackson, F Rob; Salomon, Robert N; Kopin, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila smooth gene encodes an RNA binding protein that has been well conserved through evolution. To investigate the pleiotropic functions mediated by the smooth gene, we have selected and characterized two sm mutants, which are viable as adults yet display robust phenotypes (including a significant decrease in lifespan). Utilizing these mutants, we have made the novel observation that disruption of the smooth/CG9218 locus leads to age-dependent muscle degeneration, and motor dysfunction. Histological characterization of adult sm mutants revealed marked abnormalities in the major thoracic tubular muscle: the tergal depressor of the trochanter (TDT). Corresponding defects include extensive loss/disruption of striations and nuclei. These pathological changes are recapitulated in flies that express a smooth RNA interference construct (sm RNAi) in the mesoderm. In contrast, targeting sm RNAi constructs to motor neurons does not alter muscle morphology. In addition to examining the TDT phenotype, we explored whether other muscular abnormalities were evident. Utilizing physiological assays developed in the laboratory, we have found that the thoracic muscle defect is preceded by dysmotility of the gastrointestinal tract. SMOOTH thus joins a growing list of hnRNPs that have previously been linked to muscle physiology/pathophysiology. Our findings in Drosophila set the stage for investigating the role of the corresponding mammalian homolog, hnRNP L, in muscle function.

  3. Smooth muscle in the annulus fibrosus of the tympanic membrane in bats, rodents, insectivores, and humans.

    PubMed

    Henson, M M; Madden, V J; Rask-Andersen, H; Henson, O W

    2005-02-01

    The annulus fibrosus and its attachment to the bony tympanic ring were studied in a series of mammals. In the pallid bat, Antrozous pallidus, there is an extensive plexus of large interconnected blood sinuses in the part of the annulus that borders the tympanic bone. The spaces between the sinuses are packed with smooth muscle cells. Most of the cells have a predominately radial orientation; they extend from the bony tympanic sulcus to a dense collagenous matrix (apical zone) where radially oriented fibers of the pars tensa are confluent with the annulus. The muscles and vessels constitute a myovascular zone. A structurally similar myovascular zone is also present in the European hedgehog. In rodents, the annulus lacks the large interconnected blood sinuses but many small vessels are present. Smooth muscle is concentrated in the broad area of attachment of the annulus to the tympanic bone. In the gerbil, smooth muscle seems to be concentrated in the central part of the width of the annulus where it is attached to bone and radiates toward the tympanic membrane. In humans collections of radially oriented smooth muscle cells were found in several locations. The smooth muscle in all species studied appears to form a rim of contractile elements for the pars tensa. This arrangement suggests a role in controlling blood flow and/or creating and maintaining tension on the tympanic membrane.

  4. Changes in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle Ca2+ homeostasis by acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Morales, Sara; Camello-Almaraz, Cristina; Moreno, Rosario; Pozo, María J; Camello, Pedro J

    2006-01-01

    Impaired smooth muscle contractility is a hallmark of acute acalculous cholecystitis. Although free cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is a critical step in smooth muscle contraction, possible alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis by cholecystitis have not been elucidated. Our aim was to elucidate changes in the Ca2+ signaling pathways induced by this gallbladder dysfunction. [Ca2+]i was determined by epifluorescence microscopy in fura 2-loaded isolated gallbladder smooth muscle cells, and isometric tension was recorded from gallbladder muscle strips. F-actin content was quantified by confocal microscopy. Ca2+ responses to the inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) mobilizing agonist CCK and to caffeine, an activator of the ryanodine receptors, were impaired in cholecystitic cells. This impairment was not the result of a decrease in the size of the releasable pool. Inflammation also inhibited Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels and capacitative Ca2+ entry induced by depletion of intracellular Ca2+ pools. In addition, the pharmacological phenotype of these channels was altered in cholecystitic cells. Inflammation impaired contractility further than Ca2+ signal attenuation, which could be related to the decrease in F-actin that was detected in cholecystitic smooth muscle cells. These findings indicate that cholecystitis decreases both Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx in gallbladder smooth muscle, but a loss in the sensitivity of the contractile machinery to Ca2+ may also be responsible for the impairment in gallbladder contractility.

  5. Time course of isotonic shortening and the underlying contraction mechanism in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Syyong, Harley T; Raqeeb, Abdul; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2011-09-01

    Although the structure of the contractile unit in smooth muscle is poorly understood, some of the mechanical properties of the muscle suggest that a sliding-filament mechanism, similar to that in striated muscle, is also operative in smooth muscle. To test the applicability of this mechanism to smooth muscle function, we have constructed a mathematical model based on a hypothetical structure of the smooth muscle contractile unit: a side-polar myosin filament sandwiched by actin filaments, each attached to the equivalent of a Z disk. Model prediction of isotonic shortening as a function of time was compared with data from experiments using ovine tracheal smooth muscle. After equilibration and establishment of in situ length, the muscle was stimulated with ACh (100 μM) until force reached a plateau. The muscle was then allowed to shorten isotonically against various loads. From the experimental records, length-force and force-velocity relationships were obtained. Integration of the hyperbolic force-velocity relationship and the linear length-force relationship yielded an exponential function that approximated the time course of isotonic shortening generated by the modeled sliding-filament mechanism. However, to obtain an accurate fit, it was necessary to incorporate a viscoelastic element in series with the sliding-filament mechanism. The results suggest that a large portion of the shortening is due to filament sliding associated with muscle activation and that a small portion is due to continued deformation associated with an element that shows viscoelastic or power-law creep after a step change in force.

  6. Maintenance of GLUT4 expression in smooth muscle prevents hypertension-induced changes in vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Kevin B; Seki, Yoshinori; Saha, Jharna; Eichinger, Felix; Charron, Maureen J; Brosius, Frank C

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that expression of GLUT4 is decreased in arterial smooth muscle of hypertensive rats and mice and that total body overexpression of GLUT4 in mice prevents enhanced arterial reactivity in hypertension. To demonstrate that the effect of GLUT4 overexpression on vascular responses is dependent on vascular smooth muscle GLUT4 rather than on some systemic effect we developed and tested smooth-muscle-specific GLUT4 transgenic mice (SMG4). When made hypertensive with angiotensin II, both wild-type and SMG4 mice exhibited similarly increased systolic blood pressure. Responsiveness to phenylephrine, serotonin, and prostaglandin F2α was significantly increased in endothelium-intact aortic rings from hypertensive wild-type mice but not in aortae of SMG4 mice. Inhibition of Rho-kinase equally reduced serotonin-stimulated contractility in aortae of hypertensive wild-type and SMG4-mice. In addition, acetylcholine-stimulated relaxation was significantly decreased in aortic rings of hypertensive wild-type mice, but not in rings of SMG4 mice. Inhibition of either prostacylin receptors or cyclooxygenase-2 reduced relaxation in rings of hypertensive SMG4 mice. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 had no effect on relaxation in rings of hypertensive wild-type mice. Cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression was decreased in hypertensive wild-type aortae but not in hypertensive SMG4 aortae compared to nonhypertensive controls. Our results demonstrate that smooth muscle expression of GLUT4 exerts a major effect on smooth muscle contractile responses and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and that normal expression of GLUT4 in vascular smooth muscle is required for appropriate smooth muscle and endothelial responses.

  7. Inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation by adiponectin requires proteolytic conversion to its globular form.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, Melissa; Taylor, Carla G; Wright, Brenda; Tworek, Leslee; Zahradka, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is the primary cardiovascular manifestation of diabetes and correlates inversely with levels of circulating adiponectin, an anti-atherosclerotic adipokine that declines in diabetes. We therefore initiated a study to examine the mechanisms by which adiponectin, a hormone released from adipose tissue, influences the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Addition of adiponectin to quiescent porcine coronary artery SMCs increased both protein and DNA synthesis and concurrently activated ERK1/2 and Akt. By contrast, globular adiponectin, a truncated form of this protein, exhibited anti-mitogenic properties as indicated by the inhibition of protein and DNA synthesis in SMCs stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Whereas globular adiponectin did not stimulate growth-related signal transduction pathways, it was able to block the PDGF-dependent phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase, a regulator of protein synthesis. Proteolysis of adiponectin with trypsin, which produces globular adiponectin, reversed the growth-stimulating actions of the undigested protein. As the existence of globular adiponectin remains controversial, western blotting was used to establish its presence in rat serum. We found that globular adiponectin was detectable in rat serum, but this result was not obtained with all antibodies. The contrasting properties of adiponectin and its globular form with respect to SMC proliferation suggest that protection against atherosclerosis may therefore be mediated, in part, by the level of globular adiponectin.

  8. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease.

  9. Urinary bladder smooth muscle engineered from adipose stem cells and a three dimensional synthetic composite.

    PubMed

    Jack, Gregory S; Zhang, Rong; Lee, Min; Xu, Yuhan; Wu, Ben M; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2009-07-01

    Human adipose stem cells were cultured in smooth muscle inductive media and seeded into synthetic bladder composites to tissue engineer bladder smooth muscle. 85:15 Poly-lactic-glycolic acid bladder dome composites were cast using an electropulled microfiber luminal surface combined with an outer porous sponge. Cell-seeded bladders expressed smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, calponinin, and caldesmon via RT-PCR and immunoflourescence. Nude rats (n=45) underwent removal of half their bladder and repair using: (i) augmentation with the adipose stem cell-seeded composites, (ii) augmentation with a matched acellular composite, or (iii) suture closure. Animals were followed for 12 weeks post-implantation and bladders were explanted serially. Results showed that bladder capacity and compliance were maintained in the cell-seeded group throughout the 12 weeks, but deteriorated in the acellular scaffold group sequentially with time. Control animals repaired with sutures regained their baseline bladder capacities by week 12, demonstrating a long-term limitation of this model. Histological analysis of explanted materials demonstrated viable adipose stem cells and increasing smooth muscle mass in the cell-seeded scaffolds with time. Tissue bath stimulation demonstrated smooth muscle contraction of the seeded implants but not the acellular implants after 12 weeks in vivo. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and short term physical properties of bladder tissue engineered from adipose stem cells.

  10. Influences on vascular wall smooth muscle cells with novel short-duration thermal angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunio, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.; Sakurada, M.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the influences on smooth muscle cells after our novel short-duration thermal angioplasty, Photo-thermo Dynamic Balloon Angioplasty (PTDBA), to reveal the mechanism that can suppress neo-intimal hyperplasia after PTDBA. We obtained the sufficient arterial dilatations by short-duration heating (<=15 s, <70°C) and low dilatation pressure (<0.4 MPa) without arterial injuries in our previous in vivo studies. Smooth muscle cells, which play most important role in chronic treatment effects, were heated during PTDBA and stretch-fixed after PTDBA. The dead cell rate by heating, estimated by Arrhenius equation with A=2.5x1016 s-1 and Ea=1.17×105 J mol-1, was 15.7+/-2.2% after PTDBA. The measured deformation rate of smooth muscle cells' nuclei was 1.6+/-0.1 after PTDBA in vivo. We found that the expression of smooth muscle cells' growth factor after PTDBA was inhibited 0.52 fold compared to that after the conventional balloon angioplasty in vivo. The measured neo-intimal hyperplasia occupancy rate was less than 20% after PTDBA in vivo. We prospect that the inhibition of the growth factor's expression by stretch-fixing may result to suppress the neo-intimal hyperplasia. In addition, the decrease of smooth muscle cells' density in the vessel media by heating might be another reason for the neo-intimal hyperplasia suppression.

  11. Cytoskeletal remodeling in differentiated vascular smooth muscle is actin isoform dependent and stimulus dependent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Gunst, Susan J; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton plays an essential role in the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. It has been suggested that actin remodeling may also play an important functional role in nonmigrating, nonproliferating differentiated vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). In the present study, we show that contractile agonists increase the net polymerization of actin in dVSM, as measured by the differential ultracentrifugation of vascular smooth muscle tissue and the costaining of single freshly dissociated cells with fluorescent probes specific for globular and filamentous actin. Furthermore, induced alterations of the actin polymerization state, as well as actin decoy peptides, inhibit contractility in a stimulus-dependent manner. Latrunculin pretreatment or actin decoy peptides significantly inhibit contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha-agonist, but these procedures have no effect on contractions induced by KCl. Aorta dVSM expresses alpha-smooth muscle actin, beta-actin, nonmuscle gamma-actin, and smooth muscle gamma-actin. The incorporation of isoform-specific cell-permeant synthetic actin decoy peptides, as well as isoform-specific probing of cell fractions and two-dimensional gels, demonstrates that actin remodeling during alpha-agonist contractions involves the remodeling of primarily gamma-actin and, to a lesser extent, beta-actin. Taken together, these results show that net isoform- and agonist-dependent increases in actin polymerization regulate vascular contractility.

  12. Differential effects of thin and thick filament disruption on zebrafish smooth muscle regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davuluri, G.; Seiler, C.; Abrams, J.; Soriano, A. J.; Pack, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The smooth muscle actin binding proteins Caldesmon and Tropomyosin (Tm) promote thin filament assembly by stabilizing actin polymerization, however, whether filament assembly affects either the stability or activation of these and other smooth muscle regulatory proteins is not known. Methods Measurement of smooth muscle regulatory protein levels in wild type zebrafish larvae following antisense knockdown of smooth muscle actin (Acta2) and myosin heavy chain (Myh11) proteins, and in colourless mutants that lack enteric nerves. Comparison of intestinal peristalsis in wild type and colourless larvae. Key Results Knockdown of Acta2 led to reduced levels of phospho-Caldesmon and Tm. Total Caldesmon and phospho-myosin light chain (p-Mlc) levels were unaffected. Knockdown of Myh11 had no effect on the levels of either of these proteins. Phospho-Caldesmon and p-Mlc levels were markedly reduced in colourless mutants that have intestinal motility comparable with wild type larvae. Conclusions & Inferences These in vivo findings provide new information regarding the activation and stability of smooth muscle regulatory proteins in zebrafish larvae and their role in intestinal peristalsis in this model organism. PMID:20591105

  13. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Malashicheva, Anna; Kostina, Daria; Kostina, Aleksandra; Irtyuga, Olga; Voronkina, Irina; Smagina, Larisa; Ignatieva, Elena; Gavriliuk, Natalia; Uspensky, Vladimir; Moiseeva, Olga; Vaage, Jarle; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin) and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin) cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis. PMID:26904289

  14. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Malashicheva, Anna; Kostina, Daria; Kostina, Aleksandra; Irtyuga, Olga; Voronkina, Irina; Smagina, Larisa; Ignatieva, Elena; Gavriliuk, Natalia; Uspensky, Vladimir; Moiseeva, Olga; Vaage, Jarle; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin) and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin) cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis.

  15. A collagen matrix derived from bladder can be used to engineer smooth muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Soo; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2008-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a collagen matrix derived from lamina propria, commonly known as bladder submucosa (BSM matrix), is a suitable biomaterial for several urologic applications, including reconstruction of the bladder and urethra in experimental models and clinical trials. In the present study, we evaluated the physical properties of BSM as well as its biocompatibility, cellular interactions, and ability to support the formation of functional tissue in order to determine whether this biomaterial could serve as a matrix for urinary smooth muscle tissue engineering. BSM matrix resembles the extracellular matrix of bladder submucosa in its native structure, composition, and mechanical properties. BSM matrix supported normal mitochondrial metabolic and proliferative functions of human urinary smooth muscle cells and did not induce cytotoxic effects in vitro. When implanted in vivo, BSM matrix promoted the regeneration of urinary smooth muscle tissues with contractility, which is a smooth muscle-specific tissue function. These results suggest that BSM matrix would be a useful biomaterial for urinary smooth muscle reconstruction.

  16. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy.

  17. Increased IGF-IEc expression and mechano-growth factor production in intestinal muscle of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease and smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Vu, Kent; Hazelgrove, Krystina; Kuemmerle, John F

    2015-12-01

    The igf1 gene is alternatively spliced as IGF-IEa and IGF-IEc variants in humans. In fibrostenotic Crohn's disease, the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 induces IGF-IEa expression and IGF-I production in intestinal smooth muscle and results in muscle hyperplasia and collagen I production that contribute to stricture formation. Mechano-growth factor (MGF) derived from IGF-IEc induces skeletal and cardiac muscle hypertrophy following stress. We hypothesized that increased IGF-IEc expression and MGF production mediated smooth muscle hypertrophy also characteristic of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease. IGF-IEc transcripts and MGF protein were increased in muscle cells isolated from fibrostenotic intestine under regulation by endogenous TGF-β1. Erk5 and MEF2C were phosphorylated in vivo in fibrostenotic muscle; both were phosphorylated and colocalized to nucleus in response to synthetic MGF in vitro. Smooth muscle-specific protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, γ-smooth muscle actin, and smoothelin was increased in affected intestine. Erk5 inhibition or MEF2C siRNA blocked smooth muscle-specific gene expression and hypertrophy induced by synthetic MGF. Conditioned media of cultured fibrostenotic muscle induced muscle hypertrophy that was inhibited by immunoneutralization of endogenous MGF or pro-IGF-IEc. The results indicate that TGF-β1-dependent IGF-IEc expression and MGF production in patients with fibrostenotic Crohn's disease regulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy a critical factor that contributes to intestinal stricture formation.

  18. The Rho-related protein Rnd1 inhibits Ca2+ sensitization of rat smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Loirand, Gervaise; Cario-Toumaniantz, Chrystelle; Chardin, Pierre; Pacaud, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The small GTP-binding Rho proteins are involved in the agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle. The action and the expression of Rnd1, a new member of the Rho protein family constitutively bound to GTP, has been studied in rat smooth muscle. Recombinant prenylated Rnd1 (0.01-0.1 mg ml−1) dose dependently inhibited carbachol- and GTPγS-induced Ca2+ sensitization in β-escin-permeabilized ileal smooth muscle strips but had no effect on the tension at submaximal [Ca2+] (pCa 6.3). Rnd1 inhibited GTPγS-induced tension without shifting the dose-response curves to GTPγS. pCa-tension relationships were not modified by Rnd1 and the rise in tension induced through the inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase by calyculin A was not affected by Rnd1. The Ca2+ sensitization induced by recombinant RhoA was completely abolished when RhoA and Rnd1 were applied together. Rnd1 was expressed at a low level in membrane fractions prepared from intestinal or arterial smooth muscles. The expression of Rnd1 was strongly increased in ileal and aortic smooth muscle from rats treated with progesterone or oestrogen. Progesterone-treated ileal muscle strips showed a decrease in agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization. The present study shows that (i) Rnd1 inhibits agonist- and GTPγS-induced Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle by specifically interfering with a RhoA-dependent mechanism and (ii) an increase in Rnd1 expression may account, at least in part, for the steroid-induced decrease in agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization. PMID:10200428

  19. Isolation and characterization of the inositol trisphosphate receptor from smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, C.C.; Saito, A.; Fleischer, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The release of Ca{sup 2+} from internal stores is requisite to muscle contraction. In skeletal muscle and heart, the Ca{sup 2+} release channels (ryanodine receptor) of sarcoplasmic reticulum, involved in excitation-contraction coupling, have recently been isolated and characterized. In smooth muscle, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) is believed to mobilize Ca{sup 2+} from internal stores and thereby modulate contraction. The authors describe the isolation of an IP{sub 3} receptor from smooth muscle. Bovine aorta smooth muscle microsomes were solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate, and the IP{sub 3} receptor was purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation and column chromatography with heparin-agarose and wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. The receptor is an oligomer of a single polypeptide with a M{sub r} of 224,000 as determined by SDS/PAGE. Negative-staining electron microscopy reveals that the receptor is a large pinwheel-like structure having surface dimensions of {approx}250 {times} 250 {angstrom} with fourfold symmetry. The IP{sub 3} receptor from smooth muscle is similar to the ryanodine receptor with regard to its large size and fourfold symmetry, albeit distinct with regard to appearance, protomer size, and ligand binding.

  20. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine.

  1. An electrophysiological study of the smooth muscle of the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, D.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical recordings were made in vitro from preparations of human colonic smooth muscle from surgically resected specimens. The behaviour of the taenia consisted of regular spike action potentials based on a slow wave rhythm (22 +/- 5 c.p.m.), with tetanic contractions of the muscle. The actions of cholinergic drugs were studied and experiments performed to investigate the mechanism of the action potentials. The circular muscle produced clusters of spikes with solitary contractions. The differences between the two muscle layers may be of relevance to understanding the colonic electromyogram as recorded in vivo. PMID:7294682

  2. Targeted gene transfection from microbubbles into vascular smooth muscle cells using focused, ultrasound-mediated delivery

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Linsey C.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a method for gene delivery to vascular smooth muscle cells using ultrasound triggered delivery of plasmid DNA from electrostatically coupled cationic microbubbles. Microbubbles carrying reporter plasmid DNA were acoustically ruptured in the vicinity of smooth muscle cells in vitro under a range of acoustic pressures (0–950 kPa) and pulse durations (0–100 cycles). No effect on gene transfection or viability was observed from application of microbubbles, DNA, or ultrasound alone. Microbubbles in combination with ultrasound (500 kPa, 1MHz, 50 cycle bursts at a Pulse Repetition Frequency [PRF] of 100 Hz) significantly reduced viability both with DNA (53 +/− 27%) and without (19 +/− 8%). Maximal gene transfection (~1% of cells) occurred using 50 cycle, 1 MHz pulses at 300 kPa which resulted in 40% viability of cells. We demonstrated that we can locally deliver DNA to vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro using microbubble carriers and focused ultrasound. PMID:20800174

  3. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) are also reviewed.

  4. Relaxation of uterine and aortic smooth muscle by glaucolides D and E from Vernonia liatroides.

    PubMed

    Campos, María; Oropeza, Martha; Ponce, Héctor; Fernández, Jaquelina; Jimenez-Estrada, Manuel; Torres, Héctor; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Vernonia spp. (Asteraceae) are used in herbolaria in Latin America in menstrual and stomach disorders, suggesting smooth muscle relaxing properties of some of their chemical constituents. For pharmacological support for this belief, sesquiterpene lactones glaucolides D and E were assayed on isolated rat smooth muscle. Glaucolide E proved more potent than glaucolide D to relax high KCl- or noradrenaline-induced contractions in aorta and to relax the high KCl-contraction in uterus. Hirsutinolide-type sesquiterpene lactone also was tested but displayed no effect. Relaxation of smooth muscle by structurally related sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide has been attributed mainly to the alpha-methylene gamma-lactone moiety; because glaucolides D and E lack this functional group, their relaxant properties may rely on other alkylating sites such as C10 of the germacra-1(10),4-diene-4-epoxide skeleton.

  5. Surface modifications of photocrosslinked biodegradable elastomers and their influence on smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ilagan, Bernadette G; Amsden, Brian G

    2009-09-01

    Photocrosslinked, biodegradable elastomers based on aliphatic polyesters have many desirable features as scaffolds for smooth muscle tissue engineering. However, they lack cell adhesion motifs. To address this shortcoming, two different modification procedures were studied utilizing a high and a low crosslink density elastomer: base etching and the incorporation of acryloyl-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) into the elastomer network during photocrosslinking. Base etching improved surface hydrophilicity without altering surface topography, but did not improve bovine aortic smooth muscle cell adhesion. Incorporation of PEG-GRGDS into the elastomer network significantly improved cell adhesion for both high and low crosslink density elastomers, with a greater effect with the higher crosslink density elastomer. Incorporation of GRGDS into the high crosslink density elastomer also enhanced smooth muscle cell proliferation, while proliferation on the low crosslink density unmodified, base etched, and PEG-GRGDS incorporated elastomers was significantly greater than on the high crosslink density unmodified and base etched elastomer.

  6. Mechanosensitive ion channels in interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kraichely, R E; Farrugia, G

    2007-04-01

    Normal gastrointestinal (GI) motility is required to mix digestive enzymes and food and to move content along the GI tract. Underlying the complex motor patterns of the gut are electrical events that reflect ion flux across cell membranes. Smooth muscle electrical activity is directly influenced by GI interstitial cells of Cajal, whose rhythmic oscillations in membrane potential in part determine the excitability of GI smooth muscle and its response to neuronal input. Coordinated activity of the ion channels responsible for the conductances that underlie ion flux in both smooth muscle and interstitial cells is a requisite for normal motility. These conductances are regulated by many factors, including mechanical stress. Recent studies have revealed mechanosensitivity at the level of the ion channels, and the mechanosensor within the channel has been identified in many cases. This has led to better comprehension of the role of mechanosensitive conductances in normal physiology and will undoubtedly lead to understanding of the consequences of disturbances in these conductances.

  7. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  8. Heterogeneity in vascular smooth muscle cell embryonic origin in relation to adult structure, physiology, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.; Bader, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regional differences in vascular physiology and disease response exist throughout the vascular tree. While these differences in physiology and disease correspond to regional vascular environmental conditions, there is also compelling evidence that the embryonic origins of the smooth muscle inherent to the vessels may play a role. Here we review what is known regarding the role of embryonic origin of vascular smooth muscle cells during vascular development. The focus of this review is to highlight the heterogeneity in the origins of vascular smooth muscle cells and the resulting regional physiologies of the vessels. Our goal is to stimulate future investigation into this area and provide a better understanding of vascular organogenesis and disease. PMID:25546231

  9. Cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor inhibition decreases vascular smooth muscle migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Hasko, Gyoergy; Pacher, Pal

    2008-12-26

    Vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration triggered by inflammatory stimuli and chemoattractants such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are key events in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Cannabinoids may modulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types through cannabinoid receptors. Here we investigated the effects of CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A), which has recently been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic effects both in mice and humans, on PDGF-induced proliferation, migration, and signal transduction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). PDGF induced Ras and ERK 1/2 activation, while increasing proliferation and migration of HCASMCs, which were dose dependently attenuated by CB{sub 1} antagonist, rimonabant. These findings suggest that in addition to improving plasma lipid alterations and decreasing inflammatory cell migration and inflammatory response, CB{sub 1} antagonists may exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and restenosis by decreasing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

  10. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  11. Primary Intraosseous Smooth Muscle Tumor of Uncertain Malignant Potential: Original Report and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Lauren; Siegal, Gene P.; Frampton, Garrett M.; Rodriguez, Michael G.; McKee, Svetlana; Conry, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of primary intraosseous smooth muscle tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) which is analogous to borderline malignant uterine smooth muscle tumors so designated. The tumor presented in the femur of an otherwise healthy 30-year-old woman. Over a 3-year period, the patient underwent 11 biopsies or resections and 2 cytologic procedures. Multiple pathologists reviewed the histologic material including musculoskeletal pathologists but could not reach a definitive diagnosis. However, metastases eventually developed and were rapidly progressive and responsive to gemcitabine and docetaxel. Molecular characterization and ultrastructural analysis was consistent with smooth muscle origin, and amplification of unmutated chromosome 12p and 12q segments appears to be the major genomic driver of this tumor. Primary intraosseous STUMP is thought to be genetically related to leiomyosarcoma of bone, but likely representing an earlier stage of carcinogenesis. Wide excision and aggressive follow-up is warranted for this potentially life-threatening neoplasm. PMID:27994831

  12. Hyperplasia of smooth muscle in mild to moderate asthma without changes in cell size or gene expression.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Prescott G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Ferrando, Ronald E; Donnelly, Samantha; Hays, Steven R; Solberg, Owen D; Carter, Roderick; Wong, Hofer H; Cadbury, Peggy S; Fahy, John V

    2004-05-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in mild to moderate asthma may result from airway smooth muscle cell proliferation or acquisition of a hypercontractile phenotype. Because these cells have not been well characterized in mild to moderate asthma, we examined the morphometric and gene expression characteristics of smooth muscle cells in this subgroup of patients with asthma. Using bronchial biopsies from 14 subjects with mild to moderate asthma and 15 control subjects, we quantified smooth muscle cell morphology by stereology and the expression of a panel of genes related to a hypercontractile phenotype of airway smooth muscle, using laser microdissection and two-step real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that airway smooth muscle cell size was similar in both groups, but cell number was nearly twofold higher in subjects with asthma (p = 0.03), and the amount of smooth muscle in the submucosa was increased 50-83% (p < 0.005). Gene expression profiling in smooth muscle cells showed no difference in the expression of genes encoding phenotypic markers in cells from healthy subjects and subjects with asthma (all p > 0.1). We conclude that airway smooth muscle proliferation is a pathologic characteristic of subjects with mild to moderate asthma. However, smooth muscle cells in mild to moderate asthma do not show hypertrophy or gene expression changes of a hypercontractile phenotype observed in vitro.

  13. A continuum model for excitation-contraction of smooth muscle under finite deformations.

    PubMed

    Sharifimajd, Babak; Stålhand, Jonas

    2014-08-21

    The main focus in most of the continuum based muscle models is the mechanics of muscle contraction while other physiological processes governing muscle contraction, e.g., cell membrane excitation and activation, are ignored. These latter processes are essential to initiate contraction and to determine the amount of generated force, and by excluding them, the developed model cannot replicate the true behavior of the muscle in question. The aim of this study is to establish a thermodynamically and physiologically consistent framework which allows us to model smooth muscle contraction by including cell membrane excitability and kinetics of myosin phosphorylation, along with dynamics of smooth muscle contraction. The model accounts for these processes through a set of coupled dissipative constitutive equations derived by applying first principles. To show the performance of the derived model, it is evaluated for two different cases: a chemo-mechanical study of pig taenia coli cells where the excitation process is excluded, and an electro-chemo-mechanical study of rat myometrium. The results show that the model is able to replicate important aspects of the smooth muscle excitation-contraction process.

  14. A Novel Selectable Islet 1 Positive Progenitor Cell Reprogrammed to Expandable and Functional Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizabeth C; Huang, Chien-Ling; Sawhney, Neha; Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; Clover, Anthony J P; Martin, Kenneth; Browne, Tara C; Whelan, Derek; Kumar, Arun H S; Mackrill, John J; Wang, Shaohua; Schmeckpeper, Jeffrey; Stocca, Alessia; Pierce, William G; Leblond, Anne-Laure; Cai, Liquan; O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Buneker, Chirlei K; Choi, Janet; MacSharry, John; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Russell, Stephen J; Caplice, Noel M

    2016-05-01

    Disorders affecting smooth muscle structure/function may require technologies that can generate large scale, differentiated and contractile smooth muscle cells (SMC) suitable for cell therapy. To date no clonal precursor population that provides large numbers of differentiated SMC in culture has been identified in a rodent. Identification of such cells may also enhance insight into progenitor cell fate decisions and the relationship between smooth muscle precursors and disease states that implicate differentiated SMC.  In this study, we used classic clonal expansion techniques to identify novel self-renewing Islet 1 (Isl-1) positive primitive progenitor cells (PPC) within rat bone marrow that exhibited canonical stem cell markers and preferential differentiation towards a smooth muscle-like fate. We subsequently used molecular tagging to select Isl-1 positive clonal populations from expanded and de novo marrow cell populations. We refer to these previously undescribed cells as the PPC given its stem cell marker profile, and robust self-renewal capacity. PPC could be directly converted into induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) using single transcription factor (Kruppel-like factor 4) knockdown or transactivator (myocardin) overexpression in contrast to three control cells (HEK 293, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) where such induction was not possible. iSMC exhibited immuno- and cytoskeletal-phenotype, calcium signaling profile and contractile responses similar to bona fide SMC. Passaged iSMC could be expanded to a scale sufficient for large scale tissue replacement.  PPC and reprogramed iSMC so derived may offer future opportunities to investigate molecular, structure/function and cell-based replacement therapy approaches to diverse cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary diseases that have as their basis smooth muscle cell functional aberrancy or numerical loss. Stem Cells 2016;34:1354-1368.

  15. Intestinal smooth muscle phenotype determines enteric neuronal survival via GDNF expression.

    PubMed

    Han, T Y; Lourenssen, S; Miller, K G; Blennerhassett, M G

    2015-04-02

    Intestinal inflammation causes initial axonal degeneration and neuronal death, as well as the proliferation of intestinal smooth muscle cells (ISMC), but subsequent axonal outgrowth leads to re-innervation. We recently showed that expression of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), the critical neurotrophin for the post-natal enteric nervous system (ENS) is upregulated in ISMC by inflammatory cytokines, leading us to explore the relationship between ISMC growth and GDNF expression. In co-cultures of myenteric neurons and ISMC, GDNF or fetal calf serum (FCS) was equally effective in supporting neuronal survival, with neurons forming extensive axonal networks among the ISMC. However, only GDNF was effective in low-density cultures where neurons lacked contact with ISMC. In early-passage cultures of colonic circular smooth muscle cells (CSMC), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting showed that proliferation was associated with expression of GDNF, and the successful survival of neonatal neurons co-cultured on CSMC was blocked by vandetanib or siGDNF. In tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, immunocytochemistry showed the selective expression of GDNF in proliferating CSMC, suggesting that smooth muscle proliferation supports the ENS in vivo as well as in vitro. However, high-passage CSMC expressed significantly less GDNF and failed to support neuronal survival, while expressing reduced amounts of smooth muscle marker proteins. We conclude that in the inflamed intestine, smooth muscle proliferation supports the ENS, and thus its own re-innervation, by expression of GDNF. In chronic inflammation, a compromised smooth muscle phenotype may lead to progressive neural damage. Intestinal stricture formation in human disease, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), may be an endpoint of failure of this homeostatic mechanism.

  16. Mitochondrial Fission of Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Yu; Jin, Jing; Li, Shan-Liang; Yan, Jie; Zhen, Chang-Lin; Gao, Jin-Lai; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Yan-Qiu; Shen, Xin; Zhang, Liang-Shuan; Wei, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Chen-Guang; Bai, Yun-Long; Dong, De-Li

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles and continuously undergo fission and fusion processes. Mitochondrial fission is involved in multiple physiological or pathological processes, but the role of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells in artery constriction is unknown. The role of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells in arterial function was investigated by measuring the tension of rat mesenteric arteries and thoracic aorta and by evaluating mitochondrial fission, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Mitochondrial fission inhibitors mdivi-1 and dynasore antagonized phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced constriction of rat mesenteric arteries. Mdivi-1 relaxed phenylephrine-induced constriction, and mdivi-1 pretreatment prevented phenylephrine-induced constriction in mice, rat aorta, and human mesenteric arteries. Phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced increase of mitochondrial fission in smooth muscle cells of rat aorta and the increase was inhibited by mdivi-1. Mdivi-1 inhibited high K(+)-induced increases of mitochondrial fission, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Prechelation of cytosolic Ca(2+) prevented high K(+)-induced cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i increase, mitochondrial fission, and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species overproduction. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mito-TEMPO antagonized phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced constriction of rat mesenteric arteries. Nitroglycerin and ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase) inhibitor Y27632, the 2 vasodilators with different vasorelaxant mechanisms, relaxed high K(+)-induced vasoconstriction and inhibited high K(+)-induced mitochondrial fission. In conclusion, the mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells is involved in artery constriction.

  17. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, airway innervation, and smooth muscle are altered in Cftr null mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Luk, Catherine; Kent, Geraldine; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2006-09-01

    The amine- and peptide-producing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are widely distributed within the airway mucosa of mammalian lung as solitary cells and innervated clusters, neuroepithelial bodies (NEB), which function as airway O2 sensors. These cells express Cftr and hence could play a role in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We performed confocal microscopy and morphometric analysis on lung sections from Cftr-/- (null), Cftr+/+, and Cftr+/- (control) mice at developmental stages E20, P5, P9, and P30 to determine the distribution, frequency, and innervation of PNEC/NEB, innervation and cell mass of airway smooth muscle, and neuromuscular junctions using synaptic vesicle protein 2, smooth muscle actin, and synaptophysin markers, respectively. The mean number of PNEC/NEB in Cftr-/- mice was significantly reduced compared with control mice at E20, whereas comparable or increased numbers were observed postnatally. NEB cells in Cftr null mice showed a significant reduction in intracorpuscular nerve endings compared with control mice, which is consistent with an intrinsic abnormality of the PNEC system. The airways of Cftr-/- mice showed reduced density (approximately 20-30%) of smooth muscle innervation, decreased mean airway smooth muscle mass (approximately 35%), and reduced density (approximately 20%) of nerve endings compared with control mice. We conclude that the airways of Cftr-/- mice exhibit heretofore unappreciated structural alterations affecting cellular and neural components of the PNEC system and airway smooth muscle and its innervation resulting in blunted O2 sensing and reduced airway tonus. Cftr could play a role in the development of the PNEC system, lung innervation, and airway smooth muscle.

  18. Mathematical Distinction in Action Potential between Primo-Vessels and Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hun; Zhang, Wenji; Lee, Sae-Bhom; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Sun-Mi; Ryu, Yeon-Hee

    2012-01-01

    We studied the action potential of Primo-vessels in rats to determine the electrophysiological characteristics of these structures. We introduced a mathematical analysis method, a normalized Fourier transform that displays the sine and cosine components separately, to compare the action potentials of Primo-vessels with those for the smooth muscle. We found that Primo-vessels generated two types of action potential pulses that differed from those of smooth muscle: (1) Type I pulse had rapid depolarizing and repolarizing phases, and (2) Type II pulse had a rapid depolarizing phase and a gradually slowing repolarizing phase. PMID:22319544

  19. Ion channels in gastrointestinal smooth muscle and interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed

    Lyford, Gregory L; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2003-12-01

    A requirement for normal gastrointestinal motility is the tight regulation of ion channels expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle. Interstitial cells of Cajal generate the slow wave and amplify neuronal signals; smooth muscle functions as the final effector organ. Recent advances in our understanding of the expression and mechano-regulation of these different subtypes of ion channels have allowed the development of hypotheses on how ion channels transduce a variety of inputs into electrical signals that directly or indirectly regulate gastrointestinal motor activity.

  20. Calcium homeostasis and sensitization in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Nikki L; Resta, Thomas C

    2014-04-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a low-pressure, low-resistance vascular bed with little to no resting tone under normal conditions. An increase in the [Ca(2+) ]i in PASMCs is an important determinant of contraction, migration, and proliferation. Both Ca(2+) influx through plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) release from the SR contribute to a rise in [Ca(2+) ]i . Additionally important in the pulmonary circulation are several kinase-mediated signaling pathways that act to increase the sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to [Ca(2+) ]i . Similarly, cytoskeletal processes resulting in dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton can further contribute to contractility in the pulmonary circulation. In addition to endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, alveolar hypoxia is an important stimulus for pulmonary vasoconstriction. However, prolonged hypoxia is a critical pathological stimulus associated with the development of pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of how Ca(2+) homeostasis and sensitization regulate PASMC contractility under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  1. Thrombospondin-1 limits ischemic tissue survival by inhibiting nitric oxide–mediated vascular smooth muscle relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, Jeff S.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Romeo, Martin J.; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tsokos, Maria; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Wink, David A.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2007-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP pathway, by relaxing vascular smooth muscle cells, is a major physiologic regulator of tissue perfusion. We now identify thrombospondin-1 as a potent antagonist of NO for regulating F-actin assembly and myosin light chain phosphorylation in vascular smooth muscle cells. Thrombospondin-1 prevents NO-mediated relaxation of precontracted vascular smooth muscle cells in a collagen matrix. Functional magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that an NO-mediated increase in skeletal muscle perfusion was enhanced in thrombospondin-1–null relative to wild-type mice, implicating endogenous thrombospondin-1 as a physiologic antagonist of NO-mediated vasodilation. Using a random myocutaneous flap model for ischemic injury, tissue survival was significantly enhanced in thrombospondin-1–null mice. Improved flap survival correlated with increased recovery of oxygen levels in the ischemic tissue of thrombospondin-1–null mice as measured by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. These findings demonstrate an important antag-onistic relation between NO/cGMP signaling and thrombospondin-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells to regulate vascular tone and tissue perfusion. PMID:17082319

  2. Orai1 forms a signal complex with SK3 channel in gallbladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Zhong, Xing-Guo; Xia, Xian-Ming; Huang, Jun-Hao; Fan, Yi-Fei; Yuan, Ren-Xiang; Xue, Nai-Rui; Du, Juan; Han, Wen-Xiu; Xu, A-Man; Shen, Bing

    2015-10-23

    Orai1 is one of the key components of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) involved in diverse physiological functions. Orai1 may associate with other proteins to form a signaling complex. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between Orai1 and small conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3). With the use of RNA interference technique, we found that the SOCE and its associated membrane hyperpolarization were reduced while Orai1 was knocked down by a specific Orai1 siRNA in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle. However, with the use of isometric tension measurements, our results revealed that agonist-induced muscle contractility was significantly enhanced after Orai1 protein was knocked down or the tissue was treated by SK3 inhibitor apamin, but not affected by larger conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel inhibitor iberiotoxin or intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel inhibitor TRAM-34. In addition, in the presence of apamin, Orai1 siRNA had no additional effect on agonist-induced contraction. In coimmunoprecipitation experiment, SK3 and Orai1 pulled down each other. These data suggest that, Orai1 physically associated with SK3 to form a signaling complex in gallbladder smooth muscle. Ca(2+) entry via Orai1 activates SK3, resulting in membrane hyperpolarization in gallbladder smooth muscle. This hyperpolarizing effect of Orai1-SK3 coupling could serve to prevent excessive contraction of gallbladder smooth muscle in response to contractile agonists.

  3. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-11-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  4. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylated Light Chain Domain of Scallop Smooth-Muscle Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.S.; Robinson, H.; O-Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Brown, J. H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-11-02

    We have determined the crystal structure of a phosphorylated smooth-muscle myosin light chain domain (LCD). This reconstituted LCD is of a sea scallop catch muscle myosin with its phosphorylatable regulatory light chain (RLC SmoA). In the crystal structure, Arg{sup 16}, an arginine residue that is present in this isoform but not in vertebrate smooth-muscle RLC, stabilizes the phosphorylation site. This arginine interacts with the carbonyl group of the phosphorylation-site serine in the unphosphorylated LCD (determined previously), and with the phosphate group when the serine is phosphorylated. However, the overall conformation of the LCD is essentially unchanged upon phosphorylation. This result provides additional evidence that phosphorylation of the RLC is unlikely to act as an on-switch in regulation of scallop catch muscle myosin.

  5. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A.; Neumayer, Katharina M. H.; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1–2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  6. Exercise, Skeletal Muscle and Circulating microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Russell, Aaron P; Lamon, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise stimulates numerous structural, metabolic, and morphological adaptations in skeletal muscle. These adaptations are vital to maintain human health over the life span. Exercise is therefore seen as a primary intervention to reduce the risk of chronic disease. Advances in molecular biology, biochemistry, and bioinformatics, combined with exercise physiology, have identified many key signaling pathways as well as transcriptional and translational processes responsible for exercise-induced adaptations. Noncoding RNAs, and specifically microRNAs (miRNAs), constitute a new regulatory component that may play a role in these adaptations. The short single-stranded miRNA sequences bind to the 3' untranslated region of specific messenger RNAs (mRNAs) on the basis of sequence homology. This results in the degradation of the target mRNA or the inhibition of protein translation causing repression of the corresponding protein. While tissue specificity or enrichment of certain miRNAs makes them ideal targets to manipulate and understand tissue development, function, health, and disease, other miRNAs are ubiquitously expressed; however, it is uncertain whether their mRNA/protein targets are conserved across different tissues. miRNAs are stable in plasma and serum and their altered circulating expression levels in disease conditions may provide important biomarker information. The emerging research into the role that miRNAs play in exercise-induced adaptations has predominantly focused on the miRNA species that are regulated in skeletal muscle or in circulation. This chapter provides an overview of these current research findings, highlights the strengths and weaknesses identified to date, and suggests where the exercise-miRNA field may move into the future.

  7. Melatonin, a potential therapeutic agent for smooth muscle-related pathological conditions and aging.

    PubMed

    Pozo, M J; Gomez-Pinilla, P J; Camello-Almaraz, C; Martin-Cano, F E; Pascua, P; Rol, M A; Acuña-Castroviejo, D; Camello, P J

    2010-01-01

    Increases or decreases in the contractile response of smooth muscle underlie important pathological conditions such as hypertension, incontinence and altered gastrointestinal transit. These disorders are also frequently encountered in the aged population. Oxidative stress and inflammation are key features in the initiation, progression, and clinical manifestations of smooth muscle disorders. Melatonin, the major secretory product of the pineal gland, has free radical scavenging and antioxidative properties and protects against oxidative insult. Recently, widespread interest has grown regarding the apparent protective effects of melatonin on smooth muscle dysfunction. "In vitro" studies have shown that melatonin decreased vascular tone of vascular beds from control, hypertensive or aged animals, through the reduction of adrenergic contraction and the increase in acetylcholine-induced relaxation. "In vivo", melatonin also attenuates sympathetic tone by direct activation of melatonin receptors, scavenging free radicals or increasing NO availability in the central nervous system. In the gastrointestinal tract, melatonin treatment improves age-related impairments in gallbladder contractility and prevents deleterious effects of cholecystitis on smooth muscle and the enteric nervous system through suppression of oxidative stress. In addition, melatonin improves colonic transit time in constipation-predominant IBS patients. Melatonin is also able to restore impaired contractility of the detrusor muscle from old animals through normalization of Ca(2+) dependent and independent contraction, mitochondrial polarity, neuromuscular function and oxidative stress, which would explain the effects of melatonin counteracting cystometric changes in senescent animals. It also reverses bladder damage following ischemia/reperfusion. In conclusion, melatonin may be a promising candidate for future research of agents that modulate smooth muscle motility.

  8. Electrical activity from smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, M; Gonella, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The electrical activities of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area have been studied in the cat. 2. Electromyographic recordings were achieved with extracellular electrodes, in vivo on acute and chronic animals, and in vitro on the isolated organ. In addition, electrical and mechanical activities were recorded from muscle strips with the sucrose gap technique. 3. Circular muscle coat electrical activity consisted exclusively of slow variations of the membrane potential of the smooth muscle cells. Each slow potential variation was followed by a contraction. 4. The electrical activity and the concomitant contractions were tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). Both disappeared in Ca-free solution or in the presence of Mn ions (10(-3) M). 5. On circular muscle, noradrenaline (10(-8)-10(-7) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.1-0.15 mg/kg in vivo) had an excitatory effect consisting in an increase of slow potential frequency. The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by phentolamine (10(-6)-10(-5) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.2 mg/kg in vivo). 6. On circular muscle, acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.), used exclusively on muscle strips, did never produce any clear cut effect. 7. Longitudinal muscle coat electrical activity consisted of spike potentials superimposed on slow time course depolarizations which were never observed alone. Each spike was followed by a contraction. This electrical activity was tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). 8. Longitudinal muscle activity was abolished by noradrenaline (10(-6) g/ml.) and enhanced by acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.). The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by propranolol (0.2 mg/kg I.V.; 10(-6) g/ml.) and that of acetylcholine by atropine (10(-7) g/ml.). 9. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data indicate that electromechanical coupling is achieved (1) in circular muscle, through Ca dependent slow variations in membrane potential of the muscle cells and (2) in longitudinal muscle, through spike

  9. Role of platelets in smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration after vascular injury in rat carotid artery.

    PubMed Central

    Fingerle, J; Johnson, R; Clowes, A W; Majesky, M W; Reidy, M A

    1989-01-01

    Intimal lesion formation was investigated in rats made thrombocytopenic by a single i.p. injection of a polyclonal antibody made against rat platelets that reduced circulating platelet counts to less than 1% of normal. The carotid artery was then denuded of endothelium with a 2 French balloon catheter, after which no platelets were found adhering to the exposed subendothelium. In control animals, platelets adhered instantly to the denuded artery. Six hours after denudation mRNA for ornithine decarboxylase, a marker for early G1 events, was found to be elevated in both thrombocytopenic and control arteries. Two days after injury the smooth muscle cell replication rate in thrombocytopenic rats was found to be significantly elevated as compared with that in uninjured carotids (13.7% +/- 8.4% vs. 0.65% +/- 0.23%) but was similar to the replication rate observed in denuded carotid arteries from animals treated with nonimmune IgG. One important difference between these animals was that no intimal thickening was observed in thrombocytopenic animals at day 4, and by day 7 the intimas were still significantly smaller than those from control rats. In a separate group of animals which were thrombocytopenic for the entire experiment, no intimal lesions were observed 7 days after injury by balloon catheter. From these results, we conclude that platelets do not play a role in the initiation of smooth muscle cell proliferation after injury by balloon catheter but may regulate their movement into the intima. Images PMID:2813399

  10. Endothelial cells direct mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle cell fate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cho-Hao; Lilly, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms.

  11. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells.

  12. Substance P Responsiveness of Smooth Muscle Cells is Regulated by the Integrin Ligand, Thrombospondin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, Lisa M.; Bowers, Chauncey W.

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular factors that determine a cell's responsiveness to neurotransmitters are of particular relevance for pharmacologically diverse cell types such as neurons and smooth muscle. We previously demonstrated that matrix-associated factors are capable of dramatically and specifically suppressing the responsiveness of smooth muscle to the neuropeptide, substance P. We now demonstrate that this influence of extracellular matrix on the pharmacological phenotype of smooth muscle cells can be blocked specifically by an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing antagonist of integrins. Of a battery of integrin ligands tested, only thrombospondin mimicked the effect of the extracellular matrix on substance P responsiveness. This effect of thrombospondin was dose dependent, RGD sensitive, and blocked by an antibody directed against the RGD-containing region of thrombospondin. Because the mRNA for thrombospondin is present in the cells of the chicken amnion, this extracellular factor may normally suppress substance P responsiveness in amniotic smooth muscle. The results suggest a role for matrix-associated integrin ligands in the regulation of cellular responses to specific neurotransmitters and hormones and in the development and maintenance of tissue-specific pharmacological properties.

  13. Cullin-3 mutation causes arterial stiffness and hypertension through a vascular smooth muscle mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Agbor, Larry N.; Ibeawuchi, Stella-Rita C.; Hu, Chunyan; Davis, Deborah R.; Keen, Henry L.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-3 (CUL3) mutations (CUL3Δ9) were previously identified in hypertensive patients with pseudohypoaldosteronism type-II (PHAII), but the mechanism causing hypertension and whether this is driven by renal tubular or extratubular mechanisms remains unknown. We report that selective expression of CUL3Δ9 in smooth muscle acts by interfering with expression and function of endogenous CUL3, resulting in impaired turnover of the CUL3 substrate RhoA, increased RhoA activity, and augmented RhoA/Rho kinase signaling. This caused vascular dysfunction and increased arterial pressure under baseline conditions and a marked increase in arterial pressure, collagen deposition, and vascular stiffness in response to a subpressor dose of angiotensin II, which did not cause hypertension in control mice. Inhibition of total cullin activity increased the level of CUL3 substrates cyclin E and RhoA, and expression of CUL3Δ9 decreased the level of the active form of endogenous CUL3 in human aortic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that selective expression of the Cul3Δ9 mutation in vascular smooth muscle phenocopies the hypertension observed in Cul3Δ9 human subjects and suggest that mutations in CUL3 cause human hypertension in part through a mechanism involving smooth muscle dysfunction initiated by a loss of CUL3-mediated degradation of RhoA. PMID:27882355

  14. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Objective To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of NG-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Methods Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C), hypertensive (H), and exercised hypertensive (EH). Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Results Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001) the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01) smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. Conclusion One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats. PMID:26107814

  15. [Vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery undergo osteoblast differentiation and calcification in vitro].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong Ping; Sun, Ming Shu; Qian, Jia Qi; Ni, Zhao Hui

    2008-04-01

    To research if the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from human umbilical artery undergo osteoblast differentiation spontaneously in vitro. The growth curve of vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery was obtained by MTT method. The course of multicell nodule formation spontaneously by VSMCs was observed morphologically. The apoptosis of VSMCs in the nodules was detected by Hoechst 33258 and TUNEL methods respectively. The expression of alkaline phosphotase in the nodules was detected by immunohistochemical method. And the calcification was studied with transmission electron microscope and by alizarin red S respectively. We found that the umbilical artery smooth muscle cells confluenced after 7 days of passage and exhibited typical "hill and valley" pattern under light microscope. The cells grew into aggregation and formed nodules at the "hill" region with culture-time prolongation. After 4-5 weeks culture, these nodules built up and calcified spontaneously. We also found alkaline phosphotase expression and apoptosis of VSMCs in these nodules at the same time. We conclude that the vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery just like from aortic artery can undergo osteoblast differentiation spontaneously in vitro, and apoptosis participate this procedure probably.

  16. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  17. Smooth muscle cell contraction increases the critical buckling pressure of arteries.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Danika M; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Yangming; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-02-22

    Recent in vitro experiments demonstrated that arteries under increased internal pressure or decreased axial stretch may buckle into the tortuous pattern that is commonly observed in aging or diseased arteries in vivo. It suggests that buckling is a possible mechanism for the development of artery tortuosity. Vascular tone has significant effects on arterial mechanical properties but its effect on artery buckling is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of smooth muscle cell contraction on the critical buckling pressure of arteries. Porcine common carotid arteries were perfused in an ex vivo organ culture system overnight under physiological flow and pressure. The perfusion pressure was adjusted to determine the critical buckling pressure of these arteries at in vivo and reduced axial stretch ratios (1.5 and 1.3) at baseline and after smooth muscle contraction and relaxation stimulated by norepinephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the critical buckling pressure was significantly higher when the smooth muscle was contracted compared with relaxed condition (97.3mmHg vs 72.9mmHg at axial stretch ratio of 1.3 and 93.7mmHg vs 58.6mmHg at 1.5, p<0.05). These results indicate that arterial smooth muscle cell contraction increased artery stability.

  18. A pseudosubstrate of PKC inhibits the phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) effect on permeabilized smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.S.; Wells, J.N. )

    1991-03-11

    Phorbol esters can induce contraction of vascular smooth muscle and potentiate calcium-induced contractions of permeabilized smooth muscle strips. The authors have used a synthetic peptide inhibitor based on residues 19-31 of PKC (PKC-I) to determine the importance of PKC in the PDBu potentiation of calcium-induced contractions in permeabilized coronary artery smooth muscle. Although peptides similar to PKC-I have been shown to also inhibit MLCK in vitro, MLCK was presumably not inhibited in our system since 30 {mu}M PKC-I alone did not alter the calcium-induced contractions. However, the potentiation of these contractions by 1 {mu}M PDBu was reduced by about 50% in the presence of 10 {mu}M PKC-I, and the potentiation was completely abolished by 30 {mu}M PKC-I. These data indicate that, in this system, PKC is not involved in calcium-induced contractions but that activation of PKC may be the mechanism by which PDBu potentiates calcium-induced contractions in permeabilized coronary artery smooth muscle.

  19. Mitogenic effects of vasoactive neuropeptides on cultured smooth muscle cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhashi, M.; Payan, D.G.

    1987-03-02

    In order to investigate the relationship between the biochemical pathways that characterize contraction and cell growth, the authors have studied both contraction, mitogenesis and protein synthesis induced by the vasoactive neuropeptides, substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on four different established vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle cell lines. Contraction in vitro was evaluated by light microscopy and recorded photographically. Mitogenesis and protein synthesis were evaluated by (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into cells and (/sup 3/H)-amino acid incorporation into trichloroacetic acid precipitated materials, respectively. SP stimulated mitogenesis of A7r5 cells (embryonic rat aorta), but failed to induce significant contraction of these cells, whereas, SP induced contraction of cultured adult rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), but failed to stimulate mitogenesis. CGRP and VIP stimulated mitogenesis and protein synthesis, respectively, of DDT/sub 1/MF-2 cells (hamster vas deferens), but neither induced contraction of this cell line. All three neuropeptides showed no effect on BC/sub 3/H1 (mouse smooth muscle-like) cells. These results suggest that neuropeptides with vasoactive properties modulate different stages of cellular mitogenic responses which may be regulated by the degree of maturation of smooth muscle cell. 22 references, 5 figures.

  20. Role of rho kinase in the functional and dysfunctional tonic smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, Márcio A F; Rattan, Satish

    2011-07-01

    Tonic smooth muscles play pivotal roles in the pathophysiology of debilitating diseases of the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. Tonic smooth muscles differ from phasic smooth muscles in the ability to spontaneously develop myogenic tone. This ability has been primarily attributed to the local production of specific neurohumoral substances that can work in conjunction with calcium sensitization via signal transduction events associated with the Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK II) pathways. In this article, we discuss the molecular pathways involved in the myogenic properties of tonic smooth muscles, particularly the contribution of protein kinase C vs the RhoA/ROCK II pathway in the genesis of basal tone, pathophysiology and novel therapeutic approaches for certain gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that manipulation of RhoA/ROCK II activity through inhibitors or silencing of RNA interface techniques could represent a new therapeutic approach for various gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Orai channel-mediated Ca2+ signals in vascular and airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Orai (Orai1, Orai2, and Orai3) proteins form a family of highly Ca2+-selective plasma membrane channels that are regulated by stromal-interacting molecules (STIM1 and STIM2); STIM proteins are Ca2+ sensors located in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. STIM and Orai proteins are expressed in vascular and airway smooth muscle and constitute the molecular components of the ubiquitous store-operated Ca2+ entry pathway that mediate the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ current. STIM/Orai proteins also encode store-independent Ca2+ entry pathways in smooth muscle. Altered expression and function of STIM/Orai proteins have been linked to vascular and airway pathologies, including restenosis, hypertension, and atopic asthma. In this review we discuss our current understanding of Orai proteins and the store-dependent and -independent signaling pathways mediated by these proteins in vascular and airway smooth muscle. We also discuss the current studies linking altered expression and function of Orai proteins with smooth muscle-related pathologies. PMID:26718630

  2. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome: a case of tracheal smooth muscle remodeling.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel P; Adam, Ryan J; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Eberlein, Michael; Klesney-Tait, Julia A; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Meyerholz, David K; Stoltz, David A

    2017-02-01

    Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is a rare clinical disorder characterized by tracheobronchial dilation and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. While the etiology of the disease remains unknown, histopathological analysis of Mounier-Kuhn airways demonstrates that the disease is, in part, characterized by cellular changes in airway smooth muscle.

  3. Fibronectin promotes differentiation of neural crest progenitors endowed with smooth muscle cell potential

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Silva, Bruno; Coelho da Costa, Meline; Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Neves, Cynara Mendes; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Calloni, Giordano Wosgrau; Trentin, Andrea Goncalves

    2009-04-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a model system used to investigate multipotency during vertebrate development. Environmental factors control NC cell fate decisions. Despite the well-known influence of extracellular matrix molecules in NC cell migration, the issue of whether they also influence NC cell differentiation has not been addressed at the single cell level. By analyzing mass and clonal cultures of mouse cephalic and quail trunk NC cells, we show for the first time that fibronectin (FN) promotes differentiation into the smooth muscle cell phenotype without affecting differentiation into glia, neurons, and melanocytes. Time course analysis indicated that the FN-induced effect was not related to massive cell death or proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Finally, by comparing clonal cultures of quail trunk NC cells grown on FN and collagen type IV (CLIV), we found that FN strongly increased both NC cell survival and the proportion of unipotent and oligopotent NC progenitors endowed with smooth muscle potential. In contrast, melanocytic progenitors were prominent in clonogenic NC cells grown on CLIV. Taken together, these results show that FN promotes NC cell differentiation along the smooth muscle lineage, and therefore plays an important role in fate decisions of NC progenitor cells.

  4. Antibodies probe for folded monomeric myosin in relaxed and contracted smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, A; Trybus, K M; Bowman, D S; Fay, F S

    1994-09-01

    Regulatory light chain phosphorylation is required for assembly of smooth and non-muscle myosins in vitro, but its effect on polymerization within the cell is not understood. Relaxed smooth muscle cells contain dephosphorylated thick filaments, but this does not exclude the presence of a pool of folded myosin monomers which could be recruited to assemble when phosphorylated, thus forming part of smooth muscle's activation pathway. To test this hypothesis, relaxed and contracted avian gizzard cryosections were labeled with a fluorescently conjugated monoclonal antibody specific for the folded monomeric conformation, or with an antibody against the tip of the tail whose epitope is accessible in the monomeric but not the filamentous state. Fluorescence intensity observed in the two physiological states was quantitated by digital imaging microscopy. Only trace amounts of folded monomeric myosin were detected in both the relaxed and contracted states. The amount of monomer also did not increase when alpha-toxin permeabilized gizzard was equilibrated in a solvent that disassembles filaments in vitro. Assembly/disassembly is therefore unlikely to play a major role in regulating the contraction/relaxation cycle in smooth muscle cells.

  5. Electrically Stimulated Adipose Stem Cells on Polypyrrole-Coated Scaffolds for Smooth Muscle Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Björninen, Miina; Gilmore, Kerry; Pelto, Jani; Seppänen-Kaijansinkko, Riitta; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna; Wallace, Gordon; Grijpma, Dirk; Haimi, Suvi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the use of polypyrrole (PPy)-coated polymer scaffolds and electrical stimulation (ES) to differentiate adipose stem cells (ASCs) towards smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Since tissue engineering lacks robust and reusable 3D ES devices we developed a device that can deliver ES in a reliable, repeatable, and cost-efficient way in a 3D environment. Long pulse (1 ms) or short pulse (0.25 ms) biphasic electric current at a frequency of 10 Hz was applied to ASCs to study the effects of ES on ASC viability and differentiation towards SMCs on the PPy-coated scaffolds. PPy-coated scaffolds promoted proliferation and induced stronger calponin, myosin heavy chain (MHC) and smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression in ASCs compared to uncoated scaffolds. ES with 1 ms pulse width increased the number of viable cells by day 7 compared to controls and remained at similar levels to controls by day 14, whereas shorter pulses significantly decreased viability compared to the other groups. Both ES protocols supported smooth muscle expression markers. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation on PPy-coated scaffolds applied through the novel 3D ES device is a valid approach for vascular smooth muscle tissue engineering.

  6. Migration of bovine aortic smooth muscle cells after wounding injury. The role of hyaluronan and RHAMM.

    PubMed Central

    Savani, R C; Wang, C; Yang, B; Zhang, S; Kinsella, M G; Wight, T N; Stern, R; Nance, D M; Turley, E A

    1995-01-01

    The migration of smooth muscle cells is a critical event in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. We have investigated the role of hyaluronan (HA) and the hyaluronan receptor RHAMM in the migration of adult bovine aortic smooth muscle cells (BASMC). Cultured BASMC migrated from the leading edge of a single scratch wound with increased velocity between 1 and 24 h. Polyclonal anti-RHAMM antisera that block HA binding with this receptor abolished smooth muscle cell migration following injury. HA stimulated the random locomotion of BASMC and its association with the cell monolayer increased following wounding injury. Immunoblot analysis of wounded monolayers demonstrated a novel RHAMM protein isoform that appeared within one hour after injury. At the time of increased cell motility after wounding, FACS analysis demonstrated an increase in the membrane localization in approximately 25% of the cell population. Confocal microscopy of injured monolayers confirmed that membrane expression of this receptor was limited to cells at the wound edge. Collectively, these data demonstrate that RHAMM is necessary for the migration of smooth muscle cells and that expression and distribution of this receptor is tightly regulated following wounding of BASMC monolayers. Images PMID:7533785

  7. Molecular identification of a component of delayed rectifier current in gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, F; Kinsella, J; Koh, S D; Vogalis, F; Schneider, A; Flynn, E R; Kenyon, J L; Horowitz, B

    1998-05-01

    Kv2.2, homologous to the shab family of Drosophila voltage-gated K+ channels, was isolated from human and canine colonic circular smooth muscle-derived mRNA. Northern hybridization analysis performed on RNA prepared from tissues and RT-PCR performed on RNA isolated from dispersed and selected smooth muscle cells demonstrate that Kv2.2 is expressed in smooth muscle cells found in all regions of the canine gastrointestinal (GI) tract and in several vascular tissues. Injection of Kv2.2 mRNA into Xenopus oocytes resulted in the expression of a slowly activating K+ current (time to half maximum current, 97 +/- 8.6 ms) mediated by 15 pS (symmetrical K+) single channels. The current was inhibited by tetraethylammonium (IC50 = 2.6 mM), 4-aminopyridine (IC50 = 1.5 mM at +20 mV), and quinine (IC50 = 13.7 microM) and was insensitive to charybdotoxin. Low concentrations of quinine (1 microM) were used to preferentially block the slow component of the delayed rectifier current in native colonic myocytes. These data suggest that Kv2.2 may contribute to this current in native GI smooth muscle cells.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide enhances oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Maziere, C; Conte, M A; Dantin, F; Maziere, J C

    1999-03-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidative modification by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells was studied by determination of the level of lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances or TBARS), the diene level and the electrophoretic mobility of the LDL particle. LPS 25-75 microg/ml induced a dose-dependent increase in LDL oxidation by copper ions, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. At 75 microg LPS/ml, the TBARS content was 1.9, 1.6, and 1.8-fold increased, respectively. The LDL degradation by J774 macrophage-like cells was concomitantly stimulated. Preincubation of the LDL particle with LPS induced a marked increase in the subsequent LDL oxidative modification either by copper ions or by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In addition, pretreatment of endothelial and smooth muscle cells with LPS also induced an enhancement of LDL oxidative modification performed in the absence of LPS. This effect was accompanied by a parallel increase in superoxide anion release by the cells. These results point at one of the mechanisms involved in the described association between bacterial infection and acute myocardial infarction as well as coronary heart disease.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates elastin synthesis by bovine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; Lee, P D; Parks, W C; Stenmark, K R

    1989-04-14

    Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates mitogenesis in smooth muscle cells, and upregulates elastin synthesis in embryonic aortic tissue. Increased smooth muscle elastin synthesis may play an important role in vascular remodeling in chronic pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, we studied the effect of IGF-I on elastin and total protein synthesis by pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells in vitro. Tropoelastin synthesis was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and total protein synthesis was measured by [3H]-leucine incorporation. In addition, the steady-state levels of tropoelastin mRNA were determined by slot blot hybridization. Incubation of confluent cultures with various concentrations of IGF-I resulted in a dose-dependent stimulation of elastin synthesis, with a 2.4-fold increase over control levels at 1000 ng/ml of IGF. The increase in elastin synthesis was reflected by a stimulation of the steady-state levels of tropoelastin mRNA. We conclude that IGF-I has potent elastogenic effects on vascular smooth muscle cells, and speculate that it may contribute to vascular wall remodeling in chronic hypertension.

  10. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  11. Smooth Muscle Cell Contraction Increases the Critical Buckling Pressure of Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Danika M.; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Yangming; Han, Hai-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Recent in vitro experiments demonstrated that arteries under increased internal pressure or decreased axial stretch may buckle into the tortuous pattern that is commonly observed in aging or diseased arteries in vivo. It suggests that buckling is a possible mechanism for the development of artery tortuosity. Vascular tone has significant effects on arterial mechanical properties but its effect on artery buckling is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of smooth muscle cell contraction on the critical buckling pressure of arteries. Porcine common carotid arteries were perfused in an ex vivo organ culture system overnight under physiological flow and pressure. The perfusion pressure was adjusted to determine the critical buckling pressure of these arteries at in vivo and reduced axial stretch ratios (1.5 and 1.3) at baseline and after smooth muscle contraction and relaxation stimulated by norepinephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the critical buckling pressure was significantly higher when the smooth muscle was contracted compared with relaxed condition (97.3mmHg versus 72.9mmHg at axial stretch ratio of 1.3 and 93.7mmHg vs 58.6mmHg at 1.5, p<0.05). These results indicate that arterial smooth muscle cell contraction increased artery stability. PMID:23261241

  12. Circumferential alignment of vascular smooth muscle cells in a circular microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Seob; Piao, Yunxian; Seo, Tae Seok

    2014-01-01

    The circumferential alignment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in an orthogonally micropatterned circular microfluidic channel is reported to form an in vivo-like smooth muscle cell layer. To construct a biomimetic smooth muscle cell layer which is aligned perpendicular to the axis of blood vessel, a half-circular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel is first fabricated by soft lithography using a convex PDMS mold. Then, the orthogonally microwrinkle patterns are generated inside the half-circular microchannel by a strain responsive wrinkling method. During the UV treatment on a PDMS substrate with uniaxial 40% stretch and a subsequent strain releasing step, the microwrinkle patterns perpendicular to the axial direction of the circular microchannel are generated, which can guide the circumferential alignment of HASMCs during cultivation. The analysis of orientation angle, shape index, and contractile protein marker expression indicates that the cultured HASMCs reveal the in vivo-like cell phenotype. Finally, a fully circular microchannel is produced by bonding two half-circular microchannels, and the HASMCs are cultured circumferentially inside the channels with high alignment and viability for 5 days. These results demonstrated the creation of an in vivo-like 3D smooth muscle cell layer in the circular microfluidic channel which can provide a bioassay platforms for in-depth study of HASMC biology and vascular function.

  13. Local Inhibition of Macrophage and Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation to Suppress Plaque Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sukhovershin, Roman A.; Toledano Furman, Naama E.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Trachtenberg, Barry H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex process responsible for a major burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are abundant within atherosclerotic plaques. This review discusses the role of macrophages and SMCs in plaque progression and provides an overview of nanoparticle-based approaches and other current methods for local targeting of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27826367

  14. Expression of smooth muscle-specific proteins in myoepithelium and stromal myofibroblasts of normal and malignant human breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Sastre, X; Frid, M G; Glukhova, M A; Thiery, J P; Koteliansky, V E

    1993-01-01

    The expression of several differentiation markers in normal human mammary gland myoepithelium and in certain stromal fibroblasts ("myofibroblasts") associated with breast carcinomas was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy of frozen sections. Several antibodies to smooth muscle-specific proteins (smooth muscle alpha-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chains, calponin, alpha 1-integrin, and high molecular weight caldesmon) and to epithelial-specific proteins (cytokeratins, E-cadherin, and desmoplakin) were used to show that myoepithelial cells concomitantly express epithelial and smooth muscle markers whereas adjacent luminal cells express only epithelial markers. The same antibodies were used to establish that stromal myofibroblasts exhibit smooth muscle phenotypic properties characterized by the expression of all the smooth muscle markers examined except for high molecular weight caldesmon. In addition, both myoepithelium and myofibroblasts show a significant degree of heterogeneity in smooth muscle protein expression. Thus, myoepithelial cells and stromal myofibroblasts are epithelial and mesenchymal cells, respectively, which coordinately express a set of smooth muscle markers while maintaining their specific original features. The dual nature of myoepithelial cells and the phenotypic transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts are examples of the plasticity of the differentiated cell phenotype. Images PMID:8430113

  15. Molecular and functional significance of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Abigail S.; Ayon, Ramon J.; Wiwchar, Michael; Angermann, Jeff E.; Pritchard, Harry A. T.; Singer, Cherie A.; Valencik, Maria L.; Britton, Fiona; Greenwood, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased peripheral resistance of small distal pulmonary arteries is a hallmark signature of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and is believed to be the consequence of enhanced vasoconstriction to agonists, thickening of the arterial wall due to remodeling, and increased thrombosis. The elevation in arterial tone in PH is attributable, at least in part, to smooth muscle cells of PH patients being more depolarized and displaying higher intracellular Ca2+ levels than cells from normal subjects. It is now clear that downregulation of voltage-dependent K+ channels (e.g., Kv1.5) and increased expression and activity of voltage-dependent (Cav1.2) and voltage-independent (e.g., canonical and vanilloid transient receptor potential [TRPC and TRPV]) Ca2+ channels play an important role in the functional remodeling of pulmonary arteries in PH. This review focuses on an anion-permeable channel that is now considered a novel excitatory mechanism in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. It is permeable to Cl− and is activated by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+-activated Cl− channel, or CaCC). The first section outlines the biophysical and pharmacological properties of the channel and ends with a description of the molecular candidate genes postulated to encode for CaCCs, with particular emphasis on the bestrophin and the newly discovered TMEM16 and anoctamin families of genes. The second section provides a review of the various sources of Ca2+ activating CaCCs, which include stimulation by mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores and Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent and voltage-independent Ca2+ channels. The third and final section summarizes recent findings that suggest a potentially important role for CaCCs and the gene TMEM16A in PH. PMID:26064450

  16. Immunohistochemical and functional studies on calcium-sensing receptors in rat uterine smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Marc J; Petrik, James J; Holloway, Alison C; Crankshaw, Denis J

    2012-01-01

    1. Activation of calcium-sensing receptors (CaS) leads to relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. However, the role of CaS in uterine smooth muscle is unknown. Therefore the aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and function of CaS in the uterus. 2. The expression of CaS in the oestrogen-dominated rat uterus was investigated using immunohistochemistry. The effects of putative CaS ligands on oxytocin-induced contractions of longitudinally orientated uterine strips from oestrogen-dominated rats were determined at reduced extracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations using conventional organ bath techniques. 3. Immunohistochemical evidence showed the presence of CaS in the endometrium and smooth muscle layers of the rat uterus. Oxytocin-induced contractions were inhibited by cations (Gd³⁺ > Ca²⁺ = Mg²⁺), polyamines (spermine > spermidine) and the positive allosteric modulators cinacalcet and calindol. However (R)- and (S)-cinacalcet were equipotent, indicating a lack of stereoselectivity, and the negative allosteric modulator calhex-231 also caused dose-dependent relaxation. In addition, although intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and cytochrome P450-dependent signal transduction have been implicated in CaS-induced relaxation of vascular smooth muscle, neither Tram-34 nor miconazole (1 μmol/L), which block these pathways, respectively, had any effect on the ability of cinacalcet to inhibit oxytocin-induced contractions. 4. Calcium-sensing receptors are expressed in smooth muscle layers of the rat uterus and their ligands produce potent relaxation of longitudinally orientated uterine strips. However, the pharmacological profile of inhibition of contractility by CaS ligands is not consistent with a role for CaS in the regulation of uterine contractility in the rat.

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 activation and serum amyloid A regulate smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Christopher A.; Best, Michael; Rich, Celeste B.; Stone, Phillip J.

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells contribute to extracellular matrix remodeling during atherogenesis. De-differentiated, synthetic smooth muscle cells are involved in processes of migration, proliferation and changes in expression of extracellular matrix components, all of which contribute to loss of homeostasis accompanying atherogenesis. Elevated levels of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A (SAA), are associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis. Although infection with periodontal and respiratory pathogens via activation of inflammatory cell Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 has been linked to vascular disease, little is known about smooth muscle cell TLR2 in atherosclerosis. This study addresses the role of SAA and TLR2 activation on smooth muscle cell matrix gene expression and insoluble elastin accumulation. Cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were treated with SAA or TLR2 agonists and the effect on expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and tropoelastin studied. SAA up-regulated MMP9 expression. Tropoelastin is an MMP9 substrate and decreased tropoelastin levels in SAA-treated cells supported the concept of extracellular matrix remodeling. Interestingly, SAA-induced down-regulation of tropoelastin was not only evident at the protein level but at the level of gene transcription as well. Contributions of proteasomes, nuclear factor κ B and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β on regulation of MMP9 vs. tropoleastin expression were revealed. Effects on Mmp9 and Eln mRNA expression persisted with long-term SAA treatment, resulting in decreased insoluble elastin accumulation. Interestingly, the SAA effects were TLR2-dependent and TLR2 activation by bacterial ligands also induced MMP9 expression and decreased tropoelastin expression. These data reveal a novel mechanism whereby SAA and/or infection induce changes in vascular elastin consistent with atherosclerosis. PMID:28257481

  18. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  19. Titanium Dioxide Modulation of the Contractibility of Visceral Smooth Muscles In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsymbalyuk, Olga V; Naumenko, Anna M; Rohovtsov, Oleksandr O; Skoryk, Mykola A; Voiteshenko, Ivan S; Skryshevsky, Valeriy A; Davydovska, Tamara L

    2017-12-01

    Electronic scanning microscopy was used in the work to obtain the image and to identify the sizes of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles 21 ± 5 nm. The qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of the preparations of the caecum, antrum, myometrium, kidneys, and lungs of the rats, burdened with titanium dioxide, was also performed. It was established using the tenzometric method in the isometric mode that the accumulation of titanium dioxide in smooth muscles of the caecum resulted in the considerable, compared to the control, increase in the frequency of their spontaneous contractions, the decrease in the duration of the contraction-relaxation cycle, and the decrease in the indices of muscle functioning efficiency (the index of contractions in Montevideo units (MU) and the index of contractions in Alexandria units (AU)). In the same experimental conditions, there was not the increase, but the decrease in the frequency of spontaneous contractions, the duration of the contraction-relaxation cycle, and the increase in MU and AU indices in the smooth muscles of myometrium (in the group of rats, burdened with TiO2 for 30 days). It was also determined that TiO2 modulates both the mechanisms of the input of extracellular Ca(2+) ions and the mechanisms of decreasing the concentration of these cations in smooth muscle cells of the caecum during the generation of the high potassium contraction. In these conditions, there is a considerable increase in the normalized maximal velocity of the contraction phase and the relaxation phase. It was demonstrated in the work that titanium dioxide also changes the cholinergic excitation in these muscles. The impact of titanium dioxide in the group of rats, burdened with TiO2, was accompanied with a considerable impairment of the kinetics of forming the tonic component of the oxytocin-induced contraction of the smooth muscles of myometrium.

  20. Effects of the gap junction blocker glycyrrhetinic acid on gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukari; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2005-04-01

    In the tunica muscularis of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, gap junctions form low-resistance pathways between pacemaker cells known as interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and between ICC and smooth muscle cells. Coupling via these junctions facilitates electrical slow-wave propagation and responses of smooth muscle to enteric motor nerves. Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) has been shown to uncouple gap junctions, but previous studies have shown apparent nonspecific effects of GA in a variety of tissues. We tested the effects of GA using isometric force measurements, intracellular microelectrode recordings, the patch-clamp technique, and the spread of Lucifer yellow within cultured ICC networks. In murine small intestinal muscles, beta-GA (10 muM) decreased phasic contractions and depolarized resting membrane potential. Preincubation of GA inhibited the spread of Lucifer yellow, increased input resistance, and decreased cell capacitance in ICC networks, suggesting that GA uncoupled ICCs. In patch-clamp experiments of isolated jejunal myocytes, GA significantly decreased L-type Ca(2+) current in a dose-dependent manner without affecting the voltage dependence of this current. The IC(50) for Ca(2+) currents was 1.9 muM, which is lower than the concentrations used to block gap junctions. GA also significantly increased large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) currents but decreased net delayed rectifier K(+) currents, including 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium-resistant currents. In conclusion, the reduction of phasic contractile activity of GI muscles by GA is likely a consequence of its inhibitory effects on gap junctions and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents. Membrane depolarization may be a consequence of uncoupling effects of GA on gap junctions between ICCs and smooth muscles and inhibition of K(+) conductances in smooth muscle cells.

  1. Titanium Dioxide Modulation of the Contractibility of Visceral Smooth Muscles In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbalyuk, Olga V.; Naumenko, Anna M.; Rohovtsov, Oleksandr O.; Skoryk, Mykola A.; Voiteshenko, Ivan S.; Skryshevsky, Valeriy A.; Davydovska, Tamara L.

    2017-02-01

    Electronic scanning microscopy was used in the work to obtain the image and to identify the sizes of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles 21 ± 5 nm. The qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of the preparations of the caecum, antrum, myometrium, kidneys, and lungs of the rats, burdened with titanium dioxide, was also performed. It was established using the tenzometric method in the isometric mode that the accumulation of titanium dioxide in smooth muscles of the caecum resulted in the considerable, compared to the control, increase in the frequency of their spontaneous contractions, the decrease in the duration of the contraction-relaxation cycle, and the decrease in the indices of muscle functioning efficiency (the index of contractions in Montevideo units (MU) and the index of contractions in Alexandria units (AU)). In the same experimental conditions, there was not the increase, but the decrease in the frequency of spontaneous contractions, the duration of the contraction-relaxation cycle, and the increase in MU and AU indices in the smooth muscles of myometrium (in the group of rats, burdened with TiO2 for 30 days). It was also determined that TiO2 modulates both the mechanisms of the input of extracellular Ca2+ ions and the mechanisms of decreasing the concentration of these cations in smooth muscle cells of the caecum during the generation of the high potassium contraction. In these conditions, there is a considerable increase in the normalized maximal velocity of the contraction phase and the relaxation phase. It was demonstrated in the work that titanium dioxide also changes the cholinergic excitation in these muscles. The impact of titanium dioxide in the group of rats, burdened with TiO2, was accompanied with a considerable impairment of the kinetics of forming the tonic component of the oxytocin-induced contraction of the smooth muscles of myometrium.

  2. Cytoplasmic free calcium, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and force in phasic and tonic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The time course of [Ca2+]i, tension, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were determined during prolonged depolarization with high K+ in intact tonic (rabbit pulmonary artery) and phasic (longitudinal layer of guinea pig ileum) smooth muscles. [Ca2+]i was monitored with the 340 nm/380 nm signal ratio of the fluorescent indicator fura-2. The fluorescence ratio had a similar time course in both muscle types during depolarization with 109 mM [K+]o; after a transient peak, there was a decline to 70% of its peak value in tonic smooth muscle, and to 60% in phasic smooth muscle. Tension, however, continued to increase in the pulmonary artery, while in the ileum it declined in parallel with the [Ca2+]i. On changing [K+]o from 109 to 20 mM, tension and [Ca2+]i either remained unchanged or declined in parallel in the pulmonary artery. Phosphorylation of the 20-kD myosin light chain, measured during stimulation of muscle strips with 109 mM [K+]o in another set of experiments, increased from 3% to a peak of 50% in the intact pulmonary artery, and then declined to a steady state value of 23%. In the intact ileum, a very rapid, early transient phosphorylation (up to 50%) at 2-3 s was seen. This transient declined by 30 s to a value that was close to the resting level (7%), while tension remained at 55% of its peak force. A quick release during maintained stimulation induced no detectable change in the [Ca2+]i in either type of smooth muscle. We discuss the possibility that the slowly rising tonic tension in pulmonary artery could be due to cooperativity between phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated crossbridges. PMID:3216188

  3. Contractile force and intracellular Ca2+ during relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gunst, S J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    1989-08-01

    Muscle strips loaded with the Ca2+ indicator aequorin were studied in vitro to determine the effects of inhibitory stimuli on force and cytosolic free Ca2+. In muscles contracted isometrically with acetylcholine (ACh), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), carbachol, decreases in muscle force caused by isoproterenol (10(-5) M) or forskolin (10(-5) M) were accompanied by proportional decreases in aequorin luminescence. A similar relationship between decreases in muscle force and aequorin luminescence was observed when muscles were relaxed by stimulating Na+-K+-ATPase activity. These results suggest that the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins was not decreased during adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent relaxation. However, aequorin luminescence did not decrease when muscles contracted by K+ depolarization were relaxed with isoproterenol. Incubation of muscles in forskolin depressed increases in both force and aequorin luminescence in response to 5-HT or ACh. Incubation of muscles in isoproterenol had a similar effect on responses to 5-HT but depressed increases in force without depressing increases in luminescence in response to ACh. Results indicate that under most conditions the reduction of cytosolic Ca2+ plays an important role in the cAMP-dependent relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

  4. [Forskolin inhibits spontaneous contraction of gastric antral smooth muscle in rats].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing-Zhi; Sun, Qian; Xu, Dong-Yuan; Zhang, Mo-Han; Piao, Li-Hua; Cai, Ying-Lan; Jin, Zheng

    2013-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) on rat gastric antral circular smooth muscle function. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC), was used to observe the influences of cAMP. Multi-channel physiological recorder was used to record spontaneous contraction activity of gastric antral circular muscle from Wistar rats. And ELISA method was used to detect the change of cAMP production in perfusate. The results showed that forskolin concentration-dependently suppressed the amplitude and frequency of the spontaneous contraction of the gastric antral muscle, and lowered the baseline of contraction movement significantly. Forskolin concentration-dependently increased the production of cAMP in the perfusate, which showed a significant negative correlation with the contraction amplitude of gastric antral ring muscle. The inhibitory effect of forskolin on spontaneous contraction activity of rat gastric antral circular muscle could be blocked by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor H-89. These results suggest forskolin increases cAMP production and then activates PKA pathway, resulting in the inhibition of the spontaneous contraction activity of rat gastric antral circular smooth muscle.

  5. Increased endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion on nanostructured titanium and CoCrMo

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Saba; Berhe, Mikal; Haberstroh, Karen M; Webster, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    In the body, vascular cells continuously interact with tissues that possess nanostructured surface features due to the presence of proteins (such as collagen and elastin) embedded in the vascular wall. Despite this fact, vascular stents intended to restore blood flow do not have nanoscale surface features but rather are smooth at the nanoscale. As the first step towards creating the next generation of vascular stent materials, the objective of this in vitro study was to investigate vascular cell (specifically, endothelial, and vascular smooth muscle cell) adhesion on nanostructured compared with conventional commercially pure (cp) Ti and CoCrMo. Nanostructured cp Ti and CoCrMo compacts were created by separately utilizing either constituent cp Ti or CoCrMo nanoparticles as opposed to conventional micronsized particles. Results of this study showed for the first time increased endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion on nanostructured compared with conventional cp Ti and CoCrMo after 4 hours’ adhesion. Moreover, compared with their respective conventional counterparts, the ratio of endothelial to vascular smooth muscle cells increased on nanostructured cp Ti and CoCrMo. In addition, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells had a better spread morphology on the nanostructured metals compared with conventional metals. Overall, vascular cell adhesion was better on CoCrMo than on cp Ti. Results of surface characterization studies demonstrated similar chemistry but significantly greater root-mean-square (rms) surface roughness as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) for nanostructured compared with respective conventional metals. For these reasons, results from the present in vitro study provided evidence that vascular stents composed of nanometer compared with micron-sized metal particles (specifically, either cp Ti or CoCrMo) may invoke cellular responses promising for improved vascular stent applications. PMID:17722261

  6. beta. -adrenergic relaxation of smooth muscle: differences between cells and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Scheid, C.R.

    1987-09-01

    The present studies were carried out in an attempt to resolve the controversy about the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation in smooth muscle. Previous studies on isolated smooth muscle cells from the toad stomach had suggested that at least some of the actions of ..beta..-adrenergic agents, including a stimulatory effect on /sup 45/Ca efflux, were dependent on the presence of a normal transmembrane Na/sup +/ gradient. Studies by other investigators using tissues derived from mammalian sources had suggested that the relaxing effect of ..beta..-adrenergic agents was Na/sup +/ independent. Uncertainty remained as to whether these discrepancies reflected differences between cells and tissues or differences between species. Thus, in the present studies, the authors utilized both tissues and cells from the same source, the stomach muscle of the toad Bufo marinus, and assessed the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation. They found that elimination of a normal Na/sup +/ gradient abolished ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation of isolated cells. In tissues, however, similar manipulations had no effect on relaxation. The reasons for this discrepancy are unclear but do not appear to be attributable to changes in smooth muscle function following enzymatic dispersion. Thus the controversy concerning the mechanisms of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation may reflect inherent differences between tissues and cells.

  7. Aging-induced alterations in female rat colon smooth muscle: the protective effects of hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Pascua, P; Camello-Almaraz, C; Pozo, M J; Martin-Cano, F E; Vara, E; Fernández-Tresguerres, J A; Camello, P J

    2012-06-01

    Aging is associated to oxidative damage and alterations in inflammatory and apoptotic pathways. Aging impairs secretion of several hormones, including melatonin and estrogens. However, the mechanisms involved in aging of smooth muscle are poorly known. We have studied the changes induced by aging in the colonic smooth muscle layer of female rats and the protective effect of hormonal therapy. We used young, aged, and ovariectomized aged female rats. Two groups of ovariectomized rats (22 months old) were treated either with melatonin or with estrogen for 10 weeks before sacrifice. Aging induced oxidative imbalance, evidenced by H(2)O(2) accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and decreased catalase activity. The oxidative damage was enhanced by ovariectomy. In addition, aged colonic muscle showed enhanced expression of the pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase 2. Expression of the activated forms of caspases 3 and 9 was also enhanced in aged colon. Melatonin and estrogen treatment prevented the oxidative damage and the activation of caspases. In conclusion, aging of colonic smooth muscle induces oxidative imbalance and activation of apoptotic and pro-inflammatory pathways. Hormonal therapy has beneficial effects on the oxidative and apoptotic changes associated to aging in this model.

  8. Oesophageal tone and sensation in the transition zone between proximal striated and distal smooth muscle oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Karamanolis, G; Stevens, W; Vos, R; Tack, J; Clave, P; Sifrim, D

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the proximal striated muscle oesophagus is less compliant and more sensitive than the distal smooth muscle oesophagus. Conventional and high resolution manometry described a transition zone between striated and smooth muscle oesophagus. We aimed to evaluate oesophageal tone and sensitivity at the transition zone of oesophagus in healthy volunteers. In 18 subjects (seven men, mean age: 28 years) an oesophageal barostat study was performed. Tone and sensitivity were assessed using stepwise isobaric distensions with the balloon located at transition zone and at distal oesophagus in random order. To study the effect induced on transition zone by a previous distension at the distal oesophagus and vice versa, identical protocol was repeated after 7 days with inverted order. Initial distension of a region is referred to as 'naïf' distension and distension of a region following the distension of the other segment as 'primed' distension. Assessment of three oesophageal symptoms (chest pain, heartburn and 'other') was obtained at the end of every distension step. Compliance was significantly higher in the transition zone than in the distal oesophagus (1.47 +/- 0.14 vs 1.09 +/- 0.09 mL mmHg(-1), P = 0.03) after 'naif' distensions. This difference was not observed during 'primed' distensions. Higher sensitivity at transition zone level was found in 11/18 (61%) subjects compared to 6/18 (33%, P < 0.05) at smooth muscle oesophagus. Chest pain and 'other' symptom were more often induced by distention of the transition zone, whereas heartburn was equally triggered by distension of either region. The transition zone is more complaint and more sensitive than smooth muscle oesophagus.

  9. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Peter D.; Gallos, George; Xu, Dingbang; Zhang, Yi; Emala, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is an important component of the pathophysiology of asthma. Taurine, an agonist of glycine receptor chloride (GlyR Cl−) channels, was found to relax contracted ASM, which led us to question whether functional GlyR Cl− channels are expressed in ASM. Messenger RNA for β (GLRB), α1 (GLRA1), α2 (GLRA2), and α4 (GLRA4) subunits were found in human (Homo sapiens) and guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) tracheal smooth muscle. Immunoblotting confirmed the protein expression of GLRA1 and GLRB subunits in ASM. Electrical activity of cultured human ASM cells was assessed using a fluorescent potentiometric dye and electrophysiological recordings. Glycine increased current and significantly increased fluorescence in a dose-dependent manner. The GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine significantly blocked the effects of glycine on potentiometric fluorescence in ASM cells. Guinea pig airway ring relaxation of ACh-induced contractions by isoproterenol was significantly left-shifted in the presence of glycine. This effect of glycine was blocked by pretreatment with the GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine. Glycine treatment during tachykinin- and acetylcholine-induced contractions significantly decreased the maintenance of muscle force compared to control. GlyR Cl− channels are expressed on ASM and regulate smooth muscle force and offer a novel target for therapeutic relaxation of ASM.—Yim, P. D., Gallos, G., Xu, D., Zhang, Y., Emala, C. W. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle. PMID:21282206

  10. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  11. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A.; Penheiter, Alan R.; Burghardt, Thomas P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  12. Nkx2-5 Lineage Tracing Visualizes the Distribution of Second Heart Field-Derived Aortic Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Andrew W.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, smooth muscle within the ascending aorta arises from two distinct sources: second heart field progenitors and the neural crest. It has recently been hypothesized that the boundary between smooth muscle from these distinct origins may be particularly susceptible to acute aortic dissection. While the contribution of second heart field progenitors to the ascending aorta is well established, detailed mapping of the anatomical distribution of second heart field-derived smooth muscle at this smooth muscle boundary has yet to be observed using a committed cardiac progenitor Cre-lineage. Using Nkx2-5-Cre knockin mice, the anatomical distribution of second heart field derived aortic smooth muscle was mapped in detail. Specifically, Nkx2-5-Cre-labeled cells constitute the entirety of the smooth muscle layer at the aortic base and then become restricted to the adventitial side of the ascending aortic media. This distribution pattern is present by E12.5 in the embryo and persists throughout embryonic development. These data reveal previously unappreciated details regarding the anatomical distribution of second heart field-derived smooth muscle within the aorta as well as the non-cardiomyocyte fates labeled by the Nkx2-5-Cre lineage. PMID:24133047

  13. Effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and smooth muscle contraction in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman; Mustafa, Ayman

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that both Rho kinase signaling and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle Rho kinase pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and muscle contraction in rat stomach. The peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite were used to induce oxidative stress. Rho kinase II expression and ACh-induced activity were measured in control and oxidant-treated cells via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activity assay kits, respectively. Single smooth muscle cell contraction was measured via scanning micrometry in the presence or absence of the Rho kinase blocker, Y-27632 dihydrochloride. All oxidant agents significantly increased ACh-induced Rho kinase II activity without affecting its expression level. Most important, oxidative stress induced by all three agents augmented ACh-stimulated muscle cell contraction, which was significantly inhibited by Y-27632. In conclusion, oxidative stress activates Rho kinase II and enhances contraction in rat gastric muscle, suggesting an important role in GI motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  14. Characterization of bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice expressing mCherry fluorescent protein substituted for the murine smooth muscle-alpha-actin gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smooth muscle a actin (SMA) is a cytoskeletal protein expressed by mesenchymal and smooth muscle cell types, including mural cells(vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes). Using Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) recombineering technology, we generated transgenic reporter mice that express a ...

  15. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  16. Interaction of protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) with smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi

    2003-06-01

    The interaction of a protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) isolated from Basidiomycetes with smooth muscle myosin components was evaluated by limited digestion, urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis, affinity chromatography and overlay assay using a peptide array. PSK was bound to the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin, but not to the essential light chain. The binding to PSK was definitely observed for unphosphorylated RLC, compared to phosphorylated one. From the amino acid sequence of the RLC, 490 peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane. Overlay assays showed that the PSK-binding on the molecule of RLC were localized in the N- and C-terminal basic regions and these sites were conserved in RLC from the human smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells.

  17. A three-dimensional chemo-mechanical continuum model for smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Böl, Markus; Schmitz, André; Nowak, Götz; Siebert, Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Based on two fields, namely the placement and the calcium concentration, a chemo-mechanically coupled three-dimensional model, describing the contractile behaviour of smooth muscles, is presented by means of a strain energy function. The strain energy function (Schmitz and Böl, 2011) is additively decomposed into a passive part, relating to elastin and collagen, and an active calcium-driven part related to the chemical contraction of the smooth muscle cells. For the description of the calcium phase the four state cross-bridge model of Hai and Murphy (Hai and Murphy, 1988) has been implemented into the finite element method. Beside three-dimensional illustrative boundary-value problems demonstrating the features of the presented modelling concept, simulations on an idealised artery document the applicability of the model to more realistic geometries.

  18. Single Nisoldipine-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Smooth Muscle Cells Isolated from Rabbit Mesenteric Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Jennings F.; Deitmer, Joachim W.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1986-08-01

    Single smooth muscle cells were enzymatically isolated from the rabbit mesenteric artery. At physiological levels of external Ca, these cells were relaxed and contracted on exposure to norepinephrine, caffeine, or high levels of potassium. The patch-clamp technique was used to measure unitary currents through single channels in the isolated cells. Single channels were selective for divalent cations and exhibited two conductance levels, 8 pS and 15 pS. Both types of channels were voltage-dependent, and channel activity occurred at potentials positive to -40 mV. The activity of both channel types was almost completely inhibited by 50 nM nisoldipine. These channels appear to be the pathways for voltage-dependent Ca influx in vascular smooth muscle and may be the targets of the clinically used dihydropyridines.

  19. Glomuvenous malformations with smooth muscle and eccrine glands: unusual histopathologic features in a familial setting.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Riccardo G; Grassi, Sara; Concardi, Monica; Puccio, Ignazio; Giordano, Calogero; Agozzino, Manuela; Caspani, Clelia; Grasso, Maurizia; Diegoli, Marta; Arbustini, Eloisa

    2014-03-01

    Glomuvenous malformations (OMIM 138000) are hamartomas presenting in childhood as multiple, bluish papules and nodules in the skin, which are characterized histopathologically by irregular vascular spaces surrounded by typical glomus cells. Glomuvenous malformations are caused by autosomal dominant mutations of the GLMN gene. A 34-year-old woman and her 16-year-old son presented with bluish papules and nodules since childhood. Biopsy specimens from both patients showed histopathologic features of glomuvenous malformations, unusually in consistent and close association with smooth muscle, hair follicles and eccrine glands. Sequencing of the GLMN gene revealed the p.C36X (c.108C>A) mutation in germline DNA from both patients. This is probably the first report describing the hamartomatous features of familial glomuvenous malformations consistently associated with a prominent smooth muscle component and eccrine glands.

  20. Prediction of peak forces for a shortening smooth muscle tissue subjected to vibration.

    PubMed

    Pidaparti, Ramana M; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Meiss, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the peak forces for a tracheal smooth muscle tissue subjected to an applied longitudinal vibration following isotonic shortening. A non-linear finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the vibratory response under experimental conditions that corresponds to forced length oscillations at 33 Hz for 1 second. The stiffness change and hysteresis estimated from the experimental data was used in the analysis. The finite element results of peak forces are compared to the experimental data obtained. The comparison of results indicate that the approach and the vibratory response obtained may be useful for describing the cross-bridge de-attachments within the cells as well as connective tissue connections characteristic of tracheal smooth muscle tissue.

  1. Effects of gymnodinium breve toxin on the smooth muscle preparation of guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, Y.; Spiegelstein, M.Y.

    1974-01-01

    1 The effects of Gymnodinium breve neurotoxin (GT) on smooth muscles were studied using the guinea-pig isolated ileum. 2 The toxin caused strong spasmogenic effects at 1-4 μg/ml, characterized by prolonged tonic contraction with superimposed pronounced pendular movements. Tachyphylaxis was observed upon administration of successive doses. 3 Atropine blocked the contractile response elicited by GT, whereas mepyramine and hexamethonium failed to do so. These findings tentatively suggested a cholinergic involvement at a post-ganglionic site of action. 4 In the presence of tetrodotoxin the effects of GT were abolished, excluding direct action of the toxin on the smooth muscle. 5 It is concluded that GT exerts its spasmogenic effects through stimulation of the post-ganglionic cholinergic nerve fibres. PMID:4152867

  2. Effects of Gymnodinium breve toxin on the smooth muscle preparation of guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, Y.; Spiegelstein, M.Y.

    1974-01-01

    1 The effects of Gymnodinium breve neurotoxin (GT) on smooth muscles were studied using the guinea-pig isolated ileum. 2 The toxin caused strong spasmogenic effects at 1-4 μg/ml, characterized by prolonged tonic contraction with superimposed pronounced pendular movements. Tachyphylaxis was observed upon administration of successive doses. 3 Atropine blocked the contractile response elicited by GT, whereas mepyramine and hexamethonium failed to do so. These findings tentatively suggested a cholinergic involvement at a post-ganglionic site of action. 4 In the presence of tetrodotoxin the effects of GT were abolished, excluding direct action of the toxin on the smooth muscle. 5 It is concluded that GT exerts its spasmogenic effects through stimulation of the post-ganglionic cholinergic nerve fibres. PMID:4155337

  3. Endometrial stromal sarcoma with smooth muscle and glandular differentiation of the feline uterus.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Maeda, H; Suzuki, A; Shibuya, H; Sakata, A; Shirai, W

    2007-05-01

    The intra-abdominal tumor developing in the uterus and lung of a domestic Shorthair cat was examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. The tumor showed a proliferation of both endometrial stromal and smooth muscle cells accompanied by prominent vasculature. There were well-differentiated endometrial glands, and tubuli made up a monolayer of eosinophilic cuboidal epithelium. Immunohistochemically, the spindle-shaped cells and half of the stromal-like cells reacted to caldesmon and desmin antibodies. The neoplastic epithelium expressed AE1/AE3 cytokeratin. Feline endometrial stromal tumor has, to the best of our knowledge, not been reported previously and has smooth muscle and glandular components that are a unique variant to the human counterpart.

  4. [Physiological and pathophysiological meanings of gastrointestinal smooth muscle motor unit SIP syncytium].

    PubMed

    Song, Ni-Na; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2016-10-25

    Gastrointestinal smooth muscle layer contains two kinds of interstitial cells with special differentiation, i.e., interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α-positive (PDGFRα(+)) cells. The ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells contact with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by gap junctions and regulate contractive function of the SMCs. Therefore, these three kinds of cells constitute a functional syncytium, i.e., the SMC, ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells syncytium (SIP syncytium). Various neurotransmitters, humoral factors, endogenous bioactive molecules, as well as drugs regulate gastrointestinal motility through the SIP syncytium. In this review, we introduce the concept of SIP syncytium and summarize functions of the syncytium, as well as its physiological and pathological significances.

  5. Atrial natriuretic factor inhibits mitogen-induced growth in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Baldini, P M; De Vito, P; Fraziano, M; Mattioli, P; Luly, P; Di Nardo, P

    2002-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a polypeptide able to affect cardiovascular homeostasis exhibiting diuretic, natriuretic, and vasorelaxant activities. ANF shows antimitogenic effects in different cell types acting through R(2) receptor. Excessive proliferation of smooth muscle cells is a common phenomenon in diseases such as atherosclerosis, but the role of growth factors in the mechanism which modulate this process has yet to be clarified. The potential antimitogenic role of ANF on the cell growth induced by growth factors appears very intriguing. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of ANF on rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells proliferation induced by known mitogens and the mechanism involved. Our data show that ANF, at physiological concentration range, inhibits RASM cell proliferation induced by known mitogens such as PDGF and insulin, and the effect seems to be elicited through the modulation of phosphatidic acid (PA) production and MAP kinases involvement.

  6. Substrates for protein kinase C in a cell free preparation of rat aorta smooth muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaki, T.; Wise, B.C.; Chuang, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been studied in a cell free system of rat aorta smooth muscles. Addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ caused phosphorylation of several proteins. The addition of phosphatidylserine or calmodulin together with Ca/sup 2 +/ further increased the phosphorylation of proteins with apparent molecular weights of 20 and 92.5 kilodaltons. The activators of protein kinase C, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and 1,2-diolein, increased phosphorylation of the protein bands of similar molecular weight to those increased by phosphatidylserine in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, whereas the biologically inactive phorbol ester, 4 ..cap alpha..-phorbol-12,13 didecanoate (4 ..cap alpha.. PDD) failed to change the pattern of protein phosphorylation. These results show that proteins present in smooth muscle of rat aorta with molecular weights of 20 and 92.5 kilodaltons are substrates for protein kinase C.

  7. Tachyphylaxis to beta-adrenoceptor agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle: studies in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C; Conolly, M E

    1980-01-01

    In studies on human isolated peripheral airway smooth muscle; 1 A concentration dependent beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis was observed to isoprenaline. 2 Cross desensitization to other beta-adrenoceptor agonists was demonstrated. 3 The desensitization was reversible with time. Hydrocortisone appeared to accelerate the recovery from the desensitized state. Low concentration isoprenaline (10(-9) mol l-1) prevented recovery whereas cyclohexamide 1.8 x 10(-4) mol l-1 had no noticeable effect on recovery. Continued occupancy of the receptor appears to prevent recovery. The recovery from the desensitized state does not apparently require synthesis of new proteins. 4 Bronchial wall cyclic AMP response to isoprenaline was attenuated after isoprenaline induced desensitization whereas total phosphodiesterase activity of bronchial wall was not altered by desensitization. Thus by exclusion the adenylate cyclase receptor complex may be altered in human peripheral airway smooth muscle beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis. PMID:6108126

  8. The relaxant effect of Nigella sativa on smooth muscles, its possible mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Keyhanmanesh, Rana; Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossien

    2014-12-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) is a spice plant which has been traditionally used for culinary and medicinal purposes. Different therapeutic properties including the beneficial effects on asthma and dyspnea, digestive and gynecology disorders have been described for the seeds of N. sativa. There is evidence of the relaxant effects of this plant and some of its constituents on different types of smooth muscle including rabbit aorta, rabbit jejunum and trachea. The relaxant effect of N. sativa could be of therapeutic importance such as bronchodilation in asthma, vasodilation in hypertension and therapeutic effect on digestive or urogenital disorders. Therefore in the present article, the relaxant effects of N. sativa and its constituents on smooth muscles and its possible mechanisms as well as clinical application of this effect were reviewed.

  9. Smooth Muscle Tumor Originating in the Pleura: A Case Report and Updated Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zarubin, Vadim; Zarineh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle tumors (SMTs) of the pleura are exceptionally rare. At present and to the best of these authors' knowledge, there are only 17 cases reported in the literature. We describe a case of a 51-year-old woman who complained of left sided pleuritic chest pain. Further, computed tomography (CT) revealed a left sided localized pleural-based mass involving the 9th rib. She underwent an interventional radiology guided percutaneous core biopsy of the lesion, which disclosed a “Smooth Muscle Tumor of Undetermined Malignant Potential (SMT-UMP).” A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) was performed for diagnosis and treatment purposes. Resections of the pleural-based mass and 9th rib were performed. SMT-UMP was the definitive diagnosis. PMID:27747117

  10. Signal-transduction pathways that regulate smooth muscle function I. Signal transduction in phasic (esophageal) and tonic (gastroesophageal sphincter) smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Harnett, Karen M; Cao, Weibiao; Biancani, Piero

    2005-03-01

    Contraction of esophageal (Eso) and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) circular muscle depends on distinct signal-transduction pathways. ACh-induced contraction of Eso muscle is linked to phosphatidylcholine metabolism, production of diacylglycerol and arachidonic acid (AA), and activation of the Ca(2+)-insensitive PKCepsilon. Although PKCepsilon does not require Ca(2+) for activation, either influx of extracellular Ca(2+) or release of Ca(2+) from stores is needed to activate the phospholipases responsible for hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids and production of second messengers, which activate PKCepsilon. In contrast, the LES uses two distinct intracellular pathways: 1) a PKC-dependent pathway activated by low doses of agonists or during maintenance of spontaneous tone, and 2) a Ca(2+)-calmodulin-myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent pathway activated in response to maximally effective doses of agonists during the initial phase of contraction. The Ca(2+) levels, released by agonist-induced activity of phospholipase C, determine which contractile pathway is activated in the LES. The Ca(2+)-calmodulin-MLCK-dependent contractile pathway has been well characterized in a variety of smooth muscles. The steps linking activation of PKC to myosin light chain (MLC20) phosphorylation and contraction, however, have not been clearly defined for LES, Eso, or other smooth muscles. In addition, in LES circular muscle, a low-molecular weight pancreatic-like phospholipase A2 (group I PLA2) causes production of AA, which is metabolized to prostaglandins and thromboxanes. These AA metabolites act on receptors linked to heterotrimeric G proteins to induce activation of phospholipases and production of second messengers to maintain contraction of LES circular muscle. We have examined the signal-transduction pathways activated by PGF(2alpha) and by thromboxane analogs during the initial contractile phase and found that these pathways are the same as those activated by other

  11. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats: A model for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Miller, A.D. ); Clowes, M.M.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Clowes, A.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  12. Design and utilization of macrophage and vascular smooth muscle cell co-culture systems in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease investigation.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Mary C; White, Sharla L Powell; Zhou, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has been acknowledged as a chronic inflammatory condition. Monocytes and macrophages lead the inflammatory pathology of atherosclerosis whereas changes in atheromatous plaque thickness and matrix composition are attributed to vascular smooth muscle cells. Because these cell types are key players in atherosclerosis progression, it is crucial to utilize a reliable system to investigate their interaction. In vitro co-culture systems are useful platforms to study specific molecular mechanisms between cells. This review aims to summarize the various co-culture models that have been developed to investigate vascular smooth muscle cell and monocyte/macrophage interactions, focusing on the monocyte/macrophage effects on vascular smooth muscle cell function.

  13. Protein kinase C–independent inhibition of arterial smooth muscle K+ channels by a diacylglycerol analogue

    PubMed Central

    Rainbow, RD; Parker, AM; Davies, NW

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Analogues of the endogenous diacylglycerols have been used extensively as pharmacological activators of protein kinase C (PKC). Several reports show that some of these compounds have additional effects that are independent of PKC activation, including direct block of K+ and Ca2+ channels. We investigated whether dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (DiC8), a commonly used diacylglycerol analogue, blocks K+ currents of rat mesenteric arterial smooth muscle in a PKC-independent manner. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Conventional whole-cell and inside-out patch clamp was used to measure the inhibition of K+ currents of rat isolated mesenteric smooth muscle cells by DiC8 in the absence and presence of PKC inhibitor peptide. KEY RESULTS Mesenteric artery smooth muscle Kv currents inactivated very slowly with a time constant of about 2 s following pulses from −65 to +40 mV. Application of 1 µM DiC8 produced an approximate 40-fold increase in the apparent rate of inactivation. Pretreatment of the cells with PKC inhibitor peptide had a minimal effect on the action of DiC8, and substantial inactivation still occurred, indicating that this effect was mainly independent of PKC. We also found that DiC8 blocked BK and KATP currents, and again a significant proportion of these blocks occurred independently of PKC activation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results show that DiC8 has a direct effect on arterial smooth muscle K+ channels, and this precludes its use as a PKC activator when investigating PKC-mediated effects on vascular K+ channels. PMID:21323899

  14. Mitochondrial regulation of cytosolic Ca²⁺ signals in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarron, John G; Olson, Marnie L; Chalmers, Susan

    2012-07-01

    The cytosolic Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]c) controls virtually every activity of smooth muscle, including contraction, migration, transcription, division and apoptosis. These processes may be activated by large (>10 μM) amplitude [Ca²⁺]c increases, which occur in small restricted regions of the cell or by smaller (<1 μM) amplitude changes throughout the bulk cytoplasm. Mitochondria contribute to the regulation of these signals by taking up Ca²⁺. However, mitochondria's reported low affinity for Ca²⁺ is thought to require the organelle to be positioned close to ion channels and within a microdomain of high [Ca²⁺]. In cultured smooth muscle, mitochondria are highly dynamic structures but in native smooth muscle mitochondria are immobile, apparently strategically positioned organelles that regulate the upstroke and amplitude of IP₃-evoked Ca²⁺ signals and IP₃ receptor (IP₃R) cluster activity. These observations suggest mitochondria are positioned within the high [Ca²⁺] microdomain arising from an IP₃R cluster to exert significant local control of channel activity. On the other hand, neither the upstroke nor amplitude of voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ entry is modulated by mitochondria; rather, it is the declining phase of the transient that is regulated by the organelle. Control of the declining phase of the transient requires a high mitochondrial affinity for Ca²⁺ to enable uptake to occur over the normal physiological Ca²⁺ range (<1 μM). Thus, in smooth muscle, mitochondria regulate Ca²⁺ signals exerting effects over a large range of [Ca²⁺] (∼200 nM to at least tens of micromolar) to provide a wide dynamic range in the control of Ca²⁺ signals.

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta as a differentiating factor for cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gawaziuk, J P; X; Sheikh, F; Cheng, Z-Q; Cattini, P A; Stephens, N L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the development of supercontractile smooth muscle cells, contributing to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways in asthmatic patients, is due to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In cultured smooth muscle cells starved by removal of 10% foetal bovine serum for 7 days, growth arrest was seen; 30% became elongated and demonstrated super contractility. Study of conditioned medium suggested that the differentiating factor was TGF-beta. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was carried out on conditioned medium from the arrested cells. Two protein bands were identified as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and TGF-beta1. To determine second messenger signalling by SMAD2, Western blotting and confocal microscopy were employed. Conditioned medium from arrested cultures showed the presence of MMP-2 and TGF-beta1, as revealed by SDS-PAGE; 68- and 25-kDa bands were seen. Differentiation was confirmed by upregulation of marker proteins, smooth muscle type myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain kinase. Confirmation was obtained by downregulating these proteins with decorin treatment, which reduces the levels of active TGF-beta and an adenoviral dominant-negative vector coding for a mutated type II TGF-beta-receptor. Activation of second messenger signalling was demonstrated immunocytochemically by the presence of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD4. Transforming growth factor-beta is likely to be the differentiating factor responsible for the development of these supercontractile smooth muscle cells. The development of such cells in vivo after cessation of an asthmatic attack could contribute to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways seen in patients.

  16. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND ELECTRON PROBE ANALYSIS OF MITOCHONDRIAL CATION ACCUMULATION IN SMOOTH MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Somlyo, A. P.; Somlyo, A. V.; Devine, C. E.; Peters, P. D.; Hall, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    The contractile responses to barium and the ultrastructure and ionic composition of mitochondria were studied in vascular smooth muscle. In normal rabbit portal anterior mesenteric vein (PAMV) and main pulmonary artery (MPA) smooth muscle mitochondria were frequently associated with the surface vesicles. The average distance between the outer mitochondrial and inner surface vesicle membrane was 4–5 nm. Ba contractures of MPA were tonic and of PAMV were phasic. Incubation of MPA and PAMV with Ba resulted in the accumulation of mitochondrial granules, followed in the MPA by massive mitochondrial swelling. Oligomycin and anoxia inhibited the appearance of mitochondrial electron-opaque granules and prevented the Ba-induced mitochondrial swelling in the MPA. Electron probe analysis of mitochondria in PAMV incubated with Ba and containing granules showed characteristic Ba signals over the mitochondria. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis also showed a highly significant (P < 0.001) correlation of P with mitochondrial Ba, in an estimated elemental ratio of approximately 3 Ba/4 P. Mitochondrial granules were still prominent after block staining of the osmium-fixed, Ba-loaded PAMV, but electron probe microanalysis showed no Ba, but only U, emissions. Tissues incubated with strontium had electron-opaque mitochondrial granules and deposits in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. X-ray microanalysis of mitochondria containing granules showed the presence of characteristic Sr and Ca emissions. The presence of Sr was similarly verified in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These findings indicate the energy dependent uptake of divalent cations, in association with phosphate, by mitochondria in vascular smooth muscle in situ and the possibility that mitochondria may contribute to the regulation of intracellular divalent cation levels in smooth muscle. PMID:4836390

  17. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, I. J.; Wagner, W. D.; Owens, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion. Images Figure 6 PMID:2316626

  18. PKC delta-isoform translocation and enhancement of tonic contractions of gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Poole, Daniel P; Furness, John B

    2007-03-01

    PKC is involved in mediating the tonic component of gastrointestinal smooth muscle contraction in response to stimulation by agonists for G protein-coupled receptors. Here, we present pharmacological and immunohistochemical evidence indicating that a member of the novel PKC isoforms, PKC-delta, is involved in maintaining muscarinic receptor-coupled tonic contractions of the guinea pig ileum. The tonic component of carbachol-evoked contractions was enhanced by an activator of conventional and novel PKCs, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu; 200 nM or 1 microM), and by an activator of novel PKCs, ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate (IDB; 100 or 500 nM). Enhancement was unaffected by concentrations of bisindolylmaleimide I (BIM-I; 22 nM) that block conventional PKCs or by a PKC-epsilon-specific inhibitor peptide but was attenuated by higher doses of BIM-I (2.2 microM). Relevant proteins were localized at a cellular and subcellular level using confocal analysis. Immunohistochemical staining of the ileum showed that PKC-delta was exclusively expressed in smooth muscles distributed throughout the layers of the gut wall. PKC-epsilon immunoreactivity was prominent in enteric neurons but was largely absent from smooth muscle of the muscularis externa. Treatment with PDBu, IDB, or carbachol resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent translocation of PKC-delta from the cytoplasm to filamentous structures within smooth muscle cells. These were parallel to, but distinct from, actin filaments. The translocation of PKC-delta in response to carbachol was significantly reduced by scopolamine or calphostin C. The present study indicates that the tonic carbachol-induced contraction of the guinea pig ileum is mediated through a novel PKC, probably PKC-delta.

  19. Smooth-muscle-specific expression of neurotrophin-3 in mouse embryonic and neonatal gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward A; McAdams, Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Vagal gastrointestinal (GI) afferents are essential for the regulation of eating, body weight, and digestion. However, their functional organization and the way that this develops are poorly understood. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is crucial for the survival of vagal sensory neurons and is expressed in the developing GI tract, possibly contributing to their survival and to other aspects of vagal afferent development. The identification of the functions of this peripheral NT-3 thus requires a detailed understanding of the localization and timing of its expression in the developing GI tract. We have studied embryos and neonates expressing the lacZ reporter gene from the NT-3 locus and found that NT-3 is expressed predominantly in the smooth muscle of the outer GI wall of the stomach, intestines, and associated blood vessels and in the stomach lamina propria and esophageal epithelium. NT-3 expression has been detected in the mesenchyme of the GI wall by embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and becomes restricted to smooth muscle and lamina propria by E15.5, whereas its expression in blood vessels and esophageal epithelium is first observed at E15.5. Expression in most tissues is maintained at least until postnatal day 4. The lack of colocalization of beta-galactosidase and markers for myenteric ganglion cell types suggests that NT-3 is not expressed in these ganglia. Therefore, NT-3 expression in the GI tract is largely restricted to smooth muscle at ages when vagal axons grow into the GI tract, and when vagal mechanoreceptors form in smooth muscle, consistent with its role in these processes and in vagal sensory neuron survival.

  20. Targeted STIM deletion impairs calcium homeostasis, NFAT activation, and growth of smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mancarella, Salvatore; Potireddy, Santhi; Wang, Youjun; Gao, Hui; Gandhirajan, Rajesh Kumar; Autieri, Michael; Scalia, Rosario; Cheng, Zhongjian; Wang, Hong; Madesh, Muniswamy; Houser, Steven R.; Gill, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The Ca2+-sensing stromal interaction molecule (STIM) proteins are crucial Ca2+ signal coordinators. Cre-lox technology was used to generate smooth muscle (sm)-targeted STIM1-, STIM2-, and double STIM1/STIM2-knockout (KO) mouse models, which reveal the essential role of STIM proteins in Ca2+ homeostasis and their crucial role in controlling function, growth, and development of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Compared to Cre+/− littermates, sm-STIM1-KO mice showed high mortality (50% by 30 d) and reduced bodyweight. While sm-STIM2-KO was without detectable phenotype, the STIM1/STIM double-KO was perinatally lethal, revealing an essential role of STIM1 partially rescued by STIM2. Vascular and intestinal smooth muscle tissues from sm-STIM1-KO mice developed abnormally with distended, thinned morphology. While depolarization-induced aortic contraction was unchanged in sm-STIM1-KO mice, α1-adrenergic-mediated contraction was 26% reduced, and store-dependent contraction almost eliminated. Neointimal formation induced by carotid artery ligation was suppressed by 54%, and in vitro PDGF-induced proliferation was greatly reduced (79%) in sm-STIM1-KO. Notably, the Ca2+ store-refilling rate in STIM1-KO SMCs was substantially reduced, and sustained PDGF-induced Ca2+ entry was abolished. This defective Ca2+ homeostasis prevents PDGF-induced NFAT activation in both contractile and proliferating SMCs. We conclude that STIM1-regulated Ca2+ homeostasis is crucial for NFAT-mediated transcriptional control required for induction of SMC proliferation, development, and growth responses to injury.—Mancarella, S., Potireddy, S., Wang, Y., Gao, H., Gandhirajan, K., Autieri, M., Scalia, R., Cheng, Z., Wang, H., Madesh, M., Houser, S. R., Gill, D. L. Targeted STIM deletion impairs calcium homeostasis, NFAT activation, and growth of smooth muscle. PMID:23159931

  1. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  2. Developmental changes in Ca2+ homeostasis and contractility in gallbladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Camello-Almaraz, Cristina; Macias, Beatriz; Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Alcon, Soledad; Martin-Cano, Francisco E; Baba, Akemishi; Matsuda, Toshio; Camello, Pedro J; Pozo, María J

    2009-04-01

    Relatively little is known about the contribution of Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent mechanisms in the contractility of neonatal gastrointestinal smooth muscle. We therefore studied Ca(2+) homeostasis and Ca(2+) sensitization mechanisms in 10-day-old and adult guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle to elucidate developmental changes in these processes. Gallbladder contractility was evaluated by isometrical tension recordings from strips, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was estimated by epifluorescence microscopy of fura-2-loaded isolated cells, and protein expression and phosphorylation were assessed by Western blot analysis. The neonatal gallbladder contracted significantly less to CCK than adult tissue, but this correlated with an increased Ca(2+) mobilization, suggesting immaturity of Ca(2+) sensitization mechanisms. The enhanced Ca(2+) release in the newborn gallbladder was the result of the increase in the size of the releasable Ca(2+) pool. Moreover, in neonatal smooth muscle cells, neither the plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump nor the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger collaborate in the extrusion of Ca(2+). In contrast, in these cells, there is an increase in phospholamban phosphorylation, which could drive to an overactivity of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump. The reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity in neonatal tissues was demonstrated by the lack of effect to Y-27362, an inhibitor of Rho kinase (ROCK), and GF-109203X, an inhibitor of PKC, on agonist-induced contraction. In addition, the neonatal gallbladder showed lower levels of RhoA, ROCK, PKC, and two effectors [C-kinase-dependent inhibitor of 17 kDa (CPI-17) and myosin phosphatase targetting 1 (MYPT1)] as well as an absence of CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in response to agonists. In conclusion, our results indicate that the main mechanisms involved in smooth muscle contractility are under developmental regulation.

  3. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells express lipoprotein lipase in human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Goldberg, I J; Steinberg, D; Witztum, J L

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL; EC 3.1.1.34) may promote atherogenesis by producing remnant lipoproteins on the endothelial surface and by acting on lipoproteins in the artery wall. In vitro, smooth muscle cells and macrophages synthesize LPL, but in human carotid lesions only a few smooth muscle cells were reported to contain LPL protein. Endothelial cells do not synthesize LPL in vitro, but in normal arteries intense immunostaining for LPL is present on the endothelium. We used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry of human and rabbit arteries to determine cellular distribution and the site of the synthesis of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions. Northern blot analysis showed that LPL mRNA was detectable in macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of "ballooned" cholesterol-fed rabbits. In situ hybridization studies of atherosclerotic lesions with an antisense riboprobe showed a strong hybridization signal for LPL mRNA in some, but not all, lesion macrophages, which were mostly located in the subendothelial and edge areas of the lesions. Also, some smooth muscle cells in lesion areas also expressed LPL mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of frozen sections of rabbit lesions with a monoclonal antibody to human milk LPL showed intense staining for LPL protein in macrophage-rich intimal lesions. The results suggest that lesion macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells express LPL mRNA and protein. Some smooth muscle cells in the lesion areas also synthesize LPL. These data are consistent with an important role for LPL in atherogenesis. Images PMID:1719546

  4. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.; Wagner, W.D.; Owens, R.T. )

    1990-03-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with (35S)sulfate and (3H)serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in (35S)sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of (3H)serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide mediates hypoxia-induced relaxation of trout urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Ryan A; Doellman, Meredith M; Head, Sally K; Olson, Kenneth R

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a recently identified gasotransmitter that may mediate hypoxic responses in vascular smooth muscle. H2S also appears to be a signaling molecule in mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle, but its existence and function in non-mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle have not been examined. In the present study we examined H2S production and its physiological effects in urinary bladder from steelhead and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and evaluated the relationship between H2S and hypoxia. H2S was produced by trout bladders, and its production was sensitive to inhibitors of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. H2S produced a dose-dependent relaxation in unstimulated and carbachol pre-contracted bladders and inhibited spontaneous contractions. Bladders pre-contracted with 80 mmol l(-1) KCl were less sensitive to H2S than bladders contracted with either 80 mmol l(-1) KC2H3O2 (KAc) or carbachol, suggesting that some of the H2S effects are mediated through an ion channel. However, H2S relaxation of bladders was not affected by the potassium channel inhibitors, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridine, and glybenclamide, or by chloride channel/exchange inhibitors 4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium salt, tamoxifen and glybenclamide, or by the presence or absence of extracellular HCO3-. Inhibitors of neuronal mechanisms, tetrodotoxin, strychnine and N-vanillylnonanamide were likewise ineffective. Hypoxia (aeration with N2) also relaxed bladders, was competitive with H2S for relaxation, and it was equally sensitive to KCl, and unaffected by neuronal blockade or the presence of extracellular HCO3-. Inhibitors of H2S synthesis also inhibited hypoxic relaxation. These experiments suggest that H2S is a phylogenetically ancient gasotransmitter in non-mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle and that it serves as an oxygen sensor/transducer, mediating the effects of hypoxia.

  6. Calcifying nanoparticles promote mineralization in vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Larry W; Charlesworth, Jon E; Yu, Sam; Lieske, John C; Miller, Virginia M

    2014-01-01

    Background Nano-sized complexes of calcium phosphate mineral and proteins (calcifying nanoparticles [CNPs]) serve as mineral chaperones. Thus, CNPs may be both a result and cause of soft tissue calcification processes. This study determined if CNPs could augment calcification of arterial vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. Methods CNPs 210 nm in diameter were propagated in vitro from human serum. Porcine aortic smooth muscle cells were cultured for up to 28 days in medium in the absence (control) or presence of 2 mM phosphate ([P] positive calcification control) or after a single 3-day exposure to CNPs. Transmission electron-microscopy was used to characterize CNPs and to examine their cellular uptake. Calcium deposits were visualized by light microscopy and von Kossa staining and were quantified by colorimetry. Cell viability was quantified by confocal microscopy of live-/dead-stained cells and apoptosis was examined concurrently by fluorescent labeling of exposed phosphatidylserine. Results CNPs, as well as smaller calcium crystals, were observed by transmission electron-microscopy on day 3 in CNP-treated but not P-treated cells. By day 28, calcium deposits were visible in similar amounts within multicellular nodules of both CNP- and P-treated cells. Apoptosis increased with cell density under all treatments. CNP treatment augmented the density of apoptotic bodies and cellular debris in association with mineralized multicellular nodules. Conclusion Exogenous CNPs are taken up by aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro and potentiate accumulation of smooth-muscle-derived apoptotic bodies at sites of mineralization. Thus, CNPs may accelerate vascular calcification. PMID:24920905

  7. Biomathematical pattern of EMG signal propagation in smooth muscle of the non-pregnant porcine uterus

    PubMed Central

    Domino, Malgorzata; Pawlinski, Bartosz; Gajewski, Zdzislaw

    2017-01-01

    Uterine contractions are generated by myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that comprise most of the myometrial layer of the uterine wall. Aberrant uterine motility (i.e., hypo- or hyper-contractility or asynchronous contractions) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of infertility due to the failure of implantation, endometriosis and abnormal estrous cycles. The mechanism whereby the non-pregnant uterus initiates spontaneous contractions remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to employ linear synchronization measures for analyzing the pattern of EMG signal propagation (direction and speed) in smooth muscles of the non-pregnant porcine uterus in vivo using telemetry recording system. It has been revealed that the EMG signal conduction in the uterine wall of the non-pregnant sow does not occur at random but it rather exhibits specific directions and speed. All detectable EMG signals moved along the uterine horn in both cervico-tubal and tubo-cervical directions. The signal migration speed could be divided into the three main types or categories: i. slow basic migration rhythm (SBMR); ii. rapid basic migration rhythm (RBMR); and iii. rapid accessory migration rhythm (RAMR). In conclusion, the EMG signal propagation in smooth muscles of the porcine uterus in vivo can be assessed using a linear synchronization model. Physiological pattern of the uterine contractile activity determined in this study provides a basis for future investigations of normal and pathologicall myogenic function of the uterus. PMID:28282410

  8. Comparison of human bronchiolar smooth muscle responsiveness in vitro with histological signs of inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    de Jongste, J C; Mons, H; Van Strik, R; Bonta, I L; Kerrebijn, K F

    1987-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the hypothesis that chronic inflammation is associated with increased sensitivity or contractility of human airway smooth muscle. Bronchiolar strips from 30 patients, 12 of whom had chronic bronchitis, were examined in the organ bath for their responses to histamine, methacholine, and leukotriene (LT) C4. The same airways were also studied histologically and small airway disease was quantified by subjective grading of the degree of inflammatory cell infiltration, smooth muscle hypertrophy, fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia. The degree of small airway disease varied widely among patients both with and without chronic bronchitis. Multiple regression analysis failed to show increased sensitivity (-log EC50) to histamine, methacholine, or LTC4 in relation to small airway disease. In contrast, the only significant correlations found were between a decreased -log EC50 to histamine and methacholine and an increased small airway disease score. Contractile responses (Tmax) to histamine and methacholine in peripheral airways tended to be higher in patients with chronic bronchitis than in those without. Tmax was not related to small airway disease scores. These results suggest that chronic airway inflammation does not cause in vitro hyperresponsiveness of human small airway smooth muscle. Images PMID:3321543

  9. Induction of cyclin A gene expression by homocysteine in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, J C; Wang, H; Perrella, M A; Yoshizumi, M; Sibinga, N E; Tan, L C; Haber, E; Chang, T H; Schlegel, R; Lee, M E

    1996-01-01

    Homocysteine is an important and independent risk factor for arteriosclerosis. We showed previously that homocysteine stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, a hallmark of arteriosclerosis. We show here that homocysteine and serum increased DNA synthesis synergistically in both human and rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). Treatment of quiescent RASMCs with 1 mM homocysteine or 2% calf serum for 36 h increased cyclin A mRNA levels by 8- and 14-fold, respectively, whereas homocysteine plus serum increased cyclin A mRNA levels by 40-fold, indicating a synergistic induction of cyclin A mRNA. Homocysteine did not increase the half-life of cyclin A mRNA (2.9 h), but it did increase the transcriptional rate of the cyclin A gene in nuclear run-on experiments. The positive effect of homocysteine on cyclin A gene transcription was confirmed by our finding that homocysteine increased cyclin A promoter activity and ATF-binding protein levels in RASMCs. Finally, 1 mM homocysteine increased cyclin A protein levels and cyclin A-associated kinase activity by threefold. This homocysteine-induced expression lesions by promoting proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:8550827

  10. MicroRNA-182 prevents vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation via FGF9/PDGFRβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Nana; Wang, Wei; Tian, Jinwei; Xie, Zulong; Lv, Bo; Dai, Jiannan; Jiang, Rui; Huang, Dan; Fang, Shaohong; Tian, Jiangtian; Li, Hulun; Yu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal phenotypic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) causes various proliferative vascular diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been established to play important roles in SMC biology and phenotypic modulation. This study revealed that the expression of miR-182 was markedly altered during rat vascular SMC phenotypic transformation in vitro. We aimed to investigate the role of miR-182 in the vascular SMC phenotypic switch and to determine the potential molecular mechanisms involved. The expression of miR-182 gene was significantly downregulated in cultured SMCs during dedifferentiation from a contractile to a synthetic phenotype. Conversely, the upregulation of miR-182 increased the expression of SMC-specific contractile genes, such as α-smooth muscle actin, smooth muscle 22α and calponin. Additionally, miR-182 overexpression potently inhibited SMC proliferation and migration under both basal conditions and under platelet-derived growth factor-BB stimulation. Furthermore, we identified fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) as the target gene of miR-182 for the phenotypic modulation of SMCs mediated through platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) signaling. These data suggest that miR-182 may be a novel SMC phenotypic marker and a modulator that may be used to prevent SMC dedifferentiation via FGF9/PDGFRβ signaling. PMID:28259995

  11. Heparin fragments inhibit human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, S.C.; Johnson, W.V.; Maciag, T.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the effect of heparin on human abdominal aortic smooth muscle cell growth. Cell proliferation was inhibited by more than 90% at a concentration of 20 ..mu..g/ml in a 12 day growth assay using heparin from Sigma, Upjohn or Calbiochem. Additionally, 200 ..mu..g/ml Upjohn heparin inhibits /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 50% in short term assays using serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor (25-100ng/ml) to initiate the cell cycle. Homogeneous size classes of heparin fragments were prepared by nitrous acid cleavage and BioGel P-10 filtration chromatography. Deca-, octa-, hexa-, tetra-, and di-saccharides inhibited proliferation by 90% at concentrations of 280, 320, 260, 180 and 100 ..mu..g/ml, respectively, in a 12 day growth assay. These data confirm the work of Castellot et.al. and extend the range of inhibitory fragments down to the tetra- and di-saccharide size. These data suggest, therefore, that di-saccharide subunit of heparin is sufficient to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The authors are now examining the role of the anhydromannose moiety on the reducing end of the nitrous acid generated fragments as a possible mediator of heparin-induced inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  12. Smooth muscle BK channel activity influences blood pressure independent of vascular tone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Gregor; Faulhaber, Jörg; Seniuk, Anika; Ehmke, Heimo; Pongs, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is an important determinant of vascular tone and contributes to blood pressure regulation. Both activities depend on the ancillary BKβ1 subunit. To determine the significance of smooth muscle BK channel activity for blood pressure regulation, we investigated the potential link between changes in arterial tone and altered blood pressure in BKβ1 knockout (BKβ1−/−) mice from three different genetically defined strains. While vascular tone was consistently increased in all BKβ1−/− mice independent of genetic background, BKβ1−/− strains exhibited increased (strain A), unaltered (strain B) or decreased (strain C) mean arterial blood pressures compared to their corresponding BKβ1+/+ controls. In agreement with previous data on aldosterone regulation by renal/adrenal BK channel function, BKβ1−/− strain A mice have increased plasma aldosterone and increased blood pressure. Consistently, blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors by spironolactone treatment reversibly restored the elevated blood pressure to the BKβ1+/+ strain A level. In contrast, loss of BKβ1 did not affect plasma aldosterone in strain C mice. Smooth muscle-restricted restoration of BKβ1 expression increased blood pressure in BKβ1−/− strain C mice, implying that impaired smooth muscle BK channel activity lowers blood pressure in these animals. We conclude that BK channel activity directly affects vascular tone but influences blood pressure independent of this effect via different pathways. PMID:24687584

  13. CCN1 suppresses pulmonary vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Jin; Zhang, Meng; Hu, Kebin; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Duo; Jin, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased vascular resistance are common features in pulmonary hypertension (PH). One of the contributing factors in the development of pulmonary vasoconstriction is increased pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) contraction. Here we report that CCN1, an extracellular matrix molecule, suppressed PASMC contraction in response to hypoxia. CCN1 (Cyr61), discovered in past decade, belongs to the Cyr61-CTGF-Nov (CCN) family. It carries a variety of cellular functions, including angiogenesis and cell adhesion, death, and proliferation. Hypoxia robustly upregulated the expression of CCN1 in the pulmonary vessels and lung parenchyma. Given that CCN1 is a secreted protein and functions in a paracine manner, we examined the potential effects of CCN1 on the adjacent smooth muscle cells. Interestingly, bioactive recombinant CCN1 significantly suppressed hypoxia-induced contraction in human PASMCs in vitro. Consistently, in the in vivo functional studies, administration of bioactive CCN1 protein significantly decreased right ventricular pressure in three different PH animal models. Mechanistically, protein kinase A-pathway inhibitors abolished the effects of CCN1 in suppressing PASMC contraction. Furthermore, CCN1-inhibited smooth muscle contraction was independent of the known vasodilators, such as nitric oxide. Taken together, our studies indicated a novel cellular function of CCN1, potentially regulating the pathogenesis of PH.

  14. Phosphorylation by casein kinase II affects the interaction of caldesmon with smooth muscle myosin and tropomyosin.

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, N V; Vorotnikov, A V; Birukov, K G; Shirinsky, V P; Gusev, N B

    1993-01-01

    Smooth muscle caldesmon was phosphorylated by casein kinase II, and the effects of phosphorylation on the interaction of caldesmon and its chymotryptic peptides with myosin and tropomyosin were investigated. The N-terminal chymotryptic peptide of caldesmon of molecular mass 27 kDa interacted with myosin. Phosphorylation of Ser-73 catalysed by casein kinase II resulted in a 2-fold decrease in the affinity of the native caldesmon (or its 27 kDa N-terminal peptide) for smooth muscle myosin. At low ionic strength, caldesmon and its N-terminal peptides of molecular masses 25 and 27 kDa were retarded on a column of immobilized tropomyosin. Phosphorylation of Ser-73 led to a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of caldesmon (or its N-terminal peptides) for tropomyosin. Thus phosphorylation of Ser-73 catalysed by casein kinase II affects the interaction of caldesmon with both smooth muscle myosin and tropomyosin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8452532

  15. Statins inhibited erythropoietin-induced proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Tae; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-12-15

    Erythropoietin (EPO) directly stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and this is believed to be one of the mechanisms of vascular access failure of hemodialysis patients. However, precise mechanisms of the EPO-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells are not certain. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are primarily used to reduce cholesterol levels, but also exert other effects, including reno-protective effects. We evaluated the effect of several statins with various hydrophilicities on the EPO-induced proliferation of primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. EPO significantly and concentration-dependently increased DNA synthesis as assessed by [³H]thymidine incorporation, cell proliferation as assessed by WST-1 assay, and activation of the p44/42MAPK pathway. Therapeutic doses of statins (pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin and fluvastatin) in patients with hypercholesterolemia almost completely suppressed all of the EPO-induced effects in a concentration-dependent manner. Co-addition of mevalonic acid almost completely reversed the effects of statins. Statin alone did not affect the basal proliferation capacity of the cells. The effects were almost similar among the statins. We concluded that statins inhibited EPO-induced proliferation in rat VSMCs at least partly through their inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase activity. In the future, statins might prove useful for the treatment of EPO-induced hyperplasia of vascular access. Because the statins all showed comparable effects irrespective of their hydrophilicities, these effects might be a class effect.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Elshaw, Shona R; Henderson, Neil; Knox, Alan J; Watson, Susan A; Buttle, David J; Johnson, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    Airway remodelling is a feature of chronic asthma comprising smooth muscle hypertrophy and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) breakdown ECM, are involved in tissue remodelling and have been implicated in airway remodelling. Although mesenchymal cells are an important source of MMPs, little data are available on airway smooth muscle (ASM) derived MMPs. We therefore investigated MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production and activity in human ASM cells.MMPs and TIMPs were examined using quantitative real-time RT–PCR, Western blotting, zymography and a quench fluorescence (QF) assay of total MMP activity.The most abundant MMPs were pro-MMP-2, pro- MMP-3, active MMP-3 and MT1-MMP. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression was low in cell lysates but high in conditioned medium. High TIMP secretion was confirmed by the ability of ASM-conditioned medium to inhibit recombinant MMP-2 in a QF assay. Thrombin increased MMP activity by activation of pro-MMP-2 independent of the conventional smooth muscle thrombin receptors PAR 1 and 4.In conclusion, ASM cells express pro-MMP-2, pro and active MMP-3, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP. Unstimulated cells secrete excess TIMP 1 and 2, preventing proteolytic activity. MMP-2 can be activated by thrombin which may contribute to airway remodelling. PMID:15265805

  17. Arp5 is a key regulator of myocardin in smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ken’ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Myocardin (Myocd) and Myocd-related transcription factors (MRTFs) are robust coactivators of serum response factor (SRF). RPEL motifs are monomeric globular actin (G-actin) binding elements that regulate MRTF localization and activity. However, the function of the RPEL motif in Myocd is largely unknown because of its low affinity for G-actin. Here, we demonstrated that the Myocd RPEL motif bound to actin-related protein 5 (Arp5) instead of conventional actin, resulting in a significant suppression of Myocd activity. In addition, Arp5 bound to a DNA binding domain of SRF via its C-terminal sequence and prevented the association of the Myocd–SRF complex with the promoter regions of smooth muscle genes. Well-differentiated smooth muscle cells mainly expressed a specific splicing variant of arp5; therefore, the protein level of Arp5 was markedly reduced by partial messenger RNA decay and translational suppression. In dedifferentiated smooth muscle cells, Arp5 knockdown restored the differentiated phenotype via Myocd activation. Thus, Arp5 is a key regulator of Myocd activity. PMID:24567363

  18. Guiding the orientation of smooth muscle cells on random and aligned polyurethane/collagen nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Qin, Xiaohong; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-09-01

    Fabricating scaffolds that can simulate the architecture and functionality of native extracellular matrix is a huge challenge in vascular tissue engineering. Various kinds of materials are engineered via nano-technological approaches to meet the current challenges in vascular tissue regeneration. During this study, nanofibers from pure polyurethane and hybrid polyurethane/collagen in two different morphologies (random and aligned) and in three different ratios of polyurethane:collagen (75:25; 50:50; 25:75) are fabricated by electrospinning. The fiber diameters of the nanofibrous scaffolds are in the range of 174-453 nm and 145-419 for random and aligned fibers, respectively, where they closely mimic the nanoscale dimensions of native extracellular matrix. The aligned polyurethane/collagen nanofibers expressed anisotropic wettability with mechanical properties which is suitable for regeneration of the artery. After 12 days of human aortic smooth muscle cells culture on different scaffolds, the proliferation of smooth muscle cells on hybrid polyurethane/collagen (3:1) nanofibers was 173% and 212% higher than on pure polyurethane scaffolds for random and aligned scaffolds, respectively. The results of cell morphology and protein staining showed that the aligned polyurethane/collagen (3:1) scaffold promote smooth muscle cells alignment through contact guidance, while the random polyurethane/collagen (3:1) also guided cell orientation most probably due to the inherent biochemical composition. Our studies demonstrate the potential of aligned and random polyurethane/collagen (3:1) as promising substrates for vascular tissue regeneration.

  19. Influence of obestatin on the gastric longitudinal smooth muscle from mice: mechanical and electrophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Squecco, Roberta; Garella, Rachele; Francini, Fabio; Baccari, Maria Caterina

    2013-11-01

    Obestatin is a hormone released from the stomach deriving from the same peptide precursor as ghrelin. It is known to act as an anorectic hormone decreasing food intake, but contrasting results have been reported about the effects of obestatin on gastrointestinal motility. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this peptide may act on the gastric longitudinal smooth muscle by using a combined mechanical and electrophysiological approach. When fundal strips from mice were mounted in organ baths for isometric recording of the mechanical activity, obestatin caused a tetrodotoxin-insensitive decrease of the basal tension and a reduction in amplitude of the neurally induced cholinergic contractile responses, even in the presence of the nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine. Obestatin reduced the amplitude of the response to the ganglionic stimulating agent dimethylphenyl piperazinium iodide but did not influence that to methacholine. In nonadrenergic, noncholinergic conditions, obestatin still decreased the basal tension of the preparations without influencing the neurally induced relaxant responses. For comparison, in circular fundal strips, obestatin had no effects. Notably, in the longitudinal antral ones, obestatin only caused a decrease of the basal tension. Electrophysiological experiments, performed by a single microelectrode inserted in a gastric longitudinal smooth muscle cell, showed that obestatin had similar effects in fundal and antral preparations: it decreased the resting specific membrane conductance, inhibited Ca(2+) currents, and positively shifted their voltage threshold of activation. In conclusion, the present results indicate that obestatin influences gastric smooth muscle exerting site-specific effects.

  20. Esophageal mucosal mast cell infiltration and changes in segmental smooth muscle contraction in noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Park, S W; Lee, H; Lee, H J; Chung, H; Park, J C; Shin, S K; Lee, S K; Lee, Y C

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells release potent mediators that alter enteric nerve and smooth muscle functions and may contribute to the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders. The goal of this study was to determine if mucosal mast cell infiltration was associated with smooth muscle segmental changes in esophageal contraction. All patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) were divided into two groups consisting of patients with non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain (FCP) according to the results of ambulatory 24 hours esophageal pH monitoring and high-resolution manometry. Pressure-volume (PV) was calculated by multiplying the length of the esophageal segment, duration of the contraction, and mean pressure over the entire space-time box (P mean). Quantification of mast cells was performed in five consecutive nonoverlapping immunostained sections. Spearman correlation analysis showed that the distal segment PV correlated with the mast cell count in all of the patients combined and in patients with FCP with correlation coefficients of 0.509 and 0.436, respectively (P = 0.004 and P = 0.042). Similar findings were observed for the segmental ratio of distal to proximal smooth muscle PV in all patients and in patients with FCP (correlation coefficients 0.566; P = 0.001 and correlation coefficients 0.525; P = 0.012, respectively). Mucosal mast cell infiltration was associated with distal esophageal contraction as a key pathophysiologic factor of NCCP.

  1. Non-Selective Cation Channels Mediate Chloroquine-Induced Relaxation in Precontracted Mouse Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle. PMID:24992312

  2. Piezo1 in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Hypertension-Dependent Arterial Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Duprat, Fabrice; Arhatte, Malika; Ranade, Sanjeev Sumant; Peyronnet, Rémi; Martins, Joana Raquel; Jodar, Martine; Moro, Céline; Offermanns, Stefan; Feng, Yuanyi; Demolombe, Sophie; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric

    2015-11-10

    The mechanically activated non-selective cation channel Piezo1 is a determinant of vascular architecture during early development. Piezo1-deficient embryos die at midgestation with disorganized blood vessels. However, the role of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) in arterial smooth muscle cells in the adult remains unknown. Here, we show that Piezo1 is highly expressed in myocytes of small-diameter arteries and that smooth-muscle-specific Piezo1 deletion fully impairs SAC activity. While Piezo1 is dispensable for the arterial myogenic tone, it is involved in the structural remodeling of small arteries. Increased Piezo1 opening has a trophic effect on resistance arteries, influencing both diameter and wall thickness in hypertension. Piezo1 mediates a rise in cytosolic calcium and stimulates activity of transglutaminases, cross-linking enzymes required for the remodeling of small arteries. In conclusion, we have established the connection between an early mechanosensitive process, involving Piezo1 in smooth muscle cells, and a clinically relevant arterial remodeling.

  3. Magnesium used in bioabsorbable stents controls smooth muscle cell proliferation and stimulates endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Katrin; Gratz, Matthias; Koeck, Kathleen; Mostertz, Joerg; Begunk, Robert; Loebler, Marian; Semmling, Beatrice; Seidlitz, Anne; Hildebrandt, Petra; Homuth, Georg; Grabow, Niels; Tuemmler, Conny; Weitschies, Werner; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Kroemer, Heyo K

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium-based bioabsorbable cardiovascular stents have been developed to overcome limitations of permanent metallic stents, such as late stent thrombosis. During stent degradation, endothelial and smooth muscle cells will be exposed to locally high magnesium concentrations with yet unknown physiological consequences. Here, we investigated the effects of elevated magnesium concentrations on human coronary artery endothelial and smooth muscle cell (HCAEC, HCASMC) growth and gene expression. In the course of 24 h after incubation with magnesium chloride solutions (1 or 10 mM) intracellular magnesium level in HCASMC raised from 0.55 ± 0.25 mM (1 mM) to 1.38 ± 0.95 mM (10 mM), while no increase was detected in HCAEC. Accordingly, a DNA microarray-based study identified 69 magnesium regulated transcripts in HCAEC, but 2172 magnesium regulated transcripts in HCASMC. Notably, a significant regulation of various growth factors and extracellular matrix components was observed. In contrast, viability and proliferation of HCAEC were increased at concentrations of up to 25 mM magnesium chloride, while in HCASMC viability and proliferation appeared to be unaffected. Taken together, our data indicate that magnesium halts smooth muscle cell proliferation and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation, which might translate into a beneficial effect in the setting of stent associated vascular injury.

  4. Phospholipase D1 is involved in α1-adrenergic contraction of murine vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Jörg W; Loga, Florian; Stegner, David; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hofmann, Franz

    2014-03-01

    α1-Adrenergic stimulation increases blood vessel tone in mammals. This process involves a number of intracellular signaling pathways that include signaling via phospholipase C, diacylglycerol (DAG), and protein kinase C. So far, it is not certain whether signaling via phospholipase D (PLD) and PLD-derived DAG is involved in this process. We asked whether PLD participates in the α1-adrenergic-mediated signaling in vascular smooth muscle. α1-Adrenergic-induced contraction was assessed by myography of isolated aortic rings and by pressure recordings using the hindlimb perfusion model in mice. The effects of the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol (IC50 0.15 vol%) and the inactive congener 2-butanol were comparatively studied. Inhibition of PLD by 1-butanol reduced specifically the α1-adrenergic-induced contraction and the α1-adrenergic-induced pressure increase by 10 and 40% of the maximum, respectively. 1-Butanol did not influence the aortic contractions induced by high extracellular potassium, by the thromboxane analog U46619, or by a phorbol ester. The effects of 1-butanol were absent in mice that lack PLD1 (Pld1(-/-) mice) or that selectively lack the CaV1.2 channel in smooth muscle (sm-CaV1.2(-/-) mice) but still present in the heterozygous control mice. α1-Adrenergic contraction of vascular smooth muscle involves activation of PLD1, which controls a portion of the α1-adrenergic-induced CaV1.2 channel activity.

  5. Benidipine, a calcium channel blocker, regulates proliferation and phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Emi; Hasegawa, Kazuhide

    2006-02-01

    Hyperproliferation of phenotypically modified vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is one of the major factors in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Previously it was demonstrated that benidipine, a dihydropyridine-calcium channel antagonist, reduced neointimal formation in a rat balloon-injury model. In the present study, we examined the effect of benidipine on the phenotypic modulation and proliferation of VSMCs, using primary cultures of rat VSMCs. In the absence of drug treatment, protein levels of the smooth muscle specific markers, such as smooth muscle myosin heavy chain-1 (SM1), calponin 1, and alpha-actin, decreased during culture. However, treatment of VSMCs with benidipine (3 - 10 micromol/L) for 1 week reversed the effect in a concentration-related manner so that high levels of marker proteins were maintained. The expression of calponin mRNAs was reduced markedly during 1-week culture, and treatment with benidipine (3 micromol/L) significantly inhibited the reduction. Treatment with benidipine for 2 days increased the level of p21 protein and partially reduced p70 S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K1) activity. These data suggest that benidipine may arrest the growth of VSMCs, thereby preventing cell dedifferentiation. These additional properties of benidipine suggest that the drug should provide useful therapy for atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  6. Hippo signaling is required for Notch-dependent smooth muscle differentiation of neural crest

    PubMed Central

    Manderfield, Lauren J.; Aghajanian, Haig; Engleka, Kurt A.; Lim, Lillian Y.; Liu, Feiyan; Jain, Rajan; Li, Li; Olson, Eric N.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling has well-defined roles in the assembly of arterial walls and in the development of the endothelium and smooth muscle of the vasculature. Hippo signaling regulates cellular growth in many tissues, and contributes to regulation of organ size, in addition to other functions. Here, we show that the Notch and Hippo pathways converge to regulate smooth muscle differentiation of the neural crest, which is crucial for normal development of the aortic arch arteries and cranial vasculature during embryonic development. Neural crest-specific deletion of the Hippo effectors Yap and Taz produces neural crest precursors that migrate normally, but fail to produce vascular smooth muscle, and Notch target genes such as Jagged1 fail to activate normally. We show that Yap is normally recruited to a tissue-specific Jagged1 enhancer by directly interacting with the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). The Yap-NICD complex is recruited to chromatin by the DNA-binding protein Rbp-J in a Tead-independent fashion. Thus, Hippo signaling can modulate Notch signaling outputs, and components of the Hippo and Notch pathways physically interact. Convergence of Hippo and Notch pathways by the mechanisms described here might be relevant for the function of these signaling cascades in many tissues and in diseases such as cancer. PMID:26253400

  7. Phenotypic heterogeneity influences the behavior of rat aortic smooth muscle cells in collagen lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Orlandi, Augusto . E-mail: orlandi@uniroma2.it; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Gabbiani, Giulio; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Ehrlich, Paul H.

    2005-12-10

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in atherosclerosis and restenosis involves responses to the surrounding microenvironment. SMCs obtained by enzymatic digestion from tunica media of newborn, young adult (YA) and old rats and from the thickened intima (TI) and underlying media of young adult rat aortas 15 days after ballooning were entrapped in floating populated collagen lattice (PCL). TI-SMCs elongated but were poor at PCL contraction and remodeling and expressed less {alpha}2 integrin compared to other SMCs that appeared more dendritic. During early phases of PCL contraction, SMCs showed a marked decrease in the expression of {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. SMCs other than TI-SMCs required 7 days to re-express {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and myosin. Only TI-SMCs in PCL were able to divide in 48 h, with a greater proportion in S and G2-M cell cycle phases compared to other SMCs. Anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibody markedly inhibited contraction but not proliferation in YA-SMC-PLCs; anti-{alpha}1 and anti-{alpha}2 integrin antibodies induced a similar slight inhibition in TI-SMC-PCLs. Finally, TI-SMCs rapidly migrated from PCL on plastic reacquiring their epithelioid phenotype. Heterogeneity in proliferation and cytoskeleton as well the capacity to remodel the extracellular matrix are maintained, when SMCs are suspended in PCLs.

  8. Smooth muscle cell proliferation in the occluded rat carotid artery: lack of requirement for luminal platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Karnovsky, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship of intimal smooth muscle cell proliferation in the permanently occluded rat carotid artery to the presence or absence of luminal platelets was examined. Blood was rinsed from the arterial lumen immediately after occlusion and was replaced by autologous, citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP, 6 to 20 X 10(5) platelets/microliter) or filtered platelet-poor plasma (PPP, less than 100 platelets/microliter). Occluded arteries were studied after 1 to 28 days by light and electron microscopy. Events occurring within the first 2 days included fibrin clot formation, endothelial degeneration and denudation, transmural migration of polymorphonucelar leukocytes and monocytes, and, in PRP-filled arteries, degranulation and disappearance of platelets. By 7 days a neointima was formed by macrophages and undifferentiated cells. The latter cells had some features of vascular smooth muscle cells and were apparently derived from medial cells which traversed the internal elastic lamina. After 14 days, identifiable smooth muscle cells emerged as the predominant cell type in a rapidly growing intimal plaque. No differences could be discerned between arteries originally filled with PRP or PPP. This experimental model is similar to atherosclerosis in dimensions of avascular area and in coexistence of degenerative, inflammatory, and proliferative processes. Cell proliferation deep within an atherosclerotic plaque could be initiated by factors other than platelets, perhaps by products of inflammatory cells. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 8 Figure 5 PMID:426040

  9. Voltage-dependent effects of barnidipine in rat vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wegener, J W; Korstanje, C; Nawrath, H

    2003-08-01

    The effects of the dihydropyridine nifedipine and its more lipophilic congener, barnidipine, were investigated in smooth muscle preparations from the rat in resting and depolarizing conditions. Both drugs relaxed precontracted aortic rings more potently in depolarizing conditions, barnidipine being more potent than nifedipine. Currents through Ca2+ channels in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (A7r5) and in isolated rat cardiomyocytes were reduced more potently by both drugs at a holding potential of -40 mV than at -80 mV. However, barnidipine and nifedipine were more effective in reducing the current in A7r5 cells than in cardiomyocytes. The IC(50) obtained in aortic rings and in A7r5 cells were similar for barnidipine but an order of magnitude different for nifedipine. The results show that, in depolarizing conditions, barnidipine was more effective than nifedipine. It is suggested that the higher potency of barnidipine acting in vascular smooth muscle is related to both a higher affinity to the inactivated state of vascular Ca2+ channels and to a more lipophilic property as compared with nifedipine.

  10. Exercise and leukocyte interchange among central circulation, lung, spleen, and muscle

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Gregory R.; Zaldivar, Frank P.; Nance, Dwight M.; Kodesh, Einat; Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Cooper, Dan M.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating leukocytes increase rapidly with exercise then quickly decrease when the exercise ends. We tested whether exercise acutely led to bidirectional interchange of leukocytes between the circulation and the lung, spleen, and active skeletal muscle. To accomplish this it was necessary to label a large number of immune cells (granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes) in a way that resulted in minimal perturbation of cell function. Rats were injected intravenously with a single bolus of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinamidyl ester (CFSE) dye which is rapidly and irreversibly taken up by circulating cells. The time course of the disappearance of labeled cells and their reappearance in the circulation following exercise was determined via flow cytometry. The majority of circulating leukocytes were labeled at 4 h. post-injection and this proportion slowly declined out to 120 h. At both 24 and 120 h, running resulted in an increase in the proportion of labeled leukocytes in the circulation. Analysis of the skeletal muscle, spleen and lung indicated that labeled leukocytes had accumulated in those tissues and were mobilized to the circulation in response to exercise. This indicates that there is an ongoing exchange of leukocytes between the circulation and tissues and that exercise can stimulate their redistribution. Exchange was slower with muscle than with spleen and lung, but in all cases, influenced by exercise. Exercise bouts redistribute leukocytes between the circulation and the lung, spleen and muscle. The modulatory effects of exercise on the immune system may be regulated in part by the systemic redistribution of immune cells. PMID:21238578

  11. Contribution of Intestinal Smooth Muscle to Crohn’s Disease Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Severi, C.; Sferra, R.; Scirocco, A.; Vetuschi, A.; Pallotta, N.; Pronio, A.; Caronna, R.; Di Rocco, G.; Gaudio, E.; Corazziari, E.; Onori, P.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells transdifferentiation and extracellular matrix deposition are involved in the fibrotic process of Crohn’s disease (CD). Mesenchymal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) de-differentiation, driven by Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) that counteracts Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) has been studied in vascular muscle. The role of SMCs in intestinal fibrogenesis is still not clearly elucidated. Aim of the study was to evaluate the possible myogenic contribution to CD fibrotic process through the comparative analysis of histological, morphometric and molecular alterations occurring in human smooth muscle. Full thickness specimens were obtained from CD (non-involved and stenotic tracts) and healthy (control) ileum. Tissues were processed for histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses and SMCs were isolated from the muscularis propria for morphofunctional and molecular (qPCR) analyses. CD stenotic ileum showed a significant increased thickness of all layers compared to CD non-involved and control ileum. IHC revealed an overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin and collagens I-III throughout all intestinal layers only in stenotic tracts. The two growth factors, PDGF and TGF-β, showed a progressive increase in expression in the muscle layer from CD non-involved to stenotic tracts. Freshly isolated SMCs presented alterations in CD non-involved tracts that progressively increased in the stenotic tracts consisting in a statistical increase in mRNA encoding for PDGF-β and collagen III, paralleled to a decrease in TGF-β and Tribbles-like protein-3 mRNA, and altered morphofunctional parameters consisting in progressive decreases in cell length and contraction to acetylcholine. These findings indicate that intrinsic myogenic alterations occur in CD ileum, that they likely precede stricture formation, and might represent suitable new targets for anti-fibrotic interventions. PMID:25578979

  12. The role of TRPP2 in agonist-induced gallbladder smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xingguo; Fu, Jie; Song, Kai; Xue, Nairui; Gong, Renhua; Sun, Dengqun; Luo, Huilai; He, Wenzhu; Pan, Xiang; Shen, Bing; Du, Juan

    2016-04-01

    TRPP2 channel protein belongs to the superfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and is widely expressed in various tissues, including smooth muscle in digestive gut. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that TRPP2 can mediate Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+) stores. However, the functional role of TRPP2 in gallbladder smooth muscle contraction still remains unclear. In this study, we used Ca(2+) imaging and tension measurements to test agonist-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration increase and smooth muscle contraction of guinea pig gallbladder, respectively. When TRPP2 protein was knocked down in gallbladder muscle strips from guinea pig, carbachol (CCh)-evoked Ca(2+) release and extracellular Ca(2+) influx were reduced significantly, and gallbladder contractions induced by endothelin 1 and cholecystokinin were suppressed markedly as well. CCh-induced gallbladder contraction was markedly suppressed by pretreatment with U73122, which inhibits phospholipase C to terminate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3) production, and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB), which inhibits IP3 recepor (IP3R) to abolish IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release. To confirm the role of Ca(2+) release in CCh-induced gallbladder contraction, we used thapsigargin (TG)-to deplete Ca(2+) stores via inhibiting sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase and eliminate the role of store-operated Ca(2+) entry on the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction. Preincubation with 2 μmol L(-1) TG significantly decreased the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction. In addition, pretreatments with U73122, 2APB or TG abolished the difference of the CCh-induced gallbladder contraction between TRPP2 knockdown and control groups. We conclude that TRPP2 mediates Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and has an essential role in agonist-induced gallbladder muscle contraction.

  13. Vagal intramuscular array afferents form complexes with interstitial cells of Cajal in gastrointestinal smooth muscle: analogues of muscle spindle organs?

    PubMed

    Powley, T L; Phillips, R J

    2011-07-14

    Intramuscular arrays (IMAs), vagal mechanoreceptors that innervate gastrointestinal smooth muscle, have not been completely described structurally or functionally. To delineate more fully the architecture of IMAs and to consider the structure-function implications of the observations, the present experiment examined the organization of the IMA terminal arbors and the accessory tissue elements of those arbors. IMA terminal fields, labeled by injection of biotinylated dextran into the nodose ganglia, were examined in whole mounts of rat gastric smooth muscle double-labeled with immunohistochemistry for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs; c-Kit) and/or inputs of different neuronal efferent transmitter (markers: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)) or afferent neuropeptidergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)) phenotypes. IMAs make extensive varicose and lamellar contacts with ICCs. In addition, axons of the multiple efferent and afferent phenotypes examined converge and articulate with IMA terminal arbors innervating ICCs. This architecture is consistent with the hypothesis that IMAs, or the multiply innervated IMA-ICC complexes they form, can function as stretch receptors. The tissue organization is also consonant with the proposal that those units can operate as functional analogues of muscle spindle organs. For electrophysiological assessments of IMA functions, experiments will need protocols that preserve both the complex architecture and the dynamic operations of IMA-ICC complexes.

  14. Transmission of rectal electric waves: is it through circular or longitudinal smooth muscle layers or both?

    PubMed

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O

    2001-04-01

    by the stretch reflex induced by rectal distension. This concept is evidenced not only by the current findings but also by the histologic structure of the rectal musculature being of the unitary type of smooth muscles.

  15. Role of BKCa in Stretch-Induced Relaxation of Colonic Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Xin, Fang; Liu, Ping; Zhao, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Si-Tao; Han, Peng; Huang, Hai-Xia; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Stretch-induced relaxation has not been clearly identified in gastrointestinal tract. The present study is to explore the role of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) in stretch-induced relaxation of colon. The expression and currents of BKCa were detected and the basal muscle tone and contraction amplitude of colonic smooth muscle strips were measured. The expression of BKCa in colon is higher than other GI segments (P < 0.05). The density of BKCa currents was very high in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). BKCa in rat colonic SMCs were sensitive to stretch. The relaxation response of colonic SM strips to stretch was attenuated by charybdotoxin (ChTX), a nonspecific BKCa blocker (P < 0.05). After blocking enteric nervous activities by tetrodotoxin (TTX), the stretch-induced relaxation did not change (P > 0.05). Still, ChTX and iberiotoxin (IbTX, a specific BKCa blocker) attenuated the relaxation of the colonic muscle strips enduring stretch (P < 0.05). These results suggest stretch-activation of BKCa in SMCs was involved in the stretch-induced relaxation of colon. Our study highlights the role of mechanosensitive ion channels in SMCs in colon motility regulation and their physiological and pathophysiological significance is worth further study.

  16. Acute experimental colitis decreases colonic circular smooth muscle contractility in rats.

    PubMed

    Myers, B S; Martin, J S; Dempsey, D T; Parkman, H P; Thomas, R M; Ryan, J P

    1997-10-01

    Distal colitis decreases the contractility of the underlying circular smooth muscle. We examined how time after injury and lesion severity contribute to the decreased contractility and how colitis alters the calcium-handling properties of the affected muscle. Distal colitis was induced in rats by intrarectal administration of 4% acetic acid. Contractile responses to acetylcholine, increased extracellular potassium, and the G protein activator NaF were determined for circular muscle strips from sham control and colitic rats at days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 postenemas. Acetylcholine stimulation of tissues from day 3 colitic rats was performed in a zero calcium buffer, in the presence of nifedipine, and after depletion of intracellular stores of calcium. The colitis was graded macroscopically as mild, moderate, or severe. Regardless of agonist, maximal decrease in force developed 2 to 3 days posttreatment, followed by a gradual return to control by day 14. The inhibitory effect of colitis on contractility increased with increasing severity of inflammation. Limiting extracellular calcium influx had a greater inhibitory effect on tissues from colitic rats; intracellular calcium depletion had a greater inhibitory effect on tissues from control animals. The data suggest that both lesion severity and time after injury affect the contractile response of circular smooth muscle from the inflamed distal colon. Impaired utilization of intracellular calcium may contribute to the decreased contractility.

  17. Role of BKCa in Stretch-Induced Relaxation of Colonic Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Stretch-induced relaxation has not been clearly identified in gastrointestinal tract. The present study is to explore the role of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) in stretch-induced relaxation of colon. The expression and currents of BKCa were detected and the basal muscle tone and contraction amplitude of colonic smooth muscle strips were measured. The expression of BKCa in colon is higher than other GI segments (P < 0.05). The density of BKCa currents was very high in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). BKCa in rat colonic SMCs were sensitive to stretch. The relaxation response of colonic SM strips to stretch was attenuated by charybdotoxin (ChTX), a nonspecific BKCa blocker (P < 0.05). After blocking enteric nervous activities by tetrodotoxin (TTX), the stretch-induced relaxation did not change (P > 0.05). Still, ChTX and iberiotoxin (IbTX, a specific BKCa blocker) attenuated the relaxation of the colonic muscle strips enduring stretch (P < 0.05). These results suggest stretch-activation of BKCa in SMCs was involved in the stretch-induced relaxation of colon. Our study highlights the role of mechanosensitive ion channels in SMCs in colon motility regulation and their physiological and pathophysiological significance is worth further study. PMID:28018918

  18. Electrical off response of cat esophageal smooth muscle: an analog simulation.

    PubMed

    Chan, W W; Diamant, N E

    1976-01-01

    This investigation was performed to define characteristics and to design an electrical model of the slow membrane depolarization, or "electrical off response," that follows stimulation of cat circular esophageal smooth muscle. The electrical off response showed the following characteristics: 1) the response was preceded by hyperpolarization of the muscle membrane; 2) the amplitude of the off-response depolarization increased directly with increasing amplitude of the preceding hyperpolarization; 3) the membrane potential showed varying degrees of oscillation around the resting point; 4) the oscillation period was constant (4-5 s) and was double the time from the point of maximum hyperpolarization to the peak of the electrical off response. These characteristics suggested that the electrical off response could be represented by a linear second-order differential equation with variable damping, and an analog simulation was constructed. By varying the damping ratio and/or the natural frequency of the analog model, the characteristics of the electrical off response of esophageal muscle could be reproduced. The model provides a means to explore the behavior of esophageal smooth muscle contraction under normal and pathological conditions.

  19. Inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction and myosin phosphorylation by ryanodine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerthoffer, W.T.; Murphey, K.A.; Khoyi, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that muscarinic activation of airway smooth muscle in low Ca++ solutions increases myosin phosphorylation without increasing tension. Blocking Ca++ influx reduced phosphorylation, but not to basal levels. It was proposed that release of intracellular Ca++ contributed to dissociation of phosphorylation and contraction. To test this hypothesis the effects of ryanodine were studied under similar conditions. Ryanodine (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) antagonized caffeine-induced contraction of canine tracheal smooth muscle. Ryanodine also reduced carbachol-induced contractions and carbachol-induced myosin phosphorylation. The effect of ryanodine on potassium and serotonin-induced contractions was also investigated to test for a nonspecific inhibitory effect. In contrast to the effect on carbachol responses, ryanodine (10(-5) M) potentiated the contractile response to low concentrations of serotonin and potassium, but had no effect on the maximum response to either stimulant. Carbachol (10(-6) M) and ryanodine (10(-5) M) both significantly decreased /sup 45/Ca++ content of tracheal muscle. The effect of ryanodine and carbachol together on /sup 45/Ca++ content was not greater than either drug alone suggesting that ryanodine reduces the caffeine and carbachol responses by depleting releaseable Ca++ stores. Ryanodine significantly reduced Ca++-induced contraction and myosin phosphorylation in carbachol-stimulated muscle, suggesting that some of the Ca++ responsible for elevated phosphorylation is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  20. Mechanical transients of single toad stomach smooth muscle cells. Effects of lowering temperature and extracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Smooth muscle's slow, economical contractions may relate to the kinetics of the crossbridge cycle. We characterized the crossbridge cycle in smooth muscle by studying tension recovery in response to a small, rapid length change (i.e., tension transients) in single smooth muscle cells from the toad stomach (Bufo marinus). To confirm that these tension transients reflect crossbridge kinetics, we examined the effect of lowering cell temperature on the tension transient time course. Once this was confirmed, cells were exposed to low extracellular calcium [( Ca2+]o) to determine whether modulation of the cell's shortening velocity by changes in [Ca2+]o reflected the calcium sensitivity of one or more steps in the crossbridge cycle. Single smooth muscle cells were tied between an ultrasensitive force transducer and length displacement device after equilibration in temperature-controlled physiological saline having either a low (0.18 mM) or normal (1.8 mM) calcium concentration. At the peak of isometric force, after electrical stimulation, small, rapid (less than or equal to 1.8% cell length in 3.6 ms) step stretches and releases were imposed. At room temperature (20 degrees C) in normal [Ca2+]o, tension recovery after the length step was described by the sum of two exponentials with rates of 40-90 s-1 for the fast phase and 2-4 s-1 for the slow phase. In normal [Ca2+]o but at low temperature (10 degrees C), the fast tension recovery phase slowed (apparent Q10 = 1.9) for both stretches and releases whereas the slow tension recovery phase for a release was only moderately affected (apparent Q10 = 1.4) while unaffected for a stretch. Dynamic stiffness was determined throughout the time course of the tension transient to help correlate the tension transient phases with specific step(s) in the crossbridge cycle. The dissociation of tension and stiffness, during the fast tension recovery phase after a release, was interpreted as evidence that this recovery phase resulted from

  1. Effect of ionizing irradiation on the physiological activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate on smooth muscle preparations.

    PubMed

    Schachinger, L; Michailov, M; Owusa Daaku, S; Prechter, I; Klöter, H; Schippel, C

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the physiological activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in smooth muscle preparations from frog lung was studied. cAMP, given as dibutyryl salt (dib-cAMP) inhibited the radiation induced contractions of the muscle in a manner similar to the action of theophylline. In vitro irradiation of dib-cAMP resulted in an alteration of the chemical structure of this substance, i.e., formation of monobutyryl-cAMP and further derivatives as well as a decomposition of the purine structure. There was also a loss of the relaxing activity of irradiated cAMP on the muscle tone of frog lung preparations. The physiologically measured inactivation of dib-cAMP was far more pronounced than the chemical alteration. An inhibitory effect of the reaction products is postulated.

  2. A comprehensive mathematical framework for modeling intestinal smooth muscle cell contraction with applications to intestinal edema.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer; Ozisik, Sevtap; Riviere, Beatrice; Shamim, Muhammad

    2015-04-01

    The contraction of intestinal smooth muscle cells (ISMCs) involves many coordinated biochemical and mechanical processes. In this work, we present a framework for modeling ISMC contractility that begins with chemical models of calcium dynamics, continues with myosin light chain phosphorylation and force generation, and ends with a cell model of the ISMC undergoing contraction-relaxation. The motivation for developing this comprehensive framework is to study the effects of edema (excess fluid build-up in the muscle tissue) on ISMC contractility. The hypothesis is that more fluid equates to dilution of an external stimulis, eventually leading to reduced contractility. We compare our results to experimental data collected from normal versus edematous intestinal muscle tissue.

  3. Effect of oxidative stress on the expression of thin filament-associated proteins in gastric smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman Abdullah; Mustafa, Ayman; Mohammad, Mukhallad; Al-Shehabat, Mustafa; Yousef, Asmaa; Al-Hashimi, Farah

    2014-09-01

    Thin filament-associated proteins such as calponin, caldesmon, and smoothelin are believed to regulate acto-myosin interaction and thus, muscle contraction. Oxidative stress has been found to affect the normal contractile behavior of smooth muscle and is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the expression of smooth muscle contractile proteins. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on the expression of thin filament-associated proteins in rat gastric smooth muscle. Single smooth muscle cells of the stomach obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Muscle cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (500 μM) for 30 min or the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (1 mM) for 90 min to induce oxidative stress. Calponin, caldesmon, and smoothelin expressions were measured via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that exposure to exogenous H2O2 or incubation of dispersed gastric muscle cells with SIN-1 significantly increased the expression of calponin, caldesmon, and smoothelin proteins. In conclusion: oxidative stress increases the expression of thin filament-associated proteins in gastric smooth muscle, suggesting an important role in gastrointestinal motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  4. Altered Expression of Human Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting (MYPT) Isovariants with Pregnancy and Labor

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, Julie; Robson, Stephen; Taggart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Myosin light-chain phosphatase is a trimeric protein that hydrolyses phosphorylated myosin II light chains (MYLII) to cause relaxation in smooth muscle cells including those of the uterus. A major component of the phosphatase is the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT), which directs a catalytic subunit to dephosphorylate MYLII. There are 5 main MYPT family members (MYPT1 (PPP1R12A), MYPT2 (PPP1R12B), MYPT3 (PPP1R16A), myosin binding subunit 85 MBS85 (PPP1R12C) and TIMAP (TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PPP1R16B)). Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation has in part been attributed to activation of the phosphatase by PKG binding to a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization domain located at the carboxyl-terminus of PPP1R12A. In animal studies, alternative splicing of PPP1R12A can lead to the inclusion of a 31-nucleotide exonic segment that generates a LZ negative (LZ-) isovariant rendering the phosphatase less sensitive to NO vasodilators and alterations in PPP1R12ALZ- and LZ+ expression have been linked to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle function. Moreover, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C, but not PPP1R16A or PPP1R16B, have the potential for LZ+/LZ- alternative splicing. Yet, by comparison to animal studies, the information on human MYPT genomic sequences/mRNA expressions is scant. As uterine smooth muscle undergoes substantial remodeling during pregnancy we were interested in establishing the patterns of expression of human MYPT isovariants during this process and also following labor onset as this could have important implications for determining successful pregnancy outcome. Objectives We used cross-species genome alignment, to infer putative human sequences not available in the public domain, and isovariant-specific quantitative PCR, to analyse the expression of mRNA encoding putative LZ+ and LZ- forms of PPP1R12A, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C as well as canonical PPP1R16A and PPP1R16B genes in human uterine smooth muscle from non

  5. The Beta-1-Receptor Blocker Nebivolol Elicits Dilation of Cerebral Arteries by Reducing Smooth Muscle [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    Cseplo, Peter; Vamos, Zoltan; Ivic, Ivan; Torok, Orsolya; Toth, Attila; Koller, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Nebivolol is known to have beta-1 blocker activity, but it was also suggested that it elicits relaxation of the peripheral arteries in part via release of nitric oxide (NO). However, the effect of nebivolol on the vasomotor tone of cerebral arteries is still unclear. Objective To assess the effects of nebivolol on the diameter of isolated rat basilar arteries (BA) in control, in the presence of inhibitors of vasomotor signaling pathways of know action and hemolysed blood. Methods and Results Vasomotor responses were measured by videomicroscopy and the intracellular Ca2+ by the Fura-2 AM ratiometric method. Under control conditions, nebivolol elicited a substantial dilation of the BA (from 216±22 to 394±20 μm; p<0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner (10−7 to 10−4 M). The dilatation was significantly reduced by endothelium denudation or by L-NAME (inhibitor of NO synthase) or by SQ22536 (adenylyl cyclase blocker). Dilatation of BA was also affected by beta-2 receptor blockade with butoxamine, but not by the guanylate cyclase blocker ODQ. Interestingly, beta-1 blockade by atenolol inhibited nebivolol-induced dilation. Also, the BKCa channel blocker iberiotoxin and KCa channel inhibitor TEA significantly reduced nebivolol-induced dilation. Nebivolol significantly reduced smooth muscle Ca2+ level, which correlated with the increases in diameters and moreover it reversed the hemolysed blood-induced constriction of BA. Conclusions Nebivolol seems to have an important dilator effect in cerebral arteries, which is mediated via several vasomotor mechanisms, converging on the reduction of smooth muscle Ca2+ levels. As such, nebivolol may be effective to improve cerebral circulation in various diseased conditions, such as hemorrhage. PMID:27716772

  6. The effect of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid on gut-derived smooth muscle cell arachidonic acid metabolism: role of endogenous prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Longo, W E; Smith, G S; Deshpande, Y; Reickenberg, C; Kaminski, D L

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of smooth muscle cells as a potential source of eicosanoid production during inflammatory states remains to be elucidated. We investigated the effect of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNB), a known pro-inflammatory agent, on jejunal smooth muscle cell eicosanoid production. Human gut-derived smooth muscle cells (HISM) were incubated with TNB for 1 hour. Additionally, some cells were preincubated with either dimethylthiourea, or indomethacin for 1 hour before exposure to identical concentrations of TNB. Incubation with TNB led to significant increases in PGE(2) and 6-keto PGF-1(alpha) release, but not leukotriene B(4) release; responses which were both inhibited by dimethylthiourea and indomethacin treatment. Our results suggest that gutderived smooth muscle cells may represent an important source of proinflammatory prostanoids but not leukotrienes during inflammatory states of the intestine. The inhibition of prostanoid activity by thiourea may be mediated by suppression of cyclooxygenase activity in this cell line.

  7. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex regulates myocardin-induced smooth muscle-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiliang; Zhang, Min; Fang, Hong; El-Mounayri, Omar; Rodenberg, Jennifer M.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.; Herring, B. Paul

    2009-01-01

    Objective Transcription regulatory complexes comprising myocardin and serum response factor (SRF) are critical for the transcriptional regulation of many smooth muscle-specific genes. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the activity of these complexes. In the current study, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in regulating the myogenic activity of myocardin. Methods and Results We found that both Brg1 and Brm are required for maintaining expression of several smooth muscle-specific genes in primary cultures of aortic smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, the ability of myocardin to induce expression of smooth muscle-specific genes is abrogated in cells expressing dominant negative Brg1. In SW13 cells, that lack endogenous Brg1 and Brm1, myocardin is unable to induce expression of smooth muscle-specific genes. Whereas, reconstitution of wild type, or bromodomain mutant forms Brg1 or Brm1, into SW13 cells restored their responsiveness to myocardin. SWI/SNF complexes were found to be required for myocardin to increase SRF binding to the promoters of smooth muscle-specific genes. Brg1 and Brm directly bind to the N-terminus of myocardin, in vitro, through their ATPase domains and Brg1 forms a complex with SRF and myocardin in vivo in smooth muscle cells. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the ability of myocardin to induce smooth muscle-specific gene expression is dependent on its interaction with SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. PMID:19342595

  8. The Modulation of Potassium Channels in the Smooth Muscle as a Therapeutic Strategy for Disorders of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of smooth muscle contractility contribute to the pathophysiology of important functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. Consequently, drugs that decrease smooth muscle contractility are effective treatments for these diseases. Smooth muscle contraction is mainly triggered by Ca(2+) influx through voltage-dependent channels located in the plasma membrane. Thus, the modulation of the membrane potential results in the regulation of Ca(2+) influx and cytosolic levels. K(+) channels play fundamental roles in these processes. The open probability of K(+) channels increases in response to various stimuli, including membrane depolarization (voltage-gated K(+) [K(V)] channels) and the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels (Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) [K(Ca)] channels). K(+) channel activation is mostly associated with outward K(+) currents that hyperpolarize the membrane and reduce cell excitability and contractility. In addition, some K(+) channels are open at the resting membrane potential values of the smooth muscle cells in some gut segments and contribute to set the resting membrane potential itself. The closure of these channels induces membrane depolarization and smooth muscle contraction. K(V)1.2, 1.5, 2.2, 4.3, 7.4 and 11.1, K(Ca)1.1 and 2.3, and inwardly rectifying type 6K(+) (K(ir)6) channels play the most important functional roles in the gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Activators of all these channels may theoretically relax the gastrointestinal smooth muscle and could therefore be promising new therapeutic options for FGID. The challenge of future drug research and development in this area will be to synthesize molecules selective for the channel assemblies expressed in the gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

  9. Enhanced elastin synthesis and maturation in human vascular smooth muscle tissue derived from induced-pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eoh, Joon H; Shen, Nian; Burke, Jacqueline A; Hinderer, Svenja; Xia, Zhiyong; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Obtaining vascular smooth muscle tissue with mature, functional elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Poor elastin secretion and organization leads to a loss of specialization in contractile smooth muscle cells, resulting in over proliferation and graft failure. In this study, human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into early smooth muscle cells, seeded onto a hybrid poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate/poly (l-lactide) (PEGdma-PLA) scaffold and cultured in a bioreactor while exposed to pulsatile flow, towards maturation into contractile smooth muscle tissue. We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow on cellular organization as well as elastin expression and assembly in the engineered tissue compared to a static control through immunohistochemistry, gene expression and functionality assays. We show that culturing under pulsatile flow resulted in organized and functional hiPSC derived smooth muscle tissue. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue with robust, well-organized cells and elastic fibers and the supporting microfibril proteins necessary for elastic fiber assembly. Through qRT-PCR analysis, we found significantly increased expression of elastin, fibronectin, and collagen I, indicating the synthesis of necessary extracellular matrix components. Functionality assays revealed that hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue cultured in the bioreactor had an increased calcium signaling and contraction in response to a cholinergic agonist, significantly higher mature elastin content and improved mechanical properties in comparison to the static control. The findings presented here detail an effective approach to engineering elastic human vascular smooth muscle tissue with the functionality necessary for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  10. Inducible expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 by vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro and within rabbit atheroma.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H.; Cybulsky, M. I.; Gimbrone, M. A.; Libby, P.

    1993-01-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), a mononuclear leukocyte adhesion molecule, is expressed in cultured vascular endothelial cells activated by cytokines and is induced in rabbit aortic endothelium in vivo within 1 week after initiation of an atherogenic diet. We now demonstrate that vascular smooth muscle cells can also express VCAM-1 in rabbit atherosclerotic lesions in vivo and in response to cytokines in vitro. Immunohistochemical staining of aortas from rabbits fed a 0.3% cholesterol-containing diet revealed that a portion of smooth muscle cells within intimal foam cell-rich lesions expressed VCAM-1. The intimal VCAM-1-expressing cells localized predominantly in regions above the internal elastic lamina. These VCAM-1-positive cells had the typical spindle shape of smooth muscle cells but had reduced alpha-actin expression in comparison to normal medial smooth muscle cells, and did not bear markers for endothelium, macrophages, and T cells. In culture, rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells expressed VCAM-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion when exposed to interferon-gamma or Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells also expressed VCAM-1 mRNA and protein in response to lipopolysaccharide, interferon-gamma, and interleukin-4. The monokines interleukin-1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not induce VCAM-1 expression in either rabbit or human vascular smooth muscle cells. Inducible VCAM-1 expression by vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo during hypercholesterolemia and in vitro in response to certain cytokines suggests a broader range of VCAM-1 functions in vascular biology than heretofore appreciated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7504883

  11. Carvedilol inhibits proliferation of cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Hideki; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Matsubara, Hiromi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima; Miyaji, Katsumasa; Nagase, Satoshi; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Aiko; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Miura, Daiji; Miura, Aya; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Date, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru

    2006-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is associated with proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in small pulmonary arteries. Inhibition of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) may be an effective treatment of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Recent studies have shown that carvedilol, an alpha- and beta-blocker with antioxidant and calcium channel blocking properties, inhibits the proliferation of cultured normal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that carvedilol has antiproliferative effects on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from six idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients who had undergone lung transplantation were cultured. To determine cell proliferation, H-thymidine incorporation was measured. Platelet-derived growth factor-induced proliferation of IPAH-PASMCs was significantly greater than that of normal control pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Carvedilol (0.1 microM to 10 microM) inhibited the proliferation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension-pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Prazosin (an alpha-blocker) and N-acetyl L cysteine (an antioxidant agent) (0.1 microM to 10 microM) did not inhibit their proliferation, but the high concentration of propranolol (a beta-blocker) and nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker) (10 microM) inhibited the proliferation. The combination of propranolol and nifedipine inhibited the proliferation but only at a high concentration (10 microM) combination. Cell cycle analysis revealed that carvedilol (10 microM) significantly decreased the number of cells in S and G2/M phases. These results indicate that carvedilol inhibits the exaggerated proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

  12. A network of 2-4 nm filaments found in sea urchin smooth muscle. Protein constituents and in situ localization.

    PubMed

    Pureur, R P; Coffe, G; Soyer-Gobillard, M O; de Billy, F; Pudles, J

    1986-01-01

    In this report the coisolation of two proteins from sea urchin smooth muscle of apparent molecular weights (Mr) 54 and 56 kD respectively, as determined on SDS-PAGE, is described. Like the intermediate filament proteins, these two proteins are insoluble in high ionic strength buffer solution. On two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and by immunological methods it is shown that these proteins are not related (by these criteria) to rat smooth muscle desmin (54 kD) or vimentin (56 kD). Furthermore, in conditions where both desmin and vimentin assemble in vitro into 10 nm filaments, the sea urchin smooth muscle proteins do not assemble into filaments. Ultrastructural studies on the sea urchin smooth muscle cell show that the thin and thick filaments organization resembles that described in the vertebrate smooth muscle. However, instead of 10 nm filaments, a network of filaments, 2-4 nm in diameter, is revealed, upon removal of the thin and thick filaments by 0.6 M KCl treatment. By indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and in particular by immunocytochemical electron microscopy studies on the sea urchin smooth muscle cell, it is shown that the antibodies raised against both 54 and 56 kD proteins appear to specifically label these 2-4 nm filaments. These findings indicate that both the 54 and 56 kD proteins might be constituents of this category of filaments. The possible significance of this new cytoskeletal element, that we have named echinonematin filaments, is discussed.

  13. Role played by Prx1-dependent extracellular matrix properties in vascular smooth muscle development in embryonic lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Juliana; Chokshi, Mithil; Aiad, Norman; Sanyal, Sonali; Kawabata, Kimihito C.; Levental, Ilya; Sundararaghavan, Harini G.; Burdick, Jason A.; Janmey, Paul; Miyazono, Kohei; Wells, Rebecca G.; Jones, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although there are many studies focusing on the molecular pathways underlying lung vascular morphogenesis, the extracellular matrix (ECM)–dependent regulation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in vascular smooth muscle development needs better understanding. In this study, we demonstrate that the paired related homeobox gene transcription factor Prx1 maintains the elastic ECM properties, which are essential for vascular smooth muscle precursor cell differentiation. We have found that Prx1null mouse lungs exhibit defective vascular smooth muscle development, downregulated elastic ECM expression, and compromised transforming growth factor (TGF)–β localization and signaling. Further characterization of ECM properties using decellularized lung ECM scaffolds derived from Prx1 mice demonstrated that Prx1 is required to maintain lung ECM stiffness. The results of cell culture using stiffness-controlled 2-D and 3-D synthetic substrates confirmed that Prx1-dependent ECM stiffness is essential for promotion of smooth muscle precursor differentiation for effective TGF-β stimulation. Supporting these results, both decellularized Prx1null lung ECM and Prx1WT (wild type) ECM scaffolds with blocked TGF-β failed to support mesenchymal cell to 3-D smooth muscle cell differentiation. These results suggest a novel ECM-dependent regulatory pathway of lung vascular development wherein Prx1 regulates lung vascular smooth muscle precursor development by coordinating the ECM biophysical and biochemical properties. PMID:26064466

  14. Electrophysiological study of the intestinal smooth muscle of the guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, H.; Osa, T.; Toida, N.

    1967-01-01

    The membrane properties of single cells of intestinal smooth muscle of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and rectum of guinea-pig have been studied. 1. The membrane potentials of longitudinal muscles of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and rectum varied from 54 to 56 mV and those of circular muscles of jejunum, ileum, caecum and rectum varied from 57 to 60 mV. The ablated longitudinal muscle had a slightly lower value (50 mV) than the intact one. 2. The longitudinal muscle generated spontaneous discharges but these were rare in the circular muscles of the intestine except for the caecum. Overshoot potentials could be observed in all regions of the intestine. The maximum rate of rise of the spontaneously discharging longitudinal muscles varied from 11 to 18 V/sec. 3. Not all of the slow potential changes (but at least some) were generated by the nervous elements distributed between the muscle layers and in them. 4. The conduction velocities measured from the longitudinal muscles of jejunum and rectum in the presence of tetrodotoxin were 2·1 cm/sec and 4·0 cm/sec respectively. 5. Chronaxies of the longitudinal muscles of jejunum and rectum were 2-5 msec and 5-18 msec respectively. 6. Intracellular stimulation of the single cells of the duodenum and caecum could trigger a spike, similar to that observed in the taenia coli. The spikes were mostly graded ones; a spike of full size was rarely elicited. When the spikes were triggered, the after-hyperpolarization appeared consistently presumably caused by the increased potassium conductance. 7. The effective membrane resistance and the time constant were measured for the longitudinal muscles of the jejunum and rectum. When spikes were generated by intracellular stimulation the observed values were 40-50 MΩ and 3-5 msec in both tissues. These values were the same as those observed in the taenia coli. 8. When the time constant of the membrane was measured by the extracellular polarizing method, the longitudinal muscles

  15. Force maintenance and myosin filament assembly regulated by Rho-kinase in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lan, Bo; Deng, Linhong; Donovan, Graham M; Chin, Leslie Y M; Syyong, Harley T; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jenny; Pascoe, Christopher D; Norris, Brandon A; Liu, Jeffrey C-Y; Swyngedouw, Nicholas E; Banaem, Saleha M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle contraction can be divided into two phases: the initial contraction determines the amount of developed force and the second phase determines how well the force is maintained. The initial phase is primarily due to activation of actomyosin interaction and is relatively well understood, whereas the second phase remains poorly understood. Force maintenance in the sustained phase can be disrupted by strains applied to the muscle; the strain causes actomyosin cross-bridges to detach and also the cytoskeletal structure to disassemble in a process known as fluidization, for which the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study we investigated the ability of airway smooth muscle to maintain force after the initial phase of contraction. Specifically, we examined the roles of Rho-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) in force maintenance. We found that for the same degree of initial force inhibition, Rho-kinase substantially reduced the muscle's ability to sustain force under static conditions, whereas inhibition of PKC had a minimal effect on sustaining force. Under oscillatory strain, Rho-kinase inhibition caused further decline in force, but again, PKC inhibition had a minimal effect. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibition led to a decrease in the myosin filament mass in the muscle cells, suggesting that one of the functions of Rho-kinase is to stabilize myosin filaments. The results also suggest that dissolution of myosin filaments may be one of the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of fluidization. These findings can shed light on the mechanism underlying deep inspiration induced bronchodilation.

  16. Muscarinic receptors: evidence for a nonuniform distribution in tracheal smooth muscle and exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Basbaum, C.B.; Grillo, M.A.; Widdicombe, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    Muscarinic receptor distribution in smooth muscle, exocrine glands, and epithelium of the ferret trachea was determined using (3H)propylbenzilylcholine mustard ((3H)PrBCM) binding and autoradiography. Specific, atropine-sensitive (3H)PrBCM binding was quantified autoradiographically in the trachealis muscle (approximately 21 binding sites/microns2), surface epithelium (approximately 6 binding sites/microns2), and submucosal glands (approximately 5 binding sites/microns2). Serous and mucous cells in the glands did not differ in receptor density. Binding sites on gland and epithelial cells were associated with basolateral membranes. In the trachealis muscle, a gradient in receptor density was observed, with outer layers of muscle containing 3 to 10 times more receptors per unit area than inner layers. Receptor distribution in both glands and muscle paralleled the distribution of cholinergic axons. However, at the light microscope level, there was no evidence for the presence of receptor ''hot spots'' related to the position of individual axons. The parallelism in the distribution of axons and receptors suggests the possibility of neural control of the genesis and/or maintenance of receptor distribution in these tissues.

  17. Small bowel transplantation induces adrenergic hypersensitivity in ileal longitudinal smooth muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, N; Balsiger, B M; Anding, W J; Duenes, J A; Sarr, M G

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the effects of small bowel transplantation on contractility of longitudinal muscle in the rat ileum. Full-thickness longitudinal muscle strips from four groups of rats (naive controls, sham-operated controls, and 1 week and 8 weeks after syngeneic orthotopic small bowel transplantation) were studied in vitro. Neither baseline contractility nor response to neural blockade (tetrodotoxin) or adrenergic/cholinergic blockade differed among the groups. Although the dose response to the cholinergic agonist bethanechol and to nitric oxide did not differ among groups, the ED50 (negative log of concentration giving half-maximal effect) for the adrenergic agonist norepinephrine was increased l week and 8 weeks after transplantation, indicating a hypersensitivity response not blocked by tetrodotoxin. Nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were of greater amplitude and occurred at lesser frequencies (>/=5 Hz) 1 week after small bowel transplantation, but returned to control values 8 weeks postoperatively. These inhibitory responses were blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NMMA but not by methylene blue, a nonspecific inhibitor of guanylate cyclase. Small bowel transplantation induces a persistent adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity at the muscle and appears to upregulate, at least transiently, other inhibitory mechanisms mediated by neural release of nitric oxide. Small bowel transplantation does not alter muscle response to cholinergic pathways. These alterations in smooth muscle contractility may affect gut function early after clinical small bowel transplantation.

  18. Mechanism of soman-induced contractions in canine tracheal smooth muscle. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Moore, D.H.; Filbert, M.G.

    1992-12-31

    The actions of the irreversible organophosphorus cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor soman were investigated on canine trachea smooth muscle in vitro. Concentrations of soman > or - 1 nM increased the amplitude and decay of contractions elicited by electric field stimulation. The effect on decay showed a marked dependence on stimulation frequency, undergoing a 2.4-fold increase between 3 and 60 Hz. Soman also potentiated tensions due to bath applied acetylcholine (ACh). Little or no potentiation was observed for contractions elicited by carbamylcholine, an agonist that is not hydrolyzed by ChE. Concentration of soman > or - 3 nM led to the appearance of sustained contractures. These contractures developed with a delayed onset and were well correlated with ChE activity. Alkylation of muscarinic receptors by propylbenzilylcholine mustard antagonized the actions of soman on both spontaneous and electrically-evoked muscle contractions. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which the toxic actions of soman are mediated by accumulation of neurally-released ACh secondary to inhibition of ChE activity. An important factor in this accumulation is suggested to be the buffering effect of the muscarinic receptors on the efflux of ACh from the neuroeffector junction. Tracheal smooth muscle, Cholinesterase inhibitors, Muscarinic receptor, Soman, Organophosphate.

  19. Epidermal growth factor controls smooth muscle alpha-isoactin expression in BC3H1 cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet- derived growth factor, and insulin on the differentiation of a mouse vascular smooth muscle-like cell line, the BC3H1 cells. On the basis of cell morphology and smooth muscle alpha-isoactin synthesis, we demonstrate that EGF at physiological concentrations prevents the differentiation of these cells, whereas platelet-derived growth factor has no apparent effect. The induction of alpha-isoactin synthesis by serum deprivation is inhibited by EGF in a dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal effect at 3-5 ng/ml and a maximal inhibition at approximately 30 ng/ml. Northern analysis also shows that EGF blocks the accumulation of alpha-isoactin mRNA normally observed during cell differentiation. Addition of EGF to differentiated cells results in a repression of alpha-isoactin synthesis, a stimulation of beta- and gamma-isoactin synthesis, and the stabilization of the nonmuscle isoactins. The synthesis of creatine phosphokinase, a muscle-specific noncontractile protein, is also regulated by EGF in a similar fashion. Modulation by EGF of alpha-isoactin expression is not affected by aphidicolin and is therefore independent of its mitogenic effect on these cells. Insulin is not required for observation of the EGF- dependent effects but instead seems to promote differentiation. Our results show that EGF can replace serum in controlling the differentiation of BC3H1 cells. PMID:3279054

  20. Effect of length oscillations on airway smooth muscle reactivity and cross-bridge cycling.

    PubMed

    Al-Jumaily, Ahmed M; Mbikou, Prisca; Redey, Prachi R

    2012-08-15

    Excessive airway narrowing due to airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperconstriction is a major symptom in many respiratory diseases. In vitro imposition of length oscillations similar to those produced by tidal breathing on contracted ASM have shown to reduce muscle active forces, which is usually attributed to unconfirmed disruption of actomyosin cross-bridges. This research focuses on an in vitro investigation of the effect of mechanical oscillations on ASM reactivity and actomyosin cross-bridges. A computerized organ bath system was used to test maximally precontracted bovine ASM subjected to length oscillations at frequencies in the range of 10-100 Hz superimposed on tidal breathing oscillation. Using an immunofluorescence technique, two specific antibodies against the phospho-serine19 myosin light chain and the α-smooth muscle actin were used to analyze the colocalization between these two filaments. Data were processed using the plug-in "colocalization threshold" of ImageJ 1.43m software. The results demonstrate that both tidal and superimposed length oscillations reduce the active force in contracted ASM for a relatively long term and that the latter enhances the force reduction of the former. This reduction was also found to be frequency and time dependent. Additionally colocalization analysis indicates that length oscillations cause the detachment of the actomyosin connections and that this condition is sustained even after the cessation of the length oscillations.

  1. On the terminology for describing the length-force relationship and its changes in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Tony R; Bates, Jason H T; Brusasco, Vito; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Chitano, Pasquale; Deng, Lin Hong; Dowell, Maria; Fabry, Ben; Ford, Lincoln E; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Gerthoffer, William T; Gilbert, Susan H; Gunst, Susan J; Hai, Chi-Ming; Halayko, Andrew J; Hirst, Stuart J; James, Alan L; Janssen, Luke J; Jones, Keith A; King, Greg G; Lakser, Oren J; Lambert, Rodney K; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Meiss, Richard A; Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Mitchell, Howard W; Mitchell, Richard W; Mitzner, Wayne; Murphy, Thomas M; Paré, Peter D; Schellenberg, R Robert; Seow, Chun Y; Sieck, Gary C; Smith, Paul G; Smolensky, Alex V; Solway, Julian; Stephens, Newman L; Stewart, Alastair G; Tang, Dale D; Wang, Lu

    2004-12-01

    The observation that the length-force relationship in airway smooth muscle can be shifted along the length axis by accommodating the muscle at different lengths has stimulated great interest. In light of the recent understanding of the dynamic nature of length-force relationship, many of our concepts regarding smooth muscle mechanical properties, including the notion that the muscle possesses a unique optimal length that correlates to maximal force generation, are likely to be incorrect. To facilitate accurate and efficient communication among scientists interested in the function of airway smooth muscle, a revised and collectively accepted nomenclature describing the adaptive and dynamic nature of the length-force relationship will be invaluable. Setting aside the issue of underlying mechanism, the purpose of this article is to define terminology that will aid investigators in describing observed phenomena. In particular, we recommend that the term "optimal length" (or any other term implying a unique length that correlates with maximal force generation) for airway smooth muscle be avoided. Instead, the in situ length or an arbitrary but clearly defined reference length should be used. We propose the usage of "length adaptation" to describe the phenomenon whereby the length-force curve of a muscle shifts along the length axis due to accommodation of the muscle at different lengths. We also discuss frequently used terms that do not have commonly accepted definitions that should be used cautiously.

  2. Unique properties of muscularis mucosae smooth muscle in guinea pig urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Layne, Jeffrey J.; Pearson, Jessica M.; Sarkissian, Hagop; Nelson, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    The muscularis mucosae, a type of smooth muscle located between the urothelium and the urinary bladder detrusor, has been described, although its properties and role in bladder function have not been characterized. Here, using mucosal tissue strips isolated from guinea pig urinary bladders, we identified spontaneous phasic contractions (SPCs) that appear to originate in the muscularis mucosae. This smooth muscle layer exhibited Ca2+ waves and flashes, but localized Ca2+ events (Ca2+ sparks, purinergic receptor-mediated transients) were not detected. Ca2+ flashes, often in bursts, occurred with a frequency (∼5.7/min) similar to that of SPCs (∼4/min), suggesting that SPCs are triggered by bursts of Ca2+ flashes. The force generated by a single mucosal SPC represented the maximal force of the strip, whereas a single detrusor SPC was ∼3% of maximal force of the detrusor strip. Electrical field stimulation (0.5–50 Hz) evoked force transients in isolated detrusor and mucosal strips. Inhibition of cholinergic receptors significantly decreased force in detrusor and mucosal strips (at higher frequencies). Concurrent inhibition of purinergic and cholinergic receptors nearly abolished evoked responses in detrusor and mucosae. Mucosal SPCs were unaffected by blocking small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels with apamin and were unchanged by blocking large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels with iberiotoxin (IbTX), indicating that SK and BK channels play a much smaller role in regulating muscularis mucosae SPCs than they do in regulating detrusor SPCs. Consistent with this, BK channel current density in myocytes from muscularis mucosae was ∼20% of that in detrusor myocytes. These findings indicate that the muscularis mucosae in guinea pig represents a second smooth muscle compartment that is physiologically and pharmacologically distinct from the detrusor and may contribute to the overall contractile properties of the urinary bladder. PMID:21632849

  3. Cholinergic facilitation of neurotransmission to the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Lau, W A; Pennefather, J N; Mitchelson, F J

    2000-07-01

    1. Functional experiments have been conducted to assess the effects of acetylcholine and carbachol, and the receptors on which they act to facilitate neurotransmission to the stromal smooth muscle of the prostate gland of the guinea-pig. 2. Acetylcholine and carbachol (0.1 microM - 0.1 mM) enhanced contractions evoked by trains of electrical field stimulation (20 pulses of 0.5 ms at 10 Hz every 50 s with a dial setting of 60 V) of nerve terminals within the guinea-pig isolated prostate. In these concentrations they had negligible effects on prostatic smooth muscle tone. 3. The facilitatory effects of acetylcholine, but not those of carbachol, were further enhanced in the presence of physostigmine (10 microM). 3. The facilitatory effects of carbachol were unaffected by the neuropeptide Y Y(1) receptor antagonist BIBP 3226 ((R)-N(2)-(diphenylacetyl)-N-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]-arginina mide) (0.3 microM, n=3) or suramin (100 microM, n=5). Prazosin (0.1 microM, n=5) and guanethidine (10 microM, n=5) alone and in combination (n=4), reduced responses to field stimulation and produced rightward shifts of the log concentration-response curves to carbachol. 4. The rank orders of potency of subtype-preferring muscarinic receptor antagonists in inhibiting the facilitatory actions of acetylcholine and carbachol were: pirenzepine > HHSiD (hexahydrosiladifenidol) > pF-HHSiD (para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol)>/= 5 himbacine, and pirenzepine > HHSiD > himbacine>/= 5 pF-HHSiD, respectively. These profiles suggest that muscarinic receptors of the M(1)-subtype mediate the facilitatory effects of acetylcholine and carbachol on neurotransmission to the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig prostate.

  4. The expression of functional postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors in the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep; Moreland, Robert B; Yang, Stone; Gallant, Cynthia M; Goldstein, Irwin; Traish, Abdulmaged

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if corpus cavernosum smooth muscle expresses functional postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors (AR).The α2-adrenoceptor agonist UK 14,304 elicited concentration-dependent contractions in rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM). The half-maximal response occurred at 0.32±0.03 μM and the maximum contraction at 10 μM UK 14,304.Pretreatment of CCSM strips with selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonists, rauwolscine and RS-15385, produced rightward shifts in the dose-response curves to UK 14,304 (pA2 values 7.1 and 8.5, respectively). In contrast, these antagonists did not alter contraction induced by the α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (PE) or oxymetazoline. UK 14,304-induced contractions were also inhibited by prazosin (pA2=9.08).UK 14,304-induced contractions, unlike those to PE, were highly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+.[3H]-rauwolscine bound to CCSM membranes with high affinity (Kd=1.5 nM). [3H]-rauwolscine binding was displaced by unlabelled rauwolscine, RS-15385, UK 14,304 and prazosin, but not by PE.UK 14,304 inhibited forskolin and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1)-induced increases in intracellular cyclic AMP concentration in primary cultures of rabbit CCSM cells.These results demonstrate that CCSM expresses Gi-coupled postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors, and activation of these receptors causes contraction of trabecular smooth muscle. PMID:9559910

  5. Developmental origins of colon smooth muscle dysfunction in IBS-like rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingjie; Winston, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that subsets of adult and pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have prior exposures to psychological or inflammatory stress. We investigated the cellular mechanisms of colonic smooth muscle dysfunction in adult rats subjected to neonatal inflammation. Ten-day-old male rat pups received 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid to induce colonic inflammation. Colonic circular smooth muscle strips were obtained 6 to 8 wk later. We found that about half of the neonate pups subjected to inflammatory insult showed a significant increase in expression of the pore-forming α1C-subunit of Cav1.2b channels in adult life. These were the same rats in whom Vip mRNA increased in the colon muscularis externae. Additional experiments showed reduced interaction of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 3 with α1C1b promoter that increased the acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) in the core promoter region. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) treatment of naïve muscularis externae swiftly recruited CREB-binding protein (CBP) to the α1C1b promoter and dissociated HDAC3 from this region to initiate transcription. The CBP interaction with the α1C1b promoter was transient, but the dissociation of HDAC3 persisted to sustain H3K9 hyperacetylation and increase in transcription. Intraperitoneal treatment of adult naïve rats with butyrate mimicked the effects of neonatal colon inflammation. We concluded that neonatal inflammation upregulates VIP in the colon muscularis externae, which modulates epigenetic events at the α1C1b promoter to activate α1C1b gene transcription. Inflammatory insult in early life may be one of the etiologies of smooth muscle dysfunction in adult life, which contributes to the altered motility function in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS. PMID:23886858

  6. Endothelin(A)-endothelin(B) receptor cross talk in endothelin-1-induced contraction of smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Robert M; Zuccarello, Mario

    2012-11-01

    The efficacy of selective endothelin (ET) receptor antagonists may be limited by a functional interaction between the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors. This interaction, also termed "cross talk", is characterized by the dependency of the inhibition of an ET-1 response due to antagonism of one ET receptor subtype upon concomitant antagonism of the other ET receptor subtype. Although a reduction in ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross talk would presumably increase the efficacy of selective ET receptor antagonists, an approach that accomplishes this aim is largely absent due to a lack of mechanistic understanding. Toward this goal, we evaluated the characteristics and potential dependencies of cross talk in smooth muscle. Smooth muscle was adopted as an exemplar not only because cross talk is widely reported in this tissue type, thereby allowing numerous comparisons, but also significant controversy surrounds the use of selective versus nonselective ET receptor antagonists in ET-1-related pathophysiologies involving smooth muscle. Based on this evaluation, we suggest that ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross talk is a dynamic process directed by either or both ET receptor subtypes and expressed to varying magnitudes depending on the ET-1 and selective ET receptor antagonist concentrations, tone due to intraluminal pressure/stretch, agonists acting at receptors other than the ET(A)/ET(B) receptors, and endothelial/epithelial function. It is speculated that ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross talk occurs through signal transduction pathways along with changes at the receptor level. Pharmacologic intervention of the signaling pathways could increase the therapeutic efficacy of ET receptor antagonists.

  7. Control of stomach smooth muscle development and intestinal rotation by transcription factor BARX1.

    PubMed

    Jayewickreme, Chenura D; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2015-09-01

    Diverse functions of the homeodomain transcription factor BARX1 include Wnt-dependent, non-cell autonomous specification of the stomach epithelium, tracheo-bronchial septation, and Wnt-independent expansion of the spleen primordium. Tight spatio-temporal regulation of Barx1 levels in the mesentery and stomach mesenchyme suggests additional roles. To determine these functions, we forced constitutive BARX1 expression in the Bapx1 expression domain, which includes the mesentery and intestinal mesenchyme, and also examined Barx1(-/)(-) embryos in further detail. Transgenic embryos invariably showed intestinal truncation and malrotation, in part reflecting abnormal left-right patterning. Ectopic BARX1 expression did not affect intestinal epithelium, but intestinal smooth muscle developed with features typical of the stomach wall. BARX1, which is normally restricted to the developing stomach, drives robust smooth muscle expansion in this organ by promoting proliferation of myogenic progenitors at the expense of other sub-epithelial cells. Undifferentiated embryonic stomach and intestinal mesenchyme showed modest differences in mRNA expression and BARX1 was sufficient to induce much of the stomach profile in intestinal cells. However, limited binding at cis-regulatory sites implies that BARX1 may act principally through other transcription factors. Genes expressed ectopically in BARX1(+) intestinal mesenchyme and reduced in Barx1(-/-) stomach mesenchyme include Isl1, Pitx1, Six2 and Pitx2, transcription factors known to control left-right patterning and influence smooth muscle development. The sum of evidence suggests that potent BARX1 functions in intestinal rotation and stomach myogenesis occur through this small group of intermediary transcription factors.

  8. Tropomyosin variants describe distinct functional subcellular domains in differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Cynthia; Appel, Sarah; Graceffa, Philip; Leavis, Paul; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching; Gunning, Peter W; Schevzov, Galina; Chaponnier, Christine; DeGnore, Jon; Lehman, William; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2011-06-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is known to be an important gatekeeper of actin function. Tm isoforms are encoded by four genes, and each gene produces several variants by alternative splicing, which have been proposed to play roles in motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Smooth muscle studies have focused on gizzard smooth muscle, where a heterodimer of Tm from the α-gene (Tmsm-α) and from the β-gene (Tmsm-β) is associated with contractile filaments. In this study we examined Tm in differentiated mammalian vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS) analysis and Western blot screening with variant-specific antibodies revealed that at least five different Tm proteins are expressed in this tissue: Tm6 (Tmsm-α) and Tm2 from the α-gene, Tm1 (Tmsm-β) from the β-gene, Tm5NM1 from the γ-gene, and Tm4 from the δ-gene. Tm6 is by far most abundant in dVSM followed by Tm1, Tm2, Tm5NM1, and Tm4. Coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunofluorescence studies demonstrate that Tm1 and Tm6 coassociate with different actin isoforms and display different intracellular localizations. Using an antibody specific for cytoplasmic γ-actin, we report here the presence of a γ-actin cortical cytoskeleton in dVSM cells. Tm1 colocalizes with cortical cytoplasmic γ-actin and coprecipitates with γ-actin. Tm6, on the other hand, is located on contractile bundles. These data indicate that Tm1 and Tm6 do not form a classical heterodimer in dVSM but rather describe different functional cellular compartments.

  9. Myosin light chain kinase controls voltage-dependent calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, A; Schakman, O; Yerna, X; Dessy, C; Morel, N

    2014-07-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent kinase myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is the activator of smooth muscle contraction. In addition, it has been reported to be involved in Ca(2+) channel regulation in cultured cells, and we previously showed that the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 decreases arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat aorta. This study was designed to investigate whether MLCK is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in resistance artery smooth muscle cell, which plays a major role in the control of blood pressure. As ML compounds were shown to have off-target effects, MLCK was downregulated by transfection with a small interfering RNA targeting MLCK (MLCK-siRNA) in rat small resistance mesenteric artery (RMA) and in the rat embryonic aortic cell line A7r5. Noradrenaline-induced contraction and Ca(2+) signal were significantly depressed in MLCK-siRNA compared to scramble-siRNA-transfected RMA. Contraction and Ca(2+) signal induced by high KCl and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were also significantly decreased in MLCK-siRNA-transfected RMA, suggesting that MLCK depletion modifies voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. KCl- and AVP-induced Ca(2+) signals and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were decreased in MLCK-depleted A7r5 cells. Eventually, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that in A7r5, MLCK controlled mRNA expression of CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.1 (T-type) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Our results suggest that MLCK controls the transcription of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  10. Loss of neurotrophin-3 from smooth muscle disrupts vagal gastrointestinal afferent signaling and satiation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward A; Biddinger, Jessica E; Baquet, Zachary C; Jones, Kevin R; McAdams, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    A large proportion of vagal afferents are dependent on neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) for survival. NT-3 is expressed in developing gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle, a tissue densely innervated by vagal mechanoreceptors, and thus could regulate their survival. We genetically ablated NT-3 from developing GI smooth muscle and examined the pattern of loss of NT-3 expression in the GI tract and whether this loss altered vagal afferent signaling or feeding behavior. Meal-induced c-Fos activation was reduced in the solitary tract nucleus and area postrema in mice with a smooth muscle-specific NT-3 knockout (SM-NT-3(KO)) compared with controls, suggesting a decrease in vagal afferent signaling. Daily food intake and body weight of SM-NT-3(KO) mice and controls were similar. Meal pattern analysis revealed that mutants, however, had increases in average and total daily meal duration compared with controls. Mutants maintained normal meal size by decreasing eating rate compared with controls. Although microstructural analysis did not reveal a decrease in the rate of decay of eating in SM-NT-3(KO) mice, they ate continuously during the 30-min meal, whereas controls terminated feeding after 22 min. This led to a 74% increase in first daily meal size of SM-NT-3(KO) mice compared with controls. The increases in meal duration and first meal size of SM-NT-3(KO) mice are consistent with reduced satiation signaling by vagal afferents. This is the first demonstration of a role for GI NT-3 in short-term controls of feeding, most likely involving effects on development of vagal GI afferents that regulate satiation.

  11. Attenuation of endothelin-1-induced calcium response by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, C Y; Sturek, M

    1996-06-01

    Although tyrosine kinases play an important role in cell growth and have been implicated in regulation of smooth muscle contraction, their role in agonist-induced myoplasmic Ca2+ responses is unclear. We examined effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and methyl 2,5-dihydroxycinnamate (MDHC) on the endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced Ca2+ response and determined underlying mechanisms for the effects. Freshly isolated smooth muscle cells from porcine coronary arteries were loaded with fura 2 ester, and myoplasmic free Ca2+ (Ca2+ (m)) concentration was estimated with fura 2 microfluorometry. Both genistein and MDHC inhibited the initial transient Cam2+ response to ET by 54 and 81%, respectively (P < 0.05), in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. Genistein also significantly delayed the Cam2+ response, with the latent period from ET-1 application to the beginning of the Cam2+ response being increased from 1.08 +/- 0.17 to 2.65 +/- 0.52 min (P < 0.05). In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, genistein inhibited the ET-1-induced Cam2+ response by 93% (P < 0.05). The Cam2+ responses to caffeine (5 mM) or inositol trisphosphate (IP3) applied intracellularly via a patch-clamp pipette were not affected by genistein. Both genistein and MDHC also abolished the sustained Cam2+ response to ET-1. However, the Cam2+ response to depolarization by 80 mM K+ was not inhibited by MDHC and only inhibited 22% by genistein (P < 0.05). These results indicate that 1) activation of tyrosine kinases is an important regulatory mechanism for the ET-1-induced Cam2+ response in vascular smooth muscle and 2) tyrosine kinases mediate ET-1-induced Ca2+ release with no direct effect on IP3-mediated Ca2+ release. Thus ET-1-mediated signaling upstream of IP3 interaction with the Ca2+ stores is regulated by tyrosine kinases.

  12. Leptin augments coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation via a Rho-kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Noblet, Jillian N; Goodwill, Adam G; Sassoon, Daniel J; Kiel, Alexander M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2016-05-01

    Leptin has been implicated as a key upstream mediator of pathways associated with coronary vascular dysfunction and disease. The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that leptin modifies the coronary artery proteome and promotes increases in coronary smooth muscle contraction and proliferation via influences on Rho kinase signaling. Global proteomic assessment of coronary arteries from lean swine cultured with obese concentrations of leptin (30 ng/mL) for 3 days revealed significant alterations in the coronary artery proteome (68 proteins) and identified an association between leptin treatment and calcium signaling/contraction (four proteins) and cellular growth and proliferation (35 proteins). Isometric tension studies demonstrated that both acute (30 min) and chronic (3 days, serum-free media) exposure to obese concentrations of leptin potentiated depolarization-induced contraction of coronary arteries. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced leptin-mediated increases in coronary artery contractions. The effects of leptin on the functional expression of Rho kinase were time-dependent, as acute treatment increased Rho kinase activity while chronic (3 day) exposure was associated with increases in Rho kinase protein abundance. Proliferation assays following chronic leptin administration (8 day, serum-containing media) demonstrated that leptin augmented coronary vascular smooth muscle proliferation and increased Rho kinase activity. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced these effects of leptin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that leptin promotes increases in coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation and indicate that these phenotypic effects are associated with alterations in the coronary artery proteome and dynamic effects on the Rho kinase pathway.

  13. Phorbol Ester Effects on Neurotransmission: Interaction with Neurotransmitters and Calcium in Smooth Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Jay M.; Gould, Robert J.; Peroutka, Stephen J.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Stimulation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle by neurotransmitters generates diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, which may regulate some forms of neurotransmission. Phorbol esters, potent inflammatory and tumorpromoting compounds, also activate protein kinase C. We demonstrate potent and selective effects of phorbol esters on smooth muscle, indicating a role for protein kinase C in neurotransmission. In rat vas deferens and dog basilar artery, phorbol esters synergize with calcium to mimic the contractile effects of neurotransmitters that act through the phosphatidylinositol cycle. In guinea pig ileum and rat uterus, phorbol esters block contractions produced by these neurotransmitters.

  14. Identification of ostruthin from Peucedanum ostruthium rhizomes as an inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Joa, Helge; Vogl, Sylvia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Zehl, Martin; Nakel, Thomas; Fakhrudin, Nanang; Heiss, Elke H; Picker, Paolo; Urban, Ernst; Wawrosch, Christoph; Saukel, Johannes; Reznicek, Gottfried; Kopp, Brigitte; Dirsch, Verena M

    2011-06-24

    Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is of substantial interest in combating cardiovascular disease. A dichloromethane extract from the rhizomes of Peucedanum ostruthium, a traditionally used Austrian medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory properties, was examined for a putative antiproliferative activity in rat aortic VSMC. This extract inhibited serum (10%)-induced VSMC proliferation concentration dependently. Further identification and biological testing of its major constituents revealed that the coumarin ostruthin (7) is the major antiproliferative substance. In summary, a new bioactivity of P. ostruthium rhizomes is described, and 7 has been identified as the responsible compound.

  15. De Novo ACTA2 Mutation Causes a Novel Syndrome of Multisystemic Smooth Muscle Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Østergaard, John R.; Ala-Kokko, Leena M.; Khan, Nadia; Grange, Dorothy K.; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Bradley, Timothy J.; Olney, Ann Haskins; Adès, Lesley; Maher, Joseph F.; Guo, Dongchuan; Buja, L. Maximilian; Kim, Dong; Hyland, James C.; Regalado, Ellen S.

    2011-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contract to perform many physiological functions, including regulation of blood flow and pressure in arteries, contraction of the pupils, peristalsis of the gut and voiding of the bladder. SMC lineage in these organs is characterized by cellular expression of the SMC isoform of α-actin, encoded by the ACTA2 gene. We report here on a unique and de novo mutation in ACTA2, R179H, that causes a syndrome characterized by dysfunction of SMCs throughout the body, leading to aortic and cerebrovascular disease, fixed dilated pupils, hypotonic bladder, malrotation and hypoperistalsis of the gut and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20734336

  16. Immunostaining of macrophages, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic mouse aorta

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Prashanthi; Fisher, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The atherosclerotic mouse aorta consists of a heterogeneous population of cells, including macrophages, endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC), that play critical roles in cardiovascular disease. Identification of these vascular cells in the vessel wall is important to understanding their function in pathological conditions. Immunohistochemistry is an invaluable technique used to detect the presence of cells in different tissues. Here, we describe immunohistochemical techniques commonly used for the detection of the vascular cells in the atherosclerotic mouse aorta using cell specific markers. PMID:26445786

  17. Device for Investigation of Mechanical Tension of Isolated Smooth Muscle Vessels and Airway Segments of Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinik, A.; Karpovich, N.; Turgunova, N.; Nosarev, A.

    2016-11-01

    For the purpose of testing and the search for new drug compounds, designed to heal many human diseases, it is necessary to investigate the deformation of experimental tissue samples under influence of these drugs. For this task a precision force sensor for measuring the mechanical tension, produced by isolated ring segments of blood vessels and airways was created. The hardware and software systems for the study of changes in contractile responses of the airway smooth muscles and blood vessels of experimental animals was developed.

  18. Signalling pathways activated by 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1D) receptors in native smooth muscle and primary cultures of rabbit renal artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hinton, J M; Hill, P; Jeremy, J; Garland, C

    2000-01-01

    The potential of primary cultures of rabbit renal artery vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was assessed as a means to investigate the signalling pathways linked to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1D) receptors in native arteries. In renal artery segments denuded of endothelium, incubated with ketanserin and prazosin (each 1 microM), and prestimulated with 20 mM K(+) Krebs buffer, 5-HT and CP 93,129, a 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, evoked concentration-dependent contractions. GR 127935, a 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1D) receptor antagonist, significantly antagonised 5-HT-evoked contractions at nanomolar concentrations. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mRNA from smooth muscle cells from the isolated renal artery and from primary cultures of VSMCs from the same artery expressed mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT(1B) receptor and the 5-HT(1D) receptor in both preparations. The sequence of the PCR fragments corresponded to the known sequence for these receptors. Application of 5-HT evoked a concentration-dependent, pertussis toxin (PTx)-sensitive reduction in cyclic AMP in both cultured cells and intact artery (cyclic AMP concentration reduced by 65.53 +/- 3.33 and 52.65 +/- 5.34% from basal with 10 microM 5-HT, respectively). The effect of 10 microM 5-HT on cAMP was increased in the presence of 20 mM K(+) (reduced by 82.50 +/- 2.50 and 87.54 +/- 3.97%, respectively). In intact arteries, contraction through 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1D) receptors was significantly attenuated by inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (wortmannin) and activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), MEK (U0126). In the cultured VSMCs, activated MAPK was identified by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting after stimulation with 5-HT, but only if 20 mM K(+) was present at the onset of stimulation. These data provide the first direct evidence that 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1B) receptors are linked to the activation of MAPK and indicate that primary cultures of renal VSMCs could provide a

  19. Heat production in chemically skinned smooth muscle of guinea-pig taenia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnbro, P; Hellstrand, P

    1991-01-01

    1. The rate of heat production of chemically skinned guinea-pig taenia coli smooth muscle at 25 degrees C was measured using microcalorimetric techniques. 2. Muscle strips were mounted isometrically and incubated in solutions containing MgATP (3.2 mM) and phosphocreatine (PCr, 12 mM), pH 6.9. Activation was obtained by the injection of Ca2+ into the sample compartment of the calorimeter. 3. The heat production rate of the resting preparation (pCa 9) was 0.40 +/- 0.03 mW g-1 wet weight (n = 23). During maximal activation (pCa 4.8) the heat rate increased to 1.12 +/- 0.07 mW g-1 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 15). With stepwise increase in [Ca2+] from pCa 9 to 4.8 the energetic cost of force maintenance tended to increase at higher [Ca2+]. 4. After activation by Ca2+, the heat production rate reached its maximum while force was still increasing. 5. Changing ionic strength from 90 to 150 mM had no effect on either basal or activated heat rate. Oligomycin, amphotericin B and the adenylate kinase inhibitor Ap5A had no effect on the basal heat rate. 6. Exchanging ATP in the incubation medium for inosine triphosphate (ITP) reduced the force and heat production after injection of Ca2+. The basal heat production was not lowered when ATP was exchanged for ITP. 7. The observed enthalpy change for PCr splitting at 25 degrees C (pH 6.9, ionic strength 90 mM) was -28 +/- 3 kJ mol-1 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 9). After correction for the phosphate equilibrium, buffer reactions, and Mg2+ binding to PCr and HPO42-, the net enthalpy change is calculated to be -39 +/- 3 kJ mol-1. 8. Heat production in the skinned smooth muscle consists of one basal component present in relaxed muscle, and one component associated with contraction. The nature of the basal heat production is unclear but does not seem to involve turnover of phosphate on the myosin light chains. The increase in the energetic tension cost with increasing activation by Ca2+ has implications for the understanding of the contractile

  20. Peripheral Airway Smooth Muscle, but Not the Trachealis, Is Hypercontractile in an Equine Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Kachmar, Linda; Ijpma, Gijs; Bates, Genevieve; Zitouni, Nedjma; Benedetti, Andrea; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2016-05-01

    Heaves is a naturally occurring equine disease that shares many similarities with human asthma, including reversible antigen-induced bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and remodeling. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the trachealis muscle is mechanically representative of the peripheral airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an equine model of asthma. Tracheal and peripheral ASM of heaves-affected horses under exacerbation, or under clinical remission of the disease, and control horses were dissected and freed of epithelium to measure unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax), stress (force/cross-sectional area), methacholine effective concentration at which 50% of the maximum response is obtained, and stiffness. Myofibrillar Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, actomyosin in vitro motility, and contractile protein expression were also measured. Horses with heaves had significantly greater Vmax and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in peripheral airway but not in tracheal smooth muscle. In addition, a significant correlation was found between Vmax and the time elapsed since the end of the corticosteroid treatment for the peripheral airways in horses with heaves. Maximal stress and stiffness were greater in the peripheral airways of the horses under remission compared with controls and the horses under exacerbation, potentially due to remodeling. Actomyosin in vitro motility was not different between controls and horses with heaves. These data demonstrate that peripheral ASM is mechanically and biochemically altered in heaves, whereas the trachealis behaves as in control horses. It is therefore conceivable that the trachealis muscle may not be representative of the peripheral ASM in human asthma either, but this will require further investigation.

  1. Molecular and functional characterization of Kv7 K+ channel in murine gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Jepps, Thomas A; Greenwood, Iain A; Moffatt, James D; Sanders, Kenton M; Ohya, Susumu

    2009-07-01

    Members of the K(v)7 voltage-gated K(+) channel family are important determinants of cardiac and neuronal membrane excitability. Recently, we and others have shown that K(v)7 channels are also crucial regulators of smooth muscle activity. The aim of the present study was to assess the K(v)7 expression in different parts of the murine gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to assess their functional roles by use of pharmacological agents. Of KCNQ/K(v)7 members, both KCNQ4/K(v)7.4 and KCNQ5/K(v)7.5 genes and proteins were the most abundantly expressed K(v)7 channels in smooth muscles throughout the GI tract. Immunohistochemical staining also revealed that K(v)7.4 and K(v)7.5 but not K(v)7.1 were expressed in the circular muscle layer of the colon. In segments of distal colon circular muscle exhibiting spontaneous phasic contractions, the nonselective K(v)7 blockers XE991 and linopirdine increased the integral of tension. Increases in the integral of tension were also observed under conditions of neuronal blockade. Similar effects, although less marked, were observed in the proximal colon. As expected, the K(v)7.1-selective blocker chromanol 293B had no effect in either type of segment. These data show that K(v)7.x especially K(v)7.4 and K(v)7.5 are expressed in different regions of the murine gastrointestinal tract and blockers of K(v)7 channels augment inherent contractile activity. Drugs that selectively block K(v)7.4/7.5 might be promising therapeutics for the treatment of motility disorders such as constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

  2. TSHZ3 and SOX9 Regulate the Timing of Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation in the Ureter by Reducing Myocardin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Elise; Caubit, Xavier; Airik, Rannar; Vola, Christine; Fatmi, Ahmed; Kispert, Andreas; Fasano, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are of key importance for the proper functioning of different visceral organs including those of the urogenital system. In the mouse ureter, the two transcriptional regulators TSHZ3 and SOX9 are independently required for initiation of smooth muscle differentiation from uncommitted mesenchymal precursor cells. However, it has remained unclear whether TSHZ3 and SOX9 act independently or as part of a larger regulatory network. Here, we set out to characterize the molecular function of TSHZ3 in the differentiation of the ureteric mesenchyme. Using a yeast-two-hybrid screen, we identified SOX9 as an interacting protein. We show that TSHZ3 also binds to the master regulator of the smooth muscle program, MYOCD, and displaces it from the coregulator SRF, thereby disrupting the activation of smooth muscle specific genes. We found that the initiation of the expression of smooth muscle specific genes in MYOCD-positive ureteric mesenchyme coincides with the down regulation of Sox9 expression, identifying SOX9 as a possible negative regulator of smooth muscle cell differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we prolonged the expression of Sox9 in the ureteric mesenchyme in vivo. We found that Sox9 does not affect Myocd expression but significantly reduces the expression of MYOCD/SRF-dependent smooth muscle genes, suggesting that down-regulation of Sox9 is a prerequisite for MYOCD activity. We propose that the dynamic expression of Sox9 and the interaction between TSHZ3, SOX9 and MYOCD provide a mechanism that regulates the pace of progression of the myogenic program in the ureter. PMID:23671695

  3. Regulation of smooth muscle cell scavenger receptor expression in vivo by atherogenic diets and in vitro by cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Freeman, M W; Libby, P

    1995-01-01

    Scavenger receptor (ScR)-mediated uptake of modified lipoproteins may contribute to the transformation of smooth muscle cells into lipid-laden foam cells during atherogenesis. This study examined the in vivo expression of ScRs in aortas, with or without balloon injury, taken from hypercholesterolemic or normocholesterolemic rabbits. Numerous intimal cells in the rabbit aortic lesions expressed ScRs as detected by immunocytochemical staining with a goat anti-rabbit ScR antibody. Single immunostaining for cell identification markers in serial sections, as well as double staining, confirmed the expression of ScRs by both intimal smooth muscle cells and macrophages. To explore potential inducers of ScR expression by smooth muscle cells in vivo, we studied the regulation of ScR expression in vitro by cytokines known to be present in atherosclerotic lesions. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased ScR mRNA levels, protein expression, and AcLDL degradative activity in cultured rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells. The induction of ScR expression in intimal smooth muscle cells in vivo could be a useful marker of smooth muscle cell activation during atherogenesis and may contribute to foam cell formation by this cell type following balloon injury and/or hypercholesterolemia. Cytokines, such as TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma, may stimulate some of the phenotypic changes that characterize the alteration in gene expression of intimal smooth muscle cells in rabbit atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:7814605

  4. Comparison of /sup 45/Ca binding and mobilization in cartilage and smooth muscle of guinea pig trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, F.R.; Weiss, G.B.; Sturm, B.

    1986-03-01

    In guinea pig trachea, separation of smooth muscle from cartilage permits measurement of /sup 45/Ca fluxes in more homogeneous preparations. The role of cartilage Ca/sup + +/ as a source for smooth muscle Ca/sup + +/ mobilization can be assessed by similar experiments with the two dissociated preparations. Equilibration of /sup 45/Ca into cartilage occurred over 2 hr; plotting of /sup 45/Ca uptake on Scatchard coordinates yields high and low affinity Ca/sup + +/ uptake components similar to those in tracheal and other smooth muscles. Washout of /sup 45/Ca from cartilage demonstrated two components with the more rapid including the extracellular (/sup 14/C-sucrose) compartment. Washout of higher affinity /sup 45/Ca (after incubation in 0.03 mM Ca/sup + +/) was increased in cartilage by Sr/sup + +/, added Ca/sup + +/, La/sup + + +/ and EGTA. Comparison with tracheal smooth muscle /sup 45/Ca washouts indicates that those Ca/sup + +/ components previously identified as of intracellular origin were not present in cartilage. Exposure to 60 mM (added) K/sup +/ during /sup 45/Ca washout increased /sup 45/Ca efflux in cartilage but not in smooth muscle. This release of /sup 45/Ca by K/sup +/ may indicate that Ca/sup + +/ can be mobilized from cartilage sites by K/sup +/ to support smooth muscle contractile responses. Thus, cartilage Ca/sup + +/ could be an important source of Ca/sup + +/ for excitation-contraction coupling in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

  5. Oxytocin is an age-specific circulating hormone that is necessary for muscle maintenance and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Elabd, Christian; Cousin, Wendy; Upadhyayula, Pavan; Chen, Robert Y; Chooljian, Marc S; Li, Ju; Kung, Sunny; Jiang, Kevin P; Conboy, Irina M

    2014-06-10

    The regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle declines with age. Previous studies suggest that this process can be reversed by exposure to young circulation; however, systemic age-specific factors responsible for this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here we report that oxytocin--a hormone best known for its role in lactation, parturition and social behaviours--is required for proper muscle tissue regeneration and homeostasis, and that plasma levels of oxytocin decline with age. Inhibition of oxytocin signalling in young animals reduces muscle regeneration, whereas systemic administration of oxytocin rapidly improves muscle regeneration by enhancing aged muscle stem cell activation/proliferation through activation of the MAPK/ERK signalling pathway. We further show that the genetic lack of oxytocin does not cause a developmental defect in muscle but instead leads to premature sarcopenia. Considering that oxytocin is an FDA-approved drug, this work reveals a potential novel and safe way to combat or prevent skeletal muscle ageing.

  6. Oxytocin is an age-specific circulating hormone that is necessary for muscle maintenance and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyayula, Pavan; Chen, Robert Y.; Chooljian, Marc S.; Li, Ju; Kung, Sunny; Jiang, Kevin P.; Conboy, Irina M.

    2014-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle declines with age. Previous studies suggest that this process can be reversed by exposure to young circulation, but systemic age-specific factors responsible for this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here we report that oxytocin- a hormone best known for its role in lactation, parturition, and social behaviors - is required for proper muscle tissue regeneration and homeostasis, and that plasma levels of oxytocin decline with age. Inhibition of oxytocin signaling in young animals reduces muscle regeneration, whereas systemic administration of oxytocin rapidly improves muscle regeneration by enhancing aged muscle stem cell activation/proliferation throughactivation of the MAPK/ERK signalling pathway. We further show that the genetic lack of oxytocin does not cause a developmental defect in muscle, but instead leads to premature sarcopenia. Considering that oxytocin is an FDA approved drug, this work reveals a potential novel and safe way to combat or prevent skeletal muscle aging. PMID:24915299

  7. Differentiation of Human Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells into Smooth-Muscle Cells: Two Novel Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Libang; Geng, Zhaohui; Nickel, Thomas; Johnson, Caitlin; Gao, Lin; Dutton, James; Hou, Cody; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protocols for differentiating human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can be inefficient and generally fail to yield cells with a specific SMC phenotype (i.e., contractile or synthetic SMCs). Here, we present two novel hiPSC-SMC differentiation protocols that yield SMCs with predominantly contractile or synthetic phenotypes. Flow cytometry analyses of smooth-muscle actin (SMA) expression indicated that ~45% of the cells obtained with each protocol assumed an SMC phenotype, and that the populations could be purified to ~95% via metabolic selection. Assessments of cellular mRNA and/or protein levels indicated that SMA, myosin heavy chain II, collagen 1, calponin, transgelin, connexin 43, and vimentin expression in the SMCs obtained via the Contractile SMC protocol and in SMCs differentiated via a traditional protocol were similar, while SMCs produced via the Sythetic SMC protocol expressed less calponin, more collagen 1, and more connexin 43. Differences were also observed in functional assessments of the two SMC populations: the two-dimensional surface area of Contractile SMCs declined more extensively (to 12% versus 44% of original size) in response to carbachol treatment, while quantification of cell migration and proliferation were greater in Synthetic SMCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that our novel differentiation protocols can efficiently generate SMCs from hiPSCs. PMID:26771193

  8. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening.

  9. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G.; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:25813541

  10. IL-22 activates oxidant signaling in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Geetanjali; Das, Dividutta; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Gilmore, Brent A; Wong, Chi-Ming; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2013-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate cell-signaling processes in response to various ligands and play important roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. The present study reports that interleukin-22 (IL-22) elicits signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) through a ROS-dependent mechanism. We find that pulmonary artery SMCs express IL-22 receptor alpha 1 and that IL-22 activates STAT3 through this receptor. IL-22-induced signaling is found to be mediated by NADPH oxidase, as indicated by the observations that the inhibition and siRNA knock-down of this enzyme inhibit IL-22 signaling. IL-22 triggers the oxidative modifications of proteins through protein carbonylation and protein glutathionylation. Mass spectrometry identified some proteins that are carbonylated in response to IL-22 stimulation, including α-enolase, heat shock cognate 71kDa protein, mitochondrial 60kDa heat shock protein, and cytoplasmic 2 actin and determined that α-tubulin is glutathionylated. Protein glutathionylation and STAT3 phosphorylation are enhanced by the siRNA knock-down of glutaredoxin, while IL-22-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation is suppressed by knocking down thioredoxin interacting protein, an inhibitor of thioredoxin. IL-22 is also found to promote the growth of SMCs via NADPH oxidase. In rats, pulmonary hypertension is found to be associated with increased smooth muscle IL-22 expression. These results show that IL-22 promotes the growth of pulmonary vascular SMCs via a signaling mechanism that involves NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidation.

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 in Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Restrains Atherogenesis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Soon Yew; Monslow, James; Todd, Leslie; Lawson, John; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placebo controlled trials of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for inhibition of COX-2 reveal an emergent cardiovascular hazard in patients selected for low risk of heart disease. Postnatal global deletion of COX-2 accelerates atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, a process delayed by selective enzyme deletion in macrophages. Methods and Results Here, selective depletion of COX-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) depressed biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGE2, elevated blood pressure and accelerated atherogenesis in Ldlr knockout (KO) mice. Deletion of COX-2 in VSMCs and ECs coincided with an increase in COX-2 expression in lesional macrophages and increased biosynthesis of thromboxane. Increased accumulation of less organized intimal collagen, laminin, α-smooth muscle actin and matrix-rich fibrosis was also apparent in lesions of the mutants. Conclusions Although atherogenesis is accelerated in global COX-2 KOs, consistent with evidence of risk transformation during chronic NSAID administration, this masks the contrasting effects of enzyme depletion in macrophages versus VSMCs and ECs. Targeting delivery of COX-2 inhibitors to macrophages may conserve their efficacy while limiting cardiovascular risk. PMID:24519928

  12. Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid on neurally mediated contraction of guinea pig trachealis smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, J; Graf, P D; Nadel, J A

    1987-10-01

    To determine whether gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects the contractile properties of airway smooth muscle and, if so, what the mechanism of action is, the authors studied guinea pig tracheal rings under isometric conditions in vitro. GABA and related substances, baclofen and muscimol, had no effect on the resting tension but reversibly depressed contractions induced by electrical field stimulation in a dose-dependent fashion, IC50 values (mean +/- S.E.) being 5.6 +/- 1.4 X 10(-6) M, 6.8 +/- 0.9 X 10(-6) M and 8.5 +/- 1.5 X 10(-5) M, respectively. In contrast, GABA did not alter the response to exogenous acetylcholine or the nonadrenergic noncholinergic inhibitory component. Pretreatment of tissues with bicuculline antagonized the inhibitory effect of GABA as well as that of baclofen. This inhibitory effect was not modified by propranolol, phentolamine, hemicholinium-3 or naloxone, but it was blocked by the Cl channel blocker furosemide and by the substitution of external Cl. These results suggest that GABA decreases the contractile response of airway smooth muscle to cholinergic nerve stimulation by inhibiting the evoked release of acetylcholine and that this effect is exerted by activating Cl-dependent, bicuculline-sensitive GABA receptors.

  13. Calcium-activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 promote murine uterine smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kyra; Vink, Joy Y; Fu, Xiao Wen; Wakita, Hiromi; Danielsson, Jennifer; Wapner, Ronald; Gallos, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence of calcium activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 in human and murine uterine smooth muscle and evaluate the physiologic role for these ion channels in murine myometrial contractility. Study Design We performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine if anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine uterine tissue to validate the study of this protein in mouse models. Immunohistochemical staining of anoctamin 1 and 2 was then performed to determine protein expression in murine myometrial tissue. The function of anoctamin 1 and 2 in murine uterine tissue was evaluated using electrophysiological studies, organ bath, and calcium flux experiments. Results Anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine USM cells. Functional studies show that selective antagonism of these channels promotes relaxation of spontaneous murine uterine smooth muscle contractions. Blockade of anoctamin 1 and 2 inhibits both agonist-induced and spontaneous transient inward currents and abolishes G-protein coupled receptor (oxytocin) mediated elevations in intracellular calcium. Conclusion The calcium activated chloride channels ANO 1 and 2 are present in human and murine myometrial tissue and may provide novel potential therapeutic targets to achieve effective tocolysis. PMID:24928056

  14. Neprilysin protects against cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Aβ-induced degeneration of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Miners, James Scott; Kehoe, Patrick; Love, Seth

    2011-09-01

    Neprilysin (NEP), which degrades amyloid-β (Aβ), is expressed by neurons and cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs). NEP immunolabeling is reduced within cerebral blood vessels of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). We have now measured NEP enzyme activity in leptomeningeal and purified cerebral cortical blood vessel preparations from control and AD patients with and without CAA. Measurements were adjusted for smooth muscle actin (SMA) to control for variations in CVSMC content. NEP activity was reduced in CAA, in both controls and AD. In leptomeningeal vessels, NEP activity was related to APOE genotype, being highest in ε2-positive and lowest in ε4-positive brains. To assess the role of NEP in protecting CVSMCs from Aβ toxicity, we measured cell death in primary human adult CVSMCs exposed to Aβ(1-40) , Aβ(1-42) or Aβ(1-40(Dutch variant)) . Aβ(1-42) was most cytotoxic to CVSMCs. Aβ(1-42) -mediated cell death was increased following siRNA-mediated knockdown or thiorphan-mediated inhibition of NEP activity; conversely Aβ(1-42) -mediated cytotoxicity was reduced by the addition of somatostatin and NEP over-expression following transfection with NEP cDNA. Our findings suggest that NEP protects CVSMCs from Aβ toxicity and protects cerebral blood vessels from the development and complications of CAA.

  15. The effect of deuterium oxide (D sub 2 O) on in vitro vascular smooth muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliam, T.M.; Liepins, A.; Rankin, A.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O), a stable nonradioactive isotope of water, has been demonstrated to reduce L-type calcium channel conductance in isolated myocytes. Since the concentration of intracellular free calcium has been implicated in the mechanism of vascular smooth muscle contraction, the authors investigated whether it inhibits contraction of vascular smooth muscle. Phenylephrine concentration-contraction curves were carried out in the rat aortic ring preparation to determine whether D{sub 2}O inhibits contraction of rat aorta induced through activation of receptor-operated calcium channels. D{sub 2}O depressed these response curves in a concentration dependent manner with 50% inhibition of maximum contraction observed with 60% D{sub 2}O; this effect proved to be reversible and non-toxic. D{sub 2}O also depressed potassium chloride curves, demonstrating an effect on voltage-operated calcium channels. Since vascular endothelium releases endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) when stimulated by a range of pharmacological agents, it was examined whether the endothelium has a role in these actions of D{sub 2}O on vascular contraction. Mechanical disruption of the endothelium had no effect.

  16. ( sup 3 H)QNB binding and contraction of rabbit colonic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ringer, M.J.; Hyman, P.E.; Kao, H.W.; Hsu, C.T.; Tomomasa, T.; Snape, W.J. Jr. )

    1987-11-01

    The authors used radioligand binding and studies of cell contraction to characterize muscarinic receptors on dispersed smooth muscle cells from rabbit proximal and distal colon. Cells obtained after serial incubations in collagenase were used to measure binding of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (({sup 3}H)QNB). At 37{degree}C, specific ({sup 3}H)QNB binding was saturable and linearly related to cell number. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to determine the affinity of ({sup 3}H)QNB for its receptor. The IC{sub 50} for the muscarinic agonists bethanechol and oxotremorine were 80 and 0.57 {mu}M, respectively. Hill coefficients were 0.67 for both, suggesting more complex interaction involving receptors of different affinities. In studies of cell contraction, bethanechol stimulated a dose-dependent decrease in cell length with half the maximal contraction occurring at 100 pM. These results suggest that (1) contraction is mediated by binding of bethanechol to M{sub 2}-muscarinic receptors and that (2) there are a large number of spare receptors in colonic smooth muscle.

  17. Ursolic acid suppresses leptin-induced cell proliferation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ya-Mei; Tsai, Chiang-Chin; Tzeng, Yu-Wen; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lee, Ming-Fen

    2017-01-29

    Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that high leptin levels are associated with adverse cardiovascular health in obese individuals. Proatherogenic effects of leptin include endothelial cell activation, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. Ursolic acid (UA) has been reported to exhibit multiple biological effects including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of UA on leptin-induced biological responses in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). A-10 VSMCs were treated with leptin in the presence or absence of UA. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was probed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. The expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, phospho-(ERK)1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and p50, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) was determined by Western blotting. Immunocytochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were also used for the detection of NF-κB. The secretion of MMP2 was detected by gelatin zymography. UA exhibited antioxidant activities in vitro. In rat VSMCs, UA effectively inhibited cell growth and the activity of MMP2 induced by leptin. These suppressive effects appeared by decreasing the activation of (ERK)1/2, the nuclear expression and translocation of NF-κB, and the production of ROS. UA appeared to inhibit leptin-induced atherosclerosis, which may prevent the development of obesity-induced cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Poyhonen, Minna; Tikka, Saara; Behbahani, Homira

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology.

  19. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Phenotypic Switch in Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Scirocco, Annunziata; Matarrese, Paola; Carabotti, Marilia; Ascione, Barbara; Malorni, Walter; Severi, Carola

    2016-02-01

    As a general rule, smooth muscle cells (SMC) are able to switch from a contractile phenotype to a less mature synthetic phenotype. This switch is accompanied by a loss of differentiation with decreased expression of contractile markers, increased proliferation as well as the synthesis and the release of several signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotaxis-associated molecules, and growth factors. This SMC phenotypic plasticity has extensively been investigated in vascular diseases, but interest is also emerging in the field of gastroenterology. It has in fact been postulated that altered microenvironmental conditions, including the composition of microbiota, could trigger the remodeling of the enteric SMC, with phenotype changes and consequent alterations of contraction and impairment of gut motility. Several molecular actors participate in this phenotype remodeling. These include extracellular molecules such as cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins, as well as intracellular proteins, for example, transcription factors. Epigenetic control mechanisms and miRNA have also been suggested to participate. In this review key roles and actors of smooth muscle phenotypic switch, mainly in GI tissue, are described and discussed in the light of literature data available so far. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 295-302, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The apoptosis induced by HMME-based photodynamic therapy in rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huijuan; Li, Xiaoyuan; Lin, Hong; Liu, Jianzhong; Yu, Hongkui

    2007-02-01

    Objective To study the effects of HMME-based photodynamic therapy on proliferation and apoptosis of rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs). Method The cytotoxic effect of HMME-PDT on rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells was studied by means of Trypan Blue assay, HMME at 10μg/ml concentration and the light dose at 2.4~4.8 J/cm2 were selected in the studies. The morphological character 24h post-PDT was investigated by HE Staining. Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) binding assays were performed to analyze the characteristics of cell death after HMME-PDT. Furthermore, The intracellular distributions of the HMME were measured by the confocal laser scanning microscope. Result It was showed the photocytotoxity to VSMC cells was dose related by Trypan Blue assay. Histology observing suggests HMME-PDT could induce cell death through apoptosis or necrosis, and the apoptosic rate was up to 50.5% by AnnexinV /PI assay. Moreover, the fluorescence images of HMME intracellular localization demonstrated that the HMME diffused into the mitochondria. Conclusion HMME-PDT could significantly inhibite VSMC proliferation and induce apoptosis.

  1. Purification and partial characterization of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans from cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatino, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans synthesized by cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells were isolated after incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into glycosaminoglycans in the presence or absence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Glycosaminoglycans were quantitated by two-dimensional electrophoresis after proteolytic digestion of the cell layers and media. The results show that the presence of serum has no effect on the chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate content of the cell layers. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid of the cell layers was three times higher in the presence of serum. In the medium , the quantity of hyaluronic was two times higher in the presence of serum while the other glycosaminoglycans remained unchanged. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid was unaffected by the presence of serum. Specific proteoglycans were isolated from medium after with (/sup 35/S)-sulfate and (/sup 3/H)-serine by isopycnic ultracentrifugation and chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B and DEAE-cellulose. Preparations contained a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, a condroitin sulfate-dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans synthesized by rabbit aorta smooth muscle cells are similar to those from human aorta.

  2. Modelling airway smooth muscle passive length adaptation via thick filament length distributions

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new model of airway smooth muscle (ASM), which surrounds and constricts every airway in the lung and thus plays a central role in the airway constriction associated with asthma. This new model of ASM is based on an extension of sliding filament/crossbridge theory, which explicitly incorporates the length distribution of thick sliding filaments to account for a phenomenon known as dynamic passive length adaptation; the model exhibits good agreement with experimental data for ASM force–length behaviour across multiple scales. Principally these are (nonlinear) force–length loops at short timescales (seconds), parabolic force–length curves at medium timescales (minutes) and length adaptation at longer timescales. This represents a significant improvement on the widely-used cross-bridge models which work so well in or near the isometric regime, and may have significant implications for studies which rely on crossbridge or other dynamic airway smooth muscle models, and thus both airway and lung dynamics. PMID:23721681

  3. May Sonic Hedgehog proteins be markers for malignancy in uterine smooth muscle tumors?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalia; Bozzini, Nilo; Baiocchi, Glauco; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes; Soares Junior, José Maria; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Carvalho, Katia Candido

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway (SHH) plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cellular differentiation. We analyzed the protein expression of SHH pathway components and evaluated whether their profile could be useful for the diagnosis, prognosis, or prediction of the risk of malignancy for uterine smooth muscle tumors (USMTs). A total of 176 samples (20 myometrium, 119 variants of leiomyoma, and 37 leiomyosarcoma) were evaluated for the protein expression of the SHH signaling components, HHIP1 (SHH inhibitor), and BMP4 (SHH target) by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis was performed to verify the specificity of the antibodies. We grouped leiomyoma samples into conventional leiomyomas and unusual leiomyomas that comprise atypical, cellular, mitotically active leiomyomas and uterine smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that SMO, SUFU, GLI1, GLI3, and BMP4 expression gradually increased depending on to the histologic tissue type. The protein expression of SMO, SUFU, and GLI1 was increased in unusual leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma samples compared to normal myometrium. The inhibitor HHIP1 showed higher expression in myometrium, whereas only negative or basal expression of SMO, SUFU, GLI1, and GLI3 was detected in these samples. Strong expression of SHH was associated with poorer overall survival. Our data suggest that the expression of SHH proteins can be useful for evaluating the potential risk of malignancy for USMTs. Moreover, GLI1 and SMO may serve as future therapeutic targets for women with USMTs.

  4. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  5. Wood creosote inhibits calcium mobilization in Guinea pig colonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Morino, Hirofumi; Ataka, Koji; Ito, Masafumi; Kuge, Tomoo

    2004-07-01

    Wood creosote, a mixture of simple phenolic compounds, has long been used as an herbal antidiarrheal medicine. Previous studies have shown that wood creosote has antimotility activity on the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, although its mechanism of action is not completely understood. The in vitro efficacy of wood creosote on calcium mobilization in guinea pig colonic smooth muscle was evaluated using a digital video camera system mounted on an inverted fluorescence microscope. The effects of wood creosote on spontaneous periodic increases in the free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), acetylcholine (ACh)-enhanced periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i), and tetrodotoxin- or nifedipine-resistant spontaneous periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i) were evaluated. Wood creosote decreased the amplitude of spontaneous (IC(50)=21 microg/ml) and ACh-enhanced (IC(50)=40 microg/ml) periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i) in guinea pig colonic smooth muscle. Wood creosote also decreased the amplitude of both tetrodotoxin- and nifedipine-resistant spontaneous periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i). These results suggest that antimotility activity through inhibition of Ca(2+) mobilization in the GI tract is at least partially responsible for the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote. Wood creosote may exert its antimotility effect, at least in part, on network regions of interstitial cells of Cajal, which act as pacemaker cells and mediators of neurotransmission in the GI tract.

  6. Phytoncide, Nanochemicals from Chamaecyparis obtusa, Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Leejin; Jang, Young-Su; Yun, Je-Jung; Song, Heesang

    2015-01-01

    Phytoncide, nanochemicals extracted from Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa), is reported to possess many pharmacological activities including immunological stimulating, anti-cancer, antioxidant, and antiinflammatory activities. However, the effect of phytoncide in vascuar diseases, especially on the behavior of vascular smooth muscle cells, has not yet been clearly elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of 15 kinds of phytoncide by various extraction conditions from C. obtusa on the proliferation and migration in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RAoSMCs). First of all, we determined the concentration of each extracts not having cytotoxicity by MTT assay. We observed that the proliferation rate measured using BrdU assay was significantly reduced by supercritical fluid, steam distillation, Me-OH, and hexane extraction fraction in order with higher extent, respectively. Moreover, the treatment of above nanofractions inhibit the migration of RAoSMCs by 40%, 60%, and 30%, respectively, both in 2-D wound healing assay and 3-D boyden chamber assay. Immunoblot revealed that the phosphorylated levels of Akt and ERK were significantly reduced in nanofractions treated RAoSMCs. Taken together, these data suggest that phytoncide extracted from C. obtusa inhibits proliferation and migration in RAoSMCs via the modulation of phosphorylated levels of Akt and ERK. Therefore, phytoncide nanomolecules might be a potential therapeutic approach to prevent or treat atheroscrelosis and restenosis.

  7. Effects of dexamethasone on the synthesis and secretion of galaptin by vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, G.L.; Harris-Hooker, S.A.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of dexamethasone (Dex) on the synthesis and secretion of beta-galactoside specific lectin (galaptin) was examined in cultured primate aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC). SMC cells were treated with 0.15 ..mu..M Dex during their proliferative phase to confluency, and after reaching confluency. Both cultures were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-phenylalanine (phe) for 24 h following exposure to Dex. Incorporation of phe into galaptin increased twofold in the medium from Dex treated confluent cultures, when serum was present. No change was found in incorporation when serum was removed prior to Dex treatment. Phe incorporation into total protein was also increased twofold by Dex treatment of SMC in the presence of serum, but there was a 1.4-fold increase when serum was absent. Dex did not affect the incorporation of phe into either total protein or galaptin in the cell layer of confluent cultures in the presence of serum, but caused a twofold increase in its absence. There was no effect of Dex on the incorporation of phe into galaptin or total protein in either the medium or cell layer of cultures given Dex during their proliferative phase. Dex retarded the growth of SMC, and lowered the total protein content of the cell layer. The results show that vascular smooth muscle cells synthesize and secrete galaptin and that Dex acts directly on confluent SMC to increase galaptin synthesis and secretion. Serum seems to modulate the effect of Dex.

  8. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  9. Functional up-regulation of KCNA gene family expression in murine mesenteric resistance artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, S J; Cheong, A; Flemming, R; Mair, L; Sivaprasadarao, A; Beech, D J

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on the hypothesis that KCNA genes (which encode KVα1 voltage-gated K+ channels) have enhanced functional expression in smooth muscle cells of a primary determinant of peripheral resistance – the small mesenteric artery. Real-time PCR methodology was developed to measure cell type-specific in situ gene expression. Profiles were determined for arterial myocyte expression of RNA species encoding KVα1 subunits as well as KVβ1, KVα2.1, KVγ9.3, BKCaα1 and BKCaβ1. The seven major KCNA genes were expressed and more readily detected in endothelium-denuded mesenteric resistance artery compared with thoracic aorta; quantification revealed dramatic differential expression of one to two orders of magnitude. There was also four times more RNA encoding KVα2.1 but less or similar amounts encoding KVβ1, KVγ9.3, BKCaα1 and BKCaβ1. Patch-clamp recordings from freshly isolated smooth muscle cells revealed dominant KVα1 K+ current and current density twice as large in mesenteric cells. Therefore, we suggest the increased RNA production of the resistance artery impacts on physiological function, although there is quantitatively less K+ current than might be expected. The mechanism conferring up-regulated expression of KCNA genes may be common to all the gene family and play a functional role in the physiological control of blood pressure. PMID:14742730

  10. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation.

  11. Smooth muscle cell-extrinsic vascular spasm arises from cardiomyocyte degeneration in sarcoglycan-deficient cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew T; Allikian, Michael J; Heydemann, Ahlke; Hadhazy, Michele; Zarnegar, Sara; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2004-03-01

    Vascular spasm is a poorly understood but critical biomedical process because it can acutely reduce blood supply and tissue oxygenation. Cardiomyopathy in mice lacking gamma-sarcoglycan or delta-sarcoglycan is characterized by focal damage. In the heart, sarcoglycan gene mutations produce regional defects in membrane permeability and focal degeneration, and it was hypothesized that vascular spasm was responsible for this focal necrosis. Supporting this notion, vascular spasm was noted in coronary arteries, and disruption of the sarcoglycan complex was observed in vascular smooth muscle providing a molecular mechanism for spasm. Using a transgene rescue strategy in the background of sarcoglycan-null mice, we replaced cardiomyocyte sarcoglycan expression. Cardiomyocyte-specific sarcoglycan expression was sufficient to correct cardiac focal degeneration. Intriguingly, successful restoration of the cardiomyocyte sarcoglycan complex also eliminated coronary artery vascular spasm, while restoration of smooth muscle sarcoglycan in the background of sarcoglycan-null alleles did not. This mechanism, whereby tissue damage leads to vascular spasm, can be partially corrected by NO synthase inhibitors. Therefore, we propose that cytokine release from damaged cardiomyocytes can feed back to produce vascular spasm. Moreover, vascular spasm feeds forward to produce additional cardiac damage.

  12. [Response mechanisms of the airway smooth muscle tissue in experimental bronchial spasm].

    PubMed

    Zashikhin, A L; Agafonov, Iu V; Barmina, A O

    2009-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at the complex evaluation of the reactivity mechanisms of bronchial smooth muscle tissue (SMT) in experimental bronchial spasm. Morphometric, cytospectrophotometric and electron microscopical analysis demonstrated the presence of three types of smooth muscle cells (SMC) within the bronchial SMT (small, medium, large), that differed in their linear and metabolic parameters. The findings of this study indicate that under the conditions of experimental bronchial spasm development, the ratios of SMC in bronchial SMT are changed with the increase in proportion of small SMC and the elimination of large SMC. In the dynamics of experimental bronchial spasm development, the activation of cytoplasmic synthesis as well as of DNA synthesis was detected mainly in group of small SMC. The reactive-dystrophic changes were marked at the subcellular level, that were most often identified in large SMC resulting in their elimination from population in the dynamics of an experiment. The data obtained suggest that one of the important mechanisms of airway SMT adaptation to the bronchial spasm development is a dynamic reorganization of SMC population.

  13. Effects of nitrendipine on growth activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Absher, M P; Baldor, L; Warshaw, D M

    1988-01-01

    Proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the arterial wall may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and hypertension. If cell migration and proliferation are dependent on extracellular calcium, then treatment with calcium channel blockers such as nitrendipine may alter these cellular responses. In the studies reported here, proliferation and migration activities were assessed in cultured bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells exposed to nitrendipine. SMCs in long-term culture are characterized by periods of either stable or enhanced proliferative activity. During the stable periods, 1 microM nitrendipine has no effect on proliferation, but during periods of enhanced proliferation, 1 microM nitrendipine augments growth by approximately 20%. SMC migration rates and interdivision times were determined from analysis of time-lapse cinematography films. During stable periods of growth, cell migration rate was inversely related to interdivision time (i.e., fast migrating cells had the shortest interdivision times). Treatment with 1 microM nitrendipine abolished the relationship between migration rate and interdivision time and prolonged interdivision times. These data suggest that the ability of nitrendipine to alter SMC proliferation, interdivision time, and migration is dependent upon the overall proliferative state of the culture.

  14. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P.; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  15. Evidence for a role of collagen synthesis in arterial smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Rocnik, E F; Chan, B M; Pickering, J G

    1998-01-01

    Migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and collagen synthesis by SMCs are central to the pathophysiology of vascular disease. Both processes can be induced shortly after vascular injury; however, a functional relationship between them has not been established. In this study, we determined if collagen synthesis was required for SMC migration, using ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB), an inhibitor of prolyl-4-hydroxylase, and 3,4-DL-dehydroproline (DHP), a proline analogue, which we demonstrate inhibit collagen elaboration by porcine arterial SMCs. SMCs exposed to EDHB or DHP attached normally to collagen- and vitronectin-coated substrates; however, spreading on collagen but not vitronectin was inhibited. SMC migration speed, quantified by digital time-lapse video microscopy, was significantly and reversibly reduced by EDHB and DHP. Flow cytometry revealed that expression of beta1 integrins, through which SMCs interact with collagen, was unaffected by EDHB or DHP. However, both inhibitors prevented normal clustering of beta1 integrins on the surface of SMCs, consistent with a lack of appropriate matrix ligands for integrin engagement. Moreover, there was impaired recruitment of vinculin into focal adhesion complexes of spreading SMCs and disassembly of the smooth muscle alpha-actin-containing cytoskeleton. These findings suggest that de novo collagen synthesis plays a role in SMC migration and implicates a mechanism whereby newly synthesized collagen may be necessary to maintain the transcellular traction system required for effective locomotion. PMID:9576753

  16. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma.

    PubMed

    An, S S; Bai, T R; Bates, J H T; Black, J L; Brown, R H; Brusasco, V; Chitano, P; Deng, L; Dowell, M; Eidelman, D H; Fabry, B; Fairbank, N J; Ford, L E; Fredberg, J J; Gerthoffer, W T; Gilbert, S H; Gosens, R; Gunst, S J; Halayko, A J; Ingram, R H; Irvin, C G; James, A L; Janssen, L J; King, G G; Knight, D A; Lauzon, A M; Lakser, O J; Ludwig, M S; Lutchen, K R; Maksym, G N; Martin, J G; Mauad, T; McParland, B E; Mijailovich, S M; Mitchell, H W; Mitchell, R W; Mitzner, W; Murphy, T M; Paré, P D; Pellegrino, R; Sanderson, M J; Schellenberg, R R; Seow, C Y; Silveira, P S P; Smith, P G; Solway, J; Stephens, N L; Sterk, P J; Stewart, A G; Tang, D D; Tepper, R S; Tran, T; Wang, L

    2007-05-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not "cure" asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored.

  17. Co-cultivation of human aortic smooth muscle cells with epicardial adipocytes affects their proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Ždychová, J; Čejková, S; Králová Lesná, I; Králová, A; Malušková, J; Janoušek, L; Kazdová, L

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Adipocytes produce several bioactive paracrine substances that can affect the growth and migration of VSMCs. Our study focuses on the direct effect of the bioactive substances in conditioned media (CM) that was obtained by incubation with primary adipocyte-derived cell lines, including cell lines derived from both preadipocytes and from more mature cells, on the proliferation rate of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs). We used a Luminex assay to measure the adipokine content of the CM and showed that there was a higher concentration of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in renal preadipocyte-CM compared with the HAoSMC control (p<0.5). The addition of both renal preadipocyte- and epicardial adipocyte- CM resulted in the elevated production of vascular endothelial growth factor compared with the control HASoSMC CM (p<0.001). The adiponectin content in renal adipocyte-CM was increased compared to all the remaining adipocyte-CM (p<0.01). Moreover, the results showed a higher proliferation rate of HAoSMCs after co-culture with epicardial adipocyte-CM compared to the HAoSMC control (p<0.05). These results suggest that bioactive substances produced by adipocytes have a stimulatory effect on the proliferation of VSMCs.

  18. [Primary culture and functional identification of distal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in mice].

    PubMed

    Li, M C; Chen, Y Q; Zhang, C T; Jiang, Q; Lu, W J; Wang, J

    2017-02-12

    Objective: To establish a method of isolation and primary culture of mice distal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and identify the functional properties. Methods: PASMCs were harvested from the distal pulmonary artery (PA) tissue of mice by enzymatic digestion of collagenaseⅠand papain; and the growth characteristics were observed under inverted microscope and identified by Immunofluorescence technique. Effects on the intracellular calcium ion concentration of distal PASMCs were detected by Fura-2-AM fluorescent probe tracer under a fluorescence microscope in Krebs solution containing clopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipin (Nif). Results: PASMCs density reached approximately to 80% in a typical valley-peak-like shape after 6 days. Cell α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunofluorescence identified that 95% of the cultured cells were PASMCs. More than 95% PASMCs responded well to calcium-potassium Krebs solution (potassium ion concentration of 60 mmol/L) and showed a rapid increase in basal [Ca(2+) ](i) after 1 minute's perfusion (Δ[Ca(2+) ](i)>50), which demonstrated that the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC) of distal PASMCs were in good function; after the perfusion of calcium Krebs, calcium-free/calcium-Krebs containing CPA and Nif, distal PASMCs showed two typical peaks, indicated the full function of store-operated calcium channel (SOCC) in distal PASMCs. Conclusion: This experiment successfully established a stable and reliable mice distal PASMCs model and the study of pulmonary vascular diseases could benefit from its higher purity and better functional condition.

  19. Thin-film dielectric elastomer sensors to measure the contraction force of smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araromi, O.; Poulin, A.; Rosset, S.; Favre, M.; Giazzon, M.; Martin-Olmos, C.; Liley, M.; Shea, H.

    2015-04-01

    The development of thin-film dielectric elastomer strain sensors for the characterization of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is presented here. Smooth muscle disorders are an integral part of diseases such as asthma and emphysema. Analytical tools enabling the characterization of SMC function i.e. contractile force and strain, in a low-cost and highly parallelized manner are necessary for toxicology screening and for the development of new and more effective drugs. The main challenge with the design of such tools is the accurate measurement of the extremely low contractile cell forces expected as a result of SMC monolayer contraction (as low as ~ 100 μN). Our approach utilizes ultrathin (~5 μm) and soft elastomer membranes patterned with elastomer-carbon composite electrodes, onto which the SMCs are cultured. The cell contraction induces an in-plane strain in the elastomer membrane, predicted to be in the order 1 %, which can be measured via the change in the membrane capacitance. The cell force can subsequently be deduced knowing the mechanical properties of the elastomer membrane. We discuss the materials and fabrication methods selected for our system and present preliminary results indicating their biocompatibility. We fabricate functional capacitive senor prototypes with good signal stability over the several hours (~ 0.5% variation). We succeed in measuring in-plane strains of 1 % with our fabricated devices with good repeatability and signal to noise ratio.

  20. Testosterone Rescues the De-Differentiation of Smooth Muscle Cells through Serum Response Factor/Myocardin.

    PubMed

    Leimgruber, Carolina; Quintar, Amado A; Peinetti, Nahuel; Scalerandi, María V; Nicola, Juan P; Miano, Joseph M; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2016-11-09

    Prostatic smooth muscle cells (pSMCs) differentiation is a key factor for prostatic homeostasis, with androgens exerting multiple effects on these cells. Here, we demonstrated that the myodifferentiator complex Srf/Myocd is up-regulated by testosterone in a dose-dependent manner in primary cultures of rat pSMCs, which was associated to the increase in Acta2, Cnn1, and Lmod1 expressions. Blocking Srf or Myocd by siRNAs inhibited the myodifferentiator effect of testosterone. While LPS led to a dedifferentiated phenotype in pSMCs, characterized by down-regulation of Srf/Myocd and smooth muscle cell (SMC)-restricted genes, endotoxin treatment on Myocd-overexpressing cells did not result in phenotypic alterations. Testosterone at a physiological dose was able to restore the muscular phenotype by normalizing Srf/Myocd expression in inflammation-induced dedifferentiated pSMCs. Moreover, the androgen reestablished the proliferation rate and IL-6 secretion increased by LPS. These results provide novel evidence regarding the myodifferentiating role of testosterone on SMCs by modulating Srf/Myocd. Thus, androgens preserve prostatic SMC phenotype, which is essential to maintain the normal structure and function of the prostate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Peptides PHI and VIP: comparison between vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle effect in rabbit uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Bardrum, B.; Ottesen, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    1986-07-01

    The distribution and effects of the two neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI), on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle in the urogenital tract of nonpregnant rabbit female, were investigated. Immunoreactive VIP and PHI were present in all regions except the ovary with the highest concentration in the uterin cervix. By using in vitro tension recordings of myometrial specimens, it was demonstrated that both peptides displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of the mechanical activity. The dose-response curves of VIP and PHI were superimposable with and ID50 of 3 x 10 Y mol/l, and their combined effect was additive. In addition, the influence of the two peptides on myometrial blood flow (MBF) was investigated by the xenon-133 washout technique. Both peptides were found to increase MBF with the same potency and efficacy. Their combined effect was additive. In conclusion VIP and PHI are present in the rabbit urogenital tract, and the two peptides are equipotent inhibitors of mechanical nonvascular and vascular smooth muscle activity in the uterus.

  2. Modeling smooth muscle myosin's two heads: long-lived enzymatic roles and phosphorylation-dependent equilibria.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam; Warshaw, David M

    2010-08-09

    Smooth muscle myosin has two heads, each capable of interacting with actin to generate force and/or motion as it hydrolyzes ATP. These heads are inhibited when their associated regulatory light chain is unphosphorylated (0P), becoming active and hydrolyzing ATP maximally when phosphorylated (2P). Interestingly, with only one of the two regulatory light chains phosphorylated (1P), smooth muscle myosin is active but its ATPase rate is <2P. To explain published 1P single ATP turnover and steady-state ATPase activities, we propose a kinetic model in which 1P myosin exists in an equilibrium between being fully active (2P) and inhibited (0P). Based on the single ATP turnover data, we also propose that each 2P head adopts a hydrolytic role distinct from its partner at any point in time, i.e., one head strongly binds actin and hydrolyzes ATP at its actin-activated rate while the other weakly binds actin. Surprisingly, the heads switch roles slowly (<0.1 s(-1)), suggesting that their activities are not independent. The phosphorylation-dependent equilibrium between active and inhibited states and the hydrolytic role that each head adopts during its interaction with actin may have implications for understanding regulation and mechanical performance of other members of the myosin family of molecular motors.

  3. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-04

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells.

  4. Affinity for MgADP and force of unbinding from actin of myosin purified from tonic and phasic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Govindaraju, Karuthapillai; Fong, Laura M.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle is unique in its ability to maintain force at low MgATP consumption. This property, called the latch state, is more prominent in tonic than phasic smooth muscle. Studies performed at the muscle strip level have suggested that myosin from tonic muscle has a greater affinity for MgADP and therefore remains attached to actin longer than myosin from phasic muscle, allowing for cross-bridge dephosphorylation and latch-bridge formation. An alternative hypothesis is that after dephosphorylation, myosin reattaches to actin and maintains force. We investigated these fundamental properties of smooth muscle at the molecular level. We used an in vitro motility assay to measure actin filament velocity (νmax) when propelled by myosin purified from phasic or tonic muscle at increasing [MgADP]. Myosin was 25% thiophosphorylated and 75% unphosphorylated to approximate in vivo conditions. The slope of νmax versus [MgADP] was significantly greater for tonic (−0.51 ± 0.04) than phasic muscle myosin (−0.15 ± 0.04), demonstrating the greater MgADP affinity of myosin from tonic muscle. We then used a laser trap assay to measure the unbinding force from actin of populations of unphosphorylated tonic and phasic muscle myosin. Both myosin types attached to actin, and their unbinding force (0.092 ± 0.022 pN for phasic muscle and 0.084 ± 0.017 pN for tonic muscle) was not statistically different. We conclude that the greater affinity for MgADP of tonic muscle myosin and the reattachment of dephosphorylated myosin to actin may both contribute to the latch state. PMID:18614813

  5. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  6. Oxygen-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Vascular Smooth Muscle and Their Possible Role in Hypoxic Arterial Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Obregon, A.; Urena, J.; Lopez-Barneo, J.

    1995-05-01

    We have investigated the modifications of cytosolic [Ca2+] and the activity of Ca2+ channels in freshly dispersed arterial myocytes to test whether lowering O_2 tension (PO_2) directly influences Ca2+ homeostasis in these cells. Unclamped cells loaded with fura-2 AM exhibit oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+ whose frequency depends on extracellular Ca2+ influx. Switching from a PO_2 of 150 to 20 mmHg leads to a reversible attenuation of the Ca2+ oscillations. In voltage-clamped cells, hypoxia reversibly reduces the influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent channels, which can account for the inhibition of the Ca2+ oscillations. Low PO_2 selectively inhibits L-type Ca2+ channel activity, whereas the current mediated by T-type channels is unaltered by hypoxia. The effect of low PO_2 on the L-type channels is markedly voltage dependent, being more apparent with moderate depolarizations. These findings demonstrate the existence of O_2-sensitive, voltage-dependent, Ca2+ channels in vascular smooth muscle that may critically contribute to the local regulation of circulation.

  7. Cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells are resistant to methylamine toxicity: no correlation to semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, S. D.; Trent, M. B.; Boor, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Methylamine (MA), a component of serum and a metabolite of nicotine and certain insecticides and herbicides, is metabolized by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). MA is toxic to cultured human umbilical vein and calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Endothelial cells, which do not exhibit endogenous SSAO activity, are exposed to SSAO circulating in serum. In contrast, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) do exhibit innate SSAO activity both in vivo and in vitro. This property, together with the critical localization of VSMC within the arterial wall, led us to investigate the potential toxicity of MA to VSMC. Cultured rat VSMC were treated with MA (10-5 to 1 M). In some cultures, SSAO was selectively inhibited with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 [(E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-fluoroallylamine]. Cytotoxicity was measured via MTT, vital dye exclusion, and clonogenic assays. MA proved to be toxic to VSMC only at relatively high concentrations (LC(50) of 0.1 M). The inhibition of SSAO with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 did not increase MA toxicity, suggesting that the production of formaldehyde via tissue-bound, SSAO-mediated MA metabolism does not play a role in the minimal toxicity observed in isolated rat VSMC. The omission of fetal calf serum (FCS), which contains high SSAO activity, from media similarly showed little effect on cytotoxicity. We conclude that VSMC--in contrast to previous results in endothelial cells--are relatively resistant to MA toxicity, and SSAO does not play a role in VSMC injury by MA.

  8. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  9. Inhibition of PKCalpha and rhoA translocation in differentiated smooth muscle by a caveolin scaffolding domain peptide.

    PubMed

    Taggart, M J; Leavis, P; Feron, O; Morgan, K G

    2000-07-10

    Receptor-coupled contraction of smooth muscle involves recruitment to the plasma membrane of downstream effector molecules PKCalpha and rhoA but the mechanism of this signal integration is unclear. Caveolins, the principal structural proteins of caveolar plasma membrane invaginations, have been implicated in the organization and regulation of many signal transducing molecules. Thus, using laser scanning confocal immunofluorescent microscopy, we tested the hypothesis that caveolin is involved in smooth muscle signaling by investigating caveolin isoform expression and localization, together with the effect of a peptide inhibitor of caveolin function, in intact differentiated smooth muscle cells. All three main caveolin isoforms were identified in uterine, stomach, and ileal smooth muscles and assumed a predominantly plasma membranous localization in myometrial cells. Cytoplasmic introduction of a peptide corresponding to the caveolin-1 scaffolding domain-an essential region for caveolin interaction with signaling molecules--significantly inhibited agonist-induced translocation of both PKCalpha and rhoA. Translocation was unimpaired by a scrambled peptide and was unaltered in sham-treated cells. The membranous localization of caveolins, and direct inhibition of receptor-coupled PKCalpha and rhoA translocation by the caveolin-1 scaffolding domain, supports the concept that caveolins can regulate the integration of extracellular contractile stimuli and downstream intracellular effectors in smooth muscle.

  10. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization.

  11. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  12. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression in human vascular intimal smooth muscle cells detected by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Barath, P.; Fishbein, M. C.; Cao, J.; Berenson, J.; Helfant, R. H.; Forrester, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    We used immunohistochemistry to detect tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and in situ hybridization to detect TNF messenger RNA (mRNA) in the intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells and in the medial smooth muscle cells of human atherosclerotic arteries. Medial smooth muscle cells showed localization of immunoreactive TNF on the cell surface and did not express TNF mRNA. Conversely, in intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells, TNF was localized in the cytoplasm and TNF mRNA was expressed by in situ hybridization. Thus 89% of intimal cells were immunohistochemically positive for TNF, 96% of them were positive by in situ hybridization, and 76% were positive for the smooth muscle cell marker, HHF35. Our results suggest that intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells are mostly, but not exclusively, derived from smooth muscle cells. These cells express TNF, whereas the medial smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic human arteries do not. The expression of TNF by these mesenchymal-appearing cells may have implications regarding the evolution of the atherosclerotic plaque. Images Figure 1 to Figure 4 Figure 3 PMID:1698022

  14. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis