Science.gov

Sample records for circulation simulations applications

  1. Application of Land Surface Data Assimilation to Simulations of Sea Breeze Circulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackaro, Scott; Lapenta, William M.; Blackwell, Keith; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary; Kimball, Sytske

    2003-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite- observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. The sea/land breeze is a well-documented mesoscale circulation that affects many coastal areas of the world including the northern Gulf Coast of the United States. The focus of this paper is to examine how the satellite assimilation technique impacts the simulation of a sea breeze circulation observed along the Mississippi/Alabama coast in the spring of 2001. The technique is implemented within the PSUNCAR MM5 V3-5 and applied at spatial resolutions of 12- and 4-km. It is recognized that even 4-km grid spacing is too coarse to explicitly resolve the detailed, mesoscale structure of sea breezes. Nevertheless, the model can forecast certain characteristics of the observed sea breeze including a thermally direct circulation that results from differential low-level heating across the land-sea interface. Our intent is to determine the sensitivity of the circulation to the differential land surface forcing produced via the

  2. Application of a Coupled Multiscale Atmospheric-Land Surface Model to Simulate the Snow Circulation in a Mountain Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, E.; Pomeroy, J.; Pietroniro, A.

    2009-05-01

    Snow cover spatial variability and snowmelt runoff are greatly influenced by the snow advected due to the wind- flow in the atmospheric boundary layer. Typically this has been accomplished by considering the snow as a subgrid scale problem in the atmospheric models. However, this subgrid scale approach can not be sufficient to explain the snow dynamics. Therefore a multiscale strategy where the hydrological, climatological, meteorological and physiographic conditions of a basin are related should improve the understanding of snow dynamics. This methodology was developed coupling the Global Environmental Multiscale Limited Area Model (GEM-LAM) with the Cold Regions Hydrological Model (CRHM). The GEM-LAM was used on a one-way nesting configuration to simulate the atmospheric-land fields at 100m of resolution with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) soil scheme. The CRHM is used as a snow transport model at the hydrometeorological stations located in the basin. The case of study is the 4th November 2007 at Marmot Creek (50° 57' N, 115° 10' W), Alberta, Canada. This strategy has proved to be a physics based procedure to describe the snow dynamics without interpolation methods.

  3. Numerical simulation of the world ocean circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takano, K.; Mintz, Y.; Han, Y. J.

    1973-01-01

    A multi-level model, based on the primitive equations, is developed for simulating the temperature and velocity fields produced in the world ocean by differential heating and surface wind stress. The model ocean has constant depth, free slip at the lower boundary, and neglects momentum advection; so that there is no energy exchange between the barotropic and baroclinic components of the motion, although the former influences the latter through temperature advection. The ocean model was designed to be coupled to the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, for the study of the dynamics of climate and climate changes. But here, the model is tested by prescribing the observed seasonally varying surface wind stress and the incident solar radiation, the surface air temperature and humidity, cloudiness and the surface wind speed, which, together with the predicted ocean surface temperature, determine the surface flux of radiant energy, sensible heat and latent heat.

  4. Anthropogenic forcing on the Hadley circulation in CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Lijun; Hu, Yongyun; Liu, Jiping

    2016-05-01

    Poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation has been an important topic in climate change studies in the past few years, and one of the critically important issues is how it is related to anthropogenic forcings. Using simulations from the coupled model intercomparison projection phase 5 (CMIP5), we study influences of anthropogenic forcings on the width and strength of the Hadley circulation. It is found that significant poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation can be reproduced in CMIP5 historical all-forcing simulations although the magnitude of trends is much weaker than observations. Simulations with individual forcings demonstrate that among three major types of anthropogenic forcings, increasing greenhouse gases (GHGs) and stratospheric ozone depletion all cause poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation, whereas anthropogenic aerosols do not have significant influences on the Hadley circulation. Increasing GHGs cause significant poleward expansion in both hemispheres, with the largest widening of the northern cell in boreal autumn. Stratospheric ozone depletion forces significant poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation for the southern cell in austral spring and summer and for the northern cell in boreal spring. In CMIP5 projection simulations for the twenty-first century, the magnitude of poleward expansion of the Hadley circulation increases with GHG forcing. On the other hand, ozone recovery competes with increasing GHGs in determining the width of the Hadley circulation, especially in austral summer. In both historical and projection simulations, the strength of the Hadley circulation shows significant weakening in winter in both hemispheres.

  5. Ocean circulation: its effects on seasonal sea-ice simulations.

    PubMed

    Hibler, W D; Bryan, K

    1984-05-04

    A diagnostic ice-ocean model of the Arctic, Greenland, and Norwegian seas is constructed and used to examine the role of ocean circulation in seasonal sea-ice simulations. The model includes lateral ice motion and three-dimensional ocean circulation. The ocean portion of the model is weakly forced by observed temperature and salinity data. Simulation results show that including modeled ocean circulation in seasonal sea-ice simulations substantially improves the predicted ice drift and ice margin location. Simulations that do not include lateral ocean movment predict a much less realistic ice edge.

  6. [Changes of cerebral circulation during weightlessness or simulated weightlessness].

    PubMed

    Wu, D W; Shen, X Y

    2000-10-01

    The results about studies on changes of the cerebral circulation during weightlessness/simulated weightlessness were reviewed in this paper. The possible influencing mechanism of weightlessness on cerebral circulation and its physiological significance were summarized. It could be concluded that the changes of cerebral circulation were the results of self-regulation of the brain to maintain its normal function, and it might play an important role in the genesis of postflight orthostatic intolerance.

  7. Effects of cumulus convection on the simulated monsoon circulation in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guang Jun )

    1994-09-01

    The effect of cumulus convection on the Asian summer monsoon circulation is investigated, using a general circulation model. Two simulations for the summer months (June, July, and August) are performed, one parameterizing convection using a mass flux scheme and the other without convective parameterization. The results show that convection has significant effects on the monsoon circulation and its associated precipitation. In the simulation with the mass flux convective parameterization, precipitation in the western Pacific is decreased, together with a decrease in surface evaporation and wind speed. In the indian monsoon region it is almost the opposite. Comparison with a simulation using moist convective adjustment to parameterize convection shows that the monsoon circulation and precipitation distribution in the no-convection simulation are very similar to those in the simulation with moist convective adjustment. The difference in the large-scale circulation with and without convective parameterization is interpreted in terms of convective stabilization of the atmosphere by convection, using dry and moist static energy budgets. It is shown that weakening of the low-level convergence in the western Pacific in the simulation with convection is closely associated with the stabilization of the atmosphere by convection, mostly through drying of the lower troposphere; changes in low-level convergence lead to changes in precipitation. The precipitation increase in the Indian monsoon can be explained similarly. 29 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Applications of a Venus thermospheric circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Dickinson, R. E.; Ridley, E. C.; Roble, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of Pioneer Venus observations suggest a global scale, day-to-night Venus thermospheric circulation. Model studies of the dynamics and energetics of the Venus thermosphere are presented in order to address new driving, mixing and cooling mechanisms for an improved model simulation. The adopted approach was to reexamine the circulation by first using a previous two dimensional code to quantify those physical processes which can be inferred from the Pioneer Venus observations. Specifically, the model was used to perform sensitivity studies to determine the degree to which eddy cooling, eddy or wave drag, eddy diffusion and 15 micrometer radiational cooling are necessary to bring the model temperature and composition fields into agreement with observations. Three EUV heating cases were isolated for study. Global temperature and composition fields in good agreement with Pioneer data were obtained. Large scale horizontal winds 220 m/s were found to be consistent with the observed cold nightside temperatures and dayside bulges of O, CO and CO2. Observed dayside temperatures were obtained by using a 7 to 19% EUV heating efficiency profile. The enhanced 15 micrometer cooling needed for thermal balance is obtained using the best rate coefficient available for atomic O collisional excitation of CO2(0,1,0). Eddy conduction was not found to be a viable cooling mechanism due to the weakened global circulation. The strong 15 micrometer damping and low EUV efficiency imply a very weak dependence of the general circulation to solar cycle variability. The NCAR terrestrial thermospheric general circulation model was adapted for Venus inputs using the above two dimensional model parameters, to give a three dimensional benchmark for future Venus modelling work.

  9. Thermohaline circulation and its box models simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyura, Kateryna; Polonsky, Alexander; Sannikov, Viktor

    2014-05-01

    Ocean Thermochaline circulation (THC) is the part of large-scale World Ocean circulation and one of the main climate system components. It is generated by global meridional density gradients, which are controlled by surface heat and freshwater fluxes. THC regulates climate variability on different timescales (from decades to thousands years) [Stocker (2000), Clark (2002)]. Study of paleoclimatic evidences of abrupt and dramatic changes in ocean-atmosphere system in the past (such as, Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events or Younger Dryas, see e.g., [Rahmstorf (2002), Alley & Clark(1999)]) shows that these events are connected with THC regimes. At different times during last 120,000 years, three THC modes have prevailed in the Atlantic. They can be labeled as stadial, interstadial and Heinrich modes or as cold, warm and off mode. THC collapse (or thermohaline catastrophe) can be one of the consequences of global warming (including modern anthropogenic climate changes occurring at the moment). The ideas underlying different box-model studies, possibility of thermochaline catastrophe in present and past are discussed in this presentation. Response of generalized four box model of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation [developing the model of Griffies & Tzippermann (1995)] on periodic, stochastic and linear forcing is studied in details. To estimate climatic parameters of the box model we used monthly salinity and temperature data of ECMWF operational Ocean Reanalysis System 3 (ORA-S3) and data from atmospheric NCEP/NCAR reanalysis on precipitation, and heat fluxes for 1959-2011. Mean values, amplitude of seasonal cycle, amplitudes and periods of typical interdecadal oscillations, white noise level, linear trend coefficients and their significance level were estimated for every hydrophysical parameter. In response to intense freshwater or heat forcing, THC regime can change resulting in thermohaline catastrophe. We analyze relevant thresholds of external forcing in

  10. Relations between winter precipitation and atmospheric circulation simulated by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    General circulation model (GCM) simulations of atmospheric circulation are more reliable than GCM simulations of temperature and precipitation. In this study, temporal correlations between 700 hPa height anomalies simulated winter precipitation at eight locations in the conterminous United States are compared with corresponding correlations in observations. The objectives are to 1) characterize the relations between atmospheric circulation and winter precipitation simulated by the GFDL, GCM for selected locations in the conterminous USA, ii) determine whether these relations are similar to those found in observations of the actual climate system, and iii) determine if GFDL-simulated precipitation is forced by the same circulation patterns as in the real atmosphere. -from Authors

  11. Numerical simulation of breeze circulation over the Crimean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Using the WRF-ARW model, we have conducted a numerical simulation of the atmospheric circulation in the Crimean region for a 30-day period in the summer. The characteristic features of the velocity fields of breeze circulation over Crimea have been identified. We have reproduced the specific features of the development of breeze as a gravity flow, such as the direct and indirect circulation cells, wave oscillations on the boundary between them associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and the formation of the breeze head. The breeze velocities and their diurnal cycle have been estimated. For mountainous regions of the southern coast of Crimea (SCC), we have shown that the coastal circulation is predominantly contributed by quasi-diurnal oscillations associated with the wind excitation on the mountain slopes. The physical conditions for the development of a strong katabatic wind have been considered. The counter breeze flows in eastern Crimea formed under the influence of the adjacent Black and Azov seas generate an intense air rise in the meeting zone. The related linear cloudiness area is clearly traced on satellite images. We have obtained daily hodographs of breeze circulation reflecting the local conditions of the shoreline and the configuration of coastal mountains.

  12. Simulating effects of highway embankments on estuarine circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional depth-averaged, finite-difference, numerical model was used to simulate tidal circulation and mass transport in the Port Royal Sound. South Carolina, estuarine system. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the utility of the Surface-Water. Integrated. Flow and Transport model (SWIFT2D) for evaluating changes in circulation patterns and mass transport caused by highway-crossing embankments. A model of subregion of Port Royal Sound including the highway crossings and having a grid size of 61 m (200ft) was derived from a 183-m (600-ft) model of the entire Port Royal Sound estuarine system. The 183-m model was used to compute boundary-value data for the 61-m submodel, which was then used to simulate flow conditions with and without the highway embankments in place. The numerical simulations show that, with the highway embankment in place, mass transport between the Broad River and Battery Creek is reduced and mass transport between the Beaufort River and Battery Creek is increased. The net result is that mass transport into and out of upper Battery Creek is reduced. The presence of the embankments also alters circulation patterns within Battery Creek.

  13. Drivers of uncertainty in simulated ocean circulation and heat uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Markus B.; Zanna, Laure

    2017-02-01

    The impact of uncertainties in air-sea fluxes and ocean model parameters on the ocean circulation and ocean heat uptake (OHU) is assessed in a novel modeling framework. We use an ocean-only model forced with the simulated sea surface fields of the CMIP5 climate models. The simulations are performed using control and 1% CO2 warming scenarios. The ocean-only ensemble adequately reproduces the mean Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and the zonally integrated OHU. The ensemble spread in AMOC strength, its weakening, and Atlantic OHU due to different air-sea fluxes is twice as large as the uncertainty range related to vertical and mesocale eddy diffusivities. The sensitivity of OHU to uncertainties in air-sea fluxes and model parameters differs vastly across basins, with the Southern Ocean exhibiting strong sensitivity to air-sea fluxes and model parameters. This study clearly demonstrates that model biases in air-sea fluxes are one of the key sources of uncertainty in climate simulations.

  14. Simulations of Tropical Circulation and Winter Precipitation Over North India: an Application of a Tropical Band Version of Regional Climate Model (RegT-Band)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, P. R.; Kar, S. C.; Mohanty, U. C.; Dey, S.; Kumari, S.; Sinha, P.; Raju, P. V. S.; Shekhar, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, simulations have been carried out to study the relationship between winter-time precipitations and the large-scale global forcing (ENSO) using the tropical band version of Regional Climate Model (RegT-Band) for 5 El Niño and 4 La Niña years. The RegT-Band model is integrated with the observed sea-surface temperature and lateral boundary conditions from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-Department of Energy (DOE) reanalysis 2 (NCEP-DOE2). The model domain extends from 50°S to 50°N and covers the entire tropics at a grid spacing of 45 km, i.e., it includes lateral boundary forcing only at the southern and northern boundaries. The performance evaluation of the model in capturing the large-scale fields followed by ENSO response with winter-time precipitation has been carried out by using model simulations against NCEP-DOE2 and Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) precipitation data. The analysis suggests that the model is able to reproduce the upper airfields and large-scale precipitation during winter time, although the model has some systematic biases compared to the observations. A comparison of model-simulated precipitation with observed precipitation at 17 station locations has been carried out. It is noticed that the RegT-Band model simulations are able to bring out the observed features reasonably well. Therefore, this preliminary study indicates that the tropical band version of the regional climate model can be effectively used for the better understanding of the large-scale global forcing.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Regional Circulation in the Monterey Bay Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Y. H.; Dietrich, D. E.; Ferziger, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to produce a high-resolution numerical model of Mon- terey Bay area in which the dynamics are determined by the complex geometry of the coastline, steep bathymetry, and the in uence of the water masses that constitute the CCS. Our goal is to simulate the regional-scale ocean response with realistic dynamics (annual cycle), forcing, and domain. In particular, we focus on non-hydrostatic e ects (by comparing the results of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic models) and the role of complex geometry, i.e. the bay and submarine canyon, on the nearshore circulation. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the rst to simulate the regional circulation in the vicinity of Monterey Bay using a non-hydrostatic model. Section 2 introduces the high resolution Monterey Bay area regional model (MBARM). Section 3 provides the results and veri cation with mooring and satellite data. Section 4 compares the results of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic models.

  16. Fabrication of thin bulk ceramics for microwave circulator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ings, J.B.; Simmins, J.J.; May, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    Planer MMIC circulator applications require the production of thin, flat garnet, spinel, and hexagonal ferrite circulator elements. Fabrication of cira 250 {mu}m circulator elements was done by tape casting and roll compaction. For the garnet, tape cast gave equivalent results to roll compaction. For the spinel and hexaferrite materials, which undergo magnetic flocculation, roll compaction was found to be the preferred fabrication method. Roll compacted lithium ferrite resulted in higher densities and lower {triangle}H and tan{delta} than did the tape case material. Roll compacted barium hexaferrite resulted in higher densities and remanent magnetization than did the tape cast material.

  17. Early Eocene's climate and ocean circulation from coupled model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

    2014-05-01

    While proxy data provide a snapshot of climate conditions at a specific location, coupled atmosphere-ocean models are able to expand this knowledge over the globe. Therefore, they are indispensable tools for understanding past climate conditions. We model the dynamical state of atmosphere and ocean during the Early Eocene and pre-industrial times, using the coupled atmosphere-ocean model ECHAM5/MPIOM with realistic reconstructions of vegetation and CO2. The resulting simulated climate variables are compared to terrestrial and oceanic proxies. The Early Eocene climate is in the global mean warmer (~13°C) and wetter (~1 mm/d) than in pre-industrial times. Especially temperatures in the Southern Ocean, the Greenland Sea and Arctic Ocean raise by up to 25K, being in accordance with surface temperature estimates from terrestrial and marine proxy data. The oceans are hereby rendered ice-free, leading to a decrease of polar albedo and thereby facilitating polar warming. This leads to a by 5K diminished equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Warmer temperatures as well as changed bathymetry have an effect on ocean dynamics in the Early Eocene. Although deep-water formation can be found in the Greenland Sea, Weddell Sea, and Tethys Sea, it is weaker than in the pre-industrial run and the resulting circulation is shallower. This is not only visible in water transport through sea gates but also in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), adopting its maximum at 700m depths in the Early Eocene, while maximum transport is reached in the pre-industrial control run at 1200m. Albeit a shallow and weak thermohaline circulation, a global ocean conveyor belt is being triggered, causing a transport from the areas of subduction through the Atlantic and Southern Oceans into the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

  18. VCSEL Applications and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson; Goorjian, Peter; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Li, Jian-Zhong

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) simulation and its applications. Details are given on the optical interconnection in information technology of VCSEL, the formulation of the simulation, its numeric algorithm, and the computational results.

  19. Sensitivity simulations of superparameterised convection in a general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) covering a horizontal grid spacing from a few hundred meters up to a few kilometers have been used to explicitly resolve small-scale and mesoscale processes. Special attention has been paid to realistically represent cloud dynamics and cloud microphysics involving cloud droplets, ice crystals, graupel and aerosols. The entire variety of physical processes on the small-scale interacts with the larger-scale circulation and has to be parameterised on the coarse grid of a general circulation model (GCM). Since more than a decade an approach to connect these two types of models which act on different scales has been developed to resolve cloud processes and their interactions with the large-scale flow. The concept is to use an ensemble of CRM grid cells in a 2D or 3D configuration in each grid cell of the GCM to explicitly represent small-scale processes avoiding the use of convection and large-scale cloud parameterisations which are a major source for uncertainties regarding clouds. The idea is commonly known as superparameterisation or cloud-resolving convection parameterisation. This study presents different simulations of an adapted Earth System Model (ESM) connected to a CRM which acts as a superparameterisation. Simulations have been performed with the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) model comparing conventional GCM runs (including convection and large-scale cloud parameterisations) with the improved superparameterised EMAC (SP-EMAC) modeling one year with prescribed sea surface temperatures and sea ice content. The sensitivity of atmospheric temperature, precipiation patterns, cloud amount and types is observed changing the embedded CRM represenation (orientation, width, no. of CRM cells, 2D vs. 3D). Additionally, we also evaluate the radiation balance with the new model configuration, and systematically analyse the impact of tunable parameters on the radiation budget and hydrological cycle. Furthermore, the subgrid

  20. Hospitable archean climates simulated by a general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Wolf, E T; Toon, O B

    2013-07-01

    Evidence from ancient sediments indicates that liquid water and primitive life were present during the Archean despite the faint young Sun. To date, studies of Archean climate typically utilize simplified one-dimensional models that ignore clouds and ice. Here, we use an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago when the Sun was 20% dimmer than it is today. Surface properties are assumed to be equal to those of the present day, while ocean heat transport varies as a function of sea ice extent. Present climate is duplicated with 0.06 bar of CO2 or alternatively with 0.02 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. Hot Archean climates, as implied by some isotopic reconstructions of ancient marine cherts, are unattainable even in our warmest simulation having 0.2 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. However, cooler climates with significant polar ice, but still dominated by open ocean, can be maintained with modest greenhouse gas amounts, posing no contradiction with CO2 constraints deduced from paleosols or with practical limitations on CH4 due to the formation of optically thick organic hazes. Our results indicate that a weak version of the faint young Sun paradox, requiring only that some portion of the planet's surface maintain liquid water, may be resolved with moderate greenhouse gas inventories. Thus, hospitable late Archean climates are easily obtained in our climate model.

  1. Analysis and applications of quadrature hybrids as RF circulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J.

    1993-12-31

    The operation of a quadrature hybrid as a power combiner is analyzed. The analytical results are compared with data measured experimentally using a 211 MHz cavity. Graphical solution of the measured cases are in good agreement with analytical predictions. The use of the 90{degree}-hybrid as an RF circulator is also analyzed. The active operation of the harmonic cavity in the NSLS VUV-ring is used to demonstrate this application. This fourth-harmonic cavity is used to change the shape of the bucket potential to lengthen a stored bunch. Thus, a longer stored-beam lifetime can be achieved without compromising the high brightness of the VUV photon beam. If operated actively, the harmonic cavity would present a mismatched load to an RF generator. Thus, a need exists for a circulator. Similarities in operation between the 90{degree}-hybrid and a circulator are discussed.

  2. Application of helium isotopes to studies of ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, P.; Newton, R.; Winckler, G.; Lupton, J.; Jenkins, W.; Top, Z.; Roether, W.; Jean-Baptiste, P.

    2004-12-01

    Since the discovery of excess He-3 in the ocean by Clarke and Craig in the 1960's helium isotopes have been used in local, regional and global studies of circulation patterns and water mass transformation in the world ocean. From initial pilot studies through systematic exploration of these tracers during the GEOSECS (Geochemical Ocean Sections) program to the recent global survey as part of the WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) hydrographic program (WHP) we obtained more detailed information on the distribution of helium isotopes, as well as their sources and sinks in the ocean. This information can now be applied to construct global fields of helium isotopes and to extract unique information on the circulation patterns at different depth levels in the ocean, as well as on local and regional processes such as ventilation of water masses in deep water formation regions. Additionally, the data sets are now sufficiently large to be useful for validation of Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCM's). In this contribution we present examples of global helium isotope fields constructed from major programs such as GEOCECS, TTO (Transient Tracers in the Ocean), SAVE (South Atlantic Ventilation Experiment) and WOCE, as well as from individual ocean sections. We use the data to delineate circulation patterns in the major ocean basins at several depth levels, especially mid-depth waters. Additionally, we outline the use of helium isotopes in studies of ocean ventilation. Finally, we compare observed and simulated helium isotope fields to highlight OGCM capabilities and deficiencies to reproduce internal He-3 excesses in the ocean and the related ventilation processes.

  3. Towards petascale simulation of atmospheric circulations with soundproof equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Zbigniew; Wyszogrodzki, Andrzej; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    This paper highlights progress with the development of a petascale implementation of general-purpose high-resolution (nonoscillatory) hydrodynamical simulation code EULAG [Prusa et al. 2008, Comput. Fluids 37, 1193]. The applications addressed are anelastic atmospheric flows in the range of scales from micro to planetary. The new modeldomain decomposition into a three dimensional processor array has been implemented to increase model performance and scalability. The performance of the new code is demonstrated on the IBM BlueGene/L and Cray XT4/XT5 supercomputers. The results show significant improvement of the model efficacy compared to the original decomposition into a two-dimensional processor array in the horizontal — a standard in meteorological models.

  4. Aspects of Numerical Simulation of Circulation Control Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Anders, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    The mass-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for circulation control airfoils. Numerical solutions are computed with a multigrid method that uses an implicit approximate factorization smoother. The effects of flow conditions (e.g., free-stream Mach number, angle of attack, momentum coefficient) and mesh on the prediction of circulation control airfoil flows are considered. In addition, the impact of turbulence modeling, including curvature effects and modifications to reduce eddy viscosity levels in the wall jet (i.e., Coanda flow), is discussed. Computed pressure distributions are compared with available experimental data.

  5. Simulations of the Diabatic Circulations of Neptune and Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, T.; Conrath, B.; Gierasch, P.; Ustinov, E.

    1996-06-01

    Voyager IRIS retrievals of temperature and para-hydrogen fraction for Neptune and Uranus in the range 100-1000 mbar are used to estimate the diabatic heating and hence the vertical velocity, dot theta , in isentropic coordinates, where theta is the potential temperature. The continuity equation, assuming steady motion, then yields the meridional circulation, v. The thermal wind equation yields the zonal wind, u. Both planets show monotonically increasing potential vorticity with latitude, thereby satisfying the Charney-Stern stability criterion. In contrast, Jupiter appears to violate the Charney-Stern criterion but be marginally stable with respect to Arnol'd's 2nd stability criterion, with the Great Red Spot and other vortices arising from fluctuations about this marginally stable state. The suggestion is that Neptune's vortices arise by means other than upper-tropospheric shear instability. Geostrophic balance of the deduced meridional circulation implies a net zonal force G = -fv, where f is the Coriolis parameter; this force must arise from irreversible processes. Planetary-wave breaking, although important in Earth's stratosphere, can be tentatively ruled out for Neptune and Uranus based on the data. We demonstrate using the EPIC general circulation model, with para hydrogen initially set to equilibrium values, that a Rayleigh-drag form for the zonal force, G = -u/tau , leads over time to the correct sign of the meridional circulation and disequilibrium of para hydrogen. Gravity-wave breaking is one possible explanation for this form of G.

  6. MD simulations suggest important surface differences between reconstituted and circulating spherical HDL1[S

    PubMed Central

    Segrest, Jere P.; Jones, Martin K.; Catte, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Since spheroidal HDL particles (sHDL) are highly dynamic, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are useful for obtaining structural models. Here we use MD to simulate sHDL with stoichiometries of reconstituted and circulating particles. The hydrophobic effect during simulations rapidly remodels discoidal HDL containing mixed lipids to sHDL containing a cholesteryl ester/triglyceride (CE/TG) core. We compare the results of simulations of previously characterized reconstituted sHDL particles containing two or three apoA-I created in the absence of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) with simulations of circulating human HDL containing two or three apoA-I without apoA-II. We find that circulating sHDL compared with reconstituted sHDL with the same number of apoA-I per particle contain approximately equal volumes of core lipid but significantly less surface lipid monolayers. We conclude that in vitro reconstituted sHDL particles contain kinetically trapped excess phospholipid and are less than ideal models for circulating sHDL particles. In the circulation, phospholipid transfer via PLTP decreases the ratio of phospholipid to apolipoprotein for all sHDL particles. Further, sHDL containing two or three apoA-I adapt to changes in surface area by condensation of common conformational motifs. These results represent an important step toward resolving the complicated issue of the protein and lipid stoichiometry of circulating HDL. PMID:23856070

  7. Postural reactions of circulation and its regulation during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. I.; Valyev, V. A.; Kirillov, M. V.; Gornago, V. A.

    The extention and intensification of space exploration the influence of weightlessness on human organism and the formation of a new level of adaptation. The studies of blood circulation is very important because of freguent occurance of cardiovascular disorders in the middle age sudjects. In connection with extention and intensification of space exploration the influence of weightlessness on human organism and the formation of a new level of adaptation mechanisms acguires a special significance (5, 9, 10). The data obtained in recently undertaken model experiments (1, 5, 10), and also during space flights (5, 9) indicate that weightlessness in many ways affects various physiological systems of organism, and first of all cardiovascular system with the development of reflex, humoral and metabolic reactions. It also indicates, that the changes in functioning of cardiovascular system brings about the discruption of its regular responses, which is foremost expressed in decreased antigravitational response, which manifests itself in lowered orthostatic stability (2, 4, 6). It is worth mentioning, that the changes during previous investigations of haemodynamics were mainly carried out with the subjects under forty, therefore agerelated specific features of blood circulation system response are described in a few articles (5, 8). The studies of the kind are especially important because of frequent occurence of cardiovascular disorders such as heart and brain vessels atherosclerosis, hypertension in the middle age, which can to a great extent complicate and affect the "acute" period of adaptation to weightlessness and readaptation process.

  8. Evaluating Parameterizations in General Circulation Models: Climate Simulation Meets Weather Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T J; Potter, G L; Williamson, D L; Cederwall, R T; Boyle, J S; Fiorino, M; Hnilo, J J; Olson, J G; Xie, S; Yio, J J

    2004-05-06

    To significantly improve the simulation of climate by general circulation models (GCMs), systematic errors in representations of relevant processes must first be identified, and then reduced. This endeavor demands that the GCM parameterizations of unresolved processes, in particular, should be tested over a wide range of time scales, not just in climate simulations. Thus, a numerical weather prediction (NWP) methodology for evaluating model parameterizations and gaining insights into their behavior may prove useful, provided that suitable adaptations are made for implementation in climate GCMs. This method entails the generation of short-range weather forecasts by a realistically initialized climate GCM, and the application of six-hourly NWP analyses and observations of parameterized variables to evaluate these forecasts. The behavior of the parameterizations in such a weather-forecasting framework can provide insights on how these schemes might be improved, and modified parameterizations then can be tested in the same framework. In order to further this method for evaluating and analyzing parameterizations in climate GCMs, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding a joint venture of its Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: the CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT). This article elaborates the scientific rationale for CAPT, discusses technical aspects of its methodology, and presents examples of its implementation in a representative climate GCM.

  9. Design and Application of Novel Horizontal Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lit, Q. H.; Zhang, Y. G.; Meng, A. H.

    The vertical circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler has been found wide application in power generation and tends to be enlarged in capacity. Because CFB is one of environment friendly and high efficiency combustion technologies, the CFB boiler has also been expected to be used in the industrial area, such as textile mill, region heating, brewery, seed drying and so on. However, the necessary height of furnace is hard to be implemented for CFB with especially small capacity. Thereby, a novel horizontal circulating fluidized bed boiler has been proposed and developed. The horizontal CFB is composed of primary combustion chamber, secondary combustion chamber, burnout chamber, cyclone, loop seal, heat recovery area. The primary combustion chamber is a riser like as that in vertical CFB, and the secondary combustion chamber is a downward passage that is a natural extension of the primary riser, which can reduce the overall height of the boiler. In some extent, the burnout chamber is also the extension of primary riser. The capacity of horizontal CFB is about 4.2-24.5MWth (6-35t/h) steam output or equivalent hot water supply. The hot water boiler of 7MWth and steam boilers of 4.2MWth (6t/h) and 10.5MWth (15t/h) are all designed and working well now. The three units of hot water horizontal CFB boiler were erected in the Neimenggu Autonomous Region, Huhehaote city for region heating. The three units of steam horizontal CFB has been installed in Yunnan, Jiang Xi and Guangdong provinces, respectively. The basic principle for horizontal CFB and experiences for designing and operating are presented in this paper. Some discussions are also given to demonstrate the promising future of horizontal CFB.

  10. Numerical simulation of Black Sea circulation and pollution propagation in coastal waters of the Great Sochi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Vladimir; Gusev, Anatoly; Diansky, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    The numerical modelling of the Black Sea (BS) is performed by using INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model). The model is based on the primitive equations in spherical s-coordinate system with free surface boundary condition. The numerical algorithm is based on the method of multicomponent splitting and has a flexible modular structure. The splitting with respect to physical processes and spatial coordinate is used. A computational method is proposed of the polluting substances (PS) transport in the BS region adjacent to the Great Sochi. It is based on INMOM application for the BS in two versions: M1 and M2. In the M1 INMOM has a uniform spatial resolution ~4 km, while M2 has non-uniform one with refinement to 50 m in the BS region near Great Sochi coast. The M2 is used only during the periods of PS transport computation for which the initial hydrothermodynamic conditions are taken from M1. Both versions reveal complexity of the BS circulation nature, however, M2 more adequately reproduces eddy circulation due to higher horizontal resolution in its eastern part. Hence, a suggestion is made that BS eddy structure simulation requires model resolution ~1.5 km, and the major factor of quasistationary Batumi anti-cyclonic gyre formation is the topographical features in this part of the sea. A computation of PS distribution from the rivers Sochi, Host and Mzymta and from 18 pipes of deep-water sewage production was performed for the high-water period from 01.04.2007 to 30.04.2007. It is shown that the significant contribution to PS distribution from these punctual sources is made by whirlwind mesoscale formations generating complicated 3-dimensional PS distribution.

  11. Variable-resolution frameworks for the simulation of tropical cyclones in global atmospheric general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzycki, Colin

    The ability of atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs) to resolve tropical cyclones in the climate system has traditionally been difficult. The challenges include adequately capturing storms which are small in size relative to model grids and the fact that key thermodynamic processes require a significant level of parameterization. At traditional GCM grid spacings of 50-300 km tropical cyclones are severely under-resolved, if not completely unresolved. This thesis explores a variable-resolution global model approach that allows for high spatial resolutions in areas of interest, such as low-latitude ocean basins where tropical cyclogenesis occurs. Such GCM designs with multi-resolution meshes serve to bridge the gap between globally-uniform grids and limited area models and have the potential to become a future tool for regional climate assessments. A statically-nested, variable-resolution option has recently been introduced into the Department of Energy/National Center for Atmospheric Research (DoE/NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) Spectral Element (SE) dynamical core. Using an idealized tropical cyclone test, variable-resolution meshes are shown to significantly lessen computational requirements in regional GCM studies. Furthermore, the tropical cyclone simulations are free of spurious numerical errors at the resolution interfaces. Utilizing aquaplanet simulations as an intermediate test between idealized simulations and fully-coupled climate model runs, climate statistics within refined patches are shown to be well-matched to globally-uniform simulations of the same grid spacing. Facets of the CAM version 4 (CAM4) subgrid physical parameterizations are likely too scale sensitive for variable-resolution applications, but the newer CAM5 package is vastly improved in performance at multiple grid spacings. Multi-decadal simulations following 'Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project' protocols have been conducted with variable-resolution grids. Climate

  12. A simulation of the winter and summer circulations with the NMC Global Spectral Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinter, J. L., III; Shukla, J.; Marx, L.; Schneider, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    The medium range forecast model of the NMC has been integrated to produce winter and summer simulations. It is found that the model climatology is similar to that of the observed atmosphere as well as climatologies of other general circulation models. The stationary and transient features of the model circulation are described, including both tropical and extratropical regions. The model hydrological cycle, radiative balance, and surface heat budget are discussed. Comparison with observations shows that the model is colder than that observed in the troposphere and cools in the lower stratosphere in the tropics and near the poles in both simulations. It is suggested that the upper branch of the Hadley cell is poorly simulated in the integrated model. The simulations are in reasonable agreement with the observations in sea level pressure, the structure of the tropospheric zonal jets, and the winter hemispheric stationary waves.

  13. MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION DYNAMICS FROM 3D MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, Dário; Charbonneau, Paul; Miesch, Mark

    2015-02-10

    The form of solar meridional circulation is a very important ingredient for mean field flux transport dynamo models. However, a shroud of mystery still surrounds this large-scale flow, given that its measurement using current helioseismic techniques is challenging. In this work, we use results from three-dimensional global simulations of solar convection to infer the dynamical behavior of the established meridional circulation. We make a direct comparison between the meridional circulation that arises in these simulations and the latest observations. Based on our results, we argue that there should be an equatorward flow at the base of the convection zone at mid-latitudes, below the current maximum depth helioseismic measures can probe (0.75 R{sub ⊙}). We also provide physical arguments to justify this behavior. The simulations indicate that the meridional circulation undergoes substantial changes in morphology as the magnetic cycle unfolds. We close by discussing the importance of these dynamical changes for current methods of observation which involve long averaging periods of helioseismic data. Also noteworthy is the fact that these topological changes indicate a rich interaction between magnetic fields and plasma flows, which challenges the ubiquitous kinematic approach used in the vast majority of mean field dynamo simulations.

  14. Mean Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Across 26.5 degs N from Eddy-Resolving Simulations Compared to Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-30

    Mean Atlantic meridional overturning circulation across 26.5N from eddy-resolving simulations compared to observations X. Xu,1 W. J. Schmitz Jr.,2 H...Observations along 26.5N are used to examine the time mean structure of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) in eddy-resolving simulations...other ocean general circulation models and includes a secondary transport maximum near 4000 m corresponding to Nordic Seas Overflow Water. The modeled

  15. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  16. Energetics analysis of the observed and simulated general circulation using three-dimensional normal mode expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kung, Ernest C.; Baker, Wayman E.

    1986-01-01

    The energetics characteristics of the observed and simulated general circulation are analyzed using three-dimensional normal mode expansions. The data sets involved are the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) analysis and simulation data and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) analysis data. The spectral energy properties of the Rossby and gravity modes and energy transformations are presented. Significant influences of model characteristics and the assimilation techniques are observed in the barotropic energy spectrum, particularly for the gravity mode. Energy transformations of the zonal mean field in the GLA analysis and simulation are similar, but distinctly different from that in the GFDL analysis. However, overall, the energy generation in the baroclinic mode is largely balanced by the sink in the barotropic mode. The present study may demonstrate utilities of the three-dimensional normal mode energetics in the analysis of the general circulation.

  17. Verification of the isotopic composition of precipitation simulated by a regional isotope circulation model over Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Masahiro; Ichiyanagi, Kimpei; Yoshimura, Kei

    2016-01-01

    The isotopic composition (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) of precipitation simulated by a regional isotope circulation model with a horizontal resolution of 10, 30 and 50 km was compared with observations at 56 sites over Japan in 2013. All simulations produced reasonable spatio-temporal variations in δ(18)O in precipitation over Japan, except in January. In January, simulated δ(18)O values in precipitation were higher than observed values on the Pacific side of Japan, especially during an explosively developing extratropical cyclone event. This caused a parameterisation of precipitation formulation about the large fraction of precipitated water to liquid detrained water in the lower troposphere. As a result, most water vapour that transported from the Sea of Japan precipitated on the Sea of Japan side. The isotopic composition of precipitation was a useful verification tool for the parameterisation of precipitation formulation as well as large-scale moisture transport processes in the regional isotope circulation model.

  18. Three dimensional simulation of transport and fate of oil spill under wave induced circulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianyi; Peter Sheng, Y

    2014-03-15

    An oil spill model is developed and coupled to a current-wave model to simulate oil spill transport in aquatic environments where waves are present. The oil spill model incorporates physical-chemical processes of oil spill, and simulates oil slick transport by a circulation-driven Lagrangian Parcel model. Using the coupled oil spill model and the current-wave model CH3D-SWAN, a laboratory observed wave induced circulation and oil slick evolution are successfully simulated, while different current-wave coupling schemes generate different flow patterns and oil slick evolution. The modeling system is also shown to simulate Langmuir circulation and resulting oil slicks. Hypothetical scenarios of oil spill near Virginia coast during Hurricane Isabel and Irene are simulated using the oil spill model and the CH3D-Storm Surge Modeling System to assess the role of storm waves during oil spill. The spill area is significantly larger when storm waves are considered, implying waves significantly increase oil spill dispersion.

  19. The Early Jurassic climate: General circulation model simulations and the paleoclimate record

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of several general circulation model simulations of the Early Jurassic climate. The general circulation model employed was developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies while most paleoclimate data were provided by the Paleographic Atlas Project of the University of Chicago. The first chapter presents an Early Jurassic base simulation, which uses detailed reconstructions of paleogeography, vegetation, and sea surface temperature as boundary condition data sets. The resulting climatology reveals an Earth 5.2[degrees]C warmer, globally, than at present and a latitudinal temperature gradient dominated by high-latitude warming (+20[degrees]C) and little tropical change (+1[degrees]C). Comparisons show a good correlation between simulated results and paleoclimate data. Sensitivity experiments are used to investigate any model-data mismatches. Chapters two and three discuss two important aspects of Early Jurassic climate, continental aridity and global warming. Chapter two focuses on the hydrological capabilities of the general circulation model. The general circulation model's hydrologic diagnostics are evaluated, using the distribution of modern deserts and Early Jurassic paleoclimate data as validating constraints. A new method, based on general circulation model diagnostics and empirical formulae, is proposed for evaluating moisture balance. Chapter three investigates the cause of past global warming, concentrating on the role of increased ocean heat transport. Early Jurassic simulations show that increased ocean heat transports may have been a major factor in past climates. Increased ocean heat transports create latitudinal temperature gradients that closely approximate paleoclimate data and solve the problem of tropical overheating that results from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. Increased carbon dioxide cannot duplicate the Jurassic climate without also including increased ocean heat transports.

  20. General circulation model simulations of winter and summer sea-level pressures over North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Legates, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, observed sea-level pressures were used to evaluate winter and summer sea-level pressures over North America simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) general circulation models. The objective of the study is to determine how similar the spatial and temporal distributions of GCM-simulated daily sea-level pressures over North America are to observed distributions. Overall, both models are better at reproducing observed within-season variance of winter and summer sea-level pressures than they are at simulating the magnitude of mean winter and summer sea-level pressures. -from Authors

  1. Simulation of the great plains low-level jet and associated clouds by general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J.; Bian, X.; Corsetti, L.

    1996-07-01

    The low-level jet frequently observed in the Great Plains of the United States forms preferentially at night and apparently influences the timing of the thunderstorms in the region. The authors have found that both the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts general circulation model and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model simulate the low-level jet rather well, although the spatial distribution of the jet frequency simulated by the two GCM`s differ considerably. Sensitivity experiments have demonstrated that the simulated low-level jet is surprisingly robust, with similar simulations at much coarser horizontal and vertical resolutions. However, both GCM`s fail to simulate the observed relationship between clouds and the low-level jet. The pronounced nocturnal maximum in thunderstorm frequency associated with the low-level jet is not simulated well by either GCM, with only weak evidence of a nocturnal maximum in the Great Plains. 36 refs., 20 figs.

  2. The Sensitivity of WRF Daily Summertime Simulations over West Africa to Alternative Parameterizations. Part 1: African Wave Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Erik; Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulakeza, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) as a West African regional-atmospheric model is evaluated. The study tests the sensitivity of WRF-simulated vorticity maxima associated with African easterly waves to 64 combinations of alternative parameterizations in a series of simulations in September. In all, 104 simulations of 12-day duration during 11 consecutive years are examined. The 64 combinations combine WRF parameterizations of cumulus convection, radiation transfer, surface hydrology, and PBL physics. Simulated daily and mean circulation results are validated against NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and NCEP/Department of Energy Global Reanalysis 2. Precipitation is considered in a second part of this two-part paper. A wide range of 700-hPa vorticity validation scores demonstrates the influence of alternative parameterizations. The best WRF performers achieve correlations against reanalysis of 0.40-0.60 and realistic amplitudes of spatiotemporal variability for the 2006 focus year while a parallel-benchmark simulation by the NASA Regional Model-3 (RM3) achieves higher correlations, but less realistic spatiotemporal variability. The largest favorable impact on WRF-vorticity validation is achieved by selecting the Grell-Devenyi cumulus convection scheme, resulting in higher correlations against reanalysis than simulations using the Kain-Fritch convection. Other parameterizations have less-obvious impact, although WRF configurations incorporating one surface model and PBL scheme consistently performed poorly. A comparison of reanalysis circulation against two NASA radiosonde stations confirms that both reanalyses represent observations well enough to validate the WRF results. Validation statistics for optimized WRF configurations simulating the parallel period during 10 additional years are less favorable than for 2006.

  3. Recent results from the GISS model of the global atmosphere. [circulation simulation for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Large numerical atmospheric circulation models are in increasingly widespread use both for operational weather forecasting and for meteorological research. The results presented here are from a model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) and described in detail by Somerville et al. (1974). This model is representative of a class of models, recently surveyed by the Global Atmospheric Research Program (1974), designed to simulate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, large-scale dynamics of the earth's atmosphere.

  4. Numerical simulation on casing modification of a boiler water circulation pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Z.; Fan, Y. Z.; Liu, S. H.; Wu, Y. L.; Zuo, Z. G.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, hydraulic performance comparisons are made by numerical simulation method on boiler water circulation pump with casings of different shapes. The existing pump adopts a semispherical casing and a garlic-shaped casing. Results show that in the garlic-shaped casing noticeable swirling vortex can be found in the top region of the discharge nozzle, and semispherical casing has better performance in hydraulic efficiency and head.

  5. Comparative energetics of the observed and simulated global circulation during the special observing periods of FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, E. C.; Baker, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Energetics of the observed and simulated global circulation are evaluated in the zonal spectral domain for the special observing periods of FGGE. The study utilizes GLA analyses of FGGE observational data and parallel simulation experiments. There are noticeable differences in energy transformations between the observation and simulation during SOP-1. These include the baroclinic conversion C(n) by the zonal mean motion and short-wave disturbances, and the nonlinear wave-wave interaction L(n) at the long and short waves. The energy transformations of the short-wave disturbances are much more intense in the simulated circulation than in the observation. However, good agreement is noted in the conversion and dissipation of kinetic energy in the large- and cyclone-wave range n = 1-10. Spectral distributions of global energy transformations at the long- and cyclone-wave range indicate that the SOP-2 simulation agrees more closely with the observed fields than the SOP-1 simulation. Other pertinent points of energetics diagnosis are also included in the discussion.

  6. A heuristic simulation model of Lake Ontario circulation and mass balance transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, J.E.; Chalupnicki, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The redistribution of suspended organisms and materials by large-scale currents is part of natural ecological processes in large aquatic systems but can contribute to ecosystem disruption when exotic elements are introduced into the system. Toxic compounds and planktonic organisms spend various lengths of time in suspension before settling to the bottom or otherwise being removed. We constructed a simple physical simulation model, including the influence of major tributaries, to qualitatively examine circulation patterns in Lake Ontario. We used a simple mass balance approach to estimate the relative water input to and export from each of 10 depth regime-specific compartments (nearshore vs. offshore) comprising Lake Ontario. Despite its simplicity, our model produced circulation patterns similar to those reported by more complex studies in the literature. A three-gyre pattern, with the classic large counterclockwise central lake circulation, and a simpler two-gyre system were both observed. These qualitative simulations indicate little offshore transport along the south shore, except near the mouths of the Niagara River and Oswego River. Complex flow structure was evident, particularly near the Niagara River mouth and in offshore waters of the eastern basin. Average Lake Ontario residence time is 8 years, but the fastest model pathway indicated potential transport of plankton through the lake in as little as 60 days. This simulation illustrates potential invasion pathways and provides rough estimates of planktonic larval dispersal or chemical transport among nearshore and offshore areas of Lake Ontario. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  7. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J.; Randall, D.A.; Boer, G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

  8. Simulated circulation and transport in adjacent wind-driven estuaries in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Jeanne C.; Bales, Jerad D.; ,

    1994-01-01

    The Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries, in North Carolina, display similar physical characteristics because of their proximity and physiographic setting. Yet, because of channel configuration and longitudinal alignment, differences in circulation and flushing exist. Spatially detailed hydrodynamic models were applied to each estuary to characterize these differences. The models were calibrated and tested using continuous records of water level and salinity collected at 15-minute intervals at sites throughout each study reach. Data and model simulations indicate that the alignment of each estuary in relation to Pamlico Sound and the predominant wind directions have significant effects on circulation and transport within each system. The range in simulated flow at the mouth of the Neuse River estuary was nearly 25 percent greater than that simulated at the mouth of the Pamlico River estuary. Simulated cumulative transport for an 11-day period in June 1991 was also greater and more dynamic in the Neuse River than in the Pamlico River. Simulated currents were generally higher in the Neuse River than in the Pamlico River and the tracking of individual particles showed greater overall movement in the Neuse River.

  9. Time-varying changes in the simulated structure of the Brewer-Dobson Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Aquila, Valentina; Waugh, Darryn W.; Oman, Luke D.

    2017-01-01

    A series of simulations using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model are analyzed in order to assess changes in the Brewer-Dobson Circulation (BDC) over the past 55 years. When trends are computed over the past 55 years, the BDC accelerates throughout the stratosphere, consistent with previous modeling results. However, over the second half of the simulations (i.e., since the late 1980s), the model simulates structural changes in the BDC as the temporal evolution of the BDC varies between regions in the stratosphere. In the mid-stratosphere in the midlatitude Northern Hemisphere, the BDC does not accelerate in the ensemble mean of our simulations despite increases in greenhouse gas concentrations and warming sea surface temperatures, and it even decelerates in one ensemble member. This deceleration is reminiscent of changes inferred from satellite instruments and in situ measurements. In contrast, the BDC in the lower stratosphere continues to accelerate. The main forcing agents for the recent slowdown in the mid-stratosphere appear to be declining ozone-depleting substance (ODS) concentrations and the timing of volcanic eruptions. Changes in both mean age of air and the tropical upwelling of the residual circulation indicate a lack of recent acceleration. We therefore clarify that the statement that is often made that climate models simulate a decreasing age throughout the stratosphere only applies over long time periods and is not necessarily the case for the past 25 years, when most tracer measurements were taken.

  10. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of a 2D Circulation Control Wind Tunnel Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Jones, Greg; Lin, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver for a circulation control airfoil. 2D and 3D simulation results are compared to a circulation control wind tunnel test conducted at the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART). The RANS simulations are compared to a low blowing case with a jet momentum coefficient, C(sub u), of 0:047 and a higher blowing case of 0.115. Three dimensional simulations of the model and tunnel walls show wall effects on the lift and airfoil surface pressures. These wall effects include a 4% decrease of the midspan sectional lift for the C(sub u) 0.115 blowing condition. Simulations comparing the performance of the Spalart Allmaras (SA) and Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence models are also made, showing the SST model compares best to the experimental data. A Rotational/Curvature Correction (RCC) to the turbulence model is also evaluated demonstrating an improvement in the CFD predictions.

  11. Application of long-circulating liposomes to cancer photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Oku, N; Saito, N; Namba, Y; Tsukada, H; Dolphin, D; Okada, S

    1997-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a cancer treatment is notable for its quite low side effects in comparison with those of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the accumulation of porphyrin derivatives used in PDT into tumor tissues is rather low. Since long-circulating liposomes are known to accumulate passively into tumor tissues, we liposomalized a porphyrin derivative, benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), and used these liposomes to investigate the usefulness of PDT for tumor-bearing mice. BPD-MA was liposomalized into glucuronate-modified liposomes, which are known to be long-circulating. These liposomes were injected i.v. into Balb/c mice bearing Meth A sarcoma, and tumor regression and survival time were monitored after irradiation with laser light. Tumor regression and complete curing of tumor (80% cure rate by the treatment with 6 mg/kg BPD-MA) were observed when long circulating liposomalized BPD-MA was injected and laser-irradiated. In contrast, only a 20% cure rate was obtained when the animals were treated with BPD-MA solution or BPD-MA entrapped in conventional liposomes. These results suggest that a long-circulating liposomal formulation of photo-sensitive agents is useful for PDT.

  12. The potential of aridity of Great Indian Desert in the atmospheric circulation: A numerical simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Raghava, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    An assortment of predominant physiographic features: arid and semiarid Great Indian Desert (GID) in the northwest, snow covered Himalayas in the north and evergreen tropical forests of Karnataka and Kerala in the south of India nestle in Indian monsoon region. In an attempt to understand the role of aridity of GID, two seasonal simulations of atmospheric circulations during June, July and August 1987 had been made with LMD Atmospheric General Circulation Model using two classified vegetation global covers. They distinguished in the vegetation merely over GID replaced with the type of Amazonian forest. The initial atmospheric state and terrestrial surface conditions prepared from ECMWF observed analyses for June 1, 1987 were used. In addition, the sea surface temperatures were prescribed from the data set of Reynolds and Roberts (USA). To stress upon the evapotranspiratory character of the imposed forest over GID, the fields of albedo and surface roughness were taken independent of afforestation. The resultant mean monthly fields of velocity potential and wind vector at 200 mb and 850 mb and precipitation had been analyzed for their anomalies. This simulative study of an imposed analogy of Amazonian forest evapotranspiration (ET) over GID exhibits its pronounced effects on the lower and upper atmospheric circulations.

  13. Numerical Simulations and Tracer Studies as a Tool to Support Water Circulation Modeling in Breeding Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The article presents a proposal of a method for computer-aided design and analysis of breeding reservoirs in zoos and aquariums. The method applied involves the use of computer simulations of water circulation in breeding pools. A mathematical model of a pool was developed, and a tracer study was carried out. A simplified model of two-dimensional flow in the form of a biharmonic equation for the stream function (converted into components of the velocity vector) was adopted to describe the flow field. This equation, supplemented by appropriate boundary conditions, was solved numerically by the finite difference method. Next, a tracer migration equation was solved, which was a two-dimensional advection-dispersion equation describing the unsteady transport of a non-active, permanent solute. In order to obtain a proper solution, a tracer study (with rhodamine WT as a tracer) was conducted in situ. The results of these measurements were compared with numerical solutions obtained. The results of numerical simulations made it possible to reconstruct water circulation in the breading pool and to identify still water zones, where water circulation was impeded.

  14. Prediction of circulation control performance characteristics for Super STOL and STOL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, Messam Abbas

    by the model. The same optimal configurations were then subjected to Super STOL cruise conditions to perform a trade off analysis between Takeoff and Cruise Performance. Supercritical airfoils modified for circulation control were also thoroughly analyzed for Takeoff and Cruise performance and may constitute a viable option for Super STOL & STOL Designs. The prediction capability produced by this research effort can be integrated with the current conceptual aircraft modeling & simulation framework. The prediction tool is applicable within the selected ranges of each variable, but methodology and formulation scheme adopted can be applied to any other design space exploration.

  15. Multiscale dynamical analysis of a high-resolution numerical model simulation of the Solomon Sea circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djath, Bughsin'; Verron, Jacques; Melet, Angelique; Gourdeau, Lionel; Barnier, Bernard; Molines, Jean-Marc

    2014-09-01

    A high 1/36° resolution numerical model is used to study the ocean circulation in the Solomon Sea. An evaluation of the model with (the few) available observation shows that the 1/36° resolution model realistically simulates the Solomon Sea circulations. The model notably reproduces the high levels of mesoscale eddy activity observed in the Solomon Sea. With regard to previous simulations at 1/12° resolution, the average eddy kinetic energy levels are increased by up to ˜30-40% in the present 1/36° simulation, and the enhancement extends at depth. At the surface, the eddy kinetic energy level is maximum in March-April-May and is minimum in December-January-February. The high subsurface variability is related to the variability of the western boundary current (New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent). Moreover, the emergence of submesoscales is clearly apparent in the present simulations. A spectral analysis is conducted in order to evidence and characterize the modeled submesoscale dynamics and to provide a spectral view of scales interactions. The corresponding spectral slopes show a strong consistency with the Surface Quasi-Geostrophic turbulence theory.

  16. Intraseasonal eddies in the Sulawesi Sea simulated in an ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masumoto, Y.; Kagimoto, T.; Yoshida, M.; Fukuda, M.; Hirose, N.; Yamagata, T.

    The intraseasonal variability associated with mesoscale eddies in the Sulawesi Sea simulated in a high resolution ocean general circulation model is described in detail. The cyclonic eddies, with a diameter of about 400 km, are generated at the entrance of the Sulawesi Sea between the Mindanao and the Halmahera Islands with 40 days interval. They are associated with a high speed (> 20 cm/s) down to 1000 m level. The anticlockwise circulation in the Sulawesi Sea, reported so far in both models and observations, may be a long time-averaged image of the above energetic eddies. The intraseasonal eddies significantly affect the volume transport through passages in the northern part of the Indonesian archipelago. The intraseasonal transport variation, however, is highly damped within the Indonesian seas in the present model.

  17. A Solar Sailcraft Simulation Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeda, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    An application was created to encourage students' practical knowledge of gravitational fields, the law of conservation of energy and other phenomena, such as gravitational slingshots. The educational software simulates the flight of a solar sail spacecraft between two planets of the Solar System using the laws of gravity and radiation…

  18. A comparison between general circulation model simulations using two sea surface temperature datasets for January 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ose, Tomoaki; Mechoso, Carlos; Halpern, David

    1994-01-01

    Simulations with the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) using two different global sea surface temperature (SST) datasets for January 1979 are compared. One of these datasets is based on Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) (SSTs) at locations where there are ship reports, and climatology elsewhere; the other is derived from measurements by instruments onboard NOAA satellites. In the former dataset (COADS SST), data are concentrated along shipping routes in the Northern Hemisphere; in the latter dataset High Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS SST), data cover the global domain. Ensembles of five 30-day mean fields are obtained from integrations performed in the perpetual-January mode. The results are presented as anomalies, that is, departures of each ensemble mean from that produced in a control simulation with climatological SSTs. Large differences are found between the anomalies obtained using COADS and HIRS SSTs, even in the Northern Hemisphere where the datasets are most similar to each other. The internal variability of the circulation in the control simulation and the simulated atmospheric response to anomalous forcings appear to be linked in that the pattern of geopotential height anomalies obtained using COADS SSTs resembles the first empirical orthogonal function (EOF 1) in the control simulation. The corresponding pattern obtained using HIRS SSTs is substantially different and somewhat resembles EOF 2 in the sector from central North America to central Asia. To gain insight into the reasons for these results, three additional simulations are carried out with SST anomalies confined to regions where COADS SSTs are substantially warmer than HIRS SSTs. The regions correspond to warm pools in the northwest and northeast Pacific, and the northwest Atlantic. These warm pools tend to produce positive geopotential height anomalies in the northeastern part of the corresponding oceans. Both warm pools in the Pacific produce large

  19. Overview of CFD Validation Experiments for Circulation Control Applications at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. S.; Lin, J. C.; Allan, B. G.; Milholen, W. E.; Rumsey, C. L.; Swanson, R. C.

    2008-01-01

    Circulation control is a viable active flow control approach that can be used to meet the NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing project s Cruise Efficient Short Take Off and Landing goals. Currently, circulation control systems are primarily designed using empirical methods. However, large uncertainty in our ability to predict circulation control performance has led to the development of advanced CFD methods. This paper provides an overview of a systematic approach to developing CFD tools for basic and advanced circulation control applications. This four-step approach includes "Unit", "Benchmar", "Subsystem", and "Complete System" experiments. The paper emphasizes the ongoing and planned 2-D and 3-D physics orientated experiments with corresponding CFD efforts. Sample data are used to highlight the challenges involved in conducting circulation control computations and experiments.

  20. MFIX simulation of NETL/PSRI challenge problem of circulating fluidized bed

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Tingwen; Dietiker, Jean-François; Shahnam, Mehrdad

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, numerical simulations of NETL/PSRI challenge problem of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) using the open-source code Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchange (MFIX) are reported. Two rounds of simulation results are reported including the first-round blind test and the second-round modeling refinement. Three-dimensional high fidelity simulations are conducted to model a 12-inch diameter pilot-scale CFB riser. Detailed comparisons between numerical results and experimental data are made with respect to axial pressure gradient profile, radial profiles of solids velocity and solids mass flux along different radial directions at various elevations for operating conditions covering different fluidization regimes. Overall, the numericalmore » results show that CFD can predict the complex gas–solids flow behavior in the CFB riser reasonably well. In addition, lessons learnt from modeling this challenge problem are presented.« less

  1. Greenhouse gas-induced climate change simulated with the CCS second-generation general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, G.J.; Mcfarlane, N.A.; Lazare, M. )

    1992-10-01

    The Canadian Climate Centre second-generation atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean incorporating thermodynamic sea ice is used to simulate the equilibrium climate response to a doubling of CO[sub 2]. The results of the simulation indicate a global annual warming of 3.5 C with enhanced warming found over land and at higher latitudes. Precipitation and evaporation rates increase by about 4 percent, and cloud cover decreases by 2.2 percent. Soil moisture decreases over continental Northern Hemisphere land areas in summer. The frozen component of soil moisture decreases and the liquid component increases in association with the increase of temperature at higher latitudes. The simulated accumulation rate of permanent snow cover decreases markedly over Greenland and increases slightly over Antarctica. Seasonal snow and sea ice boundaries retreat, but local decreases in planetary albedo are counteracted by tropical increases, so there is little change in the global average. 39 refs.

  2. The Tropical Subseasonal Variability Simulated in the NASA GISS General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Daehyun; Sobel, Adam H.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Chen, Yonghua; Camargo, Suzana J.; Yao, Mao-Sung; Kelley, Maxwell; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2012-01-01

    The tropical subseasonal variability simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model, Model E2, is examined. Several versions of Model E2 were developed with changes to the convective parameterization in order to improve the simulation of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). When the convective scheme is modified to have a greater fractional entrainment rate, Model E2 is able to simulate MJO-like disturbances with proper spatial and temporal scales. Increasing the rate of rain reevaporation has additional positive impacts on the simulated MJO. The improvement in MJO simulation comes at the cost of increased biases in the mean state, consistent in structure and amplitude with those found in other GCMs when tuned to have a stronger MJO. By reinitializing a relatively poor-MJO version with restart files from a relatively better-MJO version, a series of 30-day integrations is constructed to examine the impacts of the parameterization changes on the organization of tropical convection. The poor-MJO version with smaller entrainment rate has a tendency to allow convection to be activated over a broader area and to reduce the contrast between dry and wet regimes so that tropical convection becomes less organized. Besides the MJO, the number of tropical-cyclone-like vortices simulated by the model is also affected by changes in the convection scheme. The model simulates a smaller number of such storms globally with a larger entrainment rate, while the number increases significantly with a greater rain reevaporation rate.

  3. Simulations of Flow Circulations and Atrazine Concentrations in a Midwest U.S. Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xianggui; Gu, Roy R.; Guo, Chuling; Wang, Kui; Li, Shijie

    Atrazine is the most commonly used herbicide in the spring for pre-emergent weed control in the corn cropping area in the Midwestern United States. A frequent high level of herbicide concentrations in reservoirs is a great concern for public health and aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a two-dimensional hydrodynamics and toxic contaminant transport model was applied to Saylorville Reservoir, Iowa, USA. The model simulates physical, chemical, and biological processes and predicts unsteady vertical and longitudinal distributions of a toxic chemical. Model results were validated by measured temperatures and atrazine concentrations. Simulated flow velocities, water temperatures, and chemical concentrations demonstrated that the spatial variation of atrazine concentrations was largely affected by seasonal flow circulation patterns in the reservoir. In particular, the simulated fate and transport of atrazine showed the effect of flow circulation on spatial distribution of atrazine during summer months as the river flow formed an underflow within the reservoir and resulted in greater concentrations near the surface of the reservoir. Atrazine concentrations in the reservoir peaked around the end of May and early June. A thorough understanding of the fate and transport of atrazine in the reservoir can assist in developing operation and pollution prevention strategies with respect to timing, amount, and depth of withdrawal. The responses of atrazine transport to various boundary conditions provide useful information in assessing environmental impact of alternative upstream watershed management practices on the quality of reservoir water.

  4. Simulation of tidal flow and circulation patterns in the Loxahatchee River Estuary, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Goodwin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a two-dimensional, vertically averaged, computer simulation model of the Loxahatchee River estuary show that under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, water circulation is dominated by freshwater inflow rather than by tidal influence. The model can simulate tidal flow and circulation in the Loxahatchee River estuary under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, but is limited, however, to low-flow and well mixed conditions. Computed patterns of residual water transport show a consistent seaward flow from the northwest fork through the central embayment and out Jupiter Inlet to the Atlantic Ocean. A large residual seaward flow was computed from the North Intracoastal Waterway to the inlet channel. Although the tide produces large flood and ebb flows in the estuary, tide-induced residual transport rates are low in comparison with freshwater-induced residual transport. Model investigations of partly mixed or stratified conditions in the estuary need to await development of systems capable of simulating three-dimensional flow patterns. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Mars atmospheric dynamics as simulated by the NASA AMES General Circulation Model. II - Transient baroclinic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.; Leovy, C. B.; Zurek, R. W.; Lee, H.; Schaeffer, J.

    1993-02-01

    A large set of experiments performed with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model is analyzed to determine the properties, structure, and dynamics of the simulated transient baroclinic eddies. There is strong transient baroclinic eddy activity in the extratropics of the Northern Hemisphere during the northern autumn, winter, and spring seasons. The eddy activity remains strong for very large dust loadings, though it shifts northward. The eastward propagating eddies are characterized by zonal wavenumbers of 1-4 and periods of about 2-10 days. The properties of the GCM baroclinic eddies in the northern extratropics are compared in detail with analogous properties inferred from Viking Lander meteorology observations.

  6. In Vitro Simulation and Validation of the Circulation with Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Figliola, Richard S.; Giardini, Alessandro; Conover, Tim; Camp, Tiffany A.; Biglino, Giovanni; Chiulli, John; Hsia, Tain-Yen

    2010-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in computational modeling, experimental simulation of the circulation with congenital heart defect using mock flow circuits remains an important tool for device testing, and for detailing the probable flow consequences resulting from surgical and interventional corrections. Validated mock circuits can be applied to qualify the results from novel computational models. New mathematical tools, coupled with advanced clinical imaging methods, allow for improved assessment of experimental circuit performance relative to human function, as well as the potential for patient-specific adaptation. In this review, we address the development of three in vitro mock circuits specific for studies of congenital heart defects. Performance of an in vitro right heart circulation circuit through a series of verification and validation exercises is described, including correlations with animal studies, and quantifying the effects of circuit inertiance on test results. We present our experience in the design of mock circuits suitable for investigations of the characteristics of the Fontan circulation. We use one such mock circuit to evaluate the accuracy of Doppler predictions in the presence of aortic coarctation. PMID:21218147

  7. A solar sailcraft simulation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čeleda, Tomáš

    2013-07-01

    An applicationAvailable online at the Aldebaran educational portal: www.aldebaran.cz/lab/plachetnice/SolarSail.html. was created to encourage students’ practical knowledge of gravitational fields, the law of conservation of energy and other phenomena, such as gravitational slingshots. The educational software simulates the flight of a solar sail spacecraft between two planets of the Solar System using the laws of gravity and radiation pressure. The students’ goal can, for example, be to fly from the Earth to Mars.

  8. Comparison Between Numerical Simulations and Drifter Observations of the Surface Circulation in the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotenko, K. A.; Poulain, P. M.; Cushman-Roisin, B. R.

    2007-12-01

    Eulerian statistics computed from drifter data and estimated from numerical simulations of circulation of the Adriatic Sea are compared for different seasons and wind forcing. The periods of interest are August-October 2003, May, June and February 2003, where drifter data have high density. The numerical simulations were performed with a 1.2- min resolution DieCAST Ocean Circulation Model adapted for the Adriatic Sea. The simulations resolve the mesoscale variability because the grid size falls below the first baroclinic deformation radius (about 5-10 km) and the model has very low horizontal dissipation. The DieCAST model is initialized with seasonally averaged temperature and salinity data and forced with climatological winds and surface buoyancy fluxes (both heat flux and evaporation minus precipitation). River discharges are varied daily according to a perpetual year for every river, and the open-boundary conditions at Otranto Strait are obtained by nesting in two larger-scale models (Cushman-Roisin et al., JGR, 2007). In the period of interests the model was forced with the COAMPS wind stresses and heat fluxes. Mean Kinetic Energy (MKE) and Eddy Kinetic Energy (EKE) estimates were obtained using the methodology commonly used with drifter (Poulain, JMS, 2001). The surface drifter observations were obtained in 2002 and 2003 as part of the DOLCEVITA project (Ursella et al., JGR, 2006). More than 120 CODE drifters were released in the northern and middle Adriatic with the purpose of studying the surface circulation at mesoscale to seasonal scale in relation to wind forcing. Drifter velocities were low-pass filtered to eliminate tidal and inertial currents. Comparison of the MKE and EKE computed from the model and drifter data shows a good agreement for high- energy dynamics along the Italian coast and local effects of strong winds like Bora and Sirocco. Discrepancies between the drifter-based and model-inferred Eulerian statistics originates in the specification

  9. Application of Local Discretization Methods in the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Kao-San; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Rood, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    We present the basic ideas of the dynamics system of the finite-volume General Circulation Model developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for climate simulations and other applications in meteorology. The dynamics of this model is designed with emphases on conservative and monotonic transport, where the property of Lagrangian conservation is used to maintain the physical consistency of the computational fluid for long-term simulations. As the model benefits from the noise-free solutions of monotonic finite-volume transport schemes, the property of Lagrangian conservation also partly compensates the accuracy of transport for the diffusion effects due to the treatment of monotonicity. By faithfully maintaining the fundamental laws of physics during the computation, this model is able to achieve sufficient accuracy for the global consistency of climate processes. Because the computing algorithms are based on local memory, this model has the advantage of efficiency in parallel computation with distributed memory. Further research is yet desirable to reduce the diffusion effects of monotonic transport for better accuracy, and to mitigate the limitation due to fast-moving gravity waves for better efficiency.

  10. Decadal Variations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation as simulated by the VIKING20 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handmann, Patricia; Fischer, Jürgen; Visbeck, Martin; Behrens, Erik; Patara, Lavinia

    2015-04-01

    Time series of observed deep circulation transports and water mass properties in the subpolar North Atlantic are beginning to be long enough to investigate multiannual to decadal variability of the deep water. At the same time high resolution ocean circulation models (1/20° resolution VIKING20 model) can be used to compare observations with model simulation. The models also allow to diagnose the deep water circulation processes more completely and to relate local to basin scale signals. North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is a complex combination of water masses from different origins and pathways that meet at the exit of the Labrador Sea. The lower part of NADW is formed by water masses entering the subpolar basin over the Greenland-Scotland ridge. Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) from the eastern sills has the longest pathway and joins the densest deep water component from Denmark Strait (DSOW) after crossing the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge through Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ); together, they form the Lower NADW. The upper component of the NADW is composed of Labrador Sea Water (LSW), which is formed and modified through deep convection in the Labrador Sea. Using 60 year long time series of North Atlantic water masses and currents produced by the Viking20 model driven by observed monthly winds, a comparison of transport variability of observed and modeled data will be presented at three locations: Deep flow at the exit of the Labrador Sea at 53°N; upper layer transports between New Jersey and Bermuda (OLEANDER section) and between the southern tip of Greenland and Portugal (OVIDE section). Is the model reproducing the observed long-term behavior of the different components in phase and amplitude? Do the results permit identification of the processes leading to these variations in transport variability? Finally, is it possible to extend the observed variability pattern over the observed time span (15 years) to the total time range of the model simulations (60

  11. The simulation of influence of different coals on the circulating fluidized bed Boiler's combustion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Yumei; Lu, Qinggang

    2003-05-01

    The combustion performance of the boiler largely depends on the coal type. Lots of experimental research shows that different fuels have different combustion characteristics. It is obvious that fuel will change the whole operating performance of Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC). We know even in a pilot-scale running boiler, the measurement of some parameters is difficult and costly. Therefore, we developed the way of simulation to evaluate the combustion performance of Chinese coals in CFB. The simulation results show that, different coals will result in different coal particle diameter and comminution depending on their mineral component and the change will affect the distribution of ash in CFBC system. In a word, the computational results are in accordance with experimental results qualitatively but there are some differences quantitatively.

  12. Dust Emissions, Transport, and Deposition Simulated with the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Ginoux, Paul; Chin, Mian; Lin, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosols have radiative impacts on Earth's atmosphere, have been implicated in local and regional air quality issues, and have been identified as vectors for transporting disease pathogens and bringing mineral nutrients to terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. We present for the first time dust simulations using online transport and meteorological analysis in the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM). Our dust formulation follows the formulation in the offline Georgia Institute of Technology-Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport Model (GOCART) using a topographical source for dust emissions. We compare results of the FVGCM simulations with GOCART, as well as with in situ and remotely sensed observations. Additionally, we estimate budgets of dust emission and transport into various regions.

  13. Bicompartmental analysis of cerebrospinal fluid circulation. Theory and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cabanes, J; Marti, J; Orozco, M; Beltran, A

    1983-08-01

    A new model for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation is proposed. Specific activity/time curves for CSF kinetics determined after intraventricular injection of a radiotracer were produced by fitting a biexponential function to data points and developing a two-compartmental model. Calculation of kinetic parameters of the model provides quantitative data about CSF dynamics. The study of each compartment separately and of the intercompartmental relationship is possible with this model. Sequential scan images and graphic plots of the variations of radioactivity in both compartments, derived from this model, add supplementary information in the evaluation of patients. Ventriculography was performed in 80 patients, who fell into four groups: those with normal CSF circulation, hydrocephalus, infantile hydrocephalus, and functioning ventricular shunts. Normal and hydrocephalic patients showed significant differences between the two groups in the means of some numerical parameters calculated from the new model. An increase of intraventricular radioactivity at 24 hours (p less than 10(-4)) and of the volume of Compartment 1 (p less than 0.01) with decreased volume of Compartment 2 (p less than 10(-4)) and total flow outside the system (p less than 10(-3)) were found in patients with hydrocephalus. The limiting values for normal patients were also estimated. Communicating and obstructive hydrocephalus could be differentiated by this method; however, no differences in mean values were found relating to the etiology or clinical course of the hydrocephalus. Normal-pressure hydrocephalus and cerebral atrophy produced significantly different mean values for the volume of Compartment 2 (p less than 0.01), flow out of the system (p less than 0.01), and intercompartmental flow (p less than 0.01).

  14. Scaling laws for parametrizations of subgrid interactions in simulations of oceanic circulations.

    PubMed

    Kitsios, V; Frederiksen, J S; Zidikheri, M J

    2014-06-28

    Parametrizations of the subgrid eddy-eddy and eddy-meanfield interactions are developed for the simulation of baroclinic ocean circulations representative of an idealized Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Benchmark simulations are generated using a spectral spherical harmonic quasi-geostrophic model with maximum truncation wavenumber of T=504, which is equivalent to a resolution of 0.24° globally. A stochastic parametrization is used for the eddy-eddy interactions, and a linear deterministic parametrization for the eddy-meanfield interactions. The parametrization coefficients are determined from the statistics of benchmark simulations truncated back to the large eddy simulation (LES) truncation wavenumber, TRsimulations.

  15. Single and two-phase natural circulation in Westinghouse pressurized water reactor simulators: Phenomena, analysis and scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.R.; Chapman, J.C.; Kukita, Y.; Motley, F.E.; Stumpf, H.; Chen, Y.S.; Tasaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    Natural circulation data obtained in the 1/48 scale W four loop PWR simulator - the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) are discussed and summarized. Core cooling modes, the primary fluid state, the primary loop mass flow and localized natural circulation phenomena occurring in the steam generator are presented. TRAC-PF1 LSTF model (using both a 1 U-tube and a 3 U-tube steam generator model) analyses of the LSTF natural circulation data including the SG recirculation patterns are presented and compared to the data. The LSTF data are then compared to similar natural circulation data obtained in the Primarkreislaufe (PKL) and the Semiscale facilities. Based on the 1/48 to 1/1705 scaling range which exists between the facilities, the implications of these data towrard natural circulation behavior in commercial plants are briefly discussed.

  16. Gulf of Mexico circulation within a high-resolution numerical simulation of the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanou, Anastasia; Chassignet, Eric P.; Sturges, Wilton

    2004-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico circulation is examined from the results of a high-resolution (1/12°) North Atlantic simulation using the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model. The motivation for this paper is twofold: first, we validate the model's performance in the Gulf of Mexico by comparing the model fields to past and recent observations, and second, given the good agreement with the observed Gulf of Mexico surface circulation and Loop Current variability, we expand the discussion and analysis of the model circulation to areas that have not been extensively observed/analyzed, such as the vertical structure of the Loop Current and associated eddies, especially the deep circulation below 1500 m. The interval between successive model eddy sheddings is 3 to 15 months, the eddy diameters range between 140 and 500 km, the life span is about 1 year, and the translational speeds are 2-3 km d-1, in good agreement with observations. Areas of high cyclonic eddy occurrence in the model are southwest of Florida, the Loop Current boundary, and the western Campeche Bay area. The cyclonic eddy diameters range between 50 and 375 km, the orbital speeds range between 1 and 55 cm s-1, the translational speeds range between 0.5 and 14 km d-1, and the eddy life spans range between 1 and 3 months. The vertical structure of the temperature and salinity of each modeled eddy, from the moment it is shed until it disintegrates in the western Gulf of Mexico, is in agreement with the few available observations. Below 1500 m, deep cyclonic eddies are associated with the surface Loop Current anticyclones. The eddy variability is consistent with Rossby waves propagating westward, and there is bottom intensification of the flow close to steep topography. Overall, we show that this very high horizontal resolution isopycnic coordinate ocean model, which is able to produce a quite realistic surface circulation for the North and equatorial Atlantic, is also able to reproduce well the smaller-scale, basin

  17. Simulation of seasonal circulations and thermohaline variabilities in the Gulf of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschariyaphotha, Nitima; Wongwises, Prungchan; Wongwises, Somchai; Humphries, Usa Wannasingha; You, Xiaobao

    2008-05-01

    Based on the Princeton Ocean Model (POM), the seasonal thermohaline feature and the ocean circulation in the Gulf of Thailand (GoT), situated between 6°N to 14°N latitude and 99°E to 105°E longitude, were studied numerically with 37 × 97 orthogonal curvilinear grid and 10 vertical sigma levels conforming to a realistic bottom topography. A spin-up phase of the first model run was executed using wind stress calculated from climatological monthly mean wind, restoring-type surface heat and salt, and climatological monthly mean fresh water flux data. In this paper, the temperature and salinity fields taken from Levitus94 data sets and the calculated temperature and salinity from the model run for 12-month mean and for each season are presented where the winter, summer, rainy, and end of the rainy seasons of Thailand are represented by the months January, April, July, and October, respectively. The simulated circulations are also described. The results show that the temperature in the GoT is warmer than the temperature of the other parts connected to the South China Sea (SCS). At any depth of inflow from SCS into the GoT, the salinity is high, but in the outflow from the GoT at the surface, the salinity is low. The strong circulations are clockwise during summer and the rainy seasons of Thailand, which are the East Asian monsoon periods, northeasterly and southwesterly during summer. They occur near Pattani and Narathiwat provinces during summer and in the central GoT during the rainy seasons. Sensitivity experiments were designed to investigate the effects of wind forcing and open boundary conditions. Wind forcing is shown to be the important factor for generating the circulation in the GoT. The lateral velocity at the open boundaries is of considerable importance to current circulation for the rainy and end of the rainy seasons, with insignificant effect for the winter and summer seasons of Thailand.

  18. Inter-annual variability of the Mediterranean thermohaline circulation in Med-CORDEX simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittoria Struglia, Maria; Adani, Mario; Carillo, Adriana; Pisacane, Giovanna; Sannino, Gianmaria; Beuvier, Jonathan; Lovato, Tomas; Sevault, Florence; Vervatis, Vassilios

    2016-04-01

    Recent atmospheric reanalysis products, such as ERA40 and ERA-interim, and their regional dynamical downscaling prompted the HyMeX/Med-CORDEX community to perform hind-cast simulations of the Mediterranean Sea, giving the opportunity to evaluate the response of different ocean models to a realistic inter-annual atmospheric forcing. Ocean numerical modeling studies have been steadily improving over the last decade through hind-cast processing, and are complementary to observations in studying the relative importance of the mechanisms playing a role in ocean variability, either external forcing or internal ocean variability. This work presents a review and an inter-comparison of the most recent hind-cast simulations of the Mediterranean Sea Circulation, produced in the framework of the Med-CORDEX initiative, at resolutions spanning from 1/8° to 1/16°. The richness of the simulations available for this study is exploited to address the effects of increasing resolution, both of models and forcing, the initialization procedure, and the prescription of the atmospheric boundary conditions, which are particularly relevant in order to model a realistic THC, in the perspective of fully coupled regional ocean-atmosphere models. The mean circulation is well reproduced by all the simulations. However, it can be observed that the horizontal resolution of both atmospheric forcing and ocean model plays a fundamental role in the reproduction of some specific features of both sub-basins and important differences can be observed among low and high resolution atmosphere forcing. We analyze the mean circulation on both the long-term and decadal time scale, and the represented inter-annual variability of intermediate and deep water mass formation processes in both the Eastern and Western sub-basins, finding that models agree with observations in correspondence of specific events, such as the 1992-1993 Eastern Mediterranean Transient, and the 2005-2006 event in the Gulf of Lion. Long

  19. Simulation of tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing of the Charlotte Harbor Estuarine System, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional circulation and constituent- transport model, SIMSYS2D, was used to simulate tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing characteristics in Charlotte Harbor. The model was calibrated and verified against field observations of stage,discharge, and velocity. Standard errors averaged about 3 percent of the range in stage at the tide stations and between 3 and 10 percent of the range in discharge measured in the inlets for the calibration period. Following calibration and verification, the model was applied to three different conditions. The first condition represented the existing physical configuration and typical freshwater inflow. The second condition represented reduced fresh water inflow, and the third represented an alteration of Sanibel Causeway. All three conditions were evaluated through Lagrangian particle tracks and simulated dye injections. Residual circulation patterns were similar for typical and reduced freshwater inflow, but reduced freshwater inflow increased the residence time in the upper harbor by a factor of two or more. Removal of Sanibel Causeway did not significantly affect residual flows in upper and lower Charlotte Harbor, Matlacha Pass, Gasparilla Sound, or the Gulf of Mexico. Analysis of Lagrangian particle tracks indicated changes in residence times in San Carlos Bay as a result of removing Sanibel Causeway, but the changes were not consistent for all particles. The residence time of 8 particles in San Carlos Bay decreased with removal of the causeway, 1 was unchanged, and the residence time of 3 particles increased. Simulated flushing characteristics of the estuarine system were affected more by reduced freshwater inflow than for typical freshwater inflow. After 30 days of simulation of reduced freshwater inflow, 42 percent of the dye injected into the upper harbor remained in the upper harbor, compared to 28 percent for typical freshwater inflow. The upper harbor has a relatively long flushing time because it is not directly

  20. Numerical simulation on dimension decrease for annular casing of one centrifugal boiler circulation pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y. Z.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Wu, Y. L.; Sha, Y. J.

    2012-11-01

    Primary formulation derivation indicates that the dimension of one existing centrifugal boiler circulation pump casing is too large. As great manufacture cost can be saved by dimension decrease, a numerical simulation research is developed in this paper on dimension decrease for annular casing of this pump with a specific speed equaling to 189, which aims at finding an appropriately smaller dimension of the casing while hydraulic performance and strength performance will hardly be changed according to the requirements of the cooperative company. The research object is one existing centrifugal pump with a diffuser and a semi-spherical annular casing, working as the boiler circulation pump for (ultra) supercritical units in power plants. Dimension decrease, the modification method, is achieved by decreasing the existing casing's internal radius (marked as "Ri0") while keeping the wall thickness. The research analysis is based on primary formulation derivation, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation and FEM (Finite Element Method) simulation. Primary formulation derivation estimates that a design casing's internal radius should be less than 0.75 Ri0. CFD analysis indicates that smaller casing with 0.75 Ri0 has a worse hydraulic performance when working at large flow rates and a better hydraulic performance when working at small flow rates. In consideration of hydraulic performance and dimension decrease, an appropriate casing's internal radius is determined, which equals to 0.875 Ri0. FEM analysis then confirms that modified pump casing has nearly the same strength performance as the existing pump casing. It is concluded that dimension decrease can be an economical method as well as a practical method for large pumps in engineering fields.

  1. Evaluation of rainfall simulations over West Africa in dynamically downscaled CMIP5 global circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinsanola, A. A.; Ajayi, V. O.; Adejare, A. T.; Adeyeri, O. E.; Gbode, I. E.; Ogunjobi, K. O.; Nikulin, G.; Abolude, A. T.

    2017-03-01

    This study presents evaluation of the ability of Rossby Centre Regional Climate Model (RCA4) driven by nine global circulation models (GCMs), to skilfully reproduce the key features of rainfall climatology over West Africa for the period of 1980-2005. The seasonal climatology and annual cycle of the RCA4 simulations were assessed over three homogenous subregions of West Africa (Guinea coast, Savannah, and Sahel) and evaluated using observed precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). Furthermore, the model output was evaluated using a wide range of statistical measures. The interseasonal and interannual variability of the RCA4 were further assessed over the subregions and the whole of the West Africa domain. Results indicate that the RCA4 captures the spatial and interseasonal rainfall pattern adequately but exhibits a weak performance over the Guinea coast. Findings from the interannual rainfall variability indicate that the model performance is better over the larger West Africa domain than the subregions. The largest difference across the RCA4 simulated annual rainfall was found in the Sahel. Result from the Mann-Kendall test showed no significant trend for the 1980-2005 period in annual rainfall either in GPCP observation data or in the model simulations over West Africa. In many aspects, the RCA4 simulation driven by the HadGEM2-ES perform best over the region. The use of the multimodel ensemble mean has resulted to the improved representation of rainfall characteristics over the study domain.

  2. Dynamic simulation of a circulating fluidized bed boiler of low circulating ratio with wide particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Huilin; Yang Lidan; Bie Rushan; Zhao Guangbo

    1999-07-01

    A steady state model of a coal fired CFB boiler considering the hydrodynamics, heat transfer and combustion is presented. This model predicts the flue gas temperature, the chemical gas species (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}) and char concentration distributions in both the axial and radial location along the furnace including the bottom and upper portion. The model was validated against experimental data generated in a 35 t/h commercial CFB boiler with low circulating ratio.

  3. Numerical simulation of blood flow and pressure drop in the pulmonary arterial and venous circulation

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, M. Umar; Vaughan, Gareth D.A.; Sainsbury, Christopher; Johnson, Martin; Peskin, Charles S.; Olufsen, Mette S.; Hill, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiscale mathematical and computational model of the pulmonary circulation is presented and used to analyse both arterial and venous pressure and flow. This work is a major advance over previous studies by Olufsen and coworkers (Ottesen et al., 2003; Olufsen et al., 2012) which only considered the arterial circulation. For the first three generations of vessels within the pulmonary circulation, geometry is specified from patient-specific measurements obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood flow and pressure in the larger arteries and veins are predicted using a nonlinear, cross-sectional-area-averaged system of equations for a Newtonian fluid in an elastic tube. Inflow into the main pulmonary artery is obtained from MRI measurements, while pressure entering the left atrium from the main pulmonary vein is kept constant at the normal mean value of 2 mmHg. Each terminal vessel in the network of ‘large’ arteries is connected to its corresponding terminal vein via a network of vessels representing the vascular bed of smaller arteries and veins. We develop and implement an algorithm to calculate the admittance of each vascular bed, using bifurcating structured trees and recursion. The structured-tree models take into account the geometry and material properties of the ‘smaller’ arteries and veins of radii ≥ 50µm. We study the effects on flow and pressure associated with three classes of pulmonary hypertension expressed via stiffening of larger and smaller vessels, and vascular rarefaction. The results of simulating these pathological conditions are in agreement with clinical observations, showing that the model has potential for assisting with diagnosis and treatment of circulatory diseases within the lung. PMID:24610385

  4. High-resolution numerical simulation of Venus atmosphere by AFES (Atmospheric general circulation model For the Earth Simulator)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko; AFES project Team

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) and performed a high-resolution simulation (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a). The highest resolution is T639L120; 1920 times 960 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 20 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state.Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k > 10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). We will show recent results of the high-resolution run, e.g., small-scale gravity waves attributed to large-scale thermal tides. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968.Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  5. Venus atmosphere simulated by a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2016-07-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) have been developed (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a) and a very high-resolution simulation is performed. The highest resolution of the model is T319L120; 960 times 480 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 40 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state. Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k>10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). Finally, recent results for thermal tides and small-scale waves will be shown in the presentation. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  6. Investigation of sludge re-circulating clarifiers design and optimization through numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Davari, S; Lichayee, M J

    2003-01-01

    In steam thermal power plants (TPP) with open re-circulating wet cooling towers, elimination of water hardness and suspended solids (SS) is performed in clarifiers. Most of these clarifiers are of high efficiency sludge re-circulating type (SRC) with capacity between 500-1,500 m3/hr. Improper design and/or mal-operation of clarifiers in TPPs results in working conditions below design capacity or production of soft water with improper quality (hardness and S.S.). This causes accumulation of deposits in heat exchangers, condenser tubes, cooling and service water pipes and boiler tubes as well as increasing the ionic load of water at the demineralizing system inlet. It also increases the amount of chemical consumptions and produces more liquid and solid waste. In this regard, a software program for optimal design and simulation of SRCs has been developed. Then design parameters of existing SRCs in four TPPs in Iran were used as inputs to developed software program and resulting technical specifications were compared with existing ones. In some cases improper design was the main cause of poor outlet water quality. In order to achieve proper efficiency, further investigations were made to obtain control parameters as well as design parameters for both mal-designed and/or mal-operated SRCs.

  7. Large eddy simulation model for wind-driven sea circulation in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronio, A.; Roman, F.; Nasello, C.; Armenio, V.

    2013-12-01

    In the present paper a state-of-the-art large eddy simulation model (LES-COAST), suited for the analysis of water circulation and mixing in closed or semi-closed areas, is presented and applied to the study of the hydrodynamic characteristics of the Muggia bay, the industrial harbor of the city of Trieste, Italy. The model solves the non-hydrostatic, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations, under the Boussinesq approximation for temperature and salinity buoyancy effects, using a novel, two-eddy viscosity Smagorinsky model for the closure of the subgrid-scale momentum fluxes. The model employs: a simple and effective technique to take into account wind-stress inhomogeneity related to the blocking effect of emerged structures, which, in turn, can drive local-scale, short-term pollutant dispersion; a new nesting procedure to reconstruct instantaneous, turbulent velocity components, temperature and salinity at the open boundaries of the domain using data coming from large-scale circulation models (LCM). Validation tests have shown that the model reproduces field measurement satisfactorily. The analysis of water circulation and mixing in the Muggia bay has been carried out under three typical breeze conditions. Water circulation has been shown to behave as in typical semi-closed basins, with an upper layer moving along the wind direction (apart from the anti-cyclonic veering associated with the Coriolis force) and a bottom layer, thicker and slower than the upper one, moving along the opposite direction. The study has shown that water vertical mixing in the bay is inhibited by a large level of stable stratification, mainly associated with vertical variation in salinity and, to a minor extent, with temperature variation along the water column. More intense mixing, quantified by sub-critical values of the gradient Richardson number, is present in near-coastal regions where upwelling/downwelling phenomena occur. The analysis of instantaneous fields has detected the presence of

  8. Simulation Study of Effects of Solar Irradiance and Sea Surface Temperature on Monsoons and Global Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A recent version of the GEOS 2 GCM was used to isolate the roles of the annual cycles of solar irradiation and/or sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on the simulated circulation and rainfall. Four 4-year long integrations were generated with the GCM. The first integration, called Control Case, used daily-interpolated SSTs from a 30 year monthly SST climatology that was obtained from the analyzed SST-data, while the solar irradiation at the top of the atmosphere was calculated normally at hourly intervals. The next two cases prescribed the SSTs or the incoming solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere at their annual mean values, respectively while everything else was kept the same as in the Control Case. In this way the influence of the annual cycles of both external forcings was isolated.

  9. Simulating Titan’s tropospheric circulation with the Portable University Model of the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieger, B.; Segschneider, J.; Keller, H. U.; Rodin, A. V.; Lunkeit, F.; Kirk, E.; Fraedrich, K.

    2004-01-01

    The Portable University Model of the Atmosphere (PUMA) is a general circulation model of intermediate complexity. In the model setup used herein, the dynamics is driven by restoration to a prescribed temperature field. Given an observed three-dimensional field of restoration temperatures, the feedback of aerosol distribution to the radiation scheme and hence to the dynamics is excluded from calculations. PUMA is adapted to Titan conditions and used to carry out a series of experiments with temperature fields based on radio occultation and infrared spectroscopy measurements taken by Voyager 1 in 1980. The resultant winds are prograde with maximum wind speeds of about 14 m/s in the troposphere. This simulation demonstrates capabilities of a restricted complexity model and provides a contribution to the prediction of the descent trajectory of the Huygens lander in January 2005.

  10. Natural circulation in a VVER reactor geometry: Experiments with the PACTEL facility and Cathare simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raussi, P.; Kainulainen, S.; Kouhia, J.

    1995-09-01

    There are some 40 reactors based on the VVER design in use. Database available for computer code assessment for VVER reactors is rather limited. Experiments were conducted to study natural circulation behaviour in the PACTEL facility, a medium-scale integral test loop patterned after VVER pressurized water reactors. Flow behaviour over a range of coolant inventories was studied with a small-break experiment. In the small-break experiments, flow stagnation and system repressurization were observed when the water level in the upper plenum fell below the entrances to the hot legs. The cause was attributed to the hot leg loop seals, which are a unique feature of the VVER geometry. At low primary inventories, core cooling was achieved through the boiler-condenser mode. The experiment was simulated using French thermalhydraulic system code CATHARE.

  11. Oxygen supply to the fetal cerebral circulation in hypoplastic left heart syndrome: a simulation study based on the theoretical models of fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Sakazaki, Sayaka; Masutani, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Masaya; Tamura, Masanori; Kuwata, Seiko; Kurishima, Clara; Saiki, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Ishido, Hirotaka; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2015-03-01

    Hypoxia due to congenital heart diseases (CHDs) adversely affects brain development during the fetal period. Head circumference at birth is closely associated with neuropsychiatric development, and it is considerably smaller in newborns with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) than in normal newborns. We performed simulation studies on newborns with CHD to evaluate the cerebral circulation during the fetal period. The oxygen saturation of cerebral blood flow in newborns with CHD was simulated according to a model for normal fetal circulation in late pregnancy. We compared the oxygen saturation of cerebral blood flow between newborns with tricuspid atresia (TA; a disease showing univentricular circulation and hypoplasia of the right ventricle), those with transposition of the great arteries (TGA; a disease showing abnormal mixing of arterial and venous blood), and those with HLHS. The oxygen saturation of cerebral blood flow in newborns with normal circulation was 75.7 %, whereas it was low (49.5 %) in both newborns with HLHS and those with TA. Although the oxygen level is affected by the blood flow through the foramen ovale, the oxygen saturation in newborns with TGA was even lower (43.2 %). These data, together with previous reports, suggest that the cerebral blood flow rate is decreased in newborns with HLHS, and the main cause was strongly suspected to be retrograde cerebral perfusion through a patent ductus arteriosus. This study provides important information about the neurodevelopmental prognosis of newborns with HLHS and suggests the need to identify strategies to resolve this unfavorable cerebral circulatory state in utero.

  12. Simulation of Lake Victoria Circulation Patterns Using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sven; Tomasson, Tumi; Taabu-Munyaho, Anthony; Sitoki, Lewis; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Lake Victoria provides important ecosystem services including transport, water for domestic and industrial uses and fisheries to about 33 million inhabitants in three East African countries. The lake plays an important role in modulating regional climate. Its thermodynamics and hydrodynamics are also influenced by prevailing climatic and weather conditions on diel, seasonal and annual scales. However, information on water temperature and circulation in the lake is limited in space and time. We use a Regional Oceanographic Model System (ROMS) to simulate these processes from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014. The model is based on real bathymetry, river runoff and atmospheric forcing data using the bulk flux algorithm. Simulations show that the water column exhibits annual cycles of thermo-stratification (September–May) and mixing (June–August). Surface water currents take different patterns ranging from a lake-wide northward flow to gyres that vary in size and number. An under flow exists that leads to the formation of upwelling and downwelling regions. Current velocities are highest at the center of the lake and on the western inshore waters indicating enhanced water circulation in those areas. However, there is little exchange of water between the major gulfs (especially Nyanza) and the open lake, a factor that could be responsible for the different water quality reported in those regions. Findings of the present study enhance understanding of the physical processes (temperature and currents) that have an effect on diel, seasonal, and annual variations in stratification, vertical mixing, inshore—offshore exchanges and fluxes of nutrients that ultimately influence the biotic distribution and trophic structure. For instance information on areas/timing of upwelling and vertical mixing obtained from this study will help predict locations/seasons of high primary production and ultimately fisheries productivity in Lake Victoria. PMID:27030983

  13. Simulation of Lake Victoria Circulation Patterns Using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS).

    PubMed

    Nyamweya, Chrispine; Desjardins, Christopher; Sigurdsson, Sven; Tomasson, Tumi; Taabu-Munyaho, Anthony; Sitoki, Lewis; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Lake Victoria provides important ecosystem services including transport, water for domestic and industrial uses and fisheries to about 33 million inhabitants in three East African countries. The lake plays an important role in modulating regional climate. Its thermodynamics and hydrodynamics are also influenced by prevailing climatic and weather conditions on diel, seasonal and annual scales. However, information on water temperature and circulation in the lake is limited in space and time. We use a Regional Oceanographic Model System (ROMS) to simulate these processes from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014. The model is based on real bathymetry, river runoff and atmospheric forcing data using the bulk flux algorithm. Simulations show that the water column exhibits annual cycles of thermo-stratification (September-May) and mixing (June-August). Surface water currents take different patterns ranging from a lake-wide northward flow to gyres that vary in size and number. An under flow exists that leads to the formation of upwelling and downwelling regions. Current velocities are highest at the center of the lake and on the western inshore waters indicating enhanced water circulation in those areas. However, there is little exchange of water between the major gulfs (especially Nyanza) and the open lake, a factor that could be responsible for the different water quality reported in those regions. Findings of the present study enhance understanding of the physical processes (temperature and currents) that have an effect on diel, seasonal, and annual variations in stratification, vertical mixing, inshore-offshore exchanges and fluxes of nutrients that ultimately influence the biotic distribution and trophic structure. For instance information on areas/timing of upwelling and vertical mixing obtained from this study will help predict locations/seasons of high primary production and ultimately fisheries productivity in Lake Victoria.

  14. Martian atmospheric gravity waves simulated by a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) significantly affect temperature and wind fields in the Martian middle and upper atmosphere. They are also one of the observational targets of the MAVEN mission. We report on the first simulations with a high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) and present a global distributions of small-scale GWs in the Martian atmosphere. The simulated GW-induced temperature variances are in a good agreement with available radio occultation data in the lower atmosphere between 10 and 30 km. For the northern winter solstice, the model reveals a latitudinal asymmetry with stronger wave generation in the winter hemisphere and two distinctive sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. Orographic GWs are filtered upon propagating upward, and the mesosphere is primarily dominated by harmonics with faster horizontal phase velocities. Wave fluxes are directed mainly against the local wind. GW dissipation in the upper mesosphere generates a body force per unit mass of tens of m s^{-1} per Martian solar day (sol^{-1}), which tends to close the simulated jets. The results represent a realistic surrogate for missing observations, which can be used for constraining GW parameterizations and validating GCMs.

  15. Tropospheric ozone simulation with a chemistry-general circulation model: Influence of higher hydrocarbon chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-Jan; Lelieveld, Jos

    2000-09-01

    We present an improved version of the global chemistry-general circulation model of Roelofs and Lelieveld [1997]. The major model improvement is the representation of higher hydrocarbon chemistry, implemented by means of the Carbon Bond Mechanism 4 (CBM-4). Simulated tropospheric ozone concentrations at remote locations, which agreed well with observations in the previous model version, are not affected much by the chemistry of higher hydrocarbons. However, ozone formation in the polluted boundary layer is significantly enhanced, resulting in a more realistic simulation of surface ozone in regions such as North America, Europe, and Southeast Asia. Our model simulates a net global tropospheric ozone production of 73 Tg yr-1 when higher hydrocarbon chemistry is considered, and -36 Tg yr-1 without higher hydrocarbon chemistry. The simulated seasonality of surface CO agrees well with observations. However, the southern hemispheric maximum for O3 and CO associated with biomass burning emissions is delayed by 1 month compared to the observations, which demonstrates the need for a better representation of biomass burning emissions. Simulated peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) concentrations agree well with observed values, although the variability is underestimated. OH decreases strongly in the continental boundary layer due to its reaction with higher hydrocarbons. However, this is almost compensated by an increase of OH over oceans in the lower half of the troposphere. Consideration of higher hydrocarbon chemistry decreases the global annual tropospheric OH concentration by about 8% compared to a background tropospheric chemistry scheme. Further, the radiative forcing by anthropogenically increased tropospheric ozone on the northern hemisphere increases, especially in July. The forcing also increases on the southern hemisphere where biomass burning emissions produce tropospheric ozone, except between December and June, that is, outside the biomass burning season, when ozone

  16. Commercial application of rainfall simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Rob J.

    2010-05-01

    Landloch Pty Ltd is a commercial consulting firm, providing advice on a range of land management issues to the mining and construction industries in Australia. As part of the company's day-to-day operations, rainfall simulation is used to assess material erodibility and to investigate a range of site attributes. (Landloch does carry out research projects, though such are not its core business.) When treated as an everyday working tool, several aspects of rainfall simulation practice are distinctively modified. Firstly, the equipment used is regularly maintained, and regularly upgraded with a primary focus on ease, safety, and efficiency of use and on reliability of function. As well, trained and experienced technical support is considered essential. Landloch's chief technician has over 10 years experience in running rainfall simulators at locations across Australia and in Africa and the Pacific. Secondly, the specific experimental conditions established for each set of rainfall simulator runs are carefully considered to ensure that they accurately represent the field conditions to which the data will be subsequently applied. Considerations here include: • wetting and drying cycles to ensure material consolidation and/or cementation if appropriate; • careful attention to water quality if dealing with clay soils or with amendments such as gypsum; • strong focus on ensuring that the erosion processes considered are those of greatest importance to the field situation of concern; and • detailed description of both material and plot properties, to increase the potential for data to be applicable to a wider range of projects and investigations. Other important company procedures include: • For each project, the scientist or engineer responsible for analysing and reporting rainfall simulator data is present during the running of all field plots, as it is essential that they be aware of any specific conditions that may have developed when the plots were subjected

  17. Applications of kinetic theory. Predictive models of circulating fluidized bed combustors: Tenth technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gidaspow, D.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. This report presents the author`s derivation of analytical solutions useful in understanding the operation of a CFB. The report is in a form of a chapter that reviews the kinetic theory applications.

  18. Application of Circulation Control Technology to Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Sankar, L. N.; Englar, R. J.; Munro, Scott E.; Li, Yi; Gaeta, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) under NASA Langley Grant NAG-1-2146, which was awarded as a part of NASA's Breakthrough Innovative Technologies (BIT) initiative. This was a three-year program, with a one-year no-cost extension. Each year's study has been an integrated effort consisting of computational fluid dynamics, experimental aerodynamics, and detailed noise and flow measurements. Year I effort examined the feasibility of reducing airframe noise by replacing the conventional wing systems with a Circulation Control Wing (CCW), where steady blowing was used through the trailing edge of the wing over a Coanda surface. It was shown that the wing lift increases with CCW blowing and indeed for the same lift, a CCW wing was shown to produce less noise. Year 2 effort dealt with a similar study on the role of pulsed blowing on airframe noise. The main objective of this portion of the study was to assess whether pulse blowing from the trailing edge of a CCW resulted in more, less, or the same amount of radiated noise to the farfield. Results show that a reduction in farfield noise of up to 5 dB is measured when pulse flow is compared with steady flow for an equivalent lift configuration. This reduction is in the spectral region associated with the trailing edge jet noise. This result is due to the unique advantage that pulsed flow has over steady flow. For a range of frequencies, more lift is experienced with the same mass flow as the steady case. Thus, for an equivalent lift and slot height, the pulsed system can operate at lower jet velocities, and hence lower jet noise. The computational analysis showed that for a given time-averaged mass flow rate, pulsed jets give a higher value of C(sub l) and a higher L/D than equivalent steady jets. This benefit is attributable to higher instantaneous jet velocities, and higher instantaneous C(sub mu) values for the pulsed jet. Pulsed jet benefits increase at higher

  19. An Active Flow Circulation Controlled Flap Concept for General Aviation Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Viken, Sally A.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Cagle, C. Mark

    2002-01-01

    A recent focus on revolutionary aerodynamic concepts has highlighted the technology needs of general aviation and personal aircraft. New and stringent restrictions on these types of aircraft have placed high demands on aerodynamic performance, noise, and environmental issues. Improved high lift performance of these aircraft can lead to slower takeoff and landing speeds that can be related to reduced noise and crash survivability issues. Circulation Control technologies have been around for 65 years, yet have been avoided due to trade offs of mass flow, pitching moment, perceived noise etc. The need to improve the circulation control technology for general aviation and personal air-vehicle applications is the focus of this paper. This report will describe the development of a 2-D General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) wing concept that utilizes a pulsed pneumatic flap.

  20. Wind driven general circulation of the Mediterranean Sea simulated with a Spectral Element Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molcard, A.; Pinardi, N.; Iskandarani, M.; Haidvogel, D. B.

    2002-05-01

    This work is an attempt to simulate the Mediterranean Sea general circulation with a Spectral Finite Element Model. This numerical technique associates the geometrical flexibility of the finite elements for the proper coastline definition with the precision offered by spectral methods. The model is reduced gravity and we study the wind-driven ocean response in order to explain the large scale sub-basin gyres and their variability. The study period goes from January 1987 to December 1993 and two forcing data sets are used. The effect of wind variability in space and time is analyzed and the relationship between wind stress curl and ocean response is stressed. Some of the main permanent structures of the general circulation (Gulf of Lions cyclonic gyre, Rhodes gyre, Gulf of Syrte anticylone) are shown to be induced by permanent wind stress curl structures. The magnitude and spatial variability of the wind is important in determining the appearance or disappearance of some gyres (Tyrrhenian anticyclonic gyre, Balearic anticyclonic gyre, Ionian cyclonic gyre). An EOF analysis of the seasonal variability indicates that the weakening and strengthening of the Levantine basin boundary currents is a major component of the seasonal cycle in the basin. The important discovery is that seasonal and interannual variability peak at the same spatial scales in the ocean response and that the interannual variability includes the change in amplitude and phase of the seasonal cycle in the sub-basin scale gyres and boundary currents. The Coriolis term in the vorticity balance seems to be responsible for the weakening of anticyclonic structures and their total disappearance when they are close to a boundary. The process of adjustment to winds produces a train of coastally trapped gravity waves which travel around the eastern and western basins, respectively in approximately 6 months. This corresponds to a phase velocity for the wave of about 1 m/s, comparable to an average velocity of

  1. Future applications of simulators in process control

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.; Wysor, W.

    1997-03-21

    Future applications of simulators in process control will see activities with high return on investment in areas such as concurrent engineering, hardware-in-the-loop controller testing, process fault detection, and Internet-retrievable simulation models and tools. These applications are based on advancing technology in the field of simulation technology. In this paper, the advancing technology will be reviewed, and projections to future uses of simulators in process control will be made.

  2. A new model to simulate the Martian mesoscale and microscale atmospheric circulation: Validation and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Forget, François

    2009-02-01

    The Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) Mesoscale Model is a new versatile simulator of the Martian atmosphere and environment at horizontal scales ranging from hundreds of kilometers to tens of meters. The model combines the National Centers for Environmental Prediction(NCEP)-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) fully compressible nonhydrostatic Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARW-WRF) dynamical core, adapted to Mars, with the LMD-general circulation model (GCM) comprehensive set of physical parameterizations for the Martian dust, CO2, water, and photochemistry cycles. Since LMD-GCM large-scale simulations are also used to drive the mesoscale model at the boundaries of the chosen domain of interest, a high level of downscaling consistency is reached. To define the initial state and the atmosphere at the domain boundaries, a specific ``hybrid'' vertical interpolation from the coarse-resolution GCM fields to the high-resolution mesoscale domain is used to ensure the stability and the physical relevancy of the simulations. Used in synoptic-scale mode with a cyclic domain wrapped around the planet, the mesoscale model correctly replicates the main large-scale thermal structure and the zonally propagating waves. The model diagnostics of the near-surface pressure, wind, and temperature daily cycles in Chryse Planitia are in accordance with the Viking and Pathfinder measurements. Afternoon gustiness at the respective landing sites is adequately accounted for on the condition that convective adjustment is turned off in the mesoscale simulations. On the rims of Valles Marineris, intense daytime anabatic (~30 m s-1) and nighttime katabatic (~40 m s-1) winds are predicted. Within the canyon corridors, topographical channeling can amplify the wind a few kilometers above the ground, especially during the night. Through large-eddy simulations in Gusev Crater, the model describes the mixing layer growth during the afternoon, and the

  3. Simulating the impact of the large-scale circulation on the 2-m temperature and precipitation climatology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of the simulated large-scale atmospheric circulation on the regional climate is examined using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model as a regional climate model. The purpose is to understand the potential need for interior grid nudging for dynamical downscal...

  4. Evaluation of a Mineral Dust Simulation in the Atmospheric-Chemistry General Circulation Model-EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Kader, M.; Astitha, M.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the atmospheric mineral dust cycle in the Atmospheric Chemistry General Circulation Model (AC-GCM) using new developed dust emissions scheme. The dust cycle, as an integral part of the Earth System, plays an important role in the Earth's energy balance by both direct and indirect ways. As an aerosol, it significantly impacts the absorption and scattering of radiation in the atmosphere and can modify the optical properties of clouds and snow/ice surfaces. In addition, dust contributes to a range of physical, chemical and bio-geological processes that interact with the cycles of carbon and water. While our knowledge of the dust cycle, its impacts and interactions with the other global-scale bio-geochemical cycles has greatly advanced in the last decades, large uncertainties and knowledge gaps still exist. Improving the dust simulation in global models is essential to minimize the uncertainties in the model results related to dust. In this study, the results are based on the ECHAM5 Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) AC-GCM simulations using T106L31 spectral resolution (about 120km ) with 31 vertical levels. The GMXe aerosol submodel is used to simulate the phase changes of the dust particles between soluble and insoluble modes. Dust emission, transport and deposition (wet and dry) are calculated on-line along with the meteorological parameters in every model time step. The preliminary evaluation of the dust concentration and deposition are presented based on ground observations from various campaigns as well as the evaluation of the optical properties of dust using AERONET and satellite (MODIS and MISR) observations. Preliminarily results show good agreement with observations for dust deposition and optical properties. In addition, the global dust emissions, load, deposition and lifetime is in good agreement with the published results. Also, the uncertainties in the dust cycle that contribute to the overall model performance

  5. Baroclinic internal wave energy distribution in the Baltic Sea derived from 45 years of circulation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Artem; Soomere, Tarmo; Kurkina, Oxana; Kurkin, Andrey; Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Markus Meier, H. E.

    2016-04-01

    Internal waves and internal tides are an essential component of the functioning of stratified shelf seas. They carry substantial amounts of energy through the water masses, drive key hydrophysical processes such as mixing and overturning and support the functioning of marine ecosystem in many ways. Their particular impact becomes evident near and at the bottom where they often create substantial loads to engineering structures and exert a wide range of impacts on the bottom sediments and evolution of the seabed. We analyse several properties of spatio-temporal distributions of energy of relatively long-period large-scale internal wave motions in the Baltic Sea. The analysis is based on numerically simulated pycnocline variations that are extracted from the hydrographic data calculated by the Rossby Centre Ocean circulation model (RCO) for the entire Baltic Sea for 1961-2005. This model has a horizontal resolution of 2 nautical miles and uses 41 vertical layers with a thickness between 3 m close to the surface and 12 m in 250 m depth. The model is forced with atmospheric data derived from the ERA-40 re-analysis using a regional atmosphere model with a horizontal resolution of 25 km. It also accounts for river inflow and water exchange through the Danish Straits. See (Meier, H.E.M., Höglund, A., 2013. Studying the Baltic Sea circulation with Eulerian tracers, in Soomere, T., Quak, E., eds., Preventive Methods for Coastal Protection, Springer, Cham, Heidelberg, 101-130) for a detailed description of the model and its forcing. The resolution of the model output used in this study (once in 6 hours) is sufficient for estimates of spectral amplitudes of the displacements of isopycnal surfaces with a typical period of 2-12 days. We provide the analysis of kinetic and potential energy of motions with these periods. The resulting maps of the maxima of energy and spatial distributions of near-bottom velocities have been evaluated for the entire simulation interval of 45

  6. A Variable Resolution Stretched Grid General Circulation Model: Regional Climate Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Takacs, Lawrence L.; Govindaraju, Ravi C.; Suarez, Max J.

    2000-01-01

    The development of and results obtained with a variable resolution stretched-grid GCM for the regional climate simulation mode, are presented. A global variable resolution stretched- grid used in the study has enhanced horizontal resolution over the U.S. as the area of interest The stretched-grid approach is an ideal tool for representing regional to global scale interaction& It is an alternative to the widely used nested grid approach introduced over a decade ago as a pioneering step in regional climate modeling. The major results of the study are presented for the successful stretched-grid GCM simulation of the anomalous climate event of the 1988 U.S. summer drought- The straightforward (with no updates) two month simulation is performed with 60 km regional resolution- The major drought fields, patterns and characteristics such as the time averaged 500 hPa heights precipitation and the low level jet over the drought area. appear to be close to the verifying analyses for the stretched-grid simulation- In other words, the stretched-grid GCM provides an efficient down-scaling over the area of interest with enhanced horizontal resolution. It is also shown that the GCM skill is sustained throughout the simulation extended to one year. The developed and tested in a simulation mode stretched-grid GCM is a viable tool for regional and subregional climate studies and applications.

  7. Large-eddy simulations of a turbulent Coanda jet on a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Takafumi; Hahn, Seonghyeon; Shariff, Karim

    2010-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations are performed of a turbulent Coanda jet separating from a rounded trailing edge of a simplified circulation control airfoil model. The freestream Reynolds number based on the airfoil chord is 0.49×106, the jet Reynolds number based on the jet slot height is 4470, and the ratio of the peak jet velocity to the freestream velocity is 3.96. Three different grid resolutions are used to show that their effect is very small on the mean surface pressure distribution, which agrees very well with experiments, as well as on the mean velocity profiles over the Coanda surface. It is observed that the Coanda jet becomes fully turbulent just downstream of the jet exit, accompanied by asymmetric alternating vortex shedding behind a thin (but blunt) jet blade splitting the jet and the external flow. A number of "backward-tilted" hairpin vortices (i.e., the head of each hairpin being located upstream of the legs) are observed around the outer edge of the jet over the Coanda surface. These hairpins create strong upwash between the legs and weak downwash around them, contributing to turbulent mixing of the high-momentum jet below the hairpins and the low-momentum external flow above them. The probability density distribution of velocity fluctuations is shown to be highly asymmetric in this region, consistent with the observation that the hairpin vortices create strong upwash and weak downwash. Turbulent structures inside the jet, its spreading rate, and self-similarity are also discussed.

  8. Acute effects of a large bolide impact simulated by a global atmospheric circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Starley L.; Crutzen, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The goal is to use a global three-dimensional atmospheric circulation model developed for studies of atmospheric effects of nuclear war to examine the time evolution of atmospheric effects from a large bolide impact. The model allows for dust and NOx injection, atmospheric transport by winds, removal by precipitation, radiative transfer effects, stratospheric ozone chemistry, and nitric acid formation and deposition on a simulated Earth having realistic geography. Researchers assume a modest 2 km-diameter impactor of the type that could have formed the 32 km-diameter impact structure found near Manson, Iowa and dated at roughly 66 Ma. Such an impact would have created on the order of 5 x 10 to the 10th power metric tons of atmospheric dust (about 0.01 g cm(-2) if spread globally) and 1 x 10 to the 37th power molecules of NO, or two orders of magnitude more stratospheric NO than might be produced in a large nuclear war. Researchers ignore potential injections of CO2 and wildfire smoke, and assume the direct heating of the atmosphere by impact ejecta on a regional scale is not large compared to absorption of solar energy by dust. Researchers assume an impact site at 45 N in the interior of present day North America.

  9. Numerical simulation of the development of mean monsoon circulation in July

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, H. L.; Qian, Y.-F.

    1982-01-01

    Eight different experiments are carried out, ranging from 8 to 20 days, with a primitive equation model consisting of five atmospheric layers and one oceanic layer. The purpose is to investigate the relative importance of radiative heating and deep cumulus condensation, orography, and initial conditions for the development of the mean monsoon circulation from June to July in the 0-180 deg E, 25 deg S - 55 deg N region. Two alternative initial states are used, one based on the observed monthly mean June pressure distribution, the other on the mean June zonal average pressure distribution. Whereas large-scale condensation and actual land and sea distributions are included in every experiment, deep cumulus cone condensation and radiative heating are always taken together. It is found that the means sea level pressure distribution and low-level flow pattern produced by these simulations are in the main determined by the diabatic heating distribution and are influenced somewhat by orography; they are, however, almost independent of the initial state. The low pressure systems are found to develop faster when diurnal variation of solar radiation is allowed for; this is thought to be due mainly to the more vigorous cumulus activity during the day.

  10. The Effect of Transport and Circulation Differences on Stratospheric Ozone Recovery in Two 35-year Three-dimensional Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Strahan, Susan; Douglass, Anne

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) has completed two 35-year simulations with WMO future baseline boundary conditions that simulate increasing N2O and CH4 emissions and decreasing organic chlorine and bromine emissions. Simulations were done with the GMI offline chemistry and transport model using 1) 1 year of winds from the Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FV-GCM), repeated for the 35 years, and 2) 1 year of winds from the Finite-Volume Data Assimilation System (FV-DAS), repeated for 35-years. The simulations have full stratospheric chemistry. To understand differences in simulated ozone recoveries, basic transport and circulation differences between these models are evaluated. The distribution of mean age of stratospheric air in the FV-GCM run agrees well with observations in the lower stratosphere but the FV-DAS ages are generally too low. This implies circulation and mixing differences that will affect the distributions of other trace species such as CH4, NO, and the organic halogens, all of which are responding to changing boundary conditions and are involved in ozone loss. Realism of model transport is evaluated, with particular attention given to regions and seasons where ozone recovery is expected. Preliminary results indicate increasing ozone trends in the lowermost stratosphere in summer and in the Antarctic and Arctic lower stratosphere in winter and spring.

  11. Effects of Solar Particle Event-Like Proton Radiation and/or Simulated Microgravity on Circulating Mouse Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Romero-Weaver, Ana L; Lin, Liyong; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-08-01

    Astronauts traveling in space missions outside of low Earth orbit will be exposed for longer times to a microgravity environment. In addition, the increased travel time involved in exploration class missions will result in an increased risk of exposure to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Both conditions could significantly affect the number of circulating blood cells. Therefore, it is critical to determine the combined effects of exposure to both microgravity and SPE radiation. The purpose of the present study was to assess these risks by evaluating the effects of SPE-like proton radiation and/or microgravity, as simulated with the hindlimb unloading (HU) system, on circulating blood cells using mouse as a model system. The results indicate that exposure to HU alone caused minimal or no significant changes in mouse circulating blood cell numbers. The exposure of mice to SPE-like proton radiation with or without HU treatment caused a significant decrease in the number of circulating lymphocytes, granulocytes and platelets. The reduced numbers of circulating lymphocytes, granulocytes, and platelets, resulting from the SPE-like proton radiation exposure, with or without HU treatment, in mice suggest that astronauts participating in exploration class missions may be at greater risk of developing infections and thrombotic diseases; thus, countermeasures may be necessary for these biological endpoints.

  12. Assessment of Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model Simulations of Winter Northern Hemisphere Atmospheric Blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jessica; Osborn, Tim

    2010-05-01

    Characterized by their persistence and quasi-stationary features, large-scale atmospheric blocking are often responsible for extreme weather events, which can have enormous impacts on human life, economy and environment e.g. European heat wave in summer 2003. Therefore, diagnostics of the present-day climate and future projections of potential changes in blocking-related extreme events are essential for risk management and adaptation planning. This study focuses on assessing the ability of six coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) to simulate large-scale winter atmospheric blocking in the Northern Hemisphere for the present-day climate (1957-1999). A modified version of the Tibaldi and Molteni (1990)'s blocking index, which measures the strength of the average westerly flow in the mid-latitudes, is applied to daily averaged 500 hPa geopotential height output from the climate models. ERA-40 re-analysis atmospheric data have also been used over the same time period to verify the models' results. The two preferred regions of blocking development, in the Euro-Atlantic and North Pacific, are well captured by most of the models. However, the prominent error in blocking simulations, according to a number of previous model assessments, consists of an underestimation of the total frequency of blocking episodes over both regions. A more detailed analysis of blocking frequency as a function of duration revealed that this error was due to an insufficient number of medium spells and long-lasting episodes, and a shift in blocking lifetime distributions towards shorter blocks, while short-lived blocking events (between 5 and 8 days) tend to be overestimated. The impact of models' systematic errors on blocking simulations has been analyzed, and results suggest that there is a primary need to reduce the time-mean bias to improve the representation of blocking in climate models. The underestimated high-frequency variability of the transient eddies embedded in

  13. WHTSubmersible: a simulator for estimating transient circulation temperature in offshore wells with the semi-submersible platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xun-cheng; Liu, Yong-wang; Guan, Zhi-chuan

    2015-10-01

    Offshore wellbore temperature field is significant to drilling fluids program, equipment selection, evaluations on potential risks caused by casing thermal stress, etc. This paper mainly describes the theoretical basis, module structure and field verification of the simulator WHTSubmersible. This computer program is a useful tool for estimating transient temperature distribution of circulating drilling fluid on semi-submersible platform. WHTSubmersible is based on a mathematical model which is developed to consider radial and axial two-dimensional heat exchange of the inner drill pipe, the annulus, the drill pipe wall, the sea water and the formation in the process of drilling fluid circulation. The solution of the discrete equations is based on finite volume method with an implicit scheme. This scheme serves to demonstrate the numerical solution procedure. Besides, the simulator also considers the heating generated by drilling fluid circulation friction, drill bit penetrating rocks, friction between the drill column and the borehole wall, and the temperature effect on thermal physical properties and rheology of the drilling fluid. These measures ensure more accurate results. The simulator has been programmed as a dynamic link library using Visual C++, the routine interface is simple, which can be connected with other computer programs conveniently. The simulator is validated with an actual well temperature filed developed on a semi-submersible platform in South China, and the error is less than 5 %.

  14. Preliminary simulated tidal flow and circulation patterns in Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of channel dredging and island construction on tidal flow and circulation in Hillsborough Bay, Fla., due to the Tampa Harbor Deepening Project is being investigated using a two-dimensional, finite-difference numerical model. Preliminary model results are presented as a series of maps showing tidal flood, tidal ebb, and circulation patterns in the bay for predredging and postdredging conditions. Complex circulation patterns occur near the bay mouth in an area where there is (1) a change in thalweg alinement of the bay, (2) an intersection of three major ship channels, and (3) submergent and emergent dredged material located adjacent to each of the channels. (USGS)

  15. Combining Abundance/Temperature Retrieval with 3D Atmospheric Circulation Simulations of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    The atmospheres of hot Jupiters are three-dimensional, non-linear entities and understanding them requires the construction of a hierarchy of models of varying sophistication. Since previous work has either focused on the atmospheric dynamics or implemented multi-band radiative transfer, a reasonable approach is to combine the treatment of 3D dynamics with dual-band radiative transfer, where the assumption is that the stellar irradiation and re-emitted radiation from the exoplanet are at distinct wavelengths. I report on the successful implementation of such a setup and demonstrate how it can be used to compute self-consistent temperature-pressure profiles on both the day and night sides of a hot Jupiter, as well as zonal-wind profiles, circulation cell patterns and the angular/temporal offset of the hotspot from the substellar point. In particular, the hotspot offset should aid us in distinguishing between different types of hot Jupiter atmospheres. Together with N. Madhusudhan, we combine the dual-band simulation technique with the abundance/temperature retrieval method of Madhusudhan & Seager, by empirically constraining a range of values for the broad-band opacities which are consistent with the current observations. The advantage of our novel method is that the range of opacities used improves with time as the observations get better. The ability to thoroughly, efficiently and systematically explore the interplay between atmospheric dynamics, radiation and synthetic spectra is an important step forward, as it prepares us for the theoretical interpretation of exoplanetary spectra which will be obtained by future space-based missions such as JWST and EChO. I acknowledge generous support from the Zwicky Prize Fellowship and the Star and Planet Formation Group (PI: Michael Meyer) at ETH Zurich.

  16. [Endothelial glycocalyx of blood circulation. II. Biological functions, state at norm and pathology, bioengineering application].

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A V; Turashev, A D

    2014-01-01

    In normal state, a complex multicomponent system called glycocalyx is present on the surface of endothelial vascular system. Due to complexity of its composition and location on the border between vessel wall and blood circulation, glycocalyx participates in a number of functions supporting the metabolism of the vascular wall. In pathological conditions undergo complete or partial loss of this structure, which leads to inconsistencies in the vascular wall and change its functions. The functions of endothelial glycocalyx are its involvement in the regulation of vascular permeability, transduction and transformation by the shear stress of blood flow on endothelium, the molecular regulation of glycocalyx microenvironment and its interaction with circulating blood cells. Also briefly be considered participation of glycocalyx in the implementation of cardiovascular diseases, their correction, bioengineering application of glycocalyx and its components.

  17. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer: detection methods and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Na; Zhou, Jia; Cui, Fang; Tang, Xiaokui

    2015-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that have disseminated from primary and metastatic sites, and circulate in the bloodstream. Advanced immunological and molecular-based methods can be used to detect and analyze the cells with the characteristics of tumor cells, and can be detected and analyzed in the blood of cancer patients. The most commonly used methods in lung cancer combine the processes of immunomagnetic enrichment and immunocytochemical detection, morphology-based enrichment coupled with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and RT-PCR alone. CTC analysis is considered a liquid biopsy approach for early diagnosis, risk stratification, evaluation of curative efficacy, and early detection of lung cancer relapse. In this review, we discuss the present techniques for analyzing CTCs, and the restrictions of using these methods in lung cancer. We also review the clinical studies in lung cancer and discuss the underlying associations between these studies and their future applications to this disease.

  18. 3D Simulation: Microgravity Environments and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Estes, Samantha; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most, if not all, 3-D and Virtual Reality (VR) software programs are designed for one-G gravity applications. Space environments simulations require gravity effects of one one-thousandth to one one-million of that of the Earth's surface (10(exp -3) - 10(exp -6) G), thus one must be able to generate simulations that replicate those microgravity effects upon simulated astronauts. Unfortunately, the software programs utilized by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration does not have the ability to readily neutralize the one-G gravity effect. This pre-programmed situation causes the engineer or analysis difficulty during micro-gravity simulations. Therefore, microgravity simulations require special techniques or additional code in order to apply the power of 3D graphic simulation to space related applications. This paper discusses the problem and possible solutions to allow microgravity 3-D/VR simulations to be completed successfully without program code modifications.

  19. Atmospheric Angular Momentum Fluctuations During 1979-1988 Simulated by Global Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, R.; Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    Changes in major global dynamical phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere are manifested in the time series of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM), as determined directly from meteorological observations and indirectly from geodetic observations of small fluctuations in the rotation of the solid Earth which are proportional to length of day. AAM fluctuations are intimately linked with energetic processes throughout the whole atmosphere and also with the stresses at the Earth's surface produced largely by turbulent momentum transport in the oceanic and continental boundary layers and by the action of normal pressure forces on orographic features. A stringent test of any numerical global circulation model (GCM) is therefore provided by a quantitative assessment of its ability to represent AAM fluctuations on all relevant timescales, ranging from months to several years. From monthly data provided by the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) of the World Climate Research Programme, we have investigated seasonal and interannual fluctuations and the decadal mean in the axial component of AAM in 23 AMIP GCMs over the period 1979-1 988. The decadal means are generally well simulated, with the model median value (1.58 x 10(exp 26) kg sq m/s) being only 3.5% larger than the observed mean and with 10 of the models being within 5% of the observed. The seasonal cycle is well reproduced, with the median amplitude of the models' seasonal standard deviations being only 2.4% larger than observed. Half the seasonal amplitudes lie within 15% of the observed, and the median correlation found between the observed and model seasonal cycles is 0.95. The dominant seasonal error is an under- estimation of AAM during northern hemisphere winter associated with errors in the position of subtropical jets. Less robust are the modeled interannual variations, although the median correlation of 0.61 between model simulations and observed AAM is statistically significant. The two El Nino

  20. Atmospheric Angular Momentum Fluctuations During 1979-1988 Simulated by Global Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, R.; Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    Changes in major global dynamical phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere are manifested in the time series of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM), as determined directly from meteorological observations and indirectly from geodetic observations of small fluctuations in the rotation of the solid Earth which are proportional to length of day. AAM fluctuations are intimately linked with energetic processes throughout the whole atmosphere and also with the stresses at the Earth's surface produced largely by turbulent momentum transport in the oceanic and continental boundary layers and by the action of normal pressure forces on orographic features. A stringent test of any numerical global circulation model (GCM) is therefore provided by a quantitative assessment of its ability to represent AAM fluctuations on all relevant timescales, ranging from months to several years. From monthly data provided by the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) of the World Climate Research Programme, we have investigated seasonal and interannual fluctuations and the decadal mean in the axial component of AAM in 23 AMIP GCMs over the period 1979-1988. The decadal means are generally well simulated, with the model median value (1.58 x 10(exp 26) kg sq m/s) being only 3.5% larger than the observed mean and with 10 of the models being within 5% of the observed. The seasonal cycle is well reproduced, with the median amplitude of the models seasonal standard deviations being only 2.4% larger than observed. Half the seasonal amplitudes lie within 15% of the observed, and the median correlation found between the observed and model seasonal cycles is 0.95. The dominant seasonal error is an underestimation of AAM during northern hemisphere winter associated with errors in the position of subtropical jets. Less robust are the modeled interannual variations, although the median correlation of 0.61 between model simulations and observed AAM is statistically significant. The two El Nino

  1. North and equatorial Pacific Ocean circulation in the CORE-II hindcast simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-heng; Lin, Hongyang; Chen, Han-ching; Thompson, Keith; Bentsen, Mats; Böning, Claus W.; Bozec, Alexandra; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Chow, Chun Hoe; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Farneti, Riccardo; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Ilicak, Mehmet; Jung, Thomas; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; Patara, Lavinia; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Yeager, Steve G.

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the mean circulation patterns, water mass distributions, and tropical dynamics of the North and Equatorial Pacific Ocean based on a suite of global ocean-sea ice simulations driven by the CORE-II atmospheric forcing from 1963-2007. The first three moments (mean, standard deviation and skewness) of sea surface height and surface temperature variability are assessed against observations. Large discrepancies are found in the variance and skewness of sea surface height and in the skewness of sea surface temperature. Comparing with the observation, most models underestimate the Kuroshio transport in the Asian Marginal seas due to the missing influence of the unresolved western boundary current and meso-scale eddies. In terms of the Mixed Layer Depths (MLDs) in the North Pacific, the two observed maxima associated with Subtropical Mode Water and Central Mode Water formation coalesce into a large pool of deep MLDs in all participating models, but another local maximum associated with the formation of Eastern Subtropical Mode Water can be found in all models with different magnitudes. The main model bias of deep MLDs results from excessive Subtropical Mode Water formation due to inaccurate representation of the Kuroshio separation and of the associated excessively warm and salty Kuroshio water. Further water mass analysis shows that the North Pacific Intermediate Water can penetrate southward in most models, but its distribution greatly varies among models depending not only on grid resolution and vertical coordinate but also on the model dynamics. All simulations show overall similar large scale tropical current system, but with differences in the structures of the Equatorial Undercurrent. We also confirm the key role of the meridional gradient of the wind stress curl in driving the equatorial transport, leading to a generally weak North Equatorial Counter Current in all models due to inaccurate CORE-II equatorial wind fields. Most models show a larger

  2. Application of Molded Interconnect Device technology to the realization of a self-biased circulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laur, Vincent; Mattei, Jean-Luc; Vérissimo, Grégory; Queffelec, Patrick; Lebourgeois, Richard; Ganne, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the first electromagnetic characterization of a self-biased circulator in molded interconnect device (MID) technology. The circulator was designed using a 3D full-wave commercial simulator. It consists of microstrip access lines connected to a Y-junction in Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) technology. Unlike classical technologies, the SIW Y-junction was not fabricated using metallic vias but by a Laser Direct Structuring (LDS) technique. A molded Cyclo-Olefin Polymer (COP) was used as a substrate and 3D metallized. The microwave properties of LDS-compatible COP are not well known so we investigated them through the use of cavity-perturbation and rectangular waveguide characterization methods. The device was then machined to insert a pre-oriented strontium hexaferrite puck doped with cobalt and lanthanum (Sr0,7La0,3Fe11,7Co0,3O19). The characteristics of the MID circulator were assessed between 28 and 32 GHz. Without magnets, insertion losses of 3.32 dB were measured at 30.7 GHz. At the same frequency, an isolation level of 13.89 dB and return losses of 19.89 dB were observed. These measurements demonstrate for the first time the high potential of MID technology for the realization of low-cost non-reciprocal devices.

  3. Outflow Channels Influencing Martian Climate: Global Circulation Model Simulations with Emplaced Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, D. L.; Colaprete, A.; Haberle, R. M.; Sloan, L. C.; Asphaug, E.

    2005-03-01

    We are using the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model to examine the climatic consequences of the sudden burst of water from outflow channels on Mars, represented here by incrementally emplacing water on the surface.

  4. Simulated Topography in Western North America Impacts Hemispheric Circulation Patterns and Regional Precipitation in IPCC AR4 Coupled Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAfee, S. A.; Russell, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Simulations of the late-20th century (1979-1999) by most of the coupled models used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4) overestimate mean winter (November to April) precipitation for all or part of western North America in comparison to observations from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project. These precipitation errors appear to be associated with 1) a southward bias in 200-hPa zonal-wind speeds, 2) overly zonal flow patterns (weak Pacific-North America pattern), and 3) muted rain shadows, all of which are also prevalent among general circulation models. In addition, the magnitude of error in simulations of late-20th century winter precipitation is significantly correlated with projected changes in winter precipitation in the mid- and late-21st century over parts of the southwestern United States and Mexico, increasing uncertainty about the timing and extent of drying in a region where water resources are already stressed and intensifying drought is expected. We suggest that these problems are related to difficulties in simulating the extent, volume, and topographic complexity of the Rocky Mountains, Sierra Nevada, Cascades and other mountain ranges in the West within the relatively coarse models. These results identify areas of concern in regional precipitation and water resource projections and suggest steps that can be taken to improve both hemispheric-scale circulation patterns and regional hydrological projections for western North America within general circulation models.

  5. The Response of the South Asian Summer Monsoon Circulation to Intensified Irrigation in Global Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, Sonali P.; Puma, Michael J.; Cook, Benjamin I.

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural intensification in South Asia has resulted in the expansion and intensification of surface irrigation over the twentieth century. The resulting changes to the surface energy balance could affect the temperature contrasts between the South Asian land surface and the equatorial Indian Ocean, potentially altering the South Asian Summer Monsoon (SASM) circulation. Prior studies have noted apparent declines in the monsoon intensity over the twentieth century and have focused on how altered surface energy balances impact the SASM rainfall distribution. Here, we use the coupled Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE-R general circulation model to investigate the impact of intensifying irrigation on the large-scale SASM circulation over the twentieth century, including how the effect of irrigation compares to the impact of increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. We force our simulations with time-varying, historical estimates of irrigation, both alone and with twentieth century GHGs and other forcings. In the irrigation only experiment, irrigation rates correlate strongly with lower and upper level temperature contrasts between the Indian sub-continent and the Indian Ocean (Pearson's r = -0.66 and r = -0.46, respectively), important quantities that control the strength of the SASM circulation. When GHG forcing is included, these correlations strengthen: r = -0.72 and r = -0.47 for lower and upper level temperature contrasts, respectively. Under irrigated conditions, the mean SASM intensity in the model decreases only slightly and insignificantly. However, in the simulation with irrigation and GHG forcing, inter-annual variability of the SASM circulation decreases by *40 %, consistent with trends in the reanalysis products. This suggests that the inclusion of irrigation may be necessary to accurately simulate the historical trends and variability of the SASM system over the last 50 years. These findings suggest that intensifying irrigation, in concert with

  6. Continued Development and Application of Circulation Control Pneumatic Technology to Advanced Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Personnel of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) Aerospace and Transportation Lab have completed a four-year grant program to develop and evaluate the pneumatic aerodynamic technology known as Circulation Control (CC) or Circulation Control Wing (CCW) for advanced transport aircraft. This pneumatic technology, which employs low-level blowing from tangential slots over round or near-round trailing edges of airfoils, greatly augments the circulation around a lifting or control surface and thus enhances the aerodynamic forces and moments generated by that surface. Two-dimensional force augmentations as high as 80 times the input blowing momentum coefficient have been recorded experimentally for these blown devices, thus providing returns of 8000% on the jet momentum expended. A further benefit is the absence of moving parts such as mechanical flaps, slats, spoilers, ailerons, elevators and rudders from these pneumatic surfaces, or the use of only very small, simple, blown aerodynamic surfaces on synergistic designs which integrate the lift, drag and control surfaces. The application of these devices to advanced aircraft can offer significant benefits in their performance, efficiency, simplicity, reliability, economic cost of operation, noise reduction, and safety of flight. To further develop and evaluate this potential, this research effort was conducted by GTRI under grant for the NASA Langley Research Center, Applied Aerodynamics Division, Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch, between June 14, 1993 and May 31, 1997.

  7. Simulated pre-industrial climate in Bergen Climate Model (version 2): model description and large-scale circulation features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otterâ, O. H.; Bentsen, M.; Bethke, I.; Kvamstø, N. G.

    2009-11-01

    The Bergen Climate Model (BCM) is a fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate. Here, a pre-industrial multi-century simulation with an updated version of BCM is described and compared to observational data. The model is run without any form of flux adjustments and is stable for several centuries. The simulated climate reproduces the general large-scale circulation in the atmosphere reasonably well, except for a positive bias in the high latitude sea level pressure distribution. Also, by introducing an updated turbulence scheme in the atmosphere model a persistent cold bias has been eliminated. For the ocean part, the model drifts in sea surface temperatures and salinities are considerably reduced compared to earlier versions of BCM. Improved conservation properties in the ocean model have contributed to this. Furthermore, by choosing a reference pressure at 2000 m and including thermobaric effects in the ocean model, a more realistic meridional overturning circulation is simulated in the Atlantic Ocean. The simulated sea-ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere is in general agreement with observational data except for summer where the extent is somewhat underestimated. In the Southern Hemisphere, large negative biases are found in the simulated sea-ice extent. This is partly related to problems with the mixed layer parametrization, causing the mixed layer in the Southern Ocean to be too deep, which in turn makes it hard to maintain a realistic sea-ice cover here. However, despite some problematic issues, the pre-industrial control simulation presented here should still be appropriate for climate change studies requiring multi-century simulations.

  8. Simulated pre-industrial climate in Bergen Climate Model (version 2): model description and large-scale circulation features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otterå, O. H.; Bentsen, M.; Bethke, I.; Kvamstø, N. G.

    2009-05-01

    The Bergen Climate Model (BCM) is a fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate. Here, a pre-industrial multi-century simulation with an updated version of BCM is described and compared to observational data. The model is run without any form of flux adjustments and is stable for several centuries. The simulated climate reproduces the general large scale circulation in the atmosphere reasonably well, except for a positive bias in the high latitude sea level pressures distribution. Also, by introducing an updated turbulence scheme in the atmosphere model a persistent cold bias has been eliminated. For the ocean part, the model drifts in sea surface temperatures and salinities are considerably reduced compared to earlier versions of BCM. Improved conservation properties in the ocean have contributed to this. Furthermore, by choosing a reference pressure at 2000 m and including thermobaric effects in the ocean model, a more realistic meridional overturning circulation is simulated in the Atlantic Ocean. The simulated sea-ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere is in general agreement with observational data except for summer where the extent is somewhat underestimated. In the Southern Hemisphere, large negative biases are found in the simulated sea-ice extent. This is partly related to problems with the mixed layer parametrization, causing the mixed layer in the Southern Ocean to be too deep, which in turn makes it hard to maintain a realistic sea-ice cover here. However, despite some problematic issues, the pre-industrial control simulation presented here should still be appropriate for climate change studies requiring multi-century simulations.

  9. Numerical simulation of the world ocean circulation and its climatic variability for 1948-2007 using the INMOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. V.; Diansky, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    The results of simulating global ocean circulation and its interannual variability in 1948-2007 using INM RAS ocean general circulation model INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model) are presented. One of the INMOM versions is also used for the Black Sea dynamics simulation. The CORE datasets were used to set realistic atmospheric forcing. Sea ice area decrease by 2007 was reproduced in the Arctic Ocean that is in good agreement with observations. The interdecadal climatic variability was revealed with significant decrease of Atlantic thermohaline circulation (ATHC) and meridional heat transport (MHT) in North Atlantic (NA) since the late 1990's. MHT presents decrease of heat transport from NA to the atmosphere since the mid-1990's. Therefore the negative feedback is revealed in the Earth climate system that leads to reducing of climate warming caused primarily by anthropogenic factor for the last decades. Long-term variability (60 years) of ATHC is revealed as well which influences NA thermal state with 10 year delay. The assumption is argued that this mechanism can make a contribution in the ATHC own long-term variability.

  10. The global distribution of natural tritium in precipitation simulated with an Atmospheric General Circulation Model and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauquoin, A.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Risi, C.; Fourré, É.; Stenni, B.; Landais, A.

    2015-10-01

    The description of the hydrological cycle in Atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs) can be validated using water isotopes as tracers. Many GCMs now simulate the movement of the stable isotopes of water, but here we present the first GCM simulations modelling the content of natural tritium in water. These simulations were obtained using a version of the LMDZ General Circulation Model enhanced by water isotopes diagnostics, LMDZ-iso. To avoid tritium generated by nuclear bomb testing, the simulations have been evaluated against a compilation of published tritium datasets dating from before 1950, or measured recently. LMDZ-iso correctly captures the observed tritium enrichment in precipitation as oceanic air moves inland (the so-called continental effect) and the observed north-south variations due to the latitudinal dependency of the cosmogenic tritium production rate. The seasonal variability, linked to the stratospheric intrusions of air masses with higher tritium content into the troposphere, is correctly reproduced for Antarctica with a maximum in winter. LMDZ-iso reproduces the spring maximum of tritium over Europe, but underestimates it and produces a peak in winter that is not apparent in the data. This implementation of tritium in a GCM promises to provide a better constraint on: (1) the intrusions and transport of air masses from the stratosphere, and (2) the dynamics of the modelled water cycle. The method complements the existing approach of using stable water isotopes.

  11. Simulating pathways of subsurface oil in the Faroe-Shetland Channel using an ocean general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Main, C E; Yool, A; Holliday, N P; Popova, E E; Jones, D O B; Ruhl, H A

    2017-01-15

    Little is known about the fate of subsurface hydrocarbon plumes from deep-sea oil well blowouts and their effects on processes and communities. As deepwater drilling expands in the Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC), oil well blowouts are a possibility, and the unusual ocean circulation of this region presents challenges to understanding possible subsurface oil pathways in the event of a spill. Here, an ocean general circulation model was used with a particle tracking algorithm to assess temporal variability of the oil-plume distribution from a deep-sea oil well blowout in the FSC. The drift of particles was first tracked for one year following release. Then, ambient model temperatures were used to simulate temperature-mediated biodegradation, truncating the trajectories of particles accordingly. Release depth of the modeled subsurface plumes affected both their direction of transport and distance travelled from their release location, and there was considerable interannual variability in transport.

  12. The simulation of transient statistics of the Southern Hemispheric circulation by the GLAS seasonal cycle model: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Shukla, J.

    1984-01-01

    The general circulation of the Southern Hemisphere is quite different from that of the Northern Hemisphere in many important ways. These include the barotropic nature of the stationary waves and the presence of a strong barotropic component to the mean zonal wind, the lack of a strong seasonal dependence of the transient eddies, and the dominant role played by eddies with periods less than 10 days compared to longer period fluctuations. Such differences attest to the importance of the altered nature of the orographic and thermal land-sea forcings in the Southern Hemisphere compared to the Northern Hemisphere. Some of the important features of the Southern Hemisphere circulation as simulated by the GLAS Seasonal Cycle Model (SCM) are presented. The geographical patterns of local variability and their seasonal shifts in the SCM are discussed and compared to observations.

  13. Simulation of the mantle and crustal Helium isotope signature in the Mediterranean Sea using a high resolution regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Dutay, Jean-claude; Jean-baptiste, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Helium isotopes (3He, 4He) are useful tracers for investigating the deep ocean circulation and for evaluating ocean general circulation models, because helium is a stable and conservative nuclide that does not take part in any chemical or biological processes. Helium in the ocean originates from three different sources: namely, (i) gas dissolution in equilibrium with atmospheric helium, (ii) helium-3 addition by radioactive decay of tritium (called tritiugenic helium), and (iii) injection of helium-3 and helium-4 by the submarine volcanic activity which occurs mainly at plate boundaries, and also addition of helium-4 from the crust and sedimentary cover by α-decay of uranium and thorium contained in various minerals (called terrigenic helium). Here we present the first simulation of the helium isotope distribution in the whole Mediterranean Sea, using a high resolution model (NEMO-MED12). The simulation was produced by building a simple source function for helium produced by submarine volcanic degassing in the main active areas of the Mediterranean, and by crustal degassing at sea bottom, based on previous estimates of the total flux of helium into the oceans. In addition to providing constraints on the degassing flux, our work provides information on the variability of the thermohaline circulation and the ventilation of the deep waters to constrain the degree to which the NEMO-MED12 can reproduce correctly the main hydrographic features of the Mediterranean Sea circulation. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  14. Simulation of the Low-Level-Jet by general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    To what degree is the low-level jet climatology and it`s impact on clouds and precipitation being captured by current general circulation models? It is hypothesised that a need for a pramaterization exists. This paper describes this parameterization need.

  15. A PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF A SPECTRAL ELEMENT OCEAN MODEL FOR SIMULATING LOW-LATITUDE CIRCULATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    MA,H.; MCCAFFREY,J.; PIACSEK,S.

    1997-11-01

    This paper is about the parallel implementation of a high-resolution, spectral element, primitive equation model of a homogeneous equatorial ocean. The present work shows that the high-order domain decomposition methods can be efficiently implemented in a massively parallel computing environment to solve large-scale CFD problems, such as the general circulation of the ocean.

  16. Virtual environment application with partial gravity simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Vanchau, Michael N.

    1994-01-01

    To support manned missions to the surface of Mars and missions requiring manipulation of payloads and locomotion in space, a training facility is required to simulate the conditions of both partial and microgravity. A partial gravity simulator (Pogo) which uses pneumatic suspension is being studied for use in virtual reality training. Pogo maintains a constant partial gravity simulation with a variation of simulated body force between 2.2 and 10 percent, depending on the type of locomotion inputs. this paper is based on the concept and application of a virtual environment system with Pogo including a head-mounted display and glove. The reality engine consists of a high end SGI workstation and PC's which drive Pogo's sensors and data acquisition hardware used for tracking and control. The tracking system is a hybrid of magnetic and optical trackers integrated for this application.

  17. Mesoscale Simulations of Coastal Circulations Evaluated Using Measurements from a Dense MESO Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    front TKE Turbulence kinetic energy UTC Universal Time Coordinated USN United States Navy WINDS Weather Information Network Display System... flow characteristics respond to forcing from surface features with a time scale of an hour or less. The ABL is quite variable in time and space while...sea breezes. A convex coastline yields convergence of the onshore low-level flow and strengthens the overall circulation, while concave coastlines

  18. Winter polar warmings and the meridional transport on Mars simulated with a general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Winter polar warmings in the middle atmosphere of Mars occur due to the adiabatic heating associated with the downward branch of the cross-equatorial meridional circulation. Thus, they are the manifestation of the global meridional transport rather than of local radiative effects. We report on a series of numerical experiments with a recently developed general circulation model of the martian atmosphere to examine the relative roles of the mechanical and thermal forcing in the meridional transport. The experiments were focused on answering the question of whether the martian circulation is consistent with the thermally driven nearly inviscid Hadley cell, as was pointed out by some previous studies, or it is forced mainly by zonally asymmetric eddies. It is demonstrated that, under realistic conditions in the middle atmosphere, the meridional transport is maintained primarily by dissipating large-scale planetary waves and solar tides. This mechanism is similar to the "extratropical pump" in the middle atmosphere on Earth. Only in the run with artificially weak zonal disturbances, was the circulation reminiscent of thermally induced Hadley cells. In the experiment with an imposed dust storm, the modified atmospheric refraction changes the vertical propagation of the eddies. As the result, the Eliassen-Palm fluxes convergence increases in high winter latitudes of the middle atmosphere, the meridional transport gets stronger, and the polar temperature rises. Additional numerical experiments demonstrated that insufficient model resolution, increased numerical dissipation, and, especially, neglect of non-LTE effects for the 15 μm CO 2 band could weaken the meridional transport and the magnitude of polar warmings in GCMs.

  19. Simulating protein dynamics: Novel methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishal, V.

    This Ph.D dissertation describes several methodological advances in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Methods like Markov State Models can be used effectively in combination with distributed computing to obtain long time scale behavior from an ensemble of short simulations. Advanced computing architectures like Graphics Processors can be used to greatly extend the scope of MD. Applications of MD techniques to problems like Alzheimer's Disease and fundamental questions in protein dynamics are described.

  20. Laboratory simulation of the geothermal heating effects on ocean overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Huang, Shi-Di; Zhou, Sheng-Qi; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand the geothermal heating effects on ocean circulation, a large-scale circulation generated and sustained by thermal forcing at the surface subject to a small amount of heating from the bottom boundary is investigated through laboratory experiments. Despite its idealization, our experiments demonstrate that the leading order effect of geothermal heating is to significantly enhance the abyssal overturning, in agreement with the findings in ocean circulation models. Our experiments also demonstrate that geothermal heating cannot influence the poleward heat transport due to the strong stratification in the thermocline. Our study further reveals that the ratio of geothermal-flux-induced turbulent dissipation to the dissipation due to other energies is the key parameter determining the dynamical importance of geothermal heating. This quantity explains why the impact of geothermal heating is sensitive to the deep stratification, the diapycnal mixing, and the amount of geothermal flux. Moreover, it is found that this dissipation ratio may be used to understand results from different studies in a consistent way.

  1. Circulating tumor cells: advances in isolation and analysis, and challenges for clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Harouaka, Ramdane; Kang, Zhigang; Zheng, Siyang; Cao, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cancer cells released from tumors into the bloodstream that are thought to have a key role in cancer metastasis. The presence of CTCs has been associated with worse prognosis in several major cancer types, including breast, prostate and colorectal cancer. There is considerable interest in CTC research and technologies for their potential use as cancer biomarkers that may enhance cancer diagnosis and prognosis, facilitate drug development, and improve the treatment of cancer patients. This review provides an update on recent progress in CTC isolation and molecular characterization technologies. Furthermore, the review covers significant advances and limitations in the clinical applications of CTC-based assays for cancer prognosis, response to anti-cancer therapies, and exploratory studies in biomarkers predictive of sensitivity and resistance to cancer therapies. PMID:24134902

  2. How Do the Parameter Changes in the Moist Processes Affect the Temperature and Circulation Simulations in the Lower-Troposphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, F.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the grid-point atmospheric model developed at IAP LASG (GAMIL2) is used to investigate how the altering parameters in the moist processes influence the simulations of the lower-tropospheric temperature and circulation. Two experiments were performed: the control experiment (CNTL) with the default parameter values and the sensitivity experiment (EXP) with the values obtained from a "two-step" parameter optimization method, which applied a full factor sampling scheme and the simplex downhill algorithm. Results show that parameter changes lead to variation of diabatic heating and affect the lower tropospheric temperature and circulation through the interaction and mutual responses between dynamical and physical processes. Furthermore, the interactions of dynamical and physical processes are different in the tropics and high latitudes. In the tropics, dynamical processes mainly resulted from vertical motion balance the variation of latent heating, both of which are negatively correlated to offset each other and play significant roles in the simulation of temperature. However, in the high latitudes, dynamical processes mainly due to horizontal advection dominate the total temperature tendency compared to physical processes. The variation of dynamical effects can overcompensate the diabatic heating from physical processes, thus affecting the geopetential height and wind fields. Moreover, there exists a positive feedback among the temperature, geopotential height, and meridional wind in the mid and high latitudes.

  3. Effects of Tropical Cyclones on Ocean Heat Transport as simulated by a High Resolution Coupled General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, E.; Gualdi, S.; Bellucci, A.; Sanna, A.; Vichi, M.; Manzini, E.; Fogli, P.; Navarra, A.; Oddo, P.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) activity and their relationship with the Northern hemispheric Ocean Heat Transport (OHT) is investigated. The analysis has been performed using 20C3M (20th Century) and A1B (21st Century) IPCC scenario climate simulations obtained running a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean-seaice coupled global model, with high-resolution in the atmosphere. The capability of the model to reproduce a realistic TC climatology has been assessed by comparing the model results from the simulation of the 20th Century with observations. The model is able to simulate tropical cyclone-like vortices with many features similar to the observed TCs. The simulated TC activity exhibits realistic structure, geographical distribution and interannual variability, indicating that the model is able to reproduce the major basic mechanisms that link the TC activity with the large scale circulation. The TC-induced ocean cooling is well represented and the TCs activity increases significantly the poleward OHT out of the tropics, but also increases the heat transport into the deep tropics. This effect, investigated looking at the 100 most intense Northern hemisphere TCs, is strongly correlated to the TC-induced momentum flux at the surface of the ocean. TCs frequency and intensity appear to be substantially stationary through the whole 1950- 2069 period. Also the effect of the TCs induced OHT) does not significantly change during the simulated period.

  4. Ocean Hydrodynamics Numerical Model in Curvilinear Coordinates for Simulating Circulation of the Global Ocean and its Separate Basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Diansky, Nikolay; Zalesny, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    scope of the CMIP-5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project). On the base of the complex proposed the Pacific Ocean circulation eddy-resolving model was realized. The integration domain covers the Pacific from Equator to Bering Strait. The model horizontal resolution is 0.125 degree and it has 20 non-uniform sigma-levels in depth. The model adequately reproduces circulation large-scale structure and its variability: Kuroshio meandering, ocean synoptic eddies, frontal zones, etc. Kuroshio high variability is shown. The distribution of contaminant was simulated that is admittedly wasted near Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The results demonstrate contaminant distribution structure and provide us understanding of hydrological fields formation processes in the North-West Pacific.

  5. Port-O-Sim Object Simulation Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzi, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    Port-O-Sim is a software application that supports engineering modeling and simulation of launch-range systems and subsystems, as well as the vehicles that operate on them. It is flexible, distributed, object-oriented, and realtime. A scripting language is used to configure an array of simulation objects and link them together. The script is contained in a text file, but executed and controlled using a graphical user interface. A set of modules is defined, each with input variables, output variables, and settings. These engineering models can be either linked to each other or run as standalone. The settings can be modified during execution. Since 2001, this application has been used for pre-mission failure mode training for many Range Safety Scenarios. It contains range asset link analysis, develops look-angle data, supports sky-screen site selection, drives GPS (Global Positioning System) and IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) simulators, and can support conceptual design efforts for multiple flight programs with its capacity for rapid six-degrees-of-freedom model development. Due to the assembly of various object types into one application, the application is applicable across a wide variety of launch range problem domains.

  6. The use of a numerical model to simulate the cavo-pulmonary assistance in Fontan circulation: a preliminary verification.

    PubMed

    Di Molfetta, Arianna; Amodeo, Antonio; Fresiello, Libera; Filippelli, Sergio; Pilati, Mara; Iacobelli, Roberta; Adorisio, Rachele; Colella, Dionisio; Ferrari, Gianfranco

    2016-06-01

    The lack of an established experience on the use of VAD for the cavo-pulmonary assistance leads to the need of dedicated VADs development and animal experiments. A dedicated numerical model could support clinical and experimental strategies design and new VADs testing. The aim of this work is to perform a preliminary verification of a lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system to simulate Fontan physiology and the effect of cavo-pulmonary assistance. Literature data of 4 pigs were used to simulate animals' baseline, and then the model was tested in simulating Fontan circulation and cavo-pulmonary-assisted condition comparing the simulation outcome (Sim) with measured literature data (Me). The results show that the numerical model can well reproduce experimental data in all three conditions (baseline, Fontan and assisted Fontan) [cardiac output (l/min): Me = 2.8 ± 1.7, Sim = 2.8 ± 1.8; ejection fraction (%): Me = 57 ± 17, Sim = 54 ± 17; arterial systemic pressure (mmHg): Me = 41.8 ± 18.6, Sim = 43.8 ± 18.1; pulmonary arterial pressure (mmHg): Me = 15.4 ± 8.9, Sim = 17.7 ± 9.9; caval pressure (mmHg): Me = 6.8 ± 4.1, Sim = 7 ± 4.6]. Systolic elastance, arterial systemic and arterial pulmonary resistances increase (10, 69, and 100 %) passing from the biventricular circulation to the Fontan physiology and then decrease (21, 39, and 50 %) once the VAD was implanted. The ventricular external work decreases (71 %) passing from the biventricular circulation to the Fontan physiology and it increases three times after the VAD implantation in parallel with the VAD power consumption. A numerical model could support clinicians in an innovative and challenging field as the use of VAD to assist the Fontan physiology and it could be helpful to personalize the VAD insertion on the base of ventricular systo-diastolic function, circulatory parameters and energetic variables.

  7. Fluid Simulation in the Movies: Navier and Stokes Must Be Circulating in Their Graves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessendorf, Jerry

    2010-11-01

    Fluid simulations based on the Incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are commonplace computer graphics tools in the visual effects industry. These simulations mostly come from custom C++ code written by the visual effects companies. Their significant impact in films was recognized in 2008 with Academy Awards to four visual effects companies for their technical achievement. However artists are not fluid dynamicists, and fluid dynamics simulations are expensive to use in a deadline-driven production environment. As a result, the simulation algorithms are modified to limit the computational resources, adapt them to production workflow, and to respect the client's vision of the film plot. Eulerian solvers on fixed rectangular grids use a mix of momentum solvers, including Semi-Lagrangian, FLIP, and QUICK. Incompressibility is enforced with FFT, Conjugate Gradient, and Multigrid methods. For liquids, a levelset field tracks the free surface. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics is also used, and is part of a hybrid Eulerian-SPH liquid simulator. Artists use all of them in a mix and match fashion to control the appearance of the simulation. Specially designed forces and boundary conditions control the flow. The simulation can be an input to artistically driven procedural particle simulations that enhance the flow with more detail and drama. Post-simulation processing increases the visual detail beyond the grid resolution. Ultimately, iterative simulation methods that fit naturally in the production workflow are extremely desirable but not yet successful. Results from some efforts for iterative methods are shown, and other approaches motivated by the history of production are proposed.

  8. Simulation of atmospheric circulation during the GIMEX 91 experiment using a meso-{gamma} primitive equations model

    SciTech Connect

    Gallee, H.; Fontaine de Ghelin, O.; Broeke, M.R. Van Den

    1995-11-01

    A meso-{gamma}-scale atmospheric model has been used to simulate atmospheric circulations observed during the Greenland Ice Margin EXperiment (GIMEX). The simulations shown here are two-dimensional and cover the 12-13 July 1991 period, a typical summer situation in this area. The synoptic-scale wind forcing is included. The tundra topography is assumed to be either flat, or averaged over a 50-km-wide cross section centered on the GIMEX transect. Simulated wind, temperature, humidity, and turbulent fluxes compare reasonably well with available observations. The simulated heat used to melt snow or ice is also shown. The sensitivity of the model results to the synoptic-scale wind forcing is significant. The impact of a tundra much warmer than the ocean on the ice sheet melting is discussed. It is found that weak easterly synoptic-scale winds are able to overwhelm this impact, especially when the tundra is assumed to be flat. 29 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. 3D Simulations of the Early Mars Climate with a General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forget, F.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Cha, S.; Marcq, E.; Schaeffer, J.; Wanherdrick, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The environmental conditions that existed on Mars during the Noachian period are subject to debate in the community. In any case, there are compelling evidence that these conditions were different than what they became later in the amazonian and possibly the Hesperian periods. Indeed, most of the old cratered terrains are disected by valley networks (thought to have been carved by flowing liquid water), whereas younger surface are almost devoid of such valleys. In addition, there are evidence that the erosion rate was much higher during the early noachian than later. Flowing water is surprising on early Mars because the solar luminosity was significantly lower than today. Even with the thick atmosphere (up to several bars).To improve our understanding of the early Mars Climate, we have developed a 3D general circulation model similar to the one used on current Earth or Mars to study the details of the climate today. Our first objective is to answer the following questions : how is the Martian climate modified if 1) the surface pressure is increased up to several bars (our baseline: 2 bars) and 2) if the sun luminosity is decreased by 25 account the heat possibly released by impacts during short periods, although it may have played a role .For this purpose, we have coupled the Martian General Circulation model developed at LMD with a sophisticated correlated k distribution model developped at NASA Ames Research Center. It is a narrow band model which computes the radiative transfer at both solar and thermal wavelengths (from 0.3 to 250 microns).

  10. Long-circulating Janus nanoparticles made by electrohydrodynamic co-jetting for systemic drug delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Sahar; Villa, Carlos H.; Dishman, Acacia F.; Grabowski, Marika E.; Pan, Daniel C.; Durmaz, Hakan; Misra, Asish C; Colón-Meléndez, Laura; Solomon, Michael J.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.; Lahann, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles with controlled physical properties have been widely used for controlled release applications. In addition to shape, the anisotropic nature of the particles can be an important design criterion to ensure selective surface modification or independent release of combinations of drugs. Purpose Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) co-jetting is used for the fabrication of uniform anisotropic nanoparticles with individual compartments and initial physicochemical and biological characterization is reported. Methods EHD co-jetting is used to create nanoparticles, which are characterized at each stage with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). Surface immobilization techniques are used to incorporate polyethylene glycol (PEG) and I125 radiolabels into the nanoparticles. Particles are injected in mice and the particle distribution after 1, 4 and 24 hours is assessed. Results and discussion Nanoparticles with an average diameter of 105.7 nm are prepared by EHD co-jetting. The particles contain functional chemical groups for further surface modification and radiolabeling. The density of PEG molecules attached to the surface of nanoparticles is determined to range between 0.02 and 6.04 ligands per square nanometer. A significant fraction of the nanoparticles (1.2% injected dose per mass of organ) circulates in the blood after 24 h. Conclusion EHD co-jetting is a versatile method for the fabrication of nanoparticles for drug delivery. Circulation of the nanoparticles for 24 h is a pre-requisite for subsequent studies to explore defined targeting of the nanoparticles to a specific anatomic site. PMID:26453170

  11. Fetal cell-free nucleic acids in the maternal circulation: new clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Wataganara, Tuangsit; Bianchi, Diana W

    2004-06-01

    Six years after the demonstration of the presence of cell-free fetal nucleic acids in maternal plasma, perinatal clinical applications continue to expand. The focus of this article is on advances that have occurred since the CNAPS II conference held in Hong Kong in 2001. Circulating fetal DNA levels (fDNA) are elevated in pregnancies complicated by fetal trisomies 13 and 21 but not 18. Measurement of fDNA levels improves the performance of the current standard maternal serum screen, by increasing the detection of Down syndrome cases by 5% with no increase in the false-positive rate. fDNA levels are elevated in women who have developed clinical symptoms of preeclampsia, but they are also elevated by the early second trimester in women who will eventually develop preeclampsia. fDNA and mRNA gamma globin measurement may have clinical utility as markers for fetomaternal hemorrhage in the late first trimester. Cell-free fetal DNA levels are quite high in the amniotic fluid, permitting fetal genomic isolation and analysis using comparative genomic hybridization techniques. Fetal DNA crosses the blood-brain barrier and is detectable in maternal cerebrospinal fluid in a subset of pregnant women. The biological implications of this are currently unknown. Review of the literature suggests that the placenta is the predominant source of the circulating fetal nucleic acids. However, detection of gamma globin mRNA sequences in the plasma of pregnant women suggests that fetal blood cells also contribute to the pool of nucleic acids. Widespread incorporation of fetal nucleic acid measurement into routine prenatal care depends on the identification of a readily accessible gender-independent fetal marker.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  13. Simulation of the effects of proposed tide gates on circulation, flushing, and water quality in residential canals, Cape Coral Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1991-01-01

    Decades of dredging and filling of Florida's low-lying coastal wetlands have produced thousands of miles of residential tidal canals and adjacent waterfront property. Typically, these canals are poorly flushed, and over time, accumulated organic-rich bottom materials, contribute to an increasingly severe degraded water quality. One-dimensional hydrodynamic and constituent-transport models were applied to two dead-end canal systems to determine the effects of canal system interconnection using tide gates on water circulation and constituent flushing. The model simulates existing and possible future circulation and flushing conditions in about 29 miles of the approximately 130 miles of tidally influenced canals in Cape Coral, located on the central west coast of peninsular Florida. Model results indicate that tidal water-level differences between the two canal systems can be converted to kinetic energy, in the form of increased water circulation, but the use of one-way tide gate interconnections. Computations show that construction of from one to four tide gates will cause replacement of a volume of water equivalent to the total volume of canals in both systems in 15 to 9 days, respectively. Because some canals flush faster than others, 47 and 21 percent of the original canal water will remain in both systems 50 days after start of operation of one and four tide gates, respectively. Some of the effects that such increased flushing are expected to have include reduced density stratification and associated dissolved-oxygen depletion in canal bottom waters, increased localized reaeration, and more efficient discharge of stormwater runoff entering the canals.

  14. Ensemble climate simulations using a fully coupled ocean-troposphere-stratosphere general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Huebener, H; Cubasch, U; Langematz, U; Spangehl, T; Niehörster, F; Fast, I; Kunze, M

    2007-08-15

    Long-term transient simulations are carried out in an initial condition ensemble mode using a global coupled climate model which includes comprehensive ocean and stratosphere components. This model, which is run for the years 1860-2100, allows the investigation of the troposphere-stratosphere interactions and the importance of representing the middle atmosphere in climate-change simulations. The model simulates the present-day climate (1961-2000) realistically in the troposphere, stratosphere and ocean. The enhanced stratospheric resolution leads to the simulation of sudden stratospheric warmings; however, their frequency is underestimated by a factor of 2 with respect to observations.In projections of the future climate using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change special report on emissions scenarios A2, an increased tropospheric wave forcing counteracts the radiative cooling in the middle atmosphere caused by the enhanced greenhouse gas concentration. This leads to a more dynamically active, warmer stratosphere compared with present-day simulations, and to the doubling of the number of stratospheric warmings. The associated changes in the mean zonal wind patterns lead to a southward displacement of the Northern Hemisphere storm track in the climate-change signal.

  15. Simulations of Madden-Julian Oscillation in High Resolution Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Liping; Stenchikov, Georgiy; McCabe, Matthew; Bangalath, HamzaKunhu; Raj, Jerry; Osipov, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    The simulation of tropical signals, especially the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), is one of the major deficiencies in current numerical models. The unrealistic features in the MJO simulations include the weak amplitude, more power at higher frequencies, displacement of the temporal and spatial distributions, eastward propagation speed being too fast, and a lack of coherent structure for the eastward propagation from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific (e.g., Slingo et al. 1996). While some improvement in simulating MJO variance and coherent eastward propagation has been attributed to model physics, model mean background state and air-sea interaction, studies have shown that the model resolution, especially for higher horizontal resolution, may play an important role in producing a more realistic simulation of MJO (e.g., Sperber et al. 2005). In this study, we employ unique high-resolution (25-km) simulations conducted using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory global High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HIRAM) to evaluate the MJO simulation against the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim re-analysis (ERAI) dataset. We specifically focus on the ability of the model to represent the MJO related amplitude, spatial distribution, eastward propagation, and horizontal and vertical structures. Additionally, as the HIRAM output covers not only an historic period (1979-2012) but also future period (2012-2050), the impact of future climate change related to the MJO is illustrated. The possible changes in intensity and frequency of extreme weather and climate events (e.g., strong wind and heavy rainfall) in the western Pacific, the Indian Ocean and the Middle East North Africa (MENA) region are highlighted.

  16. El Nino-southern oscillation simulated in an MRI atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, T.; Tokioka, T.; Endoh, M.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1992-11-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (GCM) was time integrated for 30 years to study interannual variability in the tropics. The atmospheric component is a global GCM with 5 levels in the vertical and 4[degrees]latitude X 5[degrees] longitude grids in the horizontal including standard physical processes (e.g., interactive clouds). The oceanic component is a GCM for the Pacific with 19 levels in the vertical and 1[degrees]x 2.5[degrees] grids in the horizontal including seasonal varying solar radiation as forcing. The model succeeded in reproducing interannual variations that resemble the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) with realistic seasonal variations in the atmospheric and oceanic fields. The model ENSO cycle has a time scale of approximately 5 years and the model El Nino (warm) events are locked roughly in phase to the seasonal cycle. The cold events, however, are less evident in comparison with the El Nino events. The time scale of the model ENSO cycle is determined by propagation time of signals from the central-eastern Pacific to the western Pacific and back to the eastern Pacific. Seasonal timing is also important in the ENSO time scale: wind anomalies in the central-eastern Pacific occur in summer and the atmosphere ocean coupling in the western Pacific operates efficiently in the first half of the year.

  17. Numerical Simulations of the Steady and Unsteady Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circulation Control Wing Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi; Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Englar, Robert J.; Ahuja, Krishan K.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a Circulation Control Wing (CCW) airfoil have been numerically investigated, and comparisons with experimental data have been made. The configuration chosen was a supercritical airfoil with a 30 degree dual-radius CCW flap. Steady and pulsed jet calculations were performed. It was found that the use of steady jets, even at very small mass flow rates, yielded a lift coefficient that is comparable or superior to conventional high-lift systems. The attached flow over the flap also gave rise to lower drag coefficients, and high L/D ratios. Pulsed jets with a 50% duty cycle were also studied. It was found that they were effective in generating lift at lower reduced mass flow rates compared to a steady jet, provided the pulse frequency was sufficiently high. This benefit was attributable to the fact that the momentum coefficient of the pulsed jet, during the portions of the cycle when the jet was on, was typically twice as much as that of a steady jet.

  18. Interannual Variability of Martian Global Dust Storms: Simulations with a Low-Order Model of the General Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankine, A. A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    We present simulations of the interannual variability of martian global dust storms (GDSs) with a simplified low-order model (LOM) of the general circulation. The simplified model allows one to conduct computationally fast long-term simulations of the martian climate system. The LOM is constructed by Galerkin projection of a 2D (zonally averaged) general circulation model (GCM) onto a truncated set of basis functions. The resulting LOM consists of 12 coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations describing atmospheric dynamics and dust transport within the Hadley cell. The forcing of the model is described by simplified physics based on Newtonian cooling and Rayleigh friction. The atmosphere and surface are coupled: atmospheric heating depends on the dustiness of the atmosphere, and the surface dust source depends on the strength of the atmospheric winds. Parameters of the model are tuned to fit the output of the NASA AMES GCM and the fit is generally very good. Interannual variability of GDSs is possible in the IBM, but only when stochastic forcing is added to the model. The stochastic forcing could be provided by transient weather systems or some surface process such as redistribution of the sand particles in storm generating zones on the surface. The results are sensitive to the value of the saltation threshold, which hints at a possible feedback between saltation threshold and dust storm activity. According to this hypothesis, erodable material builds up its a result of a local process, whose effect is to lower the saltation threshold until a GDS occurs. The saltation threshold adjusts its value so that dust storms are barely able to occur.

  19. Simulating the effects of the 1991 Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption using the ARPEGE atmosphere general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otterå, Odd Helge

    2008-03-01

    The climate changes that occured following the volcanic eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Phillippines on 15 June 1991 have been simulated using the ARPEGE atmosphere general circulation model (AGCM). The model was forced by a reconstructed spatial-time distribution of stratospheric aerosols intended for use in long climate simulations. Four statistical ensembles of the AGCM simulations with and without volcanic aerosols over a period of 5 years following the eruption have been made, and the calculated fields have been compared to available observations. The model is able to reproduce some of the observed features after the eruption, such as the winter warming pattern that was observed over the Northern Hemisphere (NH) during the following winters. This pattern was caused by an enhanced Equator-to-pole temperature gradient in the stratosphere that developed due to aerosol heating of the tropics. This in turn led to a strengthening of the polar vortex, which tends to modulate the planetary wave field in such a way that an anomalously positive Arctic Oscillation pattern is produced in the troposphere and at the surface, favouring warm conditions over the NH. During the summer, the model produced a more uniform cooling over the NH.

  20. Chemistry-Climate Model Simulations of Twenty-First Century Stratospheric Climate and Circulation Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-15

    response to the changes in anthropo - genic forcings (i.e., changes in the amounts of GHGs and ODSs). A rather important component of the ‘‘fingerprint’’ of...Southern Ocean carbon cycle. J. Climate, 21, 5820–5834. McLandress, C., and T. G. Shepherd, 2009: Simulated anthropo - genic changes in the Brewer

  1. Observations and Numerical Simulations of Urban Heat Island and Sea Breeze Circulations over New York City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Peter P.; Raman, Sethu

    2005-10-01

    Observations from two SOund Detection And Ranging (SODAR) units, a 10 m micrometeorological tower and five Automated Surface Observing Stations (ASOS) were examined during several synoptic scale flow regimes over New York City after the World Trade Center disaster on September 11, 2001. An ARPS model numerical simulation was conducted to explore the complex mesoscale boundary layer structure over New York City. The numerical investigation examined the urban heat island, urban roughness effect and sea breeze structure over the New York City region. Estimated roughness lengths varied from 0.7 m with flow from the water to 4 m with flow through Manhattan. A nighttime mixed layer was observed over lower Manhattan, indicating the existence of an urban heat island. The ARPS model simulated a sea-breeze front moving through lower Manhattan during the study period consistent with the observations from the SODARs and the 10-m tower observations. Wind simulations showed a slowing and cyclonic turning of the 10-m air flow as the air moved over New York City from the ocean. Vertical profiles of simulated TKE and wind speeds showed a maximum in TKE over lower Manhattan during nighttime conditions. It appears that this TKE maximum is directly related to the influences of the urban heat island.

  2. The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Pozzer, A.; Brühl, C.; Buchholz, J.; Ganzeveld, L.; Hoor, P.; Kerkweg, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; Sander, R.; Steil, B.; Stiller, G.; Tanarhte, M.; Taraborrelli, D.; van Aardenne, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2006-11-01

    The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model setup up to 0.01 hPa was used at spectral T42 resolution to simulate the lower and middle atmosphere. With the high vertical resolution the model simulates the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. The model meteorology has been tested to check the influence of the changes to ECHAM5 and the radiation interactions with the new representation of atmospheric composition. In the simulations presented here a Newtonian relaxation technique was applied in the tropospheric part of the domain to weakly nudge the model towards the analysed meteorology during the period 1998-2005. This allows an efficient and direct evaluation with satellite and in-situ data. It is shown that the tropospheric wave forcing of the stratosphere in the model suffices to reproduce major stratospheric warming events leading e.g. to the vortex split over Antarctica in 2002. Characteristic features such as dehydration and denitrification caused by the sedimentation of polar stratospheric cloud particles and ozone depletion during winter and spring are simulated well, although ozone loss in the lower polar stratosphere is slightly underestimated. The model realistically simulates stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes as indicated by comparisons with satellite and in situ measurements. The evaluation of tropospheric chemistry presented here focuses on the distributions of ozone, hydroxyl radicals, carbon monoxide and reactive nitrogen compounds. In spite of minor shortcomings, mostly related to the relatively coarse T42 resolution and the neglect of inter-annual changes in biomass burning emissions, the main characteristics of the trace gas distributions are generally reproduced well. The MESSy submodels and the

  3. Inter-comparison of the mean circulation in the Coral and Solomon Sea simulated by high resolution ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, C.; Durand, F.; Gasparin, F.; Melet, A.; Ganachaud, A.

    2010-12-01

    Of primary importance to the properties of water masses transported by the northern limb of the South Pacific subtropical gyre toward the equatorial band, the transfer within the Coral and, ultimately, the Solomon Sea is perturbed by the labyrinthine topography of the region. It results in highly energetic currents and complex pathways through the Vanuatu Archipelago and New Caledonia, at the entrance of the Coral Sea, and through the Solomon Sea once the flow has bifurcated northward along the coasts of Australia and of the Louisiade Archipelago of Papua New Guinea. In the Coral Sea, the existence of the North Vanuatu Jet and North Caledonian Jet is now well established but their variations as well as their detailed characteristics, including for instance their vertical extension, remain largely unknown. In this study, recourse to ocean simulations is made in order to highlight the representation of such complex circulation of the south western Pacific Ocean and to analyze the long term variability and physical mechanism implied in the jet dynamics. A brief overview of recent observations collected through the comprehensive observational SPICE program (CLIVAR/WCRP) will first be presented in order to set the context. Then, 6 different state-of-the-art numerical experiments with high horizontal resolution, ranging from 1/10 to 1/12 degree, and realistic topography regionally focused on the Coral and Solomon Sea or extracted from global experiments, are analyzed. Here, we will consider OGCMs forced by realistic and observed atmospheric fields but each model has its own strategy in terms of diffusion, topography representation and boundaries condition when appropriate. The focus is set primarily on the annual mean circulation of the upper ocean layers (above the 1000-m depth) and on the water mass transports simulated in the vicinity of the various topographic obstacles. The results will underline that most of high resolution numerical models have reached a high

  4. Communication Simulations for Power System Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jason C.; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2013-05-29

    New smart grid technologies and concepts, such as dynamic pricing, demand response, dynamic state estimation, and wide area monitoring, protection, and control, are expected to require considerable communication resources. As the cost of retrofit can be high, future power grids will require the integration of high-speed, secure connections with legacy communication systems, while still providing adequate system control and security. While considerable work has been performed to create co-simulators for the power domain with load models and market operations, limited work has been performed in integrating communications directly into a power domain solver. The simulation of communication and power systems will become more important as the two systems become more inter-related. This paper will discuss ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to create a flexible, high-speed power and communication system co-simulator for smart grid applications. The framework for the software will be described, including architecture considerations for modular, high performance computing and large-scale scalability (serialization, load balancing, partitioning, cross-platform support, etc.). The current simulator supports the ns-3 (telecommunications) and GridLAB-D (distribution systems) simulators. Ongoing and future work will be described, including planned future expansions for a traditional transmission solver. A test case using the co-simulator, utilizing a transactive demand response system created for the Olympic Peninsula and AEP gridSMART demonstrations, requiring two-way communication between distributed and centralized market devices, will be used to demonstrate the value and intended purpose of the co-simulation environment.

  5. A new geometrical approach to Eulerian transport: an application to the ocean circulation; final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWilliams, J. C.; Chao, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the transport processes in the large-scale ocean circulations using the new transport theory. We focus on the mid-latitude ocean circulation, especially the Gulf Stream, because it is recognized as a most energetic ocean current and plays a crucial role in maintaining the earth's climate system.

  6. Application of remote sensing to study nearshore circulation. [and the continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, J.; Lobecker, R.; Stauble, D.; Welch, C.; Haas, L.; Fang, C. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research to use remote sensing techniques for studying the continental shelf is reported. The studies reported include: (1) nearshore circulation in the vincinity of a natural tidal inlet; (2) identification of indicators of biological activity; (3) remote navigation system for tracking free drifting buoys; (4) experimental design of an estuaring tidal circulation; and (5) Skylab support work.

  7. Outflow Channels and Martian Climate: General Circulation Model (GCM) Simulations with Emplaced Water and Cloud Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, D.; Colaprete, A.; Haberle, R.; Asphaug, E.; Sloan, L.

    2005-12-01

    One of the most intriguing signatures of surface water on Mars is large outflow channels believed to have been carved out by gigantic flood events in the late Noachian or Hesperian. We use the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) to study how abrupt eruption of water onto the Martian surface might have affected the early climate of Mars, and to calculate where the water ultimately went as part of a transient hydrologic cycle. Our model includes the emplacement of large amounts of water onto the surface of a cold, dry Mars in the vicinity of Ares Valles, with current day orbital configurations. Specifically, 106 km3 of water was released at a rate of 0.1 km3/s at end of Northern Hemisphere summer. We have begun modeling with the MGCM with outflow water and cloud physics. The current cloud physics include cloud particle nucleation and growth, with radiative effects added at a later date. These results are being compared with a control case with no outflow in the model, and a case with water, but without clouds. In all cases we are examining the radiative effects of water vapor, albedo effects of water ice, and latent heat effects for this large influx of water. Preliminary results show differences between these three cases, but the factors that are causing these differences have not yet been determined. These results will be interesting to compare with studies that suggest significant, but possibly localized or regional, precipitation in the Hesperian, as opposed to the more widely recognized precipitation during the Noachian. Current analyses and longer model runs will allow us to calculate the specific effects of outflow water on past Martian climate, as well as where the water might have ended up.

  8. Outflow Channels and Martian Climate: General Circulation Model (GCM) Simulations with Emplaced Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, D.; Colaprete, A.; Haberle, R.; Asphaug, E.; Sloan, L.

    2005-08-01

    The existence of past surface water on Mars has been inferred on the basis of geomorphologic interpretation of spacecraft images. Among the most intriguing signatures of surface water are large outflow channels believed to have been carved out by gigantic flood events in the late Noachian or Hesperian. We use the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) to study how abrupt eruption of water onto the Martian surface might have affected climate, and to consider where the water ultimately went. Our initial model begins by emplacing large amounts of water onto the surface of Mars in the vicinity of Ares Valley, for current day orbital configurations. Specifically, 10\\^6 km\\^3 of water was released at a rate of 0.1 km\\^3/s at end of Northern summer. The MGCM was run for 10 years; a control version, without water, was run the same length of time, in order to assess the climatic impact from the radiative and thermal effects of the released water. Model modifications for the results that will be presented include (1) a customized sublimation scheme, (2) latent heat effects of water transitions, (3) radiative effects of water vapor, (4) albedo effects, and (5) clouds. Preliminary results indicate slight surface temperature increases due to latent heating is areas of water deposition, and cooling in the outflow formation area. Results also suggest that water vapor is distributed throughout the atmosphere. Results for these and other atmospheric variables, as well as water tracer distribution, will be presented. We acknowledge the University Aligned Research Center and the Mars Fundamental Research Program for their funding contributions.

  9. Developing a non-fouling hybrid microfluidic device for applications in circulating tumour cell detections.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yubo; Yang, Xiuying; Zhang, Jingchang; Cao, Xudong

    2017-03-01

    Non-specific cell adsorption is a challenge in sensitive detections using microfluidic systems, such as detecting circulating tumour cells from blood samples. In this report, we present a new strategy to study the combined effects of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity, electric charges and roughness on surface non-fouling properties of a PDMS/SU-8 microfluidic system. To achieve this, microchannel surfaces were modified by poly(amidoamine) generation 4 and generation 7, dendrimers that rendered surfaces negatively and positively charged at pH 7.4, respectively. Water contact angle, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and microscopy were used to characterize and confirm surface modifications, and the non-fouling performance of the resulting surfaces was tested using both live and dead CCRM-CEM cancer cells. Our results show that for live cells, electric charges of a surface is the most important factor affecting the non-fouling features of the surface in microfluidic systems; in contrast, for dead cells, surface hydrophilicity is the most important factor affecting surface non-fouling properties. However, surface roughness does not seem to be as important for both live and dead cells under the experimental conditions used in this study. These results also highlight the importance of different considerations when designing a lab-on-a-chip microfluidic system for high sensitivity biosensing and detection applications.

  10. Simulated response of the mid-Holocene Atlantic meridional overturning circulation in ECHAM6-FESOM/MPIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaoxu; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-08-01

    Changes of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) in the mid-Holocene compared to the preindustrial state are explored in different coupled climate models. Using time-slice integrations by a newly developed global finite-element model ECHAM6-FESOM with unstructured mesh and high resolution, our simulations show an enhanced mid-Holocene AMOC, accompanied by an increase in the ocean salinity over regions of deep water formation. We identify two different processes affecting the AMOC: (1) a more positive phase of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) increased water density over the Labrador Sea through anomalous net evaporation and surface heat loss; (2) a decreased import of sea ice from the Arctic causes a freshwater reduction in the northern North Atlantic Ocean. Using the coupled model ECHAM6-MPIOM in T63GR15 and T31GR30 grids, we find that the simulated AMOC has significant discrepancy with different model resolutions. In detail, stronger-than-present mid-Holocene AMOC is revealed by simulations with the T63GR15 grid, which resembles the result of ECHAM6-FESOM, while a decline of the mid-Holocene AMOC is simulated by the low resolution model with the T31GR30 grid. Such discrepancy can be attributed to different changes in Labrador Sea density which is mainly affected by (1) NAO-induced net precipitation and deep water convection, (2) freshwater transport from the Arctic Ocean, and (3) the strength of AMOC itself. Finally, we analyzed available coupled climate models showing a diversity of responses of AMOC to mid-Holocene forcings, most of which reveal positive AMOC changes related to northern high latitudes salinification.

  11. Numerical simulation of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations by an ocean general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

    2003-01-01

    We simulated the spatial distributions and the temporal variations of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations in the ocean by using the ocean general circulation model which was developed by National Center of Atmospheric Research. These nuclides are introduced into seawaters from global fallout due to atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The distribution of radioactive deposition on the world ocean is estimated from global precipitation data and observed values of annual deposition of radionuclides at the Meteorological Research Institute in Japan and several observed points in New Zealand. Radionuclides from global fallout have been transported by advection, diffusion and scavenging, and this concentration reduces by radioactive decay in the ocean. We verified the results of the model calculations by comparing simulated values of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu in seawater with the observed values included in the Historical Artificial Radionuclides in the HAM database, which has been constructed by the Meteorological Research Institute. The vertical distributions of the calculated 137Cs concentrations were in good agreement and are in good agreement with the observed profiles in the 1960s up to 250 m, in the 1970s up to 500 m, in the 1980s up to 750 m and in the 1990s up to 750 m. However, the calculated 137Cs concentrations were underestimated compared with the observed 137Cs at the deeper layer. This may suggest other transport processes of 137Cs to deep waters. The horizontal distributions of 137Cs concentrations in surface water could be simulated. A numerical tracer release experiment was performed to explain the horizontal distribution pattern. A maximum (239,240)Pu concentration layer occurs at an intermediate depth for both observed and calculated values, which is formed by particle scavenging. The horizontal distributions of the calculated (239,240)Pu concentrations in surface water could be simulated by considering the scavenging effect.

  12. Simulations of the mesoscale circulation of the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heburn, George W.; Johnson, Clifford D.

    1995-01-01

    The Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian Seas provide the only link between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Oceans. This is a very dynamic region, rich in mesoscale variability. A two-layer, hydrodynamic version of the Navy layered ocean model is used to simulate the mesoscale frontal features and associated current systems. The model is wind-driven using monthly mean wind stresses and inflow/outflow mass flux from the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans. The current transports from the model results compare favorably with transport measurements from a number of observational experiments.

  13. Numerical simulation of hydrothermal circulation in the Cascade Range, north-central Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Paulson, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Alternate conceptual models to explain near-surface heat-flow observations in the central Oregon Cascade Range involve (1) an extensive mid-crustal magmatic heat source underlying both the Quaternary arc and adjacent older rocks or (2) a narrower deep heat source which is flanked by a relatively shallow conductive heat-flow anomaly caused by regional ground-water flow (the lateral-flow model). Relative to the mid-crustal heat source model, the lateral-flow model suggests a more limited geothermal resource base, but a better-defined exploration target. We simulated ground-water flow and heat transport through two cross sections trending west from the Cascade range crest in order to explore the implications of the two models. The thermal input for the alternate conceptual models was simulated by varying the width and intensity of a basal heat-flow anomaly and, in some cases, by introducing shallower heat sources beneath the Quaternary arc. Near-surface observations in the Breitenbush Hot Springs area are most readily explained in terms of lateral heat transport by regional ground-water flow; however, the deep thermal structure still cannot be uniquely inferred. The sparser thermal data set from the McKenzie River area can be explained either in terms of deep regional ground-water flow or in terms of a conduction-dominated system, with ground-water flow essentially confined to Quaternary rocks and fault zones.

  14. 3D-Simulation Of Concentration Distributions Inside Large-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischnewski, R.; Ratschow, L.; Hartge, E. U.; Werthe, J.

    With increasing size of modern CFB combustors the lateral mixing of fuels and secondary air gains more and more importance. Strong concentration gradients, which result from improper lateral mixing, can lead to operational problems, high flue gas emissions and lower boiler efficiencies. A 3D-model for the simulation of local gas and solids concentrations inside industrial-sized CFB boilers has been developed. The model is based on a macroscopic approach and considers all major mechanisms during fuel spreading and subsequent combustion of char and volatiles. Typical characteristics of modern boilers like staged combustion, a smaller cross-sectional area in the lower section of the combustion chamber and the co-combustion of additional fuels with coal can be considered. The 252 MWth combustor of Stadtwerke Duisburg AG is used for the validation of the model. A comprehensive picture of the local conditions inside the combustion chamber is achieved by the combination of local gas measurements and the three-dimensional simulation of concentration distributions.

  15. Recent Upgrades to the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model: Applications to Mars' Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Schaeffer, J.

    2008-09-01

    We report on recent improvements to the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model (GCM), a robust 3D climate-modeling tool that is state-of-the-art in terms of its physics parameterizations and subgrid-scale processes, and which can be applied to investigate physical and dynamical processes of the present (and past) Mars climate system. The most recent version (gcm2.1, v.24) of the Ames Mars GCM utilizes a more generalized radiation code (based on a two-stream approximation with correlated k's); an updated transport scheme (van Leer formulation); a cloud microphysics scheme that assumes a log-normal particle size distribution whose first two moments are treated as atmospheric tracers, and which includes the nucleation, growth and sedimentation of ice crystals. Atmospheric aerosols (e.g., dust and water-ice) can either be radiatively active or inactive. We apply this version of the Ames GCM to investigate key aspects of the present water cycle on Mars. Atmospheric dust is partially interactive in our simulations; namely, the radiation code "sees" a prescribed distribution that follows the MGS thermal emission spectrometer (TES) year-one measurements with a self-consistent vertical depth scale that varies with season. The cloud microphysics code interacts with a transported dust tracer column whose surface source is adjusted to maintain the TES distribution. The model is run from an initially dry state with a better representation of the north residual cap (NRC) which accounts for both surface-ice and bare-soil components. A seasonally repeatable water cycle is obtained within five Mars years. Our sub-grid scale representation of the NRC provides for a more realistic flux of moisture to the atmosphere and a much drier water cycle consistent with recent spacecraft observations (e.g., Mars Express PFS, corrected MGS/TES) compared to models that assume a spatially uniform and homogeneous north residual polar cap.

  16. Interdecadal and Interannual Variability in the Northern Extratropical Circulation Simulated with the JMA Global Model. Part I: Wintertime Leading Mode.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Ryuichi; Sugi, Masato; Sato, Nobuo

    1995-12-01

    Interdecadal and interannual atmospheric variability in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere is investigated using an atmospheric GCM. The model used for this research is a T42 GCM version of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA-GSM89) global model. The 34-yr integration from January 1955 to December 1988 has been performed employing the real observed near-global SST condition. To estimate internal variability of the tropical and extratropical atmospheres, another 34-yr integration was conducted using the seasonally varying, climatological SST without interannual variability.Using the rotated EOF analysis, the authors made an intercomparison of the Pacific/North American (PNA) wintertime teleconnection patterns prevailing in the observed and simulated extratropical atmospheres in the two experiments. The polarity of PNA derived from the real SST experiment is indicative of definite interdecal variability. particularly an abrupt change of the midlatitude circulation regime over the North Pacific in the 1976/77 winter. By contrast, this mode, deduced from the climatological SST control run, has intermonthly and short-term interannual variability but no pronounced interdecadal variability.It is strongly suggested that the anomalous SST forcing exerts strong influence on the PNA mode and modulates its amplitude, and as a consequence, longer-tem variability, such as interdecadal variability, has appeared in the time sequence of this mode. It is confirmed from the T42 GCM experiment that the interdecadal variations of the wintertime extratropical atmosphere over the North Pacific are substantially controlled by the anomalous SST forcing in the Tropics, and that, in particular, the tropical forcing is primarily responsible for the abrupt change of the midlatitude circulation regime in the 197/77 winter.

  17. Interannual tropical rainfall variability in general circulation model simulations associated with the atmospheric model intercomparison project

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K.R.; Palmer, T.N.

    1996-11-01

    The interannual variability of rainfall over the Indian subcontinent, the African Sahel, and the Nordeste region of Brazil have been evaluated in 32 models for the period 1979 - 88 as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The interannual variations of Nordeste rainfall are the most readily captured, owing to the intimate link with Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures. The precipitation variations over India and the Sahel are less well simulated. Additionally, an Indian monsoon wind shear index was calculated for each model. This subset of models also had a rainfall climatology that was in better agreement with observations, indicating a link between systematic model error and the ability to simulate interannual variations. A suite of six European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) AMIP runs (differing only in their initial conditions) have also been examined. As observed, all-India rainfall was enhanced in 1988 relative to 1987 in each of these realizations. All-India rainfall variability during other years showed little or no predictability, possibly due to internal chaotic dynamics associated with intraseasonal monsoon fluctuations and/or unpredictable land surface process interactions. The interannual variations of Nordeste rainfall were best represented. The State University of New York at Albany /National Center for Atmospheric Research Genesis model was run in five initial condition realizations. In this model, the Nordeste rainfall variability was also best reproduced. However, for all regions the skill was less than that of the ECMWF model. The relationships of the all-India and Sahel rainfall/SST teleconnections with horizontal resolution, convection scheme closure, and numerics have been evaluated. 64 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. The 0.125 degree finite-volume General Circulation Model on the NASA Columbia Supercomputer: Preliminary Simulations of Mesoscale Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B.-W.; Atlas, R.; Chern, J.-D.; Reale, O.; Lin, S.-J.; Lee, T.; Chang, J.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Columbia supercomputer was ranked second on the TOP500 List in November, 2004. Such a quantum jump in computing power provides unprecedented opportunities to conduct ultra-high resolution simulations with the finite-volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). During 2004, the model was run in realtime experimentally at 0.25 degree resolution producing remarkable hurricane forecasts [Atlas et al., 2005]. In 2005, the horizontal resolution was further doubled, which makes the fvGCM comparable to the first mesoscale resolving General Circulation Model at the Earth Simulator Center [Ohfuchi et al., 2004]. Nine 5-day 0.125 degree simulations of three hurricanes in 2004 are presented first for model validation. Then it is shown how the model can simulate the formation of the Catalina eddies and Hawaiian lee vortices, which are generated by the interaction of the synoptic-scale flow with surface forcing, and have never been reproduced in a GCM before.)

  19. A Wind Tunnel Model to Explore Unsteady Circulation Control for General Aviation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagle, Christopher M.; Jones, Gregory S.

    2002-01-01

    Circulation Control airfoils have been demonstrated to provide substantial improvements in lift over conventional airfoils. The General Aviation Circular Control model is an attempt to address some of the concerns of this technique. The primary focus is to substantially reduce the amount of air mass flow by implementing unsteady flow. This paper describes a wind tunnel model that implements unsteady circulation control by pulsing internal pneumatic valves and details some preliminary results from the first test entry.

  20. Comparisons of spectral thermospheric general circulation model simulations and E and F region chemical release wind observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, I. S.; Larsen, M. F.

    1993-03-01

    High-latitude chemical release wind measurements were carried out in February and March 1978, in March 1985, and in March 1987. In each of the experiments, wind profiles were obtained covering heights in both the E and the F region. Three of the release experiments were carried out on the evening side of the auroral oval and one on the morning side. Two sets of measurements were carried out in disturbed conditions at solar maximum, while the other two were carried out during quiet periods at solar minimum. The spectral thermospheric general circulation model that has been developed at the Danish Meteorological Institute is used to simulate the conditions appropriate to each of the four experiments and detailed comparisons between the model predictions and the measurements are presented. Considering the uncertainties in the various external sources of forcing, such as the plasma convection patterns, the model adequately reproduces the major features of all the wind profiles. However in the E region the relative wind maxima from the model are, in general, above the heights of the observed wind maxima, possibly due to the oversimplified auroral precipitation used in the model, with the electrons being represented by single Maxwellian energy spectra only. The uncoupled neutral and ionized atmospheric compositions used in the model may also explain part of the unrealistic simulated winds. The upward propagating tides are found to modify the E region winds significantly, even under disturbed conditions when the plasma forcing might be expected to dominate the dynamics. In our results the latter is shown by the sensitivity of the simulated flows to the lower boundary condition which is the imposed tidal oscillation structure.

  1. The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Pozzer, A.; Brühl, C.; Buchholz, J.; Ganzeveld, L.; Hoor, P.; Kerkweg, A.; Lawrence, M. G.; Sander, R.; Steil, B.; Stiller, G.; Tanarhte, M.; Taraborrelli, D.; van Aardenne, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2006-07-01

    The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model version up to 0.01 hPa was used at T42 resolution (~2.8 latitude and longitude) to simulate the lower and middle atmosphere. The model meteorology has been tested to check the influence of the changes to ECHAM5 and the radiation interactions with the new representation of atmospheric composition. A Newtonian relaxation technique was applied in the tropospheric part of the domain to weakly nudge the model towards the analysed meteorology during the period 1998-2005. It is shown that the tropospheric wave forcing of the stratosphere in the model suffices to reproduce the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation and major stratospheric warming events leading e.g. to the vortex split over Antarctica in 2002. Characteristic features such as dehydration and denitrification caused by the sedimentation of polar stratospheric cloud particles and ozone depletion during winter and spring are simulated accurately, although ozone loss in the lower polar stratosphere is slightly underestimated. The model realistically simulates stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes as indicated by comparisons with satellite and in situ measurements. The evaluation of tropospheric chemistry presented here focuses on the distributions of ozone, hydroxyl radicals, carbon monoxide and reactive nitrogen compounds. In spite of minor shortcomings, mostly related to the relatively coarse T42 resolution and the neglect of interannual changes in biomass burning emissions, the main characteristics of the trace gas distributions are generally reproduced well. The MESSy submodels and the ECHAM5/MESSy1 model output are available through the internet on request.

  2. General circulation and thermal structure simulated by a Venus AGCM with a two-stream radiative code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Ikeda, Kohei; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding Venus climate and atmospheric dynamics. At the present stage, however, the full-physics model is under development. Ikeda (2011) developed a two-stream radiative transfer code, which covers the solar to infrared radiative processes due to the gases and aerosol particles. The radiative code was applied to Venus AGCM (T21L52) at Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, Univ. Tokyo. We analyzed the results in a few Venus days simulation that was restarted after nudging zonal wind to a super-rotating state until the equilibrium. The simulated thermal structure has low-stability layer around 105 Pa at low latitudes, and the neutral stability extends from ˜105 Pa to the lower atmosphere at high latitudes. At the equatorial cloud top, the temperature lowers in the region between noon and evening terminator. For zonal and meridional winds, we can see difference between the zonal and day-side means. As was indicated in previous works, the day-side mean meridional wind speed mostly corresponds to the poleward component of the thermal tide and is much higher than the zonal mean. Toward understanding dynamical roles of waves in UV cloud tracking and brightness, we calculated the eddy heat and momentum fluxes averaged over the day-side hemisphere. The eddy heat and momentum fluxes are poleward in the poleward flank of the jet. In contrast, the fluxes are relatively weak and equatorward at low latitudes. The eddy momentum flux becomes equatorward in the dynamical situation that the simulated equatorial wind is weaker than the midlatitude jet. The sensitivity to the zonal flow used for the nudging will be also discussed in the model validation.

  3. Circulation in blast driven instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Mixing in many natural phenomena (e.g. supernova collapse) and engineering applications (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) is often initiated through hydrodynamic instabilities. Explosions in these systems give rise to blast waves which can interact with perturbations at interfaces between different fluids. Blast waves are formed by a shock followed by a rarefaction. This wave profile leads to complex time histories of interface acceleration. In addition to the instabilities induced by the acceleration field, the rarefaction from the blast wave decompresses the material at the interface, further increasing the perturbation growth. After the passage of the wave, circulation circulation generated by the blast wave through baroclinic vorticity continues to act upon the interface. In this talk, we provide scaling laws for the circulation and amplitude growth induced by the blast wave. Numerical simulations of the multifluid Euler equations solved using a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method are used to validate the theoretical results.

  4. Simulation, design and fabrication of microwave ferrite components for monostatic radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Ryan Seamus

    A theory encompassing ferrite materials and their application to microwave circuits is presented herein. Several aspects of these materials and the devices that incorporate them are discussed. In particular, the behavior of infinitely extended microwave ferrites in the presence of a radio frequency (rf) signal is reviewed. The conditions for Faraday rotation and birefringence are outlined and the electromagnetic wave response is quantified. Further, magnetostatic modes and spin waves are discussed which require that the rf electric intensity be identically zero. A time-domain simulation routine is presented that accounts for electromagnetic wave propagation within finitely extended ferrite materials. This routine is fully second-order accurate. The routine is validated by comparing the network parameter data of a stripline phase shifter against the data obtained from a popular frequency domain formulation. Excellent correlation is observed, thus establishing that the routine is consistent with other simulation approaches. A review of the Bode-Fano criterion is presented wherein the fundamental matchability of an arbitrary load impedance function is addressed. This criterion is represented by integral equations that provide a relationship between the bandwidth and tolerance of match of an arbitrary impedance function. This theory is applied to the matchability of three port circulators by appealing to the concept of a required load impedance for perfect isolation. When applied to circulators in this manner, the realized bandwidth can exceed the fundamental limit in certain cases, but it is shown that the Bode-Fano criterion still provides a good "rule of thumb" regarding the matchability of a given circulator device. Three circulators are presented in validation of the Bode-Fano criterion, each of which utilize ferrite materials that exhibit high crystalline anisotropy, and hence they are "self-biased" devices. Simulation data is provided for the frequency response

  5. Multiyear Simulations of the Martian Water Cycle with the Ames General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J. R.; Nelli, S. M.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Mars atmosphere is carbon dioxide dominated with non-negligible amounts of water vapor and suspended dust particles. The atmospheric dust plays an important role in the heating and cooling of the planet through absorption and emission of radiation. Small dust particles can potentially be carried to great altitudes and affect the temperatures there. Water vapor condensing onto the dust grains can affect the radiative properties of both, as well as their vertical extent. The condensation of water onto a dust grain will change the grain s fall speed and diminish the possibility of dust obtaining high altitudes. In this capacity, water becomes a controlling agent with regard to the vertical distribution of dust. Similarly, the atmosphere s water vapor holding capacity is affected by the amount of dust in the atmosphere. Dust is an excellent green house catalyst; it raises the temperature of the atmosphere, and thus, its water vapor holding capacity. There is, therefore, a potentially significant interplay between the Martian dust and water cycles. Previous research done using global, 3-D computer modeling to better understand the Martian atmosphere treat the dust and the water cycles as two separate and independent processes. The existing Ames numerical model will be employed to simulate the relationship between the Martian dust and water cycles by actually coupling the two cycles. Water will condense onto the dust, allowing the particle's radiative characteristics, fall speeds, and as a result, their vertical distribution to change. Data obtained from the Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and especially the Mars Global Surveyor missions will be used to determine the accuracy of the model results.

  6. Time-varying Atmospheric Circulation Patterns Caused by N2 Condensation Flows on a Simulated Triton Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C.; Chanover, N.; Murphy, J. R.; Zalucha, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Triton and Pluto are two members of a possible class of bodies with an N2 frost covered surface in vapor-pressure equilibrium with a predominately N2 atmosphere. Modeling the dynamics of such an atmosphere is useful for several reasons. First, winds on Triton were inferred from images of surface streaks and active plumes visible at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby in August 1989. Dynamic atmospheric simulations can reveal the seasonal conditions under which such winds would arise and therefore how long before the Voyager 2 encounter the ground streaks may have been deposited. Second, atmospheric conditions on Pluto at the time of the New Horizons flyby are expected to be similar to those on Triton. Therefore, a dynamical model of a cold, thin N2 atmosphere can be used to predict wind speed and direction on Pluto during the New Horizons encounter with the Pluto/Charon system in July 2015. We used a modified version of the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model, version 2.0, to model an N2 atmosphere in contact with N2 surface frosts. We altered the Ames GCM to simulate conditions found on Triton. These alterations included changing the size, rotation rate, orbital inclination, surface gravity, and distance to the Sun of the parent body to model the proper time-varying insolation. We defined the gas properties for an N2 atmosphere, including values for latent heat, specific heat, and the vapor pressure-temperature relationship for N2 frosts. Our simulations assumed an N2 atmosphere with an initial average surface pressure of 18 microbars and we chose N2 frost albedo and emissivity values that resulted in a stable surface pressure over time. We incorporated a 190-meter deep ten-layer water-ice subsurface layer covered with a 20-centimeter global layer of N2 frost. Our simulations did not include atmospheric radiative heat transfer, but did include conduction, convection, and surface-boundary layer heating. We ran simulations of 100 Triton days at 10 points along

  7. Simulated and Observed Circulation in the Indonesian Seas: 1/12 deg Global HYCOM and the INSTANT Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-14

    flow) and the upper ocean flow of the global thermohaline circulation . Impediments within the Indonesian Seas that may reduce the throughflow...Atlantic deep water formation in an OGCM’s ventilation and thermohaline circulation . J. Phys. Oceanogr., 28:1759-1785. Gordon, A.L., 2005...Schmitz, W.J., Jr., 1995. On the interbasin-scale thermohaline circulation . Rev. Geophys., 33:151-173. Shriver, J.F., Hurlburt, H.E., 1997. The

  8. Simulated and Observed Circulation in the Indonesian Seas: 1/12 degree Global HYCOM and the INSTANT Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    the upper ocean flow of the global thermohaline circulation . Impediments within the Indonesian Seas that may reduce the throughflow transport include...1998. The role of North Atlantic deep water formation in an OGCM’s ventilation and thermohaline circulation . J. Phys. Oceanogr. 28, 1759-1785...L03611, doi: 10.1029/2006GL028363. Schmitz Jr., W.J., 1995. On the interbasin-scale thermohaline circulation . Rev. Geophys. 33,151-173. Shriver

  9. Simulation of tropical cyclogenesis in association with large-scale cyclonic circulation over the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xi; Chen, Guanghua; Xiao, Xiao

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the difference in tropical cyclone (TC) formation in different cyclonic circulation locations using a mesoscale model on a beta plane. A weak initial vortex is imposed at different positions in a cyclonic circulation. Numerical experiments indicate that the tropical disturbances located in the center and northeastern parts of the cyclonic circulation are favorable to TC formation, while those located in the south of the cyclonic circulation are unfavorable. Since the asymmetric circulation induced by the beta effect peaks in the northeastern quadrant of the vortex, when the initial vortex is placed in the southern part of the cyclonic circulation, the vortex begins to develop in the south due to the effect of the westerly wind of the cyclonic circulation. The westerly wind of the cyclonic circulation gradually decreases and the vortex is contributed mainly by the beta effect afterwards. Thus, establishment of the convection-circulation-moisture positive feedback is delayed, unfavorable to TC rapid development. On the contrary, when the initial vortex is placed in the northern part of the cyclonic circulation, the superposition of the beta gyres and easterly wind of the cyclonic circulation induces stronger wavenumber-1 wind in the northeastern part of the vortex. The greater asymmetric wind is closely associated with the symmetric wind through energy conversion, thus accelerating a positive feedback and facilitating vortex development into a stronger TC. Meanwhile, when the initial vortex is placed in the center and eastern parts of the cyclonic circulation, the vortex develops a little slower than when it is placed in the northern part, but stronger than when placed in the southern part.

  10. Importance of the Annual Cycles of SST and Solar Irradiance for Circulation and Rainfall: A Climate Model Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Yogesh C.; Lau, William K. M.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Annual cycle of climate and precipitation is related to annual cycle of sunshine and sea-surface temperatures. Understanding its behavior is important for the welfare of humans worldwide. For example, failure of Asian monsoons can cause widespread famine and grave economic disaster in the subtropical regions. For centuries meteorologists have struggled to understand the importance of the summer sunshine and associated heating and the annual cycle of sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on rainfall in the subtropics. Because the solar income is pretty steady from year to year, while SSTs depict large interannual variability as consequence of the variability of ocean dynamics, the influence of SSTs on the monsoons are better understood through observational and modeling studies whereas the relationship of annual rainfall to sunshine remains elusive. However, using NASA's state of the art climate model(s) that can generate realistic climate in a computer simulation, one can answer such questions. We asked the question: if there was no annual cycle of the sunshine (and its associated land-heating) or the SST and its associated influence on global circulation, what will happen to the annual cycle of monsoon rains? By comparing the simulation of a 4-year integration of a baseline Control case with two parallel anomaly experiments: 1) with annual mean solar and 2) with annual mean sea-surface temperatures, we were able to draw the following conclusions: (1) Tropical convergence zone and rainfall which moves with the Sun into the northern and southern hemispheres, specifically over the Indian, African, South American and Australian regions, is strongly modulated by the annual cycles of SSTs as well as solar forcings. The influence of the annual cycle of solar heating over land, however, is much stronger than the corresponding SST influence for almost all regions, particularly the subtropics; (2) The seasonal circulation patterns over the vast land-masses of the Northern

  11. The variability, structure and energy conversion of the northern hemisphere traveling waves simulated in a Mars general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqun; Toigo, Anthony D.

    2016-06-01

    Investigations of the variability, structure and energetics of the m = 1-3 traveling waves in the northern hemisphere of Mars are conducted with the MarsWRF general circulation model. Using a simple, annually repeatable dust scenario, the model reproduces many general characteristics of the observed traveling waves. The simulated m = 1 and m = 3 traveling waves show large differences in terms of their structures and energetics. For each representative wave mode, the geopotential signature maximizes at a higher altitude than the temperature signature, and the wave energetics suggests a mixed baroclinic-barotropic nature. There is a large contrast in wave energetics between the near-surface and higher altitudes, as well as between the lower latitudes and higher latitudes at high altitudes. Both barotropic and baroclinic conversions can act as either sources or sinks of eddy kinetic energy. Band-pass filtered transient eddies exhibit strong zonal variations in eddy kinetic energy and various energy transfer terms. Transient eddies are mainly interacting with the time mean flow. However, there appear to be non-negligible wave-wave interactions associated with wave mode transitions. These interactions include those between traveling waves and thermal tides and those among traveling waves.

  12. Eddy-resolving simulations of the Fimbul Ice Shelf cavity circulation: Basal melting and exchange with open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattermann, T.; Smedsrud, L. H.; Nøst, O. A.; Lilly, J. M.; Galton-Fenzi, B. K.

    2014-10-01

    Melting at the base of floating ice shelves is a dominant term in the overall Antarctic mass budget. This study applies a high-resolution regional ice shelf/ocean model, constrained by observations, to (i) quantify present basal mass loss at the Fimbul Ice Shelf (FIS); and (ii) investigate the oceanic mechanisms that govern the heat supply to ice shelves in the Eastern Weddell Sea. The simulations confirm the low melt rates suggested by observations and show that melting is primarily determined by the depth of the coastal thermocline, regulating deep ocean heat fluxes towards the ice. Furthermore, the uneven distribution of ice shelf area at different depths modulates the melting response to oceanic forcing, causing the existence of two distinct states of melting at the FIS. In the simulated present-day state, only small amounts of Modified Warm Deep Water enter the continental shelf, and ocean temperatures beneath the ice are close to the surface freezing point. The basal mass loss in this so-called state of “shallow melting” is mainly controlled by the seasonal inflow of solar-heated surface water affecting large areas of shallow ice in the upper part of the cavity. This is in contrast to a state of “deep melting”, in which the thermocline rises above the shelf break depth, establishing a continuous inflow of Warm Deep Water towards the deep ice. The transition between the two states is found to be determined by a complex response of the Antarctic Slope Front overturning circulation to varying climate forcings. A proper representation of these frontal dynamics in climate models will therefore be crucial when assessing the evolution of ice shelf basal melting along this sector of Antarctica.

  13. Large eddy simulation applications in gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Kevin

    2009-07-28

    The gas turbine presents significant challenges to any computational fluid dynamics techniques. The combination of a wide range of flow phenomena with complex geometry is difficult to model in the context of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solvers. We review the potential for large eddy simulation (LES) in modelling the flow in the different components of the gas turbine during a practical engineering design cycle. We show that while LES has demonstrated considerable promise for reliable prediction of many flows in the engine that are difficult for RANS it is not a panacea and considerable application challenges remain. However, for many flows, especially those dominated by shear layer mixing such as in combustion chambers and exhausts, LES has demonstrated a clear superiority over RANS for moderately complex geometries although at significantly higher cost which will remain an issue in making the calculations relevant within the design cycle.

  14. Application of Satellite Altimetry to Ocean Circulation Studies: 1987-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. -L.; Cheney, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Altimetric measurement of the height of the sea surface from space provides global observation of the world's oceans. The last eight years have witnessed a rapid growth in the use of altimetry data from the study of the ocean circulations, thanks to the multiyear data from the Geosat Mission.

  15. Application of LANDSAT TM images to assess circulation and dispersion in coastal lagoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kjerfve, B.; Jensen, J. R.; Magill, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    The main objectives are formulated around a four pronged work approach, consisting of tasks related to: image processing and analysis of LANDSAT thematic mapping; numerical modeling of circulation and dispersion; hydrographic and spectral radiation field sampling/ground truth data collection; and special efforts to focus the investigation on turbid coastal/estuarine fronts.

  16. The application of Seasat-1 radar altimetry to continental shelf circulation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornillon, P.; Reed, M.; Spaulding, M.; Swanson, C.

    1980-01-01

    Seasat-1 radar altimetry data have been used to verify a continental shelf circulation model subjected to tidal forcing on the open boundary. The model makes use of the semi-implicit mode of time integration, removing the surface gravity wave time step restriction. Both the altimetry and the model predictions are compared with empirically determined tidal fluctuations and generally good agreement is obtained.

  17. Application of bonded NdFeB magnet for C-Band circulator component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiantoro, T.; Idayanti, N.; Sudrajat, N.; Septiani, A.; Dedi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper bonded NdFeB permanent magnets of the crashed-ribbon type were made as an alternative for circulator magnet to improve their magnetic performance. The fabrication process is also easier than the sintered NdFeB because there had no shrinkage of product (such as sintered barium ferrite magnet), with the others advantages as follows; large freeness of product shapes, high precision of dimension and good corrosion resistance. The dimension of the samples was measured to calculate its bulk densities and the magnetic properties were characterized by Permagraph to obtain values such as; Remanence induction (Br) in kG, Coercivity value (Hcj) in kOe, the Maximum energy product (BH max) in MGOe. Whereas the surface magnetic field strength (B) was observed by the Gauss-meter. The bonded NdFeB permanent magnets revealed 6.39 kG of Br, 6.974 kOe of Hcj and 7.13 MGOe of BHmax. The circulator performance was measured using Vector Network Analyzer (VNA). The optimum values of the circulator measurement at a frequency of 5 GHz show a VSWR value of 1.062 and insertion loss of -0.463 dB. The bonded magnet could be used as component of permanent magnets on the circulator that working on C-Band at a frequency range of 4 GHz - 8 GHz.

  18. Simulation of a dust episode over Eastern Mediterranean using a high-resolution atmospheric chemistry general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Kader, Mohamed; Zittis, Georgios; Astitha, Marina; Lelieveld, Jos; Tymvios, Fillipos

    2013-04-01

    An extended episode of low visibility took place over the Eastern Mediterranean in late September 2011, caused by a strong increase in dust concentrations, analyzed from observations of PM10 (Particulate Matter with <10μm in diameter). A high-resolution version of the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/Messy2.41 Atmospheric Chemistry) was used to simulate the emissions, transport and deposition of airborne desert dust. The model configuration involves the spectral resolution of T255 (0.5°, ~50Km) and 31 vertical levels in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The model was nudged towards ERA40 reanalysis data to represent the actual meteorological conditions. The dust emissions were calculated online at each model time step and the aerosol microphysics using the GMXe submodel (Global Modal-aerosol eXtension). The model includes a sulphur chemistry mechanism to simulate the transformation of the dust particles from the insoluble (at emission) to soluble modes, which promotes dust removal by precipitation. The model successfully reproduces the dust distribution according to observations by the MODIS satellite instruments and ground-based AERONET stations. The PM10 concentration is also compared with in-situ measurements over Cyprus, resulting in good agreement. The model results show two subsequent dust events originating from the Negev and Sahara deserts. The first dust event resulted from the transport of dust from the Sahara on the 21st of September and lasted only briefly (hours) as the dust particles were efficiently removed by precipitation simulated by the model and observed by the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) satellites. The second event resulted from dust transport from the Negev desert to the Eastern Mediterranean during the period 26th - 30th September with a peak concentration at 2500m elevation. This event lasted for four days and diminished due to dry deposition. The observed reduced visibility over Cyprus

  19. Sensitivity of simulated circulation dynamics to the choice of surface wind forcing in the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Patrick J.; Hurlburt, Harley E.

    2005-06-01

    The circulation sensitivity to the choice of wind-forcing product is investigated with the NRL Layered Ocean Model (NLOM) configured for the Japan/East Sea. Monthly climatologies from seven different wind-stress data sets (and wind-stress curl) are formed from observed and model-derived atmospheric data sets. The resulting maps of wind-stress curl reveal significantly different spatial patterns and magnitudes, even two with largely opposite large-scale patterns of wind-stress curl. These wind sets were used in forcing three sets of simulations, 1/8° linear and 1/8° and 1/32° nonlinear. In addition, seasonally varying straits forcing (inflow through Tsushima balanced by outflow through Tsugaru and Soya) was included in all the simulations, and simulations with straits forcing only were performed. The 1.5-layer linear reduced-gravity simulations include only the lowest order dynamics, mainly Munk β 1/3 western boundary layers (due to both wind and straits forcing) and a Sverdrup interior. The nonlinear simulations add bottom topography, multiple internal modes, diapycnal mixing, and ventilation of layer interfaces. At 1/8° resolution, only weak barotropic/baroclinic instabilities occur, but at 1/32° resolution these are much stronger, allowing vigorous transfer of energy from the upper ocean to the abyssal layer via baroclinic instability. This drives much stronger mean abyssal currents that more strongly steer upper-ocean current pathways than at 1/8°, i.e. there is much stronger upper ocean-topographical coupling. The linear model simulates most of the basic features, e.g., the subpolar gyre with all but the straits forcing only, the East Korean Warm Current (EKWC) and its connection to the subpolar front with all but one wind-forcing set, but the remaining wind set gives a continuous Nearshore Branch (NB) of the Tsushima Warm Current along the coast of Honshu. In all of the linear simulations with an EKWC, the separation latitude from the coast of Korea is

  20. Characterization of Jupiter's Deep Circulation and Static Stability through Wide Channel Numerical Simulations of the Dynamics and Interactions of Southern Midlatitudes Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Juberias, Raul; Dowling, T. E.

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed features and dynamics of Jovian vortices are sensitive to the underlying environmental structure of Jupiter’s atmosphere, in particular to the vertical wind shear and the static stability, and that forward modeling techniques can be successfully used to eliminate a large range of possibilities in a self-consistent manner and hence constrain the atmospheric structure below the cloud regions (Youseff and Marcus 2003, Morales-Juberias et al. 2005). However, these studies have generally been done on a narrow latitude-band basis (˜15°). Here we present wide channel simulations (˜40°) of two major meteorological events observed in the southern atmosphere of Jupiter involving the interaction of the Great Red Spot (GRS) with other nearby vortices. Namely, the spots associated with the recirculation of the South Tropical Disturbance of 1979 (Smith et al. 1979) and the White Ovals (WOS) in 2000 when ovals BE and FA merged to form BA (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 2001). By studying these two events using wide channel simulations, not unlike the strategy used in terrestrial synoptic meteorology, we show that we can gain new insights into the patterns governing Jupiter's global circulations, drawing a coherent picture of the vertical structure of the atmosphere for the whole southern mid-latitudinal regions of Jupiter over time. In particular, we find that the model output best captures the dynamics of the individual vortices and the morphology of their interactions when the deformation length in this region is like that derived by Read et al. 2006 and the deep winds vary following a dependence like that derived by Dowling 1995 in which the westward jets remain constant with depth but the eastward jets increase with depth. Computational resources were provided by the New Mexico Computing Applications Center and NMT. This work was supported by PATM grants NNX08AE91G and NNX08AE64G.

  1. Methods of sound simulation and applications in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaertner, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of methods for electronically synthesizing sounds is presented. A given amount of hardware and computer capacity places an upper limit on the degree and fidelity of realism of sound simulation which is attainable. Good sound realism for aircraft simulators can be especially expensive because of the complexity of flight sounds and their changing patterns through time. Nevertheless, the flight simulator developed at the Research Institute for Human Engineering, West Germany, shows that it is possible to design an inexpensive sound simulator with the required acoustic properties using analog computer elements. The characteristics of the sub-sound elements produced by this sound simulator for take-off, cruise and approach are discussed.

  2. Seasonal Water Transport in the Atmosphere of Mars: Applications of a Mars General Circulation Model Using Mars Global Surveyor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    This is a Final Report for a Joint Research Interchange (JRI) between NASA Ames Research Center and San Jose State University, Department of Meteorology. We present below a summary of progress made during the duration of this JRI. The focus of this JRI has been to investigate seasonal water vapor transport in the atmosphere of Mars and its effects on the planet's present climate. To this end, the primary task has been to adapt a new dynamical processor for the adiabatic tendencies of the atmospheric circulation into the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model (MGCM). Using identical boundary and initial conditions, several comparative tests between the new and old MGCMs have been performed and the nature of the simulated circulations have been diagnosed. With confidence that the updated version of the Ames MGCM produces quite similar mean and eddy circulation statistics, the new climate model is well poised as a tool to pursue fundamental questions related to the spatial and seasonal variations of atmospheric water vapor on Mars, and to explore exchanges of water with non-atmospheric reservoirs and transport within its atmosphere. In particular, the role of surface sources and sinks can be explored, the range of water-vapor saturation altitudes can be investigated, and plausible precipitation mechanisms can be studied, for a range of atmospheric dust loadings, such future investigations can contribute to a comprehensive study of surface inventories, exchange mechanisms, and the relative importance of atmospheric transport Mars' water cycle. A listing of presentations made and manuscripts submitted during the course of this project is provided.

  3. Seasonal Water Transport in the Atmosphere of Mars: Applications of a Mars General Circulation Model Using Mars Global Surveyor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    This is a Final Report for a Joint Research Interchange (JRI) between NASA Ames Research Center and San Jose State University, Department of Meteorology. We present below a summary of progress made during the duration of this JRI. The focus of this JRI has been to investigate seasonal water vapor transport in the atmosphere of Mars and its effects on the planet's present climate. To this end, the primary task has been to adapt a new dynamical processor for the adiabatic tendencies of the atmospheric circulation into the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model (MGCM). Using identical boundary and initial conditions, several comparative tests between the new and old MGCMs have been performed and the nature of the simulated circulations have been diagnosed. With confidence that the updated version of the Ames MGCM produces quite similar mean and eddy circulation statistics, the new climate model is well poised as a tool to pursue fundamental questions related to the spatial and seasonal variations of atmospheric water vapor on Mars, and to explore exchanges of water with non-atmospheric reservoirs and transport within its atmosphere. In particular, the role of surface sources and sinks can be explored, the range of water-vapor saturation altitudes can be investigated, and plausible precipitation mechanisms can be studied, for a range of atmospheric dust loadings. Such future investigations can contribute to a comprehensive study of surface inventories, exchange mechanisms, and the relative importance of atmospheric transport Mars' water cycle. A listing of presentations made and manuscripts submitted during the course of this project is provided.

  4. Simulating transoceanic migrations of young loggerhead sea turtles: merging magnetic navigation behavior with an ocean circulation model.

    PubMed

    Putman, Nathan F; Verley, Philippe; Shay, Thomas J; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2012-06-01

    Young loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from eastern Florida, USA, undertake a transoceanic migration in which they gradually circle the Sargasso Sea before returning to the North American coast. Loggerheads possess a 'magnetic map' in which regional magnetic fields elicit changes in swimming direction along the migratory pathway. In some geographic areas, however, ocean currents move more rapidly than young turtles can swim. Thus, the degree to which turtles can control their migratory movements has remained unclear. In this study, the movements of young turtles were simulated within a high-resolution ocean circulation model using several different behavioral scenarios, including one in which turtles drifted passively and others in which turtles swam briefly in accordance with experimentally derived data on magnetic navigation. Results revealed that small amounts of oriented swimming in response to regional magnetic fields profoundly affected migratory routes and endpoints. Turtles that engaged in directed swimming for as little as 1-3 h per day were 43-187% more likely than passive drifters to reach the Azores, a productive foraging area frequented by Florida loggerheads. They were also more likely to remain within warm-water currents favorable for growth and survival, avoid areas on the perimeter of the migratory route where predation risk and thermal conditions pose threats, and successfully return to the open-sea migratory route if carried into coastal areas. These findings imply that even weakly swimming marine animals may be able to exert strong effects on their migratory trajectories and open-sea distributions through simple navigation responses and minimal swimming.

  5. Effects of cloud-radiative heating on atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations of convectively coupled equatorial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jia-Lin; Kim, Daehyun; Lee, Myong-In; Kang, In-Sik

    2007-12-01

    This study examines the effects of cloud-radiative heating on convectively coupled equatorial waves simulated by the Seoul National University (SNU) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). The strength of cloud-radiative heating is adjusted by modifying the autoconversion rate needed for cloud condensates to grow up to raindrops. The results show that increasing the autoconversion rate has little effect on the climatological mean precipitation, but it significantly reduces the time-mean clouds and radiative heating in the upper troposphere and enhances heating due to moist processes in the middle troposphere. These lead to cooling of time-mean upper troposphere temperature and drying of lower-troposphere moisture. Reduction of cloud-radiative heating enhances the prominence of Kelvin and n = 0 eastward inertial gravity (EIG) waves. It also tends to enhance significantly the variance of the Kelvin, equatorial Rossby (ER), mixed Rossby-gravity (MRG), and n = 1 westward inertial gravity (WIG) waves, but not the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) or n = 0 EIG wave. Reduction of cloud-radiative heating has little effect on the phase speed of the waves, which is associated with unchanged effective static stability caused by the near cancellation between reduced dry static stability and reduced diabatic heating. An important implication of this study is that when tuning GCM's top-of-the-atmosphere radiative fluxes to fit the observations, one needs to make sure that the enhancement factor of cloud-radiative heating at the intraseasonal timescale also fits with the observation so that the convectively coupled equatorial waves are not suppressed.

  6. Streamflow changes in the Sierra Nevada, California, simulated using a statistically downscaled general circulation model scenario of climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilby, Robert L.; Dettinger, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    Simulations of future climate using general circulation models (GCMs) suggest that rising concentrations of greenhouse gases may have significant consequences for the global climate. Of less certainty is the extent to which regional scale (i.e., sub-GCM grid) environmental processes will be affected. In this chapter, a range of downscaling techniques are critiqued. Then a relatively simple (yet robust) statistical downscaling technique and its use in the modelling of future runoff scenarios for three river basins in the Sierra Nevada, California, is described. This region was selected because GCM experiments driven by combined greenhouse-gas and sulphate-aerosol forcings consistently show major changes in the hydro-climate of the southwest United States by the end of the 21st century. The regression-based downscaling method was used to simulate daily rainfall and temperature series for streamflow modelling in three Californian river basins under current-and future-climate conditions. The downscaling involved just three predictor variables (specific humidity, zonal velocity component of airflow, and 500 hPa geopotential heights) supplied by the U.K. Meteorological Office couple ocean-atmosphere model (HadCM2) for the grid point nearest the target basins. When evaluated using independent data, the model showed reasonable skill at reproducing observed area-average precipitation, temperature, and concomitant streamflow variations. Overall, the downscaled data resulted in slight underestimates of mean annual streamflow due to underestimates of precipitation in spring and positive temperature biases in winter. Differences in the skill of simulated streamflows amongst the three basins were attributed to the smoothing effects of snowpack on streamflow responses to climate forcing. The Merced and American River basins drain the western, windward slope of the Sierra Nevada and are snowmelt dominated, whereas the Carson River drains the eastern, leeward slope and is a mix of

  7. Narrowing of the Upwelling Branch of the Brewer-Dobson Circulation and Hadley Cell in Chemistry-Climate Model Simulations of the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Stolarski, Richard S.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Waugh, Darryn

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the width of the upwelling branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and Hadley cell in the 21st Century are investigated using simulations from a coupled chemistry-climate model. In these model simulations the tropical upwelling region narrows in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The narrowing of the Brewer-Dobson circulation is caused by an equatorward shift of Rossby wave critical latitudes and Eliassen-Palm flux convergence in the subtropical lower stratosphere. In the troposphere, the model projects an expansion of the Hadley cell's poleward boundary, but a narrowing of the Hadley cell's rising branch. Model results suggest that eddy forcing may also play a part in the narrowing of the rising branch of the Hadley cell.

  8. Narrowing of the Upwelling Branch of the Brewer-Dobson Circulation and Hadley Cell in Chemistry-Climate Model Simulations of the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Stolarski, Richard S.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Waugh, Darryn

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the width of the upwelling branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and Hadley cell in the 21st Century are investigated using simulations from a coupled chemistry-climate model. In these model simulations the tropical upwelling region narrows in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The narrowing of the Brewer-Dobson circulation is caused by an equatorward shift of Rossby wave critical latitudes and Eliassen-Palm flux convergence in the subtropical lower stratosphere. In the troposphere, the model projects an expansion of the Hadley cell's poleward boundary, but a narrowing of the Hadley rising branch. Model results suggest that the narrowing of the Hadley cell ascent is also eddy-driven.

  9. Dynamics of circulating antibodies against Trichinella spiralis after application of anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Cerman, J; Spaldonová, R

    1977-01-01

    Formation and dynamics of circulating antibodies were studied in mice experimentally inefected with T. spiralis and treated with mebendazole. Latex-fixation tube was used in the experiment. In the control group of untreated mice the antibodies were detected on the 21st day after infection. The antibody level reached the maximum on day 76 and low titres were found still on day 207 after infection. In mice treated with mebendazole in the intestinal phase of trichinellosis, the antibodies were detected 10 or 7 days earlier than in the control group. At this time the antibody level reached the maximum and then it decreased gradually until no antibodies were detected on days 66-76. This phenomenon correlated with postmortem examination and suggested that the formation and dynamics of circulating antibodies against T. spiralis are directly dependent on the effectiveness of the treatment.

  10. A new application of a finite element heat and mass transfer numerical modeling code (FEHM) to heat and fluid circulation in lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.; Stauffer, P. H.; Calder, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    those properties to dome material regions. Further modifications to the dome geometry and material properties were made to better simulate specific lava domes, including Santiaguito in Guatemala and Unzen in Japan. Preliminary results suggest that FEHM produces a reasonable simulation of fluid movement in a saturated, post-eruptive (cooling) lava dome, with recharge from meteoric water, over periods of years to decades. This model setup is applicable to the older lava domes at Santiaguito and the dome at Unzen. The simulations presented were restricted at this point to lower temperature materials (< 250°C) to avoid computationally more intensive phase change. A grid based on the geometry of the older Santiaguito lava domes has produced temperature gradients and fluid flow paths in a similar location to hot springs at the real dome complex.

  11. Evaluation of Methylation Biomarkers for Detection of Circulating Tumor DNA and Application to Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Susan M.; Ho, Thu; Brown, Glenn S.; Baker, Rohan T.; Thomas, Melissa L.; McEvoy, Aidan; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Ross, Jason P.; Lockett, Trevor J.; Young, Graeme P.; LaPointe, Lawrence C.; Pedersen, Susanne K.; Molloy, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors shed DNA into circulation, and there is growing evidence that the detection of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has broad clinical utility, including monitoring of disease, prognosis, response to chemotherapy and tracking tumor heterogeneity. The appearance of ctDNA in the circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) isolated from plasma or serum is commonly detected by identifying tumor-specific features such as insertions, deletions, mutations and/or aberrant methylation. Methylation is a normal cell regulatory event, and since the majority of ccfDNA is derived from white blood cells (WBC), it is important that tumour-specific DNA methylation markers show rare to no methylation events in WBC DNA. We have used a novel approach for assessment of low levels of DNA methylation in WBC DNA. DNA methylation in 29 previously identified regions (residing in 17 genes) was analyzed in WBC DNA and eight differentially-methylated regions (DMRs) were taken through to testing in clinical samples using methylation specific PCR assays. DMRs residing in four genes, BCAT1, GRASP, IKZF1 and IRF4, exhibited low positivity, 3.5% to 7%, in the plasma of colonoscopy-confirmed healthy subjects, with the sensitivity for detection of ctDNA in colonoscopy-confirmed patients with colorectal cancer being 65%, 54.5%, 67.6% and 59% respectively. PMID:27983717

  12. Aerodynamic Response of a Pitching Airfoil with Pulsed Circulation Control for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panther, Chad C.

    Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) have experienced a renewed interest in development for urban, remote, and offshore applications. Past research has shown that VAWTs cannot compete with Horizontals Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs) in terms of energy capture efficiency. VAWT performance is plagued by dynamic stall (DS) effects at low tip-speed ratios (lambda), where each blade pitches beyond static stall multiple times per revolution. Furthermore, for lambda<2, blades operate outside of stall during over 70% of rotation. However, VAWTs offer many advantages such as omnidirectional operation, ground proximity of generator, lower sound emission, and non-cantilevered blades with longer life. Thus, mitigating dynamic stall and improving VAWT blade aerodynamics for competitive power efficiency has been a popular research topic in recent years and the directive of this study. Past research at WVU focused on the addition of circulation control (CC) technology to improve VAWT aerodynamics and expand the operational envelope. A novel blade design was generated from the augmentation of a NACA0018 airfoil to include CC capabilities. Static wind tunnel data was collected for a range of steady jet momentum coefficients (0.01≤ Cmu≤0.10) for analytical vortex model performance projections. Control strategies were developed to optimize CC jet conditions throughout rotation, resulting in improved power output for 2≤lambda≤5. However, the pumping power required to produce steady CC jets reduced net power gains of the augmented turbine by approximately 15%. The goal of this work was to investigate pulsed CC jet actuation to match steady jet performance with reduced mass flow requirements. To date, no experimental studies have been completed to analyze pulsed CC performance on a pitching airfoil. The research described herein details the first study on the impact of steady and pulsed jet CC on pitching VAWT blade aerodynamics. Both numerical and experimental studies were

  13. Application of circulation classifications from the COST733 collection to the detection of solar and geomagnetic effects on tropospheric circulation over Europe in winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, Radan; Cahynová, Monika; Kyselý, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Many studies of circulation classifications are biased by the fact that they are based on a single classification only; that is, their results are affected by the properties of a particular classification to an unknown extent. A large number of circulation classifications produced and collected in the COST733 database allows such a bias to be removed. As an example, we examine effects of solar activity variations on the frequency of circulation types, making use of more than sixty objective classifications for each of 12 domains, defined over Europe. To determine the solar effects, winter months (December to March) are divided into three classes according to the mean monthly solar activity, within which the frequencies of occurrence of circulation types are calculated. Circulation types coming from any classification with significant differences in frequency between high and low solar activity are identified. Current results generally confirm results of a previous study based on a single classification only (subjective Hess-Brezowsky) that (a) westerly types are more frequent under high than low solar activity; (b) northerly types are more frequent under low than high activity, and (iii) easterly and anticyclonic types are more frequent under low than moderate solar activity; the opposite holds for cyclonic types. The research is supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic under contract OC115 and the Grant Agency of the Czech Academy of Sciences, project A300420805.

  14. Low-frequency variability of circulation in the northern Japan/East Sea based on numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Dmitry; Stepanova, Victoriia; Gusev, Anatoly

    2014-05-01

    Interannual and interdecadal variability of circulation in the northern Japan/East Sea (JES) is investigated using an ocean model INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model). INMOM is a three-dimensional, σ-coordinate, nonlinear, finite difference model which uses the hydrostatic and Boussinesq approximations. Using 1/10° mesh with 15 sigma levels, the basin-scale circulation of the JES was reproduced. Nudging conditions for temperature and salinity were applied in the straits of the JES. To represent the coastline and topography ETOPO2 was used. We used the initial temperature and salinity fields from Levitus data and the atmospheric forcing from CORE database. The basin-scale circulation of the JES was reconstructed from 1958 to 2006. To study the variability of circulation in the northern JES we analyzed the relative vorticity variability both in the layer from 500 m to 2500 m and at depths of 500, 800 and 2500 m. Harmonics with periods of 4-5 and 10 years dominate in the variability of circulation in the Japan Basin. It is supposed that the interannual variability is determined by the Japan Basin geographical features. We analyzed the potential density field during winter and established a connection between winter cooling and decadal variability of deep water circulation.

  15. On the reduced lifetime of nitrous oxide due to climate change induced acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation as simulated by the MPI Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracher, D.; Manzini, E.; Reick, C. H.; Schultz, M. G.; Stein, O.

    2014-12-01

    Greenhouse gas induced climate change will modify the physical conditions of the atmosphere. One of the projected changes is an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation in the stratosphere, as it has been shown in many model studies. This change in the stratospheric circulation consequently bears an effect on the transport and distribution of atmospheric components such as N2O. Since N2O is involved in ozone destruction, a modified distribution of N2O can be of importance for ozone chemistry. N2O is inert in the troposphere and decays only in the stratosphere. Thus, changes in the exchange between troposphere and stratosphere can also affect the stratospheric sink of N2O, and consequently its atmospheric lifetime. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential of currently approximately 300 CO2-equivalents in a 100-year perspective. A faster decay in atmospheric N2O mixing ratios, i.e. a decreased atmospheric lifetime of N2O, will also reduce its global warming potential. In order to assess the impact of climate change on atmospheric circulation and implied effects on the distribution and lifetime of atmospheric N2O, we apply the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model, MPI-ESM. MPI-ESM consists of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM, the land surface model JSBACH, and MPIOM/HAMOCC representing ocean circulation and ocean biogeochemistry. Prognostic atmospheric N2O concentrations in MPI-ESM are determined by land N2O emissions, ocean-atmosphere N2O exchange and atmospheric tracer transport. As stratospheric chemistry is not explicitly represented in MPI-ESM, stratospheric decay rates of N2O are prescribed from a MACC MOZART simulation. Increasing surface temperatures and CO2 concentrations in the stratosphere impact atmospheric circulation differently. Thus, we conduct a series of transient runs with the atmospheric model of MPI-ESM to isolate different factors governing a shift in atmospheric circulation. From those transient

  16. Application of control theory to dynamic systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auslander, D. M.; Spear, R. C.; Young, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The application of control theory is applied to dynamic systems simulation. Theory and methodology applicable to controlled ecological life support systems are considered. Spatial effects on system stability, design of control systems with uncertain parameters, and an interactive computing language (PARASOL-II) designed for dynamic system simulation, report quality graphics, data acquisition, and simple real time control are discussed.

  17. Application of simulation models for the optimization of business processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jašek, Roman; Sedláček, Michal; Chramcov, Bronislav; Dvořák, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the applications of modeling and simulation tools in the optimization of business processes, especially in solving an optimization of signal flow in security company. As a modeling tool was selected Simul8 software that is used to process modeling based on discrete event simulation and which enables the creation of a visual model of production and distribution processes.

  18. The incorporation of microfluidics into circulating tumor cell isolation for clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Kozminsky, Molly; Wang, Yang; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2016-01-01

    The second leading cause of death in the United States, cancer is at its most dangerous as it spreads to secondary locations. Cancer cells in the blood stream, or circulating tumor cells (CTCs), present an opportunity to study metastasis provided they may be extracted successfully from blood. Engineers have accelerated the development of technologies that achieve this goal based on exploiting differences between tumor cells and surrounding blood cells such as varying expression patterns of membrane proteins or physical characteristics. Collaboration with biologists and clinicians has allowed additional analysis and will lead to the use of these rare cells to their full potential in the fight against cancer. PMID:27857883

  19. Simulating continental surface waters: An application to Holocene northern Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, M.T.

    1997-07-01

    A model (SWAM) to predict surface waters (lakes and wetlands) on the scale of atmospheric general circulation models is developed. SWAM is based on a linear reservoir hydrologic model and is driven by runoff, precipitation, evaporation, topography, and water transport directions. SWAM is applied to the modern climate using observed estimates of the hydrologic variables and a 5{prime} {times} 5{prime} digital terrain model to represent topography. It simulates the surface water area of northern Africa (about 1% of the land area) in reasonable agreement with observed estimates (0.65%). A middle Holocene (6000 yr BP) simulation using the results of the GENESIS atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) illustrates the sensitivity of the simulated surface waters to climatic changes and the model`s utility as a diagnostic tool for AGCMs. SWAM and GENESIS capture the general pattern of climate change 6000 yr BP. There is an increase in the simulated surface water area from about 1% to about 3% of the land area, including an increase in the area of Lake Chad by about five times and extensive surface water throughout northern Mali, consistent with observed patterns of surface water change during the Holocene. Limitations in the modeling of surface waters appear to result from the relatively coarse resolution of global elevation data. 73 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. An Open Simulation System Model for Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1995-01-01

    A model for a generic and open environment for running multi-code or multi-application simulations - called the open Simulation System Model (OSSM) - is proposed and defined. This model attempts to meet the requirements of complex systems like the Numerical Propulsion Simulator System (NPSS). OSSM places no restrictions on the types of applications that can be integrated at any state of its evolution. This includes applications of different disciplines, fidelities, etc. An implementation strategy is proposed that starts with a basic prototype, and evolves over time to accommodate an increasing number of applications. Potential (standard) software is also identified which may aid in the design and implementation of the system.

  1. Using the Variable-Resolution General Circulation Model CAM-SE to Simulate Regional Tropical Cyclone Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzycki, C. M.; Jablonowski, C.; Taylor, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ability of General Circulation Models (GCMs) to resolve tropical cyclones in the climate system has traditionally been difficult due to issues such as small storm size and the existence of key thermodynamic processes requiring significant parameterization. At traditional GCM grid resolutions of 50-300 km tropical cyclones are severely under-resolved, if not totally unresolved. Recent improvements in computational ability as well as advances in GCM model design now allow for simulations with grid spacings as small as 10-25 km. At these resolutions, models are able to more effectively capture key dynamical features of tropical cyclones. This paper explores a variable-resolution global model approach that allows for high spatial resolutions in areas of interest, such as low-latitude ocean basins where tropical cyclogenesis occurs. Such GCM designs with multi-resolution meshes serve to bridge the gap between globally uniform grids and limited area models and have the potential to become a future tool for regional climate assessments. A statically-nested, variable-resolution option has recently been introduced into the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) Spectral Element (SE) dynamical core. The SE dynamical core is also known as the 'High-Order Method Modeling Environment' (HOMME). We present aquaplanet climate experiments which showcase the ability of nested meshes to produce realistic tropical cyclones selectively in high resolution grids embedded within a global domain. We also evaluate model performance when coupled to an active land model and forced with historical sea surface temperatures by comparing multi-year results from variable-resolution CAM-SE to other globally-uniform high resolution tropical cyclone studies recently completed by the climate modeling community. Specific focus is paid to intensity profiles and track densities as well as the interannual variability in storm count in tropical regions of

  2. Comparison of tropical pacific temperature and current simulations with two vertical mixing schemes embedded in an ocean general circulation model and reference to observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Chao, YI; Ma, Chung-Chun; Mechoso, Carlos R.

    1995-01-01

    The Pacanowski-Philander (PP) and Mellor-Yamada (MY) parameterization models of vertical mixing by turbulent processes were embedded in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory high-resolution ocean general circulation model of the tropical Pacific Ocean. All other facets of the numerical simulations were the same. Simulations were made for the 1987-1988 period. At the equator the MY simulation produced near-surface temperatures more uniform with depth, a deeper thermocline, a deeper core speed of the Equatorial Undercurrent, and a South Equatorial Current with greater vertical thickness compared with that computed with the PP method. Along 140 deg W, between 5 deg N and 10 deg N, both simulations were the same. Moored buoy current and temperature observations had been recorded by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory at three sites (165 deg E, 140 deg W, 110 deg W) along the equator and at three sites (5 deg N, 7 deg N, 9 deg N) along 140 deg W. Simulated temperatures were lower than those observed in the near-surface layer and higher than those observed in the thermocline. Temperature simulations were in better agreement with observations compared to current simulations. At the equator, PP current and temperature simulations were more representative of the observations than MY simulations.

  3. Snowline instability in a general circulation model: application to Carboniferous glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; Yip, Kuor-Kier, J.; Baum, S.K.

    1994-11-01

    For over twenty years it has been known that energy balance models (EBMs) with snow-albedo feedback are characterized by unstable behavior in some areas of parameter space. This behaviour leads to rapid changes in snow area due to small changes in forcing, and has been termed the small ice cap instability (SICI). It has never been clarified whether this behaviour reflects a real feature of the climate system or a limitation in EBMs. In this study we demonstrate that evidence for similar unstable behavior can also be found in an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), using a realistic set of boundary conditions for the Carboniferous (300 Ma), one of the most extensive periods of glaciation in Earth history. When solar luminosity is sequentially lowered to near values appropriate for the Carboniferous, there is a discontinuous increase in summer snow area. The instability occurs in approximately the same area of parameter space as one previously found in an EBM. Analysis of selected fields indicates that the circulation is primarily affected in the area of snow increase; far-field effects are minimal. There is good agreement between model-generated summer snowcover and one reconstruction of Carboniferous ice cover. Although more work is required on this topic, our results provide increased support for the possibility that the snowline instability represents a real feature of the climate system, and that it may help explain some cases of glacial inception and abrupt transitions in Earth history. 63 refs., 20 figs.

  4. Circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum (CNAPS): applications in oncology

    PubMed Central

    González-Masiá, José A; García-Olmo, Damián; García-Olmo, Dolores C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of small amounts of circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum (CNAPS) is not a new finding. The verification that such amounts are significantly increased in cancer patients, and that CNAPS might carry a variety of genetic and epigenetic alterations related to cancer development and progression, has aroused great interest in the scientific community in the last decades. Such alterations potentially reflect changes that occur during carcinogenesis, and include DNA mutations, loss of heterozygosity, viral genomic integration, disruption of microRNA, hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes, and changes in the mitochondrial DNA. These findings have led to many efforts toward the implementation of new clinical biomarkers based on CNAPS analysis. In the present article, we review the main findings related to the utility of CNAPS analysis for early diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of cancer, most of which appear promising. However, due to the lack of harmonization of laboratory techniques, the heterogeneity of disease progression, and the small number of recruited patients in most of those studies, there has been a poor translation of basic research into clinical practice. In addition, many aspects remain unknown, such as the release mechanisms of cell-free nucleic acids, their biological function, and the way by which they circulate in the bloodstream. It is therefore expected that in the coming years, an improved understanding of the relationship between CNAPS and the molecular biology of cancer will lead to better diagnosis, management, and treatment. PMID:23874104

  5. Estimating the time evolution of the geoid: An application of the adjoint method in global mantle circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbach, A.; Bunge, H.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Forward simulations of mantle circulation processes in the Earth's interior suffer from the problem of an unknown initial condition, that is the temperature distribution of the past is not known a-priori. With the help of the adjoint method (Bunge (2003)), we are able to determine an optimal initial condition iteratively, given a temperature model of the present time. Here we use an s-wave tomography (Grand (1997)) as the estimator for present-day Earth structure. The seismic model is converted into temperature using a published self-consistent mineralogical model (Piazzoni (2007)), allowing us to constrain a time series of mantle flow consistent with the present-day estimator for the past 40 Myrs. Temperature fluctuations initiate density anomalies, which in turn influence the Earth's external gravitational field. Gravity provides an important constraint for geodynamic modelling. We find a very high correlation of our model geoid for the present time to current satellite derived geoid solutions. Furthermore, our models of paleo circulation allow us to determine time-series of the geoid for the past 40 Ma. Some remarkable geodynamic features can be recognized from our proof-of-concept models, especially the sinking of the Farallon and the Tethys slab through the Earth's mantle, and their associated effects on past topography and geoid.

  6. The simulation of the seasonal cycle of the Southern Hemispheric circulation by the GLAS Seasonal Cycle Model and a comparison to observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Shukla, J.

    1983-01-01

    The general circulation of the Southern Hemisphere is quite different from that of the Northern Hemisphere in many important ways. These include the barotropic nature of the stationary waves and the presence of a strong barotropic component to the mean zonal wind, the lack of a strong seasonal dependence of the transient eddies, and the dominant role played by eddies with periods less than 10 days compared to longer period fluctuations. Such differences attest to the importance of the altered nature of the orographic and thermal land-sea forcings in the Southern Hemisphere compared to the Northern Hemisphere. Some of the important features of the Southern Hemisphere circulation as simulated by the GLAS Seasonal Cycle Model (SCM) are presented. The geographical patterns of local variability and their seasonal shifts in the SCM are discussed and compared to observations.

  7. Weather and event generators based on analogues of atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiou, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Analogues of atmospheric circulation have had numerous applications on weather prediction, climate reconstructions and detection/attribution analyses. A stochastic weather generator based on circulation analogues was recently proposed by Yiou (2014) to simulate sequences of European temperatures. One of the features of this weather generator is that it preserves the spatial and temporal structures of the climate variables to be simulated. This method is flexible enough to be combined efficiently with a storm detection algorithm in order to generate large catalogues of high impact extra-tropical storms that hit Europe. I will present the gist of the method of circulation analogues and some performances. Two promising applications for weather generators based on this method (ensemble climate prediction and extra-tropical storms) will be tested. References Yiou, P.: AnaWEGE: a weather generator based on analogues of atmospheric circulation, Geosci. Model Dev., 7, 531-543, doi:10.5194/gmd-7-531-2014, 2014.

  8. The relation between AMOC, gyre circulation, and meridional heat transports in the North Atlantic in model simulations of the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, Johann; Moreno-Chamarro, Eduardo; Lohmann, Katja

    2016-04-01

    While it is clear that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is responsible for meridional heat transfer from the South Atlantic and the tropics to the North Atlantic, the majority of the heat transport in the northern North Atlantic and the Nordic seas is carried by the gyre system. However, the detailed mechanisms determining the interaction between and the temporal modulation of the components of the northward heat transport system are not clear. Long-term climate records and model simulations can help to identify important processes and to provide background for the changes that are presently observed. Multi-centennial proxy records from the subpolar North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas indicate, for example, an out-of-phase behavior of sea surface temperature and gyre circulation between the two regions with consequences for regional climate. Paleoceanographic evidence from Fram Strait shows a pronounced modulation of heat transfer to the Arctic by the Atlantic Water layer during the last 2000 years and reconstructions from the Subpolar North Atlantic suggest a role of ocean circulation in the transition between the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age. Here we explore a small ensemble of last millennium simulations, carried out with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model, and analyze mechanisms connecting the AMOC and gyre circulation and their relation to external forcing. Our results support the important role of the Subpolar Gyre strength and the related meridional mass and temperature fluxes. We find that the modulation of the northward heat transport into the Nordic Seas and the Arctic has pronounced impact on sea-ice distribution, ocean-atmosphere interaction, and the surface climate in Scandinavia and Western Europe.

  9. Clinical Application of Circulating Tumour Cells in Prostate Cancer: From Bench to Bedside and Back

    PubMed Central

    León-Mateos, Luis; Vieito, María; Anido, Urbano; López López, Rafael; Muinelo Romay, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide. To improve future drug development and patient management, surrogate biomarkers associated with relevant outcomes are required. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are tumour cells that can enter the circulatory system, and are principally responsible for the development of metastasis at distant sites. In recent years, interest in detecting CTCs as a surrogate biomarker has ghiiukjrown. Clinical studies have revealed that high levels of CTCs in the blood correlate with disease progression in patients with prostate cancer; however, their predictive value for monitoring therapeutic response is less clear. Despite the important progress in CTC clinical development, there are critical requirements for the implementation of their analysis as a routine oncology tool. The goal of the present review is to provide an update on the advances in the clinical validation of CTCs as a surrogate biomarker and to discuss the principal obstacles and main challenges to their inclusion in clinical practice. PMID:27657044

  10. Dense water formation and BiOS-induced variability in the Adriatic Sea simulated using an ocean regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunić, Natalija; Vilibić, Ivica; Šepić, Jadranka; Somot, Samuel; Sevault, Florence

    2016-08-01

    A performance analysis of the NEMOMED8 ocean regional circulation model was undertaken for the Adriatic Sea during the period of 1961-2012, focusing on two mechanisms, dense water formation (DWF) and the Adriatic-Ionian Bimodal Oscillating System (BiOS), which drive interannual and decadal variability in the basin. The model was verified based on sea surface temperature and sea surface height satellite measurements and long-term in situ observations from several key areas. The model qualitatively reproduces basin-scale processes: thermohaline-driven cyclonic circulation and freshwater surface outflow along the western Adriatic coast, dense water dynamics, and the inflow of Ionian and Levantine waters to the Adriatic. Positive temperature and salinity biases are reported; the latter are particularly large along the eastern part of the basin, presumably because of the inappropriate introduction of eastern Adriatic rivers into the model. The highest warm temperature biases in the vertical direction were found in dense-water-collecting depressions in the Adriatic, indicating either an inappropriate quantification of DWF processes or temperature overestimation of modelled dense water. The decadal variability in the thermohaline properties is reproduced better than interannual variability, which is considerably underestimated. The DWF rates are qualitatively well reproduced by the model, being larger when preconditioned by higher basin-wide salinities. Anticyclonic circulation in the northern Ionian Sea was modelled only during the Eastern Mediterranean Transient. No other reversals of circulation that could be linked to BiOS-driven changes were modelled.

  11. On simulation of transfer processes in the freeboard region of a steam-generator furnace with a circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    B.B. Rokhman

    2006-01-15

    A semiempirical, stationary, two-zone model of transfer processes in the freeboard region of a reactor with a circulating boiling layer has been constructed. The features of the aerodynamics, heat and mass transfer, and combustion of anthracite culm in the core and near-wall ring region of a flow in a KFS-0.2 pilot plant have been investigated in detail.

  12. Diagnostic Applications and Methods to Isolate Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Cha-Mei

    2013-03-01

    Each year a million new cancer cases are diagnosed in the United States. Ninety percent of the deaths will be the result of metastasis, not from the primary tumor. Tissue biopsy is a universally accepted tool for cancer diagnosis and determination of treatment. The procedure varies, but is invasive, costly, and can be fatal, and for these reasons is seldom repeated after initial diagnosis. Monitoring of treatment response and for possible relapse is usually done by CT or MRI scan, both of which are expensive and require the tumor to change size perceptibly. Further, cancer can mutate or develop resistance to therapeutics and require modification of the treatment regimen. The initial tissue biopsy often cannot reflect the disease as it progresses, requiring new biopsy samples to determine a change of treatment. All carcinomas, about 80% of all cancer, shed tumor cells into the circulation, most often at the later stages when treatment is more critical. These circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the cause of metastasis, and can be isolated from patient blood to serve as ``liquid biopsy''. These CTCs contain a valuable trove of information that help both patient and clinician understand disease status. In addition to counting the number of CTCs (known to be a prognostic indicator of survival), CTCs can provide biomarker information such as protein expressions and gene mutations, amplifications, and translocations. This information can be used to determine treatment. During treatment, the number of intact and apoptotic CTCs can be measured on a repeated basis to measure the patient's response to treatment and disease progression. Following treatment, liquid biopsy can be repeated at regular intervals to watch for relapse. Methods to isolate CTCs can be grouped into three categories: i) immunocapture based on surface markers of CTCs, ii) size exclusion based on CTC size, typically larger than blood cells, and iii) negative selection utilizing red blood cell lysis, white

  13. Multitasking simulation: Present application and future directions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Traci Nicole; Rho, Jason C

    2017-02-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education lists multi-tasking as a core competency in several medical specialties due to increasing demands on providers to manage the care of multiple patients simultaneously. Trainees often learn multitasking on the job without any formal curriculum, leading to high error rates. Multitasking simulation training has demonstrated success in reducing error rates among trainees. Studies of multitasking simulation demonstrate that this type of simulation is feasible, does not hinder the acquisition of procedural skill, and leads to better performance during subsequent periods of multitasking. Although some healthcare agencies have discouraged multitasking due to higher error rates among multitasking providers, it cannot be eliminated entirely in settings such as the emergency department in which providers care for more than one patient simultaneously. Simulation can help trainees to identify situations in which multitasking is inappropriate, while preparing them for situations in which multitasking is inevitable.

  14. Study on bubbly flow behavior in natural circulation reactor by thermal-hydraulic simulation tests with SF6-Gas and ethanol liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yoshiyuki; Suga, Keishi; Hibi, Koki; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Komeno, Toshihiro; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Serizawa, Akimi; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Arai, Takahiro

    2009-02-01

    An advanced experimental technique has been developed to simulate two-phase flow behavior in a light water reactor (LWR). The technique applies three kinds of methods; (1) use of sulfur-hexafluoride (SF6) gas and ethanol (C2H5OH) liquid at atmospheric temperature and a pressure less than 1.0MPa, where the fluid properties are similar to steam-water ones in the LWR, (2) generation of bubble with a sintering tube, which simulates bubble generation on heated surface in the LWR, (3) measurement of detailed bubble distribution data with a bi-optical probe (BOP), (4) and measurement of liquid velocities with the tracer liquid. This experimental technique provides easy visualization of flows by using a large scale experimental apparatus, which gives three-dimensional flows, and measurement of detailed spatial distributions of two-phase flow. With this technique, we have carried out experiments simulating two-phase flow behavior in a single-channel geometry, a multi-rod-bundle one, and a horizontal-tube-bundle one on a typical natural circulation reactor system. Those experiments have clarified a) a flow regime map in a rod bundle on the transient region between bubbly and churn flow, b) three-dimensional flow behaviour in rod-bundles where inter-subassembly cross-flow occurs, c) bubble-separation behavior with consideration of reactor internal structures. The data have given analysis models for the natural circulation reactor design with good extrapolation.

  15. The application of circulating tumor cells detecting methods in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, M; Łosiewicz, K; Socha, P; Mecik-Kronenberg, T; Wasowicz, K

    2013-01-01

    Cancers are one of the most common diseases affecting dogs. Many of them develop spontaneously and their biology and histopathology shows many similarities to human cancers. What more, it is proved that there are much more analogies in molecular mechanisms of cancer development between these two species. Human oncology is seeking more and more efficient methods for an early disease detection which results directly in the extended life expectancy of patients affected. One of the most modern trends in the diagnosis of cancer is to detect circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients. It is known that these cells are responsible for the formation of metastases in distant organs what results in the patient death. Moreover, it's confirmed that CTC are already present in patients' bloodstream in the early stages of tumor development. There is no doubt that mechanism of metastasis development in dogs is identical and thus the CTC are also present in their bloodstream. Despite the intense researches there is still no optimal method of isolating cancer cells from the blood where they occur extremely rarely. The purpose of this study is to analyze the implications of the detection methods of tumor cells in the blood in veterinary oncology.

  16. Adaptation of Semiautomated Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) Assays for Clinical and Preclinical Research Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, Lori E.; Hedley, Benjamin D.; Keeney, Michael; Allan, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of cancer-related deaths occur subsequent to the development of metastatic disease. This highly lethal disease stage is associated with the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). These rare cells have been demonstrated to be of clinical significance in metastatic breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. The current gold standard in clinical CTC detection and enumeration is the FDA-cleared CellSearch system (CSS). This manuscript outlines the standard protocol utilized by this platform as well as two additional adapted protocols that describe the detailed process of user-defined marker optimization for protein characterization of patient CTCs and a comparable protocol for CTC capture in very low volumes of blood, using standard CSS reagents, for studying in vivo preclinical mouse models of metastasis. In addition, differences in CTC quality between healthy donor blood spiked with cells from tissue culture versus patient blood samples are highlighted. Finally, several commonly discrepant items that can lead to CTC misclassification errors are outlined. Taken together, these protocols will provide a useful resource for users of this platform interested in preclinical and clinical research pertaining to metastasis and CTCs. PMID:24637923

  17. Clinical application of circulating tumor cells in breast cancer: overview of the current interventional trials.

    PubMed

    Bidard, François-Clément; Fehm, Tanja; Ignatiadis, Michail; Smerage, Jeffrey B; Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Janni, Wolfgang; Messina, Carlo; Paoletti, Costanza; Müller, Volkmar; Hayes, Daniel F; Piccart, Martine; Pierga, Jean-Yves

    2013-06-01

    In 2004, circulating tumor cells (CTC) enumeration by the CellSearch® technique at baseline and during treatment was reported to be associated with prognosis in metastatic breast cancer patients. In 2008, the first evidence of the impact of CTC detection by this technique on survival of cM0(i+) patients were reported. These findings were confirmed by other non-interventional studies, whereas CTC were also investigated as a surrogate for tumor biology, mainly for HER2 expression/amplification. The aim of this report is to present the current prospective large interventional studies that have been specifically designed to demonstrate that CTC enumeration/characterization may improve the management of breast cancer patients: STIC CTC METABREAST (France) and Endocrine Therapy Index (USA) assess the CTC-guided hormone therapy vs chemotherapy decision in M1 patients; SWOG0500 (USA) and CirCe01 (France) assess the CTC count changes during treatment in metastatic patients; DETECT III (M1 patients, Germany) and Treat CTC (cM0(i+) patients, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Breast International Group) assess the use of anti-HER2 treatments in HER2-negative breast cancer patients selected on the basis of CTC detection/characterization. These trials have different designs in various patient populations but are expected to be the pivotal trials for CTC implementation in the routine management of breast cancer patients.

  18. Design strategies and applications of circulating cell-mediated drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gloria B.; Dong, Cheng; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems, particularly nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems, possess a tremendous amount of potential to improve diagnostic and therapeutic effects of drugs. Controlled drug delivery targeted to a specific disease is designed to significantly improve the pharmaceutical effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. Unfortunately, only a few targeted drug delivery systems can achieve high targeting efficiency after intravenous injection, even with the development of numerous surface markers and targeting modalities. Thus, alternative drug and nanomedicine targeting approaches are desired. Circulating cells, such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and stem cells, present innate disease sensing and homing properties. Hence, using living cells as drug delivery carriers has gained increasing interest in recent years. This review highlights the recent advances in the design of cell-mediated drug delivery systems and targeting mechanisms. The approaches of drug encapsulation/conjugation to cell-carriers, cell-mediated targeting mechanisms, and the methods of controlled drug release are elaborated here. Cell-based “live” targeting and delivery could be used to facilitate a more specific, robust, and smart payload distribution for the next-generation drug delivery systems. PMID:25984572

  19. Upper Ocean Mixing Processes and Circulation in the Arabian Sea during Monsoons using Remote Sensing, Hydrographic Observations and HYCOM Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Arabian Sea experiences more evaporation than precipitation and is connected to the warm and highly saline waters of the Persian Gulf and Red Sea...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Upper Ocean Mixing Processes and Circulation in the...and Ocean Sciences University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208 phone: (803) 777-2572 fax: (803) 777-6610 email: sbulusu@geol.sc.edu

  20. Numerical simulation of water circulation in the central part of the Sea of Japan and study of its long-term variability in 1958-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, D. V.; Diansky, N. A.; Novotryasov, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The response of circulation in the Sea of Japan (SJ) to the CORE-calculated real atmospheric forcing for 1958-2006 is reconstructed using the general ocean circulation model developed at the Institute of Computational Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (ICM RAS). Features of the interannual variability of the circulation in the intermediate and deep layers of the central part of SJ are studied from the numerical simulation results. For this, the spatiotemporal variability of the relative vorticity is calculated. Frequency spectra of this variability are calculated at depths of 500 and 800 m and the layer-average between these levels. The spectra have a quasi-discrete structure with maxima in vicinities of 4-5, 7, and 10-year periods. Coincidence is ascertained between frequencies corresponding to these periods and earlier determined frequencies of the inter-annual variability of the temperature field observed in the intermediate layer of the SJ in the second half of the 20th century.

  1. Evaluation of a dynamically downscaled atmospheric reanalyse in the prospect of forcing long term simulations of the ocean circulation in the Gulf of Lions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, C.; Barnier, B.; Molines, J. M.; Fraunié, P.; Jacob, D.; Kotlarski, S.

    The paper evaluates atmospheric reanalysis as possible forcing of model simulations of the ocean circulation inter-annual variability in the Gulf of Lions in the Western Mediterranean Sea between 1990 and 2000. The sensitivity of the coastal atmospheric patterns to the model resolution is investigated using the REMO regional climate model (18 km, 1 h), and the recent global atmospheric reanalysis ERA40 (125 km, 6 h). At scales from a few years to a few days, both atmospheric data sets exhibit a very similar weather, and agreement between REMO and ERA40 is especially good on the seasonal cycle and at the daily variability scale. At smaller scales, REMO reproduces more realistic spatio-temporal patterns in the ocean forcing: specific wind systems, particular atmospheric behaviour on the shelf, diurnal cycle, sea-breeze. Ocean twin experiments (1990-1993) clearly underline REMO skills to drive dominant oceanic processes in this microtidal area. Finer wind patterns induce a more realistic circulation and hydrology of the shelf water: unique shelf circulation, upwelling, temperature and salinity exchanges at the shelf break. The hourly sampling of REMO introduces a diurnal forcing which enhances the behaviour of the ocean mixed layer. In addition, the more numerous wind extremes modify the exchanges at the shelf break: favouring the export of dense shelf water, enhancing the mesoscale variability and the interactions of the along slope current with the bathymetry.

  2. Using Simulation Models in Demonstrating Statistical Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuermann, Allen C.; Hommertzheim, Donald L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes five statistical simulation programs developed at Wichita State University--Coin Flip and Raindrop, which demonstrate the binomial, Poisson, and other related distributions; Optimal Search; QSIM; and RANDEV, a random deviate generation program. Advantages of microcomputers over mainframes and the educational uses of models are noted.…

  3. Virtual reality applications in robotic simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, David J.; Gott, Charles J.; Goza, S. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) provides a means to practice integrated extravehicular activities (EVA)/remote manipulator system (RMS) operations in the on-orbit configuration with no discomfort or risk to crewmembers. VR afforded the STS-61 crew the luxury of practicing the integrated EVA/RMS operations in an on-orbit configuration prior to the actual flight. The VR simulation was developed by the Automation and Robotics Division's Telepresence/Virtual Reality Lab and Integrated Graphics, Operations, and Analysis Lab (IGOAL) at JSC. The RMS Part Task Trainer (PTT) was developed by the IGOAL for RMS training in 1988 as a fully functional, kinematic simulation of the shuttle RMS and served as the RMS portion of the integrated VR simulation. Because the EVA crewmember could get a realistic view of the shuttle and payload bay in the VR simulation, he/she could explore different positions and views to determine the best method for performing a specific task, thus greatly increasing the efficiency of use of the neutral buoyancy facilities.

  4. Tropical cyclone activity in a warmer climate as simulated by a high-resolution coupled general circulation model: changes in frequency and air-sea interaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, Enrico; Gualdi, Silvio; Navarra, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the possible changes that the greenhouse global warming might generate in the characteristics of the tropical cyclones (TCs). The analysis has been performed using climate scenario simulations carried out with a fully coupled high-resolution global general circulation model (INGV-SXG) with a T106 atmospheric resolution. The capability of the model to reproduce a reasonably realistic TC climatology has been assessed by comparing the model results from a simulation of the XX Century with observations. The model appears to be able to simulate tropical cyclone-like vortices with many features similar to the observed TCs. The simulated TC activity exhibits realistic geographical distribution, seasonal modulation and interannual variability, suggesting that the model is able to reproduce the major basic mechanisms that link the TC occurrence with the large scale circulation. The results from the climate scenarios reveal a substantial general reduction of the TC frequency when the atmospheric CO2 concentration is doubled and quadrupled. The reduction appears particularly evident for the tropical north west Pacific (NWP) and north Atlantic (ATL). In the NWP the weaker TC activity seems to be associated with a reduced amount of convective instabilities. In the ATL region the weaker TC activity seems to be due to both the increased stability of the atmosphere and a stronger vertical wind shear. Despite the generally reduced TC activity, there is evidence of increased rainfall associated with the simulated cyclones. Using the new fully coupled CMCC model (CMCC_MED), with a T159 atmospheric resolution, we found a significant modulation of the Ocean Heat Transport (OHT) induced by the TC activity. Thus the possible changes that greenhouse induced global warming during 21st century might generate in the characteristics of the TC-induced OHT have been analyzed.

  5. Greenhouse effect simulator - An educational application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Alan Freitas; Viveiros, Bruno Martins; da Silva, Claudio Elias

    2016-12-01

    Using the program "Modellus", we intend to create a simple simulation to show the impacts that the Greenhouse Effect might have, in a didactic and friendly way, in order to expose this notions to high and middle school students. In order to do so, we created a program that will simulate a sweep, through the Troposphere, and create two lines in a graphic, one showing the temperatures behavior, in normal conditions, and the other showing how the temperature behaves in the presence of excess of Greenhouse gases. The main purpose of the project is to use the model in schools and try to make kids more conscious of their roles in our so society, showing them the consequences of the tendency of our acts, stimulating them to be more proactives to change the future.

  6. Color visual simulation applications at the Defense Mapping Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simley, J. D.

    1984-09-01

    The Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) produces the Digital Landmass System data base to provide culture and terrain data in support of numerous aircraft simulators. In order to conduct data base and simulation quality control and requirements analysis, DMA has developed the Sensor Image Simulator which can rapidly generate visual and radar static scene digital simulations. The use of color in visual simulation allows the clear portrayal of both landcover and terrain data, whereas the initial black and white capabilities were restricted in this role and thus found limited use. Color visual simulation has many uses in analysis to help determine the applicability of current and prototype data structures to better meet user requirements. Color visual simulation is also significant in quality control since anomalies can be more easily detected in natural appearing forms of the data. The realism and efficiency possible with advanced processing and display technology, along with accurate data, make color visual simulation a highly effective medium in the presentation of geographic information. As a result, digital visual simulation is finding increased potential as a special purpose cartographic product. These applications are discussed and related simulation examples are presented.

  7. [Peculiarities of application of a cell saver apparatus in neonathal cardiosurgery using artificial blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Kuz'menko, S O; Chasovs'kyĭ, K S

    2015-01-01

    Elaborated and introduced into the practice method of the blood preservation, while correction of complex inborn heart failures (IHF) in a newborn babies, was proposed. It assumes application of system for intraoperative reinfusion of own erythrocytes with processing of residual perfusate and their reinfusion in a postperfusion period. Impact of the blood preservation on volume of a donor's blood components, hematological indices and methods of application of washed erythrocytes while correction of complex IHF in a newborn babies were presented. The method was applied in 47 newborn babies, to whom an arterial switch was performed for the main vessels transposition.

  8. Application of the EPRI simulator qualification methodology to the Bugey simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, B.; Le Coq, G. , 75 - Paris )

    1990-01-01

    The report describes application of the EPRI Simulator Qualification Methodology by EdF to the Bugey Simulator. The major objective of the study was to evaluate the methodology itself rather than to perform a complete qualification of the simulator. The key objectives were achieved. The major advantages and difficulties of using the methodology have been identified and discussed. 7 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. NASA's Large-Eddy Simulation Research for Jet Noise Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Research into large-eddy simulation (LES) for application to jet noise is described. The LES efforts include in-house code development and application at NASA Glenn along with NASA Research Announcement sponsored work at Stanford University and Florida State University. Details of the computational methods used and sample results for jet flows are provided.

  10. The balance of kinetic and total energy simulated by the OSU two-level atmospheric general circulation model for January and July

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.-T.; Gates, W. L.; Kim, J.-W.

    1984-01-01

    A three-year simulation which prescribes seasonally varying solar radiation and sea surface temperature is the basis of the present study of the horizontal structure of the balances of kinetic and total energy simulated by Oregon State University's two-level atmospheric general circulation model. Mechanisms responsible for the local energy changes are identified, and the energy balance requirement's fulfilment is examined. In January, the vertical integral of the total energy shows large amounts of external heating over the North Pacific and Atlantic, together with cooling over most of the land area of the Northern Hemisphere. In July, an overall seasonal reversal is found. Both seasons are also characterized by strong energy flux divergence in the tropics, in association with the poleward transport of heat and momentum.

  11. A thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (time-GCM): Equinox solar cycle minimum simulations (30-500 km)

    SciTech Connect

    Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C.

    1994-03-15

    A new simulation model of the mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere with coupled electrodynamics has been developed and used to calculate the global circulation, temperature and compositional structure between 30-500 km for equinox, solar cycle minimum, geomagnetic quiet conditions. The model incorporates all of the features of the NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIE-GCM) but the lower boundary has been extended downward from 97 to 30 km (10 mb) and it includes the physical and chemical processes appropriate for the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The first simulation used Rayleigh friction to represent gravity wave drag in the middle atmosphere and although it was able to close the mesospheric jets it severely damped the diurnal tide. Reduced Rayleigh friction allowed the tide to penetrate to thermospheric heights but did not close the jets. A gravity wave parameterization developed by Fritts and Lu allows both features to exist simultaneously with the structure of tides and mean flow dependent upon the strength of the gravity wave source. The model calculates a changing dynamic structure with the mean flow and diurnal tide dominant in the mesosphere, the in-situ generated semi-diurnal tide dominating the lower thermosphere and an in-situ generated diurnal tide in the upper thermosphere. The results also show considerable interaction between dynamics and composition, especially atomic oxygen between 85 and 120 km. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Field Applications of In Situ Remediation Technologies: Ground-Water Circulation Wells

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report is one in a series that show recent pilot demonstrations and full-scale applications that treat soil and ground water in situ or increase the solubility and mobility of contaminants to improve their removal by other remediation technologies.

  13. Linear stability analysis of the three-dimensional thermally-driven ocean circulation: application to interdecadal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Thierry; Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2001-08-01

    What can we learn from performing a linear stability analysis of the large-scale ocean circulation? Can we predict from the basic state the occurrence of interdecadal oscillations, such as might be found in a forward integration of the full equations of motion? If so, do the structure and period of the linearly unstable modes resemble those found in a forward integration? We pursue here a preliminary study of these questions for a case in idealized geometry, in which the full nonlinear behavior can also be explored through forward integrations. Specifically, we perform a three-dimensional linear stability analysis of the thermally-driven circulation of the planetary geostrophic equations. We examine the resulting eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, comparing them with the structure of the interdecadal oscillations found in the fully nonlinear model in various parameter regimes. We obtain a steady state by running the time-dependent, nonlinear model to equilibrium using restoring boundary conditions on surface temperature. If the surface heat fluxes are then diagnosed, and these values applied as constant flux boundary conditions, the nonlinear model switches into a state of perpetual, finite amplitude, interdecadal oscillations. We construct a linearized version of the model by empirically evaluating the tangent linear matrix at the steady state, under both restoring and constant-flux boundary conditions. An eigen-analysis shows there are no unstable eigenmodes of the linearized model with restoring conditions. In contrast, under constant flux conditions, we find a single unstable eigenmode that shows a striking resemblance to the fully-developed oscillations in terms of three-dimensional structure, period and growth rate. The mode may be damped through either surface restoring boundary conditions or sufficiently large horizontal tracer diffusion. The success of this simple numerical method in idealized geometry suggests applications in the study of the stability of

  14. Impact of tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature biases on the simulated atmospheric circulation and precipitation over the Atlantic region: An ECHAM6 model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Bader, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    As many coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models, the coupled Earth System Model developed at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology suffers from severe sea-surface temperature (SST) biases in the tropical Atlantic. We performed a set of SST sensitivity experiments with its atmospheric model component ECHAM6 to understand the impact of tropical Atlantic SST biases on atmospheric circulation and precipitation. The model was forced by a climatology of observed global SSTs to focus on simulated seasonal and annual mean state climate. Through the superposition of varying tropical Atlantic bias patterns extracted from the MPI-ESM on top of the control field, this study investigates the relevance of the seasonal variation and spatial structure of tropical Atlantic biases for the simulated response. Results show that the position and structure of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) across the Atlantic is significantly affected, exhibiting a dynamically forced shift of annual mean precipitation maximum to the east of the Atlantic basin as well as a southward shift of the oceanic rain belt. The SST-induced changes in the ITCZ in turn affect seasonal rainfall over adjacent continents. However not only the ITCZ position but also other effects arising from biases in tropical Atlantic SSTs, e.g. variations in the wind field, change the simulation of precipitation over land. The seasonal variation and spatial pattern of tropical Atlantic SST biases turns out to be crucial for the simulated atmospheric response and is essential for analyzing the contribution of SST biases to coupled model mean state biases. Our experiments show that MPI-ESM mean-state biases in the Atlantic sector are mainly driven by SST biases in the tropical Atlantic while teleconnections from other basins seem to play a minor role.

  15. Responses of the Tropical Pacific to Wind Forcing as Observed by Spaceborne Sensors and Simulated by an Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Qenqing; Atlas, Robert

    1996-01-01

    In this study, satellite observations, in situ measurements, and model simulations are combined to assess the oceanic response to surface wind forcing in the equatorial Pacific. The surface wind fields derived from observations by the spaceborne special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and from the operational products of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are compared. When SSM/I winds are used to force a primitive-equation ocean general circulation model (OGCM), they produce 3 C more surface cooling than ECMWF winds for the eastern equatorial Pacific during the cool phase of an El Nino-Southern Oscillation event. The stronger cooling by SSM/I winds is in good agreement with measurements at the moored buoys and observations by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, indicating that SSM/I winds are superior to ECMWF winds in forcing the tropical ocean. In comparison with measurements from buoys, tide gauges, and the Geosat altimeter, the OGCM simulates the temporal variations of temperature, steric, and sea level changes with reasonable realism when forced with the satellite winds. There are discrepancies between model simulations and observations that are common to both wind forcing fields, one of which is the simulation of zonal currents; they could be attributed to model deficiencies. By examining model simulations under two winds, vertical heat advection and uplifting of the thermocline are found to be the dominant factors in the anomalous cooling of the ocean mixed layer.

  16. Simulators of Superconductor Critical Current: Design, Characteristics, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, L. F.; Srivastava, A. N.; Stauffer, T. C.

    1991-01-01

    The superconductor simulator is an electronic circuit that emulates the extremely nonlinear voltage-current characteristic (the basis of a critical-current measurement) of a superconductor along with its other major electrical properties. Three different types of simulators have been constructed: the passive, active, and hybrid simulator. The passive simulator has the fewest circuit components and offers the least amount of versatility, while the active and hybrid simulators offer more versatility and consequently have more components. Design, characteristics, and applications of the superconductor simulator along with a summary of features are presented. These simulators are high precision instruments, and are thus useful for establishing the integrity of part of a superconductor measurement system. They are potentially useful for testing the measurement method and data acquisition and analysis routines. The 50 A simulator provides critical-current precision of 0.1% at a 1 μV signal. This is significantly higher than the precision of a superconducting standard reference material. The superconductor simulator could significantly benefit superconductor measurement applications that require high-precision quality assurance. PMID:28184143

  17. Impact of Enhanced Low-level Stratus on Simulated SSTs, Precipitation and the Circulation in the Tropical Atlantic Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, J.; Eichhorn, A.

    2015-12-01

    Most coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) show a substantial warm bias in sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the eastern tropical Atlantic. The impact of enhanced low-level clouds on SST, precipitation and the circulation in the tropical Atlantic sector is tested. Therefore, we have conducted sensitivity experiments with the atmospheric model ECHAM6 and the coupled version of it (MPI-ESM1) in which we enhance the formation of low-level stratus at the inversion layer in the low troposphere. The impact of enhanced low-level clouds is compared to the standard version of the models. There is a direct cloud impact by reducing the incoming solar radiation at the surface. The reduced incoming solar radiation leads to a cooling of SSTs in the eastern tropical Atlantic in the coupled atmosphere-ocean model. This in turn causes not only locally rainfall reductions in oceanic precipitation but also a remote precipitation enhancement over north east Brazil. These precipitation changes are associated with changes in the equatorial wind-stress forcing. The impact of the wind stress changes on the equatorial zonal SST-gradient and the seasonal cycle is also analysed.

  18. An overlooked problem in model simulations of the thermohaline circulation and heat transport in the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Boening, C.W.; Holland, W.R.; Bryan, F.O.; Danabasoglu, G.; Mcwilliams, J.C. |

    1995-03-01

    Many models of the large-scale thermohaline circulation in the ocean exhibit strong zonally integrated upwelling in the midlatitude North Atlantic that significantly decreases the amount of deep water that is carried from the formation regions in the subpolar North Atlantic toward low latitudes and across the equator. In an analysis of results from the Community Modeling Effort using a suite of models with different horizontal resolution, wind and thermohaline forcing, and mixing parameters, it is shown that the upwelling is always concentrated in the western boundary layer between roughly 30 deg and 40 deg N. The vertical transport across 1000 m appears to be controlled by local dynamics and strongly depends on the horizontal resolution and mixing parameters of the model. It is suggested that in models with a realistic deep-water formation rate in the subpolar North Atlantic, the excessive upwelling can be considered as the prime reason for the typically too low meridional overturning rates and northward heat transports in the subtropical North Atlantic. A new isopycnal advection and mixing parameterization of tracer transports by mesoscale eddies yield substantial improvements in these integral measures of the circulation.

  19. Developing large eddy simulation for turbomachinery applications.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Simon J; Tucker, Paul G; Xia, Hao; Klostermeier, Christian

    2009-07-28

    For jets, large eddy resolving simulations are compared for a range of numerical schemes with no subgrid scale (SGS) model and for a range of SGS models with the same scheme. There is little variation in results for the different SGS models, and it is shown that, for schemes which tend towards having dissipative elements, the SGS model can be abandoned, giving what can be termed numerical large eddy simulation (NLES). More complex geometries are investigated, including coaxial and chevron nozzle jets. A near-wall Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model is used to cover over streak-like structures that cannot be resolved. Compressor and turbine flows are also successfully computed using a similar NLES-RANS strategy. Upstream of the compressor leading edge, the RANS layer is helpful in preventing premature separation. Capturing the correct flow over the turbine is particularly challenging, but nonetheless the RANS layer is helpful. In relation to the SGS model, for the flows considered, evidence suggests issues such as inflow conditions, problem definition and transition are more influential.

  20. Multigrid methods with applications to reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Shengyou

    1994-05-01

    Multigrid methods are studied for solving elliptic partial differential equations. Focus is on parallel multigrid methods and their use for reservoir simulation. Multicolor Fourier analysis is used to analyze the behavior of standard multigrid methods for problems in one and two dimensions. Relation between multicolor and standard Fourier analysis is established. Multiple coarse grid methods for solving model problems in 1 and 2 dimensions are considered; at each coarse grid level we use more than one coarse grid to improve convergence. For a given Dirichlet problem, a related extended problem is first constructed; a purification procedure can be used to obtain Moore-Penrose solutions of the singular systems encountered. For solving anisotropic equations, semicoarsening and line smoothing techniques are used with multiple coarse grid methods to improve convergence. Two-level convergence factors are estimated using multicolor. In the case where each operator has the same stencil on each grid point on one level, exact multilevel convergence factors can be obtained. For solving partial differential equations with discontinuous coefficients, interpolation and restriction operators should include information about the equation coefficients. Matrix-dependent interpolation and restriction operators based on the Schur complement can be used in nonsymmetric cases. A semicoarsening multigrid solver with these operators is used in UTCOMP, a 3-D, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional reservoir simulator. The numerical experiments are carried out on different computing systems. Results indicate that the multigrid methods are promising.

  1. Simulation of the mantle and crustal helium isotope signature in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, M.; Dutay, J.-C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Fourré, P. E.

    2015-08-01

    Helium isotopes (3He, 4He) are useful tracers for investigating the deep ocean circulation and for evaluating ocean general circulation models, because helium is a stable and conservative nuclide that does not take part in any chemical or biological process. Helium in the ocean originates from three different sources: namely, (i) gas dissolution in equilibrium with atmospheric helium, (ii) helium-3 addition by radioactive decay of tritium (called tritiugenic helium), and (iii) injection of terrigenic helium-3 and helium-4 by the submarine volcanic activity which occurs mainly at plate boundaries, and also addition of (mainly) helium-4 from the crust and sedimentary cover by α-decay of uranium and thorium contained in various minerals. We present the first simulation of the terrigenic helium isotope distribution in the whole Mediterranean Sea, using a high-resolution model (NEMO-MED12). For this simulation we build a simple source function for terrigenic helium isotopes based on published estimates of terrestrial helium fluxes. We estimate a hydrothermal flux of 3.5 mol 3He yr-1 and a lower limit for the crustal flux at 1.6 10-7 mol 4He mol m-2 yr-1. In addition to providing constraints on helium isotope degassing fluxes in the Mediterranean, our simulations provide information on the ventilation of the deep Mediterranean waters which are useful for assessing NEMO-MED12 performance. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  2. Simulation of the mantle and crustal helium isotope signature in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, M.; Dutay, J.-C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Fourré, E.

    2015-12-01

    Helium isotopes (3He, 4He) are useful tracers for investigating the deep ocean circulation and for evaluating ocean general circulation models, because helium is a stable and conservative nuclide that does not take part in any chemical or biological process. Helium in the ocean originates from three different sources, namely, (i) gas dissolution in equilibrium with atmospheric helium, (ii) helium-3 addition by radioactive decay of tritium (called tritiugenic helium), and (iii) injection of terrigenic helium-3 and helium-4 by the submarine volcanic activity which occurs mainly at plate boundaries, and also addition of (mainly) helium-4 from the crust and sedimentary cover by α-decay of uranium and thorium contained in various minerals. We present the first simulation of the terrigenic helium isotope distribution in the whole Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution model (NEMO-MED12). For this simulation we build a simple source function for terrigenic helium isotopes based on published estimates of terrestrial helium fluxes. We estimate a hydrothermal flux of 3.5 mol3 He yr-1 and a lower limit for the crustal flux at 1.6 × 10-7 4He mol m-2 yr-1. In addition to providing constraints on helium isotope degassing fluxes in the Mediterranean, our simulations provide information on the ventilation of the deep Mediterranean waters which is useful for assessing NEMO-MED12 performance. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  3. A diabatic circulation two-dimensional model with photochemistry - Simulations of ozone and long-lived tracers with surface sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stordal, F.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Horntveth, K.

    1985-01-01

    Numerous studies have been concerned with the possibility of a reduction of the stratospheric ozone layer. Such a reduction could lead to an enhanced penetration of ultraviolet (UV) radiation to the ground, and, as a result, to damage in the case of several biological processes. It is pointed out that the distributions of many trace gases, such as ozone, are governed in part by transport processes. The present investigation presents a two-dimensional photochemistry-transport model using the residual circulation. The global distribution of both ozone and components with ground sources computed in this model is in good agreement with the observations even though slow diffusion is adopted. The agreement is particularly good in the Northern Hemisphere. The results provide additional support for the idea that tracer transport in the stratosphere is mainly of advective nature.

  4. Coupling Planet Simulator Mars, a general circulation model of the Martian atmosphere, to the ice sheet model SICOPOLIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, O. J.; Grieger, B.; Keller, H. U.; Greve, R.; Fraedrich, K.; Kirk, E.; Lunkeit, F.

    2007-11-01

    A general circulation model of the Martian Atmosphere is coupled with a 3-dimensional polythermal ice-sheet model of the polar ice caps. With this combination a series of experiments is carried out to investigate the impact of long-term obliquity change on the Martian north polar ice cap (NPC). The behaviour of the NPC is tested under obliquities of θ=15∘, 25∘ and 35∘. With increasing obliquity the area covered by the NPC gets smaller but does not vanish. However, when started from an ice-free condition the models develop an ice cap only for low obliquities. The 'critical' obliquity at which a build-up of a new polar cap is possible is θ=22∘.

  5. Effects of surface current-wind interaction in an eddy-rich general ocean circulation simulation of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Heiner; Löptien, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Deoxygenation in the Baltic Sea endangers fish yields and favours noxious algal blooms. Yet, vertical transport processes ventilating the oxygen-deprived waters at depth and replenishing nutrient-deprived surface waters (thereby fuelling export of organic matter to depth) are not comprehensively understood. Here, we investigate the effects of the interaction between surface currents and winds on upwelling in an eddy-rich general ocean circulation model of the Baltic Sea. Contrary to expectations we find that accounting for current-wind effects inhibits the overall vertical exchange between oxygenated surface waters and oxygen-deprived water at depth. At major upwelling sites, however (e.g. off the southern coast of Sweden and Finland) the reverse holds: the interaction between topographically steered surface currents with winds blowing over the sea results in a climatological sea surface temperature cooling of 0.5 K. This implies that current-wind effects drive substantial local upwelling of cold and nutrient-replete waters.

  6. Effect of tropical cyclones on residual circulation and momentum balance in a subtropical estuary and inlet: Observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutak, Bilge; Sheng, Y. Peter

    2011-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic model, Curvilinear-Grid Hydrodynamics in 3-D (CH3D), and observation data are used to investigate the effects of Tropical Storms Fay and Hanna in 2008 on the spatial structure of residual circulation and momentum balance inside the subtropical estuarine system of the Northern Coastal Basin and St. Augustine Inlet. During a typical tidal cycle, four residual eddies are formed: two strong eddies inside of the inlet and two weaker eddies outside of the inlet. During Tropical Storms Fay and Hanna the alongshore component of the northeasterly winds disrupted the ocean-side eddies first and forced the alongshore southeasterly current. Owing to not-so-strong local winds, residual flow at the mouth of the inlet never became complete inflow. However, following Tropical Storm Fay's landfall, flow inside the inlet became complete outflow owing to relaxing wind and the remote wind effect created by the alongshore component of the southeasterly wind. The residual circulation returned to its prestorm condition in 4 days owing to relatively short storm duration. Model results revealed that the cross-sectional residual flow pattern observed at the inlet mouth is highly variable with time and location of the cross section. Comparison of various terms in the horizontal momentum equations shows that the balance is primarily between the barotropic pressure gradient and nonlinear advection. Although the wind stress and bottom friction briefly become significant in the balance, they are still at least an order of magnitude smaller. Baroclinic pressure gradient is weak despite the increase in precipitation and river discharge.

  7. Application of the implicit particle filter to a model of nearshore circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. N.; Ehret, L. L.

    2014-04-01

    The implicit particle filter is applied to a stochastically forced shallow water model of nearshore flow, and found to produce reliable state estimates with tens of particles. The state vector of this model consists of a height anomaly and two horizontal velocity components at each point on a 128 × 98 regular rectangular grid, making for a state dimension O(104). The particle filter was applied to the model with two parameter choices representing two distinct dynamical regimes, and performed well in both. Demands on computing resources were manageable. Simulations with as many as a hundred particles ran overnight on a modestly configured workstation. In this case of observations defined by a linear function of the state vector, taken every time step of the numerical model, the implicit particle filter is equivalent to the optimal importance filter, i.e., at each step any given particle is drawn from the density of the system conditioned jointly upon observations and the state of that particle at the previous time. Even in this ideal case, the sample occasionally collapses to a single particle, and resampling is necessary. In those cases, the sample rapidly reinflates, and the analysis never loses track. In both dynamical regimes, the ensembles of particles deviated significantly from normality.

  8. Rigorous CMP and electroplating simulations for DFM applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granik, Yuri; Strecker, Norbert

    2008-03-01

    We present the chip-scale CMP simulator for layer uniformity analysis within Calibre DFM framework. The CMP simulator is intended to be used during smart fill optimizations, accurate parasitic extractions, defocus variability compensations, and other DFM applications. It is tightly integrated with Mentor Graphics DFM components for yield analysis and optimization. The paper discusses the key concepts of the electro-chemical copper deposition and slurry CMP models that are used in the simulation. The data flow is described, including the use of mask information from design layout data. Application examples, including the process flow and the simulated results, are presented. Both the electroplating and the CMP models include empirical parameters that describe the width- and space- dependency. Fast and accurate global optimization search algorithms are implemented to find optimum modeling parameter values.

  9. Impact of Satellite Remote Sensing Data on Simulations of Coastal Circulation and Hypoxia on the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    We estimated surface salinity flux and solar penetration from satellite data, and performed model simulations to examine the impact of including the satellite estimates on temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen distributions on the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) near the ...

  10. Mobile Applications and Multi-User Virtual Reality Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordillo, Orlando Enrique

    2016-01-01

    This is my third internship with NASA and my second one at the Johnson Space Center. I work within the engineering directorate in ER7 (Software Robotics and Simulations Division) at a graphics lab called IGOAL. We are a very well-rounded lab because we have dedicated software developers and dedicated 3D artist, and when you combine the two, what you get is the ability to create many different things such as interactive simulations, 3D models, animations, and mobile applications.

  11. Separating climate change signals into thermodynamic, lapse-rate and circulation effects: theory and application to the European summer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, Nico; Kotlarski, Sven; Fischer, Erich; Lüthi, Daniel; Zubler, Elias; Schär, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Climate models robustly project a strong overall summer warming across Europe showing a characteristic north-south gradient with enhanced warming and drying in southern Europe. However, the processes that are responsible for this pattern are not fully understood. We here employ an extended surrogate or pseudo-warming approach to disentangle the contribution of different mechanisms to this response pattern. The basic idea of the surrogate technique is to use a regional climate model and apply a large-scale warming to the lateral boundary conditions of a present-day reference simulation, while maintaining the relative humidity (and thus implicitly increasing the specific moisture content). In comparison to previous studies, our approach includes two important extensions: first, different vertical warming profiles are applied in order to separate the effects of a mean warming from lapse-rate effects. Second, a twin-design is used, in which the climate change signals are not only added to present-day conditions, but also subtracted from a scenario experiment. We demonstrate that these extensions provide an elegant way to separate the full climate change signal into contributions from large-scale thermodynamic (TD), lapse-rate (LR), and circulation and other remaining effects (CO). The latter in particular include changes in land-ocean contrast and spatial variations of the SST warming patterns. We find that the TD effect yields a large-scale warming across Europe with no distinct latitudinal gradient. The LR effect, which is quantified for the first time in our study, leads to a stronger warming and some drying in southern Europe. It explains about 50 % of the warming amplification over the Iberian Peninsula, thus demonstrating the important role of lapse-rate changes. The effect is linked to an extending Hadley circulation. The CO effect as inherited from the driving GCM is shown to further amplify the north-south temperature change gradient. In terms of mean summer

  12. A Standalone Vision Impairments Simulator for Java Swing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, Theofanis; Votis, Konstantinos; Korn, Peter; Tzovaras, Dimitrios; Likothanasis, Spriridon

    A lot of work has been done lately in an attempt to assess accessibility. For the case of web rich-client applications several tools exist that simulate how a vision impaired or colour-blind person would perceive this content. In this work we propose a simulation tool for non-web JavaTM Swing applications. Developers and designers face a real challenge when creating software that has to cope with a lot of interaction situations, as well as specific directives for ensuring an accessible interaction. The proposed standalone tool will assist them to explore user-centered design and important accessibility issues for their JavaTM Swing implementations.

  13. Clinical Applications of NanoVelcro Rare-Cell Assays for Detection and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie-Fu; Zhu, Yazhen; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Hodara, Elisabeth; Hou, Shuang; Agopian, Vatche G.; Tomlinson, James S.; Posadas, Edwin M.; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Liquid biopsy of tumor through isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) allows non-invasive, repetitive, and systemic sampling of disease. Although detecting and enumerating CTCs is of prognostic significance in metastatic cancer, it is conceivable that performing molecular and functional characterization on CTCs will reveal unprecedented insight into the pathogenic mechanisms driving lethal disease. Nanomaterial-embedded cancer diagnostic platforms, i.e., NanoVelcro CTC Assays represent a unique rare-cell sorting method that enables detection isolation, and characterization of CTCs in peripheral blood, providing an opportunity to noninvasively monitor disease progression in individual cancer patients. Over the past decade, a series of NanoVelcro CTC Assays has been demonstrated for exploring the full potential of CTCs as a clinical biomarker, including CTC enumeration, phenotyping, genotyping and expression profiling. In this review article, the authors will briefly introduce the development of three generations of NanoVelcro CTC Assays, and highlight the clinical applications of each generation for various types of solid cancers, including prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma. PMID:27375790

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of Maternal Circulation: Wall Shear Stress in the Human Placenta and Its Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, E.; Bhatt, M.; Bertin, G. I.; Deloison, B.; Salomon, L. J.; Deloron, P.; Fournier, T.; Barakat, A. I.; Tsatsaris, V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the human placenta the maternal blood circulates in the intervillous space (IVS). The syncytiotrophoblast (STB) is in direct contact with maternal blood. The wall shear stress (WSS) exerted by the maternal blood flow on the STB has not been evaluated. Our objective was to determine the physiological WSS exerted on the surface of the STB during the third trimester of pregnancy. Material and Methods To gain insight into the shear stress levels that the STB is expected to experience in vivo, we have formulated three different computational models of varying levels of complexity that reflect different physical representations of the IVS. Computations of the flow fields in all models were performed using the CFD module of the finite element code COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4. The mean velocity of maternal blood in the IVS during the third trimester was measured in vivo with dynamic MRI (0.94±0.14 mm.s-1). To investigate if the in silico results are consistent with physiological observations, we studied the cytoadhesion of human parasitized (Plasmodium falciparum) erythrocytes to primary human STB cultures, in flow conditions with different WSS values. Results The WSS applied to the STB is highly heterogeneous in the IVS. The estimated average values are relatively low (0.5±0.2 to 2.3±1.1 dyn.cm-2). The increase of WSS from 0.15 to 5 dyn.cm-2 was associated with a significant decrease of infected erythrocyte cytoadhesion. No cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes was observed above 5 dyn.cm-2 applied for one hour. Conclusion Our study provides for the first time a WSS estimation in the maternal placental circulation. In spite of high maternal blood flow rates, the average WSS applied at the surface of the chorionic villi is low (<5 dyn.cm-2). These results provide the basis for future physiologically-relevant in vitro studies of the biological effects of WSS on the STB. PMID:26815115

  15. Global circulation of the Earth's atmosphere at altitudes from 0 to 135 Km simulated with the ARM model. Consideration of the solar activity contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.; Cherepanova, L. A.; Dement'eva, A. V.; Repnev, A. I.; Klyuchnikova, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of simulations of the global circulation and temperature regime in the altitude range from the lower tropospheric layers to 135 km are presented. They were obtained with the Atmospheric Research Model (ARM), an advanced modification of a version of the Cologne Middle Atmosphere Model (COMMA). The ARM is characterized by higher spatial resolution and better parameterizations of the radiation sources and heat sinks. At the lower boundary of the model, wavy sources of perturbations, which are caused by internal gravity waves and planetary waves, are specified. The results of the modeling of the global temperature and wind fields for the mean solar activity level are presented, and their changes, which are caused by variations of the UV-radiation fluxes in the solar activity cycle and by solar proton flares, are also considered.

  16. Dynamic application of microprojection arrays to skin induces circulating protein extravasation for enhanced biomarker capture and detection.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Jacob W; Meliga, Stefano C; Corrie, Simon R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-04-01

    Surface modified microprojection arrays are a needle-free alternative to capture circulating biomarkers from the skin in vivo for diagnosis. The concentration and turnover of biomarkers in the interstitial fluid, however, may limit the amount of biomarker that can be accessed by microprojection arrays and ultimately their capture efficiency. Here we report that microprojection array insertion induces protein extravasation from blood vessels and increases the concentration of biomarkers in skin, which can synergistically improve biomarker capture. Regions of blood vessels in skin were identified in the upper dermis and subcutaneous tissue by multi-photon microscopy. Insertion of microprojection array designs with varying projection length (40-190 μm), density (5000-20,408 proj.cm(-2)) and array size (4-36 mm(2)) did not affect the degree of extravasation. Furthermore, the location of extravasated protein did not correlate with projection penetration to these highly vascularised regions, suggesting extravasation was not caused by direct puncture of blood vessels. Biomarker extravasation was also induced by dynamic application of flat control surfaces, and varied with the impact velocity, further supporting this conclusion. The extravasated protein distribution correlated well with regions of high mechanical stress generated during insertion, quantified by finite element models. Using this approach to induce extravasation prior to microprojection array-based biomarker capture, anti-influenza IgG was captured within a 2 min application time, demonstrating that extravasation can lead to rapid biomarker sampling and significantly improved microprojection array capture efficiency. These results have broad implications for the development of transdermal devices that deliver to and sample from the skin.

  17. Ocean circulation and terrestrial runoff dynamics in the Mesoamerican region from spectral optimization of SeaWiFS data and a high resolution simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chérubin, L. M.; Kuchinke, C. P.; Paris, C. B.

    2008-09-01

    The evolution in time and space of terrestrial runoff in waters of the Mesoamerican region was examined using remote sensing techniques combined with river discharge and numerical ocean circulation models. Ocean color SeaWiFS images were processed using a new Spectral Optimization Algorithm for atmospheric correction and ocean property retrieval in Case-2 waters. A total of 157 SeaWiFS images were collected between 1997 and 2006 and processed to produce Colored Detrital Material images of the Mesoamerican waters. Monthly terrestrial runoff load and river discharge computed with a land-elevation model were used as input to a numerical model, which simulated the transport of buoyant matter from terrestrial runoff. Based on land cover for years 2003-2004, modeling results showed that the river discharge seasonality was correlated with the image averaged CDM, and the simulated plume reproduces the spatial patterns and temporal evolution of the observed CDM plume. River discharge peaked in August and CDM peaked from September to January. The buoyant matter concentration was high from October to January, and was at its lowest from March to April. Between October and December the plume was transported out of the Mesoamerican waters by a cyclonic gyre located north of Honduras. Part of the runoff from Honduras was transported towards Chinchorro Banks and the Yucatan Channel, part re-circulated into the Gulf of Honduras, and part taken toward the outside of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System. This study shows that all the reefs of the MBRS, including the most offshore atolls of the region, are under the influence of terrestrial runoff on a seasonal basis, with maximum effect during October to January, and minimum from March to April. Furthermore, what is seen as a giant plume in satellite images is in fact composed of runoffs of different ages.

  18. The northern wintertime divergence extrema at 200 hPa and surface cyclones as simulated in the AMIP integration of the ECMWF general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    Divergence and convergence centers at 200 hPa and mean sea level pressure (MSLP) cyclones were located every 6 hr for a 10-yr general circulation model (GCM) simulation with the ECMWF (Cycle 36) for the boreal winters from 1980 to 1988. The simulation used the observed monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST) for the decade. Analysis of the frequency, location, and strength of these centers and cyclones gives insight into the dynamical response of the model to the varying SST. The results indicate that (1) the model produces reasonable climatologies of upper-level divergence and MSLP cyclones; (2) the model distribution of anomalies of divergence and convergence centers and MSLP cyclones is consistent with observations for the 1982-83 and 1986-87 El Nifio events; (3) the tropical Indian Ocean is the region of greatest divergence activity and interannual variability in the model; (4) the variability of the divergence centers is greater than that of the convergence centers; (5) strong divergence centers occur chiefly over the ocean in the midlatitudes but are more land-based in the tropics, except in the Indian Ocean; and (6) locations of divergence and convergence centers can be a useful tool for the intercomparison of global atmospheric simulations.

  19. Simulations of Hurricane Katrina (2005) with the 0.125 degree finite-volume General Circulation Model on the NASA Columbia Supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B.-W.; Atlas, R.; Reale, O.; Lin, S.-J.; Chern, J.-D.; Chang, J.; Henze, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina was the sixth most intense hurricane in the Atlantic. Katrina's forecast poses major challenges, the most important of which is its rapid intensification. Hurricane intensity forecast with General Circulation Models (GCMs) is difficult because of their coarse resolution. In this article, six 5-day simulations with the ultra-high resolution finite-volume GCM are conducted on the NASA Columbia supercomputer to show the effects of increased resolution on the intensity predictions of Katrina. It is found that the 0.125 degree runs give comparable tracks to the 0.25 degree, but provide better intensity forecasts, bringing the center pressure much closer to observations with differences of only plus or minus 12 hPa. In the runs initialized at 1200 UTC 25 AUG, the 0.125 degree simulates a more realistic intensification rate and better near-eye wind distributions. Moreover, the first global 0.125 degree simulation without convection parameterization (CP) produces even better intensity evolution and near-eye winds than the control run with CP.

  20. Baroclinic Waves and CO2 Snowfalls in Martian Winter Polar Atmosphere Simulated by a General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, T.; Medvedev, A. S.; Kasaba, Y.; Hartogh, P.

    2016-09-01

    The CO2 snowfalls in winter polar atmosphere have been simulated by a MGCM. Our results show that they are strongly modulated by the synoptic dynamical features such as baroclinic planetary waves, as well as by gravity waves in smaller scale.

  1. Simulated and observed circulation in the Indonesian Seas: 1/12° global HYCOM and the INSTANT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, E. J.; Hurlburt, H. E.; Xu, X.; Shriver, Jay F.; Gordon, A. L.; Sprintall, J.; Susanto, R. D.; van Aken, H. M.

    2010-08-01

    A 1/12° global version of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) using 3-hourly atmospheric forcing is analyzed and directly compared against observations from the International Nusantara STratification ANd Transport (INSTANT) program that provides the first long-term (2004-2006) comprehensive view of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) inflow/outflow and establishes an important benchmark for inter-basin exchange, including the net throughflow transport. The simulated total ITF transport (-13.4 Sv) is similar to the observational estimate (-15.0 Sv) and correctly distributed among the three outflow passages (Lombok Strait, Ombai Strait and Timor Passage). Makassar Strait carries ˜75% of the observed total ITF inflow and while the temporal variability of the simulated transport has high correlation with the observations, the simulated mean volume transport is ˜37% too low. This points to an incorrect partitioning between the western and eastern inflow routes in the model and is the largest shortcoming of this simulation. HYCOM simulates the very deep (>1250 m) overflow at Lifamatola Passage (-2.0 Sv simulated vs. -2.5 Sv observed) and indicates overflow contributions originating from the North (South) Equatorial Current in boreal winter-spring (summer-autumn). A new finding of INSTANT is the mean eastward flow from the Indian Ocean toward the interior Indonesian Seas on the north side of Ombai Strait. This flow is not robustly simulated at 1/12° resolution, but is found in a 1/25° version of global HYCOM using climatological forcing, indicating the importance of horizontal resolution. However, the 1/25° model also indicates that the mean eastward flow retroflects, turning back into the main southwestward Ombai Strait outflow, and in the mean does not enter the interior seas to become part of the water mass transformation process. The 1/12° global HYCOM is also used to fill in the gaps not measured as part of the INSTANT observational network. It indicates

  2. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows for Aerothermodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) Finite Element Simulation. It covers the background, governing equations, weak formulation, shock capturing, inviscid flux discretization, time discretization, linearization, and implicit solution strategies. It also reviews some applications such as Type IV Shock Interaction, Forward-Facing Cavity and AEDC Sharp Double Cone.

  3. Business Financial Applications. Curriculum Guide. Simulations. Test Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Ray Nell; Patton, Jan

    This business financial applications document combines the curriculum guide, simulations, and the test bank for the 1-semester course. The guide provides students with an overview of the banking industry used for entry-level positions or advancement into an occupationally specific course. It begins with a course description, suggested scope and…

  4. Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Simulation: Future Applications in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gwendolyn B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes possible applications of new technologies to special education. Discusses results of a study designed to explore the use of robotics, artificial intelligence, and computer simulations to aid people with handicapping conditions. Presents several scenarios in which specific technological advances may contribute to special education…

  5. Simulating phenological shifts in French temperate forests under two climatic change scenarios and four driving global circulation models.

    PubMed

    Lebourgeois, François; Pierrat, Jean-Claude; Perez, Vincent; Piedallu, Christian; Cecchini, Sébastien; Ulrich, Erwin

    2010-09-01

    After modeling the large-scale climate response patterns of leaf unfolding, leaf coloring and growing season length of evergreen and deciduous French temperate trees, we predicted the effects of eight future climate scenarios on phenological events. We used the ground observations from 103 temperate forests (10 species and 3,708 trees) from the French Renecofor Network and for the period 1997-2006. We applied RandomForest algorithms to predict phenological events from climatic and ecological variables. With the resulting models, we drew maps of phenological events throughout France under present climate and under two climatic change scenarios (A2, B2) and four global circulation models (HadCM3, CGCM2, CSIRO2 and PCM). We compared current observations and predicted values for the periods 2041-2070 and 2071-2100. On average, spring development of oaks precedes that of beech, which precedes that of conifers. Annual cycles in budburst and leaf coloring are highly correlated with January, March-April and October-November weather conditions through temperature, global solar radiation or potential evapotranspiration depending on species. At the end of the twenty-first century, each model predicts earlier budburst (mean: 7 days) and later leaf coloring (mean: 13 days) leading to an average increase in the growing season of about 20 days (for oaks and beech stands). The A2-HadCM3 hypothesis leads to an increase of up to 30 days in many areas. As a consequence of higher predicted warming during autumn than during winter or spring, shifts in leaf coloring dates appear greater than trends in leaf unfolding. At a regional scale, highly differing climatic response patterns were observed.

  6. Separating climate change signals into thermodynamic, lapse-rate and circulation effects: Theory and application to the European summer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Nico; Kotlarski, Sven; Fischer, Erich; Lüthi, Daniel; Zubler, Elias; Schär, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Climate models robustly project a strong overall summer warming across Europe showing a characteristic north-south gradient with enhanced warming and drying in southern Europe. However, the processes that are responsible for this pattern are not fully understood. We here employ an extended surrogate or pseudo-warming approach to disentangle the contribution of different mechanisms to this response pattern. The basic idea of the surrogate technique is to use a regional climate model and apply a large-scale warming to the lateral boundary conditions of a present-day reference simulation, while maintaining the relative humidity (and thus implicitly increasing the specific moisture content). In comparison to previous studies, our approach includes two important extensions: First, different vertical warming profiles are applied in order to separate the effects of a mean warming from lapse-rate effects. Second, a twin-design is used, in which the temperature change signal is not only added to present-day conditions, but also subtracted from a scenario experiment. We use the regional climate model COSMO-CLM with a grid spacing of approximately 50 km (EURO-CORDEX EUR-44 setup) using transient simulations (1950-2100) with the RCP8.5 emissions scenario. We demonstrate that the aforementioned extensions provide an elegant way to separate the full climate change signal into contributions from large-scale thermodynamics (LST), lapse-rate (LR) and large-scale circulation (LSC). In our framework the LSC effect also includes effects due to changes in land-sea contrast and the spatial variations of the SST warming pattern. We find that the LST effect yields a large-scale warming across Europe without any distinct latitudinal gradient. The LR effect, which is quantified for the first time in our study, leads to a stronger warming and some drying in Southern Europe. It explains about 50% of the warming amplification over the Iberian Peninsula, thus demonstrating the important role of

  7. Simulated Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in the 20th century with an ocean model forced by reanalysis-based atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Chun; Drange, Helge; Gao, Yongqi; Bentsen, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Global ocean hindcast simulations for the period 1871-2009 have been run with the ocean-sea ice component of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM-O), forced by an adjusted version of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis version 2 data set (20CRv2 data set), as well as by the commonly used second version of atmospheric forcing data set for the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase-II (CORE-II) for the period 1948-2007 (hereafter CORE.v2 data set). The simulated Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the 20CR and the CORE simulations have comparable variability as well as mean strength during the last three decades of the integration. The simulated AMOC undergoes, however, distinctly different evolutions during the period 1948-1970, with a sharply declining strength in CORE but a gradual increase in 20CR. Sensitivity experiments suggest that differences in the wind forcing between CORE and 20CR have major impact on the simulated AMOCs during this period. It is furthermore found that differences in the air temperature between the two data sets do contribute to the differences in AMOC, but to a much lesser degree than the wind. An additional factor for the diverging AMOC in the two decades following 1948 is the inevitable switching of atmospheric forcing fields in 1948 in the CORE.v2-based runs due to the cyclic spin-up procedure of the ocean model. The latter is a fundamental issue for any ocean hindcast simulation. The ocean initial state mainly influence the actual value but to a lesser degree also the temporal evolution (variability) of AMOC. It may take about two decades for the AMOC to adjust to a new atmospheric state during the spin-up, although a dynamically balanced ocean initial state tends to reduce the adjustment time and the magnitude of the deviation, implying that an ocean model run with atmospheric forcing fields extending back in time, like 20CRv2, can be used to extend the reliable duration of CORE-type of simulations.

  8. Simulated Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation in the 20th century with an ocean model forced by reanalysis-based atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Chun; Drange, Helge; Gao, Yongqi; Bentsen, Mats

    2016-04-01

    Global ocean hindcast simulations for the period 1871--2009 have been run with the ocean-sea ice component of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM-O), forced by an adjusted version of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis version 2 data set (20CRv2 data set), as well as by the commonly used second version of atmospheric forcing data set for the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase-II (CORE-II) for the period 1948--2007 (hereafter CORE.v2 data set). The simulated Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the 20CR and the CORE simulations have comparable variability as well as mean strength during the last three decades of the integration. The simulated AMOC undergoes, however, distinctly different evolutions during the period 1948--1970, with a sharply declining strength in CORE but a gradual increase in 20CR. Sensitivity experiments suggest that differences in the wind forcing between CORE and 20CR have major impact on the simulated AMOCs during this period. It is furthermore found that differences in the air temperature between the two data sets do contribute to the differences in AMOC, but to a much lesser degree than the wind. An additional factor for the diverging AMOC in the two decades following 1948 is the inevitable switching of atmospheric forcing fields in 1948 in the CORE.v2-based runs due to the cyclic spin-up procedure of the ocean model. The latter is a fundamental issue for any ocean hindcast simulation. The ocean initial state mainly influence the actual value but to a lesser degree also the temporal evolution (variability) of AMOC. It may take about two decades for the AMOC to adjust to a new atmospheric state during the spin-up, although a dynamically balanced ocean initial state tends to reduce the adjustment time and the magnitude of the deviation, implying that an ocean model run with atmospheric forcing fields extending back in time, like 20CRv2, can be used to extend the reliable duration of CORE-type of simulations.

  9. Global trend analysis of surface CO simulated using the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model, EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Pozzer, Andrea; Lelieveld, Jos

    2013-04-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important trace gas in tropospheric chemistry. It directly influences the concentration of tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH), and therefore regulates the lifetimes of various tropospheric trace gases. Since anthropogenic activity produces about 60% of the annual global emission of the tropospheric CO, temporal trend analysis of surface CO is needed to understand the increasing (decreasing) influence of humans on the cleansing capacity of the atmosphere. In this study, the global trend of surface CO from 2001 to 2010 was estimated using the EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy for Atmospheric Chemistry) model. The simulation is based on the emission scenario based on RCP8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways). The global EMAC simulations of monthly surface CO are evaluated with monthly MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere) observations (i.e. MOP03TM), and the spatial correlations range from 0.87 to 0.97. The simulated trends are compared with the data from a global surface CO monitoring network, the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG), which includes also the NOAA/CMDL (Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Cooperative Air Sampling Network. Over the United States and Western Europe, the significant decreases of surface CO are estimated at -49.7±2.7 and -38.6±2.7 ppbv per decade. In contrast, the surface CO increased by +12.4±10.2 and +7.2±3.7 ppbv per decade over South America and South Africa, respectively.

  10. Assessing the ability of isotope-enabled General Circulation Models to simulate the variability of Iceland water vapor isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erla Sveinbjornsdottir, Arny; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Jonsson, Thorsteinn; Ritter, Francois; Riser, Camilla; Messon-Delmotte, Valerie; Bonne, Jean Louis; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2014-05-01

    During the fall of 2010 we installed an autonomous water vapor spectroscopy laser (Los Gatos Research analyzer) in a lighthouse on the Southwest coast of Iceland (63.83°N, 21.47°W). Despite initial significant problems with volcanic ash, high wind, and attack of sea gulls, the system has been continuously operational since the end of 2011 with limited down time. The system automatically performs calibration every 2 hours, which results in high accuracy and precision allowing for analysis of the second order parameter, d-excess, in the water vapor. We find a strong linear relationship between d-excess and local relative humidity (RH) when normalized to SST. The observed slope of approximately -45 o/oo/% is similar to theoretical predictions by Merlivat and Jouzel [1979] for smooth surface, but the calculated intercept is significant lower than predicted. Despite this good linear agreement with theoretical calculations, mismatches arise between the simulated seasonal cycle of water vapour isotopic composition using LMDZiso GCM nudged to large-scale winds from atmospheric analyses, and our data. The GCM is not able to capture seasonal variations in local RH, nor seasonal variations in d-excess. Based on daily data, the performance of LMDZiso to resolve day-to-day variability is measured based on the strength of the correlation coefficient between observations and model outputs. This correlation coefficient reaches ~0.8 for surface absolute humidity, but decreases to ~0.6 for δD and ~0.45 d-excess. Moreover, the magnitude of day-to-day humidity variations is also underestimated by LMDZiso, which can explain the underestimated magnitude of isotopic depletion. Finally, the simulated and observed d-excess vs. RH has similar slopes. We conclude that the under-estimation of d-excess variability may partly arise from the poor performance of the humidity simulations.

  11. Fetal Circulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Echocardiography/Your Unborn Baby's Heart - Fetal Echocardiogram Test - Detection of a Heart Defect - Fetal Circulation • Care & Treatment • Tools & Resources Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates 4 Heart Attack Symptoms in Women ...

  12. Numerical Simulation of Ferrofluid Flow for Subsurface Environmental Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Moridis, George J.

    1997-05-05

    Ferrofluids are suspensions of magnetic particles of diameter approximately 10 nm stabilized by surfactants in carrier liquids. The large magnetic susceptibility of ferrofluids allows the mobilization of ferrofluid through permeable rock and soil by the application of strong external magnetic fields. We have developed simulation capabilities for both miscible and immiscible conceptualizations of ferrofluid flow through porous media in response to magnetic forces arising from the magnetic field of a rectangular permanent magnet. The flow of ferrofluid is caused by the magnetization of the particles and their attraction toward a magnet, regardless of the orientation of the magnet. The steps involved in calculating the flow of ferrofluid are (1) calculation of the external magnetic field, (2) calculation of the gradient of the external magnetic field, (3) calculation of the magnetization of the ferrofluid, and (4) assembly of the magnetic body force term and addition of this term to the standard pressure gradient and gravity force terms. We compare numerical simulations to laboratory measurements of the magnetic field, fluid pressures, and the two-dimensional flow of ferrofluid to demonstrate the applicability of the methods coded in the numerical simulators. We present an example of the use of the simulator for a field-scale application of ferrofluids for barrier verification.

  13. Simulating organic species with the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: a comparison of model results with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzer, A.; Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Sander, R.; Ganzeveld, L.; Kerkweg, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-01-01

    The atmospheric-chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 is evaluated with observations of different organic ozone precursors. This study continues a prior analysis which focused primarily on the representation of atmospheric dynamics and ozone. We use the results of the same reference simulation and apply a statistical analysis using data from numerous field campaigns. The results serve as a basis for future improvements of the model system. ECHAM5/MESSy1 generally reproduces the spatial distribution and the seasonal cycle of carbon monoxide (CO) very well. However, for the background in the northern hemisphere we obtain a negative bias (mainly due to an underestimation of emissions from fossil fuel combustion), and in the high latitude southern hemisphere a yet unexplained positive bias. The model results agree well with observations of alkanes, whereas severe problems in the simulation of alkenes are present. For oxygenated compounds the results are ambiguous: The model results are in good agreement with observations of formaldehyde, but systematic biases are present for methanol and acetone. The discrepancies between the model results and the observations are explained (partly) by means of sensitivity studies.

  14. Simulating organic species with the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: a comparison of model results with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzer, A.; Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Sander, R.; Ganzeveld, L.; Kerkweg, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-05-01

    The atmospheric-chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 is evaluated with observations of different organic ozone precursors. This study continues a prior analysis which focused primarily on the representation of atmospheric dynamics and ozone. We use the results of the same reference simulation and apply a statistical analysis using data from numerous field campaigns. The results serve as a basis for future improvements of the model system. ECHAM5/MESSy1 generally reproduces the spatial distribution and the seasonal cycle of carbon monoxide (CO) very well. However, for the background in the Northern Hemisphere we obtain a negative bias (mainly due to an underestimation of emissions from fossil fuel combustion), and in the high latitude Southern Hemisphere a yet unexplained positive bias. The model results agree well with observations of alkanes, whereas severe problems in the simulation of alkenes and isoprene are present. For oxygenated compounds the results are ambiguous: The model results are in good agreement with observations of formaldehyde, but systematic biases are present for methanol and acetone. The discrepancies between the model results and the observations are explained (partly) by means of sensitivity studies.

  15. Climate and Habitability of Kepler 452b Simulated with a Fully Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongyun; Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Yonggang; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of Kepler 452b is a milestone in searching for habitable exoplanets. While it has been suggested that Kepler 452b is the first Earth-like exoplanet discovered in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star, its climate states and habitability require quantitative studies. Here, we first use a three-dimensional fully coupled atmosphere–ocean climate model to study the climate and habitability of an exoplanet around a Sun-like star. Our simulations show that Kepler 452b is habitable if CO2 concentrations in its atmosphere are comparable or lower than that in the present-day Earth atmosphere. However, our simulations also suggest that Kepler 452b can become too hot to be habitable if there is the lack of silicate weathering to limit CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. We also address whether Kepler 452b could retain its water inventory after 6.0 billion years of lifetime. These results in the present Letter will provide insights about climate and habitability for other undiscovered exoplanets similar to Kepler 452b, which may be observable by future observational missions.

  16. THE CHALLENGE OF DETECTING CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER VIRUS CIRCULATION IN WILD BOAR (SUS SCROFA): SIMULATION OF SAMPLING OPTIONS.

    PubMed

    Sonnenburg, Jana; Schulz, Katja; Blome, Sandra; Staubach, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is one of the most important viral diseases of domestic pigs ( Sus scrofa domesticus) and wild boar ( Sus scrofa ). For at least 4 decades, several European Union member states were confronted with outbreaks among wild boar and, as it had been shown that infected wild boar populations can be a major cause of primary outbreaks in domestic pigs, strict control measures for both species were implemented. To guarantee early detection and to demonstrate freedom from disease, intensive surveillance is carried out based on a hunting bag sample. In this context, virologic investigations play a major role in the early detection of new introductions and in regions immunized with a conventional vaccine. The required financial resources and personnel for reliable testing are often large, and sufficient sample sizes to detect low virus prevalences are difficult to obtain. We conducted a simulation to model the possible impact of changes in sample size and sampling intervals on the probability of CSF virus detection based on a study area of 65 German hunting grounds. A 5-yr period with 4,652 virologic investigations was considered. Results suggest that low prevalences could not be detected with a justifiable effort. The simulation of increased sample sizes per sampling interval showed only a slightly better performance but would be unrealistic in practice, especially outside the main hunting season. Further studies on other approaches such as targeted or risk-based sampling for virus detection in connection with (marker) antibody surveillance are needed.

  17. Application of Phase Field Simulations to Fuel Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Clarno, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    The application of the phase filed method to simulate the formation and the stress induced re-orientation of zirconium hydride during dry storage of the spent fuel and clad assembly is discussed. The phase field technique is able to capture qualitatively the effect of external stress on the hydride orientation in Zr-H system. However, the modeling effort to-date is far from adequate and several issues remain to be addressed before the simulations can be used as a predictive tool for the behavior of the clad during long time dry storage.

  18. Applications of large eddy simulation methods to gyrokinetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bañón Navarro, A. Happel, T.; Teaca, B. [Applied Mathematics Research Centre, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB; Max-Planck für Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau; Max-Planck Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching; Max-Planck Hammett, G. W. [Max-Planck Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-03-15

    The large eddy simulation (LES) approach—solving numerically the large scales of a turbulent system and accounting for the small-scale influence through a model—is applied to nonlinear gyrokinetic systems that are driven by a number of different microinstabilities. Comparisons between modeled, lower resolution, and higher resolution simulations are performed for an experimental measurable quantity, the electron density fluctuation spectrum. Moreover, the validation and applicability of LES is demonstrated through a series of diagnostics based on the free energetics of the system.

  19. Launch Site Computer Simulation and its Application to Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sham, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of computer simulation, the Lockheed developed STS Processing Model, and the application of computer simulation to a wide range of processes. The STS Processing Model is an icon driven model that uses commercial off the shelf software and a Macintosh personal computer. While it usually takes one year to process and launch 8 space shuttles, with the STS Processing Model this process is computer simulated in about 5 minutes. Facilities, orbiters, or ground support equipment can be added or deleted and the impact on launch rate, facility utilization, or other factors measured as desired. This same computer simulation technology can be used to simulate manufacturing, engineering, commercial, or business processes. The technology does not require an 'army' of software engineers to develop and operate, but instead can be used by the layman with only a minimal amount of training. Instead of making changes to a process and realizing the results after the fact, with computer simulation, changes can be made and processes perfected before they are implemented.

  20. Learning Circulant Sensing Kernels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Compressive sensing based high resolution channel estimation for OFDM system. To appear in IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Signal Processing, Special...and R. D. Nowak. Toeplitz compressed sensing ma- trices with applications to sparse channel estimation . Submitted to IEEE Transactions on Information...various applications. For compressive sens- ing, recent work has used random Toeplitz and circulant sensing matrices and proved their efficiency in theory

  1. Kelvin waves and ozone Kelvin waves in the quasi-biennial oscillation and semiannual oscillation: A simulation by a high-resolution chemistry-coupled general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shingo; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2005-09-01

    Equatorial Kelvin waves and ozone Kelvin waves were simulated by a T63L250 chemistry-coupled general circulation model with a high vertical resolution (300 m). The model produces a realistic quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and a semiannual oscillation (SAO) in the equatorial stratosphere. The QBO has a period slightly longer than 2 years, and the SAO shows rapid reversals from westerly to easterly regimes and gradual descents of westerlies. Results for the zonal wave number 1 slow and fast Kelvin waves are discussed. Structure of the waves and phase relationships between temperature and ozone perturbations coincide well with satellite observations made by LIMS, CLAES, and MLS. They are generally in phase (antiphase) in the lower (upper) stratosphere as theoretically expected. The fast Kelvin waves in the temperature and ozone are dominant in the upper stratosphere because the slow Kelvin waves are effectively filtered by the QBO westerly. In this simulation, the fast Kelvin waves encounter their critical levels in the upper stratosphere when zonal asymmetry of the SAO westerly is enhanced by an intrusion of the extratropical planetary waves. In addition to the critical level filtering effect, modulations of wave properties by background winds are evident near easterly and westerly shears associated with the QBO and SAO. Enhancement of wave amplitude in the QBO westerly shear is well coincident with radiosonde observations. Increase/decrease of vertical wavelength in the QBO easterly/westerly is obvious in this simulation, which is consistent with the linear wave theory. Shortening of wave period due to the descending QBO westerly shear zone is demonstrated for the first time. Moreover, dominant periods during the QBO westerly phase are longer than those during the QBO easterly phase for both the slow and fast Kelvin waves.

  2. Simulating Mars' Dust Cycle with a Mars General Circulation Model: Effects of Water Ice Cloud Formation on Dust Lifting Strength and Seasonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere [1,2,3]. Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer [4]. Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across [5]. Regional storm activity is enhanced before northern winter solstice (Ls200 degrees - 240 degrees), and after northern solstice (Ls305 degrees - 340 degrees ), which produces elevated atmospheric dust loadings during these periods [5,6,7]. These pre- and post- solstice increases in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere with cross-equatorial transport of dust leading to enhanced dust lifting in the southern hemisphere [6]. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles [8,9,10]. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading.

  3. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  4. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-04-18

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  5. Simulations of the Atmospheric General Circulation Using a Cloud-Resolving Model as a Superparameterization of Physical Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairoutdinov, Marat; Randall, David; Demott, Charlotte

    2005-07-01

    Traditionally, the effects of clouds in GCMs have been represented by semiempirical parameterizations. Recently, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) was embedded into each grid column of a realistic GCM, the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), to serve as a superparameterization (SP) of clouds. Results of the standard CAM and the SP-CAM are contrasted, both using T42 resolution (2.8° × 2.8° grid), 26 vertical levels, and up to a 500-day-long simulation. The SP was based on a two-dimensional (2D) CRM with 64 grid columns and 24 levels collocated with the 24 lowest levels of CAM. In terms of the mean state, the SP-CAM produces quite reasonable geographical distributions of precipitation, precipitable water, top-of-the-atmosphere radiative fluxes, cloud radiative forcing, and high-cloud fraction for both December-January-February and June-July-August. The most notable and persistent precipitation bias in the western Pacific, during the Northern Hemisphere summer of all the SP-CAM runs with 2D SP, seems to go away through the use of a small-domain three-dimensional (3D) SP with the same number of grid columns as the 2D SP, but arranged in an 8 × 8 square with identical horizontal resolution of 4 km. Two runs with the 3D SP have been carried out, with and without explicit large-scale momentum transport by convection. Interestingly, the double ITCZ feature seems to go away in the run that includes momentum transport.The SP improves the diurnal variability of nondrizzle precipitation frequency over the standard model by precipitating most frequently during late afternoon hours over the land, as observed, while the standard model maximizes its precipitation frequency around local solar noon. Over the ocean, both models precipitate most frequently in the early morning hours as observed. The SP model also reproduces the observed global distribution of the percentage of days with nondrizzle precipitation rather well. In contrast, the standard model tends to precipitate more

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations: Parameter evaluation, application and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a theoretical technique for investigating the physical properties of a wide variety of molecules. This dissertation contains my studies on three important parts of the MD simulation: evaluation of parameters in empirical energy functions widely used in MD simulations, application of MD simulation on experimentally interested biological molecules and development of new methods for constraint dynamics simulations. All the work in this thesis made use of CHARMM as an MD simulation tool. The MD simulation uses empirical energy functions parameterized by a set of parameters. These parameters play an important role in the quality of the simulations. I evaluated nine parameter sets from Harvard University and Molecular Simulations, Inc. for protein simulations by the MD simulations of hydrated form of carboxy- myoglobin and interleukin-1/beta, which are rich in two typical protein structure motifs, helix and β sheet structures respectively. It is found that some sets are good at representing helical structure proteins while others are good at β sheet proteins. But all of them need improvement on representing motions at low temperature. Experimental evidence indicates that the 1A coiled-coil domains of the Intermediate Filament (IF) proteins consisting of coiled human keratins 1 and 10 (K1 and K10) are 'hot spots' for substitutional mutations. Some of these mutations are correlated to the human skin diseases-epidermolytic hyperkeratiosis (EH) and epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). The MD simulation technique is used here for the first time to model and simulate these proteins to elucidate the molecular-level effects of these mutations. Lacking the experimental crystal structures, the initial structure of 1A domain of the wild type Intermediate Filament protein and its mutants were modeled from scratch to reproduce the well- known properties of the proteins of this kind followed by identical MD simulations. The important result is

  7. Potential alteration of fjordal circulation due to a large floating structure—Numerical investigation with application to Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2013-01-02

    Circulation in typical fjords is characterized by a shallow brackish layer at the surface over a deep long and narrow saltwater column. This surface layer is responsible for the outflow of water from the fjord, is easily disrupted by external forces, such as wind, and is influenced by freshwater inflow. In this paper, we postulate that the stability of fjordal circulation may also be vulnerable to impacts from anthropogenic alterations, such as floating structures, that could constrict the mixing and transport in the upper layers of the water column. The potential for alteration of circulation in Hood Canal, a silled-fjord located inside Puget Sound, Washington, has been examined. Using classical analytical treatments along the lines formulated by Hansen and Rattray [1965], Rattray [1967], Dyer [1973] and more recently, MacCready [2004], we develop a solution applicable to a range of estuary classifications varying from a partially mixed estuary regime to classical fjord conditions. Both estuary types exist in the Puget Sound system, and we compare our analytical solution with observed data. The analysis is based on an exponential variation of eddy viscosity with depth, and it has been extended further with modifications of the free surface boundary conditions to develop a solution representing the presence of a floating bridge at the estuary/fjord entrance. The model results show that tidally averaged mean circulation under the influence of such a constraint could reduce by as much as 30 to 50 percent. The overall water quality of fjords and narrow estuaries is dependent on net circulation and flushing. A potential decrease in residual flow or a corresponding increase in residence time of this magnitude merits further study.

  8. The LHCb Simulation Application, Gauss: Design, Evolution and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.; Corti, G.; Easo, S.; Jones, C. R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Pappagallo, M.; Robbe, P.; LHCb Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The LHCb simulation application, Gauss, is based on the Gaudi framework and on experiment basic components such as the Event Model and Detector Description. Gauss also depends on external libraries for the generation of the primary events (PYTHIA 6, EvtGen, etc.) and on GEANT4 for particle transport in the experimental setup. The application supports the production of different types of events from minimum bias to B physics signals and particle guns. It is used for purely generator-level studies as well as full simulations. Gauss is used both directly by users and in massive central productions on the grid. The design and implementation of the application and its evolution due to evolving requirements will be described as in the case of the recently adopted Python-based configuration or the possibility of taking into account detectors conditions via a Simulation Conditions database. The challenge of supporting at the same time the flexibililty needed for the different tasks for which it is used, from evaluation of physics reach to background modeling, together with the stability and reliabilty of the code will also be described.

  9. Evolution of the Macondo well blowout: simulating the effects of the circulation and synthetic dispersants on the subsea oil transport.

    PubMed

    Paris, Claire B; Hénaff, Matthieu Le; Aman, Zachary M; Subramaniam, Ajit; Helgers, Judith; Wang, Dong-Ping; Kourafalou, Vassiliki H; Srinivasan, Ashwanth

    2012-12-18

    During the Deepwater Horizon incident, crude oil flowed into the Gulf of Mexico from 1522 m underwater. In an effort to prevent the oil from rising to the surface, synthetic dispersants were applied at the wellhead. However, uncertainties in the formation of oil droplets and difficulties in measuring their size in the water column, complicated further assessment of the potential effect of the dispersant on the subsea-to-surface oil partition. We adapted a coupled hydrodynamic and stochastic buoyant particle-tracking model to the transport and fate of hydrocarbon fractions and simulated the far-field transport of the oil from the intrusion depth. The evaluated model represented a baseline for numerical experiments where we varied the distributions of particle sizes and thus oil mass. The experiments allowed to quantify the relative effects of chemical dispersion, vertical currents, and inertial buoyancy motion on oil rise velocities. We present a plausible model scenario, where some oil is trapped at depth through shear emulsification due to the particular conditions of the Macondo blowout. Assuming effective mixing of the synthetic dispersants at the wellhead, the model indicates that the submerged oil mass is shifted deeper, decreasing only marginally the amount of oil surfacing. In this scenario, the oil rises slowly to the surface or stays immersed. This suggests that other mechanisms may have contributed to the rapid surfacing of oil-gas mixture observed initially. The study also reveals local topographic and hydrodynamic processes that influence the oil transport in eddies and multiple layers. This numerical approach provides novel insights on oil transport mechanisms from deep blowouts and on gauging the subsea use of synthetic dispersant in mitigating coastal damage.

  10. Application of acute maximal exercise to protect orthostatic tolerance after simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Crandall, C. G.; Convertino, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that one bout of maximal exercise performed at the conclusion of prolonged simulated microgravity would improve blood pressure stability during an orthostatic challenge. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), arginine vasopressin (AVP), plasma renin activity (PRA), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cardiac output (Q), forearm vascular resistance (FVR), and changes in leg volume were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope in seven subjects immediately prior to reambulation from 16 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) under two experimental conditions: 1) after maximal supine cycle ergometry performed 24 h before returning to the upright posture (exercise) and 2) without exercise (control). After HDT, the reduction of LBNP tolerance time from pre-HDT levels was greater (P = 0.041) in the control condition (-2.0 +/- 0.2 min) compared with the exercise condition (-0.4 +/- 0.2 min). At presyncope after HDT, FVR and NE were higher (P < 0.05) after exercise compared with control, whereas MAP, HR, E, AVP, PRA, ANP, and leg volume were similar in both conditions. Plasma volume (PV) and carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were reduced after control HDT, but were restored by the exercise treatment. Maintenance of orthostatic tolerance by application of acute intense exercise after 16 days of simulated microgravity was associated with greater circulating levels of NE, vasoconstriction, Q, baroreflex sensitivity, and PV.

  11. Thermochemistry Models Applicable to a Vectorized Particle Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Brian Lee

    1991-02-01

    The finite rates of reactions and thermal excitation processes in a gas result in thermochemical non-equilibrium in the hypersonic rarefied flowfield associated with vehicles during atmospheric entry. The low-density nature of this flow is such that the familiar Navier-Stokes equations are not applicable. Alternatively, particle simulation methods circumvent the difficulties of rarefaction by modeling the gas as a collection of moving and colliding particles in accordance with the principles of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird has been applied extensively but is limited by excessive computational expense. An alternative particle simulation, tailored specifically to the vector-processing architecture of modern supercomputers, has been developed by Baganoff and McDonald to optimize computational performance in modeling the three-dimensional non-reactive flow of general gas mixtures including simple models for rotational and vibrational relaxation. The objective of this thesis is to extend the vectorized simulation to treat chemically reactive flows and to enhance the models for vibrational relaxation. A collision selection rule has been developed to yield vibrational relaxation rates which match the experimental fits of Millikan and White. Selection rules for dissociation, atomic exchange, and recombination reactions were developed to yield reaction rates which match those dictated by the Arrhenius experimental fits over the temperature range of interest. The vibrational relaxation mechanics model of McDonald was modified for application to both the simple harmonic and anharmonic oscillator descriptions of the quantized vibrational mode. Reaction mechanics are modeled by proportional addition or removal of reaction energy from each contributing mode in a collision. All of these models retain computational simplicity while satisfying detailed balance and promoting equilibrium. An improved reaction model

  12. Application of particle method to the casting process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Zulaida, Y. M.; Anzai, K.

    2012-07-01

    Casting processes involve many significant phenomena such as fluid flow, solidification, and deformation, and it is known that casting defects are strongly influenced by the phenomena. However the phenomena complexly interacts each other and it is difficult to observe them directly because the temperature of the melt and other apparatus components are quite high, and they are generally opaque; therefore, a computer simulation is expected to serve a lot of benefits to consider what happens in the processes. Recently, a particle method, which is one of fully Lagrangian methods, has attracted considerable attention. The particle methods based on Lagrangian methods involving no calculation lattice have been developed rapidly because of their applicability to multi-physics problems. In this study, we combined the fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification simulation programs, and tried to simulate various casting processes such as continuous casting, centrifugal casting and ingot making. As a result of continuous casting simulation, the powder flow could be calculated as well as the melt flow, and the subsequent shape of interface between the melt and the powder was calculated. In the centrifugal casting simulation, the mold was smoothly modeled along the shape of the real mold, and the fluid flow and the rotating mold are simulated directly. As a result, the flow of the melt dragged by the rotating mold was calculated well. The eccentric rotation and the influence of Coriolis force were also reproduced directly and naturally. For ingot making simulation, a shrinkage formation behavior was calculated and the shape of the shrinkage agreed well with the experimental result.

  13. A new approach to determining the rates of recruitment of circulating leukocytes into tissues: Application to the measurement of leukocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Daniel; Khoo, John C.; Glass, Christopher K.; Palinski, Wulf; Almazan, Felicidad

    1997-01-01

    Recruitment of circulating monocytes into the artery wall is an important feature of early atherogenesis. In vitro studies have identified a number of adhesion molecules and chemokines that may control this process but very little work has been done to evaluate their relative importance in vivo, in part because there have been no methods available of sufficient sensitivity and reliability. This paper proposes a new approach in which advantage is taken of naturally occurring or transgenically induced mutations to “mark” donor cells and to follow their fate in recipient animals using highly sensitive PCR methods. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by preliminary studies of monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions. However, the method should in principle be applicable to the study of any of the circulating leukocytes and their rate of entry into any tissue or tissues of interest. PMID:9108101

  14. LLNL Ocean General Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wickett, M. E.; Caldeira, K.; Duffy, P.

    2005-12-29

    The LLNL OGCM is a numerical ocean modeling tool for use in studying ocean circulation over a wide range of space and time scales, with primary applications to climate change and carbon cycle science.

  15. Tracing the circulation of groundwater in volcanic systems using the 87Sr/86Sr ratio: Application to Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotta, Marcello; D'Alessandro, Walter; Arienzo, Ilenia; Longo, Manfredi

    2017-02-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr ratio was investigated in groundwater circulating in the volcanic edifice of Mt. Etna in order to estimate the possible contribution of deep brines circulating in the sedimentary basement. Samples from 14 sites were collected and analyzed for their chemical composition and Sr-isotope ratios. While the most common approach of coupling 87Sr/86Sr ratios with the concentration of dissolved Sr is not effective in distinguishing between the deep brine and seawater contributions, we suggest that the Sr/Cl ratio is a useful complementary parameter that needs to be considered when attempting to clearly identify the Sr sources. The obtained data indicate that the Sr-isotope signature of groundwater is determined by the volcanics hosting the aquifer. The volcanic isotopic signature is modified by very small amounts of brines (< 1%), characterized by a high concentration of Sr and a 87Sr/86Sr ratio typical of sedimentary environments, but only at sites where the groundwater circulates almost in contact with the sedimentary basement. Conversely, the contribution of seawater is completely ruled out since this should produce a higher concentration of chloride. The proposed approach is potentially very effective for tracing the circulation of groundwater not only at Mt. Etna but also at volcanic edifices that overlie a bedrock with different 87Sr/86Sr ratios as well as at volcanic islands where freshwater overlies seawater.

  16. Reweighted ensemble dynamics simulations: Theory, improvement, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lin-Chen; Zhou, Xin; Ouyang, Zhong-Can

    2015-06-01

    Based on multiple parallel short molecular dynamics simulation trajectories, we designed the reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method to more efficiently sample complex (biopolymer) systems, and to explore their hierarchical metastable states. Here we further present an improvement to depress statistical errors of the RED and we discuss a few keys in practical application of the RED, provide schemes on selection of basis functions, and determination of the free parameter in the RED. We illustrate the application of the improvements in two toy models and in the solvated alanine dipeptide. The results show the RED enables us to capture the topology of multiple-state transition networks, to detect the diffusion-like dynamical behavior in an entropy-dominated system, and to identify solvent effects in the solvated peptides. The illustrations serve as general applications of the RED in more complex biopolymer systems. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11175250).

  17. Comprehensive numerical simulation analysis of flow and mass transfer by tuning inlet conditions in solution circulating technique focused to grow quality KDP crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Cheng, Min; Yang, Sen; Huang, Yi

    2017-04-01

    The inclusions are easily to be generated because of the nonuniform distribution of supersaturation of crystal surface in KDP crystal growth process, and the inclusions can reduce the growth quality of crystal. So in order to increase the growth rate of crystal and improve the uniformity of surface supersaturation, the numerical simulation of hydrodynamics and mass transfer in the growth of KDP crystal by using solution circulating method have been performed in this paper. The KDP crystal is in eccentric motion in the calculation model, and the effects of inlet velocities, positions of inlet pipe, and incident angles on the crystal growth are discussed. The surface supersaturation and standard deviation of supersaturation are obtained as functions of different inlet velocities, positions of inlet pipe, and incident angles. The value of surface supersaturation is higher and the standard deviation of surface supersaturation is lower when the inlet pipe and crystal are at the same height. Besides, the uniformity of crystal is improved obviously when the axis of inlet pipe is tangent to the rotation track of R-Py tip.

  18. Implementation of non-local boundary layer schemes in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and its impact on simulated mesoscale circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, I.; Ronda, R. J.; Caselles, V.; Estrela, M. J.

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes the implementation of different non-local Planetary Boundary Layer schemes within the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) model. The two selected PBL parameterizations are the Medium-Range Forecast (MRF) PBL and its updated version, known as the Yonsei University (YSU) PBL. YSU is a first-order scheme that uses non-local eddy diffusivity coefficients to compute turbulent fluxes. It is based on the MRF, and improves it with an explicit treatment of the entrainment. With the aim of evaluating the RAMS results for these PBL parameterizations, a series of numerical simulations have been performed and contrasted with the results obtained using the Mellor and Yamada (MY) scheme, also widely used, and the standard PBL scheme in the RAMS model. The numerical study carried out here is focused on mesoscale circulation events during the summer, as these meteorological situations dominate this season of the year in the Western Mediterranean coast. In addition, the sensitivity of these PBL parameterizations to the initial soil moisture content is also evaluated. The results show a warmer and moister PBL for the YSU scheme compared to both MRF and MY. The model presents as well a tendency to overestimate the observed temperature and to underestimate the observed humidity, considering all PBL schemes and a low initial soil moisture content. In addition, the bias between the model and the observations is significantly reduced moistening the initial soil moisture of the corresponding run. Thus, varying this parameter has a positive effect and improves the simulated results in relation to the observations. However, there is still a significant overestimation of the wind speed over flatter terrain, independently of the PBL scheme and the initial soil moisture used, even though a different degree of accuracy is reproduced by RAMS taking into account the different sensitivity tests.

  19. Bandwidth broadening for stripline circulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Hsien-Wen; Wu, Shi-Yao; Chang, Tsun-Hsu

    2017-02-01

    This work provides a detailed analysis and simulation to demonstrate how to broaden the operating bandwidth of a circulator. A double-Y junction circulator is designed, and the shape of the central stripline is optimized with the knowledge of a modified equation. The equation predicts two resonant conditions. The overlapping of the two resonant conditions jointly constitutes the broad bandwidth. The bias magnetic field is simulated and then used in full electromagnetic-wave simulation. The designed circulator was fabricated in the S-band for communication purpose. The measured results agree very well with simulation. The overall operation range is from 1643 to 2027 MHz with the insertion loss less than 0.35 dB, reflection, and isolation better than 20 dB. The mechanism will be discussed.

  20. An assessment of Antarctic Circumpolar Current and Southern Ocean meridional overturning circulation during 1958-2007 in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farneti, Riccardo; Downes, Stephanie M.; Griffies, Stephen M.; Marsland, Simon J.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Chassignet, Eric; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Gusev, Anatoly; Hallberg, Robert W.; Howard, Armando; Ilicak, Mehmet; Jung, Thomas; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Long, Matthew; Lu, Jianhua; Masina, Simona; Mishra, Akhilesh; Navarra, Antonio; George Nurser, A. J.; Patara, Lavinia; Samuels, Bonita L.; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Wang, Qiang; Yeager, Steve G.

    2015-09-01

    In the framework of the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II), we present an analysis of the representation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and Southern Ocean meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in a suite of seventeen global ocean-sea ice models. We focus on the mean, variability and trends of both the ACC and MOC over the 1958-2007 period, and discuss their relationship with the surface forcing. We aim to quantify the degree of eddy saturation and eddy compensation in the models participating in CORE-II, and compare our results with available observations, previous fine-resolution numerical studies and theoretical constraints. Most models show weak ACC transport sensitivity to changes in forcing during the past five decades, and they can be considered to be in an eddy saturated regime. Larger contrasts arise when considering MOC trends, with a majority of models exhibiting significant strengthening of the MOC during the late 20th and early 21st century. Only a few models show a relatively small sensitivity to forcing changes, responding with an intensified eddy-induced circulation that provides some degree of eddy compensation, while still showing considerable decadal trends. Both ACC and MOC interannual variabilities are largely controlled by the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Based on these results, models are clustered into two groups. Models with constant or two-dimensional (horizontal) specification of the eddy-induced advection coefficient κ show larger ocean interior decadal trends, larger ACC transport decadal trends and no eddy compensation in the MOC. Eddy-permitting models or models with a three-dimensional time varying κ show smaller changes in isopycnal slopes and associated ACC trends, and partial eddy compensation. As previously argued, a constant in time or space κ is responsible for a poor representation of mesoscale eddy effects and cannot properly simulate the sensitivity of the ACC and MOC

  1. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  2. Clinical simulators: applications and implications for rural medical education.

    PubMed

    Ypinazar, V A; Margolis, S A

    2006-01-01

    Medical education has undergone significant changes globally. Calls for the revitalisation of centuries old pathways of learning have resulted in innovative medical curricula. Didactic modes of teaching which involved the learning of copious amounts of facts have given way to curricula that focus on the horizontal and vertical integration of basic and clinical sciences. Increasing concern for patient care and safety has led to a 'gap' between the needs of medical students to acquire necessary psychomotor skills and the safety and wellbeing of the patient. This has resulted in alternate teaching methods that include non-patient based training for the acquisition of clinical skills. The use of computerised, full-sized human simulators provides medical students with the necessary psychomotor and clinical reasoning skills in a realistic learning environment, while remaining risk free to patients. These clinical simulators are powerful learning tools that have applications at all levels of medical education across multiple disciplines, emphasising the multidisciplinary approach required in many medical situations. This article reviews the literature on medical simulation and provides the contextual basis for the establishment of a Clinical Simulation Learning Centre (CSLC) in a rural clinical school in Australia. The educational program, as well as the design, layout and equipment of the CSLC are described, as well as implications for rural practitioners. The CSLC has been a major capital investment in a relatively under-resourced part of regional Australia and has provided opportunities for ongoing education across a range of healthcare professionals in the community.

  3. Numerical simulation of NQR/NMR: Applications in quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Possa, Denimar; Gaudio, Anderson C; Freitas, Jair C C

    2011-04-01

    A numerical simulation program able to simulate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented, written using the Mathematica package, aiming especially applications in quantum computing. The program makes use of the interaction picture to compute the effect of the relevant nuclear spin interactions, without any assumption about the relative size of each interaction. This makes the program flexible and versatile, being useful in a wide range of experimental situations, going from NQR (at zero or under small applied magnetic field) to high-field NMR experiments. Some conditions specifically required for quantum computing applications are implemented in the program, such as the possibility of use of elliptically polarized radiofrequency and the inclusion of first- and second-order terms in the average Hamiltonian expansion. A number of examples dealing with simple NQR and quadrupole-perturbed NMR experiments are presented, along with the proposal of experiments to create quantum pseudopure states and logic gates using NQR. The program and the various application examples are freely available through the link http://www.profanderson.net/files/nmr_nqr.php.

  4. Development of Simulators for Electrochemical Responses: Experimental and Pedagogical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Feldberg, S W; Goldstein, C I; Rudolph, M

    1997-06-19

    The work carried out in this CRADA addressed the development of computational algorithms to simulate the response for commonly used electrochemical techniques. The goal was the incorporation of these algorithms into DigiSimR, a generalized simulator for cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV, a ubiquitously applied electroanalytical technique used by nonelectrochemists as well as electrochemists, is sometimes referred to as "electrochemical spectroscopy". The latest version, DigiSimR 2.1, is now being sold by the industrial partner, Bioanalytical Systems, Inc. The response of the electrochemical community to this latest program (as well as its predecessors, DigiSimR 2.0 and the DOS version; versions 2.0 and 2.1 are for Windows), has been uniformly positive and numerous publications are now appearing which feature its application.

  5. Numerical Simulations of Plasma Based Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Jacob, J. D.; Ashpis, D. E.

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to simulate flow control applications using plasma actuators. The effects of the plasma actuators on the external flow are incorporated into Navier Stokes computations as a body force vector. In order to compute this body force vector, the model solves two additional equations: one for the electric field due to the applied AC voltage at the electrodes and the other for the charge density representing the ionized air. The model is calibrated against an experiment having plasma-driven flow in a quiescent environment and is then applied to simulate a low pressure turbine flow with large flow separation. The effects of the plasma actuator on control of flow separation are demonstrated numerically.

  6. Application of a delumping procedure to compositional reservoir simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stenby, E.H.; Christensen, J.R.; Knudsen, K.; Leibovici, C.

    1996-12-31

    Characterization and lumping are always performed when dealing with reservoir fluids. The number of pseudocomponents in a compositional reservoir simulation is normally between three and eight. In order to optimize the reservoir performance, it is necessary to know a detailed composition of the product stream from the reservoir. This paper deals with the problems of how to come from the lumped system (for which the reservoir simulation was performed) to a description of the full system (which is important in order to optimize the down-stream facilities). The equations of the delumping procedure are shown and the application of the method is illustrated through examples, including a constant volume depletion experiment and the fifth SPE Comparative example with a fluid description from a North Sea reservoir (with the calculated composition after a lumping, an experiment and a delumping).

  7. Numerical simulation of electrified jets: An application to electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzacchiello, D.; Vermiglio, S.; Chinesta, F.; Nabat, S.; Lafdi, K.

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns the numerical simulation of electrified jets with application to the electrospinning process for the fabrication of fibers with controllable size, diameter, and cross section shape. Most numerical models used to simulate electrospinning rely on the Upper Convected Maxwell model (UCM) which is fit to model polymer melts. However, in most electrospinning processes the fluid is a polymer solution with a Newtonian solvent that evaporates after the fiber is deposited on the collector. In this work we propose to describe the fluid rheology using Giesekus model, which predicts the properties of polymer solutions more accurately, and show the impact of the rheological model on the prediction of the fiber radius and size.

  8. Clinical application of a microfluidic chip for immunocapture and quantification of circulating exosomes to assist breast cancer diagnosis and molecular classification

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shimeng; Tian, Hongzhu; Li, Xiancheng; Jin, Dong; Li, Xiaojie; Kong, Jing; Yang, Chun; Yang, Xuesong; Lu, Yao; Luo, Yong; Lin, Bingcheng; Niu, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention has been attracted by exosomes in blood-based diagnosis because cancer cells release more exosomes in serum than normal cells and these exosomes overexpress a certain number of cancer-related biomarkers. However, capture and biomarker analysis of exosomes for clinical application are technically challenging. In this study, we developed a microfluidic chip for immunocapture and quantification of circulating exosomes from small sample volume and applied this device in clinical study. Circulating EpCAM-positive exosomes were measured in 6 cases breast cancer patients and 3 healthy controls to assist diagnosis. A significant increase in the EpCAM-positive exosome level in these patients was detected, compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we quantified circulating HER2-positive exosomes in 19 cases of breast cancer patients for molecular classification. We demonstrated that the exosomal HER2 expression levels were almost consistent with that in tumor tissues assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The microfluidic chip might provide a new platform to assist breast cancer diagnosis and molecular classification. PMID:28369094

  9. Multiscale modeling of the cardiovascular system: application to the study of pulmonary and coronary perfusions in the univentricular circulation.

    PubMed

    Laganà, Katia; Balossino, Rossella; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pennati, Giancarlo; Bove, Edward L; de Leval, Marc R; Dubini, Gabriele

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the coronary and pulmonary blood flow dynamics resulting from two configurations of systemic-to-pulmonary artery shunts currently utilized during the Norwood procedure: the central (CS) and modified Blalock Taussig (MBTS) shunts. A lumped parameter model of the neonatal cardiovascular circulation and detailed 3-D models of the shunt based on the finite volume method were constructed. Shunt sizes of 3, 3.5 and 4 mm were considered. A multiscale approach was adopted to prescribe appropriate and realistic boundary conditions for the 3-D models of the Norwood circulation. Results showed that the average shunt flow rate is higher for the CS option than for the MBTS and that pulmonary flow increases with shunt size for both options. Cardiac output is higher for the CS option for all shunt sizes. Flow distribution between the left and the right pulmonary arteries is not completely balanced, although for the CS option the discrepancy is low (50-51% of the pulmonary flow to the right lung) while for the MBTS it is more pronounced with larger shunt sizes (51-54% to the left lung). The CS option favors perfusion to the right lung while the MBTS favors the left. In the CS option, a smaller percentage of aortic flow is distributed to the coronary circulation, while that percentage rises for the MBTS. These findings may have important implications for coronary blood flow and ventricular function.

  10. Timeslice experiments for understanding regional climate projections: applications to the tropical hydrological cycle and European winter circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Robin; Douville, Hervé; Skinner, Christopher B.

    2017-01-01

    A set of atmosphere-only timeslice experiments are described, designed to examine the processes that cause regional climate change and inter-model uncertainty in coupled climate model responses to CO_2 forcing. The timeslice experiments are able to reproduce the pattern of regional climate change in the coupled models, and are applied here to two cases where inter-model uncertainty in future projections is large: the tropical hydrological cycle, and European winter circulation. In tropical forest regions, the plant physiological effect is the largest cause of hydrological cycle change in the two models that represent this process. This suggests that the CMIP5 ensemble mean may be underestimating the magnitude of water cycle change in these regions, due to the inclusion of models without the plant effect. SST pattern change is the dominant cause of precipitation and circulation change over the tropical oceans, and also appears to contribute to inter-model uncertainty in precipitation change over tropical land regions. Over Europe and the North Atlantic, uniform SST increases drive a poleward shift of the storm-track. However this does not consistently translate into an overall polewards storm-track shift, due to large circulation responses to SST pattern change, which varies across the models. Coupled model SST biases influence regional rainfall projections in regions such as the Maritime Continent, and so projections in these regions should be treated with caution.

  11. Numerical simulation of lava flows: Applications to the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, James R.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Kousoum, Juliana; Lampkin, Derrick J.

    1993-01-01

    Lava flows are the visible expression of the extrusion of volcanic materials on a variety of planetary surfaces. A computer program described by Ishihara et al. appears to be well suited for application to different environments, and we have undertaken tests to evaluate their approach. Our results are somewhat mixed; the program does reproduce reasonable lava flow behavior in many situations, but we have encountered some conditions common to planetary environments for which the current program is inadequate. Here we present our initial efforts to identify the 'parameter space' for reasonable numerical simulations of lava flows.

  12. Coalescing binary black holes: Applications enabled by many simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Harald

    2013-04-01

    Recently, the Caltech-Cornell-CITA collaboration has succeeded in computing about 100 binary black hole (BBH) coalescence waveforms. These waveforms include a very long inspiral phase (some exceeding 60 cycles) and are of exquisite accuracy. The configurations simulated include extreme regions of the BBH parameter space like nearly extremal spins, high mass-ratios, and strongly precessing systems. This talk reports on applications of these waveforms to study strong field gravity and aid gravitational wave astronomy, in particular post-Newtonian comparisons and construction of template banks for BBH waveforms.

  13. On subsonic compressible flows by a method of correspondence II : application of methods to studies of flow with circulation about a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    GELBART ABE; Bartnoff, Shepard

    1947-01-01

    A general method for studying the flow of a compressible fluid around a closed body was discussed in Part I of this report. Here, application is made to the specific case in which the linearized equation of state is used. For a given incompressible flow around a specific profile, a corresponding compressible flow is found. The flow at infinity remains unchanged. Detailed studies are made of the flow with circulation around a unit circle, and velocity distributions are found for a wide range of Mach number and angle of attack. Comparisons are made with other methods.

  14. AMOBA - ARINC 653 Simulator for Modular Based Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal, E.; Rufino, J.; Schoofs, T.; Windsor, J.

    2008-08-01

    The ARINC 653 standard has taken a leading role within the aeronautical industry in the development of safety-critical systems based upon the Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) concept. The related cost savings in reduced integration, verification and validation effort has raised interest in the European space industry for developing a spacecraft IMA approach and for the definition of an ARINC 653-for-space software framework. As part of this process, it is necessary to establish an effective way to test and develop space applications without having access to the final IMA target platform. This paper describes the design and the architecture of a multi-platform and modular ARINC 653 simulator that emulates an execution environment for ARINC 653 space applications.

  15. Application of cellular automata approach for cloud simulation and rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Immanuel, W.; Paul Mary Deborrah, S.; Samuel Selvaraj, R.

    2014-03-15

    Current techniques for creating clouds in games and other real time applications produce static, homogenous clouds. These clouds, while viable for real time applications, do not exhibit an organic feel that clouds in nature exhibit. These clouds, when viewed over a time period, were able to deform their initial shape and move in a more organic and dynamic way. With cloud shape technology we should be able in the future to extend to create even more cloud shapes in real time with more forces. Clouds are an essential part of any computer model of a landscape or an animation of an outdoor scene. A realistic animation of clouds is also important for creating scenes for flight simulators, movies, games, and other. Our goal was to create a realistic animation of clouds.

  16. Statistical downscaling of general-circulation-model- simulated average monthly air temperature to the beginning of flowering of the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergant, Klemen; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka; Črepinšek, Zalika

    2002-02-01

    Phenological observations are a valuable source of information for investigating the relationship between climate variation and plant development. Potential climate change in the future will shift the occurrence of phenological phases. Information about future climate conditions is needed in order to estimate this shift. General circulation models (GCM) provide the best information about future climate change. They are able to simulate reliably the most important mean features on a large scale, but they fail on a regional scale because of their low spatial resolution. A common approach to bridging the scale gap is statistical downscaling, which was used to relate the beginning of flowering of Taraxacum officinale in Slovenia with the monthly mean near-surface air temperature for January, February and March in Central Europe. Statistical models were developed and tested with NCAR/NCEP Reanalysis predictor data and EARS predictand data for the period 1960-1999. Prior to developing statistical models, empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was employed on the predictor data. Multiple linear regression was used to relate the beginning of flowering with expansion coefficients of the first three EOF for the Janauary, Febrauary and March air temperatures, and a strong correlation was found between them. Developed statistical models were employed on the results of two GCM (HadCM3 and ECHAM4/OPYC3) to estimate the potential shifts in the beginning of flowering for the periods 1990-2019 and 2020-2049 in comparison with the period 1960-1989. The HadCM3 model predicts, on average, 4 days earlier occurrence and ECHAM4/OPYC3 5 days earlier occurrence of flowering in the period 1990-2019. The analogous results for the period 2020-2049 are a 10- and 11-day earlier occurrence.

  17. Global distribution of gravity wave fields and their seasonal dependence in the Martian atmosphere simulated in a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Medvedev, Alexander; Yiğit, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) are small-scale atmospheric waves generated by various geophysical processes, such as topography, convection, and dynamical instability. On Mars, several observations and simulations have revealed that GWs strongly affect temperature and wind fields in the middle and upper atmosphere. We have worked with a high-resolution Martian general circulation model (MGCM), with the spectral resolution of T106 (horizontal grid interval of ~67 km), for the investigations of generation and propagation of GWs. We analyzed for three kinds of wavelength ranges, (1) horizontal total wavenumber s=21-30 (wavelength λ~700-1000 km), (2) s=31-60 (λ~350-700 km), and (3) s=61-106 (λ~200-350 km). Our results show that shorter-scale harmonics progressively dominate with height during both equinox and solstice. We have detected two main sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. In both seasons GW energy in the troposphere due to the shorter-scale harmonics is concentrated in the low latitudes in a good agreement with observations. Orographically-generated GWs contribute significantly to the total energy of disturbances, and strongly decay with height. Thus, the non-orographic GWs of tropospheric origin dominate near the mesopause. The vertical fluxes of wave horizontal momentum are directed mainly against the larger-scale wind. Mean magnitudes of the drag in the middle atmosphere are tens of m s-1 sol-1, while instantaneously they can reach thousands of m s-1 sol-1, which results in an attenuation of the wind jets in the middle atmosphere and in tendency of their reversal.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Fluidic Actuators for Flow Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasta, Veer N.; Koklu, Mehti; Wygnanski, Israel L.; Fares, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Active flow control technology is finding increasing use in aerospace applications to control flow separation and improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper we examine the characteristics of a class of fluidic actuators that are being considered for active flow control applications for a variety of practical problems. Based on recent experimental work, such actuators have been found to be more efficient for controlling flow separation in terms of mass flow requirements compared to constant blowing and suction or even synthetic jet actuators. The fluidic actuators produce spanwise oscillating jets, and therefore are also known as sweeping jets. The frequency and spanwise sweeping extent depend on the geometric parameters and mass flow rate entering the actuators through the inlet section. The flow physics associated with these actuators is quite complex and not fully understood at this time. The unsteady flow generated by such actuators is simulated using the lattice Boltzmann based solver PowerFLOW R . Computed mean and standard deviation of velocity profiles generated by a family of fluidic actuators in quiescent air are compared with experimental data. Simulated results replicate the experimentally observed trends with parametric variation of geometry and inflow conditions.

  19. Desktop Application Program to Simulate Cargo-Air-Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbert, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The DSS Application is a computer program comprising a Windows version of the UNIX-based Decelerator System Simulation (DSS) coupled with an Excel front end. The DSS is an executable code that simulates the dynamics of airdropped cargo from first motion in an aircraft through landing. The bare DSS is difficult to use; the front end makes it easy to use. All inputs to the DSS, control of execution of the DSS, and postprocessing and plotting of outputs are handled in the front end. The front end is graphics-intensive. The Excel software provides the graphical elements without need for additional programming. Categories of input parameters are divided into separate tabbed windows. Pop-up comments describe each parameter. An error-checking software component evaluates combinations of parameters and alerts the user if an error results. Case files can be created from inputs, making it possible to build cases from previous ones. Simulation output is plotted in 16 charts displayed on a separate worksheet, enabling plotting of multiple DSS cases with flight-test data. Variables assigned to each plot can be changed. Selected input parameters can be edited from the plot sheet for quick sensitivity studies.

  20. Microchambers flow simulation for immunoassay-based biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ashwin; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents fluid modeling and simulation of microchambers within microfluidic chip for immunoassay based biosensing applications. A microfluidic biosensor chip for fluorescence based immunoassay detection of biological elements should include suitably designed chambers with rinsing channels. Microfluidic chambers are necessary in holding and immobilizing enzymes onto the microfluidic surface. They function as center of interest for enzyme interactions and optical detection. It is also necessary to incorporate cleaning function into the micro-chambers to instigate reusability. The shape and size of the chamber is a crucial factor for sensitivity of the integrated biosensor as the optical detection unit would be placed at the top of the chamber. In the present work, combinations of chambers and channels with various geometries and sizes are simulated for rinsing flows. Chambers are analyzed for rinsing behavior under certain pressure drops between the inlet and outlet channels. Average velocity and flow contours are plotted and compared at different cross-sections within the chambers. Simulations are performed using FEM software, FEMLAB (Comsol, Inc., Burlington, MA). Optimized chambers are selected based on optimal rinsing, negligible slow zones without reverse flows, relatively simple geometry and low pressure drops.

  1. Simulation of Lidar System Performance in Terrestrial Mapping Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, R. T.; Fullmer, R. R.

    2003-12-01

    Anyone who has used terrestrial lidar data in physical science applications has likely observed both systematic and random errors in datasets. An understanding of the potential sources of error is important when applying post-mission filters that remove errors, artifacts and unwanted features - such as vegetation - from lidar "point-cloud" data sets. System error sources typically include, (1) range error associated with transceiver optoelectronics design and atmospheric transmission characteristics, (2) pointing error associated with scanner dynamics, platform instability and GPS/INS readouts. To better understand and anticipate lidar data phenomenology and quality when designing lidar systems and surveys, simulation software has been developed at Utah State University Center for Advanced Imaging Ladar. The simulation focuses on energy-detection lidars common in commercial airborne mapping applications. It accepts as inputs: laser power, pulse width, wavelength, beam divergence and pulse repetition frequency; optics including aperture, field-of-view, and transmission loss; detector characteristics including focal plane array geometry, quantum efficiency, noise-equivalent power, optical efficiency, optical pass band, noise bandwidth, and readout error; scanner dynamics including bandwidth and damping ratio; GPS/INS errors associated with various instrument grades; environmental parameters including aerosol type, visibility, and solar spectral irradiance; scene parameters including backscatter distribution and reflectivity; and trajectories including position, velocity, and attitude. The simulation is designed to be adaptable to a wide variety of lidar system types, environmental settings, and aircraft trajectories over specific terrain models. It was built in MATLAB/Simulink, a convenient environment for computation and data generation, and has many graphical interfaces. Principally funded by the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center at China Lake, California, it has been

  2. Currents and transports connected with the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation in the subpolar North Atlantic: Results from observations and eddy-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Hurlburt, H. E.; Schmitz, W. J.; Hogan, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Results from an interannually-forced, eddy-resolving simulation based on the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, in conjunction with a small but well-determined transport database, are used to investigate the currents and transports associated with the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) in the subpolar North Atlantic (SPNA). The model results yield an approximately consistent sea surface height variation associated with the warming in the western SPNA since the early 1990s and similar to observed mean transports for trans-basin AMOC across the WOCE hydrographic section AR19 and boundary currents at the exit of the Labrador Sea near 53°N and east of the Grand Banks near 43°N. Over a 34-year integration the model-determined AMOC across the AR19 section and the western boundary current near 53°N both exhibit no systematic trend but some long-term (interannual and longer) variabilities, including a decadal transport variation of 3-4Sv from relatively high in the 1990s to low in the 2000s. However, the long-term current/transport variabilities are low compared to those on shorter time scales (intraseasonal and shorter). For example, the annual mean AMOC transports have a standard deviation of 1.7Sv, compared to 3.8Sv for monthly means and 6.7Sv for daily means. These results emphasize that, in determining transport variability, rapid sampling of the current over long time intervals is required to filter out the high frequency variabilities, as routinely done using data from moored instruments, in order to avoid aliasing the lower frequency variabilities of interest. This finding is critical for discussion of transport variability based on sparsely sampled hydrographic data.Variation of sea surface height (SSH, cm) anomaly in the central Labrador Sea (57°N, 52°W) based on the 0.08° HYCOM simulation E127 (red lines) and merged altimeter data (blue lines) from http://www.aviso.oceanobs.com. The data have a resolution of 1/3° and the model results are

  3. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.

    1981-05-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  4. Bolsa Bay, California, Proposed Ocean Entrance System Study. Report 3. Tidal Circulation and Transport Computer Simulation and Water Quality Assessment. Section 2. Signal Landmark’s Proposed Secondary Alternative ’The Lake Plan’

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    Preliminary Desilting Basin Design for East Garden Grove-Wintersburg Channel at the Proposed Bolsa Chica Project," Moffatt & Nichol, Engineers, Long Beach...BLS MISCELLANEOUS PAPER CERC-89-17 BOLSA BAY, CALIFORNIA, PROPOSED OCEAN ENTRANCE SYSTEM STUDY Report 3 TIDAL CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORT COMPUTER...SIMULATION AND WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT _ -- SECTION 2: SIGNAL LANDMARK’S PROPOSED SECONDARY ALTERNATIVE "THE LAKE PLAN" by Lyndell Z. Hales, Sandra L

  5. Predictive Gyrokinetic Transport Simulations and Application of Synthetic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, J.

    2009-11-01

    In this work we make use of the gyrokinetic transport solver TGYRO [1] to predict kinetic plasma profiles consistent with energy and particle fluxes in the DIII-D tokamak. TGYRO uses direct nonlinear and neoclassical fluxes calculated by the GYRO and NEO codes, respectively, to solve for global, self-consistent temperature and density profiles via Newton iteration. Previous work has shown that gyrokinetic simulation results for DIII-D discharge 128913 match experimental data rather well in the plasma core, but with a discrepancy in both fluxes and fluctuation levels emerging closer to the edge (r/a > 0.8). The present work will expand on previous results by generating model predictions across the entire plasma core, rather than at isolated test radii. We show that TGYRO predicts temperature and density profiles in good agreement with experimental observations which simultaneously yield near-exact (to within experimental uncertainties) agreement with power balance calculations of the particle and energy fluxes for r/a <=0.8. Moreover, we use recently developed synthetic diagnostic algorithms [2] to show that TGYRO also predicts density and electron temperature fluctuation levels in close agreement with experimental measurements across the simulated plasma volume. 8pt [1] J. Candy, C. Holland, R.E. Waltz, M.R. Fahey, and E. Belli, ``Tokamak profile prediction using direct gyrokinetic and neoclassical simulation," Phys. Plasmas 16, 060704 (2009). [2] C. Holland, A.E. White, G.R. McKee, M.W. Shafer, J. Candy, R.E. Waltz, L. Schmitz, and G.R. Tynan, ``Implementation and application of two synthetic diagnostics for validating simulations of core tokamak turbulence," Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009).

  6. Simulation of Underground Muon Flux with Application to Muon Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, J. A. K.; Bonneville, A.; Flygare, J.; Lintereur, A.; Kouzes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Muon tomography uses highly energetic muons, produced by cosmic rays interacting within the upper atmosphere, to image dense materials. Like x-rays, an image can be constructed from the negative of the absorbed (or scattered) muons. Unlike x-rays, these muons can penetrate thousands of meters of earth. Muon tomography has been shown to be useful across a wide range of applications (such as imaging of the interior of volcanoes and cargo containers). This work estimates the sensitivity of muon tomography for various underground applications. We use simulations to estimate the change in flux as well as the spatial resolution when imaging static objects, such as mine shafts, and dynamic objects, such as a CO2 reservoir filling over time. We present a framework where we import ground density data from other sources, such as wells, gravity and seismic data, to generate an expected muon flux distribution at specified underground locations. This information can further be fed into a detector simulation to estimate a final experimental sensitivity. There are many applications of this method. We explore its use to image underground nuclear test sites, both the deformation from the explosion as well as the supporting infrastructure (access tunnels and shafts). We also made estimates for imaging a CO2 sequestration site similar to Futuregen 2.0 in Illinois and for imaging magma chambers beneath the Cascade Range volcanoes. This work may also be useful to basic science, such as underground dark matter experiments, where increasing experimental sensitivity requires, amongst other factors, a precise knowledge of the muon background.

  7. Application of simulated annealing to some seismic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velis, Danilo Ruben

    Wavelet estimation, ray tracing, and traveltime inversion are fundamental problems in seismic exploration. They can be finally reduced to minimizing a highly nonlinear cost function with respect to a certain set of unknown parameters. I use simulated annealing (SA) to avoid local minima and inaccurate solutions often arising by the use of linearizing methods. I illustrate all applications using numerical and/or real data examples. The first application concerns the 4th-order cumulant matching (CM) method for wavelet estimation. Here the reliability of the derived wavelets depends strongly on the amount of data. Tapering the trace cumulant estimate reduces significantly this dependency, and allows for a trace-by-trace implementation. For this purpose, a hybrid strategy that combines SA and gradient-based techniques provides efficiency and accuracy. In the second application I present SART (SA ray tracing), which is a novel method for solving the two-point ray tracing problem. SART overcomes some well known difficulties in standard methods, such as the selection of new take-off angles, and the multipathing problem. SA finds the take-off angles so that the total traveltime between the endpoints is a global minimum. SART is suitable for tracing direct, reflected, and headwaves, through complex 2-D and 3-D media. I also develop a versatile model representation in terms of a number of regions delimited by curved interfaces. Traveltime tomography is the third SA application. I parameterize the subsurface geology by using adaptive-grid bicubic B-splines for smooth models, or parametric 2-D functions for anomaly bodies. The second approach may find application in archaeological and other near-surface studies. The nonlinear inversion process attempts to minimize the rms error between observed and predicted traveltimes.

  8. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D; Shende, Sameer S; Huck, Kevin A; Mr. Alan Morris, and Mr. Wyatt Spear

    2012-03-14

    The goal of the FACETS project (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) was to provide a multiphysics, parallel framework application (FACETS) that will enable whole-device modeling for the U.S. fusion program, to provide the modeling infrastructure needed for ITER, the next step fusion confinement device. Through use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, FACETS is able to switch from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics in a flexible manner. This enables use of simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that can take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS does so in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application execute in parallel by utilizing task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. ParaTools, Inc. was tasked with supporting the performance analysis and tuning of the FACETS components and framework in order to achieve the parallel scaling goals of the project. The TAU Performance System® was used for instrumentation, measurement, archiving, and profile / tracing analysis. ParaTools, Inc. also assisted in FACETS performance engineering efforts. Through the use of the TAU Performance System, ParaTools provided instrumentation, measurement, analysis and archival support for the FACETS project. Performance optimization of key components has yielded significant performance speedups. TAU was integrated into the FACETS build for both the full coupled application and the UEDGE component. The performance database provided archival storage of the performance regression testing data generated by the project, and helped to track improvements in the software development.

  9. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  10. Modelling Circulation Control by Blowing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    circulation control is initially presented for the Coanda flaw of a wail jot around a circular cylinder in a free stream. The decay in the jet momentum...Jue to viscojs and ontiainment effects , has boon represented in the model by decaying the strength of each vortex is it flows downstream frorn the...slot. The model’s application has then boon extended to predict the effect of circulation control on other sh&,,os of aerofoll. The paper includes the

  11. Simulation of Laser Cooling and Trapping in Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan; Lunblad, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    An advanced computer code is undergoing development for numerically simulating laser cooling and trapping of large numbers of atoms. The code is expected to be useful in practical engineering applications and to contribute to understanding of the roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and numbers of particles play in experiments using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms. The code is based on semiclassical theories of the forces exerted on atoms by magnetic and optical fields. Whereas computer codes developed previously for the same purpose account for only a few physical mechanisms, this code incorporates many more physical mechanisms (including atomic collisions, sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Stark and Zeeman energy shifts, gravitation, and evanescent-wave phenomena) that affect laser-matter interactions and the cooling of atoms to submillikelvin temperatures. Moreover, whereas the prior codes can simulate the interactions of at most a few atoms with a resonant light field, the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation by the present code is limited only by computer memory. Hence, the present code represents more nearly completely the complex physics involved when using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms in engineering applications. Another advantage that the code incorporates is the possibility to analyze the interaction between cold atoms of different atomic number. Some properties that cold atoms of different atomic species have, like cross sections and the particular excited states they can occupy when interacting with each other and light fields, play important roles not yet completely understood in the new experiments that are under way in laboratories worldwide to form ultracold molecules. Other research efforts use cold atoms as holders of quantum information, and more recent developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics also use ultracold atoms to explore and expand new information-technology ideas. These experiments give a hint

  12. Continuously on-going hindcast simulations for impact applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Ivonne; Geyer, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Observations for e.g. temperature, precipitation, radiation, or wind are often used as meteorological forcing for different impact models, like e.g. crop models, urban models, economic models and energy system models. To assess a climate signal, the time period covered by the observation is often too short, they have gaps in between, and are inhomogeneous over time, due to changes in the measurements itself or in the near surrounding. Thus output from global and regional climate models can close the gap and provide homogeneous and physically consistent time series of meteorological parameters. CORDEX evaluation runs performed for the IPCC-AR5 provide a good base for the regional scale. However, with respect to climate services, continuously on-going hindcast simulations are required for regularly updated applications. In this study two projects are presented where hindcast-simulations optimized for a region of interest are performed continuously. The hindcast simulation performed by HZG covering Europe includes the EURO-CORDEX domain with a wider extend to the north to cover the ice edge. The simulation under consideration of the coastDat-experiences is available for the period of 1979 - 2015, prolonged ongoing and fulfills the customer's needs with respect of output variables, levels, intervals and statistical measures. CoastDat - customers are dealing e.g. with naval architecture, renewable energies, offshore wind farming, shipping emissions, coastal flood risk and others. The evaluation of the hindcast is done for Europe by using the EVAL-tool of the CCLM community and by comparison with HYRAS - data for Germany and neighbouring countries. The Climate Research group at the national Austrian weather service, ZAMG, is focusing on high mountain regions and, especially on the Alps. The hindcast-simulation is forced by ERA-interim and optimized for the Alpine Region. One of the main tasks is to capture strong precipitation events which often occur during summer when

  13. Simulation of secondary fault shear displacements - method and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fälth, Billy; Hökmark, Harald; Lund, Björn; Mai, P. Martin; Munier, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    We present an earthquake simulation method to calculate dynamically and statically induced shear displacements on faults near a large earthquake. Our results are aimed at improved safety assessment of underground waste storage facilities, e.g. a nuclear waste repository. For our simulations, we use the distinct element code 3DEC. We benchmark 3DEC by running an earthquake simulation and then compare the displacement waveforms at a number of surface receivers with the corresponding results obtained from the COMPSYN code package. The benchmark test shows a good agreement in terms of both phase and amplitude. In our application to a potential earthquake near a storage facility, we use a model with a pre-defined earthquake fault plane (primary fault) surrounded by numerous smaller discontinuities (target fractures) representing faults in which shear movements may be induced by the earthquake. The primary fault and the target fractures are embedded in an elastic medium. Initial stresses are applied and the fault rupture mechanism is simulated through a programmed reduction of the primary fault shear strength, which is initiated at a pre-defined hypocenter. The rupture is propagated at a typical rupture propagation speed and arrested when it reaches the fault plane boundaries. The primary fault residual strength properties are uniform over the fault plane. The method allows for calculation of target fracture shear movements induced by static stress redistribution as well as by dynamic effects. We apply the earthquake simulation method in a model of the Forsmark nuclear waste repository site in Sweden with rock mass properties, in situ stresses and fault geometries according to the description of the site established by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB). The target fracture orientations are based on the Discrete Fracture Network model developed for the site. With parameter values set to provide reasonable upper bound estimates of target fracture

  14. A Fast Hybrid Approach to Air Shower Simulations and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, H.-J.; Farrar, Glennys; Bleicher, Marcus; Reiter, Manuel; Soff, Sven; Stoecker, Horst

    2003-07-01

    The SENECA model, a new hybrid approach to air shower simulations, is presented. It combines the use of efficient cascade equations in the energy range where a shower can be treated as one-dimensional, with a traditional Monte Carlo method which traces individual particles. This allows one to repro duce natural fluctuations of individual showers as well as the lateral spread of low energy particles. The model is quite efficient in computation time. As an application of the new approach, the influence of the low energy hadronic models on shower properties for AUGER energies is studied. We conclude that these models have a significant impact on the tails of lateral distribution functions, and deserve therefore more attention.

  15. Foam flooding reservoir simulation algorithm improvement and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yining; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Ruihe; Lai, Fengpeng; Zhang, Hanhan

    2014-05-01

    As one of the important enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technologies, Foam flooding is being used more and more widely in the oil field development. In order to describe and predict foam flooding, experts at domestic and abroad have established a number of mathematical models of foam flooding (mechanism, empirical and semi-empirical models). Empirical models require less data and apply conveniently, but the accuracy is not enough. The aggregate equilibrium model can describe foam generation, burst and coalescence by mechanism studying, but it is very difficult to accurately describe. The research considers the effects of critical water saturation, critical concentration of foaming agent and critical oil saturation on the sealing ability of foam and considers the effect of oil saturation on the resistance factor for obtaining the gas phase relative permeability and the results were amended by laboratory test, so the accuracy rate is higher. Through the reservoir development concepts simulation and field practical application, the calculation is more accurate and higher.

  16. Applications of a simulation model to decisions in mallard management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowardin, L.M.; Johnson, D.H.; Shaffer, T.L.; Sparling, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A system comprising simulation models and data bases for habitat availability and nest success rates was used to predict results from a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) management plan and to compare six management methods with a control. Individual treatments in the applications included land purchase for waterfowl production, wetland easement purchase, lease of uplands for waterfowl management, cropland retirement, use of no-till winter wheat, delayed cutting of alfalfa, installation of nest baskets, nesting island construction, and use of predator-resistant fencing.The simulations predicted that implementation of the management plan would increase recruits by 24%. Nest baskets were the most effective treatment, accounting for 20.4% of the recruits. No-till winter wheat was the second most effective, accounting for 5.9% of the recruits. Wetland loss due to drainage would cause an 11% loss of breeding population in 10 years.The models were modified to account for migrational homing. The modification indicated that migrational homing would enhance the effects of management. Nest success rates were critical contributions to individual management methods. The most effective treatments, such as nest baskets, had high success rates and affected a large portion of the breeding population.Economic analyses indicated that nest baskets would be the most economical of the three techniques tested. The applications indicated that the system is a useful tool to aid management decisions, but data are scarce for several important variables. Basic research will be required to adequately model the effect of migrational homing and density dependence on production. The comprehensive nature of predictions desired by managers will also require that production models like the one described here be extended to encompass the entire annual cycle of waterfowl.

  17. Multi-formalism modelling and simulation: application to cardiac modelling

    PubMed Central

    Defontaine, Antoine; Hernández, Alfredo; Carrault, Guy

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular modelling has been a major research subject for the last decades. Different cardiac models have been developed at a cellular level as well as at the whole organ level. Most of these models are defined by a comprehensive cellular modelling using continuous formalisms or by a tissue-level modelling often based on discrete formalisms. Nevertheless, both views still suffer from difficulties that reduce their clinical applications: the first approach requires heavy computational resources while the second one is not able to reproduce certain pathologies. This paper presents an original methodology trying to gather advantages from both approaches, by means of an hybrid model mixing discrete and continuous formalisms. This method has been applied to define a hybrid model of cardiac action potential propagation on a 2D grid of endocardial cells, combining cellular automata and a set of cells defined by the Beeler Reuter model. For simulations under physiologic and ischemic conditions, results show that the action potential propagation as well as electrogram reconstructions are consistent with clinical diagnosis. Finally, the interest of the proposed approach is discussed within the frame of cardiac modelling and simulation. PMID:15520534

  18. Application of wildfire simulation models for risk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, A.; Finney, M.

    2009-04-01

    Wildfire simulation models are being widely used by fire and fuels specialists in the U.S. to support tactical and strategic decisions related to the mitigation of wildfire risk. Much of this application has resulted from the development of a minimum travel time (MTT) fire spread algorithm (M. Finney) that makes it computationally feasible to simulate thousands of fires and generate burn probability and intensity maps over large areas (10,000 - 2,000,000 ha). The MTT algorithm is parallelized for multi-threaded processing and is imbedded in a number of research and applied fire modeling applications. High performance computers (e.g., 32-way 64 bit SMP) are typically used for MTT simulations, although the algorithm is also implemented in the 32 bit desktop FlamMap3 program (www.fire.org). Extensive testing has shown that this algorithm can replicate large fire boundaries in the heterogeneous landscapes that typify much of the wildlands in the western U.S. In this paper, we describe the application of the MTT algorithm to understand spatial patterns of burn probability (BP), and to analyze wildfire risk to key human and ecological values. The work is focused on a federally-managed 2,000,000 ha landscape in the central interior region of Oregon State, USA. The fire-prone study area encompasses a wide array of topography and fuel types and a number of highly valued resources that are susceptible to fire. We quantitatively defined risk as the product of the probability of a fire and the resulting consequence. Burn probabilities at specific intensity classes were estimated for each 100 x 100 m pixel by simulating 100,000 wildfires under burn conditions that replicated recent severe wildfire events that occurred under conditions where fire suppression was generally ineffective (97th percentile, August weather). We repeated the simulation under milder weather (70th percentile, August weather) to replicate a "wildland fire use scenario" where suppression is minimized to

  19. Simulation of Stress and Strain for Induction-Hardening Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitry; Markegård, Leif; Asperheim, John Inge; Kristoffersen, Hans

    2013-11-01

    The possibility to manage stress and strain in hardened parts might be beneficial for a number of induction-hardening applications. The most important of these benefits are the improvement of fatigue strength, avoidance of cracks, and minimization of distortion. An appropriate and powerful way to take the stress and strain into account during the development of a process is to make use of computer simulations. In-house developed and commercial software packages have been coupled to incorporate the electromagnetic task into the calculations. The simulations have been performed followed by analysis of the results. The influences of two different values of quenching intensity, strength of initial material structure, strength of austenite, surface power density-frequency-time combination, and workpiece diameter on the residual stress are studied. The influence of quenching intensity is confirmed by the series of experiments representing the external hardening of a cylinder with eight variations of quenching intensity. Measured by x-rays, the values of surface tangential stress are used as a dataset for verification of the model being used for analyses.

  20. G-cueing microcontroller (a microprocessor application in simulators)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horattas, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    A g cueing microcontroller is described which consists of a tandem pair of microprocessors, dedicated to the task of simulating pilot sensed cues caused by gravity effects. This task includes execution of a g cueing model which drives actuators that alter the configuration of the pilot's seat. The g cueing microcontroller receives acceleration commands from the aerodynamics model in the main computer and creates the stimuli that produce physical acceleration effects of the aircraft seat on the pilots anatomy. One of the two microprocessors is a fixed instruction processor that performs all control and interface functions. The other, a specially designed bipolar bit slice microprocessor, is a microprogrammable processor dedicated to all arithmetic operations. The two processors communicate with each other by a shared memory. The g cueing microcontroller contains its own dedicated I/O conversion modules for interface with the seat actuators and controls, and a DMA controller for interfacing with the simulation computer. Any application which can be microcoded within the available memory, the available real time and the available I/O channels, could be implemented in the same controller.

  1. Application of digital holographic interferometry to pressure measurements of symmetric, supercritical and circulation-control airfoils in transonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Francisco J.

    1987-01-01

    Six airfoil interferograms were evaluated using a semiautomatic image-processor system which digitizes, segments, and extracts the fringe coordinates along a polygonal line. The resulting fringe order function was converted into density and pressure distributions and a comparison was made with pressure transducer data at the same wind tunnel test conditions. Three airfoil shapes were used in the evaluation to test the capabilities of the image processor with a variety of flows. Symmetric, supercritical, and circulation-control airfoil interferograms provided fringe patterns with shocks, separated flows, and high-pressure regions for evaluation. Regions along the polygon line with very clear fringe patterns yielded results within 1% of transducer measurements, while poorer quality regions, particularly near the leading and trailing edges, yielded results that were not as good.

  2. Potential of space-borne GNSS reflectometry to constrain simulations of the ocean circulation. A case study for the South African current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saynisch, Jan; Semmling, Maximilian; Wickert, Jens; Thomas, Maik

    2015-11-01

    The Agulhas current system transports warm and salty water masses from the Indian Ocean into the Southern Ocean and into the Atlantic. The transports impact past, present, and future climate on local and global scales. The size and variability, however, of the respective transports are still much debated. In this study, an idealized model based twin experiment is used to study whether sea surface height (SSH) anomalies estimated from reflected signals of the Global Navigation Satellite System reflectometry (GNSS-R) can be used to determine the internal water mass properties and transports of the Agulhas region. A space-borne GNSS-R detector on the International Space Station (ISS) is assumed and simulated. The detector is able to observe daily SSH fields with a spatial resolution of 1-5∘. Depending on reflection geometry, the precision of a single SSH observation is estimated to reach 3 cm (20 cm) when the carrier phase (code delay) information of the reflected GNSS signal is used. The average precision over the Agulhas region is 7 cm (42 cm). The proposed GNSS-R measurements surpass the radar-based satellite altimetry missions in temporal and spatial resolution but are less precise. Using the estimated GNSS-R characteristics, measurements of SSH are generated by sampling a regional nested general circulation model of the South African oceans. The artificial observations are subsequently assimilated with a 4DVAR adjoint data assimilation method into the same ocean model but with a different initial state and forcing. The assimilated and the original, i.e., the sampled model state, are compared to systematically identify improvements and degradations in the model variables that arise due to the assimilation of GNSS-R based SSH observations. We show that SSH and the independent, i.e., not assimilated model variables velocity, temperature, and salinity improve by the assimilation of GNSS-R based SSH observations. After the assimilation of 90 days of SSH observations

  3. Large-Eddy Simulation Code Developed for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2003-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES) code was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to provide more accurate and detailed computational analyses of propulsion flow fields. The accuracy of current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods is limited primarily by their inability to properly account for the turbulent motion present in virtually all propulsion flows. Because the efficiency and performance of a propulsion system are highly dependent on the details of this turbulent motion, it is critical for CFD to accurately model it. The LES code promises to give new CFD simulations an advantage over older methods by directly computing the large turbulent eddies, to correctly predict their effect on a propulsion system. Turbulent motion is a random, unsteady process whose behavior is difficult to predict through computer simulations. Current methods are based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) analyses that rely on models to represent the effect of turbulence within a flow field. The quality of the results depends on the quality of the model and its applicability to the type of flow field being studied. LES promises to be more accurate because it drastically reduces the amount of modeling necessary. It is the logical step toward improving turbulent flow predictions. In LES, the large-scale dominant turbulent motion is computed directly, leaving only the less significant small turbulent scales to be modeled. As part of the prediction, the LES method generates detailed information on the turbulence itself, providing important information for other applications, such as aeroacoustics. The LES code developed at Glenn for propulsion flow fields is being used to both analyze propulsion system components and test improved LES algorithms (subgrid-scale models, filters, and numerical schemes). The code solves the compressible Favre-filtered Navier- Stokes equations using an explicit fourth-order accurate numerical scheme, it incorporates a compressible form of

  4. Testing simulation and structural models with applications to energy demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Hendrik

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation deals with energy demand and consists of two parts. Part one proposes a unified econometric framework for modeling energy demand and examples illustrate the benefits of the technique by estimating the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital. Part two assesses the energy conservation policy of Daylight Saving Time and empirically tests the performance of electricity simulation. In particular, the chapter "Imposing Monotonicity and Curvature on Flexible Functional Forms" proposes an estimator for inference using structural models derived from economic theory. This is motivated by the fact that in many areas of economic analysis theory restricts the shape as well as other characteristics of functions used to represent economic constructs. Specific contributions are (a) to increase the computational speed and tractability of imposing regularity conditions, (b) to provide regularity preserving point estimates, (c) to avoid biases existent in previous applications, and (d) to illustrate the benefits of our approach via numerical simulation results. The chapter "Can We Close the Gap between the Empirical Model and Economic Theory" discusses the more fundamental question of whether the imposition of a particular theory to a dataset is justified. I propose a hypothesis test to examine whether the estimated empirical model is consistent with the assumed economic theory. Although the proposed methodology could be applied to a wide set of economic models, this is particularly relevant for estimating policy parameters that affect energy markets. This is demonstrated by estimating the Slutsky matrix and the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital, which are crucial parameters used in computable general equilibrium models analyzing energy demand and the impacts of environmental regulations. Using the Berndt and Wood dataset, I find that capital and energy are complements and that the data are significantly consistent with duality

  5. Application of optically-induced-dielectrophoresis in microfluidic system for purification of circulating tumour cells for gene expression analysis- Cancer cell line model

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Chou, Wen-Pin; Huang, Song-Bin; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Yung-Chang; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in a blood circulation system are associated with cancer metastasis. The analysis of the drug-resistance gene expression of cancer patients’ CTCs holds promise for selecting a more effective therapeutic regimen for an individual patient. However, the current CTC isolation schemes might not be able to harvest CTCs with sufficiently high purity for such applications. To address this issue, this study proposed to integrate the techniques of optically induced dielectrophoretic (ODEP) force-based cell manipulation and fluorescent microscopic imaging in a microfluidic system to further purify CTCs after the conventional CTC isolation methods. In this study, the microfluidic system was developed, and its optimal operating conditions and performance for CTC isolation were evaluated. The results revealed that the presented system was able to isolate CTCs with cell purity as high as 100%, beyond what is possible using the previously existing techniques. In the analysis of CTC gene expression, therefore, this method could exclude the interference of leukocytes in a cell sample and accordingly contribute to higher analytical sensitivity, as demonstrated in this study. Overall, this study has presented an ODEP-based microfluidic system capable of simply and effectively isolating a specific cell species from a cell mixture. PMID:27609546

  6. Application of optically-induced-dielectrophoresis in microfluidic system for purification of circulating tumour cells for gene expression analysis- Cancer cell line model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Chou, Wen-Pin; Huang, Song-Bin; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Yung-Chang; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in a blood circulation system are associated with cancer metastasis. The analysis of the drug-resistance gene expression of cancer patients’ CTCs holds promise for selecting a more effective therapeutic regimen for an individual patient. However, the current CTC isolation schemes might not be able to harvest CTCs with sufficiently high purity for such applications. To address this issue, this study proposed to integrate the techniques of optically induced dielectrophoretic (ODEP) force-based cell manipulation and fluorescent microscopic imaging in a microfluidic system to further purify CTCs after the conventional CTC isolation methods. In this study, the microfluidic system was developed, and its optimal operating conditions and performance for CTC isolation were evaluated. The results revealed that the presented system was able to isolate CTCs with cell purity as high as 100%, beyond what is possible using the previously existing techniques. In the analysis of CTC gene expression, therefore, this method could exclude the interference of leukocytes in a cell sample and accordingly contribute to higher analytical sensitivity, as demonstrated in this study. Overall, this study has presented an ODEP-based microfluidic system capable of simply and effectively isolating a specific cell species from a cell mixture.

  7. Application of the re-circulating tracer well test method to determine nitrate reaction rates in shallow unconfined aquifers.

    PubMed

    Burbery, Lee F; Flintoft, Mark J; Close, Murray E

    2013-02-01

    Five re-circulating tracer well tests (RCTWTs) have been conducted in a variety of aquifer settings, at four sites across New Zealand. The tests constitute the first practical assessment of the two-well RCTWT methodology described by Burbery and Wang (Journal of Hydrology, 2010; 382:163-173) and were aimed at evaluating nitrate reaction rates in situ. The performance of the RCTWTs differed significantly at the different sites. The RCTWT method performed well when it was applied to determine potential nitrate reaction rates in anoxic, electro-chemically reductive, nitrate-free aquifers of volcanic lithology, on the North Island, New Zealand. Regional groundwater flow was not fast-flowing in this setting. An effective first-order nitrate reaction rate in the region of 0.09 d(-1) to 0.26 d(-1) was determined from two RCTWTs applied at one site where a reaction rate of 0.37 d(-1) had previously been estimated from a push-pull test. The RCTWT method performed poorly, however, in a fast-flowing, nitrate-impacted fluvio-glacial gravel aquifer that was examined on the South Island, New Zealand. This setting was more akin to the hypothetical physiochemical problem described by Burbery and Wang (2010). Although aerobic conditions were identified as the primary reason for failure to measure any nitrate reaction in the gravel aquifer, failure to establish significant interflow in the re-circulation cell due to the heterogeneous nature of the aquifer structure, and natural variability exhibited in nitrate contaminant levels of the ambient groundwater further contributed to the poor performance of the test. Our findings suggest that in practice, environmental conditions are more complex than assumed by the RCTWT methodology, which compromises the practicability of the method as one for determining attenuation rates in groundwater based on tracing ambient contaminant levels. Although limited, there appears to be a scope for RCTWTs to provide useful information on potential

  8. Optimization of prednisolone-loaded long-circulating liposomes via application of Quality by Design (QbD) approach.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Bianca; Porfire, Alina; Muntean, Dana-Maria; Vlase, Laurian; Lupuţ, Lavinia; Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Alupei, Marius Costel; Banciu, Manuela; Achim, Marcela; Tomuţă, Ioan

    2016-11-16

    Quality by design principles (QbD) were used to assist the formulation of prednisolone-loaded long-circulating liposomes (LCL-PLP) in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the preparation process. This approach enables us to improve the final product quality in terms of liposomal drug concentration, encapsulation efficiency and size, and to minimize preparation variability. A 19-run D-optimal experimental design was used to study the impact of the highest risk factors on PLP liposomal concentration (Y1- μg/ml), encapsulation efficiency (Y2-%) and size (Y3-nm). Out of six investigated factors, four of them were identified as critical parameters affecting the studied responses. PLP molar concentration and the molar ratio of DPPC to MPEG-2000-DSPE had a positive impact on both Y1 and Y2, while the rotation speed at the formation of the lipid film had a negative impact. Y3 was highly influenced by prednisolone molar concentration and extrusion temperature. The accuracy and robustness of the model was further on confirmed. The developed model was used to optimize the formulation of LCL-PLP for efficient accumulation of the drug to tumor tissue. The cytotoxicity of the optimized LCL-PLP on C26 murine colon carcinoma cells was assessed. LCL-PLP exerted significant anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects on M2 macrophages, affecting indirectly the C26 colon carcinoma cell proliferation and development.

  9. Application of flat panel OLED display technology for the point-of-care detection of circulating cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Katchman, Benjamin A.; Smith, Joseph T.; Obahiagbon, Uwadiae; Kesiraju, Sailaja; Lee, Yong-Kyun; O’Brien, Barry; Kaftanoglu, Korhan; Blain Christen, Jennifer; Anderson, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care molecular diagnostics can provide efficient and cost-effective medical care, and they have the potential to fundamentally change our approach to global health. However, most existing approaches are not scalable to include multiple biomarkers. As a solution, we have combined commercial flat panel OLED display technology with protein microarray technology to enable high-density fluorescent, programmable, multiplexed biorecognition in a compact and disposable configuration with clinical-level sensitivity. Our approach leverages advances in commercial display technology to reduce pre-functionalized biosensor substrate costs to pennies per cm2. Here, we demonstrate quantitative detection of IgG antibodies to multiple viral antigens in patient serum samples with detection limits for human IgG in the 10 pg/mL range. We also demonstrate multiplexed detection of antibodies to the HPV16 proteins E2, E6, and E7, which are circulating biomarkers for cervical as well as head and neck cancers. PMID:27374875

  10. Multiscale optical simulation settings: challenging applications handled with an iterative ray-tracing FDTD interface method.

    PubMed

    Leiner, Claude; Nemitz, Wolfgang; Schweitzer, Susanne; Kuna, Ladislav; Wenzl, Franz P; Hartmann, Paul; Satzinger, Valentin; Sommer, Christian

    2016-03-20

    We show that with an appropriate combination of two optical simulation techniques-classical ray-tracing and the finite difference time domain method-an optical device containing multiple diffractive and refractive optical elements can be accurately simulated in an iterative simulation approach. We compare the simulation results with experimental measurements of the device to discuss the applicability and accuracy of our iterative simulation procedure.

  11. A class of the van Leer-type transport schemes and its application to the moisture transport in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shian-Jiann; Chao, W.C.; Sud, Y.C.; Walker, G.K. )

    1994-07-01

    A generalized form of the second-order van Leer transport scheme is derived. Several constraints to the implied subgrid linear distribution are discussed. A very simple positive-definite scheme can be derived directly from the generalized form. A monotonic version of these scheme is applied to the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) for the moisture transport calculations, replacing the original fourth-order center-differencing scheme. Comparisons with the original scheme are made in idealized tests as well as in a summer climate simulation using the full GLA GCM. A distinct advantage of the monotonic transport scheme is its ability to transport sharp gradients without producing spurious oscillations and unphysical negative mixing ratio. Within the context of low-resolution climate simulations, the aforementioned characteristics are demonstrated to be very beneficial in regions where cumulus convection is active. The model-produced precipitation pattern using the new transport scheme is more coherently organized both in time and in space, and correlates better with observations. The side effect of the filling algorithm used in conjunction with the original scheme is also discussed, in the context of idealized tests. The major weakness of the proposed transport scheme with a local monotonic constraint is its substantial implicit diffusion at low resolution. Alternative constraints are discussed to counter this problem. 34 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A class of the van Leer-type transport schemes and its application to the moisture transport in a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shian-Jiann; Chao, Winston C.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    A generalized form of the second-order van Leer transport scheme is derived. Several constraints to the implied subgrid linear distribution are discussed. A very simple positive-definite scheme can be derived directly from the generalized form. A monotonic version of the scheme is applied to the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) for the moisture transport calculations, replacing the original fourth-order center-differencing scheme. Comparisons with the original scheme are made in idealized tests as well as in a summer climate simulation using the full GLA GCM. A distinct advantage of the monotonic transport scheme is its ability to transport sharp gradients without producing spurious oscillations and unphysical negative mixing ratio. Within the context of low-resolution climate simulations, the aforementioned characteristics are demonstrated to be very beneficial in regions where cumulus convection is active. The model-produced precipitation pattern using the new transport scheme is more coherently organized both in time and in space, and correlates better with observations. The side effect of the filling algorithm used in conjunction with the original scheme is also discussed, in the context of idealized tests. The major weakness of the proposed transport scheme with a local monotonic constraint is its substantial implicit diffusion at low resolution. Alternative constraints are discussed to counter this problem.

  13. Long-Circulating Heparin-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Application as a Protein Drug Delivery Platform

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Shin, Meong Cheol; David, Allan E.; Zhou, Jie; Lee, Kyuri; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Starch-coated, PEGylated and heparin-functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (DNPH) were successfully synthesized and characterized in detail. The PEGylation (20 kDa) process resulted in an average coating of 430 PEG molecules per nanoparticle. After that, heparin conjugation was carried out to attain the final DNPH platform with 35.4 μg of heparin/mg Fe. Commercially acquired heparin-coated magnetic nanoparticles were also PEGylated (HP) and characterized for comparison. Protamine was selected as a model protein to demonstrate the strong binding affinity and high loading content of DNPH for therapeutically relevant cationic proteins. DNPH showed a maximum loading of 22.9 μg protamine/mg Fe. In the pharmacokinetic study, DNPH displayed a long-circulating half-life of 9.37 h, 37.5-fold longer than that (0.15 h) of H P. This improved plasma stability enabled extended exposure of DNPH to the tumor lesions, as was visually confirmed in a flank 9L-glioma mouse model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitative analysis of the Fe content in excised tumor lesions further demonstrated the superior tumor targeting ability of DNPH, with up to 31.36 μg Fe/g tissue (13.07% injected dose (I.D.)/g tissue) and 7.5-fold improvement over that (4.27 μg Fe/g tissue; 1.78% I.D./g tissue) of HP. Overall, DNPH shed light of the potential to be used as a protein drug delivery platform. PMID:24024964

  14. Large eddy simulation modelling of combustion for propulsion applications.

    PubMed

    Fureby, C

    2009-07-28

    Predictive modelling of turbulent combustion is important for the development of air-breathing engines, internal combustion engines, furnaces and for power generation. Significant advances in modelling non-reactive turbulent flows are now possible with the development of large eddy simulation (LES), in which the large energetic scales of the flow are resolved on the grid while modelling the effects of the small scales. Here, we discuss the use of combustion LES in predictive modelling of propulsion applications such as gas turbine, ramjet and scramjet engines. The LES models used are described in some detail and are validated against laboratory data-of which results from two cases are presented. These validated LES models are then applied to an annular multi-burner gas turbine combustor and a simplified scramjet combustor, for which some additional experimental data are available. For these cases, good agreement with the available reference data is obtained, and the LES predictions are used to elucidate the flow physics in such devices to further enhance our knowledge of these propulsion systems. Particular attention is focused on the influence of the combustion chemistry, turbulence-chemistry interaction, self-ignition, flame holding burner-to-burner interactions and combustion oscillations.

  15. Many-Task Applications in the Integrated Plasma Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Samantha S; Elwasif, Wael R; Bernholdt, David E; Shet, Aniruddha G; Bramley, R

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS), a framework for coupled multiphysics simulation of fusion plasmas, in the context of many-task computing. The IPS supports multiple levels of parallelism: individual computational tasks can be parallel, components can launch multiple tasks concurrently, tasks from multiple components can be executed concurrently within a simulation, and multiple simulations can be run simultaneously. Each level of parallelism is constructed on top of the many-task computing capabilities implemented in the IPS, the foundation for the parallelism presented at the multiple simulation level. We show that a modest number of simultaneous simulations, with appropriately sized resource allocations, can provide a better trade-off between resource utilization and overall execution time than if they are run as separate jobs. This approach is highly beneficial for situations in which individual simulation tasks may differ significantly in parallel scalability, as is the case in many scientific communities where coupled simulations rely substantially on legacy code.

  16. Development of a Numerical Method for Patient-Specific Cerebral Circulation Using 1D-0D Simulation of the Entire Cardiovascular System with SPECT Data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Fujiwara, Naoya; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Yamada, Shigeki; Liang, Fuyou; Takagi, Shu; Oshima, Marie

    2016-08-01

    The detailed flow information in the circle of Willis (CoW) can facilitate a better understanding of disease progression, and provide useful references for disease treatment. We have been developing a one-dimensional-zero-dimensional (1D-0D) simulation method for the entire cardiovascular system to obtain hemodynamics information in the CoW. This paper presents a new method for applying 1D-0D simulation to an individual patient using patient-specific data. The key issue is how to adjust the deviation of physiological parameters, such as peripheral resistance, from literature data when patient-specific geometry is used. In order to overcome this problem, we utilized flow information from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. A numerical method was developed to optimize physiological parameters by adjusting peripheral cerebral resistance to minimize the difference between the resulting flow rate and the SPECT data in the efferent arteries of the CoW. The method was applied to three cases using different sets of patient-specific data in order to investigate the hemodynamics of the CoW. The resulting flow rates in the afferent arteries were compared to those of the phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC-MRA) data. Utilization of the SPECT data combined with the PC-MRA data showed a good agreement in flow rates in the afferent arteries of the CoW with those of PC-MRA data for all three cases. The results also demonstrated that application of SPECT data alone could provide the information on the ratios of flow distributions among arteries in the CoW.

  17. Simulation of morphodinamic processes in small coastal systems: application to the Aljezur coastal stream (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Martha; Fortunato, André B.; Oliveira, Anabela; Bertin, Xavier; Bruneau, Nicolas; Rodrigues, Marta

    2010-05-01

    models ELCIRC and SWAN for making their source codes available and Guillaume Dodet for providing the time-series of wave spectra. The first author is grateful to Prof. João Dias for the orientation provided during this work. This research would not have been be possible without the participants in the field campaigns: R. Taborda, C. Andrade, C. Freitas, A.M. Silva, C. Antunes (Faculdade de Ciências de Lisboa), L. David, P. Freire, R. Capitão, C.J.E.M Fortes, L.S. Pedro, J. Vale, A. Nahon, D. Neves, C. Zózimo, L. Pinheiro (LNEC), A. Cravo, M. Rosa, C. Monteiro, S. Cardeira and C. Loureiro (Universidade do Algarve). The authors are grateful for all the effort and support. References Bertin, X., Oliveira, A. and Fortunato, A.B. 2009. Simulating morphodynamics with unstructured grids: description and validation of a modeling system for coastal applications, Ocean Modelling, 28/1-3: 75-87. Booij, N., Ris, R.C. and Holthuijsen, L.H., 1999. A third generation wave model for coastal regions; Part I: model description and validation. Journal of Geophysical Research, 104: 7649-7666. Dodet, G., Bertin, X. and Taborda, R. 2010. Wave climate variability in the North-East Atlantic Ocean over the last six decades, Ocean Modelling, 31: 120 - 131. Fortunato, A.B. and Oliveira, A. 2004. A modeling system for tidally driven long-term morphodynamics, Journal of Hydraulic Research, 42/4: 426-434. Zhang, Y.-L., Baptista, A.M. and Myers, E. P. 2004. A cross-scale model for 3D baroclinic circulation in estuary-plume-shelf systems: I. Formulation and skill assessment, Continental Shelf Research, 24/18: 2187-2214.

  18. Atmospheric turbulence simulation techniques with application to flight analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. T.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical modeling of atmospheric turbulence is discussed. The statistical properties of atmospheric turbulence, in particular the probability distribution, the spectra, and the coherence are reviewed. Different atmospheric turbulence simulation models are investigated, and appropriate statistical analyses are carried out to verify their validity. The models for simulation are incorporated into a computer model of aircraft flight dynamics. Statistical results of computer simulated landings for an aircraft having characteristics of a DC-8 are reported for the different turbulence simulation techniques. The significance of various degrees of sophistication in the turbulence simulation techniques on the landing performance of the aircraft is discussed.

  19. Computer simulations for the development of navigation systems for spaceborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardine, G.; Lamarre, H.; Duhamel, D.; Lanoe, I.

    1991-10-01

    Computer simulations are presently employed to establish the greatest possible reliability in spacecraft navigation system structural design, subsystem requirement definition, algorithm development, and software testing. Attention is given to the methods available for exploitation of simulation tools, and to the verification of model applicability and accuracy. Illustrative examples of simulator use are given.

  20. Applications of agent-based simulation for human socio-cultural behavior modeling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) has gained wide attention over the past few years. ABMS is a powerful simulation modeling technique that has a number of applications, including applications to real-world business problems [1]. This modeling technique has been used by scientists to analyze complex system-level behavior by simulating the system from the bottom up. The major application of ABMS includes social, political, biology, and economic sciences. This paper provides an overview of ABMS applications with the emphasis on modeling human socio-cultural behavior (HSCB).

  1. A scheme for optical circulator by using asymmetric Y-branch waveguide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xionggui; Wang, Yaxin; Chen, Ming; Liang, Shan

    2017-06-01

    A novel scheme for optical circulator is proposed, in which the asymmetric Y-branch waveguide structures are employed to achieve the optical unidirectional propagation. The optical performance of our optical circulator is numerically investigated by using the beam propagation method. The simulated results show that not only high optical extinction ratio and low optical loss for both TE and TM modes can be easily realized, but the dependence of the operation wavelength and polarization is very weak in our configuration. Particularly, the proposed optical circulator has several advantages such as simple structure, reconfigurable port number and large fabrication tolerance, which is very useful for design and fabrication. This novel device provides a new way to achieve optical circulation propagation function, and has wide potential applications in photonic integrated systems.

  2. Interannual variability of the Adriatic Sea circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg Paklar, Gordana; Sepic, Jadranka; Grbec, Branka; Dzoic, Tomislav; Kovac, Zarko; Ivatek-Sahdan, Stjepan

    2016-04-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) was implemented in order to reproduce interannual variability of the Adriatic Sea circulation. Simulations and model result analysis were performed for a three-year period from 1st January 2011 to 31st December 2013. ROMS model run was forced with realistic atmospheric fields obtained from meteorological model Aladin, climatological river discharges, tides and Mediterranean circulation imposed at the southern open boundary. Atmospheric forcing included momentum, heat and water fluxes calculated interactively from the Aladin surface fields during ROMS model simulations. Model results were compared with available CTD and ADCP measurements and discussed in the light of the climatological circulation and thermohaline properties of the Adriatic Sea and its coastal areas. Interannual variability in the Adriatic circulation is related to the prevailing atmospheric conditions, changes in the hydrological conditions and water mass exchange at the Otranto Strait. Basic features of the Adriatic circulation - basin-wide cyclonic circulation with several embedded smaller cyclonic gyres around main pits - are well reproduced by ROMS model. Modelled temperatures and salinities are within corresponding seasonal intervals, although measured profiles generally indicate stronger stratification than modelled ones. Summer circulation in 2011 with current reversal obtained along the eastern Adriatic coast was related to the sampling results of the early fish stages as well as to ARGO drifter movements. Simulated fields from the Adriatic scale model were used to prescribe the initial and open boundary conditions for the interannual simulation in the middle Adriatic coastal domain.

  3. Finial Scientific/Technical Report: Application of a Circulating Fluidized Bed Process for the Chemical Looping Combustion of Solid Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Wei-Ping Pan; Dr. John T. Riley

    2005-10-10

    Chemical Looping Combustion is a novel combustion technology for the inherent separation of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}. In 1983, Richter and Knoche proposed reversible combustion, which utilized both the oxidation and reduction of metal. Metal associated with its oxidized form as an oxygen carrier was circulated between two reactors--oxidizer and reducer. In the reducer, the solid oxygen carrier reacts with the fuel to produce CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and elemental metal only. Pure CO{sub 2} will be obtained in the exit gas stream from the reducer after H{sub 2}O is condensed. The pure CO{sub 2} is ready for subsequent sequestration. In the oxidizer, the elemental metal reacts with air to form metal oxide and separate oxygen from nitrogen. Only nitrogen and some unused oxygen are emitted from the oxidizer. The advantage of CLC compared to normal combustion is that CO{sub 2} is not diluted with nitrogen but obtained in a relatively pure form without any energy needed for separation. In addition to the energy-free purification of CO{sub 2}, the CLC process also provides two other benefits. First, NO{sub x} formation can be largely eliminated. Secondly, the thermal efficiency of a CLC system is very high. Presently, the CLC process has only been used with natural gas. An oxygen carrier based on an energy balance analysis and thermodynamics analysis was selected. Copper (Cu) seems to be the best choice for the CLC system for solid fuels. From this project, the mechanisms of CuO reduction by solid fuels may be as follows: (1) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are available, reduction of CuO could start at about 400 C or less. (2) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is lower, reduction of CuO could occur at an onset temperature of about 500 C, char gasification reactivity in CO{sub 2} was lower at lower temperatures. (3) If pyrolysis products of solid fuels are unavailable and the reduction temperature is higher than 750 C

  4. Quantification of uncertainties for application in detonation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Miao; Ma, Zhibo

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation has become an important means in designing detonation systems, and the quantification of its uncertainty is also necessary to reliability certification. As to quantifying the uncertainty, it is the most important to analyze how the uncertainties occur and develop, and how the simulations develop from benchmark models to new models. Based on the practical needs of engineering and the technology of verification & validation, a framework of QU(quantification of uncertainty) is brought forward in the case that simulation is used on detonation system for scientific prediction. An example is offered to describe the general idea of quantification of simulation uncertainties.

  5. Application of Hidden Markov Models in Biomolecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Saurabh; Shamsi, Zahra; Moffett, Alexander S; Selvam, Balaji; Shukla, Diwakar

    2017-01-01

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) provide a framework to analyze large trajectories of biomolecular simulation datasets. HMMs decompose the conformational space of a biological molecule into finite number of states that interconvert among each other with certain rates. HMMs simplify long timescale trajectories for human comprehension, and allow comparison of simulations with experimental data. In this chapter, we provide an overview of building HMMs for analyzing bimolecular simulation datasets. We demonstrate the procedure for building a Hidden Markov model for Met-enkephalin peptide simulation dataset and compare the timescales of the process.

  6. Applications of formal simulation languages in the control and monitoring subsystems of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacovara, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The notions, benefits, and drawbacks of numeric simulation are introduced. Two formal simulation languages, Simpscript and Modsim are introduced. The capabilities of each are discussed briefly, and then the two programs are compared. The use of simulation in the process of design engineering for the Control and Monitoring System (CMS) for Space Station Freedom is discussed. The application of the formal simulation language to the CMS design is presented, and recommendations are made as to their use.

  7. Development of the KOSMS management simulation training system and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, Yoshiki

    The use of games which simulate actual corporate management has recently become more common and is now utilized in various ways for in-house corporate training courses. KOSMS (Kobe Steel Management Simulation System), a training system designed to help improve the management skills of senior management staff, is a unique management simulation training system in which the participants, using personal computers, must make decisions concerning a variety of management activities, in simulated competition with other corporations. This report outlines the KOSMS system, and describes the basic structure and detailed contents of the management simulation models, and actual application of the KOSMS management simulation training.

  8. Prospective Educational Applications of Mental Simulation: A Meta-Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Meer, Josephine P.; Theunissen, Nicolet C. M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the potential of mental simulation (mentally rehearsing an action to enhance performance) as a useful contemporary educational method. By means of a meta-review, it is examined which conditions impede or facilitate the effectiveness of mental simulation (MS). A computer search was conducted using Ovid PsycINFO. Reviews,…

  9. Applications of granular-dynamics numerical simulations to asteroid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, D. C.; Michel, P.; Schwartz, S. R.; Yu, Y.; Ballouz, R.-L.; Matsumura, S.

    2014-07-01

    Spacecraft images and indirect observations including thermal inertia measurements indicate most small bodies have surface regolith. Evidence of granular flow is also apparent in the images. This material motion occurs in very low gravity, therefore in a totally different gravitational environment than on the Earth. Upcoming sample-return missions to small bodies, and possible future manned missions, will involve interaction with the surface regolith, so it is important to develop tools to predict the surface response. We have added new capabilities to the N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav [1,2] that permit the simulation of granular dynamics, including multi-contact physics and friction forces, using the soft-sphere discrete-element method [3]. The numerical approach has been validated through comparison with laboratory experiments (e.g., [3,4]). (1) We carried out impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes under Earth's gravity [5] and compared the results to laboratory experiments [6] in support of JAXA's Hayabusa 2 asteroid sample-return mission. We tested different projectile shapes and confirmed that the 90-degree cone was the most efficient at excavating mass when impacting 5-mm-diameter glass beads. Results are sensitive to the normal coefficient of restitution and the coefficient of static friction. Preliminary experiments in micro-gravity for similar impact conditions show both the amount of ejected mass and the timescale of the impact process increase, as expected. (2) It has been found (e.g., [7,8]) that ''fresh'' (unreddened) Q-class asteroids have a high probability of recent planetary encounters (˜1 Myr; also see [9]), suggesting that surface refreshening may have occurred due to tidal effects. As an application of the potential effect of tidal interactions, we carried out simulations of Apophis' predicted 2029 encounter with the Earth to see whether regolith motion might occur, using a range of plausible material parameters

  10. TiO2 based nanostructured memristor for RRAM and neuromorphic applications: a simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongale, T. D.; Patil, P. J.; Desai, N. K.; Chougule, P. P.; Kumbhar, S. M.; Waifalkar, P. P.; Patil, P. B.; Vhatkar, R. S.; Takale, M. V.; Gaikwad, P. K.; Kamat, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    We report simulation of nanostructured memristor device using piecewise linear and nonlinear window functions for RRAM and neuromorphic applications. The linear drift model of memristor has been exploited for the simulation purpose with the linear and non-linear window function as the mathematical and scripting basis. The results evidences that the piecewise linear window function can aptly simulate the memristor characteristics pertaining to RRAM application. However, the nonlinear window function could exhibit the nonlinear phenomenon in simulation only at the lower magnitude of control parameter. This has motivated us to propose a new nonlinear window function for emulating the simulation model of the memristor. Interestingly, the proposed window function is scalable up to f( x) = 1 and exhibits the nonlinear behavior at higher magnitude of control parameter. Moreover, the simulation results of proposed nonlinear window function are encouraging and reveals the smooth nonlinear change from LRS to HRS and vice versa and therefore useful for the neuromorphic applications.

  11. Variation simulation for compliant sheet metal assemblies with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yufeng

    Sheet metals are widely used in discrete products, such as automobiles, aircraft, furniture and electronics appliances, due to their good manufacturability and low cost. A typical automotive body assembly consists of more than 300 parts welded together in more than 200 assembly fixture stations. Such an assembly system is usually quite complex, and takes a long time to develop. As the automotive customer demands products of increasing quality in a shorter time, engineers in automotive industry turn to computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools for help. Computers are an invaluable resource for engineers, not only to simplify and automate the design process, but also to share design specifications with manufacturing groups so that production systems can be tooled up quickly and efficiently. Therefore, it is beneficial to develop computerized simulation and evaluation tools for development of automotive body assembly systems. It is a well-known fact that assembly architectures (joints, fixtures, and assembly lines) have a profound impact on dimensional quality of compliant sheet metal assemblies. To evaluate sheet metal assembly architectures, a special dimensional analysis tool need be developed for predicting dimensional variation of the assembly. Then, the corresponding systematic tools can be established to help engineers select the assembly architectures. In this dissertation, a unified variation model is developed to predict variation in compliant sheet metal assemblies by considering fixture-induced rigid-body motion, deformation and springback. Based on the unified variation model, variation propagation models in multiple assembly stations with various configurations are established. To evaluate the dimensional capability of assembly architectures, quantitative indices are proposed based on the sensitivity matrix, which are independent of the variation level of the process. Examples are given to demonstrate their applications in selecting robust assembly

  12. Extended MHD simulations for application to ITER disruption mitigation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James; Schetterer, Sam; ITER Disruption Mitigation Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Various disruption scenarios are modeled computationally by use of the CORSICA and NIMROD codes, following the work of Kruger and Strauss with the aim of providing starting-points for investigation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques. It is found that pressure-driven instabilities previously observed in simulations of DIII-D are verified, and that halo currents from vertical displacements are observed in simulations with implementation of resistive walls for ITER. We discuss implications and plans for simulations of disruption mitigation techniques. We outline validation activities for existing facilities. Work performed for USITER under DE-AC05-00OR22725 subcontract # 4000118643.

  13. Development and application of a streamline micellar/polymer simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Lake, L.W.; Pope, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    A large-scale, two-dimensional, multicomponent, multiphase, compositional simulator for micellar/polymer flooding has been developed and applied. It can be used to calculate the areal sweep with any well pattern and any irregular reservoir boundary. The model involves both streamline and finite-difference techniques. In order to demonstrate that this model is capable of handling large field problems, a large-scale simulation of the north lease of the Kansas' El Dorado micellar/polymer pilot test was made. The simulated final oil recovery and the production histories of each producer are illustrated. 28 refs.

  14. Application of shell elements in simulation of cans ironing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. V.; Erisov, Y. A.; Aryshensky, E. V.; Aryshensky, V. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the special shell finite elements are used to simulate the drawing with high ironing ratio of aluminum beverage cans. These elements are implemented in commercial software complex PAM-STAMP 2G by means of T.T.S. normal stress option, which is used for ironing to describe well normal stress. By comparison of simulation and experimental data, it is shown that shell elements with T.T.S. option are capable to provide accurate simulation of deep drawing and ironing. The error of can thickness and height computation agrees with the engineering computation accuracy.

  15. Aggregate Building Simulator (ABS) Methodology Development, Application, and User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.

    2011-11-30

    As the relationship between the national building stock and various global energy issues becomes a greater concern, it has been deemed necessary to develop a system of predicting the energy consumption of large groups of buildings. Ideally this system is to take advantage of the most advanced energy simulation software available, be able to execute runs quickly, and provide concise and useful results at a level of detail that meets the users needs without inundating them with data. The resulting methodology that was developed allows the user to quickly develop and execute energy simulations of many buildings simultaneously, taking advantage of parallel processing to greatly reduce total simulation times. The result of these simulations can then be rapidly condensed and presented in a useful and intuitive manner.

  16. Applications and requirements for real-time simulators in ground-test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpasi, Dale J.; Blech, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    This report relates simulator functions and capabilities to the operation of ground test facilities, in general. The potential benefits of having a simulator are described to aid in the selection of desired applications for a specific facility. Configuration options for integrating a simulator into the facility control system are discussed, and a logical approach to configuration selection based on desired applications is presented. The functional and data path requirements to support selected applications and configurations are defined. Finally, practical considerations for implementation (i.e., available hardware and costs) are discussed.

  17. Electromagnetic and Thermal Simulations of Human Neurons for SAR Applications

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Felipe; Millholland, Gilbert; Peddinti, Seshasai Vamsi Krishna; Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher; Morisaki, Jorge; Rizkalla, Maher E.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the electromagnetic waves (EM) on human neurons (HN) has been under investigation for decades, in efforts to understand the impact of cell phones (radiation) on human health, or radiation absorption by HN for medical diagnosis and treatment. Research issues including the wave frequency, power intensity, reflections and scattering, and penetration depths are of important considerations to be incorporated into the research study. In this study, computer simulation for the EM exposure to HN was studied for the purpose of determining the upper limits of the electric and magnetic field intensities, power consumption, reflections and transmissions, and the change in temperature resulting from the power absorption by human neurons. Both high frequency structural simulators (HFSS) from ANSYS software, and COMSOL multi-physics were used for the simulation of the EM transmissions and reflections, and the temperature profile within the cells, respectively. For the temperature profile estimation, the study considers an electrical source of 0.5 watt input power, 64 MHz. The EM simulation was looking into the uniformity of the fields within the sample cells. The size of the waveguide was set to be appropriate for a small animal model to be conducted in the future. The incident power was fully transmitted throughout the waveguide, and less than 1% reflections were observed from the simulation. The minimum reflected power near the sample under investigation was found to be with negligible reflected field strengths. The temperature profile resulting from the COMSOL simulation was found to be near 0.25 m°K, indicating no change in temperature on the neuro cells under the EM exposure. The paper details the simulation results for the EM response determined by HFSS, and temperature profile simulated by COMSOL. PMID:27617054

  18. Fundamentals of chemistry modeling applicable to a vectorized particle simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the fundamentals of extending the vectorized particle simulation method derived by Baganoff and McDonald (1990), McDonald and Baganoff (1988), and McDonald (1989) for modeling chemically reacting flows. Details of reaction mechanics per reaction are presented, with particular attention given to the quantum nature of the vibrational mode. The models of reactive flows developed here were verified through a simulation of a superheated diatomic gas relaxing thermochemically to equilibrium in a reservoir.

  19. Application of Global Paleovegetation Data for Benchmarking Paleoclimate Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, K.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate models provide an opportunity for testing hypotheses concerning the causes of past climatic variations, providing the consistent explanations of past climate changes, and simulating potential future climate changes. We compare paleovegetation syntheses from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Mid Holocene (MH) with simulations performed as part of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) 2 and 3 projects, with the aim of evaluating the ability of the simulations to reproduce the key regional and global patterns of climate recorded by the data. We apply two approaches using vegetation models in a data-model comparison framework: a forward-modeling approach that simulates vegetation using climate-model output, and an inverse-modeling approach that uses the vegetation data to infer the past values of the specific climate that controlled vegetation distributions. In the forward-modeling approach, we use the BIOME 4 equilibrium-biogeochemistry model and palaeovegetation data (e.g. BIOME 6000), which includes new regional pollen data sets from Australia, Southeast Asia, South America, and the Indian subcontinent, in order to evaluate the response of PMIP2 AOGCMs simulations of the LGM and MH. For the inverse approach, we use BIOME4 to iteratively estimate the potential paleoclimate consistent with based on the BIOME6000 data using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm. BIOME 4 employs mechanistic descriptions of the relationship of vegetation on climate and also allows the direct effects of carbon dioxide concentration to be considered. In addition to standard (i.e. map-comparison) approaches for comparing the simulated/observed vegetation and climate, we show some diagnostics based the mapping of observed and simulated biomes in climatic spaces. These diagnoses can provide information about the specific climatological explanations for the mismatches between the simulations and observations.

  20. Electromagnetic and Thermal Simulations of Human Neurons for SAR Applications.

    PubMed

    Perez, Felipe; Millholland, Gilbert; Peddinti, Seshasai Vamsi Krishna; Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher; Morisaki, Jorge; Rizkalla, Maher E

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the electromagnetic waves (EM) on human neurons (HN) has been under investigation for decades, in efforts to understand the impact of cell phones (radiation) on human health, or radiation absorption by HN for medical diagnosis and treatment. Research issues including the wave frequency, power intensity, reflections and scattering, and penetration depths are of important considerations to be incorporated into the research study. In this study, computer simulation for the EM exposure to HN was studied for the purpose of determining the upper limits of the electric and magnetic field intensities, power consumption, reflections and transmissions, and the change in temperature resulting from the power absorption by human neurons. Both high frequency structural simulators (HFSS) from ANSYS software, and COMSOL multi-physics were used for the simulation of the EM transmissions and reflections, and the temperature profile within the cells, respectively. For the temperature profile estimation, the study considers an electrical source of 0.5 watt input power, 64 MHz. The EM simulation was looking into the uniformity of the fields within the sample cells. The size of the waveguide was set to be appropriate for a small animal model to be conducted in the future. The incident power was fully transmitted throughout the waveguide, and less than 1% reflections were observed from the simulation. The minimum reflected power near the sample under investigation was found to be with negligible reflected field strengths. The temperature profile resulting from the COMSOL simulation was found to be near 0.25 m°K, indicating no change in temperature on the neuro cells under the EM exposure. The paper details the simulation results for the EM response determined by HFSS, and temperature profile simulated by COMSOL.

  1. Equation Free Projective Integration and its Applicability for Simulating Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemella, B.; Shay, M. A.; Drake, J. F.; Dorland, W.

    2004-12-01

    We examine a novel simulation scheme called equation free projective integration1 which has the potential to allow global simulations of plasmas while still including the global effects of microscale physics. These simulation codes would be ideal for such multiscale problems as the Earth's magnetosphere, tokamaks, and the solar corona. In this method, the global plasma variables stepped forward in time are not time-integrated directly using dynamical differential equations, hence the name "equation free." Instead, these variables are represented on a microgrid using a kinetic simulation. This microsimulation is integrated forward long enough to determine the time derivatives of the global plasma variables, which are then used to integrate forward the global variables with much larger time steps. We are exploring the feasibility of applying this scheme to simulate plasma, and we will present the results of exploratory test problems including the development of 1-D shocks and magnetic reconnection. 1 I. G. Kevrekidis et. al., ``Equation-free multiscale computation: Enabling microscopic simulators to perform system-level tasks,'' arXiv:physics/0209043.

  2. Equation free projective integration and its applicability for simulating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Michael A.; Drake, James F.; Dorland, William; Swisdak, Marc

    2004-11-01

    We examine a novel simulation scheme called equation free projective integration^1 which has the potential to allow global simulations of plasmas while still including the global effects of microscale physics. These simulation codes would be ideal for such multiscale problems as tokamaks, the Earth's magnetosphere, and the solar corona. In this method, the global plasma variables stepped forward in time are not time-integrated directly using dynamical differential equations, hence the name ``equation free.'' Instead, these variables are represented on a microgrid using a kinetic simulation. This microsimulation is integrated forward long enough to determine the time derivatives of the global plasma variables, which are then used to integrate forward the global variables with much larger time steps. We are exploring the feasibility of applying this scheme to simulate plasma, and we will present the results of exploratory test problems including the development of 1-D shocks and magnetic reconnection. ^1 I. G. Kevrekidis et. al., ``Equation-free multiscale computation: Enabling microscopic simulators to perform system-level tasks,'' arXiv:physics/0209043.

  3. Application of GPU processing for Brownian particle simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Way Lee; Sheharyar, Ali; Sadr, Reza; Bouhali, Othmane

    2015-01-01

    Reports on the anomalous thermal-fluid properties of nanofluids (dilute suspension of nano-particles in a base fluid) have been the subject of attention for 15 years. The underlying physics that govern nanofluid behavior, however, is not fully understood and is a subject of much dispute. The interactions between the suspended particles and the base fluid have been cited as a major contributor to the improvement in heat transfer reported in the literature. Numerical simulations are instrumental in studying the behavior of nanofluids. However, such simulations can be computationally intensive due to the small dimensions and complexity of these problems. In this study, a simplified computational approach for isothermal nanofluid simulations was applied, and simulations were conducted using both conventional CPU and parallel GPU implementations. The GPU implementations significantly improved the computational performance, in terms of the simulation time, by a factor of 1000-2500. The results of this investigation show that, as the computational load increases, the simulation efficiency approaches a constant. At a very high computational load, the amount of improvement may even decrease due to limited system memory.

  4. Plasma Processing of Lunar Regolith Simulant for Diverse Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, Elizabeth C.; Sen, Subhayu; O'Dell, J. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Versatile manufacturing technologies for extracting resources from the moon are needed to support future space missions. Of particular interest is the production of gases and metals from lunar resources for life support, propulsion, and in-space fabrication. Deposits made from lunar regolith could yield highly emissive coatings and near-net shaped parts for replacement or repair of critical components. Equally important is development of high fidelity lunar simulants for ground based validation of potential lunar surface operations. Described herein is an innovative plasma processing technique for insitu production of gases, metals, coatings, and deposits from lunar regolith, and synthesis of high fidelity lunar simulant from NASA issued lunar simulant JSC-1. Initial plasma reduction trials of JSC-1 lunar simulant have indicated production of metallic iron and magnesium. Evolution of carbon monoxide has been detected subsequent to reduction of the simulant using the plasma process. Plasma processing of the simulant has also resulted in glassy phases resembling the volcanic glass and agglutinates found in lunar regolith. Complete and partial glassy phase deposits have been obtained by varying the plasma process variables. Experimental techniques, product characterization, and process gas analysis will be discussed.

  5. DEVELOPMENTS AND APPLICATIONS OF CFD SIMULATIONS OF MICROMETEOROLOGY AND POLLUTION TRANSPORT IN SUPPORT OF AIR QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development and application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are being advanced through case studies for simulating air pollutant concentrations from sources within open fields and within complex urban building environments. CFD applications have been under deve...

  6. Emulation of dynamic simulators with application to hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Machac, David; Reichert, Peter; Albert, Carlo

    2016-05-15

    Many simulation-intensive tasks in the applied sciences, such as sensitivity analysis, parameter inference or real time control, are hampered by slow simulators. Emulators provide the opportunity of speeding up simulations at the cost of introducing some inaccuracy. An emulator is a fast approximation to a simulator that interpolates between design input–output pairs of the simulator. Increasing the number of design data sets is a computationally demanding way of improving the accuracy of emulation. We investigate the complementary approach of increasing emulation accuracy by including knowledge about the mechanisms of the simulator into the formulation of the emulator. To approximately reproduce the output of dynamic simulators, we consider emulators that are based on a system of linear, ordinary or partial stochastic differential equations with a noise term formulated as a Gaussian process of the parameters to be emulated. This stochastic model is then conditioned to the design data so that it mimics the behavior of the nonlinear simulator as a function of the parameters. The drift terms of the linear model are designed to provide a simplified description of the simulator as a function of its key parameters so that the required corrections by the conditioned Gaussian process noise are as small as possible. The goal of this paper is to compare the gain in accuracy of these emulators by enlarging the design data set and by varying the degree of simplification of the linear model. We apply this framework to a simulator for the shallow water equations in a channel and compare emulation accuracy for emulators based on different spatial discretization levels of the channel and for a standard non-mechanistic emulator. Our results indicate that we have a large gain in accuracy already when using the simplest mechanistic description by a single linear reservoir to formulate the drift term of the linear model. Adding some more reservoirs does not lead to a significant

  7. Emulation of dynamic simulators with application to hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machac, David; Reichert, Peter; Albert, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Many simulation-intensive tasks in the applied sciences, such as sensitivity analysis, parameter inference or real time control, are hampered by slow simulators. Emulators provide the opportunity of speeding up simulations at the cost of introducing some inaccuracy. An emulator is a fast approximation to a simulator that interpolates between design input-output pairs of the simulator. Increasing the number of design data sets is a computationally demanding way of improving the accuracy of emulation. We investigate the complementary approach of increasing emulation accuracy by including knowledge about the mechanisms of the simulator into the formulation of the emulator. To approximately reproduce the output of dynamic simulators, we consider emulators that are based on a system of linear, ordinary or partial stochastic differential equations with a noise term formulated as a Gaussian process of the parameters to be emulated. This stochastic model is then conditioned to the design data so that it mimics the behavior of the nonlinear simulator as a function of the parameters. The drift terms of the linear model are designed to provide a simplified description of the simulator as a function of its key parameters so that the required corrections by the conditioned Gaussian process noise are as small as possible. The goal of this paper is to compare the gain in accuracy of these emulators by enlarging the design data set and by varying the degree of simplification of the linear model. We apply this framework to a simulator for the shallow water equations in a channel and compare emulation accuracy for emulators based on different spatial discretization levels of the channel and for a standard non-mechanistic emulator. Our results indicate that we have a large gain in accuracy already when using the simplest mechanistic description by a single linear reservoir to formulate the drift term of the linear model. Adding some more reservoirs does not lead to a significant

  8. Pebble-bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-11-01

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This report presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to determine

  9. Understanding the past to interpret the future: comparison of simulated groundwater recharge in the upper Colorado River basin (USA) using observed and general-circulation-model historical climate data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, Fred D.; Gangopadhyay, Subhrendu; Pruitt, Tom

    2017-03-01

    In evaluating potential impacts of climate change on water resources, water managers seek to understand how future conditions may differ from the recent past. Studies of climate impacts on groundwater recharge often compare simulated recharge from future and historical time periods on an average monthly or overall average annual basis, or compare average recharge from future decades to that from a single recent decade. Baseline historical recharge estimates, which are compared with future conditions, are often from simulations using observed historical climate data. Comparison of average monthly results, average annual results, or even averaging over selected historical decades, may mask the true variability in historical results and lead to misinterpretation of future conditions. Comparison of future recharge results simulated using general circulation model (GCM) climate data to recharge results simulated using actual historical climate data may also result in an incomplete understanding of the likelihood of future changes. In this study, groundwater recharge is estimated in the upper Colorado River basin, USA, using a distributed-parameter soil-water balance groundwater recharge model for the period 1951-2010. Recharge simulations are performed using precipitation, maximum temperature, and minimum temperature data from observed climate data and from 97 CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5) projections. Results indicate that average monthly and average annual simulated recharge are similar using observed and GCM climate data. However, 10-year moving-average recharge results show substantial differences between observed and simulated climate data, particularly during period 1970-2000, with much greater variability seen for results using observed climate data.

  10. Adaptation to mechanical load determines shape and properties of heart and circulation: the CircAdapt model.

    PubMed

    Arts, Theo; Delhaas, Tammo; Bovendeerd, Peter; Verbeek, Xander; Prinzen, Frits W

    2005-04-01

    With circulatory pathology, patient-specific simulation of hemodynamics is required to minimize invasiveness for diagnosis, treatment planning, and followup. We investigated the advantages of a smart combination of often already known hemodynamic principles. The CircAdapt model was designed to simulate beat-to-beat dynamics of the four-chamber heart with systemic and pulmonary circulation while incorporating a realistic relation between pressure-volume load and tissue mechanics and adaptation of tissues to mechanical load. Adaptation was modeled by rules, where a locally sensed signal results in a local action of the tissue. The applied rules were as follows: For blood vessel walls, 1) flow shear stress dilates the wall and 2) tensile stress thickens the wall; for myocardial tissue, 3) strain dilates the wall material, 4) larger maximum sarcomere length increases contractility, and 5) contractility increases wall mass. The circulation was composed of active and passive compliances and inertias. A realistic circulation developed by self-structuring through adaptation provided mean levels of systemic pressure and flow. Ability to simulate a wide variety of patient-specific circumstances was demonstrated by application of the same adaptation rules to the conditions of fetal circulation followed by a switch to the newborn circulation around birth. It was concluded that a few adaptation rules, directed to normalize mechanical load of the tissue, were sufficient to develop and maintain a realistic circulation automatically. Adaptation rules appear to be the key to reduce dramatically the number of input parameters for simulating circulation dynamics. The model may be used to simulate circulation pathology and to predict effects of treatment.

  11. Results from Binary Black Hole Simulations in Astrophysics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Present and planned gravitational wave observatories are opening a new astronomical window to the sky. A key source of gravitational waves is the merger of two black holes. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), in particular, is expected to observe these events with signal-to-noise ratio's in the thousands. To fully reap the scientific benefits of these observations requires a detailed understanding, based on numerical simulations, of the predictions of General Relativity for the waveform signals. New techniques for simulating binary black hole mergers, introduced two years ago, have led to dramatic advances in applied numerical simulation work. Over the last two years, numerical relativity researchers have made tremendous strides in understanding the late stages of binary black hole mergers. Simulations have been applied to test much of the basic physics of binary black hole interactions, showing robust results for merger waveform predictions, and illuminating such phenomena as spin-precession. Calculations have shown that merging systems can be kicked at up to 2500 km/s by the thrust from asymmetric emission. Recently, long lasting simulations of ten or more orbits allow tests of post-Newtonian (PN) approximation results for radiation from the last orbits of the binary's inspiral. Already, analytic waveform models based PN techniques with incorporated information from numerical simulations may be adequate for observations with current ground based observatories. As new advances in simulations continue to rapidly improve our theoretical understanding of the systems, it seems certain that high-precision predictions will be available in time for LISA and other advanced ground-based instruments. Future gravitational wave observatories are expected to make precision.

  12. Testing Mantle Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, P.; Davies, D.; Davies, J.

    2008-12-01

    Over the past decade, a new family of mantle convection models have been developed, which are conditioned by recent plate motion history (e.g. Bunge et al., 1997). They are commonly known as 'mantle circulation models' and allow for comparisons between present-day model predictions and ever improving seismic tomography images (e.g. Li et al. 2008). In this work, we present results from systematic investigations into the influence of various model parameters upon final model prediction/tomography correlations, to obtain a better understanding of their relative importance. These include a range of material properties, such as the radial viscosity structure, the Clapeyron slope of mineral phase transitions and compressibility; in addition to other aspects, such as the initial condition for the simulation. For our comparisons, we focus in particular on two large robust mid-mantle seismic anomalies, which others have related to the subduction of the Farallon and Tethys plates (e.g. Romanowicz, 1980). While these features are recovered with some fidelity in most simulations, the match can vary greatly. We find that there is a great deal of information in this mismatch, which includes information on the plate motion history.

  13. Model for simulating rotational data for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    This document describes a wind simulation model to be used in relation to wind turbine operations. The model is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77. The model simulates turbulence and mean wind effects as they are experienced at a rotating point on the blade of either a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) or a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The model is fast, requiring 15 to 120 seconds of VAX execution time to produce a simulation and related statistics. The model allows the user to set a number of wind parameters so that he may evaluate the uncertainty of model results as well as their typical values. When this capability is combined with short execution time, the user can quickly produce a number of simulations based on reasonable variation of input parameters and can use these simulations to obtain a range of wind turbine responses to the turbulence. This ability is important because some of the wind parameters that cannot be precisely evaluated should be prescribed over a range of values. This document is essentially a user's guide. Its features include theoretical derivations, samples of output, comparisons of measured and modeled results, a listing of the FORTRAN code, a glossary for the code, and the input and output of a sample run.

  14. The application of tapered multi-mode fiber in laser signal simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ruiguang; Guo, Hao; Liang, Weiwei; Zhang, Wenpan; Li, Hui

    2016-09-01

    According to laser signal simulation, the advantage of application of tapered multi-mode fiber on laser pulse signal transmission was analyzed. By optical system simulation, the effect on the coupling efficiency of 1.06μm laser pulse signal of different angle was analyzed. By optical experiment, the coupling efficiency and transmission mode of different incident angle and force condition were confirmed. Combining the application of simulation system, with convex lens, frosted glass and optical integrator on the outlet of fiber, the far-field energy distribution was measured. According the receiving optical system entrance pupil, the effect on the beam quality to the simulation result was analyzed. The results showed that the application of tapered multi-mode fiber on laser pulse signal simulation is feasible, and the equipment has been used in the engineering projects.

  15. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  16. Statistical inference for stochastic simulation models--theory and application.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Florian; Calabrese, Justin M; Reineking, Björn; Wiegand, Thorsten; Huth, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Statistical models are the traditional choice to test scientific theories when observations, processes or boundary conditions are subject to stochasticity. Many important systems in ecology and biology, however, are difficult to capture with statistical models. Stochastic simulation models offer an alternative, but they were hitherto associated with a major disadvantage: their likelihood functions can usually not be calculated explicitly, and thus it is difficult to couple them to well-established statistical theory such as maximum likelihood and Bayesian statistics. A number of new methods, among them Approximate Bayesian Computing and Pattern-Oriented Modelling, bypass this limitation. These methods share three main principles: aggregation of simulated and observed data via summary statistics, likelihood approximation based on the summary statistics, and efficient sampling. We discuss principles as well as advantages and caveats of these methods, and demonstrate their potential for integrating stochastic simulation models into a unified framework for statistical modelling.

  17. Simulation of a Flywheel Electrical System for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.; Wolff, Frederick J.; Dravid, Narayan V.

    2000-01-01

    A Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Project was initiated at the NASA Glenn Research Center as a possible replacement for the battery energy storage system on the International Space Station (ISS). While the hardware fabrication work was being performed at a university and contractor's facility, the related simulation activity was begun at Glenn. At the top level, Glenn researchers simulated the operation of the ISS primary electrical system (as described in another paper) with the Flywheel Energy Storage Unit (FESU) replacing one Battery Charge and Discharge Unit (BCDU). The FESU consists of a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor/Generator (PMSM), which is connected to the flywheel; the power electronics that connects the PMSM to the ISS direct-current bus; and the associated controller. The PMSM model is still under development, but this paper describes the rest of the FESU model-the simulation of the converter and the associated control system that regulates energy transfer to and from the flywheel.

  18. Potts-model grain growth simulations: Parallel algorithms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.A.; Plimpton, S.J.; Swiler, T.P.

    1997-08-01

    Microstructural morphology and grain boundary properties often control the service properties of engineered materials. This report uses the Potts-model to simulate the development of microstructures in realistic materials. Three areas of microstructural morphology simulations were studied. They include the development of massively parallel algorithms for Potts-model grain grow simulations, modeling of mass transport via diffusion in these simulated microstructures, and the development of a gradient-dependent Hamiltonian to simulate columnar grain growth. Potts grain growth models for massively parallel supercomputers were developed for the conventional Potts-model in both two and three dimensions. Simulations using these parallel codes showed self similar grain growth and no finite size effects for previously unapproachable large scale problems. In addition, new enhancements to the conventional Metropolis algorithm used in the Potts-model were developed to accelerate the calculations. These techniques enable both the sequential and parallel algorithms to run faster and use essentially an infinite number of grain orientation values to avoid non-physical grain coalescence events. Mass transport phenomena in polycrystalline materials were studied in two dimensions using numerical diffusion techniques on microstructures generated using the Potts-model. The results of the mass transport modeling showed excellent quantitative agreement with one dimensional diffusion problems, however the results also suggest that transient multi-dimension diffusion effects cannot be parameterized as the product of the grain boundary diffusion coefficient and the grain boundary width. Instead, both properties are required. Gradient-dependent grain growth mechanisms were included in the Potts-model by adding an extra term to the Hamiltonian. Under normal grain growth, the primary driving term is the curvature of the grain boundary, which is included in the standard Potts-model Hamiltonian.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF CFD SIMULATION APPLICATIONS FOR LOCAL-SCALE AREAS AND POTENTIAL INTERFACE WITH MESOSCALE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation summarizes developments of ongoing applications of fine-scale (geometry specific) CFD simulations to urban areas within atmospheric boundary layers. Enabling technology today and challenges for the future are discussed. There is a challenging need to develop a ...

  20. A forestry application simulation of man-machine techniques for analyzing remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkebile, J.; Russell, J.; Lube, B.

    1976-01-01

    The typical steps in the analysis of remotely sensed data for a forestry applications example are simulated. The example uses numerically-oriented pattern recognition techniques and emphasizes man-machine interaction.

  1. Iterative Schemes for Time Parallelization with Application to Reservoir Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrido, I; Fladmark, G E; Espedal, M S; Lee, B

    2005-04-18

    Parallel methods are usually not applied to the time domain because of the inherit sequentialness of time evolution. But for many evolutionary problems, computer simulation can benefit substantially from time parallelization methods. In this paper, they present several such algorithms that actually exploit the sequential nature of time evolution through a predictor-corrector procedure. This sequentialness ensures convergence of a parallel predictor-corrector scheme within a fixed number of iterations. The performance of these novel algorithms, which are derived from the classical alternating Schwarz method, are illustrated through several numerical examples using the reservoir simulator Athena.

  2. Multipath Metropolis simulation: An application to the classical Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakić, Predrag S.; Radošević, Slobodan M.; Mali, Petar M.; Stričević, Lazar M.; Petrić, Tara D.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the Multipath Metropolis simulation of the classical Heisenberg model. Unlike the standard single-path algorithm, the Metropolis algorithm applied to multiple random-walk paths becomes an embarrassingly parallel algorithm in which many processor cores can be easily utilized. This is important since processor cores are progressively becoming less expensive and thus more accessible. The most obvious advantage of the multipath approach is in employing independent random-walk paths to produce an uncorrelated simulation output with a normal distribution allowing for straightforward and rigorous statistical analysis.

  3. Parallel continuous simulated tempering and its applications in large-scale molecular simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zang, Tianwu; Yu, Linglin; Zhang, Chong; Ma, Jianpeng

    2014-07-28

    In this paper, we introduce a parallel continuous simulated tempering (PCST) method for enhanced sampling in studying large complex systems. It mainly inherits the continuous simulated tempering (CST) method in our previous studies [C. Zhang and J. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 194112 (2009); C. Zhang and J. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244101 (2010)], while adopts the spirit of parallel tempering (PT), or replica exchange method, by employing multiple copies with different temperature distributions. Differing from conventional PT methods, despite the large stride of total temperature range, the PCST method requires very few copies of simulations, typically 2–3 copies, yet it is still capable of maintaining a high rate of exchange between neighboring copies. Furthermore, in PCST method, the size of the system does not dramatically affect the number of copy needed because the exchange rate is independent of total potential energy, thus providing an enormous advantage over conventional PT methods in studying very large systems. The sampling efficiency of PCST was tested in two-dimensional Ising model, Lennard-Jones liquid and all-atom folding simulation of a small globular protein trp-cage in explicit solvent. The results demonstrate that the PCST method significantly improves sampling efficiency compared with other methods and it is particularly effective in simulating systems with long relaxation time or correlation time. We expect the PCST method to be a good alternative to parallel tempering methods in simulating large systems such as phase transition and dynamics of macromolecules in explicit solvent.

  4. Blowing Circulation Control on a Seaplane Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B. D.; Liu, P. Q.; Qu, Q. L.

    2011-09-01

    RANS simulations are presented for blowing circulation control on a seaplane airfoil. Realizable k-epsilon turbulent model and pressure-based coupled algorithm with second-order discretization were adopted to simulate the compressible flow. Both clear and simple flap configuration were simulated with blowing momentum coefficient Cμ = 0, 0.15 and 0.30. The results show that blowing near the airfoil trailing edge could enhance the Coanda effect, delay the flow separation, and increase the lift coefficient dramatically. The blowing circulation control is promising to apply to taking off and landing of an amphibious aircraft or seaplane.

  5. Power grid simulation applications developed using the GridPACK™ high performance computing framework

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu; Perkins, William; Palmer, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the GridPACK™ software framework for developing power grid simulations that can run on high performance computing platforms, with several example applications (dynamic simulation, static contingency analysis, and dynamic contingency analysis) that have been developed using GridPACK.

  6. Application of the Experiential Learning Cycle in Learning from a Business Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Jung-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of engaging students in Kolb's experiential learning cycle on facilitating students' simulation game performance and knowledge application skills in learning with a business simulation game. A sample was drawn from a population of business-major undergraduate students at the School of…

  7. Application Of Computer Simulation To The Entertainment Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelman, Phillip S.

    1983-10-01

    Images generated by computer have started to appear in feature films (TRON, Star Trek II), in television commercials and in animated films. Of particular interest is the use of computer generated imagery which simulates the images which a real camera might have made if the imaged objects had been real.

  8. Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Simulation: Future Applications in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gwendolyn B.; And Others

    The report describes three advanced technologies--robotics, artificial intelligence, and computer simulation--and identifies the ways in which they might contribute to special education. A hybrid methodology was employed to identify existing technology and forecast future needs. Following this framework, each of the technologies is defined,…

  9. Simulation of fumigant transport and volatilization from tarped broadcast applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the ability of the HYDRUS 2D/3D model to simulate chloropicrin and 1,3-dichloropropene fate, transport and volatilization. Three fields with similar soil conditions were broadcast fumigated under a totally impermeable film (TIF). One field was used to calibrate HYDRUS by adjusting fumig...

  10. STREAM TEMPERATURE SIMULATION OF FORESTED RIPARIAN AREAS: II. MODEL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SHADE-HSPF modeling system described in a companion paper has been tested and applied to the Upper Grande Ronde (UGR) watershed in northeast Oregon. Sensitivities of stream temperature to the heat balance parameters in Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) and the ripa...

  11. Application of Particle Simulations to the NRL Laser Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-10

    1987]. The ECDI (and the LHDI to a lesser extent) is suppressed when k1l : 0 [ Lashmore -Davies and Martin, 19731. Simulations with the magnetic field...instability, Phys. Fluids, 15, 662, 1972. Lashmore -Davies, C. N., and T. J. Martin, Electrostatic instabilities driven by an electric current

  12. Automatic mathematical modeling for real time simulation program (AI application)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Caroline; Purinton, Steve

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is described for automatic mathematical modeling and generating simulation models. The major objective was to create a user friendly environment for engineers to design, maintain, and verify their models; to automatically convert the mathematical models into conventional code for computation; and finally, to document the model automatically.

  13. GIS and crop simulation modelling applications in climate change research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The challenges that climate change presents humanity require an unprecedented ability to predict the responses of crops to environment and management. Geographic information systems (GIS) and crop simulation models are two powerful and highly complementary tools that are increasingly used for such p...

  14. Selection of bioprocess simulation software for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Shanklin, T; Roper, K; Yegneswaran, P K; Marten, M R

    2001-02-20

    Two commercially available, process-simulation software packages (Aspen Batch Plus v1.2, Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Intelligen SuperPro v3.0, INTELLIGEN, INC., Scotch Plains, Ner Jersey) are evaluated for use in modeling industrial, biotechnology processes. Software is quantitatively evaluated by Kepner-Tregoe Decision Analysis (Kepner and Tregoe, 1981). This evaluation shows that Aspen Batch Plus v1.2 (ABP) and Intelligen SuperPro v3.0 (ISP) can successfully perform specific simulation tasks but do not provide a complete model of all phenomena occurring within a biotechnology process. Software is best suited to provide a format for process management, using material and energy balances to answer scheduling questions, explore equipment change-outs, and calculate cost data. The ability of simulation software to accurately predict unit operation scale-up and optimize bioprocesses is limited. To realistically evaluate the software, a vaccine manufacturing process under development at Merck & Company is simulated. Case studies from the vaccine process are presented as examples of how ABP and ISP can be used to shed light on real-world processing issues.

  15. Nesting Large-Eddy Simulations Within Mesoscale Simulations for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Mirocha, J. D.; Chow, F. K.; Kosovic, B.; Lundquist, K. A.

    2008-12-01

    With increasing demand for more accurate atmospheric simulations for wind turbine micrositing, for operational wind power forecasting, and for more reliable turbine design, simulations of atmospheric flow with resolution of tens of meters or higher are required. These time-dependent large-eddy simulations (LES) account for complex terrain and resolve individual atmospheric eddies on length scales smaller than turbine blades. These small-domain high-resolution simulations are possible with a range of commercial and open- source software, including the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In addition to "local" sources of turbulence within an LES domain, changing weather conditions outside the domain can also affect flow, suggesting that a mesoscale model provide boundary conditions to the large-eddy simulations. Nesting a large-eddy simulation within a mesoscale model requires nuanced representations of turbulence. Our group has improved the Weather and Research Forecating model's (WRF) LES capability by implementing the Nonlinear Backscatter and Anisotropy (NBA) subfilter stress model following Kosoviæ (1997) and an explicit filtering and reconstruction technique to compute the Resolvable Subfilter-Scale (RSFS) stresses (following Chow et al, 2005). We have also implemented an immersed boundary method (IBM) in WRF to accommodate complex terrain. These new models improve WRF's LES capabilities over complex terrain and in stable atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate approaches to nesting LES within a mesoscale simulation for farms of wind turbines in hilly regions. Results are sensitive to the nesting method, indicating that care must be taken to provide appropriate boundary conditions, and to allow adequate spin-up of turbulence in the LES domain. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Computer-aided design of stripline ferrite junction circulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    A general design procedure is presented for stripline Y-junction circulators employing solid dielectric between ground planes. The resonator design and impedance matching are derived in a form suitable for computer evaluation. The procedure is applicable to cases where either the circulator bandwidth or the ground plane spacing is specified. An experimental S-band switching circulator design illustrates the technique.

  17. Development and application of an atmospheric turbulence model for use in flight simulators in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Joshi, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of simulated turbulence on aircraft handling qualities was investigated. Pilot opinion of the handling qualities of a light general aviation aircraft were evaluated in a motion-base simulator using a simulated turbulence environment. A realistic representation of turbulence disturbances is described in terms of rms intensity and scale length and their random variations with time. The time histories generated by the proposed turbulence models showed characteristics which appear to be more similar to real turbulence than the frequently-used Gaussian turbulence model. In addition, the proposed turbulence models can flexibly accommodate changes in atmospheric conditions and be easily implemented in flight simulator studies. Six turbulence time histories, including the conventional Gaussian model, were used in an IFR-tracking task. The realism of each of the turbulence models and the handling qualities of the simulated airplane were evaluated. Analysis of pilot opinions shows that at approximately the same rms intensities of turbulence, the handling quality ratings transit from the satisfactory level, for the simple Gaussian model, to an unacceptable level for more realistic and compositely structured turbulence models.

  18. A comparison of general circulation models and their application to temperature change assessments in a high-latitude agricultural area in northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Shi, Yandan; Hao, Fanghua; Jiao, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The two main focuses of this study are a comparison of the general circulation models (GCMs) from Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Inter-Comparison Project (CMIP5) and an assessment of the surface air temperature under multiple climate scenarios in a high middle latitude area of China. In the past 55 years temperatures in this area have shown an obvious upward trend (a rise of 1.50 °C), and another important change during this time period was a significant alteration in tillage practices that occurred in 1986. Using methods and tools such as average deviation, the Taylor figure and the space techniques rating (SS), time sequence related coefficient, and the M2 index, a comprehensive spatial-temporal assessment was performed based on the CMIP5 models. The simulations provided by the models had certain common features, but there were also significant differences. The three best models (CanCM4, INMCM4, and IPSL-CM5A-MR) have a common characteristic: the institutions where they were developed are located at latitudes that are similar to or higher than the latitude of the study area. Future climate changes were analyzed by simulating a representative concentration pathway 4.5/8.5 (RCP4.5/RCP8.5) of emission scenarios with a multi-model ensemble. The temperatures under the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios have a certain upward trend, with increases of 2.24 and 5.44 °C, respectively. From a spatial perspective, the distributions of the temperature change trend showed a southwest to northeast step increase under both scenarios, but the warming trend in the area of each lattice point under the RCP4.5 scenario is much lower than that of the RCP8.5 scenario. There are no obvious changes in the spatial distribution of the accumulated intensity and frequency of the regional air temperature in the three periods (2016-2035, 2036-2065, and 2066-2095) under the two scenarios.

  19. Geothermal Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Lost circulation is an expensive and often encountered problem when drilling into geothermal formations. A method is needed to more accurately describe loss zones encountered during geothermal drilling to allow for more realistic testing since present testing techniques are inadequate. A Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool (LCZMT) is being developed that will quickly locate a loss zone and then provide a visual image of this zone as it intersects the wellbore. A modified Sandia high temperature Acoustic Borehole Televiewer should allow modeling of geothermal loss zones, which would in turn lead to testing that can be performed to evaluate lost circulation materials under simulated downhole conditions. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Mesoscopic membrane physics: concepts, simulations, and selected applications.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Markus

    2009-05-19

    The window of a few tens to a few hundred nanometers in length scale is a booming field in lipid membrane research, owing largely to two reasons. First, many exciting biophysical and cell biological processes take place within it. Second, experimental techniques manage to zoom in on this sub-optical scale, while computer simulations zoom out to system sizes previously unattainable, and both will be meeting soon. This paper reviews a selection of questions and concepts in this field and demonstrates that they can often be favorably addressed with highly simplified simulation models. Among the topics discussed are membrane adhesion to substrates, mixed lipid bilayers, lipid curvature coupling, pore formation by antimicrobial peptides, composition-driven protein aggregation, and curvature driven vesiculation.

  1. Simulating Quantile Models with Applications to Economics and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, José A. F.

    2010-05-01

    The massive increase in the speed of computers over the past forty years changed the way that social scientists, applied economists and statisticians approach their trades and also the very nature of the problems that they could feasibly tackle. The new methods that use intensively computer power go by the names of "computer-intensive" or "simulation". My lecture will start with bird's eye view of the uses of simulation in Economics and Statistics. Then I will turn out to my own research on uses of computer- intensive methods. From a methodological point of view the question I address is how to infer marginal distributions having estimated a conditional quantile process, (Counterfactual Decomposition of Changes in Wage Distributions using Quantile Regression," Journal of Applied Econometrics 20, 2005). Illustrations will be provided of the use of the method to perform counterfactual analysis in several different areas of knowledge.

  2. Application of Monte Carlo simulations to improve basketball shooting strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June

    2016-10-01

    The underlying physics of basketball shooting seems to be a straightforward example of Newtonian mechanics that can easily be traced by using numerical methods. However, a human basketball player does not make use of all the possible basketball trajectories. Instead, a basketball player will build up a database of successful shots and select the trajectory that has the greatest tolerance to the small variations of the real world. We simulate the basketball player's shooting training as a Monte Carlo sequence to build optimal shooting strategies, such as the launch speed and angle of the basketball, and whether to take a direct shot or a bank shot, as a function of the player's court position and height. The phase-space volume Ω that belongs to the successful launch velocities generated by Monte Carlo simulations is then used as the criterion to optimize a shooting strategy that incorporates not only mechanical, but also human, factors.

  3. A Social Diffusion Model with an Application on Election Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Min; Hung, San-Chuan; Kung, Perng-Hwa; Lin, Shou-De

    2014-01-01

    Issues about opinion diffusion have been studied for decades. It has so far no empirical approach to model the interflow and formation of crowd's opinion in elections due to two reasons. First, unlike the spread of information or flu, individuals have their intrinsic attitudes to election candidates in advance. Second, opinions are generally simply assumed as single values in most diffusion models. However, in this case, an opinion should represent preference toward multiple candidates. Previously done models thus may not intuitively interpret such scenario. This work is to design a diffusion model which is capable of managing the aforementioned scenario. To demonstrate the usefulness of our model, we simulate the diffusion on the network built based on a publicly available bibliography dataset. We compare the proposed model with other well-known models such as independent cascade. It turns out that our model consistently outperforms other models. We additionally investigate electoral issues with our model simulator. PMID:24995351

  4. A social diffusion model with an application on election simulation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jing-Kai; Wang, Fu-Min; Tsai, Chin-Hua; Hung, San-Chuan; Kung, Perng-Hwa; Lin, Shou-De; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Lei, Chin-Laung

    2014-01-01

    Issues about opinion diffusion have been studied for decades. It has so far no empirical approach to model the interflow and formation of crowd's opinion in elections due to two reasons. First, unlike the spread of information or flu, individuals have their intrinsic attitudes to election candidates in advance. Second, opinions are generally simply assumed as single values in most diffusion models. However, in this case, an opinion should represent preference toward multiple candidates. Previously done models thus may not intuitively interpret such scenario. This work is to design a diffusion model which is capable of managing the aforementioned scenario. To demonstrate the usefulness of our model, we simulate the diffusion on the network built based on a publicly available bibliography dataset. We compare the proposed model with other well-known models such as independent cascade. It turns out that our model consistently outperforms other models. We additionally investigate electoral issues with our model simulator.

  5. Application of dynamic Monte Carlo technique in proton beam radiotherapy using Geant4 simulation toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fada

    Monte Carlo method has been successfully applied in simulating the particles transport problems. Most of the Monte Carlo simulation tools are static and they can only be used to perform the static simulations for the problems with fixed physics and geometry settings. Proton therapy is a dynamic treatment technique in the clinical application. In this research, we developed a method to perform the dynamic Monte Carlo simulation of proton therapy using Geant4 simulation toolkit. A passive-scattering treatment nozzle equipped with a rotating range modulation wheel was modeled in this research. One important application of the Monte Carlo simulation is to predict the spatial dose distribution in the target geometry. For simplification, a mathematical model of a human body is usually used as the target, but only the average dose over the whole organ or tissue can be obtained rather than the accurate spatial dose distribution. In this research, we developed a method using MATLAB to convert the medical images of a patient from CT scanning into the patient voxel geometry. Hence, if the patient voxel geometry is used as the target in the Monte Carlo simulation, the accurate spatial dose distribution in the target can be obtained. A data analysis tool---root was used to score the simulation results during a Geant4 simulation and to analyze the data and plot results after simulation. Finally, we successfully obtained the accurate spatial dose distribution in part of a human body after treating a patient with prostate cancer using proton therapy.

  6. Declarative simulation of dynamicals systems: the 812 programming language and its application to the simulation of genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Giavitto, Jean-Louis; Michel, Olivier; Delaplace, Franck

    2003-01-01

    A major part of biological processes can be modeled as dynamical systems (DS), that is, as a time-varying state. In this article, we advocate a declarative approach for prototyping the simulation of DS. We introduce the concepts of collection, stream and fabric. A fabric is a multi-dimensional object that represents the successive values of a structured set of variables. A declarative programming language, called 8 1/2 has been developed to support the concept of fabrics. Several examples of working 8 1/2 programs are given to illustrate the relevance of the fabric data structure for simulation applications and to show how recursive fabric definitions can be easily used to model various biological phenomena in a natural way (a resolution of PDE, a simulation in artificial life, the Turing diffusion-reaction process and various examples of genetic networks). In the conclusion, we recapitulate several lessons we have learned from the 8 1/2 project.

  7. Application of Flight Simulator Record/Playback Feature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    complex visual flying task in ASPT under one of three instructional conditions which differed in their use of an automated record/playback feature. The...Advanced Instructional Features and Methods in ASPT . The work unit supports project 1123, Flying Training Development; task 112302, Ivstructional...cloverleaf maneuver flown in the present study. Appwffaa. The study was conducted on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) located at the Flying

  8. Magnetic Testing, and Modeling, Simulation and Analysis for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghosian, Mary; Narvaez, Pablo; Herman, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation (Aerospace) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS) participated with Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the implementation of a magnetic cleanliness program of the NASA/JPL JUNO mission. The magnetic cleanliness program was applied from early flight system development up through system level environmental testing. The JUNO magnetic cleanliness program required setting-up a specialized magnetic test facility at Lockheed Martin Space Systems for testing the flight system and a testing program with facility for testing system parts and subsystems at JPL. The magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis capability was set up and performed by Aerospace to provide qualitative and quantitative magnetic assessments of the magnetic parts, components, and subsystems prior to or in lieu of magnetic tests. Because of the sensitive nature of the fields and particles scientific measurements being conducted by the JUNO space mission to Jupiter, the imposition of stringent magnetic control specifications required a magnetic control program to ensure that the spacecraft's science magnetometers and plasma wave search coil were not magnetically contaminated by flight system magnetic interferences. With Aerospace's magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis and JPL's system modeling and testing approach, and LMSS's test support, the project achieved a cost effective approach to achieving a magnetically clean spacecraft. This paper presents lessons learned from the JUNO magnetic testing approach and Aerospace's modeling, simulation and analysis activities used to solve problems such as remnant magnetization, performance of hard and soft magnetic materials within the targeted space system in applied external magnetic fields.

  9. Preparation, applications, and digital simulation of carbon interdigitated array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Kolesov, Grigory; Parkinson, B A

    2014-08-05

    Carbon interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes with features sizes down to 1.2 μm were fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of patterned photoresist. Cyclic voltammetry of reversible redox species produced the expected steady-state currents. The collection efficiency depends on the IDA electrode spacing, which ranged from around 2.7 to 16.5 μm, with the smaller dimensions achieving higher collection efficiencies of up to 98%. The signal amplification because of redox cycling makes it possible to detect species at relatively low concentrations (10(-5) molar) and the small spacing allows detection of transient electrogenerated species with much shorter lifetimes (submillisecond). Digital simulation software that accounts for both the width and height of electrode elements as well as the electrode spacing was developed to model the IDA electrode response. The simulations are in quantitative agreement with experimental data for both a simple fast one electron redox reaction and an electron transfer with a following chemical reaction at the IDAs with larger gaps whereas currents measured for the smallest IDA electrodes, that were larger than the simulated currents, are attributed to convection from induced charge electrokinetic flow.

  10. Human Performance Modeling and Simulation for Launch Team Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peaden, Cary J.; Payne, Stephen J.; Hoblitzell, Richard M., Jr.; Chandler, Faith T.; LaVine, Nils D.; Bagnall, Timothy M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research into modeling and simulation of humans for launch team analysis, training, and evaluation. The initial research is sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA)'s Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) and NASA's Exploration Program and is focused on current and future launch team operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The paper begins with a description of existing KSC launch team environments and procedures. It then describes the goals of new Simulation and Analysis of Launch Teams (SALT) research. The majority of this paper describes products from the SALT team's initial proof-of-concept effort. These products include a nominal case task analysis and a discrete event model and simulation of launch team performance during the final phase of a shuttle countdown; and a first proof-of-concept training demonstration of launch team communications in which the computer plays most roles, and the trainee plays a role of the trainee's choice. This paper then describes possible next steps for the research team and provides conclusions. This research is expected to have significant value to NASA's Exploration Program.

  11. Preparation, Applications, and Digital Simulation of Carbon Interdigitated Array Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fei; Kolesov, Grigory; Parkinson, Bruce A.

    2014-12-16

    Carbon interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes with features sizes down to 1.2 μm were fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of patterned photoresist. Cyclic voltam-metry of reversible redox species produced the expected steady-state currents. The collection efficiency depends on the IDA electrode spacing, which ranged from around 2.7 to 16.5 μm, with the smaller dimensions achieving higher collection efficiencies of up to 98%. The signal amplification because of redox cycling makes it possible to detect species at relatively low concentrations (10–5 molar) and the small spacing allows detection of transient electrogenerated species with much shorter lifetimes (submillisecond). Digital simulation software that accounts for both the width and height of electrode elements as well as the electrode spacing was developed to model the IDA electrode response. The simulations are in quantitative agreement with experimental data for both a simple fast one electron redox reaction and an electron transfer with a following chemical reaction at the IDAs with larger gaps whereas currents measured for the smallest IDA electrodes, that were larger than the simulated currents, are attributed to convection from induced charge electrokinetic flow. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Enhancement of the southward return flow of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation by data assimilation and its influence in an assimilative ocean simulation forced by CORE-II atmospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yosuke; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Toyoda, Takahiro; Nakano, Hideyuki

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the difference in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) mean state between free and assimilative simulations of a common ocean model using a common interannual atmospheric forcing. In the assimilative simulation, the reproduction of cold cores in the Nordic Seas, which is absent in the free simulation, enhances the overflow to the North Atlantic and improves AMOC with enhanced transport of the deeper part of the southward return flow. This improvement also induces an enhanced supply of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and causes better representation of the Atlantic deep layer despite the fact that correction by the data assimilation is applied only to temperature and salinity above a depth of 1750 m. It also affects Circumpolar Deep Water in the Southern Ocean. Although the earliest influence of the improvement propagated by coastal waves reaches the Southern Ocean in 10-15 years, substantial influence associated with the arrival of the renewed NADW propagates across the Atlantic Basin in several decades. Although the result demonstrates that data assimilation is able to improve the deep ocean state even if there is no data there, it also indicates that long-term integration is required to reproduce variability in the deep ocean originating from variations in the upper ocean. This study thus provides insights on the reliability of AMOC and the ocean state in the Atlantic deep layer reproduced by data assimilation systems.

  13. Conservation of circulation in magnetohydrodynamics

    PubMed

    Bekenstein; Oron

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate at both the Newtonian and (general) relativistic levels the existence of a generalization of Kelvin's circulation theorem (for pure fluids) that is applicable to perfect magnetohydrodynamics. The argument is based on the least action principle for magnetohydrodynamic flow. Examples of the new conservation law are furnished. The new theorem should be helpful in identifying new kinds of vortex phenomena distinct from magnetic ropes or fluid vortices.

  14. MODIS cloud and aerosol retrieval simulator and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wind, Galina

    Executing a cloud or aerosol physical properties retrieval algorithm from controlled synthetic data is an important step in retrieval algorithm development. Synthetic data can help answer questions about the sensitivity and performance of the algorithm or aid in determining how an existing retrieval algorithm may perform with a planned sensor. Synthetic data can also help in solving issues that may have surfaced in the retrieval results. Synthetic data become very important when other validation methods, such as field campaigns,are of limited scope. These tend to be of relatively short duration and often are costly. Ground stations have limited spatial coverage whilesynthetic data can cover large spatial and temporal scales and a wide variety of conditions at a low cost. In this work I develop an advanced cloud and aerosol retrieval simulator for the MODIS instrument, also known as Multi-sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator (MCARS). In a close collaboration with the modeling community I have seamlessly combined the GEOS-5 global climate model with the DISORT radiative transfer code, widely used by the remote sensing community, with the observations from the MODIS instrument to create the simulator. With the MCARS simulator it was then possible to solve the long standing issue with the MODIS aerosol optical depth retrievals that had a low bias for smoke aerosols. MODIS aerosol retrieval did not account for effects of humidity on smoke aerosols. The MCARS simulator also revealed an issue that has not been recognized previously, namely,the value of fine mode fraction could create a linear dependence between retrieved aerosol optical depth and land surface reflectance. MCARS provided the ability to examine aerosol retrievals against "ground truth" for hundreds of thousands of simultaneous samples for an area covered by only three AERONET ground stations. Findings from MCARS are already being used to improve the performance of operational MODIS aerosol

  15. On the relevance of tidal forcing in modelling the Mediterranean thermohaline circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannino, G.; Carillo, A.; Pisacane, G.; Naranjo, C.

    2015-05-01

    The four dominant constituents of the semi-diurnal and diurnal tides have been implemented in a regional eddy-resolving Mediterranean version of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model to assess the role played by tides on the simulated Mediterranean thermohaline circulation. To this aim we have compared two 10-year hindcast simulations differing only for the inclusion/omission of tidal forcing. Following the recent recommendations suggested by Sannino et al. (2014) both simulations use the same model having a substantial increment of the horizontal resolution in the region of the Strait of Gibraltar. The results suggest that application of explicit tidal forcing in a Mediterranean model has non negligible effects on the simulated circulation in addition to the expected intensification of local mixing processes. The western basin exhibits an immediate response to the different characteristics of the inflowing AW observable in the modified deep water convection processes in the Gulf of Lion. The inclusion of tidal forcing also induces changes in the intermediate circulation of the Tyrrhenian Sea bringing to a better representation of local structures and a reinforcement of the global thermohaline cell. LIW dispersal paths in the eastern basin are also affected by tides.

  16. A TT&C Performance Simulator for Space Exploration and Scientific Satellites - Architecture and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donà, G.; Faletra, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the TT&C performance simulator toolkit developed internally at Thales Alenia Space Italia (TAS-I) to support the design of TT&C subsystems for space exploration and scientific satellites. The simulator has a modular architecture and has been designed using a model-based approach using standard engineering tools such as MATLAB/SIMULINK and mission analysis tools (e.g. STK). The simulator is easily reconfigurable to fit different types of satellites, different mission requirements and different scenarios parameters. This paper provides a brief description of the simulator architecture together with two examples of applications used to demonstrate some of the simulator’s capabilities.

  17. Overview of the EarthCARE simulator and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zadelhoff, G.; Donovan, D. P.; Lajas, D.

    2011-12-01

    The EarthCARE Simulator (ECSIM) was initially developed in 2004 as a scientific tool to simulate atmospheric scenes, radiative transfer and instrument models for the four instruments of the EarthCARE mission. ECSIM has subsequently been significantly further enhanced and is evolving into a tool for both mission performance assessment and L2 retrieval development. It is an ESA requirement that all L2 retrieval algorithms foreseen for the ground segment will be integrated and tested in ECSIM. It is furthermore envisaged, that the (retrieval part of) ECSIM will be the tool for scientists to work with on updates and new L2 algorithms during the EarthCARE Commissioning phase and beyond. ECSIM is capable of performing 'end to end' simulations of single, or any combination of the EarthCARE instruments. That is, ECSIM starts with an input atmospheric ``scene'', then uses various radiative transfer and instrument models in order to generate synthetic observations which can be subsequently inverted. The results of the inversions may then be compared to the input "truth". ECSIM consists of a modular general framework populated by various models. The models within ECSIM are grouped according to the following scheme: 1) Scene creation models (3D atmospheric scene definition) 2) Orbit models (orbit and orientation of the platform as it overflies the scene) 3) Forward models (calculate the signal impinging on the telescope/antenna of the instrument(s) in question) 4) Instrument models (calculate the instrument response to the signals calculated by the Forward models) 5) Retrieval models (invert the instrument signals to recover relevant geophysical information) Within the default ECSIM models crude instrument specific parameterizations (i.e. empirically based radar reflectivity vs. IWC relationships) are avoided. Instead, the radiative transfer forward models are kept separate (as possible) from the instrument models. In order to accomplish this, the atmospheric scenes are

  18. The German VR Simulation Realism Scale--psychometric construction for virtual reality applications with virtual humans.

    PubMed

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Virtual training applications with high levels of immersion or fidelity (for example for social phobia treatment) produce high levels of presence and therefore belong to the most successful Virtual Reality developments. Whereas display and interaction fidelity (as sub-dimensions of immersion) and their influence on presence are well researched, realism of the displayed simulation depends on the specific application and is therefore difficult to measure. We propose to measure simulation realism by using a self-report questionnaire. The German VR Simulation Realism Scale for VR training applications was developed based on a translation of scene realism items from the Witmer-Singer-Presence Questionnaire. Items for realism of virtual humans (for example for social phobia training applications) were supplemented. A sample of N = 151 students rated simulation realism of a Fear of Public Speaking application. Four factors were derived by item- and principle component analysis (Varimax rotation), representing Scene Realism, Audience Behavior, Audience Appearance and Sound Realism. The scale developed can be used as a starting point for future research and measurement of simulation realism for applications including virtual humans.

  19. Applications of Multi-Cycle Earthquake Simulations to Earthquake Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, Jacquelyn Joan

    This dissertation seeks to contribute to earthquake hazard analyses and forecasting by conducting a detailed study of the processes controlling the occurrence, and particularly the clustering, of large earthquakes, the probabilities of these large events, and the dynamics of their ruptures. We use the multi-cycle earthquake simulator RSQSim to investigate several fundamental aspects of earthquake occurrence in order to improve the understanding of earthquake hazard. RSQSim, a 3D, boundary element code that incorporates rate- and state-friction to simulate earthquakes in fully interacting, complex fault systems has been successful at modeling several aspects of fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Multi-event earthquake models with time-dependent nucleation based on rate- and state-dependent friction, such as RSQSim, provide a viable physics-based method for modeling earthquake processes. These models can provide a better understanding of earthquake hazard by improving our knowledge of earthquake processes and probabilities. RSQSim is fast and efficient, and therefore is able to simulate very long sequences of earthquakes (from hundreds of thousands to millions of events). This makes RSQSim an ideal instrument for filling in the current gaps in earthquake data, from short and incomplete earthquake catalogs to unrealistic initial conditions used for dynamic rupture models. RSQSim catalogs include foreshocks, aftershocks, and occasional clusters of large earthquakes, the statistics of which are important for the estimation of earthquake probabilities. Additionally, RSQSim finds a near optimal nucleation location that enables ruptures to propagate at minimal stress conditions and thus can provide suites of heterogeneous initial conditions for dynamic rupture models that produce reduced ground motions compared to models with homogeneous initial stresses and arbitrary forced nucleation locations.

  20. Hybrid simulation codes with application to shocks and upstream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid codes in which part of the plasma is represented as particles and the rest as a fluid are discussed. In the past few years such codes with particle ions and massless, fluid electrons have been applied to space plasmas, especially to collisionless shocks. All of these simulation codes are one-dimensional and similar in structure, except for how the field equations are solved. The various approaches that are used (resistive Ohm's law, predictor-corrector, Hamiltonian) are described in detail and results from the various codes are compared with examples taken from collisionless shocks and low frequency wave phenomena upstream of shocks.

  1. Evaluation of the efficiency and accuracy of new methods for atmospheric opacity and radiative transfer calculations in planetary general circulation model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zube, Nicholas Gerard; Zhang, Xi; Natraj, Vijay

    2016-10-01

    General circulation models often incorporate simple approximations of heating between vertically inhomogeneous layers rather than more accurate but computationally expensive radiative transfer (RT) methods. With the goal of developing a GCM package that can model both solar system bodies and exoplanets, it is vital to examine up-to-date RT models to optimize speed and accuracy for heat transfer calculations. Here, we examine a variety of interchangeable radiative transfer models in conjunction with MITGCM (Hill and Marshall, 1995). First, for atmospheric opacity calculations, we test gray approximation, line-by-line, and correlated-k methods. In combination with these, we also test RT routines using 2-stream DISORT (discrete ordinates RT), N-stream DISORT (Stamnes et al., 1988), and optimized 2-stream (Spurr and Natraj, 2011). Initial tests are run using Jupiter as an example case. The results can be compared in nine possible configurations for running a complete RT routine within a GCM. Each individual combination of opacity and RT methods is contrasted with the "ground truth" calculation provided by the line-by-line opacity and N-stream DISORT, in terms of computation speed and accuracy of the approximation methods. We also examine the effects on accuracy when performing these calculations at different time step frequencies within MITGCM. Ultimately, we will catalog and present the ideal RT routines that can replace commonly used approximations within a GCM for a significant increase in calculation accuracy, and speed comparable to the dynamical time steps of MITGCM. Future work will involve examining whether calculations in the spatial domain can also be reduced by smearing grid points into larger areas, and what effects this will have on overall accuracy.

  2. Altitude distribution of tropospheric ozone over the Northern Hemisphere during 1996, simulated with a chemistry-general circulation model at two different horizontal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentarchos, A. S.; Roelofs, G. J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2001-01-01

    The spatial/temporal variability of the vertical distribution of tropospheric ozone in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) over a period of 1 year (1996) is studied with a coupled chemistry-general circulation model. The model is used at two different horizontal resolutions (T30: 3.75°×3.75° and T63: 1.875°×1.875°) and is nudged towards European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts analyses for 1996, using a four-dimensional assimilation technique (newtonian relaxation), to enable direct comparisons of observations and model results. Overall, the model reproduces satisfactorily the magnitude and seasonal variability of the vertical ozone distribution observed at six selected locations. Discrepancies occur, however, at remote locations in the subtropical Atlantic and tropical Pacific where ozone concentrations throughout the free troposphere are overestimated by the fourth version of the European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM4)-T30. A considerable improvement is evident at T63, which can be attributed, at least partially, to less efficient transport of ozone precursors from the polluted continents at higher resolution. In the upper troposphere/tropopause region, short-term ozone variations are better reproduced at higher resolution. The origin of tropospheric ozone is examined by decomposing its seasonal variation in the model into ozone from the stratosphere and ozone produced within the troposphere. Differences in the NH annual tropospheric ozone budget for 1996, between T30 and T63 mean amounts are relatively small. The tropospheric ozone budget is dominated by photochemical production and destruction (2716 and 2684 Tg, respectively), while the net ozone flux from the stratosphere is estimated to be 436 Tg, and dry deposition is estimated to be 487 Tg.

  3. Estimating and Measuring Application Latency of Typical Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS)-Based Simulation Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    analysis of state space consistency using a Petri net model (Hodson, 2009). 21 Figure 3: Producer, Network, and Consumer Models by Hodson...used a Petri net model to simulate a consumer/producer system to characterize the age of the state data. This research effort will use actual 24...software architecture, which is based on Hodson’s analysis of state space consistency using Petri net (Hodson, 2009). Figure 4: Multithreaded

  4. Space Station gas-grain simulation facility: application to exobiology.

    PubMed

    McKay, C P; Stoker, C R; Morris, J; Conley, G; Schwartz, D

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station provides an environment in which the forces required to suspend particles during an experiment can be reduced by as much as six orders of magnitude. This reduction in levitation force enables us to perform many new experiments in a variety of disciplines. We have grouped these experiments into two categories: 1) those involving an individual particle or the interaction between a few particles and 2) those involving clouds in particles. We consider only particle experiments at this stage because cloud experiments suffer from electrostatic interactions and levitation-forced coalescence therefore requiring considerably more space, mass and crew interaction. The displacement of a particle resulting from g-jitter for ballistic, Knudsen and Stokes flow regimes is considered in detail and the radiation, acoustic, electrostatic and electromagnetic levitation mechanisms to control this motion are reviewed. We have selected the simulation of organic haze production ion Titan as an example experiment for detailed study. The objective of this experiment is to simulate the photolysis of methane and the subsequent formation of the organic haze particles in the upper atmosphere of Titan.

  5. Simulation of nose whistlers: An application to low latitude whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kalpana; Singh, R. P.; Kumar Singh, Abhay; Singh, R. N.

    2006-05-01

    Simulation technique for whistler mode signal propagating through inhomogeneous plasma using WKB approximation has been developed (Singh, K., Singh, R.P., Ferencz, O.E., 2004. Simulation of whistler mode propagation for low latitude stations. Earth Planet Space 56, 979-987). In the present paper, we have used it for the analysis of recorded signals at low latitudes and estimated the nose frequency, which is not observed on the dynamic spectra. At low latitudes nose frequency is ˜100 kHz or more and therefore it is absent in the dynamic spectra due to attenuation of the signal at higher frequencies. The importance of nose frequency is in determining the exact path of propagation, which is required in probing of ambient medium. It is shown that the method permits to study the nose frequency variation, it can be used to deduce physical parameters as the global electric field. A case study permits to get a reasonable value of the electric field, which up to now could not be done at very low latitude.

  6. Simulation of a Complex Groundwater System and an Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premchitt, Jerasak; Das Gupta, Ashim

    1981-06-01

    A hydrologic model of an extensive groundwater basin was developed for the study of land subsidence due to deep well pumping in Bangkok, Thailand. It is a quasi-three-dimensional flow model with relevant modifications to suit the hydrogeologic situations in the problem area. The troublesome effect of yield from aquitard is discarded, while the field information on subsurface strata is fully utilized to establish a realistic model. The subsurface is considered to be a single hydraulically connected body stratified into model layers for convenience in the simulation. Pumping can be imposed at any depth, and discharge rates can be arbitrary. Any number of model layers can be incorporated, with coupling being provided through the leakage flux. The power and flexibility of the model is demonstrated in the simulation of groundwater flow regime in the Lower Central Plain of Thailand for a time period of 45 years. At first the model is calibrated with available field measurements in the past, and it is then extended for the prediction of future situations. The model represents the actual field situation. The mathematical process is simple, and it would require less computing effort than the equivalent full three-dimensional model or the quasi-three-dimensional model with one-dimensional elements to represent aquitards.

  7. Nonlinear three-dimensional trajectory following: simulation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, George H.

    In light of recent military requirements for unmanned and autonomous vehicles, research into methods of designing arbitrary three-dimensional trajectories and controlling aircraft along them has become vital. In this report, we explore two methods of nonlinear control for the purpose of following three-dimensional trajectories and paths. First, prior work on a dynamic feedback linearization exploiting the differential flatness of the ideal airplane is adapted with the intent of implementing it on a physical testbed in MIT's Realtime indoor Autonomous Vehicle test ENvironment (RAVEN), but poor behavior—both in simulation and in hardware—under moderate levels of joint parameter uncertainty thwarted attempts at implementation. Additionally, the differential flatness technique in its pure form follows trajectories, which are sometimes inferior intuitively and practically to paths. In the context of unmanned air vehicle (UAV) flight in gusty environments, this motivated the extension of prior work on two-dimensional path following to three-dimensions, and simulations are presented in which the fully nonlinear controller derived from differential flatness follows a trajectory that is generated dynamically from a path. The three-dimensional path-following logic is actually implemented in RAVEN, and results are presented that demonstrate good vertical rise time in response to a step input and centimeter accuracy in vertical and lateral tracking. Future directions are proposed.

  8. The northern wintertime divergence extrema at 200 hPa and MSLP cyclones as simulated in the AMIP integration by the ECMWF general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.S. )

    1994-01-01

    Divergence and convergence centers at 200 hPa and mean sea level pressure (MSLP) cyclones are located every 6 hours for a 10-year GCM simulation for the boreal winters from 1980 to 1988. The simulation used the observed monthly mean SST for the decade. Analysis of the frequency, locations, and strengths of these centers and cyclones give insight into the dynamical response of the model to the varying SST. IT is found that (1) the model produces reasonable climatologies of upper-level divergence and MSLP cyclones. (2) The model distribution of anomalies of divergence/convergence centers and MSLP cyclones is consistent with available observations for the 1982-83 and 2986-87 El Nino events. (3) The tropical Indian Ocean is the region of greatest divergence activity and interannual variability in the model. (4) The variability of the divergence centers is greater than that of the convergence centers. (5) Strong divergence centers are chiefly oceanic events in the midlatitudes but are more land based in the tropics, except in the Indian. (6) Locations of divergence/convergence centers can be a useful tool for the intercomparison of global atmospheric simulations.

  9. High-fidelity simulations of unsteady civil aircraft aerodynamics: stakes and perspectives. Application of zonal detached eddy simulation

    PubMed Central

    Deck, Sébastien; Gand, Fabien; Brunet, Vincent; Ben Khelil, Saloua

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of zonal detached eddy simulations (ZDES) for unsteady civil aircraft applications as a reflection on the stakes and perspectives of the use of hybrid methods in the framework of industrial aerodynamics. The issue of zonal or non-zonal treatment of turbulent flows for engineering applications is discussed. The ZDES method used in this article and based on a fluid problem-dependent zonalization is briefly presented. Some recent landmark achievements for conditions all over the flight envelope are presented, including low-speed (aeroacoustics of high-lift devices and landing gear), cruising (engine–airframe interactions), propulsive jets and off-design (transonic buffet and dive manoeuvres) applications. The implications of such results and remaining challenges in a more global framework are further discussed. PMID:25024411

  10. High-fidelity simulations of unsteady civil aircraft aerodynamics: stakes and perspectives. Application of zonal detached eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Deck, Sébastien; Gand, Fabien; Brunet, Vincent; Ben Khelil, Saloua

    2014-08-13

    This paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of zonal detached eddy simulations (ZDES) for unsteady civil aircraft applications as a reflection on the stakes and perspectives of the use of hybrid methods in the framework of industrial aerodynamics. The issue of zonal or non-zonal treatment of turbulent flows for engineering applications is discussed. The ZDES method used in this article and based on a fluid problem-dependent zonalization is briefly presented. Some recent landmark achievements for conditions all over the flight envelope are presented, including low-speed (aeroacoustics of high-lift devices and landing gear), cruising (engine-airframe interactions), propulsive jets and off-design (transonic buffet and dive manoeuvres) applications. The implications of such results and remaining challenges in a more global framework are further discussed.

  11. Simulation of spatially evolving turbulence and the applicability of Taylor's hypothesis in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sangsan; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    For the numerical simulation of inhomogeneous turbulent flows, a method is developed for generating stochastic inflow boundary conditions with a prescribed power spectrum. Turbulence statistics from spatial simulations using this method with a low fluctuation Mach number are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, which validates the procedure. Turbulence statistics from spatial simulations are also compared to those from temporal simulations using Taylor's hypothesis. Statistics such as turbulence intensity, vorticity, and velocity derivative skewness compare favorably with the temporal simulation. However, the statistics of dilatation show a significant departure from those obtained in the temporal simulation. To directly check the applicability of Taylor's hypothesis, space-time correlations of fluctuations in velocity, vorticity, and dilatation are investigated. Convection velocities based on vorticity and velocity fluctuations are computed as functions of the spatial and temporal separations. The profile of the space-time correlation of dilatation fluctuations is explained via a wave propagation model.

  12. Prognostic Aspects of Sub-seasonal Rainfall Characteristics using the Outputs of General Circulation Model: An Application of Statistical Downscaling and Temporal Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Mohanty, U. C.; Ghosh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Most regions of India experience varied rainfall duration during the southwest monsoon, changes in which exhibit major impact not only agriculture, but also other sectors like hydrology, agriculture, food and fodder storage etc. In addition, changes in sub-seasonal rainfall characteristics highly impact the rice production. As part of the endeavor seasonal climate outlook, as well as information for weather within climate may be helpful for advance planning and risk management in agriculture. The General Circulation Model (GCM) provide an alternative to gather information for weather within climate but variability is very low in comparison to observation. On the other hand, the spatial resolution of GCM predicted rainfall is not found at the observed station/grid point. To tackle the problem, initially a statistical downscaling over 19 station of Odisha state is undertaken using the atmospheric parameters predicted by a GCM (NCEP-CFSv2). For the purpose, an extended domain is taken for analyzing the significant zone for the atmospheric parameters like zonal wind at 850hPa, Sea Surface Temperature (SST), geopotential height. A statistical model using the pattern projection method is further developed based on empirical orthogonal function. The downscaled rainfall is found better in association with station observation in comparison to raw GCM prediction in view of deterministic and probabilistic skill measure. Further, the sub-seasonal and seasonal forecast from the GCMs can be used at different time steps for risk management. Therefore, downscaled seasonal/monthly rainfall is further converted to sub-seasonal/daily time scale using a non-homogeneous markov model. The simulated weather sequences are further compared with the observed sequence in view of categorical rainfall events. The outcomes suggest that the rainfall amount are overestimated for excess rainfall and henceforth larger excess rainfall events can be realized. The skill for prediction of rainfall

  13. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  14. Coupled Simulation of Heart Valves: Applications to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Bakhaty, Ahmed A; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-07-01

    The last few decades have seen great advances in the understanding of heart valves, and consequently, in the development of novel treatment modalities and surgical procedures for valves afflicted by disease. This is due in part to the profound advancements in computing technology and noninvasive medical imaging techniques that have made it possible to numerically model the complex heart valve systems characterized by distinct features at different length scales and various interacting processes. In this article, we highlight the importance of explicitly coupling these multiple scales and diverse processes to accurately simulate the true behavior of the heart valves, in health and disease. We examine some of the computational modeling studies that have a direct consequence on clinical practice.

  15. Metamaterials for circuit QED: Quantum simulations and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, Bruno G.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to design periodically structured materials not present in nature provides scientists with new tools, ranging from sub-wavelength imaging to well controlled band structures for wave propagation in photonic crystals. Superconducting metamaterials have been recently proposed to manipulate the density-of-modes of transmission lines [D. J. Egger and F. K. Wilhelm, Phys. Rev. Letters 111, 163601 (2013)]. We further build on these ideas and develop a toolbox for environment manipulation based on nano-structured, periodic, lossless, superconducting circuits. In particular we show that high density of low energy states can be achieved using a superlattice arrangement of left-handed circuit elements. Multimode, ultra-strong coupling of superconducing qubits to such engineered environments thus allow for experimental implementation of quantum simulation of interesting new phenomena as well as for complex quantum state engineering.

  16. NO{sub x} formation and reduction during combustion of wet sewage sludge in the circulating fluidized bed -- Measurements and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Philippek, C.; Knoebig, T.; Schoenfelder, H.; Werther, J.

    1997-12-31

    Mechanically dewatered municipal sewage sludge with a water content between 70 and 80 wt% was incinerated in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The combustion chamber had a total height of 15 m and a circular cross-section of 0.1 m diameter. In order to compensate for heat losses, the combustor was electrically heated from the outside. The combustion temperature of 850 C could thus be maintained along the whole length of the riser. Axial concentration profiles of the gaseous species O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, NO, N{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3} and organic carbon measured as CH{sub 4} were recorded for a variety of operating conditions. Since a major part of the investigation was devoted to the elucidation of the mechanisms of NO{sub x} formation and reduction in the case of combustion of wet sewage sludge, the combustor was also used for reaction kinetic studies whereby different gases, e.g., CO, NH{sub 3}, NO and N{sub 2}O were injected into the combustor which was during these experiments fluidized with nitrogen. The kinetic studies lead to a simplified kinetic scheme for NO{sub x} formation and reduction under conditions of sludge combustion. The combustor model divides the combustion chamber into four stages, i.e., a bottom zone, a splash-zone, an upper dilute zone and an exit zone. The bottom zone is modeled as a bubbling fluidized bed, whereas for the upper dilute zone a two-phase structure with an upflowing dilute suspension phase and a downflowing dense phase is assumed. This model is combined with a combustion model and the NO{sub x} formation and reduction model to form the CFB sludge combustor model. The calculations yield axial distributions of the different gaseous species which are shown to be fairly good agreement with the measurements. The model is able to explain the effects of different operating variables on the NO{sub x} emissions. IN particular, the model is able to explain why two-stage combustion, which in the case of coal combustion is

  17. Circulation Systems on Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Gary

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the use of microcomputers in comprehensive library circulation systems. Topics covered include system requirements (reliability, completeness); determining circulation system needs (saving money, improving service, modernization); limitations of microcomputers (capacity, kinds of data stored, number of stations or terminals); system…

  18. A three-dimensional chemistry/general circulation model simulation of anthropogenically derived ozone in the troposphere and its radiative climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-Jan; Lelieveld, Jos; van Dorland, Rob

    1997-10-01

    We present results from the tropospheric chemistry/climate European Center Hamburg Model by comparing two simulations that consider a preindustrial and a contemporary emission scenario. Photochemical O3 production from anthropogenically emitted precursors contributes about 30% to the present-day tropospheric O3 content, which is roughly equal to the natural photochemical production. Transports of stratospheric O3 into the troposphere contribute about 40%. As a result of anthropogenic emissions, the O3 maximum over remote northern hemisphere (NH) areas has shifted from winter to spring, when photochemical production of O3 is relatively efficient. Over NH continents the preindustrial seasonal variability is relatively weak whereas a distinct surface O3 summer maximum appears in the contemporary simulation. In the (sub)tropical southern hemisphere (SH), anthropogenic biomass burning emissions cause an increase of O3 mixing ratios in the dry season (September-November). We calculate a relative increase in O3 mixing ratios due to anthropogenic emissions of about 30% in the pristine SH middle and high latitudes to about 100% in the polluted NH boundary layer. The model simulations suggest that the absolute increase of tropospheric O3 maximizes in the middle troposphere. Through convection, upper tropospheric O3 mixing ratios are significantly affected in the tropical regions and, during summer, in the middle and high NH latitudes. Under these conditions the radiative forcing of climate by increasing O3 is relatively large. We calculate a global and annual average radiative forcing by tropospheric O3 perturbations of 0.42 W m-2, i.e., 0.51 W m-2 in the NH and 0.33 W m-2 in the SH.

  19. Tracers of Past Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, J.

    2003-12-01

    Information about how the ocean circulated during the past is useful in understanding changes in ocean and atmospheric chemistry, changes in the fluxes of heat and freshwater between the ocean and atmosphere, and changes in global wind patterns. The circulation of surface waters in the ocean leaves an imprint on sea surface temperature, and is also inextricably linked to the patterns of oceanic productivity. Much valuable information about past ocean circulation has been inferred from reconstructions of surface ocean temperature and productivity, which are covered in separate chapters. Here the focus is on the geochemical tracers that are used to infer the flow patterns and mixing of subsurface water masses.Several decades ago it was realized that chemistry of the shells of benthic foraminifera (carbon isotope and Cd/Ca ratios) carried an imprint of the nutrient content of deep-water masses (Shackleton, 1977; Broecker, 1982; Boyle, 1981). This led rapidly to the recognition that the water masses in the Atlantic Ocean were arrayed differently during the last glacial maximum than they are today, and the hypothesis that the glacial arrangement reflected a diminished contribution of low-nutrient North Atlantic deep water (NADW) ( Curry and Lohmann, 1982; Boyle and Keigwin, 1982). More detailed spatial reconstructions indicated a shallow nutrient-depleted water mass overlying a more nutrient-rich water mass in the glacial Atlantic. These findings spurred advances not only in geochemistry but in oceanography and climatology, as workers in these fields attempted to simulate the inferred glacial circulation patterns and assess the vulnerability of the modern ocean circulation to changes such as observed for the last ice age.While the nutrient distributions in the glacial Atlantic Ocean were consistent with a diminished flow of NADW, they also could have reflected an increase in inflow from the South