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Sample records for circulatory disease risks

  1. Radiation and circulatory disease.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P

    Exposure to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the heart and coronary arteries. However, only recently have studies with high-quality individual dosimetry data allowed this risk to be quantified while also adjusting for concomitant chemotherapy, and medical and lifestyle risk factors. At lower levels of exposure the evidence is less clear. In this article I review radiation-associated risks of circulatory disease in groups treated with radiotherapy for malignant and non-malignant disease, and in occupationally- or environmentally-exposed groups receiving rather lower levels of radiation dose, also for medical diagnostic purposes. Results of a meta-analysis suggest that excess relative risks per unit dose for various types of heart disease do not exhibit statistically significant (p>0.2) heterogeneity between studies. Although there are no marked discrepancies between risks derived from the high-dose therapeutic and medical diagnostic studies and from the moderate/low dose occupational and environmental studies, at least for ischemic heart disease and stroke there are indications of larger risks per unit dose for lower dose rate and fractionated exposures. Risks for stroke and other types of circulatory disease are significantly more variable (p<0.0001), possibly resulting from confounding and effect-modification by well known (but unobserved) risk factors. Adjustment for any of mean dose, dose fractionation or age at exposure results in the residual heterogeneity for cerebrovascular disease becoming non-significant. The review provides strong evidence in support of a causal association between both low and high dose radiation exposure and most types of circulatory disease.

  2. Measuring perceptions of synergistic circulatory disease risk due to smoking and the oral contraceptive pill.

    PubMed

    French, David P; Gayton, Emma L; Burton, Jessica; Thorogood, Margaret; Marteau, Theresa M

    2002-12-01

    There is evidence that the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) and smoking contribute independently to risk of circulatory disease. There is mixed evidence that the combined risk may be greater than the sum of these factors operating in isolation. Little is known about how the general population views the risks from OCP use, singly and in combination with smoking. Previous attempts at assessing whether the public views risks as operating synergistically have generally found evidence for subadditive models, where the combined risk is less than the sum of factors operating in isolation. However, concerns have been expressed over the validity of the measures of risk perception used. Therefore, this study used three distinct methods of measurement to assess the extent to which 241 undergraduate students perceive the risks of smoking and the OCP separately and combined, for circulatory disease. For all three methods, respondents read each of four vignettes describing information about a woman's risk factors (with high and low levels of both OCP and smoking), and then estimated risk of circulatory disease using one of the three risk measures. The three measures produced similar ratings. Consistent with the epidemiological evidence, information about smoking had more impact on estimates of overall risk than did information about the OCP For all three measures, responses were consistent with an additive model of risk from smoking and the OCP. This convergence of results from different methods suggests that all three methods of measurement employed, which all had a large number of response options, may be valid.

  3. Chronic low-dose exposure in the Techa River Cohort: risk of mortality from circulatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Krestinina, Lyudmila Yurievna; Epifanova, Svetlana; Silkin, Stanislav; Mikryukova, Lyudmila; Degteva, Marina; Shagina, Natalia; Akleyev, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the mortality from circulatory diseases for about 30,000 members of the Techa River cohort over the period 1950-2003, and to investigate how these rates depend on radiation doses. This population received both external and internal exposures from (90)Sr, (89)Sr, (137)Cs, and other uranium fission products as a result of waterborne releases from the Mayak nuclear facility in the Southern Urals region of the Russian Federation. The analysis included individualized estimates of the total (external plus internal) absorbed dose in muscle calculated based on the Techa River Dosimetry System 2009. The cohort-average dose to muscle tissue was 35 mGy, and the maximum dose was 510 mGy. Between 1950 and 2003, 7,595 deaths from circulatory diseases were registered among cohort members with 901,563 person years at risk. Mortality rates in the cohort were analyzed using a simple parametric excess relative risk (ERR) model. For all circulatory diseases, the estimated excess relative risk per 100 mGy with a 15-year lag period was 3.6 % with a 95 % confidence interval of 0.2-7.5 %, and for ischemic heart disease it was 5.6 % with a 95 % confidence interval of 0.1-11.9 %. A linear ERR model provided the best fit. Analyses with a lag period shorter than 15 years from the beginning of exposure did not reveal any significant risk of mortality from either all circulatory diseases or ischemic heart disease. There was no evidence of an increased mortality risk from cerebrovascular disease (p > 0.5). These results should be regarded as preliminary, since they will be updated after adjustment for smoking and alcohol consumption.

  4. [Forming a community at risk for circulatory system diseases among workers engaged into underground mining].

    PubMed

    Shliapnikov, D M; Shur, P Z; Kostarev, V G; Alexeyev, V B; Vlasova, E M; Uhabov, V M

    2015-01-01

    Forming a community at risk for circulatory system diseases will increase efficiency of medical and prophylactic measures on managing risk of arterial hypertension. Epidemiologic analysis helped to reveal reliable connection between arterial hypertension predictors and work conditions of mining machine operators and supported actualization of high occupational risk suggested in a priori evaluation. Mathematic modelling helped to forecast increase in the disease probability: with noise level of 94 dB after 10 years of work, 17.9% of workers are expected to have arterial hypertension preventing from further occupational activity. Forecasting results of arterial hypertension probability help to form risk groups for medical and preventive technologies managing occupational risk, and predictors enable to specify necessity of individual medical preventive measures.

  5. Radiation exposure and circulatory disease risk: Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor data, 1950-2003.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yukiko; Kodama, Kazunori; Nishi, Nobuo; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Suyama, Akihiko; Soda, Midori; Grant, Eric J; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Sakata, Ritsu; Moriwaki, Hiroko; Hayashi, Mikiko; Konda, Manami; Shore, Roy E

    2010-01-14

    To investigate the degree to which ionising radiation confers risk of mortality from heart disease and stroke. Prospective cohort study with more than 50 years of follow-up. Atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. 86 611 Life Span Study cohort members with individually estimated radiation doses from 0 to >3 Gy (86% received <0.2 Gy). Mortality from stroke or heart disease as the underlying cause of death and dose-response relations with atomic bomb radiation. About 9600 participants died of stroke and 8400 died of heart disease between 1950 and 2003. For stroke, the estimated excess relative risk per gray was 9% (95% confidence interval 1% to 17%, P=0.02) on the basis of a linear dose-response model, but an indication of possible upward curvature suggested relatively little risk at low doses. For heart disease, the estimated excess relative risk per gray was 14% (6% to 23%, P<0.001); a linear model provided the best fit, suggesting excess risk even at lower doses. However, the dose-response effect over the restricted dose range of 0 to 0.5 Gy was not significant. Prospective data on smoking, alcohol intake, education, occupation, obesity, and diabetes had almost no impact on the radiation risk estimates for either stroke or heart disease, and misdiagnosis of cancers as circulatory diseases could not account for the associations seen. Doses above 0.5 Gy are associated with an elevated risk of both stroke and heart disease, but the degree of risk at lower doses is unclear. Stroke and heart disease together account for about one third as many radiation associated excess deaths as do cancers among atomic bomb survivors.

  6. Radiation exposure and circulatory disease risk: Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor data, 1950-2003

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Kazunori; Nishi, Nobuo; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Suyama, Akihiko; Soda, Midori; Grant, Eric J; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Sakata, Ritsu; Moriwaki, Hiroko; Hayashi, Mikiko; Konda, Manami; Shore, Roy E

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the degree to which ionising radiation confers risk of mortality from heart disease and stroke. Design Prospective cohort study with more than 50 years of follow-up. Setting Atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Participants 86 611 Life Span Study cohort members with individually estimated radiation doses from 0 to >3 Gy (86% received <0.2 Gy). Main outcome measures Mortality from stroke or heart disease as the underlying cause of death and dose-response relations with atomic bomb radiation. Results About 9600 participants died of stroke and 8400 died of heart disease between 1950 and 2003. For stroke, the estimated excess relative risk per gray was 9% (95% confidence interval 1% to 17%, P=0.02) on the basis of a linear dose-response model, but an indication of possible upward curvature suggested relatively little risk at low doses. For heart disease, the estimated excess relative risk per gray was 14% (6% to 23%, P<0.001); a linear model provided the best fit, suggesting excess risk even at lower doses. However, the dose-response effect over the restricted dose range of 0 to 0.5 Gy was not significant. Prospective data on smoking, alcohol intake, education, occupation, obesity, and diabetes had almost no impact on the radiation risk estimates for either stroke or heart disease, and misdiagnosis of cancers as circulatory diseases could not account for the associations seen. Conclusion Doses above 0.5 Gy are associated with an elevated risk of both stroke and heart disease, but the degree of risk at lower doses is unclear. Stroke and heart disease together account for about one third as many radiation associated excess deaths as do cancers among atomic bomb survivors. PMID:20075151

  7. [Trans isomers of unsaturated fatty acids increase the risk of atherosclerosis-related circulatory system diseases].

    PubMed

    Perova, N V; Metel'skaia, V A; Boĭtsov, S A

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a review of the literature on a relevant non-drug prevention problem, namely the negative effect of trans isomers of unsaturated fatty acids (trans-UFA) on the risk of circulatory system diseases (CSD) and other chronic noncommunicable diseases. It gives data on the specific features of the structure and ability of trans-UFA to elevate the plasma levels of atherogenic low-density lipoproteins and to lower those of non/antiatherogenic high-density lipoproteins. The natural sources of their moderate content in the animal fats from ruminants and those of their redundant content in the margarines manufactured by hydrogenation of liquid vegetable oils are described. A new technology for preparing soft margarines (spreads) is presented, which can produce fatty products that do not virtually contain trans-UFA. There is evidence that trans-UFA can considerably raise the risk of CSD and their acute complications. It is concluded that the manufacture of fatty products with low and even no trans-UFA levels should be expanded in Russia to improve its population's health.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of Median Lifetime on Radiation Risks Estimates for Cancer and Circulatory Disease amongst Never-Smokers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation risks are estimated in a competing risk formalism where age or time after exposure estimates of increased risks for cancer and circulatory diseases are folded with a probability to survive to a given age. The survival function, also called the life-table, changes with calendar year, gender, smoking status and other demographic variables. An outstanding problem in risk estimation is the method of risk transfer between exposed populations and a second population where risks are to be estimated. Approaches used to transfer risks are based on: 1) Multiplicative risk transfer models -proportional to background disease rates. 2) Additive risk transfer model -risks independent of background rates. In addition, a Mixture model is often considered where the multiplicative and additive transfer assumptions are given weighted contributions. We studied the influence of the survival probability on the risk of exposure induced cancer and circulatory disease morbidity and mortality in the Multiplicative transfer model and the Mixture model. Risks for never-smokers (NS) compared to the average U.S. population are estimated to be reduced between 30% and 60% dependent on model assumptions. Lung cancer is the major contributor to the reduction for NS, with additional contributions from circulatory diseases and cancers of the stomach, liver, bladder, oral cavity, esophagus, colon, a portion of the solid cancer remainder, and leukemia. Greater improvements in risk estimates for NS s are possible, and would be dependent on improved understanding of risk transfer models, and elucidating the role of space radiation on the various stages of disease formation (e.g. initiation, promotion, and progression).

  9. [Risk of death from circulatory diseases in a cohort of patients exposed to chronic radiation].

    PubMed

    Azizova, T V; Grigoryeva, E S; Hunter, N; Pikulina, M V; Moseeva, M B

    To assess mortality from circulatory diseases (CD) in a cohort of workers exposed occupationally to chronic radiation in relation to external and internal exposure, by taking into account known non-radiation risk factors (RFs), such as smoking (including smoking index), alcohol consumption, hypertension, and body mass index. Mortality from CD (ICD-10: I00 - I99) was studied in a cohort of 22,377 nuclear power plant («Mayak» Production Association) workers exposed occupationally to chronic radiation. The study was based on the individual dose estimates of external and internal exposure taken from the new Mayak workers dosimetry system 2008 (MWDS-2008). The quantitative characteristics of smoking (smoking index) were used for the first time to assess the risk for CD in the cohort of workers exposed to chronic radiation. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between CD mortality and external gamma-dose after adjusting for the non-radiation RFs; the excess relative risk per unit dose (ERR/Gy) was 0.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0 to 0.11). Introducing an additional adjustment for internal alpha-dose resulted in a twofold increase in ERR/Gy=0.10 (95% CI: 0.02 to 0.21). There was a statistically significant increasing trend in CD mortality with the elevated absorbed dose from internal alpha-radiation in the liver (ERR/Gy=0.27; 95% CI: 0.12 to 0.48). However, ERR/Gy decreased and lost its statistical significance after adjusting for external gamma-dose. The results of this study are in good agreement with risk estimates obtained in the Japanese cohort of atomic bomb survivors and in the cohorts of occupationally exposed workers.

  10. [Oral contraception and circulatory risks].

    PubMed

    Wingrave, S J

    1984-10-01

    The longterm prospective study of health effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) conducted by the Royal College of General Practitioners compared 23,000 OC users with 23,000 controls matched for age and marital status. As of 1981, 55 deaths attributable to circulatory problems had occurred in ever-users of OCs, ciompared to 10 in controls, giving a relative risk of 4.2 for OC users. No relation was found between duration of use and mortality risk among users, although mortality risks were greater at all durations of use than for nonusers. Parity was related to mortality risk among users but not among controls. The most significant factors affecting the relation between pill use and circulatory risk were age and smoking. Among users who smoked, the risk ratios were 3.4 for those aged 25-34, 4.2 for those aged 35-44, 7.4 for those aged 45 and over, and 5.1 for the entire group. Among nonsmoking pill users, the ratios were 1.6 for those aged 25-34, 3.3 for those aged 35-44, 4.6 for those 45 and over, and 3.2 for the total sample. Among smokers, the rates of excess deaths were 1 in 10,000 for users aged 15-34, 1 in 2000 for those aged 35-44, and 1 in550 for those aged 45 and over. Among nonsmokers, the rates were 1 in 50,000 users for those aged 25-34, 1 in 6700 for those aged 35-44, and 1 in 2500 for those aged 45 and over. The majority of deaths were attributed to ischemic cardiac problems and to sub-arachnoid hemorrhages, and risks appeared to be elevated in former as well as current users. The total incidence of circulatory effects in former users appears to be elevated only for cerebrovascular disorders, but the suggestion of residual effects requires further study before conclusions can be drawn. Smokers who developed cardiovascular or cerebrovascular problems were at 2-3 times greater risk of dying than were other women. The percentages of fatal cases of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular diseases were 22.8% among ever-users who smoked, 10.9% among controls who

  11. Risk of mortality from circulatory diseases in Mayak workers cohort following occupational radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Azizova, T V; Grigorieva, E S; Hunter, N; Pikulina, M V; Moseeva, M B

    2015-09-01

    Mortality from circulatory diseases (CD) (ICD-9 codes 390-459) was studied in an extended Mayak worker cohort, which included 22,377 workers first employed at the Mayak Production Association in 1948-1982 and followed up to the end of 2008. The enlarged cohort and extended follow-up as compared to the previous analyses provided an increased number of deaths from CD and improved statistical power of this mortality study. The analyses were based on dose estimates provided by a new Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008). For the first time in the study of non-cancer effects in this cohort quantitative smoking data (smoking index) were taken into account. A significant increasing trend for CD mortality with increasing dose from external gamma-rays was found after having adjusted for non-radiation factors; the excess relative risk per unit dose (ERR/Gy) was 0.05 (95% confidence interval (CI):  >0, 0.11). Inclusion of an additional adjustment for dose from internal alpha-radiation to the liver resulted in a two-fold increase of ERR/Gy = 0.10 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.21). A significant increasing trend in CD mortality with increasing dose from internal alpha-radiation to the liver was observed (ERR/Gy = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.12, 0.48). However the ERR/Gy decreased and lost its significance after adjusting for dose from external gamma-rays. Results of the current study are in good agreement with risk estimates obtained for the Japanese LSS cohort as well as other studies of cohorts of nuclear workers.

  12. Skipping Breakfast and Risk of Mortality from Cancer, Circulatory Diseases and All Causes: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Yae; Onishi, Kazunari; Hosoda, Takenobu; Amano, Hiroki; Otani, Shinji; Kurozawa, Youichi; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Breakfast eating habits are a dietary pattern marker and appear to be a useful predictor of a healthy lifestyle. Many studies have reported the unhealthy effects of skipping breakfast. However, there are few studies on the association between skipping breakfast and mortality. In the present study, we examined the association between skipping breakfast and mortality from cancer, circulatory diseases and all causes using data from a large-scale cohort study, the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study (JACC) Study. Methods A cohort study of 34,128 men and 49,282 women aged 40–79 years was conducted, to explore the association between lifestyle and cancer in Japan. Participants completed a baseline survey during 1988 to 1990 and were followed until the end of 2009. We classified participants into two groups according to dietary habits with respect to eating or skipping breakfast and carried out intergroup comparisons of lifestyle. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results There were 5,768 deaths from cancer and 5,133 cases of death owing to circulatory diseases and 17,112 cases for all causes of mortality during the median 19.4 years follow-up. Skipping breakfast was related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. After adjusting for confounding factors, skipping breakfast significantly increased the risk of mortality from circulatory diseases [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.42] and all causes (HR = 1.43) in men and all causes mortality (HR = 1.34) in women. Conclusion Our findings showed that skipping breakfast is associated with increasing risk of mortality from circulatory diseases and all causes among men and all causes mortality among women in Japan. PMID:27046951

  13. [Circulatory disease surveillance system in Korea].

    PubMed

    Chun, Byung-Yeol

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of establishing the circulatory disease surveillance system in Korea is to ensure that the problems of circulatory disease importance are being monitored efficiently and effectively. The goals of circulatory disease surveillance system are to monitor the epidemiological trends of circulatory disease and to evaluate the outcome of health activity for controlling circulatory diseases. Surveillance system are being updated to achieve the needs for the integration of the surveillance and information system, the establishment of data standards, the electronic exchange of data, and changes in the goals of circulatory disease surveillance system to facilitate the response of this system to manage the national health problem effectively. This article provides the target diseases and determinant indicators to be monitored, structure of circulatory disease surveillance system, and many tasks and related activities that should be applied to this system.

  14. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Circulatory Disease from Exposure to Low-Level Ionizing Radiation and Estimates of Potential Population Mortality Risks

    PubMed Central

    Azizova, Tamara V.; Bazyka, Dimitry; Bouffler, Simon D.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Chekin, Sergey; Chumak, Vadim V.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; de Vathaire, Florent; Hall, Per; Harrison, John D.; Hildebrandt, Guido; Ivanov, Victor; Kashcheev, Valeriy V.; Klymenko, Sergiy V.; Kreuzer, Michaela; Laurent, Olivier; Ozasa, Kotaro; Schneider, Thierry; Tapio, Soile; Taylor, Andrew M.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Vandoolaeghe, Wendy L.; Wakeford, Richard; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Zhang, Wei; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although high doses of ionizing radiation have long been linked to circulatory disease, evidence for an association at lower exposures remains controversial. However, recent analyses suggest excess relative risks at occupational exposure levels. Objectives: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize information on circulatory disease risks associated with moderate- and low-level whole-body ionizing radiation exposures. Methods: We conducted PubMed/ISI Thomson searches of peer-reviewed papers published since 1990 using the terms “radiation” AND “heart” AND “disease,” OR “radiation” AND “stroke,” OR “radiation” AND “circulatory” AND “disease.” Radiation exposures had to be whole-body, with a cumulative mean dose of < 0.5 Sv, or at a low dose rate (< 10 mSv/day). We estimated population risks of circulatory disease from low-level radiation exposure using excess relative risk estimates from this meta-analysis and current mortality rates for nine major developed countries. Results: Estimated excess population risks for all circulatory diseases combined ranged from 2.5%/Sv [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8, 4.2] for France to 8.5%/Sv (95% CI: 4.0, 13.0) for Russia. Conclusions: Our review supports an association between circulatory disease mortality and low and moderate doses of ionizing radiation. Our analysis was limited by heterogeneity among studies (particularly for noncardiac end points), the possibility of uncontrolled confounding in some occupational groups by lifestyle factors, and higher dose groups (> 0.5 Sv) generally driving the observed trends. If confirmed, our findings suggest that overall radiation-related mortality is about twice that currently estimated based on estimates for cancer end points alone (which range from 4.2% to 5.6%/Sv for these populations). PMID:22728254

  15. Self-Reported Snoring Frequency and Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease: The Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

    PubMed Central

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sakurai, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Maeda, Kenji; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Sato, Shinichi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2012-01-01

    Background Although associations between snoring and cardiovascular disease have been reported in several prospective studies, there is limited evidence from Asian populations. The objective of this study was to determine if there is an association between self-reported snoring frequency and the incidence of cardiovascular disease in Japanese. Methods The subjects were 2350 men and 4163 women aged 40 to 69 years who lived in 3 communities in Japan. All subjects were participants in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS) and were followed for 6 years. Incidence of cardiovascular disease during the follow-up period comprised events of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, sudden cardiac death and stroke. Results During the 6-year follow-up period, 97 participants (56 men and 41 women) had cardiovascular events. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, self-reported snoring frequency was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events among women but not men. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for cardiovascular events were 0.9 (0.4–2.0) for sometimes snoring and 2.5 (1.0–6.1) for everyday snoring in women and 0.7 (0.3–1.3) and 1.0 (0.5–2.1), respectively, in men. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated the association in women; the respective hazard ratios for cardiovascular events were 0.9 (0.4–1.9) and 2.1 (0.9–5.4). Conclusions Self-reported habitual snoring was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events among Japanese women. Overweight may partly mediate this association. PMID:22447210

  16. Self-reported snoring frequency and incidence of cardiovascular disease: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS).

    PubMed

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Sakurai, Susumu; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Maeda, Kenji; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Sato, Shinichi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2012-01-01

    Although associations between snoring and cardiovascular disease have been reported in several prospective studies, there is limited evidence from Asian populations. The objective of this study was to determine if there is an association between self-reported snoring frequency and the incidence of cardiovascular disease in Japanese. The subjects were 2350 men and 4163 women aged 40 to 69 years who lived in 3 communities in Japan. All subjects were participants in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS) and were followed for 6 years. Incidence of cardiovascular disease during the follow-up period comprised events of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, sudden cardiac death and stroke. During the 6-year follow-up period, 97 participants (56 men and 41 women) had cardiovascular events. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, self-reported snoring frequency was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events among women but not men. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for cardiovascular events were 0.9 (0.4-2.0) for sometimes snoring and 2.5 (1.0-6.1) for everyday snoring in women and 0.7 (0.3-1.3) and 1.0 (0.5-2.1), respectively, in men. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated the association in women; the respective hazard ratios for cardiovascular events were 0.9 (0.4-1.9) and 2.1 (0.9-5.4). Self-reported habitual snoring was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events among Japanese women. Overweight may partly mediate this association.

  17. Determination of the Risk of Radiation-Associated Circulatory and Cancer Disease Mortality in a NASA Early Astronaut Cohort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elgart, S. R.; Chappell, L.; Milder, C. M.; Shavers, M. R.; Huff, J. L.; Little, M.; Patel, Z. S.

    2017-01-01

    Of the many possible health challenges posed during extended exploratory missions to space, the effects of space radiation on cardiovascular disease and cancer are of particular concern. There are unique challenges to estimating those radiation risks; care and appropriate and rigorous methodology should be applied when considering small cohorts such as the NASA astronaut population. The objective of this work was to determine if there was sufficient evidence for excess risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer in early NASA astronaut cohorts. NASA astronauts in selection groups 1-7 were chosen; this relatively homogeneous cohort consists of 73 white males, who unlike today's astronauts, maintained similar smoking and drinking habits to the general US population, and have published radiation doses. The participants flew in space on missions Mercury through Shuttle and received space radiation doses between 0-74.1 milligrays. Cause of death information was obtained from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) program at NASA Johnson Space Center. Mortality was compared with the US male population. Trends of mortality with dose were assessed using a logistic model, fitted by maximum likelihood. Only 32 (43.84 percent) of the 73 early astronauts have died. Standard mortality ratios (SMRs) for cancer (n=7, SMR=43.4, 95 percent CI 17.8, 84.9), all circulatory disease (n=7, SMR=33.2, 95 percent CI 13.7, 65.0), and ischemic heart disease (IHD) (n=5, SMR=40.1, 95 percent CI 13.2, 89.4) were significantly lower than for the US white male population. For cerebrovascular disease, the upper confidence interval for SMR included 100, indicating it was not significantly different from the US population (n=2, SMR = 77.0, 95 percent CI 9.4, 268.2). The power of the study is low and remains below 10 percent even when risks 10 times those reported in the literature are assumed. Due to small sample size, there is currently insufficient statistical power to evaluate space

  18. Circulatory disease mortality in the Massachusetts tuberculosis fluoroscopy cohort study.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Zablotska, Lydia B; Brenner, Alina V; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2016-03-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation is associated with circulatory disease. Risks from lower-dose fractionated exposures, such as from diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. In this study we aimed to ascertain the relationship between fractionated low-to-medium dose radiation exposure and circulatory disease mortality in a cohort of 13,568 tuberculosis patients in Massachusetts, some with fluoroscopy screenings, between 1916 and 1961 and follow-up until the end of 2002. Analysis of mortality was in relation to cumulative thyroid (cerebrovascular) or lung (all other circulatory disease) radiation dose via Poisson regression. Over the full dose range, there was no overall radiation-related excess risk of death from circulatory disease (n = 3221; excess relative risk/Gy -0.023; 95% CI -0.067, 0.028; p = 0.3574). Risk was somewhat elevated in hypertensive heart disease (n = 89; excess relative risk/Gy 0.357; 95% CI -0.043, 1.030, p = 0.0907) and slightly decreased in ischemic heart disease (n = 1950; excess relative risk/Gy -0.077; 95% CI -0.130, -0.012; p = 0.0211). However, under 0.5 Gy, there was a borderline significant increasing trend for all circulatory disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.345; 95% CI -0.032, 0.764; p = 0.0743) and for ischemic heart disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.465; 95% CI, -0.032, 1.034, p = 0.0682). Pneumolobectomy increased radiation-associated risk (excess relative risk/Gy 0.252; 95% CI 0.024, 0.579). Fractionation of dose did not modify excess risk. In summary, we found no evidence of radiation-associated excess circulatory death risk overall, but there are indications of excess circulatory death risk at lower doses (<0.5 Gy). Although consistent with other radiation-exposed groups, the indications of higher risk at lower doses are unusual and should be confirmed against other data.

  19. Space Radiation Cancer, Circulatory Disease and CNS Risks for Near Earth Asteroid and Mars Missions: Uncertainty Estimates for Never-Smokers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The uncertainties in estimating the health risks from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are a major limitation to the length of space missions and the evaluation of potential risk mitigation approaches. NASA limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced cancer death (REID), and protects against uncertainties in risks projections using an assessment of 95% confidence intervals after propagating the error from all model factors (environment and organ exposure, risk coefficients, dose-rate modifiers, and quality factors). Because there are potentially significant late mortality risks from diseases of the circulatory system and central nervous system (CNS) which are less well defined than cancer risks, the cancer REID limit is not necessarily conservative. In this report, we discuss estimates of lifetime risks from space radiation and new estimates of model uncertainties are described. The key updates to the NASA risk projection model are: 1) Revised values for low LET risk coefficients for tissue specific cancer incidence, with incidence rates transported to an average U.S. population to estimate the probability of Risk of Exposure Induced Cancer (REIC) and REID. 2) An analysis of smoking attributable cancer risks for never-smokers that shows significantly reduced lung cancer risk as well as overall cancer risks from radiation compared to risk estimated for the average U.S. population. 3) Derivation of track structure based quality functions depends on particle fluence, charge number, Z and kinetic energy, E. 4) The assignment of a smaller maximum in quality function for leukemia than for solid cancers. 5) The use of the ICRP tissue weights is shown to over-estimate cancer risks from SPEs by a factor of 2 or more. Summing cancer risks for each tissue is recommended as a more accurate approach to estimate SPE cancer risks. 6) Additional considerations on circulatory and CNS disease risks. Our analysis shows that an individual s

  20. [Prevention of circulatory system diseases in underground mining workers].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, E M; Alexeyev, M B; Shliapnikov, D M; Nosov, A E; Barannikov, V G

    2015-01-01

    The article covers results of preventive measures in workers engaged into underground mining. Those measures are aimed to prevent occupationally mediated health disorders resulting in circulatory diseases. The prophylaxis was proven effective on premorbid condition--that was demonstrated in reliable decrease of cause-effect relationship intensity for health disorders in workers subjected to prophylactic measures. Transitory disablement morbidity due to cicrulatory system diseases decreased. Situational modelling of risk changes for the studied group demonstrated changes of diseases risk under medical prophylactic measures. After the prophylaxis, the risk demonstrated 3.1 times decrease.

  1. Review and meta-analysis of epidemiological associations between low/moderate doses of ionizing radiation and circulatory disease risks, and their possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Little, M P; Tawn, E J; Tzoulaki, I; Wakeford, R; Hildebrandt, G; Paris, F; Tapio, S; Elliott, P

    2010-05-01

    Although the link between high doses of ionizing radiation and damage to the heart and coronary arteries has been well established for some time, the association between lower-dose exposures and late occurring cardiovascular disease has only recently begun to emerge, and is still controversial. In this paper, we extend an earlier systematic review by Little et al. on the epidemiological evidence for associations between low and moderate doses of ionizing radiation exposure and late occurring blood circulatory system disease. Excess relative risks per unit dose in epidemiological studies vary over at least two orders of magnitude, possibly a result of confounding and effect modification by well-known (but unobserved) risk factors, and there is statistically significant (p < 0.00001) heterogeneity between the risks. This heterogeneity is reduced, but remains significant, if adjustments are made for the effects of fractionated delivery or if there is stratification by endpoint (cardiovascular disease vs. stroke, morbidity vs. mortality). One possible biological mechanism is damage to endothelial cells and subsequent induction of an inflammatory response, although it seems unlikely that this would extend to low-dose and low-dose-rate exposure. A recent paper of Little et al. proposed an arguably more plausible mechanism for fractionated low-dose effects, based on monocyte cell killing in the intima. Although the predictions of the model are consistent with the epidemiological data, the experimental predictions made have yet to be tested. Further epidemiological and biological evidence will allow a firmer conclusion to be drawn.

  2. Risks of circulatory diseases among Mayak PA workers with radiation doses estimated using the improved Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008.

    PubMed

    Moseeva, Maria B; Azizova, Tamara V; Grigoryeva, Evgenia S; Haylock, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The new Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008) was published in 2013 and supersedes the Doses-2005 dosimetry system for Mayak Production Association (PA) workers. It provides revised external and internal dose estimates based on the updated occupational history data. Using MWDS-2008, a cohort of 18,856 workers first employed at one of the main Mayak PA plants during 1948-1972 and followed up to 2005 was identified. Incidence and mortality risks from ischemic heart disease (IHD) (International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes 410-414) and from cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) (ICD-9 codes 430-438) were examined in this cohort and compared with previously published risk estimates in the same cohort based on the Doses-2005 dosimetry system. Significant associations were observed between doses from external gamma-rays and IHD and CVD incidence and also between internal doses from alpha-radiation and IHD mortality and CVD incidence. The estimates of excess relative risk (ERR)/Gy were consistent with those estimates from the previous studies based on Doses-2005 system apart from the relationship between CVD incidence and internal liver dose where the ERR/Gy based on MWDS-2008 was just over three times higher than the corresponding estimate based on Doses-2005 system. Adjustment for smoking status did not show any effect on the estimates of risk from internal alpha-particle exposure.

  3. Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Mark P.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

  4. Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes Associated with Perioperative Transfusion-associated Circulatory Overload.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Leanne; Jia, Qing; Subramanian, Arun; Yadav, Hemang; Schroeder, Darrell R; Kor, Daryl J

    2017-03-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload remains underappreciated in the perioperative environment. The authors aimed to characterize risk factors for perioperative transfusion-associated circulatory overload and better understand its impact on patient-important outcomes. In this case-control study, 163 adults undergoing noncardiac surgery who developed perioperative transfusion-associated circulatory overload were matched with 726 transfused controls who did not develop respiratory complications. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate potential risk factors for transfusion-associated circulatory overload. The need for postoperative mechanical ventilation, lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and mortality were compared. For this cohort, the mean age was 71 yr and 56% were men. Multivariable analysis revealed the following independent predictors of transfusion-associated circulatory overload: emergency surgery, chronic kidney disease, left ventricular dysfunction, previous β-adrenergic receptor antagonist use, isolated fresh frozen plasma transfusion (vs. isolated erythrocyte transfusion), mixed product transfusion (vs. isolated erythrocyte transfusion), and increasing intraoperative fluid administration. Patients who developed transfusion-associated circulatory overload were more likely to require postoperative mechanical ventilation (73 vs. 33%; P < 0.001) and experienced prolonged intensive care unit (11.1 vs. 6.5 days; P < 0.001) and hospital lengths of stay (19.9 vs. 9.6 days; P < 0.001). Survival was significantly reduced (P < 0.001) in transfusion recipients who developed transfusion-associated circulatory overload (1-yr survival 72 vs. 84%). Perioperative transfusion-associated circulatory overload was associated with a protracted hospital course and increased mortality. Efforts to minimize the incidence of transfusion-associated circulatory overload should focus on the judicious use of

  5. Current discussions of DDREF, cataracts, circulatory diseases and dose limits.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wolfgang-Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Although more than a century of radiation research has provided a lot of insight into radiation risk, there are still fields that need clarification. This is particularly true for the low dose range, meaning doses up to ∼100 mSv. One can detect biological effects in that dose range, but it is unclear whether these biological effects like mutations or chromosomal aberrations translate into health effects like cancer, cataracts or circulatory diseases. Thus, for radiation protection purposes, assumptions have to made that must be reappraised on the basis of new findings from time to time. Affected by new insights are currently the DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), cataracts and circulatory diseases. If the new findings are very convincing, dose limits have to be changed at short notice. If there are only weak indications, stability of the radiation protection system is more important than changing limits all the time. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The Circulatory System in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, Steven M; Waldman, Brett

    2016-07-01

    In the cirrhotic liver, distortion of the normal liver architecture is caused by structural and vascular changes. Portal hypertension is often associated with a hyperdynamic circulatory syndrome in which cardiac output and heart rate are increased and systemic vascular resistance is decreased. The release of several vasoactive substances is the primary factor involved in the reduction of mesenteric arterial resistance, resulting in sodium and water retention with eventual formation of ascites. Management of these patients with acute cardiac dysfunction often requires invasive hemodynamic monitoring in an intensive care unit setting to tailor decisions regarding use of fluids and vasopressors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk Factors and Outcomes in Transfusion-associated Circulatory Overload

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Edward L.; Kwaan, Nicholas; Looney, Mark R.; Gajic, Ognjen; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Gropper, Michael A.; Koenigsberg, Monique; Wilson, Greg; Matthay, Michael; Bacchetti, Peter; Toy, Pearl

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transfusion-associated circulatory overload is characterized by new respiratory distress and hydrostatic pulmonary edema within 6 hours after blood transfusion, but its risk factors and outcomes are poorly characterized. METHODS Using a case control design, we enrolled 83 patients with severe transfusion-associated circulatory overload identified by active surveillance for hypoxemia and 163 transfused controls at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minn) hospitals. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression, and survival and length of stay were analyzed using proportional hazard models. RESULTS Transfusion-associated circulatory overload was associated with chronic renal failure (OR 27.0; 95% CI, 5.2–143), a past history of heart failure (OR 6.6; 95% CI, 2.1–21), hemorrhagic shock (OR 113; 95% CI, 14.1–903), number of blood products transfused (OR 1.11 per unit; 95% CI, 1.01–1.22), and fluid balance per hour (OR 9.4 per liter; 95% CI, 3.1–28). Patients with transfusion-associated circulatory overload had significantly increased in-hospital mortality (hazard ratio 3.20; 95% CI, 1.23–8.10) after controlling for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II (APACHE-II) score, and longer hospital and intensive care unit lengths of stay. CONCLUSIONS The risk of transfusion-associated circulatory overload increases with the number of blood products administered and a positive fluid balance, and in patients with pre-existing heart failure and chronic renal failure. These data, if replicated, could be used to construct predictive algorithms for transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and subsequent modifications of transfusion practice might prevent morbidity and mortality associated with this complication. PMID:23357450

  8. [The diseases of circulatory system in employees of railway transport].

    PubMed

    Molodtsov, R N; Shemetova, G N

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the epidemiologic and medical social aspects of diseases of circulatory system in employees of railway transport in 2000-2010 exemplified by Privolzhskiy railroad. The established tendencies in prevalence of pathology of cardio-vascular system in railroad workers makes the issues of practical implementation of priority of prevention in the organization of medical care to this group of patients to come to foreground. The main directions for complex prevention of diseases of circulatory system in employees of railway transport are presented.

  9. Fasting and non-fasting triglycerides and risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease in Japanese men and women: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS).

    PubMed

    Iso, Hiroyasu; Imano, Hironori; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ohira, Tetsuya; Cui, Renzhe; Noda, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shinichi; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Hitsumoto, Shinichi; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Kitamura, Akihiko

    2014-11-01

    Non-fasting triglycerides were reported to have a greater impact on risk of ischemic cardiovascular events than fasting triglycerides. However, evidence from Asia, where the prevalence of dyslipidemia is generally lower, has been limited. We used 1975-1986 baseline surveys to investigate cohort data of 10,659 (4264 men and 6395 women) residents aged 40-69 years, initially free from ischemic heart disease and stroke, in four Japanese communities. Serum triglyceride concentrations at baseline were obtained for 2424 fasting (≥8 h after meal) and 8235 non-fasting (<8 h after meal) participants. During the 22-year follow-up, 284 (165 men and 119 women) developed ischemic heart disease and 666 (349 men and 317 women) ischemic stroke. After adjustment for age, sex and known cardiovascular risk factors, multivariable hazard ratios (95%CI) of ischemic cardiovascular disease (ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke) for the highest versus lowest quartiles of triglycerides were 1.71 (1.14-2.59), P for trend = 0.013, for fasting participants and 1.60 (1.25-2.05), P for trend <0.001, for non-fasting participants. The positive associations did not differ between fasting and non-fasting men, while they were strong for non-fasting women. They were stronger for ischemic heart disease than for ischemic stroke. After further adjustment for HDL-cholesterol, these associations were slightly attenuated, but remained statistically significant. Non-fasting as well as fasting triglycerides are predictive of risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease for Japanese men, as are non-fasting triglycerides for women. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Physiological characteristics of patients with schizophrenia prematurely dying from circulatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pao-Huan; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Kuo, Chian-Jue; Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Huang, Shou-Hung; Chen, Chiao-Chicy

    2016-09-01

    Patients with schizophrenia before reaching geriatric age are at high risk of circulatory mortality. However, investigations are lacking on the characteristics of physiological measurement among these at-risk patients. In this study, we followed acutely inpatients with schizophrenia disorder for cause of death through record linkage to the Death Certification System in Taiwan. Cases of patients who died because of circulatory morbidity (ICD-9 401-443) before turning 65 years old were used. Each schizophrenia case was then matched with two mentally healthy controls for the age and sex, and date of laboratory examination. Clinical data of all subjects were obtained by reviewing medical records. Totally, 81 patients with schizophrenia who died from circulatory diseases at mean ages of 48.0 ± 10.7 years were investigated. The mean age at the final acute psychiatric hospitalization was 43.0 ± 10.9 years. Multivariate analysis showed that elevated fasting serum glucose levels (95% confidence interval [CI] for odds ratio (OR) = 1.00-1.03), blood leukocyte counts (95% CI for odds ratio (OR) = 1.07-1.55), and heart rates on electrocardiogram (95% CI for OR = 1.04-1.10) in the final psychiatric hospitalization collectively provided the predictive validity for premature circulatory death. Systemic inflammatory activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction along with dysregulation of glucose metabolism rather than lipids could be the physiological characteristics of schizophrenia patients at risk of premature circulatory mortality. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Burden of Circulatory System Diseases and Ignored Barriers of Knowledge Translation

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri, Hamed-Basir; Saravani, Shahzad; Shokraneh, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Circulatory system disease raise third highest disability-adjusted life years among Iranians and ischemic cardiac diseases are main causes for such burden. Despite available evidences on risk factors of the disease, no effective intervention was implemented to control and prevent the disease. This paper non-systematically reviews available literature on the problem, solutions, and barriers of implementation of knowledge translation in Iran. It seems that there are ignored factors such as cultural and motivational issues in knowledge translation interventions but there are hopes for implementation of started projects and preparation of students as next generation of knowledge transferors. PMID:24250994

  12. [Perioperative respiratory and circulatory management for chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Arai, Masayasu

    2013-11-01

    To avoid perioperative cardiac complications and deterioration of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD), anesthesiologists are required to manage respiration and circulation properly. Three mechanisms are considered to worsen renal function during inappropriate mechanical ventilation; first, hypercapnia or hypoxemia, second, unstable systemic hemodynamic, and third, systemic inflammatory mediators derived from pulmonary biotrauma. Many circulatory problems are present in CKD patients, for example, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, arterial sclerotic valve disease, salt and water retention etc. Blood pressure in CKD patients should be controlled properly before surgery. Renal blood flow and renal perfusion pressure should be maintained by aggressive fluid therapy to avoid perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) on CKD, while cardiac congestion should also be avoided. Perioerative renal protective effects of human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP) on CKD still needs further investigation. Appropriate hemodynamic monitoring, including direct arterial pressure, left ventricular preload, intravascular volume and cardiac output could be helpful for anesthesiologists to manage CKD patients safely. In the area of CKD and anesthesia, there is lack of evidence in respiratory and circulatory strategies. Prospective studies in these aspects are required in the future.

  13. Radiation-associated circulatory disease mortality in a pooled analysis of 77,275 patients from the Massachusetts and Canadian tuberculosis fluoroscopy cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Van; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Brenner, Alina V.; Little, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    High-dose ionising radiation is associated with circulatory disease. Risks associated with lower-dose (<0.5 Gy) exposures remain unclear, with little information on risk modification by age at exposure, years since exposure or dose-rate. Tuberculosis patients in Canada and Massachusetts received multiple diagnostic x-ray fluoroscopic exposures, over a wide range of ages, many at doses <0.5 Gy. We evaluated risks of circulatory-disease mortality associated with <0.5 Gy radiation exposure in a pooled cohort of 63,707 patients in Canada and 13,568 patients in Massachusetts. Under 0.5 Gy there are increasing trends for all circulatory disease (n = 10,209; excess relative risk/Gy = 0.246; 95% CI 0.036, 0.469; p = 0.021) and for ischaemic heart disease (n = 6410; excess relative risk/Gy = 0.267; 95% CI 0.003, 0.552; p = 0.048). All circulatory-disease and ischaemic-heart-disease risk reduces with increasing time since exposure (p < 0.005). Over the entire dose range, there are negative mortality dose trends for all circulatory disease (p = 0.014) and ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.003), possibly due to competing causes of death over this dose interval.These results confirm and extend earlier findings and strengthen the evidence for circulatory-disease mortality radiation risk at doses <0.5 Gy. The limited information on well-known lifestyle/medical risk factors for circulatory disease implies that confounding of the dose trend cannot be entirely excluded. PMID:28287147

  14. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest for hemiarch replacement in a pediatric patient with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Kuwajima, Ken; Yoshitani, Kenji; Kato, Shinya; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Kamei, Masataka; Ohnishi, Yoshihiko

    2014-08-01

    Moyamoya disease is a chronic cerebrovascular occlusive disease, occurring predominantly in young populations, that causes cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage. Patients with moyamoya disease are at high risk of neurological complications during cardiac surgery because of perioperative hemodynamic changes. However, there is no established evidence on temperature management during cardiopulmonary bypass. Previous reports described normothermia or mild to moderate hypothermia during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with moyamoya disease; however, surgical conditions, such as not having enough space to clamp the aorta or a clean surgical field, sometimes force us to use deep hypothermic circuratory arrest. We report a successful case of a pediatric patient with moyamoya disease who underwent deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (18 °C) for hemiarch replacement without neurological complications. Deep hypothermia may be an alternative technique for achieving cerebral protection in the context of moyamoya disease.

  15. [The gender aspects of diet factors effect on development of diseases of circulatory system among rural population].

    PubMed

    Kamalova, F M; Valeeva, E R

    2014-01-01

    The unhealthy diet is one of important controllable risk factors of development of noninfectious diseases. The gender differences in attitude to one's own health confirm significance of their effect on health condition. The study was carried out to establish the effect of diet factors on the rate of diseases of circulatory system in rural population with consideration of gender distribution. The analysis of results of sampling examination of rural population established that 51% of disease rate in males and 22% of disease rate in females are related to diseases of circulatory system. In males and females rate of diseases of circulatory system is determined by diet factors. The direction of relationship is direct and inverse, differs in males and females and depends on diet factors. The gender differences were manifested not only in conditionality of rate of diseases of circulatory system by diet factors but also by their mutual interaction. The health management of rural population is based on examination and analysis of relationship between health of rural population and factors of their diet.

  16. [The disease burden of cardiovascular and circulatory diseases in China, 1990 and 2010].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangmei; Liu, Yunning; Wang, Lijun; Yin, Peng; Liu, Shiwei; You, Jinling; Zeng, Xinying; Zhou, Maigeng

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the death status of disease burden of cardiovascular and circulatory diseases in 1990 and 2010 in China, and to provide the basic information for cardiovascular and circulatory disease prevention and control. Using the results of the Global Burden of Diseases Study 2010 (GBD 2010) to describe the cardiovascular and circulatory diseases deaths status and disease burden in China. The measurement index included the mortality, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLL), years lived with disability (YLD), and disability-adjusted life years (DALY). At the same time, we used the population from 2010 national census as standard population to calculate the age-standardized mortality rate and DALY rate, YLL rate and YLD rates which will describe the mortality status and disease burden of total and different types of cardiovascular disease. We also calculated the change in 1990 and 2010 for all indexes, to describe the change of the burden of disease in the 20 years. In 2010, the total deaths of cardiovascular and circulatory diseases reached 3.136 2 million, the mortality rate reached 233.70 per 100 000 people and the age-standardized mortality rate was 256.90 per 100 000 people. The total DALYs, YLLs, and YLDs of cardiovascular and circulatory diseases reached 58.2055, 54.0488, and 4.1568 million person-years, respectively, and the age-standardized DALY rate, YLL rate and YLD rate were 4 639.04, 4 313.13, 325.91 per 100 000. In 1990, the deaths only 2.1675 million and the DALYs, YLLs and YLDs were 45.2679, 42.2922, and 2.9757 million person-years. The age-standardized mortality rate was 300.30 per 100 000 people. And the age-standardized DALY rate, YLL rate and YLD rate were 5 872.58, 5 523.42 and 349.16 per 100 000. Compared with the result in 1990, the total deaths, DALYs, YLLs, and YLDs were increased 44.72%, 28.58%, 27.80%, and 39.68%, respectively, while the age-standardized mortality rate, age-standardized DALY rate, age-standardized YLL rate, and

  17. [Surgical correction of circulatory disturbance of the vertebral artery in trauma and degenerative diseases].

    PubMed

    Shchedrenok, V V; Zakhmatova, T V; Zuev, I V; Moguchaia, O V; Topol'skova, N V; Sebelev, K I; Malova, A M

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of examination and surgery of 185 patients with degenerative diseases as well as with a cervical spine trauma. The circulatory disturbance of the vertebral artery took place in all patients. A different degree of changes was observed in color duplex scanning. There were minor circulatory disturbances, course deformations (angular, C, S, V-shaped twists) and dissection of the vertebral artery. Color duplex scanning allowed estimating of local and system hemodynamic significance of extravasal influences. The strategy of treatment and volume of surgical interference were defined by the degree of circulatory disturbance in the vertebral artery.

  18. Mortality from Circulatory System Diseases and Malformations in Children in the State of Rio de Janeiro.

    PubMed

    Salim, Thais Rocha; Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes de

    2016-06-01

    The epidemiological profile of mortality in a population is important for the institution of measures to improve health care and reduce mortality Objective: To estimate mortality rates and the proportional mortality from cardiovascular diseases and malformations of the circulatory system in children and adolescents. This is a descriptive study of mortality from cardiovascular diseases, malformations of the circulatory system, from all causes, ill-defined causes and external causes in children and adolescents in the state of Rio de Janeiro from 1996 to 2012. Populations were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística - IBGE) and deaths obtained from the Department of Informatics of the Unified Health System (DATASUS)/Ministry of Health. There were 115,728 deaths from all causes, 69,757 in males. The annual mortality from cardiovascular diseases was 2.7/100,000 in men and 2.6/100,000 in women. The annual mortality from malformations of the circulatory system was 7.5/100,000 in men and 6.6/100,000 in women. Among the specific causes of circulatory diseases, cardiomyopathies had the highest rates of annual proportional mortality, and from malformations of the circulatory system, it occurred due to unspecified malformations of the circulatory system, at all ages and in both genders. Mortality from malformations of the circulatory system was most striking in the first years of life, while cardiovascular diseases were more relevant in adolescents. Low access to prenatal diagnosis or at birth probably prevented the proper treatment of malformations of the circulatory system.

  19. Mortality from Circulatory System Diseases and Malformations in Children in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Thais Rocha; Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; de Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiological profile of mortality in a population is important for the institution of measures to improve health care and reduce mortality Objective To estimate mortality rates and the proportional mortality from cardiovascular diseases and malformations of the circulatory system in children and adolescents. Methods This is a descriptive study of mortality from cardiovascular diseases, malformations of the circulatory system, from all causes, ill-defined causes and external causes in children and adolescents in the state of Rio de Janeiro from 1996 to 2012. Populations were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística - IBGE) and deaths obtained from the Department of Informatics of the Unified Health System (DATASUS)/Ministry of Health. Results There were 115,728 deaths from all causes, 69,757 in males. The annual mortality from cardiovascular diseases was 2.7/100,000 in men and 2.6/100,000 in women. The annual mortality from malformations of the circulatory system was 7.5/100,000 in men and 6.6/100,000 in women. Among the specific causes of circulatory diseases, cardiomyopathies had the highest rates of annual proportional mortality, and from malformations of the circulatory system, it occurred due to unspecified malformations of the circulatory system, at all ages and in both genders. Conclusion Mortality from malformations of the circulatory system was most striking in the first years of life, while cardiovascular diseases were more relevant in adolescents. Low access to prenatal diagnosis or at birth probably prevented the proper treatment of malformations of the circulatory system. PMID:27192384

  20. No evidence for an increase in circulatory disease mortality in astronauts following space radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Little, Mark P

    2016-08-01

    Previous analysis has shown that astronauts have a significantly lower standardized mortality ratio for circulatory disease mortality compared to the U.S. population, which is consistent with the rigorous selection process and healthy lifestyles of astronauts, and modest space radiation exposures from past space missions. However, a recent report by Delp et al. estimated the proportional mortality ratio for ages of 55-64 y of Apollo lunar mission astronauts to claim a high risk of cardiovascular disease due to space radiation compared to the U.S. population or to non-flight astronauts. In this Commentary we discuss important deficiencies in the methods and assumptions on radiation exposures used by Delp et al. that we judge cast serious doubt on their conclusions. Copyright © 2016 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). All rights reserved.

  1. No evidence for an increase in circulatory disease mortality in astronauts following space radiation exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Little, Mark P.

    2016-08-01

    Previous analysis has shown that astronauts have a significantly lower standardized mortality ratio for circulatory disease mortality compared to the U.S. population, which is consistent with the rigorous selection process and healthy lifestyles of astronauts, and modest space radiation exposures from past space missions. However, a recent report by Delp et al. estimated the proportional mortality ratio for ages of 55-64 y of Apollo lunar mission astronauts to claim a high risk of cardiovascular disease due to space radiation compared to the U.S. population or to non-flight astronauts. In this Commentary we discuss important deficiencies in the methods and assumptions on radiation exposures used by Delp et al. that we judge cast serious doubt on their conclusions.

  2. Does uranium induce circulatory diseases? First results from a French cohort of uranium workers.

    PubMed

    Guseva Canu, Irina; Garsi, Jerome-Philippe; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Jacob, Sophie; Collomb, Philippe; Acker, Alain; Laurier, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    Increased risk of circulatory system diseases (CSDs) was observed in nuclear workers handling uranium and plutonium in Russia and the UK. This work examines the CSD mortality after chronic intake of uranium among 2897 workers (79,892 person-years) at a uranium processing plant (1960-2006) in France. Cumulative exposure to different uranium compounds, classified by their isotopic composition and solubility type, was quantified on the basis of a plant-specific job-exposure matrix and individual job histories. HRs and associated 95% CI for CSD (n = 111) and specific CSD categories were estimated using Cox regression models, stratified on sex and birth cohort and adjusted for potential confounders. The effect of smoking was analysed among 260 smokers (42 CSD deaths). Compared to unexposed workers, CSD mortality was increased among workers exposed to slowly soluble reprocessed uranium (RPU) (HR = 2.13, 95% CI = 0.96 to 4.70) and natural uranium (HR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.69). The risk increased with cumulative exposure and exposure duration. In the subgroup of smokers, the risk estimates were higher but with larger CIs: HR=1.91 (95% CI = 0.92 to 3.98) for natural uranium and HR = 4.78 (95% CI = 1.38 to 16.50) for RPU. The authors observed that exposure to slowly soluble uranium, namely RPU, may increase the risk of CSD mortality. However, these results are preliminary since the study is lacking statistical power and many other biological and lifestyle-related factors may cause CSD. More detailed investigations are necessary to confirm these findings and analyse in depth the effects of internal radiation exposure on the circulatory system.

  3. Second-hand smoke, cotinine levels, and risk of circulatory mortality in a large cohort study of never-smokers.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Valentina; Neasham, David; Airoldi, Luisa; Ferrari, Pietro; Jenab, Mazda; Boffetta, Paolo; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boeing, Heiner; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Arriola, Larraitz; Lund, Eiliv; Bueno-De-Mesquita, Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Melander, Olle; Hallmans, Goran; Riboli, Elio; Saracci, Rodolfo; Vineis, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Exposure to second-hand smoke has been shown to be associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in several, but not all, epidemiologic studies. Our aim was to investigate the risk of circulatory death associated with exposure to second-hand smoke in never-smokers in a very large prospective study, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. A secondary aim was to use cotinine levels for cross-validating self-reported second-hand smoke exposure. Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the risk of death due to circulatory causes associated with second-hand smoke exposure in 135,233 never-smokers. Exposure to second-hand smoke was assessed through a questionnaire at enrollment and then validated against plasma cotinine measurements in a subsample. Study participants who reported second-hand smoke exposure at home had higher cotinine levels (median plasma cotinine concentration in exposed = 0.82 microg/L; in those unexposed 0.02 microg/L). Second-hand smoke exposure at home was associated with an increased risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.38 [95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.90]), all circulatory diseases (1.28 [0.98-1.69]), and coronary heart disease (1.31 [0.83-2.08]) after adjustment for age, sex, education, physical activity, and body mass index. Dose-response relationships were observed between exposure to second-hand smoke at home and risk of circulatory death (HR per each additional hour/d = 1.25 [1.04-1.50]). Having a partner who smokes more than 30 cigarettes per day considerably increased the risk of a circulatory death (2.94 [1.11-7.78]). Second-hand smoke exposure at home was not associated with total mortality (1.03 [0.93-1.13]). Exposure to second-hand smoke at home (as confirmed by plasma cotinine levels) increases the risk of cardiovascular mortality.

  4. A Review of Non-Cancer Effects, Especially Circulatory and Ocular Diseases1

    PubMed Central

    Little, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    There is a well-established association between high doses (> 5 Gy) of ionizing radiation exposure and damage to the heart and coronary arteries, although only recently have studies with high quality individual dosimetry been conducted that would enable quantification of this risk adjusting for concomitant chemotherapy. The association between lower dose exposures and late occurring circulatory disease has only recently begun to emerge in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in various occupationally-exposed cohorts, and is still controversial. Excess relative risks per unit dose in moderate and low dose epidemiological studies are somewhat variable, possibly a result of confounding and effect modification by well known (but unobserved) risk factors. Radiation doses of 1 Gy or more are associated with increased risk of posterior subcapsular cataract. Accumulating evidence from the Japanese atomic bomb survivors, Chernobyl liquidators, US astronauts and various other exposed groups suggest that cortical cataracts may also be associated with ionizing radiation, although there is little evidence that nuclear cataracts are radiogenic. The dose response appears to be linear, although modest thresholds (of no more than about 0.6 Gy) cannot be ruled out. A variety of other non-malignant effects have been observed after moderate/low dose exposure in various groups, in particular respiratory and digestive disease and central nervous system (and in particular neuro-cognitive) damage. However, because these are generally only observed in isolated groups, or because the evidence is excessively heterogeneous, these associations must be treated with caution. PMID:23903347

  5. [Procedure for coding the causes of death in some circulatory system diseases].

    PubMed

    Kakorina, E P; Aleksandrova, G A; Frank, G A; Mal'kov, P G; Zaĭratians, O V; Vaĭsman, D Sh

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the unification of requirements for coding the causes of death in circulatory system diseases, by taking into account the recently updated ICD-10 and the Consensus of the Expert Council Task Force on Pathological Anatomy, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation (27 February 2014).

  6. Serum Albumin and High-Sensitivity C-reactive Protein are Independent Risk Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease in Middle-Aged Japanese Individuals: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Sachimi; Kitamura, Akihiko; Imano, Hironori; Cui, Renzhe; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Umesawa, Mitsumasa; Muraki, Isao; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: It is important to explore predictive markers other than conventional cardiovascular risk factors for early detection and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD), a major risk factor for end-stage renal failure. We hypothesized that serum albumin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to be independent markers, and examined their associations with the risk of CKD. Methods: We examined the associations of serum albumin and hs-CRP levels with the risk of incident CKD, in 2535 Japanese adults aged 40–69 years without CKD at baseline during a median 9.0-year follow-up after adjustment for known cardiovascular risk factors. Results: During the follow-up period, 367 cases of CKD developed. In multivariable analyses adjusted for known risk factors, the CKD hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest versus lowest quartiles of serum albumin levels were 0.69 (0.40–1.17) for men and 0.42 (0.28–0.64) for women. Corresponding values for hs-CRP were 0.95 (0.54–1.67) for men and 1.85 (1.25 -2.75) for women. The association of combined serum albumin and hs-CRP with the risk of CKD was examined for women. The hazard ratio was 1.72 (1.17–2.54) for low versus higher albumin levels at lower hs-CRP levels, but such an association was not observed at high hs-CRP level. The hazard ratio was 1.96 (1.44–2.66) for high versus lower hs-CRP levels at higher serum albumin levels, but such association was not observed at low serum albumin level. Conclusion: Both low serum albumin and high hs-CRP levels were predictive of CKD for women. PMID:26911856

  7. [Application of artificial neural networks in forecasting the number of circulatory system diseases death toll].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Shao, Yi; Shang, Kezheng; Wang, Shigong; Wang, Jinyan

    2014-09-01

    Set up the model of forecasting the number of circulatorys death toll based on back-propagation (BP) artificial neural networks discuss the relationship between the circulatory system diseases death toll meteorological factors and ambient air pollution. The data of tem deaths, meteorological factors, and ambient air pollution within the m 2004 to 2009 in Nanjing were collected. On the basis of analyzing the ficient between CSDDT meteorological factors and ambient air pollution, leutral network model of CSDDT was built for 2004 - 2008 based on factors and ambient air pollution within the same time, and the data of 2009 est the predictive power of the model. There was a closely system diseases relationship between meteorological factors, ambient air pollution and the circulatory system diseases death toll. The ANN model structure was 17 -16 -1, 17 input notes, 16 hidden notes and 1 output note. The training precision was 0. 005 and the final error was 0. 004 999 42 after 487 training steps. The results of forecast show that predict accuracy over 78. 62%. This method is easy to be finished with smaller error, and higher ability on circulatory system death toll on independent prediction, which can provide a new method for forecasting medical-meteorological forecast and have the value of further research.

  8. Alcohol increases circulatory disease mortality in Russia: acute and chronic effects or misattribution of cause?

    PubMed Central

    Leon, David A; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M; McKee, Martin; Kiryanov, Nikolay; Andreev, Evgueny

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a consensus that the large fluctuations in mortality seen in Russia in the past two decades can be attributed to trends in alcohol consumption. However, the precise mechanisms linking alcohol to mortality from circulatory disease remain unclear. It has recently been argued that a substantial number of such deaths currently ascribed to cardiovascular disorders are misclassified cases of acute alcohol poisoning. Methods Analysis of routine mortality data and of a case–control study of mortality among working-age (25–54 years) men occurring in the Russian city of Izhevsk, west of the Ural mountains, 2003–05. Interviews were carried out with proxy informants for both the dead cases (N = 1750) and the controls (N = 1750) selected at random from a population register. Mortality was analysed according to indicators of alcohol problems. Results Hazardous drinking was associated with an increased risk of death from circulatory diseases as a whole [odds ratio (OR) = 4.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.23, 5.31] adjusted for age, smoking and education. The association with alcoholic cardiomyopathy was particularly strong (OR = 15.7, 95% CI 9.5, 25.9). Although there was no association with deaths from myocardial infarction (MI; OR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.59, 2.32), there was a strong association with the aggregate of all other ischaemic heart disease (IHD; OR = 4.04, 95% CI 2.79, 5.84). Stronger associations for each of these causes (other than MI) were seen with whether or not the man had drunk very heavily in the previous week. However, associations also remained when analyses were restricted to subjects with no evidence of recent heavy drinking, suggesting that misclassification of acute alcohol poisonings is unlikely to explain these overall associations. Conclusion Taken as a whole, the available evidence suggests that the positive association of alcohol with increased cardiovascular disease mortality may be best explained as

  9. Favorable Circulatory System Outcomes as Adjuvant Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Treatment for Cerebrovascular Diseases in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Hong, Yu-Chiang; Chang, Ku-Chou; Shih, Chun-Chuan; Hung, Jen-Wen; Liu, Chia-Wei; Tan, Teng-Yeow; Huang, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study searches the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) used in a previous project, aiming for reconstructing possible cerebrovascular disease-related groups (DRG),and estimating the costs between cerebrovascular disease and related diseases. Methods and Materials We conducted a nationwide retrospective cohort study in stroke inpatients, we examined the overall costs in 3 municipalities in Taiwan, by evaluating the possible costs of the expecting diagnosis related group (DRG) by using the international classification of diseases version-9 (ICD-9) system, and the overall analysis of the re-admission population that received traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment and those who did not. Results The trend demonstrated that the non-participant costs were consistent with the ICD-9 categories (430 to 437) because similarities existed between years 2006 to 2007. Among the TCM patients, a wide variation and additional costs were found compared to non-TCM patients during these 2 years. The average re-admission duration was significantly shorter for TCM patients, especially those initially diagnosed with ICD 434 during the first admission. In addition, TCM patients demonstrated more severe general symptoms, which incurred high conventional treatment costs, and could result in re-admission for numerous reasons. However, in Disease 7 of ICD-9 category, representing the circulatory system was most prevalent in non-TCM inpatients, which was the leading cause of re-admission. Conclusion We concluded that favorable circulatory system outcomes were in adjuvant TCM treatment inpatients, there were less re-admission for circulatory system events and a two-third reduction of re-admission within ICD-9 code 430 to 437, compared to non-TCM ones. However, there were shorter re-admission duration other than circulatory system events by means of unfavorable baseline condition. PMID:24475108

  10. Favorable circulatory system outcomes as adjuvant traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment for cerebrovascular diseases in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Hung, Yu-Chiang; Hong, Yu-Chiang; Chang, Ku-Chou; Shih, Chun-Chuan; Hung, Jen-Wen; Liu, Chia-Wei; Tan, Teng-Yeow; Huang, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This study searches the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) used in a previous project, aiming for reconstructing possible cerebrovascular disease-related groups (DRG),and estimating the costs between cerebrovascular disease and related diseases. We conducted a nationwide retrospective cohort study in stroke inpatients, we examined the overall costs in 3 municipalities in Taiwan, by evaluating the possible costs of the expecting diagnosis related group (DRG) by using the international classification of diseases version-9 (ICD-9) system, and the overall analysis of the re-admission population that received traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment and those who did not. The trend demonstrated that the non-participant costs were consistent with the ICD-9 categories (430 to 437) because similarities existed between years 2006 to 2007. Among the TCM patients, a wide variation and additional costs were found compared to non-TCM patients during these 2 years. The average re-admission duration was significantly shorter for TCM patients, especially those initially diagnosed with ICD 434 during the first admission. In addition, TCM patients demonstrated more severe general symptoms, which incurred high conventional treatment costs, and could result in re-admission for numerous reasons. However, in Disease 7 of ICD-9 category, representing the circulatory system was most prevalent in non-TCM inpatients, which was the leading cause of re-admission. We concluded that favorable circulatory system outcomes were in adjuvant TCM treatment inpatients, there were less re-admission for circulatory system events and a two-third reduction of re-admission within ICD-9 code 430 to 437, compared to non-TCM ones. However, there were shorter re-admission duration other than circulatory system events by means of unfavorable baseline condition.

  11. Effects of Particulate Matter and Its Chemical Constituents on Elderly Hospital Admissions Due to Circulatory and Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiane Morais; Forti, Maria Cristina; de Freitas, Clarice Umbelino; Nascimento, Felipe Parra; Junger, Washington Leite; Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Various fractions of particulate matter have been associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The purpose of our study is to analyze the associations between concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5–10, PM10 and their chemical constituents (soluble ions) with hospital admissions due to circulatory and respiratory diseases among the elderly in a medium-sized city in Brazil. A time series study was conducted using Poisson regression with generalized additive models adjusted for confounders. Statistically significant associations were identified between PM10 and PM2.5–10 and respiratory diseases. Risks of hospitalization increased by 23.5% (95% CI: 13.5; 34.3) and 12.8% (95% CI: 6.0; 20.0) per 10 μg/m3 of PM2.5-10 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 exhibited a significant association with circulatory system diseases, with the risk of hospitalization increasing by 19.6% (95% CI: 6.4; 34.6) per 10 μg/m3. Regarding the chemical species; SO42−, NO3−, NH4+ and K+ exhibited specific patterns of risk, relative to the investigated outcomes. Overall, SO42− in PM2.5–10 and K+ in PM2.5 were associated with increased risk of hospital admissions due to both types of diseases. The results agree with evidence indicating that the risks for different health outcomes vary in relation to the fractions and chemical composition of PM10. Thus, PM10 speciation studies may contribute to the establishment of more selective pollution control policies. PMID:27669280

  12. Effects of Particulate Matter and Its Chemical Constituents on Elderly Hospital Admissions Due to Circulatory and Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tatiane Morais; Forti, Maria Cristina; de Freitas, Clarice Umbelino; Nascimento, Felipe Parra; Junger, Washington Leite; Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-09-23

    Various fractions of particulate matter have been associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The purpose of our study is to analyze the associations between concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5-10, PM10 and their chemical constituents (soluble ions) with hospital admissions due to circulatory and respiratory diseases among the elderly in a medium-sized city in Brazil. A time series study was conducted using Poisson regression with generalized additive models adjusted for confounders. Statistically significant associations were identified between PM10 and PM2.5-10 and respiratory diseases. Risks of hospitalization increased by 23.5% (95% CI: 13.5; 34.3) and 12.8% (95% CI: 6.0; 20.0) per 10 μg/m³ of PM2.5-10 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 exhibited a significant association with circulatory system diseases, with the risk of hospitalization increasing by 19.6% (95% CI: 6.4; 34.6) per 10 μg/m³. Regarding the chemical species; SO₄(2-), NO₃(-), NH₄⁺ and K⁺ exhibited specific patterns of risk, relative to the investigated outcomes. Overall, SO₄(2-) in PM2.5-10 and K⁺ in PM2.5 were associated with increased risk of hospital admissions due to both types of diseases. The results agree with evidence indicating that the risks for different health outcomes vary in relation to the fractions and chemical composition of PM10. Thus, PM10 speciation studies may contribute to the establishment of more selective pollution control policies.

  13. Mortality from Circulatory System Diseases among French Uranium Miners: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Drubay, Damien; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Laroche, Pierre; Laurier, Dominique; Rage, Estelle

    2015-05-01

    A significant association has been observed between radon exposure and cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) mortality among French uranium miners, but risk factors for circulatory system diseases (CSD) have not been previously considered. We conducted new analyses in the recently updated (through 2007) French cohort of uranium miners (n = 5,086), which included 442 deaths from CSD, 167 of them from ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 105 from CeVD. A nested case-control study was then set up to collect and investigate the influence of these risk factors on the relationships between mortality from CSD and occupational external gamma ray and internal ionizing radiation exposure (radon and long-lived radionuclides) in this updated cohort. The nested case-control study included miners first employed after 1955, still employed in 1976 and followed up through 2007. Individual information about CSD risk factors was collected from medical files for the 76 deaths from CSD (including 26 from IHD and 16 from CeVD) and 237 miners who had not died of CSD by the end of follow-up. The exposure-risk relationships were assessed with a Cox proportional hazard model weighted by the inverse sampling probability. A significant increase in all CSD and CeVD mortality risks associated with radon exposure was observed in the total cohort [hazard ratios: HRCSD/100 working level months (WLM) = 1.11, 95% confidence interval (1.01; 1.22) and HRCeVD/100 WLM = 1.25 (1.09; 1.43), respectively]. A nonsignificant exposure-risk relationship was observed for every type of cumulative ionizing radiation exposure and every end point [e.g., HRCSD/100WLM = 1.43 (0.71; 2.87)]. The adjustment for each CSD risk factor did not substantially change the exposure-risk relationships. When the model was adjusted for overweight, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and smoking status, the HR/100WLM for CSD, for example, was equal to 1.21 (0.54; 2.75); and when it was adjusted for risk factors selected with the

  14. Development of a Transplantation Risk Index in Patients With Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Decision Support Tool.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lily E; Grimm, Joshua C; Magruder, J Trent; Shah, Ashish S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a risk index specific to patients on mechanical circulatory support that accurately predicts 1-year mortality after orthotopic heart transplantation using the United Network for Organ Sharing database. Few clinical tools are available to aid in the decision between continuing long-term device support and performing transplantation in patients bridging with mechanical circulatory support. Using a prospectively collected, open cohort, 6,036 patients receiving mechanical circulatory support who underwent orthotopic heart transplantation between 2000 and 2013 were evaluated and randomly separated into derivation (80%) and validation (20%) groups. Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed using variables that improved the explanatory power of the model, which was determined using multiple methods. Points for a simple additive risk index were apportioned on the basis of relative effect on odds of 1-year mortality. A 75-point scoring system was created from 9 recipient and 4 donor variables. The average score in the validation cohort was 14.4 ± 7.7, and scores ranged from 0 to 57; these values were similar to those in the derivation cohort. Each 1-point increase predicted an 8.3% increase in the odds of 1-year mortality (odds ratio: 1.08; 95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 1.11). Low (0 to 10), intermediate (11 to 20), and high (>20) risk score cohorts were created, with predicted average 1-year mortalities of 8.6%, 12.8%, and 31%, respectively, in the validation cohort. The investigators present a novel, internally cross-validated risk index that accurately predicts mortality in bridge-to-transplantation patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices for Pediatric Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Moskowitz, William B; Stevens, Randy M; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2017-01-01

    The use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices is a viable therapeutic treatment option for patients with congestive heart failure. Ventricular assist devices, cavopulmonary assist devices, and total artificial heart pumps continue to gain acceptance as viable treatment strategies for both adults and pediatric patients as bridge-to-transplant, bridge-to-recovery, and longer-term circulatory support alternatives. We present a review of the current and future MCS devices for patients having congenital heart disease (CHD) with biventricular or univentricular circulations. Several devices that are specifically designed for patients with complex CHD are in the development pipeline undergoing rigorous animal testing as readiness experiments in preparation for future clinical trials. These advances in the development of new blood pumps for patients with CHD will address a significant unmet clinical need, as well as generally improve innovation of the current state of the art in MCS technology. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [The role of endorphins in the etiopathogenesis of circulatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Salomon, P

    1999-08-01

    At the beginning of the 70-ties various studies showed the existence of endogenous opiates in central nervous system. The chemical structure of first endogenous pentapeptides called enkephalins (met-enkephalin and leu-enkephalin) and their receptor was already known in 1975. Further investigations confirmed the existence of opiates (endorphins) in brain, pituitary gland, spinal cord and other tissues. Endorphins may exert various effects: analgesic (especially dynorphin and b-endorphin), antidiuretic, depressive on respiratory center, constipative, they also cause physical and mental dependence. These peptides, which are not known thoroughly may play a big part in the regulation of many biochemical and hemodynamic processes. Many of these mechanisms are already described and changes in concentrations of endorphins, for example in patients with silent myocardial ischaemia, are basic in the pathogenesis of this disease. Many of these mechanisms are controversial, the role of endogenous opiates in pathogenesis of hypertension or congestive heart failure is still unknown. This study summerizes the present knowledge endorphins and tries to answer whether changes in the concentration of endorphins are primary or secondary to the biochemical and hemodynamic disturbances in 2 diseases.

  17. Heavy Alcohol Consumption is Associated with Impaired Endothelial Function: The Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Aoi; Cui, Renzhe; Kitamura, Akihiko; Liu, Keyang; Imano, Hironori; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Previous studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption is protective against cardiovascular disease, but heavy alcohol consumption increases its risk. Endothelial dysfunction is hypothesized to contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. However, few population-based studies have examined a potential effect of alcohol consumption on endothelial function. Methods: This study included 404 men aged 30–79 years who were recruited from residents in 2 communities under the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study in 2013 and 2014. We asked the individuals about the frequency and volume of alcohol beverages and converted the data into grams of ethanol per day. Endothelial function was assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) measurements during reactive hyperemia. We performed cross-sectional analysis of alcohol consumption and %FMD by logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, baseline brachial artery diameter, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HbA1c, smoking, antihypertensive medication use, and community. Results: Individuals who drank ≥ 46 g/day ethanol had a lower age-adjusted mean %FMD than non-drinkers (p<0.01). Compared with non-drinkers, the age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence interval) of low %FMD (<5.3%) for former, light (<23.0 g/day ethanol), moderate (23.0–45.9 g/day ethanol), and heavy (≥ 46.0 g/day ethanol) drinkers were 1.61 (0.67–3.89), 0.84 (0.43–1.66), 1.09 (0.52–2.25), and 2.99 (1.56–5.70), respectively. The corresponding multivariable-adjusted ORs were 1.76 (0.69–4.50), 0.86 (0.42–1.76), 0.98 (0.45–2.12), and 2.39 (1.15–4.95), respectively. Conclusions: Heavy alcohol consumption may be an independent risk factor of endothelial dysfunction in Japanese men. PMID:27025680

  18. Evidence of divergence with duration of residence in circulatory disease mortality in migrants to Australia.

    PubMed

    Gray, Linsay; Harding, Seeromanie; Reid, Alison

    2007-12-01

    Very little is known about how acculturation affects health in different societal settings. Using duration of residence, this study investigates acculturation and circulatory disease mortality among migrants in Australia. Data from death records, 1998-2002, and from 2001 Census data were extracted for seven migrant groups [New Zealand; United Kingdom (UK)/Ireland; Germany; Greece; Italy; China/Singapore/Malaysia/Vietnam (East Asia); and India/Sri Lanka (South Asia)] aged 45-64 years. Poisson regression models were fitted to estimate the duration of residence effect (categorized in 5-year bands and also as having arrived 2-16, 17-31 and 32 years ago or more), adjusted for sex, 5-year age group and year of death, then additionally for occupational class and marital status (SES) on relative risks (RR) of CVD mortality. Compared with the Australia-born population, CVD mortality was generally lower in each migrant group. Decreasing mortality with increasing duration of residence was observed for migrants from New Zealand (RR 0.95, 95% Confidence Interval 0.92-0.98, P<0.01, per 5-year increase), Greece (0.90, 0.86-0.94, P<0.01), Italy (0.94, 0.91-0.97, P<0.01) and South Asia (0.95, 0.91-0.99, P<0.01), mainly in older age groups. Trends remained after SES adjustment and also when broader categories of duration of residence were used. CVD mortality among migrants from the UK/Ireland appeared to converge towards those of the Australian-born. These results show divergence in CVD mortality compared with the Australian rate for New Zealanders, Greeks, Italians and South Asians. Sustained cardio-protective behavioural practices in the Australian setting is a potential explanation.

  19. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    The risks of late effects from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are potentially a limitation to long-term space travel. The late effects of highest concern have significant lethality including cancer, effects to the central nervous system (CNS), and circulatory diseases (CD). For cancer and CD the use of age and gender specific models with uncertainty assessments based on human epidemiology data for low LET radiation combined with relative biological effectiveness factors (RBEs) and dose- and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors (DDREF) to extrapolate these results to space radiation exposures is considered the current "state-of-the-art". The revised NASA Space Risk Model (NSRM-2014) is based on recent radio-epidemiology data for cancer and CD, however a key feature of the NSRM-2014 is the formulation of particle fluence and track structure based radiation quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates, which are distinct from the ICRP quality factors, and shown to lead to smaller uncertainties in risk estimates. Many persons exposed to radiation on earth as well as astronauts are life-time never-smokers, which is estimated to significantly modify radiation cancer and CD risk estimates. A key feature of the NASA radiation protection model is the classification of radiation workers by smoking history in setting dose limits. Possible qualitative differences between GCR and low LET radiation increase uncertainties and are not included in previous risk estimates. Two important qualitative differences are emerging from research studies. The first is the increased lethality of tumors observed in animal models compared to low LET radiation or background tumors. The second are Non- Targeted Effects (NTE), which include bystander effects and genomic instability, which has been observed in cell and animal models of cancer risks. NTE's could lead to significant changes in RBE and DDREF estimates for GCR particles, and the potential

  20. [Current characteristics of all-cause and circulatory disease mortality in the Azerbaijan Republic].

    PubMed

    Azizov, V A; Khatamzade, E M

    2016-01-01

    To prove the value of summary data from the State Statistics Commission to characterize of risk of death from circulatory system diseases (CSD). The official data of the State Statistics Commission of the Azerbaijan Republic, which are available at its website (www.stat.gov.az), were analyzed using descriptive statistical procedures to identify qualitative signs. The population-level CSD death rates in 2011-2013 ranged from 362.7 to 379.60/0000, amounting to 61.1-63.8% of the all-cause mortality in the population. There were definite differences in male and female deaths due to CSD (377.2-392.0 and 348.4-367.40/0000) and in its proportion among all-cause mortality rates (58.4-60.5 and 64.1-66.4%). The death rates from CSD in the urban (361.1-380.80/0000) and rural (364.5-378.30/0000) populations and its proportion among all-cause mortality rates in these populations (60.6-62.7 and 61.6-62.8%) were similar. The male and female working-age population showed essentially dissimilar CSD mortality rates (169.2-179.8 and 51.8-57.10/0000), the men being at greater risk of death (3.14-3.27). The ratio of all-cause mortality rates in the male and female working-age populations (2.62-2.67) differed from that of CSD-specific ones in these populations (3.14-3.27). There was a slight difference in CSD-specific mortality rates in the urban and rural working-age populations (116.1-125.0 and 104.9-114.70/0000). There was also evidence for their similarity in the proportion of CSD among the all-cause mortality rates (43.2-46.2 and 45.0-49.6%). The existing characteristics of mortality in the population (a growth tendency due to CSD) suggest the priority of preventing these diseases.

  1. Mechanical circulatory support: balancing bleeding and clotting in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa; Massicotte, M Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) provides a bridge to heart transplant in children and adults with life-threatening heart failure and sustains patients ineligible for transplant. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides temporary support for patients in cardiac or pulmonary failure through external gas exchange and continuous flow of blood. Because the median time to heart transplant exceeds event-free time on ECMO, pulsatile left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used to support infants and children. Continuous flow LVADs are preferred in adolescents and adults due to increased pump durability and improved overall survival. The shear stress created by the mechanical pumps cause changes in the hematologic system; acquired von Willebrand syndrome occurs in almost all patients treated with MCS. Despite the improvements in survival, major bleeding occurs in one-third of patients with a LVAD and ischemic stroke and LVAD thrombosis can affect 12% of adults and 29% of children. An antithrombotic strategy to mitigate LVAD bleeding and thrombotic complications has been tested in a randomized trial in children, but intensity of antithrombotic therapy in adults varies widely. Consensus guidelines for antithrombotic therapy during ECMO were created due to significant differences in management across centers. Because of the high risk for both bleeding and thrombotic complications, experts in hemostasis can significantly impact care of patients requiring mechanical circulatory support and are a necessary part of the management team. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  2. [Impact of Macao Medical Voucher Program on health outcomes of the residents: changes of mortality from circulatory system diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghua; Pang, Chuan; Tam, Kwoping

    2014-07-01

    To examine whether the implementation of Macao Medical Voucher Program has helped promote the health outcomes of the residents in the case of mortality from circulatory system diseases. Based on 144 monthly observations of the mortality from circulatory system diseases in Macao during 2001-2012, we carried out a trend analysis of the time series to identify significant differences in the mortality data after the implementation of the Medical Voucher in Macao. This study was controlled for the compounding factors including medical resources (numbers of physicians, nurses and patient beds per thousand population and public healthcare expenditure), economic development level (GDP per capita), social human development level, population aging factor, natural seasonal effects and long-term trends. During 2010-2012 when the Medical Voucher Program in Macao was implemented, the annual mortality rates from circulatory system diseases were significantly lowered by 24% as compared with those recorded during 2001-2009 (P<0.01), which was equivalent to avoiding 123 deaths related of circulatory system diseases per year. Evidence in this study suggests a robust connection between the timing of the implementation of Macao Medical Voucher Program and a significant decrease in the mortality from circulatory system diseases in Macao, but their causal relationship awaits confirmation in further research.

  3. [Comparison of a rural town and a fishing town: diet and circulatory system diseases].

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Ozasa, K; Higashi, A; Watanabe, Y; Hayashi, K; Aoike, A; Kawai, K

    1993-10-01

    We report a comparative study of the Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) for circulatory system diseases and diet in a rural town and a fishing town in Kyoto Prefecture. SMR was assessed during the 5-year period from 1983 through 1987, and compared with the standard age- and sex-adjusted demographic and mortality statistics compiled by the National Census Bureau of Japan in 1985. A food frequency questionnaire in which the respondents evaluated their food consumption during the previous 1-year period was used to assess diet. The questionnaire was administered during February 1989 in the rural town and during February 1990 in the fishing town. In comparison with the standard statistics, SMR was higher in the rural town and lower in the fishing town. The inhabitants of the fishing town more frequently consumed low-fat and low-sodium foods, such as fish, potatoes, tofu, and green, yellow and other vegetables, and less frequently consumed high-fat and high-sodium foods, such as meat, fried food, pickles, than did the inhabitants of the rural town. The residents of the fishing town also consumed a greater variety of foods in one week. The two towns differ in geography and economic structure, and their inhabitants have different life-styles and eating habits. The lower SMR for circulatory system diseases in the fishing town may be related to the greater consumption of fish and vegetables with lower meat and salt intake, as well as the balanced of diet.

  4. Changes of circulatory and nervous diseases mortality patterns during periods of exceptional solar events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolska, Katerina

    2017-04-01

    The paper contains a statistical analysis of exceptional solar events and daily numbers of deaths from diseases from ICD-10 group VI. Diseases of the nervous system, group IX. Diseases of the circulatory system, and overall daily numbers of deaths in the Czech Republic. It is demonstrated that neurological diseases exhibit greater instability during the period of rising and falling solar activity. Specifically, we study the daily number of deaths separately for both sexes at the age groups under 39 and 40+ during the Solar Cycles No. 23 and No. 24. We focus mainly on exceptional solar events such as a "Bastille Day event" on July 14, 2000 (class X5), "Halloween solar storm" on October 28, 2003 (class X17), and events on January 7, 1997, April 2, 2000 (class X20), or September 7, 2005 (class X15). Special attention is given to "St. Patrick's Day storm" on March 17, 2015, the strongest geomagnetic storm of the Solar Cycle No. 24 that occurred following a coronal mass ejection (CME). We investigate changes in daily numbers of deaths during 1 month before and 1 month after these exceptional solar events. We take specific storm dynamics of geophysical parameters into consideration, and we also apply the results of risky characteristics of expositions by ionospheric and geomagnetic parameters. It is verified that, for diseases of the nervous system, women are generally more sensitive than men. On the contrary, this differences between men and women are not found for diseases of the circulatory system. Our findings suggest that the impact of hazardous space weather conditions on human health depends on the specific course and strength of individual solar storm.

  5. Risk Factors for Post-Transplant Death in Donation after Circulatory Death Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Miao, Ji; Shi, Xiaolei; Wu, Yafu; Jiang, Chunping; Zhu, Xinhua; Wu, Xingyu; Ding, Yitao; Xu, Qingxiang

    2017-08-22

    In spite of the increasing success of liver transplantation, there remains inevitable risk of postoperative complications, re-operations, and even death. Risk factors that correlate with post-transplant death have not been fully identified. We performed a retrospective analysis of 65 adults that received donation after circulatory death liver transplantation. Binary logistic regression and Cox's proportional hazards regression were employed to identify risk factors that associate with postoperative death and the length of survival period. Twenty-two recipients (33.8%) deceased during 392.3 ± 45.6 days. The higher preoperative Child-Pugh score (p = .007), prolonged postoperative ICU stay (p = .02), and more postoperative complications (p = .0005) were observed in deceased patients. Advanced pathological staging (p = .02) with more common nerve invasion (p = .03), lymph node invasion (p = .02), and para-tumor satellite lesion (p = .01) were found in deceased group. The higher pre-transplant Child-Pugh score was a risk factor for post-transplant death (OR = 4.38, p = .011), and was correlated with reduced post-transplant survival period (OR = 0.35, p = .009). Nerve invasion was also a risk factor for post-transplant death (OR = 13.85, p = .014), although it failed to affect survival period. Our study emphasizes the impact of recipient's pre-transplant liver function as well as pre-transplant nerve invasion by recipient's liver cancer cells on postoperative outcome and survival period in patients receiving liver transplantation.

  6. High-risk medical devices, children and the FDA: regulatory challenges facing pediatric mechanical circulatory support devices.

    PubMed

    Almond, Christopher S D; Chen, Eric A; Berman, Michael R; Less, Joanne R; Baldwin, J Timothy; Linde-Feucht, Sarah R; Hoke, Tracey R; Pearson, Gail D; Jenkins, Kathy; Duncan, Brian W; Zuckerman, Bram D

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric mechanical circulatory support is a critical unmet need in the United States. Infant- and child-sized ventricular assist devices are currently being developed largely through federal contracts and grants through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). Human testing and marketing of high-risk devices for children raises epidemiologic and regulatory issues that will need to be addressed. Leaders from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), NHLBI, academic pediatric community, and industry convened in January 2006 for the first FDA Workshop on the Regulatory Process for Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices. The purpose was to provide the pediatric community with an overview of the federal regulatory process for high-risk medical devices and to review the challenges specific to the development and regulation of pediatric mechanical circulatory support devices. Pediatric mechanical circulatory support present significant epidemiologic, logistic, and financial challenges to industry, federal regulators, and the pediatric community. Early interactions with the FDA, shared appreciation of challenges, and careful planning will be critical to avoid unnecessary delays in making potentially life-saving devices available for children. Collaborative efforts to address these challenges are warranted.

  7. Contrasting patterns of hospital admissions and mortality during heat waves: are deaths from circulatory disease a real excess or an artifact?

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Hajat, Shakoor; Fadda, Emanuela; Buja, Alessandra; Fedeli, Ugo; Spolaore, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    In old subjects exposed to extreme high temperature during a heat wave, studies have consistently reported an excess of death from cardio- or cerebro-vascular disease. By contrast, dehydration, heat stroke, acute renal insufficiency, and respiratory disease were the main causes of hospital admission in the two studies carried out in elderly during short spells of hot weather. The excess of circulatory disease reported by mortality studies, but not by morbidity studies, could be explained by the hypothesis that deaths from circulatory disease occur rapidly in isolated people before they reach a hospital. Since the contrasting patterns of hospital admission and mortality during heat waves could also be due to chance (random variation over time and space in the spectrum of diseases induced by extreme heat), and bias (poor quality of diagnosis on death certificate and other artifacts), it should be confirmed by a concurrent study of mortality and morbidity. Many heat-related diseases may be preventable with adequate warning and an appropriate response to heat emergencies, but preventive efforts are complicated by the short time interval that may elapse between high temperatures and death. Therefore, prevention programs must be based around rapid identification of high-risk conditions and persons. The effectiveness of the intervention measures must be formally evaluated. If cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases are rapidly fatal health outcomes with a short time interval between exposure to high temperature and death, deaths from circulatory disease might be an useful indicator in evaluating the effectiveness of a heat watch/warning system.

  8. Tailored circulatory intervention in adults with pulmonary hypertension due to congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Couperus, L E; Henkens, I R; Jongbloed, M R M; Hazekamp, M G; Schalij, M J; Vliegen, H W

    2016-06-01

    Adults with pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease (PH-CHD) often have residual shunts. Invasive interventions aim to optimise pulmonary flow and prevent right ventricular failure. However, eligibility for procedures strongly depends on the adaptation potential of the pulmonary vasculature and right ventricle to resultant circulatory changes. Current guidelines are not sufficiently applicable to individual patients, who exhibit great diversity and complexity in cardiac anomalies. We present four complex adult PH-CHD patients with impaired pulmonary flow, including detailed graphics of the cardiopulmonary circulation. All these patients had an ambiguous indication for shunt intervention. Our local multidisciplinary Grown-Ups with Congenital Heart Disease team reached consensus regarding a patient-tailored invasive treatment strategy, adjacent to relevant guidelines. Interventions improved pulmonary haemodynamics and short-term clinical functioning in all cases. Individual evaluation of disease characteristics is mandatory for tailored interventional treatment in PH-CHD patients, adjacent to relevant guidelines. Both strict registration of cases and multidisciplinary and multicentre collaboration are essential in the quest for optimal therapy in this patient population.

  9. Relationship between fine particulate matter events with respect to synoptic weather patterns and the implications for circulatory and respiratory disease in Taipei, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Li-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the relationship between PM2.5, synoptic weather patterns, and admissions for circulatory and respiratory disease. A PM2.5 event is defined as a day when the daily mean PM2.5 concentration exceeds 65 μg/m(3). PM2.5 events that coincided with the occurrence of PM attributed to Asian dust storm (ADS) and photochemical smog (PCS) were removed from the study in order to focus solely on the health effects from PM2.5. A one-tailed z-test and a relative risk (RR) estimate were performed. Hospital admissions for respiratory diseases were greater than those for circulatory diseases, and asthma-related diseases had a higher impact in the Adults group, and the maximum RR was 1.94 [1.37 2.77] on the first day after the event. It is evident that PM2.5 episodes connected to particular synoptic weather patterns pose a risk to health as large as ADS and PCS events.

  10. Fifth INTERMACS annual report: risk factor analysis from more than 6,000 mechanical circulatory support patients.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K; Naftel, David C; Kormos, Robert L; Stevenson, Lynne W; Pagani, Francis D; Miller, Marissa A; Baldwin, J T; Timothy Baldwin, J; Young, James B

    2013-02-01

    The 5th annual report of the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) summarizes and analyzes the first 6 years of patient and data collection. The current analysis includes more than 6000 patients and updated risk factors for continuous flow pumps. Among continuous flow pumps, actuarial survival is 80% at 1 year and 70% at 2 years. Quality of life indicators are generally favorable and adverse event burden will likely influence patient selections of advanced heart failure therapies.

  11. The death of the circulatory system diseases in China: provincial socioeconomic and environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Pu, Haixia; Li, Jiatian; Wang, Pin; Cui, Linlin; Wang, Huaxin

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have explored the association between circulatory system diseases (CSDs) and provincial socioeconomic and environmental factors from spatial perspective, although large literature have focused on CSD. The numbers of death of hypertension disease (HD), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) are investigated, and 14 representative socioeconomic and environmental factors are collected. Stepwise regression model (SRM) and geographically weighted regression model (GWRM) are applied to determine the spatial correlation between the number of death of those diseases and selected factors. The results are the following: (1) diseases exhibit a pattern of zonal distribution. Higher HD is mostly distributed in south district, whereas higher IHD and CVD are observed in the north area. (2) SO2 emission amount (SO2 EA) is significantly positively related with HD, while coal consumption (CC) and PM2.5 are notably positively correlated with IHD and CVD. (3) A 10,000 tons increase in SO2 EA results in three increases in the numbers of death of HD. For every 100 ten thousand tons (TTTs) increase in CC, the death of IHD and CVD increases by 11.1 and 15.7, while for every 1 μg/m(3) increase in ambient PM2.5 concentration, the numbers of death of IHD and CVD increase by 34.773 and 43.222, respectively. (4) Our findings show that there exist spatial differences for SO2 EA, CC, and PM2.5 influencing HD, IHD, and CVD. This study is expected to provide a reference for HD, IHD, and CVD control in different regions.

  12. Diseases of the circulatory system among adult people diagnosed with infantile autism as children: A longitudinal case control study.

    PubMed

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2016-10-01

    Research dealing with adult people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) noticeably lags behind studies of children and young individuals with ASD. The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence and types of diseases of the circulatory system in a clinical sample of 118 adult people diagnosed with infantile autism (IA) as children with 336 sex and age matched controls from the general population. All participants were screened through the nationwide Danish National Hospital Register. The average observation time of both groups was 37.2 years, and mean age at follow-up was 49.6 years. Of the 118 people with IA, 11 (9.3%) were registered with at least one disease of the circulatory system against 54 (16.1%) in the comparison group (p=0.09; OR=0.54; 95% CI 0.3-1.2). Ischemic heart diseases occurred significantly more frequently among people in the comparison group (p=0.02). It is argued that diseases of the circulatory system may be underdiagnosed in people with IA because of the difficulties they face with respect to identifying and communicating symptoms of ill health. Bearing in mind that cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of death in most developed countries, it is suggested that to prevent disease and manage health conditions, health monitoring is essential in adult people with IA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Life expectancy and death by diseases of the circulatory system in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Hällgren, Jonas; Westman, Jeanette; Ösby, Urban; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Gissler, Mika; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Excess mortality from diseases and medical conditions (natural death) in persons with psychiatric disorders has been extensively reported. Even in the Nordic countries with well-developed welfare systems, register based studies find evidence of an excess mortality. In recent years, cardiac mortality and death by diseases of the circulatory system has seen a decline in all the Nordic countries, but a recent paper indicates that women and men in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, who had been hospitalised for a psychotic disorder, had a two to three-fold increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality by diseases of the circulatory system among patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the three Nordic countries Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. Furthermore, the aim was to examine and compare life expectancy among these patients. Cause specific Standardized Mortality Rates (SMRs) were calculated for each specific subgroup of mortality. Life expectancy was calculated using Wiesler's method. The SMR for bipolar disorder for diseases of the circulatory system was approximately 2 in all countries and both sexes. SMR was slightly higher for people with schizophrenia for both genders and in all countries, except for men in Denmark. Overall life expectancy was much lower among persons with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, with life expectancy being from 11 to 20 years shorter. Our data show that persons in the Nordic countries with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have a substantially reduced life expectancy. An evaluation of the reasons for these increased mortality rates should be prioritized when planning healthcare in the coming years.

  14. Life Expectancy and Death by Diseases of the Circulatory System in Patients with Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia in the Nordic Countries

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Hällgren, Jonas; Westman, Jeanette; Ösby, Urban; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Gissler, Mika; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Objective Excess mortality from diseases and medical conditions (natural death) in persons with psychiatric disorders has been extensively reported. Even in the Nordic countries with well-developed welfare systems, register based studies find evidence of an excess mortality. In recent years, cardiac mortality and death by diseases of the circulatory system has seen a decline in all the Nordic countries, but a recent paper indicates that women and men in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, who had been hospitalised for a psychotic disorder, had a two to three-fold increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality by diseases of the circulatory system among patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the three Nordic countries Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. Furthermore, the aim was to examine and compare life expectancy among these patients. Cause specific Standardized Mortality Rates (SMRs) were calculated for each specific subgroup of mortality. Life expectancy was calculated using Wiesler’s method. Results The SMR for bipolar disorder for diseases of the circulatory system was approximately 2 in all countries and both sexes. SMR was slightly higher for people with schizophrenia for both genders and in all countries, except for men in Denmark. Overall life expectancy was much lower among persons with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, with life expectancy being from 11 to 20 years shorter. Conclusion Our data show that persons in the Nordic countries with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have a substantially reduced life expectancy. An evaluation of the reasons for these increased mortality rates should be prioritized when planning healthcare in the coming years. PMID:23826212

  15. Circulatory disease mortality rates in the elderly and exposure to PM(2.5) generated by biomass burning in the Brazilian Amazon in 2005.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Karine Vila Real; Ignotti, Eliane; Hacon, Sandra de Souza

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between the exposure to fine particulate matter and circulatory disease mortality rates in the elderly living in the Brazilian Amazon. An ecological study of circulatory disease, acute myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular disease mortality rates in micro areas of the Brazilian Amazon was carried out. The environmental exposure indicator used was percentage hours of PM(2.5) concentrations > 25µg/m(3) divided by the total number of estimated hours of PM(2.5) in 2005. The association between exposure and circulatory disease mortality rates was strongest in the oldest age group. No significant statistical association was found between cerebrovascular disease mortality rates and exposure. Circulatory disease mortality rates in the elderly living in the Amazon have been influenced by atmospheric pollution from emissions caused by forest fires.

  16. Outcomes following implantation of mechanical circulatory support in adults with congenital heart disease: An analysis of the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS).

    PubMed

    VanderPluym, Christina J; Cedars, Ari; Eghtesady, Pirooz; Maxwell, Bryan G; Gelow, Jill M; Burchill, Luke J; Maltais, Simon; Koehl, Devin A; Cantor, Ryan S; Blume, Elizabeth D

    2017-03-07

    Adults with congenital heart disease represent an expanding and unique population of patients with heart failure (HF) in whom the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has not been characterized. We sought to describe overall use, patient characteristics, and outcomes of MCS in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). All patients entered into the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) between June 23, 2006, and December 31, 2015, were included. Patients with ACHD were identified using pre-operative data and stratified by ventricular morphology. Mortality was compared between ACHD and non-ACHD patients, and multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of death after device implantation. Of 16,182 patients, 126 with ACHD stratified as follows: systemic morphologic left ventricle (n = 63), systemic morphologic right ventricle (n = 45), and single ventricle (n = 17). ACHD patients were younger (42 years ± 14 vs 56 years ± 13; p < 0.0001) and were more likely to undergo device implantation as bridge to transplant (45% vs 29%; p < 0.0001). A higher proportion of ACHD patients had biventricular assist device (BiVAD)/total artificial heart (TAH) support compared with non-ACHD patients (21% vs 7%; p < 0.0001). More ACHD patients on BiVAD/TAH support were INTERMACS profile 1 compared with patients on systemic left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support (35% vs 15%; p = 0.002). ACHD and non-ACHD patients with LVADs had similar survival; survival was worse for patients on BIVAD/TAH support. BiVAD/TAH support was the only variable independently associated with mortality (early phase hazard ratio 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-11.1; p = 0.001). For ACHD patients receiving MCS, ventricular morphology was not associated with mortality. ACHD patients with LVADs have survival similar to non-ACHD patients. Mortality is higher for patients requiring BiVAD/TAH support, potentially owing to higher INTERMACS profile. These

  17. Blood pressure, hypertension and mortality from circulatory disease in men and women who survived the siege of Leningrad.

    PubMed

    Koupil, Ilona; Shestov, Dmitri B; Sparén, Pär; Plavinskaja, Svetlana; Parfenova, Nina; Vågerö, Denny

    2007-01-01

    The population of Leningrad suffered from severe starvation, cold and psychological stress during the siege in 1941-1944. We investigated long-term effects of the siege on cardiovascular risk factors and mortality in surviving men and women. 3905 men born 1916-1935 and 1729 women born 1910-1940, resident in St Petersburg (formerly Leningrad) between 1975 and 1982, of whom a third experienced the siege as children, adolescents or young adults, were examined for cardiovascular risk factors in 1975-1977 and 1980-1982 respectively and followed till end 2005. Effects of siege exposure on blood pressure, lipids, body size, and mortality were studied in multivariate analysis stratified by gender and period of birth, adjusted for age, smoking, alcohol and social characteristics. Women who were 6-8 years-old and men who were 9-15 years-old at the peak of starvation had higher systolic blood pressure compared to unexposed subjects born during the same period of birth (fully adjusted difference 8.8, 95% CI: 0.1-17.5 mm Hg in women and 2.9, 95% CI: 0.7-5.0 mm Hg in men). Mean height of women who were exposed to siege as children appeared to be greater than that of unexposed women. Higher mortality from ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease was noted in men exposed at age 6-8 and 9-15, respectively. The experience of severe stress and starvation in childhood and puberty may have long-term effects on systolic blood pressure and circulatory disease in surviving men and women with potential gender differences in the effect of siege experienced at pre-pubertal age.

  18. Liver grafts procured from donors after circulatory death have no increased risk of microthrombi formation.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Cornelia J; Simon, Tiarah C; de Jonge, Jeroen; Doukas, Michael; Biermann, Katharina; Metselaar, Herold J; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Polak, Wojciech G

    2016-12-01

    Microthrombi formation provoked by warm ischemia and vascular stasis is thought to increase the risk of nonanastomotic strictures (NAS) in liver grafts obtained by donation after circulatory death (DCD). Therefore, potentially harmful intraoperative thrombolytic therapy has been suggested as a preventive strategy against NAS. Here, we investigated whether there is histological evidence of microthrombi formation during graft preservation or directly after reperfusion in DCD livers and the development of NAS. Liver biopsies collected at different time points during graft preservation and after reperfusion were triple-stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H & E), von Willebrand factor VIII (VWF), and Fibrin Lendrum (FL) to evaluate the presence of microthrombi. In a first series of 282 sections obtained from multiple liver segments of discarded DCD grafts, microthrombi were only present in 1%-3% of the VWF stainings, without evidence of thrombus formation in paired H & E and FL stainings. Additionally, analysis of 132 sections obtained from matched, transplanted donation after brain death and DCD grafts showed no difference in microthrombi formation (11.3% versus 3.3% respectively; P = 0.082), and no relation to the development of NAS (P = 0.73). Furthermore, no microthrombi were present in perioperative biopsies in recipients who developed early hepatic artery thrombosis. Finally, the presence of microthrombi did not differ before or after additional flushing of the graft with preservation solution. In conclusion, the results of our study derogate from the hypothesis that DCD livers have an increased tendency to form microthrombi. It weakens the explanation that microthrombi formation is a main causal factor in the development of NAS in DCD and that recipients could benefit from intraoperative thrombolytic therapy to prevent NAS following liver transplantation. Liver Transplantation 22 1676-1687 2016 AASLD.

  19. The Duration of Impella 2.5 Circulatory Support and Length of Hospital Stay of Patients Undergoing High-risk Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Anusionwu, Obiora; Fischman, Daniel; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the impact of duration of Impella 2.5 support (Abiomed, Danvers, MA) on hospitalization of patients after high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). There has been a continuous increase in prevalence of coronary artery disease with more patients needing PCI during acute myocardial infarction. Some of these patients have to undergo high-risk revascularization with circulatory support like the Impella 2.5 device. Methods This study was a single center retrospective study of patients admitted to our hospital who required Impella circulatory support during percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients’ medical records, cardiac catheterization laboratory and 2-D echocardiography reports were reviewed to ascertain left ventricular ejection fraction, duration of Impella support, Coronary Care Unit (CCU) days and the length of stay in the hospital. A P-value of ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Over a 15-month period, we had 25 patients with 19 males and 6 females. Mean age of the patient cohort was 68 ± 10 years. Mean LVEF of the group was 32 ± 16%. Mean length of hospital stay was 8 ± 8 days and mean CCU stay was 4 ± 4 days. The Impella was successfully inserted in all cases with a median duration of support of 70 minutes (range, 4 - 5760 minutes). Bleeding complication occurred in 8%. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between the duration of Impella support and hospital stay was 0.49 (P = 0.023) while it was 0.71 (P = 0.001) between Impella support duration and CCU days. Conclusions Our study suggests that there is a positive correlation between the duration of Impella 2.5 circulatory support and hospital stay and/or CCU days. The correlation seems to be stronger with CCU days.

  20. Is gender policy related to the gender gap in external cause and circulatory disease mortality? A mixed effects model of 22 OECD countries 1973–2008

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gender differences in mortality vary widely between countries and over time, but few studies have examined predictors of these variations, apart from smoking. The aim of this study is to investigate the link between gender policy and the gender gap in cause-specific mortality, adjusted for economic factors and health behaviours. Methods 22 OECD countries were followed 1973–2008 and the outcomes were gender gaps in external cause and circulatory disease mortality. A previously found country cluster solution was used, which includes indicators on taxes, parental leave, pensions, social insurances and social services in kind. Male breadwinner countries were made reference group and compared to earner-carer, compensatory breadwinner, and universal citizen countries. Specific policies were also analysed. Mixed effect models were used, where years were the level 1-units, and countries were the level 2-units. Results Both the earner-carer cluster (ns after adjustment for GDP) and policies characteristic of that cluster are associated with smaller gender differences in external causes, particularly due to an association with increased female mortality. Cluster differences in the gender gap in circulatory disease mortality are the result of a larger relative decrease of male mortality in the compensatory breadwinner cluster and the earner-carer cluster. Policies characteristic of those clusters were however generally related to increased mortality. Conclusion Results for external cause mortality are in concordance with the hypothesis that women become more exposed to risks of accident and violence when they are economically more active. For circulatory disease mortality, results differ depending on approach – cluster or indicator. Whether cluster differences not explained by specific policies reflect other welfare policies or unrelated societal trends is an open question. Recommendations for further studies are made. PMID:23145477

  1. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  2. Cancer risks in children with congenital malformations in the nervous and circulatory system-A population based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuelian; Overvad, Kim; Olsen, Jørn

    2014-08-01

    We estimated the age and organ-specific cancer risk for children with a congenital malformation (CM) in the nervous or in the circulatory system. We identified 1,709,456 live born singletons in Denmark between 1 January 1977 and 31 December 2007 and excluded children with chromosomal birth defects. Information on CMs was obtained from the Danish National Hospital Register. Information on cancer occurrence was obtained from the Danish Cancer Registry. We applied Cox proportional hazards regression model to estimate hazard ratios (HR) for cancer. Children entered into the CM cohort on the day of birth regardless of when the CM was diagnosed or on the day of CM diagnosis in an alternative analysis. Overall, 4484 (0.26%) and 24,643 (1.44%) children were diagnosed with a CM in the nervous and in the circulatory system, respectively. Compared with children without any CM, children with a CM in the nervous system had a 5.97 fold (95%CI [confidence interval]: 4.66-7.64) higher risk of cancer, including cancer in the central nervous system (HR=18.84, 95%CI: 12.67-28.01), in the mesothelial and soft tissue (HR=15.64, 95%CI: 7.99-30.60), in the skin (HR=4.91, 95%CI: 2.19-11.0). The associations were stronger early in life. Children with a CM in the circulatory system had a 2.64 fold (95%CI: 2.21-3.16) higher risk of cancer, including cancer in the lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues (HR=3.22, 95%CI: 2.43-4.27) and cancer in the CNS (HR=2.40, 95%CI: 1.43-4.02). Some of these associations were weaker in the alternative analysis. Children with subtypes of CM in the two systems showed a higher cancer risk. Children who were diagnosed with a CM in the nervous system had a substantially higher cancer risk especially early in life. Children diagnosed with a CM in the circulatory system had a moderately higher cancer risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Circulatory and Ventilatory Power: Characterization in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Castello-Simões, Viviane; Minatel, Vinicius; Karsten, Marlus; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Perseguini, Natália Maria; Milan, Juliana Cristina; Arena, Ross; Neves, Laura Maria Tomazi; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Catai, Aparecida Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulatory power (CP) and ventilatory power (VP) are indices that have been used for the clinical evaluation of patients with heart failure; however, no study has evaluated these indices in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) without heart failure. Objective To characterize both indices in patients with CAD compared with healthy controls. Methods Eighty-seven men [CAD group = 42 subjects and healthy control group (CG) = 45 subjects] aged 40–65 years were included. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed on a treadmill and the following parameters were measured: 1) peak oxygen consumption (VO2), 2) peak heart rate (HR), 3) peak blood pressure (BP), 4) peak rate-pressure product (peak systolic HR x peak BP), 5) peak oxygen pulse (peak VO2/peak HR), 6) oxygen uptake efficiency (OUES), 7) carbon dioxide production efficiency (minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope), 8) CP (peak VO2 x peak systolic BP) and 9) VP (peak systolic BP/carbon dioxide production efficiency). Results The CAD group had significantly lower values for peak VO2 (p < 0.001), peak HR (p < 0.001), peak systolic BP (p < 0.001), peak rate-pressure product (p < 0.001), peak oxygen pulse (p = 0.008), OUES (p < 0.001), CP (p < 0.001), and VP (p < 0.001) and significantly higher values for peak diastolic BP (p = 0.004) and carbon dioxide production efficiency (p < 0.001) compared with CG. Stepwise regression analysis showed that CP was influenced by group (R2 = 0.44, p < 0.001) and VP was influenced by both group and number of vessels with stenosis after treatment (interaction effects: R2 = 0.46, p < 0.001). Conclusion The indices CP and VP were lower in men with CAD than healthy controls. PMID:26131703

  4. Development of a Deprivation Index and its relation to premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system in Hungary, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Attila; Nagy, Csilla; Páldy, Anna; Beale, Linda

    2010-05-01

    An association between health and socio-economic status is well known. Based on international and national studies, the aims of this study were to develop a multi-dimensional index at the municipality level, to provide information about socio-economic deprivation in Hungary and to investigate the association between socio-economic status and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system. Seven municipality level socio-economic indicators were used from the National Information System of Spatial Development (income, low qualification, unemployment, one-parent families, large families, density of housing and car ownership). After normalisation and standardisation, indicator weights were evaluated using factor analysis. A risk analysis study was conducted using the Rapid Inquiry Facility software to evaluate the association between deprivation and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system for the years 1998-2004. Areas of significantly high deprivation were identified in the northeastern, eastern and southwestern parts of Hungary. A statistically significant association was found between premature cardiovascular mortality and deprivation status in both genders. The Deprivation Index is the first composite index at the municipality level in Hungary and includes key factors that affect socio-economic status. The identified association highlighted the fact that inequalities in socio-economic status may reflect the spatial distribution of health status in a population. The results can be used to inform prevention strategies and help plan local health promotion programs aimed at reducing health inequalities.

  5. Combined television viewing and computer use and mortality from all-causes and diseases of the circulatory system among adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ford, Earl S

    2012-01-23

    Watching television and using a computer are increasingly common sedentary behaviors. Whether or not prolonged screen time increases the risk for mortality remains uncertain. Mortality for 7,350 adults aged ≥ 20 years who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 1999-2002 and were followed through 2006 was examined. Participants were asked a single question about the amount of time they spent watching television or videos or using a computer during the past 30 days. During a median follow-up of 5.8 years, 542 participants died. At baseline, 12.7% of participants reported watching television or using a computer less than 1 h per day, 16.4% did so for 1 h, 27.8% for 2 h, 18.7% for 3 h, 10.9% for 4 h, and 13.5% for 5 or more h. After extensive adjustment, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality for the top category of exposure was 1.30 (95% confidence interval: 0.82, 2.05). No significant trend across categories of exposure was noted. The amount of screen time was also not significantly related to mortality from diseases of the circulatory system. In the present study, screen time did not significantly predict mortality from all-causes and diseases of the circulatory system.

  6. Retinal Vascular Changes and Prospective Risk of Disabling Dementia: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

    PubMed Central

    Jinnouchi, Hiroshige; Kitamura, Akihiko; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Kiyama, Masahiko; Imano, Hironori; Okada, Takeo; Cui, Renzhe; Umesawa, Mitsumasa; Muraki, Isao; Hayama-Terada, Mina; Kawasaki, Ryo; Sankai, Tomoko; Ohira, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the association of retinal vascular changes with a risk of dementia in longitudinal population-based study. Methods: We performed a nested case-control study of 3,718 persons, aged 40–89 years, enrolled between 1983 and 2004. Retinal vascular changes were observed in 351 cases with disabling dementia (average period before the onset, 11.2 years) and in 702 controls matched for sex, age, and baseline year. Incidence of disabling dementia was defined as individuals who received cares for disabilities including dementia-related symptoms and/or behavioral disturbance. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and multivariable adjusted OR (Models 1 and 2) for incidence of disabling dementia according to each retinal vascular change. Regarding confounding variables, Model 1 included overweight status, hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and smoking status, whereas Model 2 also included incidence of stroke prior to disabling dementia for further analysis. Results: The proportion of cases (controls) with retinal vascular changes was 23.1 (15.7)% for generalized arteriolar narrowing, 7.7 (7.5)% for focal arteriolar narrowing, 15.7 (11.8)% for arteriovenous nicking, 10.5 (9.3)% for increased arteriolar wall reflex, and 11.4 (9.8)% for any other retinopathy. Generalized arteriolar narrowing was associated with an increased risk of disabling dementia: crude OR, 1.66 (95% confidence interval, 1.19–2.31); Model 1: OR, 1.58 (1.12–2.23); Model 2: OR, 1.48 (1.04–2.10). The number of retinal abnormalities was associated in a dose–response manner with the risk. Conclusion: Generalized arteriolar narrowing and total number of retinal abnormalities may be useful markers for identifying persons at higher risks of disabling dementia. PMID:27904027

  7. Mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system among the elderly population in Brazilian Amazon: temporal and spatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Karine Vila Real; Neves, Sandra Mara Alves da Silva; Ignotti, Eliane

    2013-12-01

    Circulatory Diseases (CD) are the major cause of death among the elderly population in Brazilian Amazon. to analyze standardized mortality rates of diseases of the circulatory system (DCS), according to the main causes of death among the elderly, in microregions of the Brazilian Amazon, in the period of 1998 - 2007. ecological study of mortality rates distribution standardized by CD and corrected by deaths from poorly defined causes among the elderly (> 65 years of age) who lived in Brazilian Amazon in the period of 1998 - 2007. The analysis were carried out by the linear regression, trend, and spatial distribution of Kernel. We verified an increasing trend in mortality by CD (β1 = 28.34 p = 0.01), due to the increasing trend in the States of Maranhão and Tocantins. The central region of Mato Grosso, Northern Tocantins, Eastern Pará and Southwestern Maranhão present hot spots with the highest mortality rates. Males present higher rates when compared to females all over the region; rates of mortality due to acute myocardial infarction and hypertensive disease present the same spatial standard of the CD group and the rates of cerebrovascular diseases present a different spatial distribution standard. Increment in mortality rates according to age was observed: the greater the age, the higher is mortality by CD. The Brazilian Amazon presents an increasing trend with high rates of mortality by the circulatory diseases, and the geographic areas with the highest rates are around the Brazilian Amazon, in the states of Tocantins, Maranhão and Mato Grosso.

  8. Atmospheric pressure fluctuations in the far infrasound range and emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, L. A.; Gorgo, Yu. P.; Dirckx, J. J. J.; Bogdanov, V. B.; Buytaert, J. A. N.; Lysenko, V. A.; Didyk, N. P.; Vershygora, A. V.; Erygina, V. T.

    2008-09-01

    This study examines whether a relation exists between rapid atmospheric pressure fluctuations, attributed to the far infrasound frequency range (APF), and a number of emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases (EEC). Over an entire year, the average integral amplitudes of APF in the range of periods from 3 s to 120 s over each hour (HA) were measured. Daily dynamics of HA averaged over the year revealed a wave shape with smooth increase from night to day followed by decrease from day to night. The total daily number of EEC within the city of Kiev, Ukraine, was related to the daily mean of HA (DHA) and to the ratio of HA averaged over the day time to HA averaged over the night time (Rdn), and was checked for confounding effects of classical meteorological variables through non-parametric regression algorithms. The number of EEC were significantly higher on days with high DHA (3.72 11.07 Pa, n = 87) compared to the low DHA (0.7 3.62 Pa, n = 260, p = 0.01), as well at days with low Rdn (0.21 1.64, n = 229) compared to the high Rdn (1.65 7.2, n = 118, p = 0.03). A difference between DHA and Rdn effects on the emergency events related to different categories of circulatory diseases points to a higher sensitivity of rheumatic and cerebro-vascular diseases to DHA, and ischaemic and hypertensive diseases to Rdn. Results suggest that APF could be considered as a meteorotropic factor capable of influencing circulatory system diseases.

  9. Trends in sudden cardiac death and its risk factors in Japan from 1981 to 2005: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Minako; Ohira, Tetsuya; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Maeda, Kenji; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Noda, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Shimamoto, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence whether sudden cardiac death (SCD) is increasing in Asia, although the incidence of coronary heart disease among urban middle-aged Japanese men has increased recently. We examined trends in the incidence of SCD and its risk factors in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study. Design and setting This was a population-based longitudinal study. Surveillance of men and women for SCD incidence and risk factors was conducted from 1981 to 2005. Subjects The surveyed population was all men and women aged 30–84 years who lived in three rural communities and one urban community in Japan. Main outcome measures Trends in SCD incidence and its risk factors. Results Age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence of SCD decreased from 1981–1985 to 1991–1995, and plateaued thereafter. The annual incidence per 100 000 person-years was 76.0 in 1981–1985, 57.9 in 1986–1990, 39.3 in 1991–1995, 31.6 in 1996–2000 and 36.8 in 2001–2005. The prevalence of hypertension decreased from 1981–1985 to 1991–1995, and plateaued thereafter for men and women. The age-adjusted prevalence of current smoking for men decreased while that of diabetes mellitus increased for both sexes from 1981–1985 to 2001–2005. Conclusions The incidence of SCD decreased from 1981 to 1995 but was unchanged from 1996 to 2005. Continuous surveillance is necessary to clarify future trends in SCD in Japan because of an increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus. PMID:22446988

  10. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  11. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  12. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is...

  13. Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support for Cardiac Disease: Temporal Trends in Use and Complications Between 2009 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Ternus, Bradley W; Jentzer, Jacob C; El Sabbagh, Abdallah; Eleid, Mackram F; Bell, Malcolm R; Murphy, Joseph G; Rihal, Charanjit S; Barsness, Gregory W

    2017-09-01

    We present the indications for use, temporal trends, complications, and 1-year clinical outcomes after single-access percutaneous mechanical circulatory support device placement from years 2009-2015 at our institution. Patients with an intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) or Impella device placed in the catheterization suite between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2015 were included. There were a total of 778 patients in this study. The mean number of devices placed per year was 111. There was no statistically significant trend in total number of devices placed overall, but the rate of Impella placement declined over time (P=.02). There was a significant trend toward less use before high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (P=.04). The composite secondary endpoint occurred in 59.4% of patients, with no significant difference between patients treated with an IABP or Impella (P=.66). There were 37 device-related complications, which occurred more commonly with the Impella (12.5%) than with the IABP (3.7%; P<.01). There was no significant overall change in the total number of devices placed per year, but we did observe a decreased use of Impella support. There was a significant decrease in the utilization of percutaneous mechanical circulatory support prior to high-risk PCI, driven primarily by a decreased usage of the IABP. There were more complications related to the Impella device vs the IABP, with no improvement in the composite outcome.

  14. Mortality from Circulatory Diseases and other Non-Cancer Outcomes among Nuclear Workers in France, the United Kingdom and the United States (INWORKS).

    PubMed

    Gillies, Michael; Richardson, David B; Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; O'Hagan, Jacqueline A; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2017-09-01

    Positive associations between external radiation dose and non-cancer mortality have been found in a number of published studies, primarily of populations exposed to high-dose, high-dose-rate ionizing radiation. The goal of this study was to determine whether external radiation dose was associated with non-cancer mortality in a large pooled cohort of nuclear workers exposed to low-dose radiation accumulated at low dose rates. The cohort comprised 308,297 workers from France, United Kingdom and United States. The average cumulative equivalent dose at a tissue depth of 10 mm [Hp(10)] was 25.2 mSv. In total, 22% of the cohort were deceased by the end of follow-up, with 46,029 deaths attributed to non-cancer outcomes, including 27,848 deaths attributed to circulatory diseases. Poisson regression was used to investigate the relationship between cumulative radiation dose and non-cancer mortality rates. A statistically significant association between radiation dose and all non-cancer causes of death was observed [excess relative risk per sievert (ERR/Sv) = 0.19; 90% CI: 0.07, 0.30]. This was largely driven by the association between radiation dose and mortality due to circulatory diseases (ERR/Sv = 0.22; 90% CI: 0.08, 0.37), with slightly smaller positive, but nonsignificant, point estimates for mortality due to nonmalignant respiratory disease (ERR/Sv = 0.13; 90% CI: -0.17, 0.47) and digestive disease (ERR/Sv = 0.11; 90% CI: -0.36, 0.69). The point estimate for the association between radiation dose and deaths due to external causes of death was nonsignificantly negative (ERR = -0.12; 90% CI: <-0.60, 0.45). Within circulatory disease subtypes, associations with dose were observed for mortality due to cerebrovascular disease (ERR/Sv = 0.50; 90% CI: 0.12, 0.94) and mortality due to ischemic heart disease (ERR/Sv = 0.18; 90% CI: 0.004, 0.36). The estimates of associations between radiation dose and non-cancer mortality are generally consistent with those observed in atomic

  15. Progression of Mortality due to Diseases of the Circulatory System and Human Development Index in Rio de Janeiro Municipalities.

    PubMed

    Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de Souza E; Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes de

    2016-10-01

    Diseases of the circulatory system (DCS) are the major cause of death in Brazil and worldwide. To correlate the compensated and adjusted mortality rates due to DCS in the Rio de Janeiro State municipalities between 1979 and 2010 with the Human Development Index (HDI) from 1970 onwards. Population and death data were obtained in DATASUS/MS database. Mortality rates due to ischemic heart diseases (IHD), cerebrovascular diseases (CBVD) and DCS adjusted by using the direct method and compensated for ill-defined causes. The HDI data were obtained at the Brazilian Institute of Applied Research in Economics. The mortality rates and HDI values were correlated by estimating Pearson linear coefficients. The correlation coefficients between the mortality rates of census years 1991, 2000 and 2010 and HDI data of census years 1970, 1980 and 1991 were calculated with discrepancy of two demographic censuses. The linear regression coefficients were estimated with disease as the dependent variable and HDI as the independent variable. In recent decades, there was a reduction in mortality due to DCS in all Rio de Janeiro State municipalities, mainly because of the decline in mortality due to CBVD, which was preceded by an elevation in HDI. There was a strong correlation between the socioeconomic indicator and mortality rates. The HDI progression showed a strong correlation with the decline in mortality due to DCS, signaling to the relevance of improvements in life conditions.

  16. Progression of Mortality due to Diseases of the Circulatory System and Human Development Index in Rio de Janeiro Municipalities

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de Souza e; de Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Background Diseases of the circulatory system (DCS) are the major cause of death in Brazil and worldwide. Objective To correlate the compensated and adjusted mortality rates due to DCS in the Rio de Janeiro State municipalities between 1979 and 2010 with the Human Development Index (HDI) from 1970 onwards. Methods Population and death data were obtained in DATASUS/MS database. Mortality rates due to ischemic heart diseases (IHD), cerebrovascular diseases (CBVD) and DCS adjusted by using the direct method and compensated for ill-defined causes. The HDI data were obtained at the Brazilian Institute of Applied Research in Economics. The mortality rates and HDI values were correlated by estimating Pearson linear coefficients. The correlation coefficients between the mortality rates of census years 1991, 2000 and 2010 and HDI data of census years 1970, 1980 and 1991 were calculated with discrepancy of two demographic censuses. The linear regression coefficients were estimated with disease as the dependent variable and HDI as the independent variable. Results In recent decades, there was a reduction in mortality due to DCS in all Rio de Janeiro State municipalities, mainly because of the decline in mortality due to CBVD, which was preceded by an elevation in HDI. There was a strong correlation between the socioeconomic indicator and mortality rates. Conclusion The HDI progression showed a strong correlation with the decline in mortality due to DCS, signaling to the relevance of improvements in life conditions. PMID:27849263

  17. Psychosocial assessment of candidates and risk classification of patients considered for durable mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Maltby, Megan C; Flattery, Maureen P; Burns, Brigid; Salyer, Jeanne; Weinland, Stephan; Shah, Keyur B

    2014-08-01

    The psychosocial assessment of candidates for transplantation (PACT), developed to assess candidates for heart transplant, has not been routinely used to assess left ventricular assist device (LVAD) candidacy. We examined the efficacy of the PACT to assess psychosocial outcomes in LVAD patients. We reviewed patients who received LVAD implants between June 2006 and April 2011 and retrospectively applied the PACT. We determined the accuracy of identifying social success with the PACT and revised domains to reflect criteria influencing social success for LVAD patients. Forty-eight patients (72% men, 44% non-white, 50.4 years old) were divided into high-scoring and low-scoring groups. Nine patients with low PACT scores were falsely categorized as high-risk, whereas 4 with high scores had poor social outcomes. The score had a high positive-predictive value (0.86) but low negative-predictive value (0.31). The PACT was revised (modified [m]PACT) to measure indicators, such as social support and understanding of care requirements, identified to more closely affect LVAD outcome. The mPACT exhibited improved accuracy. A reclassification table was developed, and the net reclassification index was 0.32. The percentage of patients incorrectly classified for social risk decreased from 27% with the PACT to 8% with the mPACT. Patients with higher mPACT scores had decreased 30-day readmission rates (26% vs 67%, p = 0.045) after device implantation. By emphasizing social support, psychologic health, lifestyle factors, and device understanding, the mPACT showed improved performance in risk-stratifying candidates for LVAD therapy. Prospective validation is warranted. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [The circulatory status in the extremities in Raynaud's disease and syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pertsov, V I

    1998-01-01

    In 39 patients with the disease and syndrome of Raynaud the state of the upper extremities blood circulation was studied up. The reliable lowering of indexes of the disease in III-IV stage in comparison with the normal level is noted. The most informative methods are rheoplethysmography and Doppler investigation of the main arteries of extremity.

  19. [Assessment of the Possibility of Comparing Mortality Rates from Diseases of the Circulatory System in the United States and Russia].

    PubMed

    Boytsov, S A; Andreev, E M; Samorodskaya, I V

    2017-01-01

    to compare and discuss causes of differences between standardized mortality rates (SMR) from diseases of the circulatory system (DCS) among men and women older than 50 years in Russia and USA. Data on mortality rate in the USA were taken from WHO mortality database (WHO MD), those on the USA population by 5-years age bands from Human Mortality Database (HMD). Information on mortality rates in Russia was obtained from Rosstat. In analysis we used age-adjusted death rates and SMR for DCS or ages more or equal 50 years. For standardization of mortality rates we used data of the European Standard Population 2013. By 23 3-digit codes mortality rates among men in USA were higher than in Russia (in the structure of mortality among women there were 28 such codes). Portion of such deaths in Russia in total number of DCS deaths was 6.5% both for men and women, while figures for USA were 36.8 and 40%, respectively. About 99% of differences in SMR from DCS between countries were determined by 8 and 6 groups of causes in men and women, respectively. Analysis of 4-digit ICD codes showed that almost 40% of DSC class deaths both in Russia and USA had the forth digit of ICD-10 code 8 or 9 and were accompanied by wording "other" or "unspecified" or formulation of diseases which were not used in clinical practice and were absent in both guidelines issued by Russian or American professional societies. Despite existence of ICD rules the conducted analysis allows to state that those rules could be interpreted differently in various countries. This resulted in obtaining noncomparable data. Comparison of mortality rates in USA and Russia based on existing ICD coding rules cannot be correctly performed. Therefore, this comparison does not allow to assess contribution of financing and organization of medical service in differences in mortality rates between two countries.

  20. [Effects of kavergal on indices of lipid peroxidation and the condition of the antioxidant system in patients with rheumatic heart disease presenting with circulatory insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Abdullaev, S F; Inoiatova, F Kh; Inoiatov, F Sh

    2002-01-01

    132 patients with rheumatic heart disease presenting with circulatory insufficiency displayed increased LPO both in the blood plasma and red cells, decline in the antioxidant enzymes activity varying with the circulatory insufficiency functional class degree of severity. Basic therapy with making use of antiinflammatory drugs, cardiac glycosides, diuretics together with drugs endowed with an antiarrhythmic activity and nitroglycerin (where indicated) was found to have practically no effect on LPO level or activity of the antioxidant system. The use of the drug kavergal, 1 g three times daily (total daily dosage being 3 g) in the complex therapy, has been shown to significantly decrease hyperlipoperoxidation both in the blood plasma and red cells increasing the activity of enzymes of the antioxidant defence.

  1. C-reactive protein levels and risk of disabling dementia with and without stroke in Japanese: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS).

    PubMed

    Chei, Choy-Lye; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Ai; Noda, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Minako; Cui, Renzhe; Imano, Hironori; Kiyama, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiko; Asada, Takashi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2014-10-01

    Studies have shown that elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) predicts stroke, which is a risk factor for dementia. It remains, however, unclear whether hs-CRP increases risk of dementia. A prospective nested case-control study of Japanese 40-69 years of age was conducted using frozen serum samples collected from approximately 7531men and women who participated in cardiovascular risk surveys from 1984 to 1994 in one community and 1989-1995 in another community under the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS). Two control subjects per case were matched by sex, age, community, and year of serum storage. The hs-CRP was measured using a latex particle-enhanced immunonephelometric assay. Between 1999 and 2013, we identified 275 disabling dementia cases (96 cases with history of stroke and 179 without it). There was a positive association between hs-CRP levels and risk of dementia with history of stroke. No significant association was observed between hs-CRP levels and risk of dementia without history of stroke. After adjustment for hypertension, diabetes and other confounding variables, the positive association remained statistically significant. The multivariable odds ratios associated with 1-SD increment of log hs-CRP were 1.02 (0.87-1.20) for total dementia, 1.35 (1.02-1.79) for dementia with history of stroke, and 0.89 (0.72-1.10) for dementia without history of stroke. Elevated hs-CRP levels were associated with increased risk of disabling dementia in individuals with history of stroke but not in those without it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro cardiovascular system emulator (bioreactor) for the simulation of normal and diseased conditions with and without mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Paula; Rezaienia, Mohammad Amin; Rahideh, Akbar; Keeble, Thomas R; Rothman, Martin T; Korakianitis, Theodosios

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a new device designed to simulate in vitro flow rates, pressures, and other parameters representing normal and diseased conditions of the human cardiovascular system. Such devices are sometimes called bioreactors or "mock" simulator of cardiovascular loops (SCVLs) in literature. Most SCVLs simulate the systemic circulation only and have inherent limitations in studying the interaction of left and right sides of circulation. Those SCVLs that include both left and right sides of the circulation utilize header reservoirs simulating cycles with constant atrial pressures. The SCVL described in this article includes models for all four chambers of the heart, and the systemic and pulmonary circulation loops. Each heart chamber is accurately activated by a separate linear motor to simulate the suction and ejection stages, thus capturing important features in the perfusion waveforms. Four mechanical heart valves corresponding to mitral, pulmonary, tricuspid, and aortic are used to control the desired unidirectional flow. This SCVL can emulate different physiological and pathological conditions of the human cardiovascular system by controlling the different parameters of blood circulation through the vascular tree (mainly the resistance, compliance, and elastance of the heart chambers). In this study, four cases were simulated: healthy, congestive heart failure, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction conditions, and left ventricular dysfunction with the addition of a mechanical circulatory support (MCS) device. Hemodynamic parameters including resistance, pressure, and flow have been investigated at aortic sinus, carotid artery, and pulmonary artery, respectively. The addition of an MCS device resulted in a significant reduction in mean blood pressure and re-establishment of cardiac output. In all cases, the experimental results are compared with human physiology and numerical simulations. The results show the capability of the SCVL to replicate various

  3. Aristotle score predicts outcome in patients requiring extracorporeal circulatory support following repair of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Derby, Christopher D; Kolcz, Jacek; Kerins, Paul J; Duncan, Daniel R; Quezada, Emilio; Pizarro, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has become the standard technique of mechanical support for the failing circulation following repair of congenital heart lesions. The objective of this study was to identify predictors of survival in patients requiring postcardiotomy ECMO. The Aristotle score, a method developed to evaluate quality of care based on complexity, was investigated as a potential predictor of outcome. Between 2003 and 2005, 37 patients required ECMO following corrective surgery for congenital heart disease. Records were reviewed retrospectively with emphasis on factors affecting survival to discharge. The comprehensive Aristotle complexity score was calculated for each patient. Overall, 28 patients (76%) survived to decannulation and 17 patients (46%) survived to discharge. There were 24 (65%) neonates and 10 patients (27%) with single ventricle physiology, with a hospital survival of 42% (10 of 24) and 50% (5 of 10), respectively. Univariate factors associated with survival included Aristotle score, duration of support, reexploration, multiple organ failure, and number of complications. Age, weight, and single-ventricle physiology were not significant. In a logistic regression model, an Aristotle score < 14 was identified as a predictor of survival (OR 0.12, CI 0.02-0.87). The Aristotle score is predictive of outcome in patients requiring postcardiotomy ECMO and may serve as a uniform criterion when comparing and evaluating quality of care and performance in this complex patient population.

  4. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  5. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ziganshin, Bulat A.

    2013-01-01

    Effective cerebral protection remains the principle concern during aortic arch surgery. Hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) is entrenched as the primary neuroprotection mechanism since the 70s, as it slows injury-inducing pathways by limiting cerebral metabolism. However, increases in HCA duration has been associated with poorer neurological outcomes, necessitating the adjunctive use of antegrade (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). ACP has superseded RCP as the preferred perfusion strategy as it most closely mimic physiological perfusion, although there exists uncertainty regarding several technical details, such as unilateral versus bilateral perfusion, flow rate and temperature, perfusion site, undue trauma to head vessels, and risks of embolization. Nevertheless, we believe that the convenience, simplicity and effectiveness of straight DHCA justifies its use in the majority of elective and emergency cases. The following perspective offers a historical and clinical comparison of the DHCA with other techniques of cerebral protection. PMID:23977599

  6. [A successfully procedure for the high risk redo-aortic valve replacement under profound hypothermic circulatory arrest and selective cerebral perfusion].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Watanabe, T; Koike, H; Nakamura, M; Abe, T

    1998-07-01

    A 45-year-old female with atypical coactation of aorta and aortic regurgitation was treated with aortic valve replacement and extra-anastomic bypass between the ascending aorta and the left common iliac artery using a 12 mm woven dacron graft in 1978. She had complained of palpitation and shortness of breath six years after surgery, cinefluoroscopy demonstrated prosthetic valve dysfunction. Thrombolytic therapy was carried out to improve the valve function, but it did not result in improvement. Therefore, we decided to proceed with re-surgery. During a median sternotomy, massive bleeding from the substernal graft occurred. Therefore, we abandoned the re-surgery at that time. Then, her general condition was getting worse and she had occasional pulmonary edema fifteen years after the initial surgery. She finally underwent redo-aortic valve replacement with the aid of profound hypothermic circulatory arrest and selective cerebral perfusion. There was no cerebral complication after the re-surgery and she is now leading normal life. A median sternotomy under profound hypothermic circulatory arrest and selective cerebral perfusion was a very useful and safe procedure for patients who had risks of inadvertent injury to the aorta or the heart during the re-surgery.

  7. Environment and illness in the Calchaquí Valley (Salta, Argentina): phytotherapy for osteo-articular and cardio-circulatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Rosa; Pochettino, María Lelia; Cortella, Alicia R

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze and discuss the phytotherapy employed for two kinds of diseases, osteo-articular and cardio-circulatory, among the inhabitants of Molinos (Calchaquí Valley, Salta Province, Northwestern Argentina). These diseases take their origin in certain environmental conditions as well as the rural activities characteristic of the zone. The observations and interviews conducted among "medicos campesinos" (traditional healers) and the general population provided valuable information concerning the relationship between man and his environment, as it relates to health-illness processes. As a result of our research, we present a chart of the 25 recorded diseases and the 42 plant species employed in their therapy, considering the organs used, the ways of preparation and administration, as well as the geographic origin.

  8. Mathematical circulatory system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method of modeling a circulatory system including a regulatory mechanism parameter. In one embodiment, a regulatory mechanism parameter in a lumped parameter model is represented as a logistic function. In another embodiment, the circulatory system model includes a compliant vessel, the model having a parameter representing a change in pressure due to contraction of smooth muscles of a wall of the vessel.

  9. Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in cardiovascular disease development among vegetarians. Vegetarians have a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Deficiency of this vitamin is associated with a variety of atherogenic processes that are mainly, but not exclusively, due to vitamin B12 deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Each 5-μmol/L increase above 10 μmol/L of serum homocysteine is associated with a 20% increased risk of circulatory health problems. Mean homocysteine concentration >10 μmol/L among vegetarians was reported in 32 of 34 reports. Macrocytosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is also associated with fatal and non-fatal coronary disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and other circulatory health problems. Compared with non-vegetarians, vegetarians have an improved profile of the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including serum lipids, blood pressure, serum glucose concentration, and weight status. However, not all studies that assessed cardiovascular disease incidence among vegetarians reported a protective effect. Among studies that did show a lower prevalence of circulatory health problems, the effect was not as pronounced as expected, which may be a result of poor vitamin B12 status due to a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 deficiency may negate the cardiovascular disease prevention benefits of vegetarian diets. In order to further reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, vegetarians should be advised to use vitamin B12 supplements. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  11. Mortality and cancer morbidity in workers from an aluminium smelter with prebaked carbon anodes--Part III: Mortality from circulatory and respiratory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Rønneberg, A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate associations between exposure to pot emissions (fluorides, sulphur dioxide) and mortality from chronic obstructive lung disease, coal tar pitch volatiles and mortality from diseases related to atherosclerosis, and carbon monoxide and mortality from ischaemic heart disease. METHODS--Mortality between 1962 to 1991 was investigated in a cohort of 1085 men hired by a Norwegian aluminium smelter between 1922 and 1975. Associations between cumulative exposure and mortality were investigated through SMR analysis based on national mortality rates; temporal relations were explored by considering exposures only within specific time windows. Circulatory mortality was also investigated by Poisson regression analysis. RESULTS--There were 501 deaths v 471.3 expected in the cohort. The excess was confined to short term workers and did not seem to be associated with exposures in the smelter. Analysis of mortality among the 661 men with at least three years employment showed associations between cumulative exposure to tar 40 years before observation and atherosclerotic mortality (P = 0.03), and between exposure to pot emissions 20-39 years before observation and mortality from chronic obstructive lung disease (P = 0.06). No association was found between exposure to carbon monoxide and mortality from ischaemic heart disease, but cerebrovascular mortality was associated with exposure to pot emissions (P = 0.02). Results for atherosclerotic and cerebrovascular diseases were confirmed through Poisson regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS--The data support previous findings of increased mortality from ischaemic heart disease in workers exposed to tar, and some support is also provided for earlier reports of increased respiratory mortality in potroom workers. PMID:7795741

  12. Re-emergence of circulatory foot-and-mouth disease virus serotypes Asia1 in Bangladesh and VP1 protein heterogeneity with vaccine strain IND 63/72.

    PubMed

    Ullah, H; Siddique, M A; Al Amin, Md; Das, B C; Sultana, M; Hossain, M A

    2015-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes O, A and Asia1 are responsible for significant number of disease outbreaks in Bangladesh; however serotype Asia1 has not been reported in circulation since 1996. The present investigation reports the detection of serotype FMDV Asia1 from local farms in 2012 and 2013 outbreaks. The farms were located in Jessore and Gazipur districts, and one of these farms was under vaccine control programme. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete VP1 gene revealed that FMDV Asia1 is under genetic lineage C having close similarity to the Asia1 sequences of Indian origin. The circulatory genotype Asia1 showed VP1 protein sequence heterogeneity of eight amino acid substitutions within the G-H loop with the vaccine strain [IND 63/72 (AY304994)] used in vaccination programme. ELISA assay revealed that, of seven, only one local field serum sample (cattle vaccinated 38 days earlier) was positive at a titre level of >2.4 (log10) but failed to protect the cattle from infection occurred by the virus. This investigation focused that the eight amino acid substitution in VP1 protein at G-H loop of the locally circulated FMDV serotype Asia1 strain may be a reason for current vaccination failure.

  13. Measurement science in the circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Jones, Casey M; Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; Cianchetti, Flor A; Glynn, Jeremy J; Healy, Laura D; Lam, Wai Yan; Nelson, Jonathan W; Parrish, Diana C; Phillips, Kevin G; Scott-Drechsel, Devon E; Tagge, Ian J; Zelaya, Jaime E; Hinds, Monica T; McCarty, Owen J T

    2014-03-01

    The dynamics of the cellular and molecular constituents of the circulatory system are regulated by the biophysical properties of the heart, vasculature and blood cells and proteins. In this review, we discuss measurement techniques that have been developed to characterize the physical and mechanical parameters of the circulatory system across length scales ranging from the tissue scale (centimeter) to the molecular scale (nanometer) and time scales of years to milliseconds. We compare the utility of measurement techniques as a function of spatial resolution and penetration depth from both a diagnostic and research perspective. Together, this review provides an overview of the utility of measurement science techniques to study the spatial systems of the circulatory system in health and disease.

  14. Measurement science in the circulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Casey M.; Baker-Groberg, Sandra M.; Cianchetti, Flor A.; Glynn, Jeremy J.; Healy, Laura D.; Lam, Wai Yan; Nelson, Jonathan W.; Parrish, Diana C.; Phillips, Kevin G.; Scott-Drechsel, Devon E.; Tagge, Ian J.; Zelaya, Jaime E.; Hinds, Monica T.; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the cellular and molecular constituents of the circulatory system are regulated by the biophysical properties of the heart, vasculature and blood cells and proteins. In this review, we discuss measurement techniques that have been developed to characterize the physical and mechanical parameters of the circulatory system across length scales ranging from the tissue scale (centimeter) to the molecular scale (nanometer) and time scales of years to milliseconds. We compare the utility of measurement techniques as a function of spatial resolution and penetration depth from both a diagnostic and research perspective. Together, this review provides an overview of the utility of measurement science techniques to study the spatial systems of the circulatory system in health and disease. PMID:24563678

  15. Wildlife disease and risk perception.

    PubMed

    Hanisch-Kirkbride, Shauna L; Riley, Shawn J; Gore, Meredith L

    2013-10-01

    Risk perception has an important influence on wildlife management and is particularly relevant to issues that present health risks, such as those associated with wildlife disease management. Knowledge of risk perceptions is useful to wildlife health professionals in developing communication messages that enhance public understanding of wildlife disease risks and that aim to increase public support for disease management. To promote knowledge of public understanding of disease risks in the context of wildlife disease management, we used a self-administered questionnaire mailed to a stratified random sample (n = 901) across the continental United States to accomplish three objectives: 1) assess zoonotic disease risk perceptions; 2) identify sociodemographic and social psychologic factors underlying these risk perceptions; and 3) examine the relationship between risk perception and agreement with wildlife disease management practices. Diseases we assessed in the surveys were rabies, plague, and West Nile virus. Risk perception, as measured by an index consisting of severity, susceptibility, and dread, was greatest for rabies and West Nile virus disease (x = 2.62 and 2.59, respectively, on a scale of 1 to 4 and least for plague (x = 2.39). The four most important variables associated with disease risk perception were gender, education, prior exposure to the disease, and concern for health effects. We found that stronger risk perception was associated with greater agreement with wildlife disease management. We found particular concern for the vulnerability of wildlife to zoonotic disease and for protection of wildlife health, indicating that stakeholders may be receptive to messages emphasizing the potential harm to wildlife from disease and to messages promoting One Health (i.e., those that emphasize the interdependence of human, domestic animal, wildlife, and ecosystem health).

  16. Animals: Disease Risks for People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Public Health Disease Risks for People at Dog Social Events People attending dog social events can ... may develop stomach cramps, diarrhea, vomiting and fever. Dog bites Dog bites are always a risk when ...

  17. [Circulatory assist devices in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Figulla, H R

    2005-03-24

    One out of 13 patients with an acute myocardial infarction is endangered of cardiogenic shock. In addition, acute valvular leakage, shunt vitiae, and acute myocarditis can lead to acute myocardial failure. As a therapeutic option, mechanical assist devices offer cardiac support and hemodynamic stabilization under these circumstances. The following minimal-invasive devices are used in cardiology and intensive care medicine: intra-aortic balloon pulsation (IABP), intra-vascular axial screw pumps, extra-corporal centrifugal pumps with and without additional membrane oxygenator. The IABP improves left ventricular function by a systolic reduction of the after-load, and an increase of diastolic blood pressure dependent on myocardial function. In contrast, axial screw pumps and centrifugal pumps can provide circulatory support independently of myocardial function. Mechanical assist devices can prevent irreversible damage not only by offering a reduction of myocardial work load, but also by improving organ perfusion in cardiogenic shock situations. Another indication for mechanical circulatory support depicts high-risk coronary angioplasty if the left ventricular ejection fraction is severely reduced or the target vessel supplies more than 50 % of vital myocardium. In case of irreversible heart failure, turbine pumps or centrifugal pumps offer a stabilization for the patient's transfer to a cardiac surgery center. They can also be used for bridging to heart transplantation in acute situations. Technical improvements will enhance the use of mechanical assist devices in the near future. Especially the development of portable emergency devices will enrich therapeutic possibilities in cardiology and intensive care medicine.

  18. Temporal trends in mortality from diseases of the circulatory system after treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based cohort study in Sweden (1973 to 2006).

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sandra; Lambert, Paul C; Sjöberg, Jan; Andersson, Therese M L; Björkholm, Magnus; Dickman, Paul W

    2013-04-10

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survival in Sweden has improved dramatically over the last 40 years, but little is known about the extent to which efforts aimed at reducing long-term treatment-related mortality have contributed to the improved prognosis. We used population-based data from Sweden to estimate the contribution of treatment-related mortality caused by diseases of the circulatory system (DCS) to temporal trends in excess HL mortality among 5,462 patients diagnosed at ages 19 to 80 between 1973 and 2006. Flexible parametric survival models were used to estimate excess mortality. In addition, we used recent advances in statistical methodology to estimate excess mortality in the presence of competing causes of death. Excess DCS mortality within 20 years after diagnosis has decreased continually since the mid-1980s and is expected to further decrease among patients diagnosed in the modern era. Age at diagnosis and sex were important predictors for excess DCS mortality, with advanced age and male sex being associated with higher excess DCS mortality. However, when accounting for competing causes of death, we found that excess DCS mortality constitutes a relatively small proportion of the overall mortality among patients with HL in Sweden. Excess DCS mortality is no longer a common source of mortality among Swedish patients with HL. The main causes of death among long-term survivors today are causes other than HL, although other (non-DCS) excess mortality also persists for as long as 20 years after diagnosis, particularly among older patients.

  19. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  20. Determinants of exercise peak arterial blood pressure, circulatory power, and exercise cardiac power in a population based sample of Finnish male and female aged 30 to 47 years: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel parameters derived from peak maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) and exercise arterial blood pressure, such as peak circulatory power (CP) and exercise cardiac power (ECP), can be used in the risk assessment of cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, the determinants of these factors are poorly characterized in the general population. Methods We assessed peak arterial blood pressure, CP and ECP with standardized cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) on 281 female and 257 male participants of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. The subjects were aged 30–47 years. Peak VO2 as well as systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressures were measured to calculate peak mean arterial pressure, CP and ECP. These parameters were assessed for correlation with sex, age, height, weight, waist-to-hip ratio, smoking, physical activity index (PAI), fasting insulin and glucose levels as well as the use of antihypertensive treatment. Results Sex, age and weight explained 36% of the variation in peak systolic blood pressure, and these factors in combination with height and the use of antihypertensive treatment explained 13% of the variation in peak diastolic blood pressure. Sex, height, weight, waist-to-hip ratio, PAI and smoking explained 49% − 52% of the variation in peak CP. Sex, age, height, weight, waist-to-hip ratio, PAI, smoking and insulin levels explained 21% − 49% of variation in ECP. Conclusions Subject demographics and lifestyle-related factors should be taken into account when exercise blood pressure response, CP and ECP are used to evaluate patients’ cardiac function in CPET. PMID:24621399

  1. Long-term Effects of Pediatric Burns on the Circulatory System.

    PubMed

    Duke, Janine M; Randall, Sean M; Fear, Mark W; Boyd, James H; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M

    2015-11-01

    The systemic responses to burns (in particular, elevated levels of catecholamines and stress hormones) have been shown to have an impact on cardiac function for at least 3 years in children with burns. However, it is not clear if these changes lead to long-term effects on the heart. The aim of this study was to assess whether pediatric burn injury is associated with increased long-term hospital use for circulatory diseases. A population-based longitudinal study was undertaken using linked hospital and death data from Western Australia for children younger than 15 years when hospitalized for a first burn injury (n = 10 436) in 1980-2012 and a frequency matched noninjury comparison cohort, randomly selected from Western Australia's birth registrations (n = 40 819). Crude admission rates and cumulative length of stay for circulatory diseases were calculated. Negative binomial and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling were used to generate incidence rate ratios and hazard ratios, respectively. After adjustment for demographic factors and preexisting health status, the burn cohort had 1.33 (incidence rate ratio) times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-1.64) as many circulatory system hospitalizations, 2.26 times the number of days in hospital with a diagnosis of a circulatory disease (2.26, 95% CI: 1.06-4.81), and were at a higher risk of incident admissions (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% CI: 1.03-1.46), compared with the uninjured cohort. Children who sustain burn injury experience elevated hospital admission rates and increased length of hospital stay for diseases of the circulatory system for a prolonged period of time after burn discharge. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Multiple exposures to airborne pollutants and hospital admissions due to diseases of the circulatory system in Santiago de Chile.

    PubMed

    Franck, Ulrich; Leitte, Arne Marian; Suppan, Peter

    2014-01-15

    High concentrations of various air pollutants have been associated with hospitalization due to development and exacerbation of cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to assess associations between airborne exposures by particulate matter as well as gaseous air pollutants and hospital admissions due to different cardiovascular disease groups in Santiago de Chile. The study was performed in the metropolitan area of Santiago de Chile during 2004-2007. We applied a time-stratified case-crossover analysis taking temporal variation, meteorological conditions and autocorrelation into account. We computed associations between daily ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5--particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 or 2.5 μm, respectively) or ozone (O3) and hospital admissions for cardiovascular illnesses. We found for CO, NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 adverse relationships to cardiovascular admissions while effect strength and lag depended on the pollutant and on the disease group. By trend, in 1-pollutant models most adverse pollutants were NO2 and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) followed by CO, while in 2-pollutant models effects of PM10 persisted in most cases whereas other effects weakened. In addition the strongest effects seemed to be immediate or with a delay of up to 2 days. Adverse effects of ozone could not be detected. Our results provided evidence for adverse health effects of combined exposure to airborne pollutants. Different pollutants accounted for varying adverse effects within different cardiovascular disease groups. Taking case numbers and effect strength of all cardiovascular diseases into account, mitigation measures should address all pollutants but especially NO2, PM10, and CO. © 2013.

  3. The influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index on hospital admissions through diseases of the circulatory system in Lisbon, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Vasconcelos, João; Silva, Giovani; Gonçalves, Fábio; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), meteorological variables, air pollutants, and hospital admissions due to diseases of circulatory systems in Lisbon (Portugal) during winter months (2003-2012). This paper is one of the few studies analyzing the impact of NAO on health through its influence on thermal stress and air pollution and is the first to be conducted in Lisbon. This study uses meteorological data (synthetized into a thermal comfort index), air pollutant metrics, and the NAO index (all clustered in 10-day cycles to overcome daily variability of the NAO index). The relationship between morbidity, thermal comfort index, NAO index, and air pollutants was explored through several linear models adjusted to seasonality through a periodic function. The possible indirect effect between the NAO index and hospital admissions was tested, assuming that NAO (independent variable) is affecting hospital admissions (outcome variable) through thermal discomfort and/or pollution levels (tested as individual mediators). This test was conducted through causal mediation analysis and adjusted for seasonal variation. The results from this study suggest a possible indirect relationship between NAO index and hospital admissions. Although NAO is not significantly associated with hospital admissions, it is significantly associated with CO, PM2.5, NO, and SO2 levels, which in turn increase the probability of hospitalization. The discomfort index (built with temperature and relative humidity) is significantly associated with hospital admissions, but its variability is not explained by the NAO index. This study highlights the impacts of the atmospheric circulation patterns on health. Furthermore, understanding the influence of the atmospheric circulation patterns can support the improvement of the existing contingency plans.

  4. The influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index on hospital admissions through diseases of the circulatory system in Lisbon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Vasconcelos, João; Silva, Giovani; Gonçalves, Fábio; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), meteorological variables, air pollutants, and hospital admissions due to diseases of circulatory systems in Lisbon (Portugal) during winter months (2003-2012). This paper is one of the few studies analyzing the impact of NAO on health through its influence on thermal stress and air pollution and is the first to be conducted in Lisbon. This study uses meteorological data (synthetized into a thermal comfort index), air pollutant metrics, and the NAO index (all clustered in 10-day cycles to overcome daily variability of the NAO index). The relationship between morbidity, thermal comfort index, NAO index, and air pollutants was explored through several linear models adjusted to seasonality through a periodic function. The possible indirect effect between the NAO index and hospital admissions was tested, assuming that NAO (independent variable) is affecting hospital admissions (outcome variable) through thermal discomfort and/or pollution levels (tested as individual mediators). This test was conducted through causal mediation analysis and adjusted for seasonal variation. The results from this study suggest a possible indirect relationship between NAO index and hospital admissions. Although NAO is not significantly associated with hospital admissions, it is significantly associated with CO, PM2.5, NO, and SO2 levels, which in turn increase the probability of hospitalization. The discomfort index (built with temperature and relative humidity) is significantly associated with hospital admissions, but its variability is not explained by the NAO index. This study highlights the impacts of the atmospheric circulation patterns on health. Furthermore, understanding the influence of the atmospheric circulation patterns can support the improvement of the existing contingency plans.

  5. Donation after circulatory death.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Murphy, P G; O'Callaghan, G

    2012-01-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) describes the retrieval of organs for the purposes of transplantation that follows death confirmed using circulatory criteria. The persisting shortfall in the availability of organs for transplantation has prompted many countries to re-introduce DCD schemes not only for kidney retrieval but increasingly for other organs with a lower tolerance for warm ischaemia such as the liver, pancreas, and lungs. DCD contrasts in many important respects to the current standard model for deceased donation, namely donation after brain death. The challenge in the practice of DCD includes how to identify patients as suitable potential DCD donors, how to support and maintain the trust of bereaved families, and how to manage the consequences of warm ischaemia in a fashion that is professionally, ethically, and legally acceptable. Many of the concerns about the practice of both controlled and uncontrolled DCD are being addressed by increasing professional consensus on the ethical and legal justification for many of the interventions necessary to facilitate DCD. In some countries, DCD after the withdrawal of active treatment accounts for a substantial proportion of deceased organ donors overall. Where this occurs, there is an increased acceptance that organ and tissue donation should be considered a routine part of end-of-life care in both intensive care unit and emergency department.

  6. Lifetime Risks of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jarett D.; Dyer, Alan; Cai, Xuan; Garside, Daniel B.; Ning, Hongyan; Thomas, Avis; Greenland, Philip; Van Horn, Linda; Tracy, Russell P.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease have not been reported across the age spectrum in black adults and white adults. METHODS We conducted a meta-analysis at the individual level using data from 18 cohort studies involving a total of 257,384 black men and women and white men and women whose risk factors for cardiovascular disease were measured at the ages of 45, 55, 65, and 75 years. Blood pressure, cholesterol level, smoking status, and diabetes status were used to stratify participants according to risk factors into five mutually exclusive categories. The remaining lifetime risks of cardiovascular events were estimated for participants in each category at each age, with death free of cardiovascular disease treated as a competing event. RESULTS We observed marked differences in the lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease across risk-factor strata. Among participants who were 55 years of age, those with an optimal risk-factor profile (total cholesterol level, <180 mg per deciliter [4.7 mmol per liter]; blood pressure, <120 mm Hg systolic and 80 mm Hg diastolic; nonsmoking status; and nondiabetic status) had substantially lower risks of death from cardiovascular disease through the age of 80 years than participants with two or more major risk factors (4.7% vs. 29.6% among men, 6.4% vs. 20.5% among women). Those with an optimal risk-factor profile also had lower lifetime risks of fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction (3.6% vs. 37.5% among men, <1% vs. 18.3% among women) and fatal or nonfatal stroke (2.3% vs. 8.3% among men, 5.3% vs. 10.7% among women). Similar trends within risk-factor strata were observed among blacks and whites and across diverse birth cohorts. CONCLUSIONS Differences in risk-factor burden translate into marked differences in the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, and these differences are consistent across race and birth cohorts. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.) PMID

  7. Risk factors for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2013-06-01

    Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors

  8. Chagas Disease Risk in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E.; Frank, David M.; Rivaldi, Chissa–Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez–Cordero, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. Methods and Findings The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five–stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post–1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc–minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence–based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag–York–Mollié model and post–1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk

  9. [Autonomic neuropathy--a problem of the circulatory system and digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Punkkinen, Jari; Koskenpato, Jari; Rosengård-Bärlund, Milla

    2014-01-01

    An autonomic disorder of the circulatory system becomes manifest as aberrant heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity already years before progressing into symptomatic disease, in which case the condition is no longer curable. Diagnosis is based on tests of autonomic nervous system function. The main thing in the treatment is management of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in addition to enhanced glucose homeostasis. Autonomic neuropathy may also affect the digestive tract and be accompanied by esophageal motility disorder, gastroparesis, diarrhea, constipation or fecal incontinence. It is essential in the diagnosis to exclude other diseases of the digestive tract.

  10. Alzheimer's disease: risk and protection.

    PubMed

    Jorm, A F

    1997-10-20

    Only four risk factors for Alzheimer's disease can be regarded as confirmed--old age, family history of dementia, apo-E genotype and Down syndrome. Other disputed risk factors with some supporting evidence include ethnic group, head trauma and aluminium in drinking water. Possible protection factors, such as anti-inflammatory drugs, oestrogen replacement therapy and a high education level, are of great interest because they suggest possible preventive action.

  11. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and refers...

  12. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and refers...

  13. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease is the most common and serious form of cardiovascular disease and refers...

  14. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? In women, high triglycerides combined ... information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart Disease Fact ...

  15. Epigenetic Inheritance of Disease and Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bohacek, Johannes; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks in an organism can be altered by environmental factors throughout life. Although changes in the epigenetic code can be positive, some are associated with severe diseases, in particular, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent evidence has indicated that certain epigenetic marks can be inherited, and reshape developmental and cellular features over generations. This review examines the challenging possibility that epigenetic changes induced by environmental factors can contribute to some of the inheritance of disease and disease risk. This concept has immense implications for the understanding of biological functions and disease etiology, and provides potential novel strategies for diagnosis and treatment. Examples of epigenetic inheritance relevant to human disease, such as the detrimental effects of traumatic stress or drug/toxic exposure on brain functions, are reviewed. Different possible routes of transmission of epigenetic information involving the germline or germline-independent transfer are discussed, and different mechanisms for the maintenance and transmission of epigenetic information like chromatin remodeling and small noncoding RNAs are considered. Future research directions and remaining major challenges in this field are also outlined. Finally, the adaptive value of epigenetic inheritance, and the cost and benefit of allowing acquired epigenetic marks to persist across generations is critically evaluated. PMID:22781843

  16. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    PubMed Central

    Aliverti, Andrea; Bovio, Dario; Fullin, Irene; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50–75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4–6% and an output of 750–1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61±0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57±0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart. PMID:19440240

  17. A contemporary review of paediatric heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Kindel, Steven J; Everitt, Melanie D

    2016-06-01

    Improvements in the care of children with cardiomyopathy, CHDs, and acquired heart disease have led to an increased number of children surviving with advanced heart failure. In addition, the advent of more durable mechanical circulatory support options in children has changed the outcome for many patients who otherwise would have succumbed while waiting for heart transplantation. As a result, more children with end-stage heart failure are being referred for heart transplantation, and there is increased demand for a limited donor organ supply. A review of important publications in the recent years related to paediatric heart failure, transplantation, and mechanical circulatory support show a trend towards pushing the limits of the current therapies to address the needs of this growing population. There have been a number of publications focussing on previously published risk factors perceived as barriers to successful heart transplantation, including elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, medication non-adherence, re-transplantation, transplantation of the failed Fontan patient, and transplantation in an infant or child bridged with mechanical circulatory support. This review will highlight some of these key articles from the last 3 years and describe recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis, and management of children with end-stage heart disease.

  18. Derivation and Validation of a Novel Right-Sided Heart Failure Model After Implantation of Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices:The EUROMACS (European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support) Right-Sided Heart Failure Risk Score.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Osama I; Akin, Sakir; Muslem, Rahatullah; Boersma, Eric; Manintveld, Olivier C; Krabatsch, Thomas; Gummert, Jan F; de By, Theo M M H; Bogers, Ad J J C; Zijlstra, Felix; Mohacsi, Paul; Caliskan, Kadir

    2017-08-27

    Background -The aim of the study was to derive and validate a novel risk score for early right-sided heart failure (RHF) after left ventricular assist device implantation. Methods -The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical irculatory Support (EUROMACS) was used to identify adult patients undergoing continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation with mainstream devices. Eligible patients (n=2988) were randomly divided into derivation (n=2000) and validation (n=988) cohorts. The primary outcome was early (<30 days) severe postoperative RHF, defined as receiving short- or long-term rightsided circulatory support, continuous inotropic support for ≥14 days, or nitric oxide ventilation for ≥48 hours. The secondary outcome was all-cause mortality and length of stay in the intensive care unit. Covariates found to be associated with RHF (exploratory univariate P<0.10) were entered into a multivariable logistic regression model. A risk score was then generated using the relative magnitude of the exponential regression model coefficients of independent predictors at the last step after checking for collinearity, likelihood ratio test, c index, and clinical weight at each step. Results -A 9.5-point risk score incorporating 5 variables (Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support class, use of multiple inotropes, severe right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography, ratio of right trial/ pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, hemoglobin) was created. The mean scores in the derivation and validation cohorts were 2.7±1.9 and 2.6±2.0, respectively (P=0.32). RHF in the derivation cohort occurred in 433 patients (21.7%) after left ventricular assist device implantation and was associated with a lower 1-year (53% versus 71%; P<0.001) and 2-year (45% versus 58%; P<0.001) survival compared with patients without RHF. RHF risk ranged from 11% (low risk score 0-2) to 43.1% (high risk score >4; P<0.0001). Median intensive care unit stay

  19. [Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tokuhei; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly patients. Identification of risk factors for AD would contribute to the understanding of AD pathogenesis and thus, help in the development of preventive methods. Early-onset familial AD is associated with mutations of the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PS-1), or PS-2, resulting in the overproduction of amyloid beta-protein. Epidemiological and case-control studies have led to the identification of several risk factors for sporadic AD. The most concrete genetic risk factor for AD is the epsilon4 allele of apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). In addition, several genes such as CTNNA3, GAB2, PVRL2, TOMM40, and APOC1 are known to be the risk factors that contribute to AD pathogenesis. On the other hand, nongenetic risk factors, such as age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, head injury, and nutrition have also been reported. Although aging is the strongest risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the development of AD as a result of ageing remain to be elucidated.

  20. Dentistry: risks for addictive disease.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Chemical dependence is chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental contributing factors and neurological characteristics. Dentists may be at an increased risk for addiction because they are in a helping profession, work in a stressful environment in which drugs are readily available, often exhibit perfectionist personality traits, and function in isolation. Treatment can be effective, especially when provided by staff skilled in working with healthcare professionals, using the Twelve-Step approach, involving families, and addressing related dysfunctional behavior patterns and psychological issues.

  1. Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163751.html Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk? Or is the link the other way ... link between Parkinson's disease and the risk for stroke. However, the study can't prove that one ...

  2. [Effect of a new Soviet-made antioxidant on the processes of lipid peroxidation in the treatment of patients with transient cerebro- vascular diseases and circulatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, N V; Khrapova, E V; Fedorova, T N

    1991-01-01

    The authors present for the first time the results of investigation and treatment of 55 patients with transitory cerebral circulation disorders (TCCD) and circulatory encephalopathy by the new antioxidant drug emoxipine . The drug was noted to produce a beneficial clinical effect in 39 patients. After emoxipine treatment the patients demonstrated an increase of the endogenous antioxidants, evidence of the formation of the antioxidant depot. In the patients suffering from TCCD, the content of endogenous antioxidants did not differ from normal both before and after the treatment. Improvement of the patients' clinical status correlated with the drug dose and changes in lipid peroxidation. In patients with deterioration of the health status and without any changes, the dose-dependent effect was not recorded.

  3. [Risk factors for arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Madoery, Roberto; Rubin, Graciela; Luquez, Hugo; Luquez, Cecilia; Cravero, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The risk factors of arterial disease (FREA) predict a future damage over the vascular system of the human body. Its detection are considered a key for the diagnostic as well as for the preventive and even curative strategies. For a long time, scientist considered those factors originated as a consecuence of large studies during the middle of the last century, with current validity up to our days. A simple classification spoke of them as traditionals. Further investigations described the so called new or emergents.factors that where joint together accordingly to their actions: coagulation factors, psicosocial, inflamatories and infectious. A recent classification, taking into account the type of impact, divided them into; causatives, predisposals and conditionals. Also, it was described a mechanism, the oxidative power, with consecuences over the endothelium, in the last part of the process. Before, another mechanism was described: the insulin resistance and the hiperinsulinism, bases for the Metabolic Syndrome, that includes a number of traditional risk factors.

  4. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Circulatory...

  5. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Circulatory...

  6. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Circulatory...

  7. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Circulatory...

  8. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Circulatory...

  9. [Lifestyle-related disease and fracture risk].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2011-05-01

    Meta analysis of fracture risk in diabetes indicates that the risk of proximal femoral fracture in type-2 diabetes is increased 1.4-1.7 times. It is well known that increased fracture risk is observed in serious kidney disease. However, it has recently been reported that increased fracture risk is also observed in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) . The risk of proximal femoral fracture increases in early stages after stroke, but gradually decreases in subsequent stages. Some reports indicate decreased fracture risk in metabolic syndrome and hyperlipidemia and increased fracture risk in hypertension, arterial calcification and ischemic heart disease, while other reports indicate contradictory results.

  10. Circulatory death determination in uncontrolled organ donors: a panel viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Bernat, James L; Bleck, Thomas P; Blosser, Sandralee A; Bratton, Susan L; Capron, Alexander M; Cornell, Danielle; DeVita, Michael A; Fulda, Gerard J; Glazier, Alexandra K; Gries, Cynthia J; Mathur, Mudit; Nakagawa, Thomas A; Shemie, Sam D

    2014-04-01

    One barrier for implementing programs of uncontrolled organ donation after the circulatory determination of death is the lack of consensus on the precise moment of death. Our panel was convened to study this question after we performed a similar analysis on the moment of death in controlled organ donation after the circulatory determination of death. We concluded that death could be determined by showing the permanent or irreversible cessation of circulation and respiration. Circulatory irreversibility may be presumed when optimal cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts have failed to restore circulation and at least a 7-minute period has elapsed thereafter during which autoresuscitation to restored circulation could occur. We advise against the use of postmortem organ support technologies that reestablish circulation of warm oxygenated blood because of their risk of retroactively invalidating the required conditions on which death was declared.

  11. State of the Art of Mechanical Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Hari R.; Anand, Jatin; Cohn, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support of the failing heart has become an important means of treating end-stage heart disease. This rapidly growing therapeutic field has produced impressive clinical outcomes and has great potential to help thousands of otherwise terminal patients worldwide. In this review, we examine the state of the art of mechanical circulatory support: current practice, totally implantable systems of the future, evolving biventricular support mechanisms, the potential for myocardial recovery and adjunctive treatment methods, and miniaturized devices with expanded indications for therapy. PMID:24808767

  12. Current status of cardiac transplantation and mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac transplantation and mechanical circulatory support are possible options for improving survival and quality of life in patients with isolated cardiac disease and end-stage heart failure. Transplantation is limited by donor availability but has a median survival of 10 years. Post-transplant immunosuppression is often transplant center dependent, but a tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil-based regimen may be preferred. Sirolimus may reduce the progression rate of transplant vasculopathy. There has been a trend toward continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices because of their increased durability and reduced size. A variety of surgical and percutaneous ventricular assist devices may be used as a bridge to decision on a patient's candidacy for transplantation. Mechanical circulatory support as destination therapy has not been widely implemented because of poor device durability, but this is expected to change with newer devices. Mechanical circulatory support as a bridge to myocardial recovery has been successful only in a few patients.

  13. The Converged Experience of Risk and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aronowitz, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Context: One underappreciated consequence of modern clinical and public health practices is that the experience of being at risk for disease has been converging with the experience of disease itself. This is especially true for certain chronic diseases, in which early diagnosis and aggressive treatment have led to symptom-less and sign-less disease and in which treatments have largely been aimed at altering the disease's future course. Methods: This article reviews the historical scholarship and medical literature pertinent to transformations in the chronic disease and risk experiences. Findings: The experience of chronic disease increasingly resembles or has become indistinguishable from risk because of (1) new clinical interventions that have directly changed the natural history of disease; (2) increased biological, clinical, and epidemiological knowledge about the risk of chronic disease; (3) the recruitment of larger numbers into chronic disease diagnoses via new screening and diagnostic technology and disease definitions; (4) new ways of conceptualizing efficacy; and (5) intense diagnostic testing and medical interventions. Conclusions: The converged experience of risk and disease has led to some unsettling and generally underappreciated consequences that might be subjected to more clinical and policy reflection and response: (1) some puzzling trends in medical decision making, such as the steep and uniform increase in the numbers of women across a broad spectrum of risk/disease in breast cancer who have opted for prophylactic mastectomies; (2) a larger and highly mobilized disease/risk population, resulting in an expanded market for interventions and greater clout for disease advocates; (3) shifts in the perceived severity of the disease, with ripple effects on how people experience and understand their illness and risk of disease; and (4) interventions that promise both to reduce the risk of disease and to treat its symptoms. PMID:19523124

  14. Mechanical circulatory support in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Robert J; Miletic, Kyle G; Schraufnagel, Dean P; Vargo, Patrick R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Stewart, Robert D; Moazami, Nader

    2016-05-01

    End-stage heart failure affects thousands of children yearly and mechanical circulatory support is used at many points in their care. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supports both the failing heart and lungs, which has led to its use as an adjunct to cardiopulmonary resuscitation as well as in post-operative cardiogenic shock. Continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (VAD) have replaced pulsatile-flow devices in adults and early studies have shown promising results in children. The Berlin paracorporeal pulsatile VAD recently gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval and remains the only VAD approved in pediatrics. Failing univentricular hearts and other congenitally corrected lesions are new areas for mechanical support. Finding novel uses, improving durability, and minimizing complications are areas of growth in pediatric mechanical circulatory support.

  15. Peripheral biomarkers of stroke: Focus on circulatory microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Murali; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Stroke occurs when blood flow stops, and that stoppage results in reduced oxygen supply to neurons in the brain. The occurrence of stroke increases with age, but anyone at any age can suffer from stroke. Recent research has implicated multiple cellular changes in stroke patients, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory responses, and changes in mRNA and proteins. Recent research has also revealed that stroke is associated with modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Stroke can be controlled by modifiable risk factors, including diet, cardiovascular, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, depression and traumatic brain injury. Stroke is the major risk factor for vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this article is to review the latest developments in research efforts directed at identifying 1) latest developments in identifying biomarkers in peripheral and central nervous system tissues, 2) changes in microRNAs (miRNAs) in patients with stroke, 3) miRNA profile and function in animal brain, and 4) protein biomarkers in ischemic stroke. This article also reviews research investigating circulatory miRNAs as peripheral biomarkers of stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pregnancy, pregnancy loss, and the risk of cardiovascular disease in Chinese women: findings from the China Kadoorie Biobank.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sanne A E; Yang, Ling; Guo, Yu; Chen, Yiping; Bian, Zheng; Tian, Xiaocao; Chang, Liang; Zhang, Shuo; Liu, Jiaqiu; Wang, Tao; Chen, Junshi; Li, Liming; Woodward, Mark; Chen, Zhengming

    2017-08-08

    Pregnancy and pregnancy loss may be linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the evidence is still inconsistent, especially in East Asians, whose reproductive patterns differ importantly from those in the West. We examined the associations of pregnancy, miscarriage, induced abortion, and stillbirth with CVD incidence among Chinese women. In 2004-2008, the nationwide China Kadoorie Biobank recruited 302,669 women aged 30-79 years from ten diverse localities. During 7 years of follow-up, 43,968 incident cases of circulatory disease, 14,440 of coronary heart disease, and 19,925 of stroke (including 11,430 ischaemic and 2170 haemorrhagic strokes), were recorded among 289,573 women without prior CVD at baseline. Cox regression yielded multiple adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for CVD risks associated with pregnancy outcomes. Overall, 99% of women had been pregnant, and among them 10%, 53%, and 7% reported having a history of miscarriage, induced abortion, and stillbirth, respectively. Each additional pregnancy was associated with an adjusted HR of 1.03 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.02; 1.04) for circulatory disease. A history of miscarriage, induced abortion, and stillbirth, respectively, were associated with adjusted HRs of 1.04 (1.01; 1.07), 1.04 (1.02; 1.07), and 1.07 (1.03; 1.11) for circulatory disease. The relationship was stronger with recurrent pregnancy loss; adjusted HRs for each additional loss being 1.04 (1.00; 1.09) for miscarriage, 1.02 (1.01; 1.04) for induced abortion, and 1.04 (1.00; 1.08) for stillbirth. Among Chinese women, increases in pregnancy, and a history and recurrence of miscarriage, induced abortion, and stillbirth are each associated with a higher risk of CVD.

  17. Sodium bicarbonate use and the risk of hypernatremia in thoracic aortic surgical patients with metabolic acidosis following deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Gutsche, Jacob T.; Ramakrishna, Harish; Setegne, Samuel L.; Jackson, Kirk R.; Augoustides, John G.; Ochroch, E. Andrew; Weiss, Stuart J.; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Cheung, Albert T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Metabolic acidosis after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for thoracic aortic operations is commonly managed with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between total NaHCO3 dose and the severity of metabolic acidosis, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of vasoactive infusions, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or hospital length of stay (LOS). Methods: In a single center, retrospective study, 87 consecutive elective thoracic aortic operations utilizing DHCA, were studied. Linear regression analysis was used to test for the relationships between the total NaHCO3 dose administered through postoperative day 2, clinical variables, arterial blood gas values, and short-term clinical outcomes. Results: Seventy-five patients (86%) received NaHCO3. Total NaHCO3 dose averaged 136 ± 112 mEq (range: 0.0–535 mEq) per patient. Total NaHCO3 dose correlated with minimum pH (r = 0.41, P < 0.0001), minimum serum bicarbonate (r = −0.40, P < 0.001), maximum serum lactate (r = 0.46, P = 0.007), duration of metabolic acidosis (r = 0.33, P = 0.002), and maximum serum sodium concentrations (r = 0.29, P = 0.007). Postoperative hypernatremia was present in 67% of patients and peaked at 12 h following DHCA. Eight percent of patients had a serum sodium ≥ 150 mEq/L. Total NaHCO3 dose did not correlate with anion gap, serum chloride, not the duration of mechanical ventilator support, vasoactive infusions, ICU or hospital LOS. Conclusion: Routine administration of NaHCO3 was common for the management of metabolic acidosis after DHCA. Total dose of NaHCO3 was a function of the severity and duration of metabolic acidosis. NaHCO3 administration contributed to postoperative hypernatremia that was often severe. The total NaHCO3 dose administered was unrelated to short-term clinical outcomes. PMID:27397449

  18. Sodium bicarbonate use and the risk of hypernatremia in thoracic aortic surgical patients with metabolic acidosis following deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Gutsche, Jacob T; Ramakrishna, Harish; Setegne, Samuel L; Jackson, Kirk R; Augoustides, John G; Ochroch, E Andrew; Weiss, Stuart J; Bavaria, Joseph E; Cheung, Albert T

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for thoracic aortic operations is commonly managed with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between total NaHCO 3 dose and the severity of metabolic acidosis, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of vasoactive infusions, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or hospital length of stay (LOS). In a single center, retrospective study, 87 consecutive elective thoracic aortic operations utilizing DHCA, were studied. Linear regression analysis was used to test for the relationships between the total NaHCO 3 dose administered through postoperative day 2, clinical variables, arterial blood gas values, and short-term clinical outcomes. Seventy-five patients (86%) received NaHCO 3 . Total NaHCO 3 dose averaged 136 ± 112 mEq (range: 0.0-535 mEq) per patient. Total NaHCO 3 dose correlated with minimum pH (r = 0.41, P < 0.0001), minimum serum bicarbonate (r = -0.40, P < 0.001), maximum serum lactate (r = 0.46, P = 0.007), duration of metabolic acidosis (r = 0.33, P = 0.002), and maximum serum sodium concentrations (r = 0.29, P = 0.007). Postoperative hypernatremia was present in 67% of patients and peaked at 12 h following DHCA. Eight percent of patients had a serum sodium ≥ 150 mEq/L. Total NaHCO 3 dose did not correlate with anion gap, serum chloride, not the duration of mechanical ventilator support, vasoactive infusions, ICU or hospital LOS. Routine administration of NaHCO 3 was common for the management of metabolic acidosis after DHCA. Total dose of NaHCO 3 was a function of the severity and duration of metabolic acidosis. NaHCO 3 administration contributed to postoperative hypernatremia that was often severe. The total NaHCO 3 dose administered was unrelated to short-term clinical outcomes.

  19. A contemporary review of mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chetan B; Cowger, Jennifer A; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical circulatory support has seen numerous advances in the recent years, with important observations made to guide patient selection for the therapy, indications for use, and management of devices after implantation. There is rapid growth in the use of left ventricular assist device therapy (LVAD) for advanced heart failure, with a movement to pursue device intervention earlier in the disease spectrum before comorbidities escalate. With this increase in LVAD use have come new challenges, including unanticipated adverse events and high readmission rates. Simultaneously, complications encountered during LVAD support and an increased number of patients supported with a goal for transplant have had an important effect on the allocation of cardiac allografts. Still, the field continues to evolve and address these challenges in systematic fashion to provide novel solutions and meet the needs of a growing population with advanced heart failure. This has led to an extensive body of literature, ranging from case reports to multicenter clinical trials, which will enhance the future of LVAD technology and patient outcomes. This review summarizes important publications in mechanical circulatory support during the past 24 months.

  20. H2S during circulatory shock: Some unresolved questions

    PubMed Central

    McCook, Oscar; Radermacher, Peter; Volani, Chiara; Asfar, Pierre; Ignatius, Anita; Kemmler, Julia; Möller, Peter; Szabó, Csaba; Whiteman, Matthew; Wood, Mark E.; Wang, Rui; Georgieff, Michael; Wachter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Numerous papers have been published on the role of H2S during circulatory shock. Consequently, knowledge about vascular sulfide concentrations may assume major importance, in particular in the context of “acute on chronic disease”, i.e., during circulatory shock in animals with pre-existing chronic disease. This review addresses the questions i) of the “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock, and, ii) to which extent injury and pre-existing co-morbidity may affect the expression of H2S producing enzymes under these conditions. In the literature there is a huge range on sulfide blood levels during circulatory shock, in part as a result of the different analytical methods used, but also due to the variable of the models and species studied. Clearly, some of the very high levels reported should be questioned in the context of the well-known H2S toxicity. As long as “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock are unknown and/or undetectable “on line” due to the lack of appropriate techniques, it appears to be premature to correlate the measured blood levels of hydrogen sulfide with the severity of shock or the H2S therapy-related biological outcomes. The available data on the tissue expression of the H2S-releasing enzymes during circulatory shock suggest that a “constitutive” CSE expression may play a crucial role of for the maintenance of organ function, at least in the kidney. The data also indicate that increased CBS and CSE expression, in particular in the lung and the liver, represents an adaptive response to stress states. PMID:24650697

  1. Mechanical circulatory support in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Wioletta; Suliga, Kamil; Rempega, Grzegorz; Rajwa, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of end-stage heart failure patients eligible for heart transplant and the disproportionately low number of donor hearts have led to increased interest in ventricular assist devices (VAD). These devices can be used as a bridge to decision, bridge to recovery, or bridge to candidacy. The main advantage of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is the improvement of organ perfusion and function, which leads to better quality of life and survival. The MCS can also be used as a destination therapy in end-stage heart failure patients who are not eligible for heart transplant. It should be remembered that, despite the tangible benefits, VAD implantation may also be associated with the risk of serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, arrhythmias, blood clots, right ventricular failure, and cardiovascular events. This study presents an up-to-date overview of the current knowledge on the role of MCS in modern medicine. PMID:27516785

  2. Single and combined effects of air pollutants on circulatory and respiratory system-related mortality in Belgrade, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Stojić, Svetlana Stanišić; Stanišić, Nemanja; Stojić, Andreja; Šoštarić, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between short- and long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and soot and mortality attributed to circulatory and respiratory diseases in Belgrade area (Serbia). The analyzed data set comprised results of regular pollutant monitoring and corresponding administrative records on frequency of daily mortality in the period 2009-2014. Nonlinear exposure-response dependencies and delayed effects of temperature were examined by means of distributed lag nonlinear models. The air pollutant loadings and circulatory system-related death rates in Belgrade area are among the highest in Europe. Data demonstrated that excess risk of death with short-term exposure to elevated concentrations of PM10, SO2, and soot was not significant, whereas marked effect size estimates for exposure over 90 d preceding mortality were found. The influence of chronic exposure was shown to be greater for respiratory than circulatory system-related mortality. When stratified by age and gender, higher risk was noted for male individuals below the age of 65 years.

  3. Worldwide risks of animal diseases: introduction.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J E

    2006-01-01

    Animal diseases impact food supplies, trade and commerce, and human health and well-being in every part of the world. Outbreaks draw the attention of those in agriculture, regulatory agencies, and government, as well as the general public. This was demonstrated by the 2000-2001 foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks that occurred in Europe, South America, Asia and Africa and by the recent increased occurrence of emerging diseases transmitted from animals to humans. Examples of these emerging zoonotic diseases are highly pathogenic avian influenza, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, West Nile virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome. There is also the risk of well-known and preventable zoonotic diseases, such as rabies, brucellosis, leishmaniasis, and echinococcosis/hydatidosis, in certain countries; these diseases have a high morbidity with the potential for a very high mortality. Animal agriculturalists should have a global disease awareness of disease risks and develop plans of action to deal with them; in order to better respond to these diseases, they should develop the skills and competencies in politics, media interactions, and community engagement. This issue of Veterinaria Italiana presents information on the risk of animal diseases; their impact on animals and humans at the international, national, industry, and societal levels; and the responses to them. In addition, specific information is provided on national and international disease monitoring, surveillance and reporting, the risk of spread of disease by bioterrorism and on import risk analysis.

  4. Stress and genetic testing for disease risk.

    PubMed

    Baum, A; Friedman, A L; Zakowski, S G

    1997-01-01

    Healthy people who believe they are at risk for a life-threatening disease appear to carry a substantial stress burden because of threat of disease and uncertainty of risk. Testing for risk factors may be helpful by reducing this uncertainty, but diseases with multiple causes, like breast cancer, appear to be determined by genetic factors and by age, reproductive behavior, exposure to environmental toxins, or unknown antecedents. For diseases caused by inherited genetic defects, testing brings different benefits and stressors. A model is proposed that predicts long-term distress when risk analysis suggests a very high risk, when uncertainty is not reduced, when results of testing are at odds with preventive actions already taken, and when people who receive a positive, risk-increasing result lack strong social support, coping skills, other psychosocial resources, or all of these.

  5. Cerebrovascular Diseases in Workers at Mayak PA: The Difference in Radiation Risk between Incidence and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Simonetto, Cristoforo; Schöllnberger, Helmut; Azizova, Tamara V.; Grigoryeva, Evgenia S.; Pikulina, Maria V.; Eidemüller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A detailed analysis of cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) for the cohort of workers at Mayak Production Association (PA) is presented. This cohort is especially suitable for the analysis of radiation induced circulatory diseases, due to the detailed medical surveillance and information on several risk factors. The risk after external, typically protracted, gamma exposure is analysed, accounting for potential additional internal alpha exposure. Three different endpoints have been investigated: incidence and mortality from all cerebrovascular diseases and incidence of stroke. Particular emphasis was given to the form of the dose-response relationship and the time dependence of the radiation induced risk. Young attained age was observed to be an important, aggravating modifier of radiation risk for incidence of CeVD and stroke. For incidence of CeVD, our analysis supports a dose response sub-linear for low doses. Finally, the excess relative risk per dose was confirmed to be significantly higher for incidence of CeVD compared to CeVD mortality and incidence of stroke. Arguments are presented for this difference to be based on a true biological effect. PMID:25933038

  6. Modern risk stratification in coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ginghina, C; Bejan, I; Ceck, C D

    2011-11-14

    The prevalence and impact of cardiovascular diseases in the world are growing. There are 2 million deaths due to cardiovascular disease each year in the European Union; the main cause of death being the coronary heart disease responsible for 16% of deaths in men and 15% in women. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease in Romania is estimated at 7 million people, of which 2.8 million have ischemic heart disease. In this epidemiological context, risk stratification is required for individualization of therapeutic strategies for each patient. The continuing evolution of the diagnosis and treatment techniques combines personalized medicine with the trend of therapeutic management leveling, based on guidelines and consensus, which are in constant update. The guidelines used in clinical practice have involved risk stratification and identification of patient groups in whom the risk-benefit ratio of using new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques has a positive value. Presence of several risk factors may indicate a more important total risk than the presence / significant increase from normal values of a single risk factor. Modern trends in risk stratification of patients with coronary heart disease are polarized between the use of simple data versus complex scores, traditional data versus new risk factors, generally valid scores versus personalized scores, depending on patient characteristics, type of coronary artery disease, with impact on the suggested therapy. All known information and techniques can be integrated in a complex system of risk assessment. The current trend in risk assessment is to identify coronary artery disease in early forms, before clinical manifestation, and to guide therapy, particularly in patients with intermediate risk, which can be classified in another class of risk based on new obtained information.

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Risk of Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J Claire; Furlano, Raoul I; Jick, Susan S; Meier, Christoph R

    2016-02-01

    An increased risk of autoimmune disease has been reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. Using data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink [CPRD], this study set out to further examine this relationship. Patients with a first-time IBD diagnosis were randomly matched to an equal-sized IBD-free comparison group. Incidence rates for new-onset autoimmune diseases were estimated. A nested case-control analysis comprising IBD patients was conducted, using conditional logistic regression to assess whether IBD severity, duration, or treatment influences the risk of developing autoimmune diseases. During follow-up, 1069 IBD and 585 IBD-free patients developed an incident autoimmune disease. An increased incidence of autoimmune disease was observed in IBD patients (incidence rate [IR] 9.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.09-10.24) compared with the non-IBD comparison group [IR 5.22, 95% CI 4.82-5.66]. In IBD patients, increased disease severity was associated with an increased risk of autoimmune disease development (odds ratio [OR] 1.62, 95% CI 1.28-2.05). Current antibiotic use was also associated with an increased risk [adjusted OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.07-2.78]. A reduced risk of incident autoimmune diseases was observed for current long-term users of aminosalicylates [adjusted OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.57-0.91]. Individuals with IBD had an increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease. Increased disease severity and current antibiotic use were associated with an increased relative risk of developing additional autoimmune diseases in IBD patients. Long-term current aminosalicylate use was associated with a reduced risk. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Mechanical circulatory support for infants and small children.

    PubMed

    Gournay, Véronique; Hauet, Quentin

    2014-01-01

    The number of children in need of mechanical circulatory support has increased substantially over the last two decades, due to the technological progress made in surgery and intensive care, leading to improved survival of patients with congenital heart disease. In addition, primary myocardial dysfunction related to myocarditis or dilated cardiomyopathy may cause end-stage cardiac failure in children or infants, although not as frequently as in adults. The need for mechanical circulatory support may be either temporary until spontaneous myocardial recovery, as in postcardiotomy cardiac failure, or prolonged until heart transplantation in the absence of recovery. Two types of mechanical circulatory devices are suitable for the paediatric population: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for short-term support; and ventricular assist devices for long-term support as a bridge to transplantation. The aim of this review is to describe the specific issues related to paediatric mechanical circulatory support and the different types of devices available, to report on their rapidly growing use worldwide and on the outcomes for each indication and type of device, and to provide a perspective on the future developments and remaining challenges in this field.

  9. The Sodium Paradox: Dysnatremia and Mortality in Patients Implanted With Extracorporeal Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner; Tatooles, Antone; Bhat, Geetha

    2016-09-20

    Dysnatremia, abnormal serum sodium levels, has long been used as a marker for disease progression in heart failure patients. Classically, hyponatremia is associated with increased fluid volume in heart failure and is often a result of neuroendocrine dysfunction and poor cardiac output. Recent studies have noted that dysnatremia and hypernatremia are predictive of worsened outcomes in critical care and renal disease populations. We investigated the relationship between dysnatremia and postoperative outcomes in patients implanted with extracorporeal mechanical circulatory devices. A total of 97 patients who underwent implantation with the CentriMag mechanical circulatory assist system were included in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on preoperative serum sodium level cutoff of 135 mEq/L. Outcomes and mortality were compared between groups. The mean age for the study population was 56.21 ± 15.13 years, and 57 patients (58.8%) were male. The mean time on CentriMag support was 22.7 days. Patients with serum sodium levels ≤135 mEq/L were noted to have significantly worsened indicators of preoperative cardiac function. However, patients with serum sodium levels >135 mEq/L had significantly shorter postoperative survival (P = .006). When entered into a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, sodium was an independent predictor for increased risk of mortality (hazard ratio: 1.224; 95% confidence interval: 1.009-1.485; P = .040). Our results indicate that elevated preoperative sodium in patients undergoing implantation of a temporary mechanical circulatory support system is predictive of worsened postoperative survival. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  11. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  12. Risk assessment of skin in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Firth, Jill

    Patients with a rheumatic disease are considered to be at high risk of developing skin problems because of their restricted mobility, vascular complications and the type of medication they are taking.

  13. An association between central aortic pressure and subclinical organ damage of the heart among a general Japanese cohort: Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS).

    PubMed

    Cui, Renzhe; Li, Yuanying; Krisztina, Gero; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Umesawa, Mitsumasa; Imano, Hironori; Ohira, Tetsuya; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Kitamura, Akihiko; Hitsumoto, Shinichi; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate associations between central aortic pressure (CAP) and subclinical organ damage of the heart amongst the general population. We conducted a cross-sectional study in a community-based population, consisting of 3002 men and women aged between 40 and 79 years. The CAP was measured using the HEM-9000AI device, an automated tonometer. Electrocardiograms (ECG) were read according to the Minnesota Code. Subclinical organ damage in the heart was defined as measurable left high amplitude R waves (LHAR), major and minor ST-T abnormalities, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of LHAR, major and minor ST-T abnormalities, and LVH was higher for subjects in the highest tertile of CAP levels than those in the lowest tertile. After further adjustments for other cardiovascular risk factors, these associations did not change substantially. The multivariable odds ratios (ORs) (95% CI) of LHAR, major and minor ST-T abnormalities, and LVH for the highest tertile of CAP levels compared to the lowest tertile were 2.7(1.9-3.9), 1.8(1.1-2.9), 1.7(1.3-2.3) and 3.2(1.3-8.1), respectively. The positive associations with LHAR and minor ST-T abnormalities were observed primarily among non-hypertensive subjects. The respective corresponding ORs were 2.8(1.7-4.6) and 1.7(1.2-2.4) for non-hypertensive subjects, and 1.7(0.9-3.3) and 1.1(0.7-1.8) for hypertensive subjects. CAP levels were associated with subclinical organ damage of the heart independent of cardiovascular risk factors, and these associations were primarily seen in non-hypertensive subjects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hemodynamics of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Burkhoff, Daniel; Sayer, Gabriel; Doshi, Darshan; Uriel, Nir

    2015-12-15

    An increasing number of devices can provide mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to patients with acute hemodynamic compromise and chronic end-stage heart failure. These devices work by different pumping mechanisms, have various flow capacities, are inserted by different techniques, and have different sites from which blood is withdrawn and returned to the body. These factors result in different primary hemodynamic effects and secondary responses of the body. However, these are not generally taken into account when choosing a device for a particular patient or while managing a patient undergoing MCS. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of cardiac, vascular, and pump mechanics and illustrate how they provide a broad foundation for understanding the complex interactions between the heart, vasculature, and device, and how they may help guide future research to improve patient outcomes.

  15. [Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer disease risk: epidemiological studies review].

    PubMed

    Cowppli-Bony, Pascale; Dartigues, Jean-François; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc

    2006-03-01

    Etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still undefined in its most frequent sporadic type, but a role of vascular risk factor is more and more evocated in its pathophysiology. This role enables to hope that preventive or curative care of vascular risk factors could decrease AD incidence. Among these factors, high blood pressure, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and tobacco consumption were the most studied. We review the risk for AD, which had been associated with each of these factors in epidemiological studies. High blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of AD in most studies while the results are more controversial for the others factors. All these four vascular risk factors have variable interaction with the presence of cerebrovascular diseases and of the epsilon 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene which is a predisposition factor for sporadic AD.

  16. Personalized genomic disease risk of volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; McGuire, Amy L.; Pereira, Stacey; Caskey, C. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is commonly used for researching the causes of genetic disorders. However, its usefulness in clinical practice for medical diagnosis is in early development. In this report, we demonstrate the value of NGS for genetic risk assessment and evaluate the limitations and barriers for the adoption of this technology into medical practice. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on 81 volunteers, and for each volunteer, we requested personal medical histories, constructed a three-generation pedigree, and required their participation in a comprehensive educational program. We limited our clinical reporting to disease risks based on only rare damaging mutations and known pathogenic variations in genes previously reported to be associated with human disorders. We identified 271 recessive risk alleles (214 genes), 126 dominant risk alleles (101 genes), and 3 X-recessive risk alleles (3 genes). We linked personal disease histories with causative disease genes in 18 volunteers. Furthermore, by incorporating family histories into our genetic analyses, we identified an additional five heritable diseases. Traditional genetic counseling and disease education were provided in verbal and written reports to all volunteers. Our report demonstrates that when genome results are carefully interpreted and integrated with an individual’s medical records and pedigree data, NGS is a valuable diagnostic tool for genetic disease risk. PMID:24082139

  17. [Risk behaviors among adolescents with complex diseases].

    PubMed

    Funes Díaz, Francisco; Gaete Pinto, Verónica

    2016-06-01

    Adolescents with complex diseases may have a higher frequency of risk behaviors than their healthy peers. To characterize risk behaviors in adolescents with complex chronic diseases. Risk behaviors were assessed by means of a self-administered questionnaire designed for this purpose, in adolescents aged 10 to 19 years, who attended a pediatrics specialties clinic due to cystic fibrosis, congenital craniofacial anomalies, liver transplantation, kidney transplantation and spinal dysraphism. We assessed 98 patients with a mean age of 14.1 years (59% women). The most common behaviors were those related to accidents and violence, physical inactivity and unhealthy eating. Tobacco, alcohol and drug use, and sexual risk behaviors were observed in patients older than 15 years. Adolescents with congenital craniofacial anomaly followed by those with cystic fibrosis, showed a greater tendency towards some risk behaviors. Less physical activity and early onset of tobacco use predominated in women. Males had more physical violence. Eighteen percent of patients had more than 3 risk behaviors; 52% had two or three and 30% had one risk behavior. Risk behaviors in these adolescents with complex diseases varied according to the type of disease, gender and age.

  18. Obesity, diabetes, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Natalia; Gao, Xiang; McCullough, Marjorie L; Jacobs, Eric J; Patel, Alpa V; Mayo, Tinisha; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether obesity and diabetes are related to risk of Parkinson's disease. We prospectively followed 147,096 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 2005. Participants provided information on anthropometric variables and medical history at baseline and on waist circumference in 1997. Incident cases of Parkinson's disease (n = 656) were confirmed by treating neurologists and medical record review. Relative risks were estimated using proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, and other risk factors. Neither body mass index nor waist circumference significantly predicted Parkinson's disease risk. Relative risk comparing individuals with a baseline body mass index of ≥ 30 to those with a body mass index <23 was 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.34; P trend: 0.79), and that comparing individuals with a waist circumference in the top category (≥ 40.3 inches in men and ≥ 35 inches in women) to those in the bottom category (<34.5 inches in men and <28 inches in women) was 1.35 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.93; P trend: 0.08). History of diabetes was not significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk (combined relative risks = 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.25; P heterogeneity = 0.96). In addition, neither body mass index at age 18 nor changes in weight between age 18 and baseline were significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk. The results did not differ significantly by gender. Our results do not provide evidence for a relationship between body mass index, weight change, waist circumference, or baseline diabetes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

  19. Uncontrolled Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death.

    PubMed

    Ave, Anne L Dalle; Bernat, James L

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death (uDCDD) refers to organ donation after a refractory cardiac arrest. We analyzed ethical issues raised by the uDCDD protocols of France, Madrid, and New York City. We recommend: (1) Termination of resuscitation (TOR) guidelines need refinement, particularly the minimal duration of resuscitation efforts before considering TOR; (2) Before enrolling in an uDCDD protocol, physicians must ascertain that additional resuscitation efforts would be ineffective; (3) Inclusion in an uDCDD protocol should not be made in the outpatient setting to avoid error and conflicts of interest; (4) The patient's condition should be reassessed at the hospital and reversible causes treated; (5) A no-touch period of at least 10 minutes should be respected to avoid the risk of autoresuscitation; (6) Once death has been determined, no procedure that may resume brain circulation should be used, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, artificial ventilation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; (7) Specific consent is required prior to entry into an uDCDD protocol; (8) Family members should be informed about the goals, risks, and benefits of planned uDCDD procedures; and (9) Public information on uDCDD is desirable because it promotes public trust and confidence in the organ donation system.

  20. [Caffeine and adaptive changes in the circulatory system during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Cendrowska-Pinkosz, Monika; Dworzański, Wojciech; Krauze, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2017-01-23

    Adaptive physiological changes that occur in pregnant women can fluctuate with the intake of substances with proven, adverse biological effect on the body. Due to the fact that caffeine is one of the most chronically used xenobiotics, the impact of consuming caffeine on adaptive processes in the circulatory system of a pregnant women required a research. Many researchers emphasise its negative effect on the circulatory system of the mother and her offspring. However, in spite of years of observation, there is no clear answer to what extent dose or in what period of time the caffeine modulates the adaptive processes during pregnancy. Because of the potential risk the supply of caffeine during pregnancy should be subjected to considerable restrictions.

  1. Separation of craniopagus Siamese twins using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D E; Reitz, B A; Carson, B S; Long, D M; Dufresne, C R; Vander Kolk, C A; Maxwell, L G; Tilghman, D M; Nichols, D G; Wetzel, R C

    1989-11-01

    Occipitally joined craniopagus Siamese twins were separated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. The 7-month-old infants shared a large sagittal venous sinus that precluded conventional neurosurgical approach because of risk of exsanguination and air embolism. After craniotomy and preliminary exposure of the sinus, each twin underwent sternotomy and total cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest allowed safe division and subsequent reconstruction of the sinus remnants. Several unusual problems were encountered, including transfusion of a large blood volume from one extracorporeal circuit to the other through the common venous sinus, deleterious warming of the exposed brain during circulatory arrest, and thrombosis of both pump oxygenators. Both infants survived, although recovery was complicated in each by neurologic injury, cranial wound infection, and hydrocephalus. This case demonstrates the valuable supportive role of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest in the management of complex surgical problems of otherwise inoperable patients.

  2. Parkinson's disease: A risk factor for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Malochet-Guinamand, Sandrine; Durif, Franck; Thomas, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. On the long term, it may be complicated by various musculoskeletal problems, such as osteoporotic fractures, that have significant socioeconomic consequences. Indeed, patients suffering from Parkinson's disease have a higher fracture risk, particularly hip fracture risk, than other subjects of the same age because of both a higher risk of falls and lower bone mineral density. Bone loss in Parkinson's disease may be associated with the severity and duration of the disease. We review here the different suspected mechanisms of accelerated bone loss in Parkinson's disease, amongst which weight loss and reduced mobility appear to play key roles. Antiparkinsonian drugs, particularly levodopa, may also be associated with decreased bone mineral density as a result of hyperhomocysteinaemia. We discuss the role of other nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, folate or vitamin K. In conclusion, it seems necessary to screen for and treat osteoporosis in this at-risk population, while actions to prevent falls are still disappointing. A better understanding of the factors explaining bone loss in this population would help implementing preventive actions.

  3. An Overview of NASA's Risk of Cardiovascular Disease from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Huff, Janice L.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The association between high doses of radiation exposure and cardiovascular damage is well established. Patients that have undergone radiotherapy for primary cancers of the head and neck and mediastinal regions have shown increased risk of heart and vascular damage and long-term development of radiation-induced heart disease [1]. In addition, recent meta-analyses of epidemiological data from atomic bomb survivors and nuclear industry workers has also shown that acute and chronic radiation exposures is strongly correlated with an increased risk of circulatory disease at doses above 0.5 Sv [2]. However, these analyses are confounded for lower doses by lifestyle factors, such as drinking, smoking, and obesity. The types of radiation found in the space environment are significantly more damaging than those found on Earth and include galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events (SPEs), and trapped protons and electrons. In addition to the low-LET data, only a few studies have examined the effects of heavy ion radiation on atherosclerosis, and at lower, space-relevant doses, the association between exposure and cardiovascular pathology is more varied and unclear. Understanding the qualitative differences in biological responses produced by GCR compared to Earth-based radiation is a major focus of space radiation research and is imperative for accurate risk assessment for long duration space missions. Other knowledge gaps for the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease include the existence of a dose threshold, low dose rate effects, and potential synergies with other spaceflight stressors. The Space Radiation Program Element within NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is managing the research and risk mitigation strategies for these knowledge gaps. In this presentation, we will review the evidence and present an overview of the HRP Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure.

  4. [The treatment of patients with circulatory system pathology in health resorts "Tarkhovskiĭ" and "Priozerskiĭ"].

    PubMed

    Iaremko, V I; Nikitin, E A; Ermakov, R A

    2015-02-01

    The authors showed the history of foundation and development of health resorts "Tarkhovsky" and "Priozersky", as well as an analysis of the treatment of patients with circulatory system diseases in these health resorts. It was found that the structure of patients fitted the profile of health resorts and in recent years has remained stable. Patients with circulatory system diseases accounted for 47.8%. The existing system of medical rehabilitation and restorative treatment of patients with diseases of the circulatory system in the health resorts "Tarkhovsky" and "Priozersky" ensures the implementation in full rehabilitation and recovery programs for all categories of contingent attached.

  5. [Identification of the main risk factors for non infectious diseases: method of classification trees].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, E D; Varaksin, A N; Zhovner, I V

    2013-01-01

    There is presented ideology of the application of one of the methods for assessment of the influence of multi-factor influence of risk factors on population health--the method of classification trees. The method of classification trees is a hierarchical procedure for constructing a decision rule that allows to divide the population into groups with higher and lower morbidity "in the coordinates of" risk factors. The main advantage of the method--the possibility of finding the complex of risk factors having the greatest impact on the health of the population (in contrast to common methods, analyzing only the single-factor effects). In the paper there are presented two possible variants of application of classification trees: 1) the finding of the complex of environmental risk factors (RF), which provides the maximum impact on the prevalence of non infectious diseases in preschool children) in Yekaterinburg (environmental risk factors--the pollution of air drinking water, in the presence of a gas stove in the child's flat, etc.). It is shown that, together with socio-economic risk factors environmental risk factors increase the prevalence of respiratory diseases in preschool children in Ekaterinburg in 2.5-4 times (depending on the list and the number of environmental RF), 2) finding the complex of non-environmental factors that most effectively compensating the negative effect of environmental pollution on human health. This posing of the problem is associated with the fact that pollution environmental factors are (usually) unmodified, while family, behavioral or social factors can be partially or completely eliminated Implementation of the recommendations presented in the paper can reduce the incidence of circulatory diseases in preschool children in Yekaterinburg more than 2 times.

  6. Dysbiosis a risk factor for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Girbovan, Anamaria; Sur, Genel; Samasca, Gabriel; Lupan, Iulia

    2017-04-01

    Celiac disease remains one of the most challenging pathologies of the small intestine. It involves multiple pathogenic pathways and there are no disease-changing pharmacological agents available against it yet. The term microbiota refers to the community of microorganisms that inhabit a particular region of the body. Normal gut microbiota has a vital role in maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and promoting health. Celiac disease is associated with microbiota alteration, especially with an increase in the number of Gram-negative bacteria and a decrease in the number of Gram-positive bacteria. There is a strong relationship between intestinal dysbiosis and celiac disease, and recent studies are aimed at determining whether the celiac disease is a risk factor for dysbiosis or dysbiosis is for celiac disease. Therefore, the aim of this review was to assess the latest findings regarding the gut microbiota and its impact on the celiac disease, including therapeutic aspects.

  7. Erectile function and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Glasser, Dale B; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Rimm, Eric B; Ascherio, Alberto

    2007-12-15

    Erectile dysfunction is common among individuals with Parkinson's disease, but it is unknown whether it precedes the onset of the classic features of Parkinson's disease. To address this question, the authors examined whether erectile dysfunction was associated with Parkinson's disease risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Analyses included 32,616 men free of Parkinson's disease at baseline in 1986 who in 2000 completed a retrospective questionnaire with questions on erectile dysfunction in different time periods. Relative risks were computed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for age, smoking, caffeine intake, history of diabetes, and other covariates. Among men who reported their erectile function before 1986, 200 were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease during 1986-2002. Men with erectile dysfunction before 1986 were 3.8 times more likely to develop Parkinson's disease during the follow-up than were those with very good erectile function (relative risk = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 2.4, 6.0; p < 0.0001). Multivariate-adjusted relative risks of Parkinson's disease were 2.7, 3.7, and 4.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.4, 11.1; p = 0.008) for participants with first onset of erectile dysfunction (before 1986) at 60 or more, 50-59, and less than 50 years of age, respectively, relative to those without erectile dysfunction. In conclusion, in this retrospective analysis in a large cohort of men, the authors observed that erectile dysfunction was associated with a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease.

  8. Peripheral vascular disease: consequence for survival and association with risk factors in the Speedwell prospective heart disease study.

    PubMed Central

    Bainton, D; Sweetnam, P; Baker, I; Elwood, P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To measure the prevalence and incidence of intermittent claudication, to describe the mortality associated wtih the condition, and to assess the relevance of risk factors for vascular disease. DESIGN--A standard questionnaire on calf pain when walking was given in the prospective Speedwell study, and a range of risk factors were measured. The men were re-examined at intervals of three years, and deaths over 11 years were identified. SETTING--The general population. PARTICIPANTS--All men aged 45 to 59 registered with 16 general practitioners. RESULTS--The prevalence of intermittent claudication increased from almost nil at ages 45-49 to 2.9% at ages 60-64. The annual incidence increased from 0.3% in the youngest men to 0.5% in those in their early 60s. Intermittent claudication was related to the existence of ischaemic heart disease, particularly angina, at the first examination. The relative odds of men with angina developing intermittent claudication was 6.7 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.6 to 12.4). The risk of death in men with intermittent claudication was substantially raised. After standardisation for age and smoking the relative odds of death was 3.8 (95% CI 2.2 to 6.5). The excess was entirely from circulatory causes. Systolic blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and white cell count were all independently associated with the development of intermittent claudication, but the most striking association was with smoking. CONCLUSIONS--Intermittent claudication is an indicator for a very high risk of death. This is only partly explained by its strong association with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:7917683

  9. Plasma urate and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weisskopf, M G; O'Reilly, E; Chen, H; Schwarzschild, M A; Ascherio, A

    2007-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to dopaminergic neuron degeneration in Parkinson's disease. Urate, a potent antioxidant, could be neuroprotective. To determine whether higher plasma concentrations of urate predict a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease, the authors conducted a nested case-control study among participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a cohort comprising over 18,000 men who provided blood samples in 1993-1995. Eighty-four incident cases of Parkinson's disease were diagnosed through 2000, and each was randomly matched to two controls by year of birth, race, and time of blood collection. Rate ratios of Parkinson's disease according to quartile of uricemia were estimated by use of conditional logistic regression. The mean urate concentration was 5.7 mg/dl among cases and 6.1 mg/dl among controls (p = 0.01). After adjustment for age, smoking, and caffeine, the rate ratio of Parkinson's disease for the highest quartile of uricemia compared with the lowest was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: 0.18, 1.02; p(trend) = 0.017). This association was stronger in analyses excluding cases diagnosed within 4 years (median) from blood collection (rate ratio = 0.17, 95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.69; p(trend) = 0.010). These results suggest that high plasma urate concentrations may decrease the risk of Parkinson's disease, and they raise the possibility that interventions to increase plasma urate may reduce the risk and delay the progression of Parkinson's disease.

  10. Periodontal Disease, Tooth Loss, and Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Dominique S; Fu, Zhuxuan; Shi, Jian; Chung, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease, which includes gingivitis and periodontitis, is highly prevalent in adults and disease severity increases with age. The relationship between periodontal disease and oral cancer has been examined for several decades, but there is increasing interest in the link between periodontal disease and overall cancer risk, with systemic inflammation serving as the main focus for biological plausibility. Numerous case-control studies have addressed the role of oral health in head and neck cancer, and several cohort studies have examined associations with other types of cancers over the past decade. For this review, we included studies that were identified from either 11 published reviews on this topic or an updated literature search on PubMed (between 2011 and July 2016). A total of 50 studies from 46 publications were included in this review. Meta-analyses were conducted on cohort and case-control studies separately when at least 4 studies could be included to determine summary estimates of the risk of cancer in relation to 1) periodontal disease or 2) tooth number (a surrogate marker of periodontal disease) with adjustment for smoking. Existing data provide support for a positive association between periodontal disease and risk of oral, lung, and pancreatic cancers; however, additional prospective studies are needed to better inform on the strength of these associations and to determine whether other cancers are associated with periodontal disease. Future studies should include sufficiently large sample sizes, improved measurements for periodontal disease, and thorough adjustment for smoking and other risk factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk in women.

    PubMed

    Manson, JoAnn E; Bassuk, Shari S

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heart disease and stroke, is the leading cause of death among U.S. women and men. Established cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and elevated total cholesterol, and risk prediction models based on such factors, perform well but do not perfectly predict future risk of CVD. Thus, there has been much recent interest among cardiovascular researchers in identifying novel biomarkers to aid in risk prediction. Such markers include alternative lipids, B-type natriuretic peptides, high-sensitivity troponin, coronary artery calcium, and genetic markers. This article reviews the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, risk prediction tools, and selected novel biomarkers and other exposures in predicting risk of developing CVD in women. The predictive role of novel cardiovascular biomarkers for women in primary prevention settings requires additional study, as does the diagnostic and prognostic utility of cardiac troponins for acute coronary syndromes in clinical settings. Sex differences in the clinical expression and physiology of metabolic syndrome may have implications for cardiovascular outcomes. Consideration of exposures that are unique to, or more prevalent in, women may also help to refine cardiovascular risk estimates in this group.

  12. The risk of Parkinson's disease in type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Bultron, Gilberto; Kacena, Katherine; Pearson, Daniel; Boxer, Michael; Yang, Ruhua; Sathe, Swati; Pastores, Gregory; Mistry, Pramod K

    2010-04-01

    In Gaucher disease, defective lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to mutations in the GBA1 gene results in lysosomal accumulation of glucocerebroside in mononuclear phagocytes and a multisystemic phenotype. Observations of occurrence of Parkinson's disease in some patients with non-neuronopathic type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) and their first degree relatives has led to the identification of GBA1 heterozygous mutations as a genetic risk factor for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the magnitude of risk of PD in patients with known GD1 has not been determined, and it is not known whether GD1/PD represents a specific sub-phenotype of GD1 with distinctive genotype/phenotype characteristics. We estimated the risk of PD in a cohort of 444 consecutively evaluated patients with GD1 compared to that in the general population. Eleven patients developed parkinsonian syndrome during a 12-year follow-up period. The adjusted life-time risk ratio of PD in GD1 compared to that in the general population was 21.4 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 10.7-38.3], with a higher risk in men compared to women. In our cohort, GD1/Parkinson's disease phenotype (GD1/PD) was characterized by higher GD1 severity score, due to higher incidence of avascular osteonecrosis. The clinical spectrum of PD varied from mild to potentially life-threatening disease. All but one patient with GD1/PD phenotype had at least one N370S GBA1 allele. In conclusion, compared to the general population, patients with GD1 have an almost 20-fold increased life-time risk of developing PD.

  13. [Prevalence of chronic diseases and risk factors among the Spanish prison population].

    PubMed

    Vera-Remartínez, E J; Borraz-Fernández, J R; Domínguez-Zamorano, J A; Mora-Parra, L M; Casado-Hoces, S V; González-Gómez, J A; Blanco-Quiroga, A; Armenteros-López, B; Garcés-Pina, E

    2014-01-01

    chronic diseases are responsible for 60% of deaths and 75% of spending on public health. There are few works on the prevalence of this type of pathology in prison. Describe the prevalence of chronic major diseases in the population and the major risk factors observed. Multicenter transversal descriptive study. The sample size was 1,170 people, who were selected through sampling stratified with simple allocation by strata among 9 prisons in the country. There were interviews and physical examinations between May and June 2013. Variables were collected: socio-demographic, diagnostic, anthropometric, clinical-analytical and risk factors. A descriptive and subsequent comparative analysis was carried out using non-parametric tests for quantitative variables using the Mann-Whitney test and a Ji-square test for categorical variables. Subsequently, binary logistic regression models to evaluate the influence of factors of risk in major pathologies. The manuscript was approved by the Ethics Committee for clinical research of the University General Hospital of Castellon. 1 of every 2 inmates has some type of chronic disease out of the 1,077 participated (92.1). Median age of 37.4 years IQR (30.0 to 44.8). 95 males, 40.6 foreigners. Prevalence: dyslipidemias (34.8); arterial hypertension (17.8); Diabetes (5.3); asthma (4.6); COPD (2.2); ischaemic heart disease (1.8) and (1.5) cardio-circulatory pathologies. Main risk factors: smoking, obesity, abdominal fat distribution, consumption of cocaine and age. It would be interesting to establish early diagnosis, encourage giving up smoking, and physical activity and dietary advice to combat the major modifiable risk factors.

  14. Serum triglycerides and risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Boullart, A C I; de Graaf, J; Stalenhoef, A F

    2012-05-01

    Dyslipidemia, especially elevated serum levels of cholesterol, is causally related to cardiovascular disease. The specific role of triglycerides has long been controversial. In this article we discuss the role of serum triglycerides in relation to the risk of cardiovascular disease. First, the (patho)physiology of triglycerides is described, including the definition and a short summary of the primary and secondary causes of hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, we will give an overview of the published epidemiological studies concerning hypertriglyceridemia and cardiovascular disease to support the view that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are an independently associated risk factor. Finally, treatment strategies and treatment targets are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Triglyceride Metabolism and Disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Infectious Disease Risk Associated with Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation opens with views of the shuttle in various stages of preparation for launch, a few moments after launch prior to external fuel tank separation, a few pictures of the earth,and several pictures of astronomical interest. The presentation reviews the factors effecting the risks of infectious disease during space flight, such as the crew, water, food, air, surfaces and payloads and the factors that increase disease risk, the factors affecting the risk of infectious disease during spaceflight, and the environmental factors affecting immunity, such as stress. One factor in space infectious disease is latent viral reactivation, such as herpes. There are comparisons of the incidence of viral reactivation in space, and in other analogous situations (such as bed rest, or isolation). There is discussion of shingles, and the pain and results of treatment. There is a further discussion of the changes in microbial pathogen characteristics, using salmonella as an example of the increased virulence of microbes during spaceflight. A factor involved in the risk of infectious disease is stress.

  16. Risk factor paradox in wasting diseases.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Horwich, Tamara B; Oreopoulos, Antigone; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Younessi, Houman; Anker, Stefan D; Morley, John E

    2007-07-01

    Emerging data indicate that conventional cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia and obesity) are paradoxically associated with better survival in distinct populations with wasting. We identify these populations and review survival paradoxes and common pathophysiologic mechanisms. A 'reverse epidemiology' of cardiovascular risk is observed in chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive lung disease, cancer, AIDS and rheumatoid arthritis, and in the elderly. These populations apparently have slowly progressive to full-blown wasting and significantly greater short-term mortality than the general population. The survival paradoxes may result from the time differential between the two competing risk factors [i.e. over-nutrition (long-term killer but short-term protective) versus undernutrition (short-term killer)]. Hemodynamic stability of obesity, protective adipokine profile, endotoxin-lipoprotein interaction, toxin sequestration of fat, antioxidation of muscle, reverse causation, and survival selection may also contribute. The seemingly counterintuitive risk factor paradox is the hallmark of chronic disease states or conditions associated with wasting disease at the population level. Studying similarities among these populations may help reveal common pathophysiologic mechanisms of wasting disease, leading to a major shift in clinical medicine and public health beyond the conventional Framingham paradigm and to novel therapeutic approaches related to wasting and short-term mortality.

  17. Temperature Management During Circulatory Arrest in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Linardi, Daniele; Faggian, Giuseppe; Rungatscher, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Surgery for complex aortic pathologies, such as acute dissections and aneurysms involving the aortic arch, remains one of the most technically and strategically challenging intervention in aortic surgery, requiring thorough understanding not only of cardiovascular physiology but also of neurophysiology (cerebral and spinal cord), and is still associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The introduction of deep hypothermia in the mid 1970s, allowing defined periods of circulatory arrest, has made possible the advent of modern aortic surgery requiring prolonged ischemic tolerance of central nervous system. In the late 1980s, when deep hypothermic circulatory arrest was the standard operative strategy for aortic surgery, selective cerebral perfusion, as an adjunct to deep hypothermia, made possible excellent neuroprotection and improved overall outcome. This encouraged the use of selective cerebral perfusion in combination with steadily increasing body core temperatures, a trend culminating in progressive promotion of moderate to mild hypothermia and even normothermia. The motivation for progressive temperature elevation was the limitation of adverse effects of deep hypothermia, in particular, reduction of systemic inflammatory response (and organ dysfunctions) and diminution of the risk of severe postoperative bleeding. However, adverse outcomes due to inappropriate temperature management (core temperatures too high for the required duration of circulatory arrest) are probably underreported. Indeed, complications historically associated with hypothermia are possibly overestimated.

  18. Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease: environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Campdelacreu, J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to update and summarise available evidence on environmental risk factors that have been associated with risk of Parkinson disease (PD) or Alzheimer disease (AD) and discuss their potential mechanisms. Evidence consistently suggests that a higher risk of PD is associated with pesticides and that a higher risk of AD is associated with pesticides, hypertension and high cholesterol levels in middle age, hyperhomocysteinaemia, smoking, traumatic brain injury and depression. There is weak evidence suggesting that higher risk of PD is associated with high milk consumption in men, high iron intake, chronic anaemia and traumatic brain injury. Weak evidence also suggests that a higher risk of AD is associated with high aluminium intake through drinking water, excessive exposure to electromagnetic fields from electrical grids, DM and hyperinsulinaemia, obesity in middle age, excessive alcohol consumption and chronic anaemia. Evidence consistently suggests that a lower risk of PD is associated with hyperuricaemia, tobacco and coffee use, while a lower risk of AD is associated with moderate alcohol consumption, physical exercise, perimenopausal hormone replacement therapy and good cognitive reserve. Weak evidence suggests that lower risk of PD is associated with increased vitamin E intake, alcohol, tea, NSAIDs, and vigorous physical exercise, and that lower risk of AD is associated with the Mediterranean diet, coffee and habitual NSAID consumption. Several environmental factors contribute significantly to risk of PD and AD. Some may already be active in the early stages of life, and some may interact with other genetic factors. Population-based strategies to modify such factors could potentially result in fewer cases of PD or AD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  20. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  1. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  2. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  3. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  4. Risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease.

    PubMed

    von Eckardstein, A

    2005-01-01

    Several controlled interventional trials have shown the benefit of anti-hypertensive and hypolipidaemic drugs for the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). International guidelines for the prevention of CHD agree in their recommendations for tertiary prevention and recommend lowering the blood pressure to below 140 mm/90 mm Hg and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol to below 2.6 mmol/l in patients with manifest CHD. Novel recommendations for secondary prevention are focused on the treatment of the pre-symptomatic high-risk patient with an estimated CHD morbidity risk of higher than 20% per 10 years or an estimated CHD mortality risk of higher than 5% per 10 years. For the calculation of this risk, the physician must record the following risk factors: sex, age, family history of premature myocardial infarction, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and triglyceride. This information allows the absolute risk of myocardial infarction to be computed by using scores or algorithms which have been deduced from results of epidemiological studies. To improve risk prediction and to identify new targets for intervention, novel risk factors are sought. High plasma levels of C-reactive protein has been shown to improve the prognostic value of global risk estimates obtained by the combination of conventional risk factors and may influence treatment decisions in patients with intermediate global cardiovascular risk (CHD morbidity risk of 10%-20% per 10 years or CHD mortality risk of 2%-5% per 10 years).

  5. Perceptions of risk: understanding cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Ruth; Heeley, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still the leading cause of death and disability worldwide despite the availability of well-established and effective preventive options. Accurate perception of a patient’s risk by both the patient and the doctors is important as this is one of the components that determine health-related behavior. Doctors tend to not use cardiovascular (CV) risk calculators and underestimate the absolute CV risk of their patients. Patients show optimistic bias when considering their own risk and consistently underestimate it. Poor patient health literacy and numeracy must be considered when thinking about this problem. Patients must possess a reasonably high level of understanding of numerical processes when doctors discuss risk, a level that is not possessed by large numbers of the population. In order to overcome this barrier, doctors need to utilize various tools including the appropriate use of visual aids to accurately communicate risk with their patients. Any intervention has been shown to be better than nothing in improving health understanding. The simple process of repeatedly conveying risk information to a patient has been shown to improve accuracy of risk perception. Doctors need to take responsibility for the accurate assessment and effective communication of CV risk in their patients in order to improve patient uptake of cardioprotective lifestyle choices and preventive medications. PMID:22312218

  6. Other Possible Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and anxiety Negative emotions like depression, stress, and anxiety can raise your risk of developing heart disease . Researchers aren't exactly sure why this is. Perhaps these emotions lead to unhealthy ways of coping, such as smoking, drink too much, or eating high-fat foods — ...

  7. TOXICOGENOMICS AND HUMAN DISEASE RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory


    Toxicogenomics and Human Disease Risk Assessment.

    Complete sequencing of human and other genomes, availability of large-scale gene
    expression arrays with ever-increasing numbers of genes displayed, and steady
    improvements in protein expression technology can hav...

  8. Residual lifetime risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Gearoid M; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Fox, Caroline S

    2017-10-01

    An accurate estimation of the lifetime risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can aid in patient education while also informing the development of public health screening programs and educational campaigns. Framingham Offspring Study participants were included if they were free of CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2) at age 50 years and had at least two serum creatinine measures during follow-up (mean 16 years, 49 506 person-years). We estimated the lifetime risk of CKD to age 90 years adjusting for the competing risk of death in the overall cohort and in population subgroups with known CKD risk factors including hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Overall 3362 individuals (52% women) were included in the study. Mean age at study baseline was 54 years. By the end of the study, 729 individuals (21.7%) developed CKD and 618 (18.4%) died. At age 50 years, the cumulative lifetime risk of CKD was 41.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 38.5-44.0]. The risk was increased in those with risk factors at baseline including diabetes (52.6%, 95% CI 44.8-60.4), hypertension (50.2%, 95% CI 46.1-54.3) and obesity (46.5%, 95% CI 41.1-52.0). For those individuals without any risk factors at baseline, the lifetime risk of CKD was lower (34.2%, 95% CI 29.4-39.0) relative to those with 1, 2 or 3 risk factors (45.0, 51.5 and 56.1% respectively, P < 0.01 for all compared with those with no risk factors). Four out of 10 individuals without CKD at age 50 years will eventually develop CKD. This risk is modified by the presence of hypertension, diabetes and obesity at baseline. This demonstrates the importance of early identification of CKD risk factors, to aid in patient education, and potentially to reduce the future risk of disease.

  9. College students' perceived disease risk versus actual prevalence rates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B; Sosa, Erica T; J McKyer, E Lisako; Ory, Marcia G

    2012-01-01

    To compare college students' perceived disease risk with disease prevalence rates. Data were analyzed from 625 college students collected with an Internet-based survey. Paired t-tests were used to separately compare participants' perceived 10-year and lifetime disease risk for 4 diseases: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and overweight/obesity. Respondents estimated their risk of developing heart disease as lower than cancer, yet rated their risk of developing heart disease as higher than diabetes and being overweight/obese. Incongruence between college students' perceived disease risk and disease prevalence rates calls for improved public health education.

  10. Radiation Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases in the Cohort of Russian Emergency Workers of the Chernobyl Accident.

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Karpenko, S V; Maksioutov, M A; Menyaylo, A N; Tumanov, K A; Kochergina, E V; Kashcheeva, P V; Gorsky, A I; Shchukina, N V; Lovachev, S S; Vlasov, O K; Ivanov, V K

    2017-07-01

    This paper continues a series of publications that analyze the impact of radiation on incidence of circulatory system diseases in the cohort of Russian recovery operation workers (liquidators) and presents the results of the analysis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence. The studied cohort consists of 53,772 liquidators who arrived in the Chernobyl accident zone within the first year after the accident (26 April 1986 to 26 April 1987). The individual doses varied from 0.0001 Gy to 1.42 Gy, and the mean external whole body dose in the cohort was 0.161 Gy. A total of 27,456 cases of CVD were diagnosed during the follow-up period 1986-2012 as a result of annual health examinations. A Poisson regression model was applied to estimate radiation risks and other risk factors associated with CVD. The following factors were identified as risk factors for CVD: the dose, duration of the liquidators' work in the Chernobyl zone, and concomitant diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, and alcohol dependence). The baseline incidence of CVD is statistically significantly (p < 0.001) associated with all studied concomitant diseases. The incidence of CVD has revealed a statistically significant dose response with the lack of a latent period and with the average ERR Gy = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.63, p < 0.001. Radiation risks of CVD statistically significantly (p = 0.01) varied with the duration of liquidators' stay in the Chernobyl zone; for those who stayed in the Chernobyl zone less than 6 wk, ERR/Gy = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.53; 1.08, p < 0.001.

  11. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers

    PubMed Central

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Aims: Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. Materials and Methods: The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. Statistical analysis used: The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as ‘outcome’ variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. Results: The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 – 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 – 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Conclusions: Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks PMID:27390474

  12. Chronic disease risk factors among hotel workers.

    PubMed

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant; Kurlikar, Prashika R

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases have emerged as a global health issue. Role of occupation in pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases has not been explored much especially in the hospitality industry. Objectives of this study include finding risk factor prevalence among hotel workers and studying relationship between occupational group and chronic disease risk factors chiefly high body mass index. A cross-sectional study was conducted among non-managerial employees from classified hotels in India. The study participants self-administered pre-designed pilot-tested questionnaires. The risk factor prevalence rates were expressed as percentages. Chi-square test was used for bi-variate analysis. Overweight was chosen as 'outcome' variable of interest and binary multi-logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants. The prevalence rates of tobacco use, alcohol use, inadequate physical activity and inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables were 32%, 49%, 24% and 92% respectively among hotel employees. Tobacco use was significantly common among those in food preparation and service, alcohol use among those in food service and security and leisure time physical activity among front office workers. More than two-fifths (42.7%) were overweight. Among the hotel workers, those employed in food preparation and security had higher odds of 1.650 (CI: 1.025 - 2.655) and 3.245 (CI: 1.296 - 8.129) respectively of being overweight. Prevalence of chronic disease risk factors is high among hotel workers. Risk of overweight is significantly high in food preparation and security departments and workplace interventions are necessary to address these risks.

  13. Cardiovascular disease and modifiable cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and many parts of the world. Potentially modifiable risk factors for CVD include tobacco use, physical inactivity, hypertension, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a cluster of interrelated metabolic risk factors. Over the last several decades, efforts to prevent or treat CVD risk factors have resulted in significantly lower rates of CVD-related mortality. However, many patients never achieve adequate control of CVD risk factors even when these factors have been identified. In addition, the growing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) threatens to undermine the improvements in CVD that have been achieved. In the United States, approximately two thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and even modest excess body weight is associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD-related mortality. Lifestyle interventions to promote weight loss reduce the risk of CVD-related illness but are difficult for patients to sustain over long periods of time. The increased incidence of obesity has also contributed to significant increases in the prevalence of other important CVD risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and type 2 DM. Pharmacologic therapies are currently available to address individual CVD risk factors, and others are being evaluated, including endocannabinoid receptor antagonists, inhibitors of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subtypes alpha and gamma, and several agents that modulate the activity of glucagon-like peptide-1. The new agents have the potential to significantly improve several CVD risk factors with a single medication and may provide clinicians with several new strategies to reduce the long-term risk of CVD.

  14. Environmental risk factors for heart disease.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Timothy E; Conklin, Daniel J; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we discuss current evidence linking environmental pollutants to cardiovascular disease (CVD). Extensive evidence indicates that environmental factors contribute to CVD risk, incidence, and severity. Migrant studies show that changes in the environment could substantially alter CVD risk in a genetically stable population. Additionally, CVD risk is affected by changes in nutritional and lifestyle choices. Recent studies in the field of environmental cardiology suggest that environmental toxins also influence CVD. Exposure to tobacco smoke is paradigmatic of such environmental risk and is strongly and positively associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In animal models of exposure, tobacco smoke induces endothelial dysfunction and prothrombotic responses and exacerbates atherogenesis and myocardial ischemic injury. Similar mechanism may be engaged by other pollutants or food constituents. Several large population-based studies indicate that exposure to fine or ultrafine particulate air pollution increases CVD morbidity and mortality, and the plausibility of this association is supported by data from animal studies. Exposure to other chemicals such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and metals has also been reported to elevate CVD risk by affecting atherogenesis, thrombosis, or blood pressure regulation. Maternal exposure to drugs, toxins, and infection has been linked with cardiac birth defects and premature CVD in later life. Collectively, the data support the notion that chronic environmental stress is an important determinant of CVD risk. Further work is required to assess the magnitude of this risk fully and to delineate specific mechanisms by which environmental toxins affect CVD.

  15. Susceptibility and risk factors in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kinane, D F

    2000-10-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a high prevalence of advanced destruction but also that relatively few individuals in each age group account for most of the advanced periodontal disease. The available data suggest that three quarters of advanced periodontal disease could be prevented by targeting an effective preventive strategy on the 28% of individuals especially at risk. Questions remain regarding: 1) whether an acceptable cost-effective preventive strategy can be devised; and 2) whether it is possible to establish a simple method of identifying the 'at risk' group. The various risk factors are numerous and include systemic diseases, smoking, drug therapy, hormonal disturbances and genetic factors as well as the more mundane factors such as plaque control and socio-economic and education and attitude factors. Aside from these factors, many patients present with periodontal disease and have no discernible predisposition other than possibly genetic, for which we can not currently test, and for the vast majority of patients there would appear to be no other alternative to periodic thorough examination for all patients, early treatment of all periodontal lesions and appropriate dental health education.

  16. Controlling risk factors in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Tuomilehto, J; Puska, P; Salonen, J; Nissinen, A

    1980-10-01

    In response to community demands to do something about the highest rates of cardiovascular diseases in the world that were found in the country of North Karelia, Finland, a comprehensive community control programme was set up in 1972. The main objective was to reduce the high rates by reducing level of smoking, serum cholesterol and blood pressure. The success of the programme was evaluated by examining independent representative population samples in 1972 and in 1977 in North Karelia and a matched control county. A decrease in the individual risk factors was found among the population aged 25-29 at the outset. This reduction was mainly based on favourable changes in lifestyle that took place through the whole community. In low as well as in high socioeconomic groups risk factor reductions occurred. At the same time morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases fell in North Karelia. The intensified health education was not accompanied by adverse emotional or psychosomatic reactions that could be measured. Since there are results from a series of experimental and controlled studies on success of risk factor reduction, this evidence should be used in development and implementation of prevention programmes for cardiovascular diseases. Primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases today requires efficient programmes because they are forming the leading cause of death in majority of the countries where reliable mortality statistics are available.

  17. Water chemistry and cardiovascular disease risk

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Zeighami, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The evidence linking cardiovascular disease risk and water quality parameters was weighed and analyzed to identify major gaps in understanding reasons for the regional differences in cardiovascular disease mortality in the United States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating occupational and public health exposure to nitrates, carbon monoxide, carbon disulfide, fibrogenic dusts, heavy metals and trace elements, chlorides, and hydro- and fluorocarbons were analyzed. Intake of cholesterol, calcium, and magnesium from food items, cooking water enhancement, and drinking water were also appraised. Based on the current state of knowledge, it is our judgment that the drinking water characteristics of highest priority from the standpoint of cardiovascular disease risks are calcium/magnesium content and chlorine treatment. The potential importance of cadmium, lead, nitrate(s), and chloride/sodium concentrations also needs to be considered. We present working hypotheses to evaluate the role(s) of these parameters and a discussion of variables that should be considered in any study design addressing the association between cardiovascular disease risk and water quality. Important variables are sample size, biological endpoint events (mortality, incidence, clinical determination), population characteristics, drinking water parameters, and dietary intake estimates. 207 references, 6 figures, 17 tables.

  18. Periodontal disease increases risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ledić, Karla; Marinković, Sonja; Puhar, Ivan; Spalj, Stjepan; Popović-Grle, Sanja; Ivić-Kardum, Marija; Samarzija, Miroslav; Plancak, Darije

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether a periodontal disease could be a risk indicator for a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The examined group comprised 93 patients with COPD (mean age 65.8 years). The control group comprised 43 systemically healthy individuals (mean age 62.1 years). Respiratory and periodontal conditions were examined in both groups. COPB subjects had significantly worse periodontal conditions than controls (p < 0.05) with regard to each parameter of periodontal condition, except for gingival inflammation. COPD patients had higher Plaque Index than control patients (82.84 +/- 22.81 vs. 57.15 +/- 26.96; p < 0.001), higher periodontal depth (3.02 +/- 0.92 vs. 2.57 +/- 0.79 mm; p = 0.007), higher gingival recession (1.97 +/- 1.09 vs. 0.91 +/- 0.79 mm; p < 0.001), and higher mean clinical attachment loss (CAL) (4.12 +/- 1.74 vs. 2.91 +/- 1.27 mm; p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression model, after controlling for other risk indicators, showed that periodontal disease, presented as CAL > or = 4 mm at > or = 60% sites, was associated with odds ratio of 3.2 (95% CI 1.0-9.8) for the COPB group. Data suggest that periodontal disease could be a risk indicator for COPD.

  19. Coagulation management in patients undergoing mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Görlinger, Klaus; Bergmann, Lars; Dirkmann, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of bleeding and thrombo-embolic complications in patients undergoing mechanical circulatory support therapy remains high and is associated with bad outcomes and increased costs. The need for anticoagulation and anti-platelet therapy varies widely between different pulsatile and non-pulsatile ventricular-assist devices (VADs) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) systems. Therefore, a unique anticoagulation protocol cannot be recommended. Notably, most thrombo-embolic complications occur despite values of conventional coagulation tests being within the targeted range. This is due to the fact that conventional coagulation tests such as international normalised ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and platelet count cannot detect hyper- or hypofibrinolysis, hypercoagulability due to tissue factor expression on circulating cells or increased clot firmness, and platelet aggregation as well as response to anti-platelet drugs. By contrast, point-of-care (POC) whole blood viscoelastic tests (thromboelastometry/-graphy) and platelet function tests (impedance or turbidimetric aggregometry) reflect in detail the haemostatic status of patients undergoing mechanical circulatory support therapy and the efficacy of their anticoagulation and antiaggregation therapy. Therefore, monitoring of haemostasis using POC thromboelastometry/-graphy and platelet function analysis is recommended during mechanical circulatory support therapy to reduce the risk of bleeding and thrombo-embolic complications. Notably, these haemostatic tests should be performed repeatedly during mechanical circulatory support therapy since thrombin generation, clot firmness and platelet response may change significantly over time with a high inter- and intra-individual variability. Furthermore, coagulation management can be hampered in non-pulsatile VADs by acquired von Willebrand syndrome, and in general by acquired factor XIII deficiency as well as by heparin

  20. Gallstone Disease and the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jun; Qi, Lu; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Yiping; Yang, Ling; Shen, Jie; Wang, Shanqing; Li, Mingqiang; Liu, Yongmei; Zhang, Libo; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-10-01

    Gallstone disease (GSD) is related to multiple cardiovascular risk factors; the present study was to prospectively examine the association between GSD and ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined the association of GSD with IHD among 199 292 men and 288 081 women aged 30-79 years in the China Kadoorie Biobank study. Participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the association of GSD with IHD. The prevalence of self-reported GSD was 3.7% in men and 7.3% in women at baseline. During 3 431 124 person-years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median, 7.2 years), we documented 10 245 incident IHD cases in men and 14 714 in women. As compared with men without GSD at baseline, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for IHD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.22) for men with GSD; the respective hazard ratio was 1.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.34) in women and 1.23 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.28) in the whole cohort. The sex difference in IHD risk associated with GSD was statistically significant (P=0.009 for interaction with sex). In addition, we found that the association between GSD and IHD was stronger in nonhypertensive than in hypertensive women (P<0.001 for interaction). In this large prospective study, the presence of GSD was associated with an increased risk of incident IHD, independent of other risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Our findings suggest novel prevention strategy to mitigate heart disease through improvement of gastrointestinal health. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Gallstone Disease and the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Qi, Lu; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Yiping; Yang, Ling; Shen, Jie; Wang, Shanqing; Li, Mingqiang; Liu, Yongmei; Zhang, Libo; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gallstone disease (GSD) is related to multiple cardiovascular risk factors; the present study was to prospectively examine the association between GSD and ischemic heart disease (IHD). Approach and Results We examined the association of GSD with IHD among 199,292 men and 288,081 women aged 30–79 years in the China Kadoorie Biobank study. Participants with cancer, heart disease, and stroke at baseline were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the association of GSD with IHD. The prevalence of self-reported GSD was 3.7% in men and 7.3% in women at baseline. During 3,431,124 person-years of follow-up between 2004 and 2013 (median, 7.2 years), we documented 10,245 incident IHD cases in men and 14,714 in women. As compared with men without GSD at baseline, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for IHD was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.22) for men with GSD; the respective hazard ratio was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.20–1.34) in women and 1.23 (95% CI, 1.17–1.28) in the whole cohort. The sex difference in IHD risk associated with GSD was statistically significant (P=0.009 for interaction with sex). In addition, we found the association between GSD and IHD was stronger in non-hypertensive than hypertensive women (P<0.001 for interaction). Conclusions In this large prospective study, the presence of GSD was associated with an increased risk of incident IHD, independent of other risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Our findings suggest novel prevention strategy to mitigate heart disease through improvement of gastrointestinal health. PMID:26272939

  2. Alzheimer's disease risk genes and mechanisms of disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Karch, Celeste M; Goate, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    We review the genetic risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their role in AD pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding of the human genome-technologic advances in methods to analyze millions of polymorphisms in thousands of subjects-have revealed new genes associated with AD risk, including ABCA7, BIN1, CASS4, CD33, CD2AP, CELF1, CLU, CR1, DSG2, EPHA1, FERMT2, HLA-DRB5-DBR1, INPP5D, MS4A, MEF2C, NME8, PICALM, PTK2B, SLC24H4-RIN3, SORL1, and ZCWPW1. Emerging technologies to analyze the entire genome in large data sets have also revealed coding variants that increase AD risk: PLD3 and TREM2. We review the relationship between these AD risk genes and the cellular and neuropathologic features of AD. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk of cardiovascular disease in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Jia, Fangyuan; Zhang, Bao; Zhang, Peiying

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) can arise because of chronic inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such disease where the risk for CVD and eventual heart failure is increased considerably. The incidence of IBD, which refers to both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, has been on the increase in several countries and is a potential risk factor for CVD. Although IBD can potentially cause venous thromboembolism, its significance in arterial stiffening, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction is only being realized now and it is currently under debate. However, several studies with large groups of patients have demonstrated the association of IBD with heart disease. It has been suggested that systemic inflammation as observed in IBD patients leads to oxidative stress and elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which lead to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle cells and sets into motion a series of events that culminate in atherosclerosis and CVD. Besides the endogenous factors and cytokines, it has been suggested that due to the compromised intestinal mucosal barrier, endotoxins and bacterial lipopolysaccharides produced by intestinal microflora can enter into circulation and activate inflammatory responses that lead to atherosclerosis. Therapeutic management of IBD-associated heart diseases cannot be achieved with simple anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids and anti-TNF-α antibodies. Treatment with existing medications for CVDs, aspirin, platelet aggregation inhibitors and statins is found to be acceptable and safe. Nevertheless, further research is needed to assess their efficacy in IBD patients suffering from heart disease. PMID:28352306

  4. [The influence of occupational environment and professional factors on the risk of cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Obelenis, Vytautas; Malinauskiene, Vilija

    2007-01-01

    The article reviews the recent scientific literature and the authors' studies on this topic. Occupational conditions and psychological factors have been shown to play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Their effect is often indirect, through damage to the central nervous, respiratory, and neuroendocrine systems. Hot climate in the workplace and intense infrared radiation cause the water and electrolyte imbalance and chronic hyperthermia and manifests as neurovegetative dystonia. The long-term effects of low temperatures condition ischemic lesions in circulatory system, trophic organ destruction. The influence of ultrahigh-frequency electromagnetic radiation on the cardiovascular system is directly related to the central nervous system and neurohumoral lesions. "Microwave disease" often manifests as polymorphic dystonia. Exposure to occupational vibration causes "white finger" syndrome or Raynaud's phenomenon together with cerebral vascular lesions. Recent studies have confirmed that noise as a chronic stressor causes the imbalance in the central and vegetative nervous systems and changes in homeostasis. Noise increases catecholamine and cholesterol concentration in blood, has an effect on plasma lipoprotein levels, increases heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and risk of myocardial infarction. Psychophysiological changes caused by long-term stress influence constant pathological changes in the central nervous system, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. The long-term effect of psychogenic stressors is very important in the etiopathogenesis of psychosomatic diseases.

  5. [The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y

    2014-11-01

    Hydrostatic pulmonary edema is a frequent and severe complication of blood transfusion. Recent epidemiological studies open the way for a better prevention of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload. Preventive measures rely solely on the medical and nursing staff. Mitigation strategies include a careful identification of patients and conditions at-risk, a single-unit transfusion policy in patients with chronic anemia, the use of slow infusion rates, the careful monitoring of patient vital signs (particularly systemic arterial blood pressure). Peritransfusion IV diuretics use is likely to be helpful, although optimal prescribing patterns have not been defined.

  6. Recommendations for donation after circulatory death kidney transplantation in Europe.

    PubMed

    van Heurn, L W Ernest; Talbot, David; Nicholson, Michael L; Akhtar, Mohammed Z; Sanchez-Fructuoso, Ana I; Weekers, Laurent; Barrou, Benoit

    2016-07-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors provides an invaluable source for kidneys for transplantation. Over the last decade, we have observed a substantial increase in the number of DCD kidneys, particularly within Europe. We provide an overview of risk factors associated with DCD kidney function and survival and formulate recommendations from the sixth international conference on organ donation in Paris, for best-practice guidelines. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Ovid Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. Topics are discussed, including donor selection, organ procurement, organ preservation, recipient selection and transplant management.

  7. Spatial forecasting of disease risk and uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Cola, L.

    2002-01-01

    Because maps typically represent the value of a single variable over 2-dimensional space, cartographers must simplify the display of multiscale complexity, temporal dynamics, and underlying uncertainty. A choropleth disease risk map based on data for polygonal regions might depict incidence (cases per 100,000 people) within each polygon for a year but ignore the uncertainty that results from finer-scale variation, generalization, misreporting, small numbers, and future unknowns. In response to such limitations, this paper reports on the bivariate mapping of data "quantity" and "quality" of Lyme disease forecasts for states of the United States. Historical state data for 1990-2000 are used in an autoregressive model to forecast 2001-2010 disease incidence and a probability index of confidence, each of which is then kriged to provide two spatial grids representing continuous values over the nation. A single bivariate map is produced from the combination of the incidence grid (using a blue-to-red hue spectrum), and a probabilistic confidence grid (used to control the saturation of the hue at each grid cell). The resultant maps are easily interpretable, and the approach may be applied to such problems as detecting unusual disease occurences, visualizing past and future incidence, and assembling a consistent regional disease atlas showing patterns of forecasted risks in light of probabilistic confidence.

  8. Risk of Disease Spread through Bioterrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Richard E.

    2006-08-01

    Bioterrorism is seen as a clear and present danger, although historically, acts of bioterrorism have been relatively unpredictable, rare and, thus far, small-scale events. The risk of an event is elevated by increasing contact among species and a global connectivity that provides rapid dissemination of infectious diseases regardless of origin. Virtually any pathogenic microbe could be used by bioterrorists. An attack may be difficult to distinguish from a naturally occurring infectious disease outbreak; however, consequences are likely to be similar. The U.S. agricultural sector is extremely vulnerable to bioterrorist attacks because our animals and plants have little or no innate resistance to foreign pathogens and are not vaccinated or otherwise protected against these diseases. It is also important to note that weapons or delivery systems are not an issue because the animals and plants themselves are the primary vector for transferring agents. Most bioterrorism agents are zoonotic in origin, thus an attack on animal populations could pose a health risk to humans. Additionally, disease outbreaks resulting from bioterrorism could jump to wildlife species, persist in the environment, replace locally adapted enzootic strains, expand their range, or emerge as a new zoonotic disease in naïve human and animal populations.

  9. Cardiovascular disease risk in women with migraine.

    PubMed

    Rockett, Fernanda Camboim; Perla, Alexandre da Silveira; Perry, Ingrid D Schweigert; Chaves, Márcia L Fagundes

    2013-09-06

    Studies suggest a higher prevalence of unfavourable cardiovascular risk factors amongst migraineurs, but results have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to investigate traditional and newly recognized risk factors as well as other surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk in obese and normal weight women with migraine. Fifty-nine adult female probands participated in this case-control study. The sample was divided into normal weight and obese migraineurs and age- and body mass index-matched control groups. The following cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed: serum levels of lipids, fasting glucose, and insulin; insulin resistance; blood pressure; smoking (categorized as current, past or never); Framingham 10-year risk of general cardiovascular disease score; C-reactive protein; family history of cardiovascular disease; physical activity; sleep disturbances; depression; and bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The means of continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test for independent samples or the Mann-Whitney U-test (for 2 groups) and ANOVA or the Kruskal-Wallis test (for 4 groups) depending on the distribution of data. All migraineurs were sedentary irrespective of nutritional status. Migraineurs had higher depression scores and shorter sleep duration, and obese migraineurs, in particular, had worse sleep quality scores. Insulin resistance and insulinaemia were associated with obesity, and obese migraineurs had lower HDL-c than normal weight controls and migraineurs. Also, the Framingham risk score was higher in obese migraineurs. These findings suggest that female migraineurs experience marked inactivity, depression, and some sleep disturbance, that higher insulin resistance and insulinaemia are related to obesity, and that obesity and migraine probably exert overlapping effects on HDL-c levels and Framingham 10-year cardiovascular risk.

  10. Cardiovascular disease risk in women with migraine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies suggest a higher prevalence of unfavourable cardiovascular risk factors amongst migraineurs, but results have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to investigate traditional and newly recognized risk factors as well as other surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk in obese and normal weight women with migraine. Methods Fifty-nine adult female probands participated in this case–control study. The sample was divided into normal weight and obese migraineurs and age- and body mass index-matched control groups. The following cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed: serum levels of lipids, fasting glucose, and insulin; insulin resistance; blood pressure; smoking (categorized as current, past or never); Framingham 10-year risk of general cardiovascular disease score; C-reactive protein; family history of cardiovascular disease; physical activity; sleep disturbances; depression; and bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The means of continuous variables were compared using Student’s t-test for independent samples or the Mann–Whitney U-test (for 2 groups) and ANOVA or the Kruskal-Wallis test (for 4 groups) depending on the distribution of data. Results All migraineurs were sedentary irrespective of nutritional status. Migraineurs had higher depression scores and shorter sleep duration, and obese migraineurs, in particular, had worse sleep quality scores. Insulin resistance and insulinaemia were associated with obesity, and obese migraineurs had lower HDL-c than normal weight controls and migraineurs. Also, the Framingham risk score was higher in obese migraineurs. Conclusion These findings suggest that female migraineurs experience marked inactivity, depression, and some sleep disturbance, that higher insulin resistance and insulinaemia are related to obesity, and that obesity and migraine probably exert overlapping effects on HDL-c levels and Framingham 10-year cardiovascular risk. PMID:24011175

  11. Animal migration and infectious disease risk.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca; Han, Barbara A

    2011-01-21

    Animal migrations are often spectacular, and migratory species harbor zoonotic pathogens of importance to humans. Animal migrations are expected to enhance the global spread of pathogens and facilitate cross-species transmission. This does happen, but new research has also shown that migration allows hosts to escape from infected habitats, reduces disease levels when infected animals do not migrate successfully, and may lead to the evolution of less-virulent pathogens. Migratory demands can also reduce immune function, with consequences for host susceptibility and mortality. Studies of pathogen dynamics in migratory species and how these will respond to global change are urgently needed to predict future disease risks for wildlife and humans alike.

  12. [Teratogenic risk during treatment of Wilson disease].

    PubMed

    Piussan, C; Mathieu, M

    1985-09-01

    Untreated Wilson's disease usually causes infertility or abortion, as a result of increased intrauterine copper level. Therefore, a chelation treatment is necessary during the whole pregnancy. The most used is D-Penicillamine whose teratogenic risks such as cutis laxa, dermatopathy or complex mesenchyme abnormalities are paradoxically rare in the new borns of treated Wilson's disease mothers, perhaps owing to hypercupremia that protects the foetus from excessive copper deficiency. Yet, it's wise to reduce chelation treatment about a quarter fold and to add 50 mg vitamin B6 weekly as we did in our case whose child was born normal.

  13. [THE CHARACTERISTIC OF SOMATOTYPE AND FUNCTIONAL STATE OF CIRCULATORY SYSTEM OF STUDENT YOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST OF RUSSIA].

    PubMed

    Timofeieva, A V; Klimova, T M; Mikhailova, A E; Zakharova, R N; Vinokurova, S P; Timofeiev, L F

    2015-01-01

    The article considers results of single-step study in random sampling of female students of the M.K. Ammosov north-east federal university (n=456). The study was carried out to investigate somatotype and functional state of circulatory system. The standard technique was applied to measure height, body mass, chest circumference, level of arterial pressure and rate of heart beats. The type of somatotype was established using Pignet index. The tone of vegetative system was determined using Kérdö index. The adaptation potential of circulatory system was determined using functional changes index. The results of study established that in 61% of examined female students the type of constitution corresponds to normosthenic one. The percentage of persons with asthenic and hypersthenic type of constitution amounted to 27% and 12% correspondingly. The signs of increasing oftone ofsympathetic nervous system are observed in 89% of girls. The functional condition of circulatory system is evaluated as "tension of adaptation mechanisms" that is apparently related to period of adaptation to new conditions. The prolonged preservation of such states results in exhaustion offunctional resources of organism and can promote development of diseases. In conditions of impacting of unfavorable ecological factors the deconditionning disorders can significantly contribute to health disturbances and decreasing of life quality. To preserve youth's health during period of education the comprehensive strategy is to be implemented such components as dynamic monitoring of health, organization of adequate diet, explanation of necessity of observance of sleep and rest pattern, development of conditions for active aerobic physical exertion and activities on correction of risk factors of development of diseases are to be included.

  14. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molodecky, Natalie A.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  15. Psychophysiological risk markers of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Mark; Malan, Leone

    2010-09-01

    Acute psychophysiological stress testing, involving measurement of cardiovascular and biological responses to laboratory-induced mental stress, is an important tool to investigate mechanisms that might account for the association between psychosocial stress and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated associations of disturbed psychophysiological responses with sub-clinical measures of atherosclerosis, hypertension, and metabolic risk. The complex pattern of stress responding is influenced by individual differences, such as coping style, race and ethnicity, genetics, background stress, and lifestyle habits, which should be taken into account when interpreting results. For example, an unique interplay between cardiac and vascular responses in black Africans and African Americans is thought to contribute towards a heightened risk of hypertension in this group. Whether or not psychophysiological risk markers provide prognostic information over and above that of established risk markers is not clear. In summary, controlled trials that examine if the modification of psychophysiological responses through lifestyle and psychosocial interventions can reduce the risk of CVD outcomes are needed to establish causality. Further work is also required that examines the associations of ambulatory responses to real life stress in relation to risk of CVD.

  16. Who Is at Risk for Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... risk factors for coronary heart disease (also called coronary artery disease) and peripheral artery disease. Diabetes . With this disease, ...

  17. Prime Time for Temporary Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Peter M; Hryniewicz, Katarzyna

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular care has witnessed a paradigm shift toward widespread use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). In this context, the 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the use of percutaneous mechanical circulatory support devices in cardiovascular care is a timely and welcome addition to the literature. This consensus statement is an important summary of the state of the field and a valuable method for all who participate in cardiovascular care to ensure up-to-date understanding of the treatment options available.

  18. Modifying women's risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Kathleen M

    2007-01-01

    To present current recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk reduction in women. Medline databases were searched from 1990 to 2006 using keywords women and cardiovascular risk, hypertension, cholesterol, and hormone replacement therapy, as well as Web sites from scientific associations such as the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, Agency for Health Research and Quality, and the Centers for Disease Control for relevant scientific statements and guidelines. Randomized controlled trials, particularly those that have influenced current practice recommendations, scientific statements, and clinical practice guidelines were selected. Factors contributing to women's particular risk and current practice recommendations. Current research has clarified the importance of regular exercise (at least 30 minutes/day most days of the week); abstinence from smoking; a diet focused on whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and low-fat protein sources; and maintenance of normal weight. This lifestyle combined with a partnership with a health care provider to maintain a normal blood pressure (115/75 mm Hg) and optimal lipoproteins through pharmacotherapy when indicated can prevent 82% of cardiovascular disease events in women.

  19. Nutrition and the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Wang, Ying-Li; Sun, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that accounts for the major cause of dementia, and the increasing worldwide prevalence of AD is a major public health concern. Increasing epidemiological studies suggest that diet and nutrition might be important modifiable risk factors for AD. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, B vitamins, polyphenols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial to AD, and consumptions of fish, fruits, vegetables, coffee, and light-to-moderate alcohol reduce the risk of AD. However, many of the results from randomized controlled trials are contradictory to that of epidemiological studies. Dietary patterns summarizing an overall diet are gaining momentum in recent years. Adherence to a healthy diet, the Japanese diet, and the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of AD. This paper will focus on the evidence linking many nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns to AD. PMID:23865055

  20. Space radiation and cardiovascular disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Marjan; Nelson, Gregory A; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Koturbash, Igor; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Future long-distance space missions will be associated with significant exposures to ionizing radiation, and the health risks of these radiation exposures during manned missions need to be assessed. Recent Earth-based epidemiological studies in survivors of atomic bombs and after occupational and medical low dose radiation exposures have indicated that the cardiovascular system may be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than was previously thought. This has raised the concern of a cardiovascular disease risk from exposure to space radiation during long-distance space travel. Ground-based studies with animal and cell culture models play an important role in estimating health risks from space radiation exposure. Charged particle space radiation has dense ionization characteristics and may induce unique biological responses, appropriate simulation of the space radiation environment and careful consideration of the choice of the experimental model are critical. Recent studies have addressed cardiovascular effects of space radiation using such models and provided first results that aid in estimating cardiovascular disease risk, and several other studies are ongoing. Moreover, astronauts could potentially be administered pharmacological countermeasures against adverse effects of space radiation, and research is focused on the development of such compounds. Because the cardiovascular response to space radiation has not yet been clearly defined, the identification of potential pharmacological countermeasures against cardiovascular effects is still in its infancy. PMID:26730293

  1. Space radiation and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Marjan; Nelson, Gregory A; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Koturbash, Igor; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-12-26

    Future long-distance space missions will be associated with significant exposures to ionizing radiation, and the health risks of these radiation exposures during manned missions need to be assessed. Recent Earth-based epidemiological studies in survivors of atomic bombs and after occupational and medical low dose radiation exposures have indicated that the cardiovascular system may be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than was previously thought. This has raised the concern of a cardiovascular disease risk from exposure to space radiation during long-distance space travel. Ground-based studies with animal and cell culture models play an important role in estimating health risks from space radiation exposure. Charged particle space radiation has dense ionization characteristics and may induce unique biological responses, appropriate simulation of the space radiation environment and careful consideration of the choice of the experimental model are critical. Recent studies have addressed cardiovascular effects of space radiation using such models and provided first results that aid in estimating cardiovascular disease risk, and several other studies are ongoing. Moreover, astronauts could potentially be administered pharmacological countermeasures against adverse effects of space radiation, and research is focused on the development of such compounds. Because the cardiovascular response to space radiation has not yet been clearly defined, the identification of potential pharmacological countermeasures against cardiovascular effects is still in its infancy.

  2. College Students' Perceived Disease Risk versus Actual Prevalence Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B.; Sosa, Erica T.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare college students' perceived disease risk with disease prevalence rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 625 college students collected with an Internet-based survey. Paired t-tests were used to separately compare participants' perceived 10-year and lifetime disease risk for 4 diseases: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and…

  3. College Students' Perceived Disease Risk versus Actual Prevalence Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B.; Sosa, Erica T.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare college students' perceived disease risk with disease prevalence rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 625 college students collected with an Internet-based survey. Paired t-tests were used to separately compare participants' perceived 10-year and lifetime disease risk for 4 diseases: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and…

  4. Risk of lung cancer in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xin; Luo, Xiaoguang; Xie, Mingliang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Recently, growing evidence has revealed the significant association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and cancer. However, controversy still exists concerning the association between PD and lung cancer. A comprehensive article search for relevant studies published was performed using the following online databases: PubMed, Web of Science and Embase up to August 31, 2016. The pooled risk ratio (RR) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using the method of inverse variance with the random-effects model. Fifteen studies comprising 348,780 PD patients were included in this study. The pooled result indicated that patients with PD were significantly associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer (RR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.41−0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, subgroup analyses performed in Western population also confirmed the significant inverse relationship between PD and risk of lung cancer (RR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.39−0.60, P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, a reduced risk of lung cancer in PD patients from Western population was consistent regardless of study design, gender, or study quality. In conclusion, PD patients were significantly associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer in Western population. The relationship between them in Asian population needs to be confirmed by future studies. PMID:27801674

  5. Risk Factors Of Heart Disease in Nurses.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Mahdi K; Hojat, Mohsen; Koshkaki, Saiede R; Nazari, Faride; Ragibnejad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Identifying and correcting the modifiable risk factors reduces the prevalence of coronary artery disorders (CAD). Nurses, with regards to their employment conditions, can be prone to cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among nurses. In this cross-sectional study, census sampling was conducted among nurses of Jahrom, Iran, in 2014. Data were collected through interviews, blood pressure measurement, anthropometric parameters, and blood sample collection. To analyze the data, descriptive statistical analysis, and comparative (independent t-test) and correlation (Pearson) tests were used; the significance level was considered to be P < 0.05. In this study, 263 (89.76%) nurses participated, 79.8% of whom were women. The mean age of the participants was 31.04 (6.97). In terms of body mass index, 41.7% was the waist-to-hip ratio, 16.7% was the waist-to-height ratio, and 63.1% were in the range of obesity. In addition, 5.7% had abnormal triglyceride, 4.9% had high cholesterol, and 15.1% had high blood pressure. The mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the participants was 1.07 (1.84). In this study, the total mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the nurses was 1.07, which showed a low risk of CAD in the study population over the next decade.

  6. Risk Factors Of Heart Disease in Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Mahdi K.; Hojat, Mohsen; Koshkaki, Saiede R.; Nazari, Faride; Ragibnejad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identifying and correcting the modifiable risk factors reduces the prevalence of coronary artery disorders (CAD). Nurses, with regards to their employment conditions, can be prone to cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among nurses. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, census sampling was conducted among nurses of Jahrom, Iran, in 2014. Data were collected through interviews, blood pressure measurement, anthropometric parameters, and blood sample collection. To analyze the data, descriptive statistical analysis, and comparative (independent t-test) and correlation (Pearson) tests were used; the significance level was considered to be P < 0.05. Results: In this study, 263 (89.76%) nurses participated, 79.8% of whom were women. The mean age of the participants was 31.04 (6.97). In terms of body mass index, 41.7% was the waist-to-hip ratio, 16.7% was the waist-to-height ratio, and 63.1% were in the range of obesity. In addition, 5.7% had abnormal triglyceride, 4.9% had high cholesterol, and 15.1% had high blood pressure. The mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the participants was 1.07 (1.84). Conclusions: In this study, the total mean percentage of the Framingham risk score of the nurses was 1.07, which showed a low risk of CAD in the study population over the next decade. PMID:28904549

  7. Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167715.html Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat And, the ... abnormal heart rhythm, a new report suggests. Chronic kidney disease can as much as double a patient's risk ...

  8. Representations of the Human Circulatory System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Manjon, Asuncion; Angon, Yolanda Postigo

    2009-01-01

    There is no agreement about the robustness of intuitive representations of the circulatory system and their susceptibility to change by instruction. In this paper, we analyse to what extent students with varying degrees of biology instruction and different ages (High School Health Science and Social Science students and first and final year…

  9. Representations of the Human Circulatory System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Manjon, Asuncion; Angon, Yolanda Postigo

    2009-01-01

    There is no agreement about the robustness of intuitive representations of the circulatory system and their susceptibility to change by instruction. In this paper, we analyse to what extent students with varying degrees of biology instruction and different ages (High School Health Science and Social Science students and first and final year…

  10. Sortilin and the risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Maria Francisca; Bourbon, Mafalda; Prata, Maria João; Alves, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are a key determinant of the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is why many studies have attempted to elucidate the pathways that regulate its metabolism. Novel latest-generation sequencing techniques have identified a strong association between the 1p13 locus and the risk of cardiovascular disease caused by changes in plasma LDL-C levels. As expected for a complex phenotype, the effects of variation in this locus are only moderate. Even so, knowledge of the association is of major importance, since it has unveiled a new metabolic pathway regulating plasma cholesterol levels. Crucial to this discovery was the work of three independent teams seeking to clarify the biological basis of this association, who succeeded in proving that SORT1, encoding sortilin, was the gene in the 1p13 locus involved in LDL metabolism. SORT1 was the first gene identified as determining plasma LDL levels to be mechanistically evaluated and, although the three teams used different, though appropriate, experimental methods, their results were in some ways contradictory. Here we review all the experiments that led to the identification of the new pathway connecting sortilin with plasma LDL levels and risk of myocardial infarction. The regulatory mechanism underlying this association remains unclear, but its discovery has paved the way for considering previously unsuspected therapeutic targets and approaches. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asim; Lin, Yulia; Lima, Ana; Hansen, Mark; Callum, Jeannie L

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an important and potentially injurious complication of transfusion that is underappreciated by clinicians. Risk factors for TACO include being at an extreme of age, having preexisting cardiac and/or (potentially) renal dysfunction, acute myocardial infarction, and individuals receiving plasma. Keys to preventing TACO, aside from identifying high-risk individuals, should be multifaceted. We advocate for the widespread use of pretransfusion checklists and implementation of nonemergent transfusion protocols. We suggest the regular use of pretransfusion diuretics in high-risk individuals. When a transfusion is required, we believe that "critical" nursing supervision and leadership are instrumental in the coordination of slow transfusion rates on computerized infusion pumps and ensuring patients are appropriately monitored. We believe that using these methodologies on a global scale will prevent many TACO events and minimize the severity when it does occur.

  12. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-05

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  13. Occupational complexity and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Elise G; Andel, Ross; Sieurin, Johanna; Feldman, Adina L; Edwards, Jerri D; Långström, Niklas; Gatz, Margaret; Wirdefeldt, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains unclear, and environmental risk-factors such as occupation have attracted interest. The goal was to investigate occupational complexity in relation to PD. We conducted a population-based cohort study based on the Swedish Twin Registry that included 28,778 twins born between 1886 and 1950. We identified 433 PD cases during the study period. Data on occupation were collected from either the 1970 or 1980 Swedish census, and occupational complexity was assessed via a job exposure matrix. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses with age as the underlying time scale were used to assess PD risk as a function of the three domains of occupational complexity: data, people, and things. Sex and smoking were included as covariates. Analyses stratified by twin pair were conducted to test for confounding by familial factors. High occupational complexity with data and people was associated with increased risk overall (Hazard Ratio [HR]  = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.14, and HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.21, respectively), and in men (HR = 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.16, and HR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.03-1.28, respectively). Complexity with things was not associated with risk of PD. When the analyses were stratified by twin pair, the HRs for occupational complexity with data and people were attenuated in men. High complexity of work with data and people is related to increased risk of PD, particularly in men. The attenuation of risk observed in the twin pair-stratified analyses suggests that the association may partly be explained by familial factors, such as inherited traits contributing to occupational selection or other factors shared by twins.

  14. Circulatory estrogen level protects against breast cancer in obese women.

    PubMed

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2013-05-01

    Literary data suggest apparently ambiguous interaction between menopausal status and obesity-associated breast cancer risk based on the principle of the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen. Before menopause, breast cancer incidence is relatively low and adiposity is erroneously regarded as a protective factor against this tumor conferred by the obesity associated defective estrogen-synthesis. By contrast, in postmenopausal cases, obesity presents a strong risk factor for breast cancer being mistakenly attributed to the presumed excessive estrogen-production of their adipose-tissue mass. Obesity is associated with dysmetabolism and endangers the healthy equilibrium of sexual hormone-production and regular menstrual cycles in women, which are the prerequisites not only for reproductive capacity but also for somatic health. At the same time, literary data support that anovulatory infertility is a very strong risk for breast cancer in young women either with or without obesity. In the majority of premenopausal women, obesity associated insulin resistance is moderate and may be counteracted by their preserved circulatory estrogen level. Consequently, it is not obesity but rather the still sufficient estrogen-level, which may be protective against breast cancer in young adult females. In obese older women, never using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) the breast cancer risk is high, which is associated with their continuous estrogen loss and increasing insulin-resistance. By contrast, obese postmenopausal women using HRT, have a decreased risk for breast cancer as the protective effect of estrogen-substitution may counteract to their obesity associated systemic alterations. The revealed inverse correlation between circulatory estrogen-level and breast cancer risk in obese women should advance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and promotes primary prevention measures. New patents recommend various methods for the prevention and treatment of obesity

  15. Circulatory Estrogen Level Protects Against Breast Cancer in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Literary data suggest apparently ambiguous interaction between menopausal status and obesity-associated breast cancer risk based on the principle of the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen. Before menopause, breast cancer incidence is relatively low and adiposity is erroneously regarded as a protective factor against this tumor conferred by the obesity associated defective estrogen-synthesis. By contrast, in postmenopausal cases, obesity presents a strong risk factor for breast cancer being mistakenly attributed to the presumed excessive estrogen-production of their adipose-tissue mass. Obesity is associated with dysmetabolism and endangers the healthy equilibrium of sexual hormone-production and regular menstrual cycles in women, which are the prerequisites not only for reproductive capacity but also for somatic health. At the same time, literary data support that anovulatory infertility is a very strong risk for breast cancer in young women either with or without obesity. In the majority of premenopausal women, obesity associated insulin resistance is moderate and may be counteracted by their preserved circulatory estrogen level. Consequently, it is not obesity but rather the still sufficient estrogen-level, which may be protective against breast cancer in young adult females. In obese older women, never using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) the breast cancer risk is high, which is associated with their continuous estrogen loss and increasing insulin-resistance. By contrast, obese postmenopausal women using HRT, have a decreased risk for breast cancer as the protective effect of estrogen-substitution may counteract to their obesity associated systemic alterations. The revealed inverse correlation between circulatory estrogen-level and breast cancer risk in obese women should advance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and promotes primary prevention measures. New patents recommend various methods for the prevention and treatment of obesity

  16. Parkinson's disease: evidence for environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kieburtz, Karl; Wunderle, Kathryn B

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has no known cause. Although recent research has focused particularly on genetic causes of PD, environmental causes also play a role in developing the disease. This article reviews environmental factors that may increase the risk of PD, as well as the evidence behind those factors. Enough evidence exists to suggest that age has a causal relationship to PD. Significant evidence exists that gender, tobacco use, and caffeine consumption are also associated with the development of PD. Other environmental factors (pesticide exposure, occupation, blood urate levels, NSAID use, brain injury, and exercise) have limited or conflicting evidence of a relationship to PD. Future research must not neglect the impact of these environmental factors on the development of PD, especially with respect to potential gene-environment interactions.

  17. Temporary Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Review of the Options, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gilotra, Nisha A; Stevens, Gerin R

    2014-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a challenging disease entity and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) can be implemented in an acute setting to stabilize acutely ill patients with cardiomyopathy in a variety of clinical situations. Currently, several options exist for temporary MCS. We review the indications, contraindications, clinical applications, and evidences for a variety of temporary circulatory support options, including the intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), CentriMag blood pump, and percutaneous ventricular assist devices (pVADs), specifically the TandemHeart and Impella. PMID:25674024

  18. Food Combination and Alzheimer Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yian; Nieves, Jeri W.; Stern, Yaakov; Luchsinger, Jose A.; Scarmeas, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between food combination and Alzheimer disease (AD) risk. Because foods are not consumed in isolation, dietary pattern (DP) analysis of food combination, taking into account the interactions among food components, may offer methodological advantages. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Northern Manhattan, New York, New York. Patients or Other Participants Two thousand one hundred forty-eight community-based elderly subjects (aged ≥65 years) without dementia in New York provided dietary information and were prospectively evaluated with the same standardized neurological and neuropsychological measures approximately every 1.5 years. Using reduced rank regression, we calculated DPs based on their ability to explain variation in 7 potentially AD-related nutrients: saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, ω-6 poly-unsaturated fatty acids, vitamin E, vitamin B12, and folate. The associations of reduced rank regression–derived DPs with AD risk were then examined using a Cox proportional hazards model. Main Outcome Measure Incident AD risk. Results Two hundred fifty-three subjects developed AD during a follow-up of 3.9 years. We identified a DP strongly associated with lower AD risk: compared with subjects in the lowest tertile of adherence to this pattern, the AD hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for subjects in the highest DP tertile was 0.62 (0.43–0.89) after multivariable adjustment (P for trend=.01). This DP was characterized by higher intakes of salad dressing, nuts, fish, tomatoes, poultry, cruciferous vegetables, fruits, and dark and green leafy vegetables and a lower intake of high-fat dairy products, red meat, organ meat, and butter. Conclusion Simultaneous consideration of previous knowledge regarding potentially AD-related nutrients and multiple food groups can aid in identifying food combinations that are associated with AD risk. PMID:20385883

  19. Loneliness and risk of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Krueger, Kristin R; Arnold, Steven E; Schneider, Julie A; Kelly, Jeremiah F; Barnes, Lisa L; Tang, Yuxiao; Bennett, David A

    2007-02-01

    Social isolation in old age has been associated with risk of developing dementia, but the risk associated with perceived isolation, or loneliness, is not well understood. To test the hypothesis that loneliness is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Longitudinal clinicopathologic cohort study with up to 4 years of annual in-home follow-up. A total of 823 older persons free of dementia at enrollment were recruited from senior citizen facilities in and around Chicago, Ill. Loneliness was assessed with a 5-item scale at baseline (mean +/- SD, 2.3 +/- 0.6) and annually thereafter. At death, a uniform postmortem examination of the brain was conducted to quantify AD pathology in multiple brain regions and the presence of cerebral infarctions. Clinical diagnosis of AD and change in previously established composite measures of global cognition and specific cognitive functions. During follow-up, 76 subjects developed clinical AD. Risk of AD was more than doubled in lonely persons (score 3.2, 90th percentile) compared with persons who were not lonely (score 1.4, 10th percentile), and controlling for indicators of social isolation did not affect the finding. Loneliness was associated with lower level of cognition at baseline and with more rapid cognitive decline during follow-up. There was no significant change in loneliness, and mean degree of loneliness during the study was robustly associated with cognitive decline and development of AD. In 90 participants who died and in whom autopsy of the brain was performed, loneliness was unrelated to summary measures of AD pathology or to cerebral infarction. Loneliness is associated with an increased risk of late-life dementia but not with its leading causes.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    Salinas, G; Velásquez, C; Saavedra, L; Ramírez, E; Angulo, H; Tamayo, J C; Orellana, A; Huivin, Z; Valdivia, C; Rodríguez, W

    2004-10-01

    Gallstone disease is a main public health problem. The overall prevalence data range from 3.9% in the pre-echographic era to 13.7% when ultrasonography was used as a diagnostic tool. This study is aimed to determine the prevalence of gallstone disease in a medium income level population in Lima, as well as the relationship with some risk factors: age, sex, familiar history and obesity. A total of 534 adult men and women from a medium economic level underwent ultrasonographic examination of abdomen for detection of gallstone disease (July 2003). The echographic evaluation was performed by 10 general surgeons trained in ultrasonography. Likewise, 4 risk factors--age, gender, familial history, and obesity--were analyzed. Pearson chi2 test (2-sided) was used with a probability of <0.05 for statistical significance and logistic regression analyses for assessment of confounding factors. The prevalence founded was 15%. Eighty-one of 534 participants had lithiasis. Compared to the age group under 30, the odds ratio for the 31 to 50 years and >50 years of age group was 0.9 and 1.1, respectively. The female-male ratio was 1.07 and the odds ratio 0.8. The prevalence of gallstone disease in people reporting a first-degree relative with lithiasis was 21%, whereas in participants without such a condition, it was 13%. On the other hand, a familial history was present in 38% of the lithiasis group and in 25% of the nonlithiasis group. The odds ratio for familial history was 1.8 (P = 0.01, 95% confidence interval 1.1-2.9). The prevalence of the disease for body mass index <24, 25 to 29, and higher than 30 was 17%, 14% and 13%, respectively. Compared to the reference group (body mass index <24), the other 2 groups (body mass index 25-29 and >30) both had a similar odds ratio, 0.8. Logistic regression analyses showed an odds ratio of 1.9 for familiar history (95% confidence interval 1.1-3.2), whereas the odds ratio of the overweight (body mass index 25-29) and obese group (body mass

  1. Risk for rheumatic disease in relation to ethnicity and admixture

    PubMed Central

    Molokhia, Mariam; McKeigue, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is high in west Africans compared with Europeans, and risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is high in Native Americans compared with Europeans. These differences are not accounted for by differences in allele or haplotype frequencies in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) region or any other loci known to influence risk of rheumatic disease. Where there has been admixture between two or more ethnic groups that differ in risk of disease, studies of the relationship of disease risk to proportionate admixture can help to distinguish between genetic and environmental explanations for ethnic differences in disease risk and to map the genes underlying these differences. PMID:11094421

  2. [Risk factors associated with pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Pelayo Vera, Salvador; Hernández Landa, Tomás; Rodríguez Guzmán, Leoncio Miguel; Hernández Cruz, Leticia

    2002-08-01

    To determine the socio-demographic and gynecological risk factors in pelvic inflammatory disease (EPI). A study of the cases and controls divided by the age and the medical attention unit was performed. Women with an active sex life, who chose to participate in the study, were included. The definition of a case were the women who presented at least four of the clinical manifestations identified as critical as the principal criteria for EPI. For both groups a questionnaire was applied which contained the socio-demographical, gynecological and obstetric variables. 50 cases and 50 controls were evaluated. The risk factors associated with EPI were: scholastic level below high school, RMp 2.22 (IC95% 1.03-5.13); low scholastic level of the couple, RMp 2.33 (0.91-6.6); working women, RMp 3.17 (IC95% 1.3-8.7); women with a low socioeconomic level, RMp 2.86 (IC95% 1.24-7.26); a history of infectious vaginitis in the previous three months, RMp 41 (IC95% 7.94-838). The history of a use of intrauterine devices (DIU) did not present any association (RMp 0.06). The presence of EPI was found to be associated to socio-demographic and previous infectious vaginitis variables. The use of oral hormones and IUD did not show any relation. A greater amount of sexual education is needed for women with an active sex life in order to avoid the pelvic inflammatory disease.

  3. Cancer risks in Crohn disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Li, X; Sundquist, J; Sundquist, K

    2009-03-01

    Patients diagnosed with Crohn disease (CD) are known to be at an increased risk of bowel cancers and lymphoma. CD is an autoimmune disease and we hypothesize that the patients are predisposed to a wider spectrum of cancers. A CD research database was constructed by identifying hospitalized CD patients from the Hospital Discharge Register and cancer patients from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Follow-up of 21 788 CD patients first hospitalized during the years 1964-2004 identified 1424 cancer cases. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated by comparing cancers in CD patients with subjects without CD. In addition to the known sites, many additional sites were in excess in CD patients. These included liver, pancreatic, lung, prostate, testicular, kidney and skin (squamous cell) cancers; nonthyroid endocrine tumors and leukemia. The previously established sites showed the highest SIRs; however, SIRs >2.0 were noted for the novel sites of the liver, testis and kidney. For testicular cancer, the SIR of seminoma was 2.74. Cancer risks were influences by age at first hospitalization for CD but whether the age effects were increasing or decreasing depending on the cancer type. This large study identified many novel subsequent cancers in CD patients.

  4. Hypertriglyceridaemia and risk of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Željko

    2017-03-16

    An elevated serum level of LDL cholesterol is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the role of elevated triglyceride levels is debated. Controversies regarding hypertriglyceridaemia as an independent risk factor for CVD have occurred partly because elevated triglyceride levels are often a component of atherogenic dyslipidaemia - they are associated with decreased levels of HDL cholesterol and increased levels of small dense LDL particles, which are highly atherogenic. Findings from several large studies indicate that elevated levels of triglycerides (either fasting or nonfasting) or, more specifically, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and their remnants, are independently associated with increased risk of CVD. Possible mechanisms for this association include excessive free fatty acid release, production of proinflammatory cytokines, coagulation factors, and impairment of fibrinolysis. Therapeutic targeting of hypertriglyceridaemia could, therefore, reduce CVD and cardiovascular events, beyond the reduction achieved by LDL-cholesterol lowering. Elevated triglyceride levels are reduced with lifestyle interventions and fibrates, which can be combined with omega-3 fatty acids. Some new drugs are on the horizon, such as volanesorsen (which targets apolipoprotein C-III), pemafibrate, and others. However, CVD outcome studies with triglyceride-lowering agents have produced inconsistent results, meaning that no convincing evidence is available that lowering triglycerides by any approach can reduce mortality.

  5. Von Willebrand factor in patients on mechanical circulatory support - a double-edged sword between bleeding and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hudzik, Bartosz; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Pacholewicz, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gasior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is an umbrella term describing the various technologies used in both short- and long-term management of patients with either end-stage chronic heart failure (HF) or acute HF. Most often, MCS has emerged as a bridge to transplantation, but more recently it is also used as a destination therapy. Mechanical circulatory support includes left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or bi-ventricular assist device (Bi-VAD). Currently, 2- to 3-year survival in carefully selected patients is much better than with medical therapy. However, MCS therapy is hampered by sometimes life-threatening complications including bleeding and device thrombosis. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) has two major functions in haemostasis. First, it plays a crucial role in platelet-subendothelium adhesion and platelet-platelet interactions (aggregation). Second, it is the carrier of factor VIII (FVIII) in plasma. Von Willebrand factor prolongs FVIII half-time by protecting it from proteolytic degradation. It delivers FVIII to the site of vascular injury thus enhancing haemostatic process. On one hand, high plasma levels of vWF have been associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. On the other, defects or deficiencies of vWF underlie the inherited von Willebrand disease or acquired von Willebrand syndrome. Here we review the pathophysiology of thrombosis and bleeding associated with vWF.

  6. Postauricular percutaneous power delivery for permanent mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Westaby, Stephen; Jarvik, Robert; Freeland, Andrew; Pigott, David; Robson, Desiree; Saito, Satoshi; Catarino, Pedro; Frazier, O H

    2002-05-01

    Percutaneous driveline infection continues to detract from both quality and length of life in patients with a left ventricular assist device. We have pursued an alternative route by using a skull-mounted percutaneous pedestal similar to cochlear implant technology. We have now used this method in patients implanted with the Jarvik 2000 heart (Jarvik Heart, Inc, New York, NY) as destination therapy for end-stage (New York Heart Association class IV) heart failure. Four men with cardiomyopathy aged 61 to 72 years received the Jarvik 2000 heart with postauricular power delivery for permanent mechanical circulatory support. The power cable was brought through the second posterior intercostal space and routed through the neck to a percutaneous titanium implant screwed to the skull. This joins with the cable to the external controller and battery. In 3 patients the pedestal healed well and remained free from infection up to 1 year. The system was user friendly, and the whole external apparatus is exchangeable. The second patient had a subdural hematoma. This caused us to improve the preparation and modify the implant procedure. For widespread use, permanent implantable circulatory support requires a reliable, user-friendly device with freedom from powerline infection. Our early experience with the Jarvik 2000 heart suggests that rigid fixation and the vascularity of scalp skin promote healing and reduce the risk of driveline infection.

  7. Simulation of a human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vinay

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a mathematically based human circulatory model. The model consists of lumped elements made of venous, arterial, peripheral, pulmonary vein and artery segments. A heart model is simulated using 4 chambers (left and right atriums and ventricles). The heart pump mechanism is operated by a simple piston based models for each of the chambers. The simulation consists of 19 (states) first order differential equations. and simulated with Matlab and Simulink. The simulation computes volume, flow rate and pressures in each segment.

  8. Pathophysiological roles of peroxynitrite in circulatory shock

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Csaba; Módis, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Peroxynitrite is a reactive oxidant produced from nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide, which reacts with proteins, lipids and DNA and promotes cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory responses. Here we overview the role of peroxynitrite in various forms of circulatory shock. Immunohistochemical and biochemical evidence demonstrate the production of peroxynitrite in various experimental models of endotoxic and hemorrhagic shock, both in rodents and in large animals. In addition, biological markers of peroxynitrite have been identified in human tissues after circulatory shock. Peroxynitrite can initiate toxic oxidative reactions in vitro and in vivo. Initiation of lipid peroxidation, direct inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, inhibition of membrane Na+/K+ ATP-ase activity, inactivation of membrane sodium channels, and other oxidative protein modifications contribute to the cytotoxic effect of peroxynitrite. In addition, peroxynitrite is a potent trigger of DNA strand breakage, with subsequent activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), which promotes cellular energetic collapse and cellular necrosis. Additional actions of peroxynitrite that contribute to the pathogenesis of shock include inactivation of catecholamines and catecholamine receptors (leading to vascular failure), endothelial and epithelial injury (leading to endothelial and epithelial hyper-permeability and barrier dysfunction) as well as myocyte injury (contributing to loss of cardiac contractile function). Neutralization of peroxynitrite with potent peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts provides cytoprotective and beneficial effects in rodent and large animal models of circulatory shock. PMID:20523270

  9. Pathophysiological roles of peroxynitrite in circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Csaba; Módis, Katalin

    2010-09-01

    Peroxynitrite is a reactive oxidant produced from nitric oxide and superoxide, which reacts with proteins, lipids, and DNA, and promotes cytotoxic and proinflammatory responses. Here, we overview the role of peroxynitrite in various forms of circulatory shock. Immunohistochemical and biochemical evidences demonstrate the production of peroxynitrite in various experimental models of endotoxic and hemorrhagic shock both in rodents and in large animals. In addition, biological markers of peroxynitrite have been identified in human tissues after circulatory shock. Peroxynitrite can initiate toxic oxidative reactions in vitro and in vivo. Initiation of lipid peroxidation, direct inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, inhibition of membrane Na+/K+ ATPase activity, inactivation of membrane sodium channels, and other oxidative protein modifications contribute to the cytotoxic effect of peroxynitrite. In addition, peroxynitrite is a potent trigger of DNA strand breakage, with subsequent activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, which promotes cellular energetic collapse and cellular necrosis. Additional actions of peroxynitrite that contribute to the pathogenesis of shock include inactivation of catecholamines and catecholamine receptors (leading to vascular failure) and endothelial and epithelial injury (leading to endothelial and epithelial hyperpermeability and barrier dysfunction), as well as myocyte injury (contributing to loss of cardiac contractile function). Neutralization of peroxynitrite with potent peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts provides cytoprotective and beneficial effects in rodent and large-animal models of circulatory shock.

  10. Heart Disease Risk Perception in College Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John S.; Grant, Melinda; Hill, Kathy L.; Brizzolara, Jeff; Belmont, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    The authors sought to assess the perception of risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) in college men and women. They surveyed 470 undergraduates from 2 major 4-year institutions who completed a questionnaire that measured perceived risks for heart disease. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents rated their risks as lower or much lower than those…

  11. Heart Disease Risk Perception in College Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John S.; Grant, Melinda; Hill, Kathy L.; Brizzolara, Jeff; Belmont, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    The authors sought to assess the perception of risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) in college men and women. They surveyed 470 undergraduates from 2 major 4-year institutions who completed a questionnaire that measured perceived risks for heart disease. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents rated their risks as lower or much lower than those…

  12. Dietary patterns: biomarkers and chronic disease risk.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ashima K

    2010-04-01

    With increasing appreciation of the complexity of diets consumed by free-living individuals, there is interest in the assessment of the overall diet or dietary patterns in which multiple related dietary characteristics are considered as a single exposure. The 2 most frequently used methods to derive dietary patterns use (i) scores or indexes based on prevailing hypotheses about the role of dietary factors in disease prevention; and (ii) factors and clusters from exploration of available dietary data. A third method, a hybrid of the hypothesis-driven and data-driven methods, attempts to predict food combinations related to nutrients or biomarkers with hypothesized associations with particular health outcomes. Dietary patterns derived from the first 2 approaches have been examined in relation to nutritional and disease biomarkers and various health outcomes, and generally show the desirable dietary pattern to be consistent with prevalent beliefs about what constitutes a healthful diet. Results from observational studies suggest that the healthful dietary patterns were associated with significant but modest risk reduction (15%-30%) for all-cause mortality and coronary heart disease. Findings for various cancers have been inconsistent. The available randomized controlled intervention trials with a long-term follow-up to examine dietary patterns in relation to health outcome have generally produced null findings. Novel findings with the potential to change existing beliefs about diet and health relationships are yet to emerge from the dietary patterns research. The field requires innovation in methods to derive dietary patterns, validation of prevalent methods, and assessment of the effect of dietary measurement error on dietary patterns.

  13. Occupational risk factors in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Leso, V; Ricciardi, W; Iavicoli, I

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although the aetiology of IBD is not completely understood, an interaction between genetic and environmental factors has been proposed. In this context, however, environmental epidemiology lacks a comprehensive evaluation of the possible role of occupational exposures in IBD development and progression. Therefore, aim of our review was to evaluate how certain occupational risk factors may affect IBD pathogenesis, clinical history and severity of disease manifestations. A critical revision of available literature concerning exposure to groups of potential workplace hazardous agents and IBD, as it appears in Medline and Web of knowledge, was performed. The role of workplace exposures to chemical and biological agents, ionizing or non-ionizing radiations, shift-works, indoor, and sedentary works as well as job strain on IBD has been critically revised. However, the limited number of studies addressing these issues prevented us from extrapolating definite conclusions. Our review pointed out some critical aspects concerning the relationship between occupational factors and IBD, in terms of causative pathways, hazardous exposure, susceptibility and consequences of IBD functional limitations on career choice and fitness for work that need future investigations. Overall, this seems a challenging public health issue, considering the strong IBD impact on patients' quality of life, work productivity and costs to society. Moreover, this review may encourage concerted actions of health care specialists, occupational physicians, employers and IBD workers to plan preventive and protective measures for "healthier patterns of work" for IBD and to develop innovative perspectives for an integrated management of "IBD at work".

  14. [Cardiovascular diseases in workers engaged into metal mining industry and mechanical engineering].

    PubMed

    Korzeneva, E V; Sineva, E L

    2007-01-01

    Peculiarities of cardiovascular diseases among workers exposed to noise and vibration include hyperkinetic hemodynamic type supporting early terms of cardiovascular functions disorder. Veloergometry and echocardiography are highly informative and diagnostic value, so helpful in early diagnosis of circulatory disorders. The authors specified objective criteria of risk associated with occupationally related cardiovascular diseases.

  15. A Comparison of Disease Risk Analysis Tools for Conservation Translocations.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, Antonia Eleanor; Sainsbury, Anthony W; McInnes, Kate; Jakob-Hoff, Richard; Ewen, John G

    2017-03-01

    Conservation translocations are increasingly used to manage threatened species and restore ecosystems. Translocations increase the risk of disease outbreaks in the translocated and recipient populations. Qualitative disease risk analyses have been used as a means of assessing the magnitude of any effect of disease and the probability of the disease occurring associated with a translocation. Currently multiple alternative qualitative disease risk analysis packages are available to practitioners. Here we compare the ease of use, expertise required, transparency, and results from, three different qualitative disease risk analyses using a translocation of the endangered New Zealand passerine, the hihi (Notiomystis cincta), as a model. We show that the three methods use fundamentally different approaches to define hazards. Different methods are used to produce estimations of the risk from disease, and the estimations are different for the same hazards. Transparency of the process varies between methods from no referencing, or explanations of evidence to justify decisions, through to full documentation of resources, decisions and assumptions made. Evidence to support decisions on estimation of risk from disease is important, to enable knowledge acquired in the future, for example, from translocation outcome, to be used to improve the risk estimation for future translocations. Information documenting each disease risk analysis differs along with variation in emphasis of the questions asked within each package. The expertise required to commence a disease risk analysis varies and an action flow chart tailored for the non-wildlife health specialist are included in one method but completion of the disease risk analysis requires wildlife health specialists with epidemiological and pathological knowledge in all three methods. We show that disease risk analysis package choice may play a greater role in the overall risk estimation of the effect of disease on animal populations

  16. Pediatric Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Matthew J; Hornby, Laura; Witteman, William; Shemie, Sam D

    2016-03-01

    Although pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death is increasing in frequency, there are no national or international donation after circulatory determination of death guidelines specific to pediatrics. This scoping review was performed to map the pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death literature, identify pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death knowledge gaps, and inform the development of national or regional pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death guidelines. Terms related to pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death were searched in Embase and MEDLINE, as well as the non-MEDLINE sources in PubMed from 1980 to May 2014. Seven thousand five hundred ninety-seven references were discovered and 85 retained for analysis. All references addressing pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death were considered. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not address pediatric patients, animal or laboratory studies, surgical techniques, and local pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death protocols. Narrative reviews and opinion articles were the most frequently discovered reference (25/85) and the few discovered studies were observational or qualitative and almost exclusively retrospective. Retained references were divided into themes and analyzed using qualitative methodology. The main discovered themes were 1) studies estimating the number of potential pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death donors and their impact on donation; 2) ethical issues in pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death; 3) physiology of the dying process after withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy; 4) cardiac pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death; and 5) neonatal pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death. Donor estimates suggest that pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death will

  17. Hepatitis Infection May Raise Risk for Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164379.html Hepatitis Infection May Raise Risk for Parkinson's Disease New ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with the liver infection hepatitis may be at heightened risk of developing Parkinson's ...

  18. Atherosclerotic Heart Disease: Prevalence and Risk Factors in Hospitalized Men with Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Margaret V.; Moore, Charity G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Atherosclerotic heart disease (ASHD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society. Few studies have determined prevalence and predictors of ASHD in hemophilia (HA), a population whose survival is improving with safer blood products and effective treatments for AIDS and hepatitis C. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence and factors associated with ASHD in hemophilia A patients in Pennsylvania. Methods The prevalence of ASHD (myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease), cardiac catheterization, coronary angiography, co-morbidities, and in-hospital mortality were assessed on statewide ASHD discharge data, 2001–2006, from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4). Results The prevalence of hemophilia ASHD admissions fluctuated between 6.5% and 10.5% for 2001 to 2006, p=0.62. Compared to HA without ASHD, HA with ASHD were older and more likely to be hypertensive, hyperlipidemic, and diabetic, all p<0.0001, with greater severity of illness, p=0.013. By contrast, HA and non-HA with ASHD had similar rates of hypertension, diabetes, and ICD-9 specified ischemic heart disease, including acute myocardial infarction (MI), p=0.39, old MI, p=0.47, and angina, p=0.63. Rates of catheterization and angiography, p=0.06 and p=0.07, were marginally lower, but primary circulatory system admitting diagnoses, p=0.29, were similar between HA and non-HA ASHD groups, as was length of stay, p=0.14, severity of illness, p=0.64, and in-hospital deaths, p=0.75. Conclusions Hemophilia patients with ASHD have similar cardiovascular risk factors, admitting diagnoses, severity of illness, and in-hospital mortality as the general population. These findings suggest cardiovascular prevention measures should be promoted in hemophilia. PMID:21371197

  19. Aggregation of vascular risk factors and risk of incident Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, J A; Reitz, C; Honig, L S; Tang, M X; Shea, Steven; Mayeux, R

    2005-08-23

    The prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is increasing in the elderly, and vascular risk factors may increase its risk. To explore the association of the aggregation of vascular risk factors with AD. The authors followed 1,138 individuals without dementia at baseline (mean age 76.2) for a mean of 5.5 years. The presence of vascular risk factors was related to incident possible and probable AD. Four risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and current smoking) were associated with a higher risk of AD (p < 0.10) when analyzed individually. The risk of AD increased with the number of risk factors (diabetes + hypertension + heart disease + current smoking). The adjusted hazards ratio of probable AD for the presence of three or more risk factors was 3.4 (95% CI: 1.8, 6.3; p for trend < 0.0001) compared with no risk factors. Diabetes and current smoking were the strongest risk factors in isolation or in clusters, but hypertension and heart disease were also related to a higher risk of AD when clustered with diabetes, smoking, or each other. The risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) increased with the number of vascular risk factors. Diabetes and current smoking were the strongest risk factors, but clusters including hypertension and heart disease also increased the risk of AD. These associations are unlikely to be explained by misclassification of the outcome, given strong associations when only probable AD is considered.

  20. Lifestyle decreases risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Slavícek, Jaroslav; Kittnar, Otomar; Fraser, Gary E; Medová, Eva; Konecná, Jana; Zizka, Robert; Dohnalová, Alena; Novák, Vladimir

    2008-12-01

    The morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases is high in the developed countries. The lifestyle changes are capable to decrease it by 50%. The aim of the present study was to measure the parameters of some risk factors before and after a one-week NEW START rehabilitative retreat. 1349 volunteers, 320 men, 1029 woman, mean age 51 +/- 14.5 (SD) years participated in 30 rehabilitative retreats from 1999-2006 in the Czech Republic, using a low-fat, low-energy, lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet and exercise, in a stress-free environment. Body weight, height, BMI, blood pressure, heart rate, serum cholesterol and blood glucose were measured. Body weight decreased in 1223 measured persons from 71.2 +/- 14.38 (SD) to 70.6 +/- 14.02 kg (p<0.0001), BMI (1,046 measured persons) from 25.1 +/- 4.60 (SD) to 24.8+4.49 (SD) kg/m2 (p<0.0001), systolic blood pressure (1,218 persons) from 129.8 +/- 23.02 (SD) to 123.8 +/- 21.52 (SD) mmHg (p<0.0001), diastolic blood pressure (1210 persons) from 79.8 +/- 12.7 (SD) to 77.5 +/- 11.6 (SD) mmHg (p<0.0001), serum cholesterol (998 persons) from 4.86 +/- 0.95 (SD) to 4.32 +/- 0.77 (SD) mmol (p<0.0001), blood glucose (544 persons) from 4.31 +/- 1.59 (SD) to 3.88 +/- 1.33 (SD) mmol (p<0.0001). Heart rate was not significantly decreased. The parameters were lower in lacto-ovo vegetarians and Seventh-day Adventists than in controls who never observed the diet and avail the lifestyle programs. The parameters were nonsignificantly changed one year after finishing the retreat in the sample of 68 persons showing the positive effect of retreats. Our results showed, that the intake of a low-fat, low-energy diet, over the course of one week in a stress-free environment, had positive impact on the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Risk of Disease from Mosquito and Tick Bites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Insect repellents help reduce the risk of mosquito and tick bites, which can transmit diseases including West Nile Virus, malaria, encephalitis, yellow fever, dengue fever, chikungunya virus, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and ehrlichiosis.

  2. On the difficulty to delimit disease risk hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charras-Garrido, M.; Azizi, L.; Forbes, F.; Doyle, S.; Peyrard, N.; Abrial, D.

    2013-06-01

    Representing the health state of a region is a helpful tool to highlight spatial heterogeneity and localize high risk areas. For ease of interpretation and to determine where to apply control procedures, we need to clearly identify and delineate homogeneous regions in terms of disease risk, and in particular disease risk hot spots. However, even if practical purposes require the delineation of different risk classes, such a classification does not correspond to a reality and is thus difficult to estimate. Working with grouped data, a first natural choice is to apply disease mapping models. We apply a usual disease mapping model, producing continuous estimations of the risks that requires a post-processing classification step to obtain clearly delimited risk zones. We also apply a risk partition model that build a classification of the risk levels in a one step procedure. Working with point data, we will focus on the scan statistic clustering method. We illustrate our article with a real example concerning the bovin spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) an animal disease whose zones at risk are well known by the epidemiologists. We show that in this difficult case of a rare disease and a very heterogeneous population, the different methods provide risk zones that are globally coherent. But, related to the dichotomy between the need and the reality, the exact delimitation of the risk zones, as well as the corresponding estimated risks are quite different.

  3. The increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Catherine; Leonard, Erin; Koffi, Jules Konan; Pelcat, Yann; Peregrine, Andrew; Chilton, Neil; Rochon, Kateryn; Lysyk, Tim; Lindsay, L Robbin; Ogden, Nicholas Hume

    2015-07-01

    There is an increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada due to range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. The objectives of this article are to i) raise public awareness with the help of veterinarians on the emerging and expanding risk of Lyme disease across Canada, ii) review the key clinical features of Lyme disease in dogs, and iii) provide recommendations for veterinarians on the management of Lyme disease in dogs.

  4. Hyperuricemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease: clinical review.

    PubMed

    Gudiño Gomezjurado, Álvaro

    2016-11-15

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Several risk factors have been associated with the development of these pathologies. However, there is controversy about whether hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease. To answer this question, we performed a recent literature review of relevant published material to assess the association of hyperuricemia with four major cardiovascular diseases: hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

  5. The increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Catherine; Leonard, Erin; Koffi, Jules Konan; Pelcat, Yann; Peregrine, Andrew; Chilton, Neil; Rochon, Kateryn; Lysyk, Tim; Lindsay, L. Robbin; Ogden, Nicholas Hume

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada due to range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. The objectives of this article are to i) raise public awareness with the help of veterinarians on the emerging and expanding risk of Lyme disease across Canada, ii) review the key clinical features of Lyme disease in dogs, and iii) provide recommendations for veterinarians on the management of Lyme disease in dogs. PMID:26130829

  6. Infection after implantation of pulsatile mechanical circulatory support devices.

    PubMed

    Holman, William L; Kirklin, James K; Naftel, David C; Kormos, Robert L; Desvign-Nickens, Patricia; Camacho, Margarita T; Ascheim, Deborah D

    2010-06-01

    INTERMACS is a registry of mechanical circulatory support devices sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. This analysis uses INTERMACS data to define the time course, incidence, and outcome of infection adverse events focusing on the first 3 months after implant. Patients entered into INTERMACS from June 23, 2006, to September 30, 2008, were analyzed. Preimplant data (demographics, hemodynamics, and laboratory values), infection adverse events, and other outcomes were recorded. Infection adverse events were analyzed to compare infection rates in subgroups of patients and define risk factors for death. The analysis was confined to pulsatile mechanical circulatory support devices. A total of 593 patients from 88 institutions were entered. Infection was a relatively common event within the first 3 months of implant and was significantly (P = .005) more common in patients with biventricular assist devices than in patients with left ventricular assist devices, although the prevalence of infection equalized in months 4 to 12. Infection had a significant adverse effect on survival. Independent risk factors for death included support with a biventricular assist device, older age, severity of patient illness implantation of the device (INTERMACS level 1), and higher blood urea nitrogen. Infection remains a relatively frequent adverse event and is associated with decreased survival. Interventions to prevent infection that focus on the preoperative and immediate postoperative periods are the ones most likely to achieve success by diminishing the incidence of infection during the initial 3 months after implantation. Rotary (continuous-flow) pumps are expected to have lower infection rates, but this remains to be seen. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  7. [Risk perception and communication: from diabetes to cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Gianinazzi, F; Bodenmann, P; Izzo, F; Voeffray Favre, A C; Rossi, I; Ruiz, J

    2010-06-09

    Evidence-based medicine has enabled to approach disease in a more rational and scientific way. Clinical research has identified behaviours and risk factors that could cause disease often "silent" at the beginning, such as diabetes. Despite the clear impact of these evidences on public health, it seems that the individual risk perception level remains weak. To mention as well, the health professionals very often have a different views, which makes it difficult to communicate the risk with patients. In this article we describe the principles of risk perception, the diabetes related risk perception concerning cardiovascular complications, and suggest some practical strategies and tools which could improve risk communication in the everyday practice.

  8. Paternal epigenetic programming: evolving metabolic disease risk.

    PubMed

    Hur, Suzy S J; Cropley, Jennifer E; Suter, Catherine M

    2017-04-01

    Parental health or exposures can affect the lifetime health outcomes of offspring, independently of inherited genotypes. Such 'epigenetic' effects occur over a broad range of environmental stressors, including defects in parental metabolism. Although maternal metabolic effects are well documented, it has only recently been established that that there is also an independent paternal contribution to long-term metabolic health. Both paternal undernutrition and overnutrition can induce metabolic phenotypes in immediate offspring, and in some cases, the induced phenotype can affect multiple generations, implying inheritance of an acquired trait. The male lineage transmission of metabolic disease risk in these cases implicates a heritable factor carried by sperm. Sperm-based transmission provides a tractable system to interrogate heritable epigenetic factors influencing metabolism, and as detailed here, animal models of paternal programming have already provided some significant insights. Here, we review the evidence for paternal programming of metabolism in humans and animal models, and the available evidence on potential underlying mechanisms. Programming by paternal metabolism can be observed in multiple species across animal phyla, suggesting that this phenomenon may have a unique evolutionary significance.

  9. [Risk assessment of periodontal disease in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Hermann, Péter; Borbély, Judit; Gera, István; Fejérdy, Pál; Soós, Borbála; Madléna, Melinda

    2011-06-01

    In this study, risk determinants were assessed for periodontal disease in the oral health survey of a representative Hungarian adult population sample. 4153 individuals participated in the study after formal consent. Participants were questionned on level of education, dental office attendance, smoking habits, oral hygiene habits and general health conditions. Quality of fixed partial dentures (FPD) were evaluated. Periodontal health status was assessed with the CPI method according to WHO criteria. When the prevalence of CPI scores was assessed by educational level, significant differences were found between groups. With increasing levels of education, a significantly higher percentage of subjects visited the dental office regularly. Higher prevalence of CPI 0 was found among those with higher level of education but there was also high prevalence of CPI 2, representing bad oral hygiene in the highly educated group. Findings of our study showed high percentage (66%) of the population attending the dental office only in case of emergency. The investigation revealed destructive effect of unsatisfactory construction of FPD on the periodontium. Healthy periodontium (CPI 0) was found among 16% of those wearing no FPD and 9% among FPD-wearers. The prevalence of deep periodontal pockets (CPI 4) was 1,6 times higher among smokers as non-smokers. Oral health statistics play an important role in planning for improvement of dental health care. Hungary needs effective prevention programs and emphasize on regular dental office attendance of individuals to improve the nation's oral health status.

  10. Risk Factors of Periodontal Disease: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    AlJehani, Yousef A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This paper aims to review the evidence on the potential roles of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors associated with periodontal disease. Data. Original articles that reported on the risk factors for periodontal disease were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1980 to Jan 2014), PubMed (using medical subject headings), and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “periodontal disease,” “periodontitis,” “risk factors,” and “causal.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. It is important to understand the etiological factors and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease to recognize and appreciate the associated risk factors. As periodontal disease is multifactorial, effective disease management requires a clear understanding of all the associated risk factors. PMID:24963294

  11. Mechanical circulatory assist for pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Y; Fuse, K; Yamaguchi, T; Saito, T; Konishi, H

    2000-11-01

    Optimal management of acute pulmonary embolism remains controversial, despite advances in thrombolytic therapy. Haemodynamic instability and, in particular, right ventricular dysfunction is associated with poor outcomes. Urgent surgical embolectomy has been the treatment of choice in this category of patients. We present two cases in which percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS) was used as an adjunct to thrombolytic therapy for progressive circulatory collapse secondary to massive acute pulmonary embolism. This experience suggests that PCPS may offer an attractive option for a condition which continues to carry significant morbidity and mortality.

  12. Microvascular Fluid Resuscitation in Circulatory Shock.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Shannan K; Strauss, Penelope Z; Chen, Hsin-Mei; Christy, LaDonna

    2017-06-01

    The microcirculation is responsible for blood flow regulation and red blood cell distribution throughout individual organs. Patients with circulatory shock have acute failure of the cardiovascular system in which there is insufficient delivery of oxygen to meet metabolic tissue requirements. All subtypes of shock pathophysiology have a hypovolemic component. Fluid resuscitation guided by systemic hemodynamic end points is a common intervention. Evidence shows that microcirculatory shock persists even after optimization of macrocirculatory hemodynamics. The ability for nurses to assess the microcirculation at the bedside in real-time during fluid resuscitation could lead to improved algorithms designed to resuscitate the microcirculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aggregation of Vascular Risk Factors and Risk of Incident Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luchsinger, Jose; Reitz, Christiane; Honig MD, Larry S.; Tang, Ming-Xin; Shea, Steven; Mayeux, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background The prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is increasing in the elderly and vascular risk factors may increase its risk. We explored the association of the aggregation of vascular risk factors to AD. Methods we followed 1,138 individuals without dementia at baseline (mean age = 76.2 years) for a mean of 5.5 years. The presence of vascular risk factors was related to incident possible and probable AD. Results Four risk factors, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and current smoking, were associated with a higher risk of AD (p < 0.10) when analyzed individually. The risk of AD increased with the number of risk factors (diabetes + hypertension + heart disease + current smoking). The adjusted HR of probable AD for the presence of 3 or more risk factors was 3.4 (95% CI: 1.8,6.3; p for trend < 0.0001) compared to no risk factors. Diabetes and current smoking were the strongest risk factors in isolation or in clusters, but hypertension and heart disease were also related to a higher risk of AD when clustered with diabetes, smoking, or each other. Conclusions The risk of AD increased with the number of vascular risk factors. Diabetes and current smoking were the strongest risk factors, but clusters including hypertension and heart disease also increased the risk of AD. These associations are unlikely to be explained by misclassification of the outcome given strong associations when only probable AD is considered. PMID:16116114

  14. Iatrogenic disease in the elderly: risk factors, consequences, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Permpongkosol, Sompol

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of iatrogenic disease in the elderly has not been extensively reported. Risk factors of iatrogenic disease in the elderly are drug-induced iatrogenic disease, multiple chronic diseases, multiple physicians, hospitalization, and medical or surgical procedures. Iatrogenic disease can have a great psychomotor impact and important social consequences. To identify patients at high risk is the first step in prevention as most of the iatrogenic diseases are preventable. Interventions that can prevent iatrogenic complications include specific interventions, the use of a geriatric interdisciplinary team, pharmacist consultation and acute care for the elderly units. PMID:21472095

  15. Intradialytic hypotension and risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Stefánsson, Bergur V; Brunelli, Steven M; Cabrera, Claudia; Rosenbaum, David; Anum, Emmanuel; Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Jensen, Donna E; Stålhammar, Nils-Olov

    2014-12-05

    Patients undergoing hemodialysis have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality compared with the general population. Intradialytic hypotension (IDH) is estimated to occur during 20%-30% of hemodialysis sessions. To date, no large studies have examined whether IDH is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. This study determined the prevalence of IDH according to interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) and studied the association between IDH and outcomes for cardiovascular events and mortality to better understand its role. This study retrospectively examined records of 39,497 hemodialysis patients during 2007 and 2008. US Renal Data System claims and dialysis provider data were used to determine outcomes. IDH was defined by current Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines (≥20 mmHg fall in systolic BP from predialysis to nadir intradialytic levels plus ≥2 responsive measures [dialysis stopped, saline administered, etc.]). IDWG was measured absolutely (in kilograms) and relatively (in percentages). IDH occurred in 31.1% of patients during the 90-day exposure assessment period. At baseline, the higher the IDWG (relative or absolute), the greater the frequency of IDH (P<0.001). For all-cause mortality, the median follow-up was 398 days (interquartile range, 231-602 days). Compared with patients without IDH, IDH was associated with all-cause mortality (7646 events; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.07 [95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 1.14]), myocardial infarction (2396 events; 1.20 [1.10 to 1.31]), hospitalization for heart failure/volume overload (8896 events; 1.13 [1.08 to 1.18]), composite hospitalization for heart failure/volume overload or cardiovascular mortality (10,805 events; 1.12 [1.08 to 1.17]), major adverse cardiac events (MACEs; myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular mortality) (4994 events, 1.10 [1.03 to 1.17]), and MACEs+ (MACEs plus arrhythmia or hospitalization for heart failure/volume overload) (12

  16. Resilience of diversity-disease risk interactions following wildfire disturbance

    Treesearch

    Devon A. Gaydos; Krishna Pacifici; Ross K. Meentemeyer; David. M. Rizzo

    2017-01-01

    The potential for biodiversity to mitigate risk of infectious diseases in ecological communities – known as the diversity-disease risk hypothesis – is fundamental to understanding links between landscape change and environmental health of forests affected by sudden oak death (SOD). Previous research of the Phytophthora ramorum pathosystem...

  17. Cardiovascular disease risk stratification and comparison in a California population.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Meng, Y-Y; Leung, K-M; Jatulis, D E; Welsh, N J; Zaher, C A; Legorreta, A P

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the need for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in an HMO population and to develop appropriate interventions for individuals in different risk groups, based on risk stratification and comparison. The analysis is based on a cross-sectional survey of the HMO members of a large employer group. Respondents (n=17,878) were stratified based on the Framingham model; 34% of respondents without cardiovascular disease were classified as moderate to high attributable risk for the disease, and 66% were classified as low attributable risk. Results of logistic regression analyses suggest that, compared with respondents with pre-existing cardiovascular disease, moderate- to high-risk respondents are more likely to smoke, have unhealthy diets, and be overweight, hypertensive, and hypercholesterolemic. More low-risk respondents had unhealthy diets than did those with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. There were no differences between these groups for physical activity and stress. Respondents had fewer modifiable risk factors and healthier lifestyles than did those who were at risk. These findings suggest that primary prevention should be enhanced, especially among those with significantly increased risk for the disease. Moreover, the approaches of this project-population-based risk assessment, stratification, and comparison-were instrumental in identifying the target population and designing appropriate interventions. (c) 2001 by CHF, Inc.

  18. Hypertensive diseases of pregnancy and risk of hypertension and stroke in later life: results from cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda J; Watson, M Stuart; Prescott, Gordon J; Sunderland, Sarah; Campbell, Doris M; Hannaford, Philip; Smith, W Cairns S

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between hypertensive diseases of pregnancy (gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia) and the development of circulatory diseases in later life. Design Cohort study of women who had pre-eclampsia during their first singleton pregnancy. Two comparison groups were matched for age and year of delivery, one with gestational hypertension and one with no history of raised blood pressure. Setting Maternity services in the Grampian region of Scotland. Participants Women selected from the Aberdeen maternity and neonatal databank who were resident in Aberdeen and who delivered a first, live singleton from 1951 to 1970. Main outcome measures Current vital and cardiovascular health status ascertained through postal questionnaire survey, clinical examination, linkage to hospital discharge, and mortality data. Results There were significant positive associations between pre-eclampsia/eclampsia or gestational hypertension and later hypertension in all measures. The adjusted relative risks varied from 1.13-3.72 for gestational hypertension and 1.40-3.98 for pre-eclampsia or eclampsia. The adjusted incident rate ratio for death from stroke for the pre-eclampsia/eclampsia group was 3.59 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 12.4). Conclusions Hypertensive diseases of pregnancy seem to be associated in later life with diseases related to hypertension. If greater awareness of this association leads to earlier diagnosis and improved management, there may be scope for reducing a proportion of the morbidity and mortality from such diseases. What is already known on this topicMuch is known about the effect of cardiovascular risks factors that are shared by men and women, but less on those specific to womenRetrospective studies, based on patient recall, suggest that hypertension in pregnancy may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in later lifeWhat this study addsProspective recording of blood pressure and proteinuria shows that

  19. Clinical examination for diagnosing circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Bart; Eck, Ruben J; Keus, Frederik; van der Horst, Iwan C C

    2017-08-01

    In the acute setting of circulatory shock, physicians largely depend on clinical examination and basic laboratory values. The daily use of clinical examination for diagnostic purposes contrasts sharp with the limited number of studies. We aim to provide an overview of the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination in estimating circulatory shock reflected by an inadequate cardiac output (CO). Recent studies showed poor correlations between CO and mottling, capillary refill time or central-to-peripheral temperature gradients in univariable analyses. The accuracy of physicians to perform an educated guess of CO based on clinical examination lies around 50% and the accuracy for recognizing a low CO is similar. Studies that used predefined clinical profiles composed of several clinical examination signs show more reliable estimations of CO with accuracies ranging from 81 up to 100%. Single variables obtained by clinical examination should not be used when estimating CO. Physician's educated guesses of CO based on unstructured clinical examination are like the 'flip of a coin'. Structured clinical examination based on combined clinical signs shows the best accuracy. Future studies should focus on using a combination of signs in an unselected population, eventually to educate physicians in estimating CO by using predefined clinical profiles.

  20. Critical care ultrasonography in circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Koster, Geert; van der Horst, Iwan C C

    2017-08-01

    The objective was to define the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and the management of circulatory shock by critical appraisal of the literature. Assessment of any patient's hemodynamic profile based on clinical examination can be sufficient in several cases, but many times unclarities remain. Arterial catheters and central venous lines are commonly used in critically ill patients for practical reasons, and offer an opportunity for advanced hemodynamic monitoring. Critical care ultrasonography may add to the understanding of the hemodynamic profile at hand. Improvements in ultrasound techniques, for example, smaller devices and improved image quality, may reduce limitations and increase its value as a complementary tool. Critical care ultrasonography has great potential to guide decisions in the management of shock, but operators should be aware of limitations and pitfalls as well. Current evidence comes from cohort studies with heterogeneous design and outcomes. Use of ultrasonography for hemodynamic monitoring in critical care expands, probably because of absence of procedure-related adverse events. Easy applicability and the capacity of distinguishing different types of shock add to its increasing role, further supported by consensus statements promoting ultrasound as the preferred tool for diagnostics in circulatory shock.

  1. Clinical examination for diagnosing circulatory shock

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Bart; Eck, Ruben J.; Keus, Frederik; van der Horst, Iwan C.C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review In the acute setting of circulatory shock, physicians largely depend on clinical examination and basic laboratory values. The daily use of clinical examination for diagnostic purposes contrasts sharp with the limited number of studies. We aim to provide an overview of the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination in estimating circulatory shock reflected by an inadequate cardiac output (CO). Recent findings Recent studies showed poor correlations between CO and mottling, capillary refill time or central-to-peripheral temperature gradients in univariable analyses. The accuracy of physicians to perform an educated guess of CO based on clinical examination lies around 50% and the accuracy for recognizing a low CO is similar. Studies that used predefined clinical profiles composed of several clinical examination signs show more reliable estimations of CO with accuracies ranging from 81 up to 100%. Summary Single variables obtained by clinical examination should not be used when estimating CO. Physician's educated guesses of CO based on unstructured clinical examination are like the ‘flip of a coin’. Structured clinical examination based on combined clinical signs shows the best accuracy. Future studies should focus on using a combination of signs in an unselected population, eventually to educate physicians in estimating CO by using predefined clinical profiles. PMID:28570301

  2. Epidemiology, environmental risk factors and genetics of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delamarre, Anna; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2017-02-08

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent neurodegenerative disease with a premotor phase that lasts several years. Risk factors that have been linked to PD are tobacco, caffeine, black tea, pesticides and calcium channel blockers. Some risk factors may be due to inverse causality (e.g. changes in personality during the premotor phase). The genetics of PD are complex with a contribution of Mendelian (e.g. SNCA, LRRK2, Parkin, Pink1,…) and non-Mendelian factors (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms). Glucocerebrosidase gene mutations (Gaucher disease) are currently the strongest genetic risk factor for PD. Studying risk factors will help to better understand the pathogenesis of PD.

  3. Apolipoprotein E: Risk factor for Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.S.; Thibodeau, S.N.; Tangalos, E.G.; Petersen, R.C.; Kokmen, E.; Smith, G.E.; Schaid, D.J.; Ivnik, R.J. )

    1994-04-01

    The apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) has three common alleles (E2, E3, and E4) that determine six genotypes in the general population. In this study, the authors examined 77 patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD), along with an equal number of age- and sex-matched controls, for an association with the APOE-E4 allele. They show that the frequency of this allele among AD patients was significantly higher than that among the control population (.351 vs. .130, P = .000006). The genotype frequencies also differed between the two groups (P = .0002), with the APOE-E4/E3 genotype being the most common in the AD group and the APOE-E3/E3 being the most common in the control group. In the AD group, homozygosity for E4 was found in nine individuals, whereas none was found in the control group. The odds ratio for AD, when associated with one or two E4 alleles, was 4.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-12.3), while the odds ratio for AD, when associated with heterozygosity for APOE-E4, was 3.6 (05% CI 1.5-9.8). Finally, the median age at onset among the AD patients decreased from 83 to 78 to 74 years as the number of APOE-E4 alleles increased from 0 to 1 to 2, respectively (test for trend, P = .001). The data, which are in agreement with recent reports, suggest that the APOE-E4 allele is associated with AD and that this allelic variant may be an important risk factor for susceptibility to AD in the general population. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction with sleep apnea treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Louis, Girardin; Brown, Clinton D; Zizi, Ferdinand; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Gorga, Joseph; McFarlane, Samy I

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death among adults in developed countries. An increase in prevalent cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., obesity, hypertension and diabetes) has led to a concerted effort to raise awareness of the need to use evidence-based strategies to help patients at risk of developing cardiovascular disease and to reduce their likelihood of suffering a stroke. Sleep apnea has emerged as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic and clinical evidence has prompted the American Heart Association to issue a scientific statement describing the need to recognize sleep apnea as an important target for therapy in reducing cardiovascular disease risks. This article examines evidence supporting associations of sleep apnea with cardiovascular disease and considers evidence suggesting cardiovascular risk reductions through sleep apnea treatment. Perspectives on emerging therapeutic approaches and promising areas of clinical and experimental research are also discussed. PMID:20602560

  5. Predicting the risk of coral disease outbreak using satellite SST.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, S. F.; Willis, B. L.; Skirving, W. J.; Page, C. A.; Eakin, C. M.; Miller, I. R.; Christensen, T. R.; Gledhill, D. K.; Liu, G.; Morgan, J. A.; Parker, B. A.; Strong, A. E.

    2009-05-01

    Several environmental parameters have been linked to outbreaks of coral disease. Here we describe the influence of remotely-sensed summer and winter temperatures, as well as local observations of coral cover, to predict the risk of White Syndrome disease outbreaks on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Coral disease is an emerging risk to coral reef ecosystems that is likely to escalate with ocean warming due to climate change. The aim of this work is to provide reef managers with an expert system for predicting disease risk on coral reefs as far as six months in advance of summer outbreaks.

  6. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  7. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  8. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in College Students12

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Jennifer; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Lofgren, Ingrid E.

    2014-01-01

    More than one-half of young adults aged 18–24 y have at least 1 coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor and nearly one-quarter have advanced atherosclerotic lesions. The extent of atherosclerosis is directly correlated with the number of risk factors. Unhealthy dietary choices made by this age group contribute to weight gain and dyslipidemia. Risk factor profiles in young adulthood strongly predict long-term CHD risk. Early detection is critical to identify individuals at risk and to promote lifestyle changes before disease progression occurs. Despite the presence of risk factors and pathological changes, risk assessment and disease prevention efforts are lacking in this age group. Most young adults are not screened and are unaware of their risk. This review provides pathological evidence along with current risk factor prevalence data to demonstrate the need for early detection. Eighty percent of heart disease is preventable through diet and lifestyle, and young adults are ideal targets for prevention efforts because they are in the process of establishing lifestyle habits, which track forward into adulthood. This review aims to establish the need for increased screening, risk assessment, education, and management in young adults. These essential screening efforts should include the assessment of all CHD risk factors and lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, and smoking), blood pressure, glucose, and body mass index in addition to the traditional lipid panel for effective long-term risk reduction. PMID:24618758

  9. Coronary heart disease risk factors in college students.

    PubMed

    Arts, Jennifer; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Lofgren, Ingrid E

    2014-03-01

    More than one-half of young adults aged 18-24 y have at least 1 coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor and nearly one-quarter have advanced atherosclerotic lesions. The extent of atherosclerosis is directly correlated with the number of risk factors. Unhealthy dietary choices made by this age group contribute to weight gain and dyslipidemia. Risk factor profiles in young adulthood strongly predict long-term CHD risk. Early detection is critical to identify individuals at risk and to promote lifestyle changes before disease progression occurs. Despite the presence of risk factors and pathological changes, risk assessment and disease prevention efforts are lacking in this age group. Most young adults are not screened and are unaware of their risk. This review provides pathological evidence along with current risk factor prevalence data to demonstrate the need for early detection. Eighty percent of heart disease is preventable through diet and lifestyle, and young adults are ideal targets for prevention efforts because they are in the process of establishing lifestyle habits, which track forward into adulthood. This review aims to establish the need for increased screening, risk assessment, education, and management in young adults. These essential screening efforts should include the assessment of all CHD risk factors and lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, and smoking), blood pressure, glucose, and body mass index in addition to the traditional lipid panel for effective long-term risk reduction.

  10. Rethinking risk for pneumococcal disease in adults: the role of risk stacking.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Stephen I; Shea, Kimberly M; Weycker, Derek; Farkouh, Raymond A; Strutton, David R; Edelsberg, John

    2015-01-01

    Using data from 3 private healthcare claims repositories, we evaluated the incidence of pneumococcal disease among adults with US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) defined at-risk conditions or rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Crohn's disease, and neuromuscular disorder/seizures and those with traditional high-risk conditions. We observed that adults with ≥2 concurrent comorbid conditions had pneumococcal disease incidence rates that were as high as or higher than rates observed in those with traditional high-risk conditions.

  11. Fundus Photography as a Convenient Tool to Study Microvascular Responses to Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    De Boever, Patrick; Louwies, Tijs; Provost, Eline; Int Panis, Luc; Nawrot, Tim S.

    2014-01-01

    The microcirculation consists of blood vessels with diameters less than 150 µm. It makes up a large part of the circulatory system and plays an important role in maintaining cardiovascular health. The retina is a tissue that lines the interior of the eye and it is the only tissue that allows for a non-invasive analysis of the microvasculature. Nowadays, high-quality fundus images can be acquired using digital cameras. Retinal images can be collected in 5 min or less, even without dilatation of the pupils. This unobtrusive and fast procedure for visualizing the microcirculation is attractive to apply in epidemiological studies and to monitor cardiovascular health from early age up to old age. Systemic diseases that affect the circulation can result in progressive morphological changes in the retinal vasculature. For example, changes in the vessel calibers of retinal arteries and veins have been associated with hypertension, atherosclerosis, and increased risk of stroke and myocardial infarction. The vessel widths are derived using image analysis software and the width of the six largest arteries and veins are summarized in the Central Retinal Arteriolar Equivalent (CRAE) and the Central Retinal Venular Equivalent (CRVE). The latter features have been shown useful to study the impact of modifiable lifestyle and environmental cardiovascular disease risk factors. The procedures to acquire fundus images and the analysis steps to obtain CRAE and CRVE are described. Coefficients of variation of repeated measures of CRAE and CRVE are less than 2% and within-rater reliability is very high. Using a panel study, the rapid response of the retinal vessel calibers to short-term changes in particulate air pollution, a known risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, is reported. In conclusion, retinal imaging is proposed as a convenient and instrumental tool for epidemiological studies to study microvascular responses to cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID

  12. Glomerular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the body. Fluid can accumulate outside the circulatory system in the face, hands, feet, or ankles and cause swelling. What are the symptoms of glomerular disease? The signs and symptoms of glomerular disease include ...

  13. Divorce and risk of hospital-diagnosed infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Davidsen, Rie B; Hviid, Anders; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Although, divorce is considered to have a negative impact on morbidity, very little is known concerning exposure to divorce and risk of infectious diseases. We aimed to investigate the association between divorce and subsequent hospital contacts with infectious diseases. We performed a nation-wide cohort study, including all Danish men and women (n≈5.6 million) alive on the 1 January 1982 or later, and followed them for infectious disease diagnosed in hospital settings from 1982 to 2010. The association between divorce and risk of infectious diseases was evaluated through rate ratios (RRs) comparing incidence rates of infectious diseases between divorced and married pesons. Compared with married persons, divorced persons were overall at a 1.48 fold (RR=1.48 (95% CI: 1.47-1.50)) increased risk of hospital-diagnosed infectious diseases (RR adjusted for sex, age, period, income and education). The risk of infectious diseases was slightly more pronounced for divorced women (RR=1.54 (1.52-1.56)) than divorced men ((RR=1.42 (1.41-1.44)). The increased risk remained almost unchanged even more than 15 years after the divorce. Young age at divorce, short duration of marriage and number of divorces further increased the risk of infectious diseases, whereas number of children at time of divorce had no impact on risk of hospital-diagnosed infectious diseases following the divorce. Divorce appears to have a moderate but long lasting impact on the risk of infectious diseases the underlying mechanism is unknown but shared risk factors predicting divorce and infectious diseases could contribute to our findings. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  14. RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS A RISK FACTOR FOR CIRCULATORY MORTALITY ASSOCIATIONS WITH AIR POLLUTION IN NYC. (R825271,R827351,R827351C001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Risks for Ross River virus disease in tropical Australia.

    PubMed

    Harley, David; Ritchie, Scott; Bain, Chris; Sleigh, Adrian C

    2005-06-01

    There are no analytical studies of individual risks for Ross River virus (RRV) disease. Therefore, we set out to determine individual risk and protective factors for RRV disease in a high incidence area and to assess the utility of the case-control design applied for this purpose to an arbovirus disease. We used a prospective matched case-control study of new community cases of RRV disease in the local government areas of Cairns, Mareeba, Douglas, and Atherton, in tropical Queensland, from January 1 to May 31, 1998. Protective measures against mosquitoes reduced the risk for disease. Mosquito coils, repellents, and citronella candles each decreased risk by at least 2-fold, with a dose-response for the number of protective measures used. Light-coloured clothing decreased risk 3-fold. Camping increased the risk 8-fold. These risks were substantial and statistically significant, and provide a basis for educational programs on individual protection against RRV disease in Australia. Our study demonstrates the utility of the case-control method for investigating arbovirus risks. Such a risk analysis has not been done before for RRV infection, and is infrequently reported for other arbovirus infections.

  16. Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and risks for cardiovascular diseases and blood diseases.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Yasmin D; Montgomery, Scott M; Ekbom, Anders; Nilsson, Olof S; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2010-06-01

    We hypothesized that patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) might have higher risks of cardiovascular and blood diseases. A total of 3141 patients, 2 to 15 years of age, with LCPD diagnosed between 1965 and 2005 were identified with the Swedish Inpatient Register. A total of 15 595 individuals without LCPD were selected randomly from among the Swedish general population, with matching according to year of birth, age, gender, and region of residence. Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses, with adjustment for socioeconomic index, were used to estimate relative risks. The patients also were compared with their same-gender siblings. Patients with LCPD had a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39-2.09) for cardiovascular diseases, compared with individuals without LCPD. The point estimate was slightly higher among subjects >30 years of age at the follow-up (HR: 2.10 [95% CI: 1.52-2.91]). There were statistically significantly higher risks for blood diseases, including anemias and coagulation defects (HR: 1.41 [95% CI: 1.07-1.86]), which were more pronounced among subjects >30 years of age at the follow-up (HR: 2.70 [95% CI: 1.50-4.84]). Patients also had statistically significantly higher risks of hypertensive disease (HR: 2.97 [95% CI: 1.87-4.72]) and nutritional anemia (HR: 2.92 [95% CI: 1.58-5.40]). Analyses using siblings as the comparison group showed consistent results for cardiovascular diseases. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that an insufficient blood supply to the femoral head, attributable to vascular pathologic conditions, is involved in the pathogenesis of LCPD.

  17. Hypersensitivity to ticks and Lyme disease risk.

    PubMed

    Burke, Georgine; Wikel, Stephen K; Spielman, Andrew; Telford, Sam R; McKay, Kathleen; Krause, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    Although residents of Lyme disease-endemic regions describe frequent exposure to ticks, Lyme disease develops in relatively few. To determine whether people who experience cutaneous hypersensitivity against tick bite have fewer episodes of Lyme disease than those who do not, we examined several factors that might restrict the incidence of Lyme disease among residents of Block Island, Rhode Island. Of 1,498 study participants, 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 23%-31%) reported > or = 1 tick bites, and 17% (95% CI 13%-21%) reported itch associated with tick bite in the previous year. Borrelia burgdorferi infected 23% (95% CI 20%-26%) of 135 nymphal Ixodes scapularis (I. dammini) ticks. The likelihood of Lyme disease infection decreased with >3 reports of tick-associated itch (odds ratio 0.14, 95% CI 0.94-0.03, p = 0.01). Prior exposure to uninfected vector ticks protects residents of disease-endemic sites from Lyme disease.

  18. Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Xiaoyi; Ramanathan, Murali; Zhang, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    With the booming of healthcare industry and the overwhelming amount of electronic health records (EHRs) shared by healthcare institutions and practitioners, we take advantage of EHR data to develop an effective disease risk management model that not only models the progression of the disease, but also predicts the risk of the disease for early disease control or prevention. Existing models for answering these questions usually fall into two categories: the expert knowledge based model or the handcrafted feature set based model. To fully utilize the whole EHR data, we will build a framework to construct an integrated representation of features from all available risk factors in the EHR data and use these integrated features to effectively predict osteoporosis and bone fractures. We will also develop a framework for informative risk factor selection of bone diseases. A pair of models for two contrast cohorts (e.g., diseased patients versus non-diseased patients) will be established to discriminate their characteristics and find the most informative risk factors. Several empirical results on a real bone disease data set show that the proposed framework can successfully predict bone diseases and select informative risk factors that are beneficial and useful to guide clinical decisions.

  19. Heart disease and its related risk factors in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Uppaluri, Chitra R

    2002-01-01

    Although Asian Indians represent the second fastest growing Asian immigrant group in the United States, we know little about their increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). A key word search of Medline (using key words Asian Indian, South Asian Indian, coronary artery disease, and heart disease), from 1980-2001, was used to develop a database of articles relating to coronary artery disease for Asian Indians in the United States and abroad. We describe the prevalence and other data of CAD in Asian-Indian communities abroad and in the United States. We then outline certain risk factors for coronary artery disease, specifically diet, cholesterol, and Type 2 diabetes, which contribute to the increased risk of heart disease in Asian Indians. Finally, we describe an approach to screening and potential prevention of coronary artery disease in those of Asian-indian descent in this country.

  20. SPATIAL DYNAMICS OF LAND COVER AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate changes may allow for vector-transmitted tropical diseases to spread into temperate areas. Areas of low ecological diversity are at higher risk of infectious disease transmission due to decreased zooprophylaxis, the diversion of disease carrying insects from humans to
    ...

  1. SPATIAL DYNAMICS OF LAND COVER AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate changes may allow for vector-transmitted tropical diseases to spread into temperate areas. Areas of low ecological diversity are at higher risk of infectious disease transmission due to decreased zooprophylaxis, the diversion of disease carrying insects from humans to
    ...

  2. Hypersensitivity to Ticks and Lyme Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Georgine; Wikel, Stephen K.; Spielman, Andrew; Telford, Sam R.; McKay, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Although residents of Lyme disease–endemic regions describe frequent exposure to ticks, Lyme disease develops in relatively few. To determine whether people who experience cutaneous hypersensitivity against tick bite have fewer episodes of Lyme disease than those who do not, we examined several factors that might restrict the incidence of Lyme disease among residents of Block Island, Rhode Island. Of 1,498 study participants, 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 23%–31%) reported >1 tick bites, and 17% (95% CI 13%–21%) reported itch associated with tick bite in the previous year. Borrelia burgdorferi infected 23% (95% CI 20%–26%) of 135 nymphal Ixodes scapularis (I. dammini) ticks. The likelihood of Lyme disease infection decreased with >3 reports of tick-associated itch (odds ratio 0.14, 95% CI 0.94–0.03, p = 0.01). Prior exposure to uninfected vector ticks protects residents of disease-endemic sites from Lyme disease. PMID:15705320

  3. Prescribe by risk: the utility of a biomarker-based risk calculation in disease management to prevent heart disease.

    PubMed

    Root, Martin; Smith, Timothy

    2005-04-01

    Preventive treatment for those most at risk of heart disease rather than those with the highest blood pressure or cholesterol values may be a more efficacious strategy for disease management. This depends on accurate biomarker-based risk assessment tools. An evidence-based model of heart disease risk was developed using the Framingham model with an additional five risk factors, including three of the newer blood biomarkers. This was applied to the adult population of the 3rd National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey cohort. Additionally, the selection criteria for therapeutic intervention from the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines (for hyperlipidemia) and the 7th Report of the Joint National Committee (for hypertension) were applied to the same subjects. Of this cohort 54% qualified for at least one of these medications while 18% qualified for both. Using this 18% cutoff, the 18% of the subjects with the highest calculated heart disease risk were also identified using the developed risk model. We applied established therapeutic reductions in heart disease probability to those identified by guidelines and to those identified by risk. Applying both drugs to the high-risk group (one third the size of the guidelines group) achieved the same reduction in population risk (about one fourth) as applying the drugs to the guideline groups and required only half as many prescriptions. Intermediate results were found when an intervention group was identified by a combination of both high risk and high levels of risk factors. In this simulation, identifying patients by heart disease risk level resulted in substantially fewer people being treated with fewer drugs and achieving a similar reduction in disease risk.

  4. Psychosocial Risk Factors Related to Ischemic Heart Disease in Women.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Tina; Hayek, Salim S; Shekiladze, Nikoloz; Schultz, William M; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-01-01

    Psychosocial risk factors such as stress and psychiatric disorders are known to have negative impacts on health outcomes, but their effects on ischemic heart disease, particularly in women, remain to be fully understood despite contributing to one-third of the population attributable risk in acute myocardial infarction. The impact of stress, social isolation, low socioeconomic status, hostility and anger, and stress-related psychiatric disorders on cardiovascular outcomes and the potential mechanisms that underlie their association with ischemic heart disease, with a focus on women, is evaluated. Online search of relevant terms, including the aforementioned risk factors, women, and ischemic heart disease, was utilized to find recent and pertinent trials. Psychosocial risk factors increase cardiovascular risk in both women and men. However, current literature points to a greater degree of adverse cardiovascular events in women who experience these risk factors than in men, but the literature is not as well-defined as the data regarding traditional risk factors and cardiovascular disease. Dedicated study of the sex differences in ischemic heart disease incidence and recurrence, including the impact of psychosocial risk factors, is warranted for the development of appropriate gender-specific diagnostic testing and treatment options in heart disease.

  5. Some risk factors for the progression of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Skaleric, U; Kovac-Kavcic, M

    2000-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is one of the most common diseases of mankind. Gingival inflammation is widespread, but advanced periodontitis is limited to relatively small subgroups of the population. Gingivitis is initiated by microbial plaque deposits on the dento-gingival interface but progression to periodontitis is modified by several environmental, behavioural, biological and health care variables. This paper reviews the reports dealing with some risk factors for periodontal disease published in recent years and compares the data with findings in a Ljubljana population. It is concluded that male smokers with lower education and low frequency of tooth brushing represent a risk population for progression of periodontal disease. Marital status and body mass need further study to be proved as risk factors for periodontitis. A socioecological model proposed by Hansen et al. (1993) should be used for understanding the interplay of different risk factors for progression of periodontal disease.

  6. Risk of coronary artery involvement in Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Ramos, María; Martínez-Del Val, Elena; Negreira Cepeda, Sagrario; González-Tomé, María I; Cedena Romero, Pilar; Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Albert de la Torre, Leticia; Blázquez-Gamero, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Kawasaki disease refers to systemic vasculitis with risk of coronary artery disease. Our objective is to identify risk factors associated with coronary artery disease in patients with complete and incomplete Kawasaki disease. Descriptive, retrospective study conducted in patients diagnosed with Kawasaki disease in a tertiary-care hospital between 2008 and 2014. The American Heart Association diagnostic criteria were used to define complete and incomplete Kawasaki disease. Thirty-one children were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease; 24 met the criteria for the complete form, and 7, for the incomplete form of this condition. Five had coronary artery disease. One of them had incomplete Kawasaki disease (1/7= 14.3%), and the remaining four had the complete form (4/24= 16.7%). No significant differences were found between both groups (p= 1.0). Patients with coronary artery involvement had a higher C-reactive protein level (median: 16.2 mg/dL versus 8.4 mg/dL, p= 0.047) and lower albuminemia (median: 3.2 mg/dL versus 3.99 mg/dL, p= 0.002). The risk of coronary artery involvement in incomplete Kawasaki disease is similar to that in complete Kawasaki disease; therefore, in patients with the incomplete form, immunoglobulin therapy should not be delayed. In our population, C-reactive protein and albumin levels were related to a higher risk of coronary artery involvement. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  7. Moist smokeless tobacco (Snus) use and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ye, Weimin; Liu, Zhiwei; Norberg, Margareta; Forsgren, Lars; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Bellocco, Rino; Alfredsson, Lars; Knutsson, Anders; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Wennberg, Patrik; Galanti, Maria Rosaria; Lager, Anton C J; Araghi, Marzieh; Lundberg, Michael; Magnusson, Cecilia; Wirdefeldt, Karin

    2016-12-10

    Cigarette smoking is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. It is unclear what constituent of tobacco smoke may lower the risk. Use of Swedish moist smokeless tobacco (snus) can serve as a model to disentangle what constituent of tobacco smoke may lower the risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether snus use was associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. Individual participant data were collected from seven prospective cohort studies, including 348 601 men. We used survival analysis with multivariable Cox regression to estimate study-specific relative risk of Parkinson's disease due to snus use, and random-effects models to pool estimates in a meta-analysis. The primary analyses were restricted to never-smokers to eliminate the potential confounding effect of tobacco smoking. During a mean follow-up time of 16.1 years, 1199 incident Parkinson's disease cases were identified. Among men who never smoked, ever-snus users had about 60% lower Parkinson's disease risk compared with never-snus users [pooled hazard ratio (HR) 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28-0.61]. The inverse association between snus use and Parkinson's disease risk was more pronounced in current (pooled HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.23-0.63), moderate-heavy amount (pooled HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19-0.90) and long-term snus users (pooled HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.24-0.83). Non-smoking men who used snus had a substantially lower risk of Parkinson's disease. Results also indicated an inverse dose-response relationship between snus use and Parkinson's disease risk. Our findings suggest that nicotine or other components of tobacco leaves may influence the development of Parkinson's disease. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  8. Options for temporary mechanical circulatory support

    PubMed Central

    Saffarzadeh, Areo

    2015-01-01

    Temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) refers to a group of devices generally used for less than 30 days to maintain adequate organ perfusion by compensating for a failure of the pumping mechanism of the heart. The increased availability and rapid adoption of new temporary MCS strategies necessitate physicians to become familiar with devices placed both percutaneously and via median sternotomy. This review will examine the different options for commonly used temporary MCS devices including intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs), veno-arterial-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO), TandemHeart® (CardiacAssist, Pittsburg, PA, USA) Impella® and BVS 5000® (both Abiomed Inc., Danvers, MA, USA), CentriMag® and Thoratec percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD)® (both Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA). A specific emphasis will be made to describe relevant mechanisms of action, standard placement strategies, hemodynamic effects, relevant contraindications and complications, and important daily management considerations. PMID:26793330

  9. SURVEYING THE RISKS FROM EMERGING DISEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite advances in sanitation and public health, new waterborne diseases have continued to cause outbreaks in humans. The reason why these organisms can cause disease outbreaks, is that their biology allows them to circumvent the safeguards put in place to prevent transmission ...

  10. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a ...

  11. Risk and Surveillance of Cancers in Primary Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hrad, Valery; Abebe, Yoftahe; Ali, Syed Haris; Velgersdyk, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary diseases have been associated in several studies with various malignancies. Understanding the risk and optimizing surveillance strategy of these malignancies in this specific subset of patients are an important facet of clinical care. For instance, primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk for cholangiocarcinoma (which is very challenging to diagnose) and when IBD is present for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, primary biliary cirrhosis patients with cirrhosis or not responding to 12 months of ursodeoxycholic acid therapy are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review we will discuss in detail the risks and optimal surveillance strategies for patients with primary biliary diseases. PMID:27413366

  12. Framingham Risk Score underestimates cardiovascular disease risk in severe psoriatic patients: implications in cardiovascular risk factors management and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Tiago; Sales, Rita; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Martins da Silva, Berta; Selores, Manuela

    2013-11-01

    Severe psoriasis has been associated with increase cardiovascular mortality, due to a higher prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and premature atherosclerosis, as a consequence of its systemic inflammation. Recently, it has been estimated that severe psoriasis may confer an increased 6.2% on long-term risk of cardiovascular disease based on Framingham Risk Score, which can have practical implications in the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, as treatment guidelines account for the risk of cardiovascular disease in treatment goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the attributable risk of severe psoriasis on long-term risk of cardiovascular disease and its implication on the correct treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease on a real-world cohort of patients. One hundred severe psoriasis patients without psoriatic arthritis or previous cardiovascular disease were evaluated and it was found that more than half of the patients were reclassified to a higher cardiovascular risk category with important clinical implications on the correct management of their cardiovascular risk factors and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, as a considerable proportion of patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and coronary heart disease equivalent risk were not being correctly managed.

  13. Adhesion Molecules: Master Controllers of the Circulatory System.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric P; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Lee, Warren L; Downey, Gregory P

    2016-03-15

    This manuscript will review our current understanding of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) relevant to the circulatory system, their physiological role in control of vascular homeostasis, innate and adaptive immune responses, and their importance in pathophysiological (disease) processes such as acute lung injury, atherosclerosis, and pulmonary hypertension. This is a complex and rapidly changing area of research that is incompletely understood. By design, we will begin with a brief overview of the structure and classification of the major groups of adhesion molecules and their physiological functions including cellular adhesion and signaling. The role of specific CAMs in the process of platelet aggregation and hemostasis and leukocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration will be reviewed as examples of the complex and cooperative interplay between CAMs during physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of the endothelial glycocalyx and the glycobiology of this complex system related to inflammatory states such as sepsis will be reviewed. We will then focus on the role of adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of specific disease processes involving the lungs and cardiovascular system. The potential of targeting adhesion molecules in the treatment of immune and inflammatory diseases will be highlighted in the relevant sections throughout the manuscript.

  14. Vegetarian diet as a risk factor for symptomatic gallstone disease.

    PubMed

    McConnell, T J; Appleby, P N; Key, T J

    2017-06-01

    Previous small studies have shown either no difference or a lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in vegetarians than in non-vegetarians. This study examined the incidence of symptomatic gallstone disease in a cohort of British vegetarians and non-vegetarians, and investigated the associations between nutrient intake and risk of symptomatic gallstone disease. The data were analysed from 49 652 adults enroled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Oxford study, one-third of whom were vegetarian. The linked databases of hospital records were used to identify incident cases. Risk by diet group was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Further analysis quantified risk by intakes of selected macronutrients. There were 1182 cases of symptomatic gallstone disease during 687 822 person-years of follow-up (mean=13.85 years). There was a large significant association between increasing body mass index (BMI) and risk of developing symptomatic gallstone disease (overall trend P<0.001). After adjustment for BMI and other risk factors, vegetarians had a moderately increased risk compared with non-vegetarians (HR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.06-1.41; P=0.006). Although starch consumption was positively associated with gallstones risk (P=0.002 for trend), it did not explain the increased risk in vegetarians. There is a highly significant association of increased BMI with risk of symptomatic gallstone disease. After adjusting for BMI, there is a small but statistically significant positive association between vegetarian diet and symptomatic gallstone disease.

  15. Prion diseases: risks, characteristics, and infection control considerations in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bali, Zarina; Bali, Rishi K; Nagrath, Saurabh

    2011-11-01

    Prion diseases are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that are rapidly progressive and fatal, with no definite cure. There are no reported cases of prion disease transmission arising from dental procedures. Nevertheless, there is a theoretical but real risk of transmission of prion disease from dental instruments. A review was made of studies up to 2008 to provide an update of the characteristics, risk of transmission, and the infection-control implications of prions in the field of dentistry. As the prions are resistant to conventional sterilization methods, highly-specific, cross-infection control measures are required when managing patients infected with these.

  16. First Annual IMACS Report: A global International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry for Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K; Cantor, Ryan; Mohacsi, Paul; Gummert, Jan; De By, Theo; Hannan, Margaret M; Kormos, Robert L; Schueler, Stephan; Lund, Lars H; Nakatani, Takeshi; Taylor, Rhiannon; Lannon, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    The first annual report of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (IMACS) registry provides global data on 5,942 patients from 31 countries. This initial report focuses on patient demographics, survival, device types, adverse events, competing outcomes, and a risk factor analysis.

  17. Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Teens at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascola, Laurene

    1987-01-01

    Parents of preteens need to be aware of the rapidly increasing incidence of sexually transmitted diseases among teenagers and to begin talking to their preteens to help prevent or modify risky sexual experimentation during middle adolescence. (MT)

  18. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... that existing CHD will worsen. CHD, also called coronary artery disease, is a condition in which a waxy substance ...

  19. Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Teens at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascola, Laurene

    1987-01-01

    Parents of preteens need to be aware of the rapidly increasing incidence of sexually transmitted diseases among teenagers and to begin talking to their preteens to help prevent or modify risky sexual experimentation during middle adolescence. (MT)

  20. Predictive Validity of a Screening Instrument for the Risk of Non-Return to Work in Patients With Internal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Streibelt, Marco; Bethge, Matthias; Gross, Thomas; Herrmann, Klaus; Ustaoglu, Ferman; Reichel, Christoph

    2017-05-01

    To test the predictive validity of the SIMBO (Screening-Instrument zur Feststellung des Bedarfs an medizinisch-beruflich orientierten Maßnahmen in der medizinischen Rehabilitation [Screening Instrument for the Access to Work-Related Multimodal Rehabilitation]; total score ranges from 0 to 100 points) in patients with internal diseases in a rehabilitation setting. Prospective multicenter study. Inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients (N=1366) aged 18 to 65 years with internal diseases. Multimodal rehabilitation programs. The primary outcome was occurrence of a critical return-to-work (RTW) event during the follow-up period. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were calculated for each disease group using the cutoff score of 27 points. A total of 1366 patients with neoplasms (n=203); endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases (n=355); and diseases of the circulatory (n=470), respiratory (n=255), and digestive (n=83) systems were included. Between 9.9% and 40.6% of the patients reported critical RTW events during the 3-month follow-up period. The area under the curve was between .849 (.754-.923) and .903 (.846-.959). Sensitivity and specificity ranged from 65.6% to 92.9% and from 80.4% to 89.9%, respectively. The positive predictive values were between 40.4% and 77.8%. The risk score SIMBO predicts short-term RTW problems after rehabilitation in patients with internal diseases. The cutoff of 27 points was confirmed as a reasonable threshold. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Overweight and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease Overweight and Obesity A healthy weight is important for a long, vigorous life. Yet overweight and obesity (extreme overweight) have reached epidemic levels in the ...

  2. A new explained-variance based genetic risk score for predictive modeling of disease risk.

    PubMed

    Che, Ronglin; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A

    2012-09-25

    The goal of association mapping is to identify genetic variants that predict disease, and as the field of human genetics matures, the number of successful association studies is increasing. Many such studies have shown that for many diseases, risk is explained by a reasonably large number of variants that each explains a very small amount of disease risk. This is prompting the use of genetic risk scores in building predictive models, where information across several variants is combined for predictive modeling. In the current study, we compare the performance of four previously proposed genetic risk score methods and present a new method for constructing genetic risk score that incorporates explained variance information. The methods compared include: a simple count Genetic Risk Score, an odds ratio weighted Genetic Risk Score, a direct logistic regression Genetic Risk Score, a polygenic Genetic Risk Score, and the new explained variance weighted Genetic Risk Score. We compare the methods using a wide range of simulations in two steps, with a range of the number of deleterious single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) explaining disease risk, genetic modes, baseline penetrances, sample sizes, relative risks (RR) and minor allele frequencies (MAF). Several measures of model performance were compared including overall power, C-statistic and Akaike's Information Criterion. Our results show the relative performance of methods differs significantly, with the new explained variance weighted GRS (EV-GRS) generally performing favorably to the other methods.

  3. Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease: a Risk Factor or a Risk Marker?

    PubMed

    Mandviwala, Taher; Khalid, Umair; Deswal, Anita

    2016-05-01

    In the USA, 69 % of adults are either overweight or obese and 35 % are obese. Obesity is associated with an increased incidence of various cardiovascular disorders. Obesity is a risk marker for cardiovascular disease, in that it is associated with a much higher prevalence of comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome, which then increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, in addition, obesity may also be an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, although obesity has been shown to be an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases, it is often associated with improved survival once the diagnosis of the cardiovascular disease has been made, leading to the term "obesity paradox." Several pathways linking obesity and cardiovascular disease have been described. In this review, we attempt to summarize the complex relationship between obesity and cardiovascular disorders, in particular coronary atherosclerosis, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation.

  4. Heart Transplant and Mechanical Circulatory Support in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Enrique, Cristina; Jorde, Ulrich P; González-Costello, José

    2017-02-07

    Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis and heart transplant is still the best treatment option. However, the scarcity of donors, long waiting times, and an increasing number of unstable patients have favored the development of mechanical circulatory support. This review summarizes the indications for heart transplant, candidate evaluation, current immunosuppression strategies, the evaluation and treatment of rejection, infectious prophylaxis, and short and long-term outcomes. Regarding mechanical circulatory support, we distinguish between short- and long-term support and the distinct strategies that can be used: bridge to decision, recovery, candidacy, transplant, and destination therapy. We then discuss indications, risk assessment, management of complications, especially with long-term support, and outcomes. Finally, we discuss future challenges and how the widespread use of long-term support for patients with advanced heart failure will only be viable if their complications and costs are reduced.

  5. Determining and mitigating risks of disease introduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosecurity can be defined as a system of processes (i.e., inputs, movements and other activities), each with a set of procedures, that taken together minimize the risk of introduction and spread of infectious organisms within or between aquatic animal populations. Biosecurity measures at the site l...

  6. Risk factors for lyme disease in Chester County, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G.; Wileyto, E. P.; Hopkins, R. B.; Cherry, B. R.; Maher, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with increased or decreased risk of infection for Lyme disease in Chester County, Pennyslvania. METHODS: The authors designed an unmatched case-control study involving 294 incident cases reported to the Chester County Health Department in 1998 and 449 controls selected by random digit dialing. All case and control participants were interviewed by telephone. RESULTS: Age is a risk factor for Lyme disease for groups aged 10-19 years old and 50 years or older. Sex was not a risk factor. Incidence of Lyme disease in a rural setting was three times the incidence in an urban setting. Increased risk also was associated with living in single family homes, homes with yards or attached land, woods on the land, signs of tick hosts seen on the land, and homes within 100 feet of woodland. Gardening for more than four hours per week was also a risk factor, but most other outdoor activities were not. Twice as many participants took protective measures against tick bites before outdoor employment than those who merely ventured into the yard or land associated with the home. Only checking for ticks during outdoor activity and the use of repellents prior to outdoor activities outside the yard were unequivocally associated with a reduced risk of Lyme disease. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to increase public awareness about the risk of acquiring Lyme disease from ticks in the immediate environment of the home. PMID:11889282

  7. Consumption of dairy products and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Honglei; O'Reilly, Eilis; McCullough, Marjorie L; Rodriguez, Carmen; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Calle, Eugenia E; Thun, Michael J; Ascherio, Alberto

    2007-05-01

    The authors prospectively investigated the association between intake of dairy products and risk of Parkinson's disease among 57,689 men and 73,175 women from the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. A total of 250 men and 138 women with Parkinson's disease were identified during follow-up (1992-2001). Dairy product consumption was positively associated with risk of Parkinson's disease: Compared with the lowest intake quintile, the corresponding relative risks for quintiles 2-5 were 1.4, 1.4, 1.4, and 1.6 (95 percent confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 2.2; p for trend = 0.05). A higher risk among dairy product consumers was found in both men and women, although the association in women appeared nonlinear. Meta-analysis of all prospective studies confirmed a moderately elevated risk of Parkinson's disease among persons with high dairy product consumption: For extreme intake categories, relative risks were 1.6 (95 percent CI: 1.3, 2.0) for both sexes, 1.8 for men (95 percent CI: 1.4, 2.4), and 1.3 for women (95 percent CI: 0.8, 2.1). These data suggest that dairy consumption may increase the risk of Parkinson's disease, particularly in men. More studies are needed to further examine these findings and to explore underlying mechanisms.

  8. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Flicker, Leon

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that some lifestyle factors are linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Many of these are potentially modifiable and include smoking, physical activity, education, social engagement, cognitive stimulation, and diet. Modification of most of these factors has other health advantages, increasing the potential benefits of modifying the individual's lifestyle. Unfortunately, most of the current evidence is based on observational data, and where human trials have been performed they have used surrogate outcomes rather than the development of Alzheimer's disease. For many of these modifiable lifestyle factors, such trials may never be performed, and an individual's choice may need to be based on the available evidence.

  9. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Emerging Adults in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abshire, Demetrius Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among emerging adults in college aged 18-25 years. CVD risks that develop during this period often persist into adulthood making it an ideal time to target CVD prevention. The specific aims of this dissertation were to 1) explore perceptions…

  10. Contagious Diseases in Competitive Sport: What Are the Risks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses fungal, bacterial, and viral infections that may strike athletes during competition, highlighting possible risks of hepatitis, herpes, and HIV. Athletes generally are more at risk off the playing field than while competing. Requiring immunizations against measles and hepatitis B prior to college admission would eliminate two diseases.…

  11. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Emerging Adults in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abshire, Demetrius Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among emerging adults in college aged 18-25 years. CVD risks that develop during this period often persist into adulthood making it an ideal time to target CVD prevention. The specific aims of this dissertation were to 1) explore perceptions…

  12. Contagious Diseases in Competitive Sport: What Are the Risks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses fungal, bacterial, and viral infections that may strike athletes during competition, highlighting possible risks of hepatitis, herpes, and HIV. Athletes generally are more at risk off the playing field than while competing. Requiring immunizations against measles and hepatitis B prior to college admission would eliminate two diseases.…

  13. Differential risk for Lyme disease along hiking trail, Germany.

    PubMed

    Richter, Dania; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer

    2011-09-01

    To estimate relative risk for exposure to ticks infected with Lyme disease-causing spirochetes in different land-use types along a trail in Germany, we compared tick density and spirochete prevalence on ruminant pasture with that on meadow and fallow land. Risk was significantly lower on pasture than on meadow and fallow land.

  14. Risk based management of invading plant disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effective control of new and emerging plant disease remains a key challenge. Attempts to eradicate pathogens often involve removal of all plants within a fixed distance of detected infected hosts, targeting asymptomatic infection. Here we develop and test potentially more efficient, epidemiologicall...

  15. Celiac disease: risk assessment, diagnosis, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Setty, Mala; Hormaza, Leonardo; Guandalini, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible individuals, triggered by gluten and related prolamins. Well identified haplotypes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region (either DQ2 [DQA*0501-DQB*0201] or DQ8 [DQA*0301-DQB1*0302]) confer a large part of the genetic susceptibility to celiac disease.Celiac disease originates as a result of a combined action involving both adaptive and innate immunity. The adaptive immune response to gluten has been well described, with the identification of specific peptide sequences demonstrating HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 restrictive binding motifs across various gluten proteins. As for innate immunity, through specific natural killer receptors expressed on their surface, intra-epithelial lymphocytes recognize nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules such as MICA, which are induced on the surface of enterocytes by stress and inflammation, and this interaction leads to their activation to become lymphokine-activated killing cells. Four possible presentations of celiac disease are recognized: (i) typical, characterized mostly by gastrointestinal signs and symptoms; (ii) atypical or extraintestinal, where gastrointestinal signs/symptoms are minimal or absent and a number of other manifestations are present; (iii) silent, where the small intestinal mucosa is damaged and celiac disease autoimmunity can be detected by serology, but there are no symptoms; and, finally, (iv) latent, where individuals possess genetic compatibility with celiac disease and may also show positive autoimmune serology, that have a normal mucosa morphology and may or may not be symptomatic.The diagnosis of celiac disease still rests on the demonstration of changes in the histology of the small intestinal mucosa. The classic celiac lesion occurs in the proximal small intestine with histologic changes of villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and increased intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Currently, serological

  16. Postcardiotomy ECMO Support after High-risk Operations in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Acheampong, Benjamin; Johnson, Jonathan N; Stulak, John M; Dearani, Joseph A; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Daly, Richard C; Haile, Dawit T; Schears, Gregory J

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac operations in high-risk adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients may require mechanical circulatory support (MCS), such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or intraaortic balloon pump (IABP), to allow the cardiopulmonary system to recover. We reviewed records for all ACHD patients who required MCS following cardiotomy at our institution from 1/2001 to 12/2013. During the study period, 2264 (mean age 39.1 years, females ∼54.1%) operations were performed in ACHD patients of whom 24 (1.1%) required postoperative MCS (14 males; median age 41 years, range 22-75). Preoperatively the 24 patients had a mean systemic ventricular ejection fraction of 47% (range 10-66%); 72% of these patients were in NYHA class III/IV heart failure. The common underlying diagnoses included pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum (20%), tetralogy of Fallot (16%), Ebstein anomaly (12%), cc-TGA (12%), septal defects (12%), and others (28%). Operations performed were valvular operations with/without maze (58.2%), Fontan conversion (21%), coronary bypass grafting with valvular operations (12.5%), and heart transplant (8.3%). Indications for MCS were left-sided (systemic) heart failure (32%), right-sided (subpulmonary) heart failure (24%), biventricular heart failure (36%), persistent arrhythmia (4%), and hypoxemia (4%). Forty-two percent were placed on ECMO only; in the second group, IABP was attempted and subsequently followed by ECMO initiation. The mean duration of MCS was 8.4 days (range 0.8-35.4). Common morbidities included coagulopathy (60%), renal failure (56%), and arrhythmia (48%). Overall, 46% of patients survived to hospital discharge. Deaths were due to either multi organ failure or the underlying cardiac disease; sepsis was the primary cause of death in one patient. Median follow-up for survivors was 41 months (maximum 106 months). NYHA functional class was I/II in all 8 late survivors. Following complex operations in high-risk ACHD patients, MCS

  17. The role of brain gaseous transmitters in the regulation of the circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Ufnal, Marcin; Sikora, Mariusz

    2011-09-01

    A number of neurotransmitters, including biologically active gases namely, nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon monoxide (CO) have been postulated to play an important role in the control of the cardiovascular system by the brain. The attention of researchers has been focused on NO in particular. It has been shown that pharmacological manipulation of NO concentration in the brain produces significant changes in circulatory parameters. Furthermore, significant alterations in the brain NO system have been found in animal models of human cardiovascular diseases. These findings imply that NO in the brain may become a promising target for new treatment strategies. Although H2S and CO have also been proved to serve as transmitters in the central nervous system, their role in the neurogenic regulation of the cardiovascular system remains more obscure. Interestingly, increased synthesis of NO, H2S and CO is found in inflammation and it appears that the gases mediate some of the circulatory responses to inflammatory stimuli. In this review we discuss the role of brain gaseous transmitters in the control of the circulatory system in health and disease.

  18. Infectious disease risk and international tourism demand.

    PubMed

    Rosselló, Jaume; Santana-Gallego, Maria; Awan, Waqas

    2017-05-01

     For some countries, favourable climatic conditions for tourism are often associated with favourable conditions for infectious diseases, with the ensuing development constraints on the tourist sectors of impoverished countries where tourism's economic contribution has a high potential. This paper evaluates the economic implications of eradication of Malaria, Dengue, Yellow Fever and Ebola on the affected destination countries focusing on the tourist expenditures.  A gravity model for international tourism flows is used to provide an estimation of the impact of each travel-related disease on international tourist arrivals. Next the potential eradication of these diseases in the affected countries is simulated and the impact on tourism expenditures is estimated.  The results show that, in the case of Malaria, Dengue, Yellow Fever and Ebola, the eradication of these diseases in the affected countries would result in an increase of around 10 million of tourist worldwide and a rise in the tourism expenditure of 12 billion dollars.  By analysing the economic benefits of the eradication of Dengue, Ebola, Malaria, and Yellow Fever for the tourist sector-a strategic economic sector for many of the countries where these TRD are present-this paper explores a new aspect of the quantification of health policies which should be taken into consideration in future international health assessment programmes. It is important to note that the analysis is only made of the direct impact of the diseases' eradication and consequently the potential multiplicative effects of a growth in the GDP, in terms of tourism attractiveness, are not evaluated. Consequently, the economic results can be considered to be skeleton ones.

  19. Diabetes mellitus is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jonathan D; Rockman, Caron B; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Guo, Yu; Zhong, Hua; Weintraub, Howard S; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z; Adelman, Mark A; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is associated with significantly increased risk of peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes is classified as a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent, but it is unknown whether diabetes is a CHD risk equivalent for peripheral vascular disease. The objective was to evaluate the odds of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or carotid artery stenosis (CAS) among participants with diabetes, CHD, or both, compared with participants without diabetes or CHD, in a nationwide vascular screening database. We hypothesized that diabetes and CHD would confer similar odds of PAD and CAS.

  20. Association between periodontal disease, bacterial vaginosis, and sexual risk behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Zabor, Emily Craig; Klebanoff, Mark; Yu, Kai; Zhang, Jun; Nansel, Tonja; Andrews, William; Schwebke, Jane; Jeffcoat, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    Background Both periodontal disease and bacterial vaginosis may cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study evaluated the association between periodontal disease and bacterial vaginosis. Methods Data from 3569 women enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Vaginal Flora was used. Periodontal disease, defined as >3 sites with ≥4mm attachment loss, was assessed by specially-calibrated hygienists at baseline. Positive bacterial vaginosis status was based on a Nugent Gram stain score ≥7. Pairs of independent variables were compared with Pearson's chi-square and risk ratios were calculated through log-binomial regression. Results 28% of women with bacterial vaginosis had periodontal disease compared to 22% without, corresponding to 1.29 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.47) times greater risk of periodontal disease among women with bacterial vaginosis. In adjusted analysis the risk ratio dropped to 1.23 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.40). Receptive oral sex with an uncircumcised partner was associated with 1.28 times (95% CI: 0.97, 1.69) the risk for periodontal disease compared to receptive oral sex with a circumcised partner, though the association is not statistically significant. Conclusions In this population, there is a small but significant association between periodontal disease and bacterial vaginosis and a possible trend between receptive oral sex with an uncircumcised partner and periodontal disease. PMID:20636412

  1. Risk factors for erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Rakesh Kumar; Shamsi, Bilal Haider; Chen, Hui-Ming; Tan, Tan; Tang, Kai-Fa; Xing, Jun-Ping

    2016-06-01

    To examine the relationship between risk factors for cardiac disease and erectile dysfunction (ED) in men from Xi'an, China. Participants were patients with cardiovascular disease who visited the Cardiovascular Medicine Department of Xi'an Jiaotong University First Affiliated Hospital between September 2011 and March 2012. Two hundred and fifty patients were issued with questionnaires and underwent a physical examination and blood test.Risk factors for ED were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 222 participants returned valid questionnaires (89% response rate), underwent a physical examination and blood test, and were included in the study. The most common cardiovascular diseases were hypertension (n = 142; 64%), coronary heart disease (n = 90; 41%) and angina pectoris (n = 78; 35%). Most patients (n = 144; 65%) had two or more cardiovascular diseases. Age, smoking, body mass index, total cholesterol level, hypertension and the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly associated with ED. Domestic location, level of education, participation in physical activity, diabetes and drinking alcohol were not associated with ED. Common risk factors for cardiovascular disease are associated with ED in patients with cardiovascular disease. This study furthers understanding of the risk factors for ED in Chinese patients with cardiovascular disease and paves the way for further research into the prevention of ED. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Association between periodontal disease, bacterial vaginosis, and sexual risk behaviours.

    PubMed

    Zabor, Emily Craig; Klebanoff, Mark; Yu, Kai; Zhang, Jun; Nansel, Tonja; Andrews, William; Schwebke, Jane; Jeffcoat, Marjorie

    2010-10-01

    Both periodontal disease and bacterial vaginosis may cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study evaluated the association between periodontal disease and bacterial vaginosis. Data from 3569 women enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Vaginal Flora were used. Periodontal disease, defined as greater than three sites with ≥4 mm attachment loss, was assessed by specially calibrated hygienists at baseline. Positive bacterial vaginosis status was based on a Nugent Gram stain score ≥7. Pairs of independent variables were compared with Pearson's χ(2) and risk ratios were calculated through log-binomial regression. Twenty-eight per cent of women with bacterial vaginosis had periodontal disease compared with 22% without , corresponding to 1.29 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.47) times greater risk of periodontal disease among women with bacterial vaginosis. In adjusted analysis the risk ratio dropped to 1.23 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.40). Receptive oral sex with an uncircumcised partner was associated with 1.28 times (95% CI: 0.97, 1.69) the risk for periodontal disease compared with receptive oral sex with a circumcised partner, though the association is not statistically significant. In this population, there is a small but significant association between periodontal disease and bacterial vaginosis and a possible trend between receptive oral sex with an uncircumcised partner and periodontal disease. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2016-11-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between hospital admission for an infection and 29 autoimmune diseases. This study shows that infections are risk factors for a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases in a dose-response and temporal manner, in agreement with the hypothesis that infections are an environmental risk factor contributing to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors.

  4. Spatial clustering of average risks and risk trends in Bayesian disease mapping.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Craig; Lee, Duncan; Dean, Nema

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporal disease mapping focuses on estimating the spatial pattern in disease risk across a set of nonoverlapping areal units over a fixed period of time. The key aim of such research is to identify areas that have a high average level of disease risk or where disease risk is increasing over time, thus allowing public health interventions to be focused on these areas. Such aims are well suited to the statistical approach of clustering, and while much research has been done in this area in a purely spatial setting, only a handful of approaches have focused on spatiotemporal clustering of disease risk. Therefore, this paper outlines a new modeling approach for clustering spatiotemporal disease risk data, by clustering areas based on both their mean risk levels and the behavior of their temporal trends. The efficacy of the methodology is established by a simulation study, and is illustrated by a study of respiratory disease risk in Glasgow, Scotland. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Epidemiology, Natural History, and Risk Stratification of Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Aniwan, Satimai; Park, Sang Hyoung; Loftus, Edward V

    2017-09-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic condition that can result in significant morbidity and disability. By studying the association between demographics and initial clinical features and subsequent natural history, one may be able to stratify patients by their risks of clinical relapse, hospitalization, and surgery. Understanding the potential environmental risk factors and natural history of CD in a given patient guides the physician when counseling the patient and selecting a treatment strategy. In this review, updated data regarding the incidence and prevalence of CD, important environmental risk factors, natural history of the disease, and important prognostic factors are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Window panes of eternity. Health, disease, and inherited risk.

    PubMed Central

    Scriver, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Personal health reflects harmony between individual and experience; it is optimal homeostasis. Disease is an outcome of incongruity leading to dishomeostasis. Relative to earlier times, disease in modern society has higher "heritability" (in the broad meaning of the term). Inherited risks are facts compatible with anticipation and prevention of disease. This viewpoint has major implications for medical practice, deployment of health services, themes of research, and education of health care personnel and citizens. PMID:6763817

  7. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Using Framingham Risk Score in Korean Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    So, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Jin-Young; Park, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to investigate the modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors and 10-year probability of the disease based on the Framingham risk score in cancer survivors, compared with the general population. Methods A total of 1,225 cancer survivors and 5,196 non-cancer controls who participated in the 2007–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were enrolled. We assessed modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking, body mass index, physical inactivity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and elevated blood glucose level. The 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease was determined by applying the Framingham cardiovascular disease risk equation among cancer survivors and non-cancer controls, ranging from 30 to 74 years old who had no overt cardiovascular diseases. Results The proportion of subjects who had higher fasting glucose levels, hemoglobin A1c levels, systolic blood pressure, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and those who had lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels was significantly higher in the cancer survivors than in the non-cancer controls. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease among the cancer survivors was higher than that in the non-cancer controls in both men and women. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease in relation to the cancer type was significantly higher in patients with hepatic, colon, lung, breast, and gastric cancer. Conclusion Cancer survivors have a higher cardiovascular disease risk and 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease than non-cancer controls. Control of cardiovascular disease risk factors and implementation of a well-defined cardiovascular disease prevention program are needed for treating cancer survivors. PMID:27468342

  8. Risk Factor Fusion for Predicting Multifactorial Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    validity of method is demonstrated by applying it to predict the occur- rence of gout in patients. 1. INTRODUCTION The goal in this paper is to...and parametric classifier design. In order to demonstrate the validity of the approach, the prediction of gout , which is a multifactorial disease...is considered. The goal is to classify a patient into one of two classes: gout or non- gout . The approach for gout classification is summarized in

  9. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions. PMID:25404329

  10. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital.

    PubMed

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2014-12-02

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions.

  11. Effect of biodiversity changes in disease risk: exploring disease emergence in a plant-virus system.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Israel; González-Jara, Pablo; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Rodelo-Urrego, Manuel; Fraile, Aurora; Piñero, Daniel; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biodiversity on the ability of parasites to infect their host and cause disease (i.e. disease risk) is a major question in pathology, which is central to understand the emergence of infectious diseases, and to develop strategies for their management. Two hypotheses, which can be considered as extremes of a continuum, relate biodiversity to disease risk: One states that biodiversity is positively correlated with disease risk (Amplification Effect), and the second predicts a negative correlation between biodiversity and disease risk (Dilution Effect). Which of them applies better to different host-parasite systems is still a source of debate, due to limited experimental or empirical data. This is especially the case for viral diseases of plants. To address this subject, we have monitored for three years the prevalence of several viruses, and virus-associated symptoms, in populations of wild pepper (chiltepin) under different levels of human management. For each population, we also measured the habitat species diversity, host plant genetic diversity and host plant density. Results indicate that disease and infection risk increased with the level of human management, which was associated with decreased species diversity and host genetic diversity, and with increased host plant density. Importantly, species diversity of the habitat was the primary predictor of disease risk for wild chiltepin populations. This changed in managed populations where host genetic diversity was the primary predictor. Host density was generally a poorer predictor of disease and infection risk. These results support the dilution effect hypothesis, and underline the relevance of different ecological factors in determining disease/infection risk in host plant populations under different levels of anthropic influence. These results are relevant for managing plant diseases and for establishing conservation policies for endangered plant species.

  12. Effect of Biodiversity Changes in Disease Risk: Exploring Disease Emergence in a Plant-Virus System

    PubMed Central

    Pagán, Israel; González-Jara, Pablo; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Rodelo-Urrego, Manuel; Fraile, Aurora; Piñero, Daniel; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biodiversity on the ability of parasites to infect their host and cause disease (i.e. disease risk) is a major question in pathology, which is central to understand the emergence of infectious diseases, and to develop strategies for their management. Two hypotheses, which can be considered as extremes of a continuum, relate biodiversity to disease risk: One states that biodiversity is positively correlated with disease risk (Amplification Effect), and the second predicts a negative correlation between biodiversity and disease risk (Dilution Effect). Which of them applies better to different host-parasite systems is still a source of debate, due to limited experimental or empirical data. This is especially the case for viral diseases of plants. To address this subject, we have monitored for three years the prevalence of several viruses, and virus-associated symptoms, in populations of wild pepper (chiltepin) under different levels of human management. For each population, we also measured the habitat species diversity, host plant genetic diversity and host plant density. Results indicate that disease and infection risk increased with the level of human management, which was associated with decreased species diversity and host genetic diversity, and with increased host plant density. Importantly, species diversity of the habitat was the primary predictor of disease risk for wild chiltepin populations. This changed in managed populations where host genetic diversity was the primary predictor. Host density was generally a poorer predictor of disease and infection risk. These results support the dilution effect hypothesis, and underline the relevance of different ecological factors in determining disease/infection risk in host plant populations under different levels of anthropic influence. These results are relevant for managing plant diseases and for establishing conservation policies for endangered plant species. PMID:22792068

  13. Use of Chronic Kidney Disease to Enhance Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk in Those at Medium Risk.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yook Chin; Lim, Hooi Min; Ching, Siew Mooi

    2015-01-01

    Based on global cardiovascular (CV) risk assessment for example using the Framingham risk score, it is recommended that those with high risk should be treated and those with low risk should not be treated. The recommendation for those of medium risk is less clear and uncertain. We aimed to determine whether factoring in chronic kidney disease (CKD) will improve CV risk prediction in those with medium risk. This is a 10-year retrospective cohort study of 905 subjects in a primary care clinic setting. Baseline CV risk profile and serum creatinine in 1998 were captured from patients record. Framingham general cardiovascular disease risk score (FRS) for each patient was computed. All cardiovascular disease (CVD) events from 1998-2007 were captured. Overall, patients with CKD had higher FRS risk score (25.9% vs 20%, p = 0.001) and more CVD events (22.3% vs 11.9%, p = 0.002) over a 10-year period compared to patients without CKD. In patients with medium CV risk, there was no significant difference in the FRS score among those with and without CKD (14.4% vs 14.6%, p = 0.84) However, in this same medium risk group, patients with CKD had more CV events compared to those without CKD (26.7% vs 6.6%, p = 0.005). This is in contrast to patients in the low and high risk group where there was no difference in CVD events whether these patients had or did not have CKD. There were more CV events in the Framingham medium risk group when they also had CKD compared those in the same risk group without CKD. Hence factoring in CKD for those with medium risk helps to further stratify and identify those who are actually at greater risk, when treatment may be more likely to be indicated.

  14. Shared Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koene, Ryan J.; Prizment, Anna E.; Blaes, Anne; Konety, Suma H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer are the two leading causes of death worldwide. Although commonly thought of as two separate disease entities, CVD and cancer possess various similarities and possible interactions, including a number of similar risk factors (e.g. obesity, diabetes), suggesting a shared biology for which there is emerging evidence. While chronic inflammation is an indispensible feature of the pathogenesis and progression of both CVD and cancer, additional mechanisms can be found at their intersection. Therapeutic advances, despite improving longevity, have increased the overlap between these diseases, but there are now millions of cancer survivors at risk of developing CVD. Cardiac risk factors have a major impact on subsequent treatment-related cardiotoxicity. In this review, we explore the risk factors common to both CVD and cancer, highlighting the major epidemiologic studies and potential biological mechanisms that account for them. PMID:26976915

  15. Dentist reliability in classifying disease risk and reason for treatment.

    PubMed

    Bader, J D; White, B A; Olsen, O; Shugars, D A

    1999-01-01

    The reliability of practicing dentists' classifications of patients' caries risk and periodontal disease risk and reason for treatment for individual teeth were determined. The risk classification protocols had been in use in a group practice for more than a year, and the reason-for-treatment protocol had been introduced six months previously. Eight dentists' classifications for caries (n = 66) and periodontal disease risk (n = 66), and six dentists' classifications for reason for treatment (n = 73) were compared to those of a nominal standard examiner. Reliability was expressed as percent agreement and kappa values. Percent agreement was 76 percent, 83 percent, and 74 percent for caries, periodontal disease, and reason for treatment, respectively, with kappa values of 0.56, 0.70, and 0.69. Dentists can attain reasonable levels of reliability using simple classification protocols with little formal training, although misclassification may be problematic for specific administrative or research-related purposes.

  16. Biomarkers for cardiovascular risk assessment in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Priscila Camillo; Ferber, Philippe; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Cutler, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis, are characterized by a high prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD), which constitutes the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among such patients. Although such effects are partly explained by a higher prevalence of traditional CV risk factors, many studies indicate that such factors do not fully explain the enhanced CV risk in these patients. In addition, risk stratification algorithms based upon traditional CV risk factors are not as predictive in autoimmune diseases as in the general population. For these reasons, the timely and accurate assessment of CV risk in these high-risk populations still remains an unmet clinical need. An enhanced contribution of different inflammatory components of the immune response, as well as autoimmune elements (e.g. autoantibodies, autoantigens, and cellular response), has been proposed to underlie the incremental CV risk observed in these populations. Recent advances in proteomic tools have contributed to the discovery of proteins involved in CVDs, including some that may be suitable to be used as biological markers. In this review we summarize the main markers in the field of CVDs associated with autoimmunity, as well as the recent advances in proteomic technology and their application for biomarker discovery in autoimmune disease.

  17. Early-life risk factors for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Borenstein, Amy R; Copenhaver, Cathleen I; Mortimer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Research findings obtained over the past 20 years suggest that Alzheimer disease (AD) may have its origins in early life. In this review, we consider the evidence for early-life risk factors for this illness. We propose that risk factors that predict neuropathology are largely distinct from those related to the clinical expression of Alzheimer disease. Early-life risk factors for pathology include genes, chromosomal abnormalities, head injury, insulin resistance, and inflammation. With regard to risk factors for clinical expression of Alzheimer disease, six general groups of childhood exposures are reviewed: (1) perinatal conditions, (2) early-life brain development, (3) early-life body growth, (4) early-life socioeconomic conditions, (5) environmental enrichment, and (6) cognitive reserve. The literature reviewed suggests that risk of Alzheimer disease is probably not determined in any single time period but results from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental exposures throughout the life course. Enhancement or preservation of brain or cognitive reserve could delay the onset of Alzheimer disease and in some cases prevent the disease from occurring altogether.

  18. National Insect and Disease Risk Map (NIDRM)--cutting edge software for rapid insect and disease risk model development

    Treesearch

    Frank J. Krist

    2010-01-01

    The Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team (FHTET) of the U.S. Forest Service is leading an effort to produce the next version of the National Insect and Disease Risk Map (NIDRM) for targeted release in 2011. The goal of this effort is to update spatial depictions of risk of tree mortality based on: (1) newly derived 240-m geospatial information depicting the...

  19. Effect of donor age and cold storage time on outcome in recipients of kidneys donated after circulatory death in the UK: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Summers, Dominic M; Johnson, Rachel J; Hudson, Alex; Collett, David; Watson, Christopher J; Bradley, J Andrew

    2013-03-02

    Use of kidneys donated after controlled circulatory death has increased the number of transplants undertaken in the UK but there remains reluctance to use kidneys from older circulatory-death donors and concern that kidneys from circulatory-death donors are particularly susceptible to cold ischaemic injury. We aimed to compare the effect of donor age and cold ischaemic time on transplant outcome in kidneys donated after circulatory death versus brain death. We used the UK transplant registry to select a cohort of first-time recipients (aged ≥ 18 years) of deceased-donor kidneys for transplantations done between Jan 1, 2005, and Nov 1, 2010. We did univariate comparisons of transplants from brain-death donors versus circulatory-death donors with χ tests for categorical data and Wilcoxon tests for non-parametric continuous data. We used Kaplan-Meier curves to show graft survival. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to adjust for donor and recipient factors associated with graft-survival with tests for interaction effects to establish the relative effect of donor age and cold ischaemia on kidneys from circulatory-death and brain-death donors. 6490 deceased-donor kidney transplants were done at 23 centres. 3 year graft survival showed no difference between circulatory-death (n=1768) and brain-death (n=4127) groups (HR 1·14, 95% CI 0·95-1·36, p=0·16). Donor age older than 60 years (compared with <40 years) was associated with an increased risk of graft loss for all deceased-donor kidneys (2·35, 1·85-3·00, p<0·0001) but there was no increased risk of graft loss for circulatory-death donors older than 60 years compared with brain-death donors in the same age group (p=0·30). Prolonged cold ischaemic time (>24 h vs <12 h) was not associated with decreased graft survival for all deceased-donor kidneys but was associated with poorer graft survival for kidneys from circulatory-death donors than for those from brain-death donors (2·36, 1·39-4·02, p for

  20. Rethinking Risk for Pneumococcal Disease in Adults: The Role of Risk Stacking

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, Stephen I.; Shea, Kimberly M.; Weycker, Derek; Farkouh, Raymond A.; Strutton, David R.; Edelsberg, John

    2015-01-01

    Using data from 3 private healthcare claims repositories, we evaluated the incidence of pneumococcal disease among adults with US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) defined at-risk conditions or rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Crohn's disease, and neuromuscular disorder/seizures and those with traditional high-risk conditions. We observed that adults with ≥2 concurrent comorbid conditions had pneumococcal disease incidence rates that were as high as or higher than rates observed in those with traditional high-risk conditions. PMID:26034770

  1. Cardiovascular disease risk in young people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequent cause of death in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), despite modern advances in glycemic control and CVD risk factor modification. CVD risk identification is essential in this high-risk population, yet remains poorly understood. This review discusses the risk factors for CVD in young people with T1D, including hyperglycemia, traditional CVD risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, hypertension), as well as novel risk factors such as insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypoglycemia. We present evidence that adverse changes in cardiovascular function, arterial compliance, and atherosclerosis are present even during adolescence in people with T1D, highlighting the need for earlier intervention. The methods for investigating cardiovascular risk are discussed and reviewed. Finally, we discuss the observational studies and clinical trials which have thus far attempted to elucidate the best targets for early intervention in order to reduce the burden of CVD in people with T1D.

  2. Circulatory responses to hypoxia in experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroll, M.; Robison, S. C.; Harrison, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three levels of decreased arterial oxygen saturation elicited a graded circulatory response in dogs, manifested by stepwise increases in cardiac output, left ventricular dp/dt, and stroke volume, and decreases in systemic vascular resistance. Responses to similar hypoxia challenges after experimental myocardial infarction were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less. Although the circulatory compensation for hypoxia was less effective after myocardial infarction, no further deterioration of the haemodynamics was noted.

  3. Circulatory responses to hypoxia in experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroll, M.; Robison, S. C.; Harrison, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three levels of decreased arterial oxygen saturation elicited a graded circulatory response in dogs, manifested by stepwise increases in cardiac output, left ventricular dp/dt, and stroke volume, and decreases in systemic vascular resistance. Responses to similar hypoxia challenges after experimental myocardial infarction were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less. Although the circulatory compensation for hypoxia was less effective after myocardial infarction, no further deterioration of the haemodynamics was noted.

  4. Dopamine agonists and risk: impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Gao, Jennifer; Brezing, Christina; Symmonds, Mkael; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Fernandez, Hubert; Dolan, Raymond J; Hallett, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Impulse control disorders are common in Parkinson's disease, occurring in 13.6% of patients. Using a pharmacological manipulation and a novel risk taking task while performing functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the relationship between dopamine agonists and risk taking in patients with Parkinson's disease with and without impulse control disorders. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, subjects chose between two choices of equal expected value: a 'Sure' choice and a 'Gamble' choice of moderate risk. To commence each trial, in the 'Gain' condition, individuals started at $0 and in the 'Loss' condition individuals started at -$50 below the 'Sure' amount. The difference between the maximum and minimum outcomes from each gamble (i.e. range) was used as an index of risk ('Gamble Risk'). Sixteen healthy volunteers were behaviourally tested. Fourteen impulse control disorder (problem gambling or compulsive shopping) and 14 matched Parkinson's disease controls were tested ON and OFF dopamine agonists. Patients with impulse control disorder made more risky choices in the 'Gain' relative to the 'Loss' condition along with decreased orbitofrontal cortex and anterior cingulate activity, with the opposite observed in Parkinson's disease controls. In patients with impulse control disorder, dopamine agonists were associated with enhanced sensitivity to risk along with decreased ventral striatal activity again with the opposite in Parkinson's disease controls. Patients with impulse control disorder appear to have a bias towards risky choices independent of the effect of loss aversion. Dopamine agonists enhance sensitivity to risk in patients with impulse control disorder possibly by impairing risk evaluation in the striatum. Our results provide a potential explanation of why dopamine agonists may lead to an unconscious bias towards risk in susceptible individuals.

  5. Heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis: understanding the risks.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, S E

    2010-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of mortality compared with the general population. Evidence suggests that this increased mortality can largely be attributed to increased cardiovascular death. In a retrospective study of an inception cohort of RA patients in Rochester, MN, the contribution of traditional and RA-specific risk factors was investigated to this increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several traditional cardiovascular risk factors were found to behave differently in RA patients. In addition, their associations with cardiovascular disease are weaker in RA patients as increased inflammation associated with RA also appears to contribute substantially to the increased cardiovascular mortality. Furthermore, the impact of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologicals on cardiovascular disease in RA patients is unclear. Cardiovascular risk scores for the general population may underestimate the risk for RA patients. Together with other studies that have demonstrated similar associations between RA and cardiovascular mortality, these data suggest that optimal control of cardiovascular risk factors is important, but not sufficient in RA patients. RA-specific cardiovascular risk prediction tools are needed, as well as clinical trials to assess the impact of therapies and tight control of inflammation in RA patients on cardiovascular outcomes and mortality.

  6. Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Future Alzheimer’s Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Greg; Chester, Cariad; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Dudley, Joel T.; Leeper, Nicholas J.; Shah, Nigam H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the association of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in the treatment of prostate cancer with subsequent Alzheimer’s disease risk. Methods We used a previously validated and implemented text-processing pipeline to analyze electronic medical record data in a retrospective cohort of patients at Stanford University and Mt. Sinai hospitals. Specifically, we extracted International Classification of Diseases-9th revision diagnosis and Current Procedural Terminology codes, medication lists, and positive-present mentions of drug and disease concepts from all clinical notes. We then tested the effect of ADT on risk of Alzheimer’s disease using 1:5 propensity score–matched and traditional multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. The duration of ADT use was also tested for association with Alzheimer’s disease risk. Results There were 16,888 individuals with prostate cancer meeting all inclusion and exclusion criteria, with 2,397 (14.2%) receiving ADT during a median follow-up period of 2.7 years (interquartile range, 1.0-5.4 years). Propensity score–matched analysis (hazard ratio, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.10 to 3.20; P = .021) and traditional multivariable-adjusted Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.64; P = .031) both supported a statistically significant association between ADT use and Alzheimer’s disease risk. We also observed a statistically significant increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease with increasing duration of ADT (P = .016). Conclusion Our results support an association between the use of ADT in the treatment of prostate cancer and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease in a general population cohort. This study demonstrates the utility of novel methods to analyze electronic medical record data to generate practice-based evidence. PMID:26644522

  7. Endometriosis: a high-risk population for major chronic diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Kvaskoff, Marina; Mu, Fan; Terry, Kathryn L.; Harris, Holly R.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Farland, Leslie; Missmer, Stacey A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite an estimated prevalence of 10% in women, the etiology of endometriosis remains poorly understood. Over recent decades, endometriosis has been associated with risk of several chronic diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, asthma/atopic diseases and cardiovascular diseases. A deeper understanding of these associations is needed as they may provide new leads into the causes or consequences of endometriosis. This review summarizes the available epidemiological findings on the associations between endometriosis and other chronic diseases and discusses hypotheses for underlying mechanisms, potential sources of bias and methodological complexities. METHODS We performed a comprehensive search of the PubMed/Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge databases for all studies reporting on the associations between endometriosis and other diseases published in English through to May 2014, using numerous search terms. We additionally examined the reference lists of all identified papers to capture any additional articles that were not identified through computer searches. RESULTS We identified 21 studies on the associations between endometriosis and ovarian cancer, 14 for breast cancer, 8 for endometrial cancer, 4 for cervical cancer, 12 for cutaneous melanoma and 3 for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as well as 9 on the links between endometriosis and autoimmune diseases, 6 on the links with asthma and atopic diseases, and 4 on the links with cardiovascular diseases. Endometriosis patients were reported to be at higher risk of ovarian and breast cancers, cutaneous melanoma, asthma, and some autoimmune, cardiovascular and atopic diseases, and at decreased risk of cervical cancer. CONCLUSIONS Increasing evidence suggests that endometriosis patients are at higher risk of several chronic diseases. Although the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood, the available data to date suggest that endometriosis is not harmless with respects to women's long-term health. If

  8. US FDA perspective on regulatory issues affecting circulatory assist devices.

    PubMed

    Sapirstein, Wolf; Chen, Eric; Swain, Julie; Zuckerman, Bram

    2006-11-01

    There has been a rapid development in mechanical circulatory support systems in the decade since the US FDA first approved a mechanical device to provide the circulatory support lacking from a failing heart. Devices are presently approved for marketing by the FDA to replace a failing ventricle, the Ventricular Assist Device or the entire heart, Total Artificial Heart. Contemporaneous with, and permitted by, improvement in technology and design, devices have evolved from units located extracorporeally to paracorporeal systems and totally implanted devices. Clinical studies have demonstrated a parallel improvement in the homeostatic adequacy of the circulatory support provided. Thus, while the circulatory support was initially tolerated for short periods to permit recovery of cardiac function, this technology eventually provided effective circulatory support for increasing periods that permitted the FDA to approve devices for bridging patients in end-stage cardiac failure awaiting transplant and eventually a device for destination therapy where patients in end-stage heart failure are not cardiac transplant candidates. The approved devices have relied on displacement pumps that mimic the pulsatility of the physiological system. Accelerated development of more compact devices that rely on alternative pump mechanisms have challenged both the FDA and device manufacturers to assure that the regulatory requirements for safety and effectiveness are met for use of mechanical circulatory support systems in expanded target populations. An FDA regulatory perspective is reviewed of what can be a potentially critical healthcare issue.

  9. Vascular and Immunobiology of the Circulatory Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Keisuke; Hla, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrates are endowed with a closed circulatory system, the evolution of which required novel structural and regulatory changes. Furthermore, immune cell trafficking paradigms adapted to the barriers imposed by the closed circulatory system. How did such changes occur mechanistically? We propose that spatial compartmentalization of the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) may be one such mechanism. In vertebrates, S1P is spatially compartmentalized in the blood and lymphatic circulation, thus comprising a sharp S1P gradient across the endothelial barrier. Circulatory S1P has critical roles in maturation and homeostasis of the vascular system as well as in immune cell trafficking. Physiological functions of S1P are tightly linked to shear stress, the key biophysical stimulus from blood flow. Thus, circulatory S1P confinement could be a primordial strategy of vertebrates in the development of a closed circulatory system. This review discusses the cellular and molecular basis of the S1P gradients and aims to interpret its physiological significance as a key feature of the closed circulatory system. PMID:27813829

  10. Vascular and Immunobiology of the Circulatory Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Gradient.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Keisuke; Hla, Timothy

    2017-02-10

    Vertebrates are endowed with a closed circulatory system, the evolution of which required novel structural and regulatory changes. Furthermore, immune cell trafficking paradigms adapted to the barriers imposed by the closed circulatory system. How did such changes occur mechanistically? We propose that spatial compartmentalization of the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) may be one such mechanism. In vertebrates, S1P is spatially compartmentalized in the blood and lymphatic circulation, thus comprising a sharp S1P gradient across the endothelial barrier. Circulatory S1P has critical roles in maturation and homeostasis of the vascular system as well as in immune cell trafficking. Physiological functions of S1P are tightly linked to shear stress, the key biophysical stimulus from blood flow. Thus, circulatory S1P confinement could be a primordial strategy of vertebrates in the development of a closed circulatory system. This review discusses the cellular and molecular basis of the S1P gradients and aims to interpret its physiological significance as a key feature of the closed circulatory system.

  11. Cardiovascular risks associated with incident and prevalent periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yau-Hua; Chasman, Daniel I; Buring, Julie E; Rose, Lynda; Ridker, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    While prevalent periodontal disease associates with cardiovascular risk, little is known about how incident periodontal disease influences future vascular risk. We compared effects of incident versus prevalent periodontal disease in developing major cardiovascular diseases (CVD), myocardial infarction (MI), ischaemic stroke and total CVD. In a prospective cohort of 39,863 predominantly white women, age ≥45 years and free of cardiovascular disease at baseline were followed for an average of 15.7 years. Cox proportional hazard models with time-varying periodontal status [prevalent (18%), incident (7.3%) versus never (74.7%)] were used to assess future cardiovascular risks. Incidence rates of all CVD outcomes were higher in women with prevalent or incident periodontal disease. For women with incident periodontal disease, risk factor adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.42 (95% CI, 1.14-1.77) for major CVD, 1.72 (1.25-2.38) for MI, 1.41 (1.02-1.95) for ischaemic stroke and 1.27 (1.06-1.52) for total CVD. For women with prevalent periodontal disease, adjusted HRs were 1.14 (1.00-1.31) for major CVD, 1.27 (1.04-1.56) for MI, 1.12 (0.91-1.37) for ischaemic stroke and 1.15 (1.03-1.28) for total CVD. New cases of periodontal disease, not just those that are pre-existing, place women at significantly elevated risks for future cardiovascular events. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Incident and Prevalent Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yau-Hua; Chasman, Daniel I; Buring, Julie E; Rose, Lynda; Ridker, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Aim While prevalent periodontal disease associates with cardiovascular risk, little is known about how incident periodontal disease influences future vascular risk. We compared effects of incident versus prevalent periodontal disease in developing major cardiovascular diseases (CVD), myocardial infarction (MI), ischemic stroke and total CVD. Material and Methods In a prospective cohort of 39863 predominantly white women, age ≥ 45 years and free of cardiovascular disease at baseline were followed for an average of 15.7 years. Cox proportional hazard models with time-varying periodontal status (prevalent [18%], incident [7.3%] vs. never [74.7%]) were used to assess future cardiovascular risks. Results Incidence rates of all CVD outcomes were higher in women with prevalent or incident periodontal disease. For women with incident periodontal disease, risk factor adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.42 (95% CI, 1.14–1.77) for major CVD, 1.72 (1.25–2.38) for MI, 1.41(1.02–1.95) for ischemic stroke, and 1.27(1.06–1.52) for total CVD. For women with prevalent periodontal disease, adjusted HRs were 1.14 (1.00–1.31) for major CVD, 1.27 (1.04–1.56) for MI, 1.12(0.91–1.37) for ischemic stroke, and 1.15(1.03–1.28) for total CVD. Conclusion New cases of periodontal disease, not just those that are pre-existing, place women at significantly elevated risks for future cardiovascular events. PMID:25385537

  13. Organ donation after circulatory determination of death: lessons and unresolved controversies.

    PubMed

    Childress, James F

    2008-01-01

    This article responds to the four pieces in this special symposium of the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics on uncontrolled organ donation following circulatory death (uDCD). The response will focus on lessons and debates about the kinds of consent necessary and sufficient for temporary organ preservation in the context of DCD and for organ donation itself; on conflicts of obligation, loyalty, and interest in DCD and ways to address those conflicts; and on benefit, cost, risk assessments of uDCD programs, including measures to achieve a more favorable balance of benefits, costs, and risks.

  14. The Impact of Disease and Drugs on Hip Fracture Risk.

    PubMed

    Leavy, Breiffni; Michaëlsson, Karl; Åberg, Anna Cristina; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa

    2017-01-01

    We report the risks of a comprehensive range of disease and drug categories on hip fracture occurrence using a strict population-based cohort design. Participants included the source population of a Swedish county, aged ≥50 years (n = 117,494) including all incident hip fractures during 1 year (n = 477). The outcome was hospitalization for hip fracture (ICD-10 codes S72.0-S72.2) during 1 year (2009-2010). Exposures included: prevalence of (1) inpatient diseases [International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes A00-T98 in the National Patient Register 1987-2010] and (2) prescribed drugs dispensed in 2010 or the year prior to fracture. We present age- and sex-standardized risk ratios (RRs), risk differences (RDs) and population attributable risks (PARs) of disease and drug categories in relation to hip fracture risk. All disease categories were associated with increased risk of hip fracture. Largest risk ratios and differences were for mental and behavioral disorders, diseases of the blood and previous fracture (RRs between 2.44 and 3.00; RDs (per 1000 person-years) between 5.0 and 6.9). For specific drugs, strongest associations were seen for antiparkinson (RR 2.32 [95 % CI 1.48-1.65]; RD 5.2 [1.1-9.4]) and antidepressive drugs (RR 1.90 [1.55-2.32]; RD 3.1 [2.0-4.3]). Being prescribed ≥10 drugs during 1 year incurred an increased risk of hip fracture, whereas prescription of cardiovascular drugs or ≤5 drugs did not appear to increase risk. Diseases inferring the greatest PARs included: cardiovascular diseases PAR 22 % (95 % CI 14-29) and previous injuries (PAR 21 % [95 % CI 16-25]; for specific drugs, antidepressants posed the greatest risk (PAR 16 % [95 % CI 12.0-19.3]).

  15. High prevalence of severe circulatory complications with diazoxide in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kayo; Kawai, Masahiko; Marumo, Chieko; Kanazawa, Hoshinori; Matsukura, Takashi; Kusuda, Satoshi; Yorifuji, Tohru; Heike, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Since diazoxide was approved for clinical use in Japan in 2008, its prescription for the treatment of infants with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (HIH) has rapidly expanded. Concomitantly, reports of complications associated with diazoxide are increasing. To clarify the trends and problems associated with the treatment of infants with HIH, we planned a nationwide surveillance in Japan. Questionnaires were sent to 255 institutions belonging to the Japanese Neonatologist Association inquiring about neonatal cases of HIH from 2009 to 2011. One hundred nineteen cases of neonates with transient HIH (THIH) related to perinatal problems and 15 cases with permanent HIH (PHIH; hypoglycemia persisting beyond a year) or genetic HIH were reported. Sixty-four infants (53.8%) with THIH were administered diazoxide, and the administration was completed within 3 months in 46 infants (71.9%). Fourteen of the PHIH or genetic cases were treated with diazoxide and 7 of them (50%) had hypoglycemia persisting beyond a year. Circulatory complications were reported in 15 infants, i.e. 10 with THIH and 5 with PHIH. Multiple regression analysis revealed that a younger gestational age at birth and higher maximum doses of diazoxide were significant risk factors for circulatory complications. Diazoxide is widely prescribed for infants with HIH as a first-line medicine in Japan, but prophylactic diuretics are uncommon. Under these circumstances, a high prevalence of severe circulatory complications in very-low-birth-weight infants was reported. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Direct comparison of percutaneous circulatory support systems in specific hemodynamic conditions in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Ostadal, Petr; Mlcek, Mikulas; Holy, Frantisek; Horakova, Svatava; Kralovec, Stepan; Skoda, Jan; Petru, Jan; Kruger, Andreas; Hrachovina, Vladimir; Svoboda, Tomas; Kittnar, Otomar; Reddy, Vivek Y; Neuzil, Petr

    2012-12-01

    Several percutaneous circulatory support systems have been recently introduced into clinical practice for the treatment of cardiogenic shock or refractory nontolerated ventricular tachycardia, in support of high-risk catheter interventions and, occasionally, cardiopulmonary resuscitation. To date, however, a direct comparison of the available systems has not been performed. Adult female pigs (weight 50-60 kg) were used throughout the experiment. Under deep anesthesia and mechanical ventilation, 3 percutaneous circulatory support systems were compared: (1) right atrium-aorta, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (n=4); (2) left atrium-aorta, TandemHeart system (n=4); (3) left ventricle-aorta, Impella 2.5 system (n=4), and (4) left ventricle-aorta with norepinephrine at 0.1 µg/kg per minute (n=4). Hemodynamic efficacy (mean arterial pressure) was measured at 3 specific conditions: ventricular pacing at 200 and 300 beats per minute, and ventricular fibrillation. Although no or only nonsignificant differences were found among the systems at ventricular pacing of 200 and 300 beats per minute, under ventricular fibrillation, the right atrium-aorta system was significantly the most efficacious, followed by the left atrium-aorta system and the left ventricle-aorta system (P<0.001). However, the left ventricle-aorta system with norepinephrine still maintained mean arterial pressure comparable with the left atrium-aorta system. Differences were seen in the hemodynamic efficacy of available percutaneous circulatory support systems, particularly under the most severe hemodynamic condition, ventricular fibrillation.

  17. LONG-TERM MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT (DESTINATION THERAPY): ON TRACK TO COMPETE WITH HEART TRANSPLANTATIO?

    PubMed Central

    Kirklin, James K.; Naftel, David C.; Pagani, Francis D.; Kormos, Robert L.; Stevenson, Lynne; Miller, Marissa; Young, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Average two-year survival following cardiac transplantation is approximately 80%. The evolution and subsequent approval of larger pulsatile and, more recently, continuous flow mechanical circulatory support (MCS) technology for destination therapy (DT) offers the potential for triage of some patients awaiting cardiac transplantation to DT. Methods The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) is a national multi-institutional study of chronic mechanical circulatory support. Between June 2006 and December 2011, 127 pulsatile and 1160 continuous flow pumps (24% of total primary LVADs) carried an initial strategy of DT therapy. Results By multivariable analysis, risk factors (p<0.05) for mortality following DT included older age, larger body mass index, history of cancer, history of cardiac surgery, INTERMACS level I (cardiogenic shock), dialysis, increased BUN, use of a pulsatile flow device and use of a RVAD. Among continuous flow LVAD patients who were not in cardiogenic shock, a particularly favorable survival was associated with no cancer, patients not in cardiogenic shock, and BUN < 50, resulting in one and two year survival of 88 and 80%. Conclusions 1) Evolution from pulsatile to continuous flow technology has dramatically improved one and two year survival; 2) Destination Therapy is not appropriate for patients with rapid hemodynamic deterioration; or severe right ventricular failure 4) Important subsets of continuous flow DT patients now enjoy survival which is competitive with heart transplantation out to about two years. PMID:22795459

  18. Future directions in Alzheimer's disease from risk factors to prevention.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Bushra; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka

    2014-04-15

    The increase in life expectancy has resulted in a high occurrence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research on AD has undergone a paradigm shift from viewing it as a disease of old age to taking a life course perspective. Several vascular, lifestyle, psychological and genetic risk factors influencing this latent period have been recognized and they may act both independently and by potentiating each other. These risk factors have consequently been used to derive risk scores for predicting the likelihood of dementia. Despite population differences, age, low education and vascular risk factors were identified as key factors in all scoring systems. Risk scores can help to identify high-risk individuals who might benefit from different interventions. The European Dementia Prevention Initiative (EDPI), an international collaboration, encourages data sharing between different randomized controlled trials. At the moment, it includes three large ongoing European trials: Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), Prevention of Dementia by Intensive Vascular Care (preDIVA), and Multidomain Alzheimer Prevention study (MAPT). Recently EDPI has developed a "Healthy Aging through Internet Counseling in Elderly" (HATICE) program, which intends to manage modifiable risk factors in an aged population through an easily accessible Internet platform. Thus, the focus of dementia research has shifted from identification of potential risk factors to using this information for developing interventions to prevent or delay the onset of dementia as well as identifying special high-risk populations who could be targeted in intervention trials.

  19. Integrative Treatments to Reduce Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan; Oberg, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing the contribution and interrelatedness of lipoprotein risk factors is critical to prioritizing treatment strategies for cardiovascular risk reduction. Lipoprotein factors still dominate risk for developing cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Some emerging risk factors such as C-reactive protein are gaining acceptance due to recent prospective clinical trials demonstrating clinical benefit in reducing these markers. Other emerging risk factors, including lipoprotein particle size, remain to be validated. In this second article of a 2-part series, we will begin with a review of formal risk assessment, discussing the contribution of multiple “risky” and “healthy” components that play a part in overall cardiovascular health. Following risk assessment, we will discuss evidence-based integrative therapies that can be used to modify any risky lipoprotein and inflammatory patient profiles, including medications, functional foods, supplements, and lifestyle approaches. The focus is on low-density lipoproteins, high-density lipoproteins, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein. Understanding the interrelatedness of lipoprotein risk factors, and finding efficient methods of treating multiple risk factors simultaneously, will not only improve the long-term health of patients but will also save on the expenditure of healthcare dollars for unnecessary testing and ineffective treatments. Integrative practitioners who understand the contribution of lifestyle factors, and who have numerous effective treatment options at their disposal, are well positioned to counsel patients on cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21461347

  20. Predicting Disease Risk Using Bootstrap Ranking and Classification Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Ohad; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are widely used to search for genetic loci that underlie human disease. Another goal is to predict disease risk for different individuals given their genetic sequence. Such predictions could either be used as a “black box” in order to promote changes in life-style and screening for early diagnosis, or as a model that can be studied to better understand the mechanism of the disease. Current methods for risk prediction typically rank single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by the p-value of their association with the disease, and use the top-associated SNPs as input to a classification algorithm. However, the predictive power of such methods is relatively poor. To improve the predictive power, we devised BootRank, which uses bootstrapping in order to obtain a robust prioritization of SNPs for use in predictive models. We show that BootRank improves the ability to predict disease risk of unseen individuals in the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) data and results in a more robust set of SNPs and a larger number of enriched pathways being associated with the different diseases. Finally, we show that combining BootRank with seven different classification algorithms improves performance compared to previous studies that used the WTCCC data. Notably, diseases for which BootRank results in the largest improvements were recently shown to have more heritability than previously thought, likely due to contributions from variants with low minimum allele frequency (MAF), suggesting that BootRank can be beneficial in cases where SNPs affecting the disease are poorly tagged or have low MAF. Overall, our results show that improving disease risk prediction from genotypic information may be a tangible goal, with potential implications for personalized disease screening and treatment. PMID:23990773

  1. Predicting disease risk using bootstrap ranking and classification algorithms.

    PubMed

    Manor, Ohad; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are widely used to search for genetic loci that underlie human disease. Another goal is to predict disease risk for different individuals given their genetic sequence. Such predictions could either be used as a "black box" in order to promote changes in life-style and screening for early diagnosis, or as a model that can be studied to better understand the mechanism of the disease. Current methods for risk prediction typically rank single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by the p-value of their association with the disease, and use the top-associated SNPs as input to a classification algorithm. However, the predictive power of such methods is relatively poor. To improve the predictive power, we devised BootRank, which uses bootstrapping in order to obtain a robust prioritization of SNPs for use in predictive models. We show that BootRank improves the ability to predict disease risk of unseen individuals in the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) data and results in a more robust set of SNPs and a larger number of enriched pathways being associated with the different diseases. Finally, we show that combining BootRank with seven different classification algorithms improves performance compared to previous studies that used the WTCCC data. Notably, diseases for which BootRank results in the largest improvements were recently shown to have more heritability than previously thought, likely due to contributions from variants with low minimum allele frequency (MAF), suggesting that BootRank can be beneficial in cases where SNPs affecting the disease are poorly tagged or have low MAF. Overall, our results show that improving disease risk prediction from genotypic information may be a tangible goal, with potential implications for personalized disease screening and treatment.

  2. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p < 5 × 10(-08)). These SNPs were evaluated for their association with CAD in the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  3. Oxidative Risk for Atherothrombotic Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    In the vasculature, reactive oxidant species including reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or halogenating species, and thiyl, tyrosyl, or protein radicals, may oxidatively modify lipids and proteins with deleterious consequences for vascular function. These biologically active free radical and non-radical species may be produced by increased activation of oxidant-generating sources and/or decreased cellular antioxidant capacity. Once formed, these species may engage in reactions to yield more potent oxidants that promote transition of the homeostatic vascular phenotype to a pathobiological state that is permissive for atherothrombogenesis. This dysfunctional vasculature is characterized by lipid peroxidation and aberrant lipid deposition, inflammation, immune cell activation, platelet activation, thrombus formation, and disturbed hemodynamic flow. Each of these pathobiological states is associated with an increase in the vascular burden of free radical species-derived oxidation products and, thereby, implicates increased oxidant stress in the pathogenesis of atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:19751821

  4. Risk Factors for Legionella longbeachae Legionnaires’ Disease, New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Kenagy, Emma; Cameron, Claire M.; Smith, Debbie; Scott, Pippa; Cho, Vicki; Mitchell, Peter; Murdoch, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella longbeachae, found in soil and compost-derived products, is a globally underdiagnosed cause of Legionnaires’ disease. We conducted a case–control study of L. longbeachae Legionnaires’ disease in Canterbury, New Zealand. Case-patients were persons hospitalized with L. longbeachae pneumonia, and controls were persons randomly sampled from the electoral roll for the area served by the participating hospital. Among 31 cases and 172 controls, risk factors for Legionnaires’ disease were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, history of smoking >10 years, and exposure to compost or potting mix. Gardening behaviors associated with L. longbeachae disease included having unwashed hands near the face after exposure to or tipping and troweling compost or potting mix. Mask or glove use was not protective among persons exposed to compost-derived products. Precautions against inhaling compost and attention to hand hygiene might effectively prevent L. longbeachae disease. Long-term smokers and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should be particularly careful. PMID:28628460

  5. Dopamine agonists and risk: impulse control disorders in Parkinson's; disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jennifer; Brezing, Christina; Symmonds, Mkael; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Fernandez, Hubert; Dolan, Raymond J.; Hallett, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Impulse control disorders are common in Parkinson's; disease, occurring in 13.6% of patients. Using a pharmacological manipulation and a novel risk taking task while performing functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the relationship between dopamine agonists and risk taking in patients with Parkinson's; disease with and without impulse control disorders. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, subjects chose between two choices of equal expected value: a ‘Sure’ choice and a ‘Gamble’ choice of moderate risk. To commence each trial, in the ‘Gain’ condition, individuals started at $0 and in the ‘Loss’ condition individuals started at −$50 below the ‘Sure’ amount. The difference between the maximum and minimum outcomes from each gamble (i.e. range) was used as an index of risk (‘Gamble Risk’). Sixteen healthy volunteers were behaviourally tested. Fourteen impulse control disorder (problem gambling or compulsive shopping) and 14 matched Parkinson's; disease controls were tested ON and OFF dopamine agonists. Patients with impulse control disorder made more risky choices in the ‘Gain’ relative to the ‘Loss’ condition along with decreased orbitofrontal cortex and anterior cingulate activity, with the opposite observed in Parkinson's; disease controls. In patients with impulse control disorder, dopamine agonists were associated with enhanced sensitivity to risk along with decreased ventral striatal activity again with the opposite in Parkinson's; disease controls. Patients with impulse control disorder appear to have a bias towards risky choices independent of the effect of loss aversion. Dopamine agonists enhance sensitivity to risk in patients with impulse control disorder possibly by impairing risk evaluation in the striatum. Our results provide a potential explanation of why dopamine agonists may lead to an unconscious bias towards risk in susceptible individuals. PMID:21596771

  6. A fetal risk factor for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Brian K; Richfield, Eric K; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; Thiruchelvam, Mona

    2004-01-01

    A lack of strong evidence for genetic heritability of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) has focused attention on environmental toxicants in the disease etiology, particularly agrichemicals. PD is associated with advanced age, but it is unclear whether specific neuronal damage could result from insults during development. This study hypothesized that prenatal exposure to pesticides would disrupt the development of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system and enhance its vulnerability to dopaminergic neurotoxicant exposures later in life. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were treated on gestational days 10-17 with saline or the pesticides maneb (MB, 1 mg/kg) or paraquat (PQ, 0.3 mg/kg). When offspring were evaluated in adulthood, there were no significant effects of prenatal MB or PQ exposure on locomotor activity. Subsequently, offspring were treated for 8 consecutive days with saline, MB (30 mg/kg), or PQ (5 mg/kg). One week after the last exposure, only males exposed to prenatal MB and adulthood PQ showed significant reductions in locomotor activity (95%) and changes in striatal neurochemistry. Stereological assessment of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and ventral tegmental area correspondingly confirmed selective dopaminergic-neuron loss in SNpc. The lack of changes in other exposure groups suggests a specificity to the sequence of exposures as well as gender specificity. These results suggest that prenatal exposure to MB produces selective, permanent alterations of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system and enhances adult susceptibility to PQ exposure. This study implicates a role for developmental neurotoxicant exposure in the induction of neurodegenerative disorders such as PD.

  7. Radiation as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, John E.; Hopewell, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Humans are continually exposed to ionizing radiation from terrestrial sources. The two major contributors to radiation exposure of the U.S. population are ubiquitous background radiation and medical exposure of patients. From the early 1980s to 2006, the average dose per individual in the United States for all sources of radiation increased by a factor of 1.7–6.2 mSv, with this increase due to the growth of medical imaging procedures. Radiation can place individuals at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Excess risk of cardiovascular disease occurs a long time after exposure to lower doses of radiation as demonstrated in Japanese atomic bomb survivors. This review examines sources of radiation (atomic bombs, radiation accidents, radiological terrorism, cancer treatment, space exploration, radiosurgery for cardiac arrhythmia, and computed tomography) and the risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The evidence presented suggests an association between cardiovascular disease and exposure to low-to-moderate levels of radiation, as well as the well-known association at high doses. Studies are needed to define the extent that diagnostic and therapeutic radiation results in increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease, to understand the mechanisms involved, and to develop strategies to mitigate or treat radiation-induced cardiovascular disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1945–1956. PMID:21091078

  8. The epidemiology of Parkinson's disease: risk factors and prevention.

    PubMed

    Ascherio, Alberto; Schwarzschild, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    Since 2006, several longitudinal studies have assessed environmental or behavioural factors that seem to modify the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Increased risk of Parkinson's disease has been associated with exposure to pesticides, consumption of dairy products, history of melanoma, and traumatic brain injury, whereas a reduced risk has been reported in association with smoking, caffeine consumption, higher serum urate concentrations, physical activity, and use of ibuprofen and other common medications. Randomised trials are investigating the possibility that some of the negative risk factors might be neuroprotective and thus beneficial in individuals with early Parkinson's disease, particularly with respect to smoking (nicotine), caffeine, and urate. In the future, it might be possible to identify Parkinson's disease in its prodromal phase and to promote neuroprotective interventions before the onset of motor symptoms. At this time, however, the only intervention that seems justifiable for the primary prevention of Parkinson's disease is the promotion of physical activity, which is likely to be beneficial for the prevention of several chronic diseases.

  9. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future.

  10. Risk for travel-associated legionnaires' disease, Europe, 2009.

    PubMed

    Beauté, Julien; Zucs, Phillip; de Jong, Birgitta

    2012-11-01

    Legionnaires' disease is underreported in Europe; notification rates differ substantially among countries. Approximately 20% of reported cases are travel-associated. To assess the risk for travel-associated Legionnaires' disease (TALD) associated with travel patterns in European countries, we retrieved TALD surveillance data for 2009 from the European Surveillance System, and tourism denominator data from the Statistical Office of the European Union. Risk (number cases reported/number nights spent) was calculated by travel country. In 2009, the network reported 607 cases among European travelers, possibly associated with 825 accommodation sites in European Union countries. The overall risk associated with travel abroad was 0.3 cases/million nights. We observed an increasing trend in risk from northwestern to southeastern Europe; Greece had the highest risk (1.7). Our findings underscore the need for countries with high TALD risks to improve prevention and control of legionellosis; and for countries with high TALD risks, but low notification rates of Legionnaires' disease to improve diagnostics and reporting.

  11. Chronic kidney disease: towards a risk-based approach.

    PubMed

    Taal, Maarten W

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 8-16% of adults worldwide and is associated with multiple adverse outcomes. It includes a heterogeneous group of conditions with widely varied associated risks; risk stratification is therefore vital for clinical management. Use of the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) instead of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation will reduce, though not eliminate, over-diagnosis of CKD. Cystatin C is recommended as an alternative measure of GFR but is not yet widely used. A new classification system for CKD, which includes GFR and albuminuria, has been endorsed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to aid risk stratification and a recently validated formula, requiring only age, gender, eGFR and albuminuria, is useful to predict risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). A risk-based approach will facilitate appropriate treatment for people at high risk of developing ESKD while sparing the majority, who are at low risk, from unnecessary intervention. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  12. Classifying risk factors for dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J C; Bachmann, C G; Linazasoro, G

    2010-09-01

    Currently there is no classification of risk factors applicable to an individual patient with Parkinson's disease for the development of dyskinesia. We conducted literature search to identify and classifying risk factors into groups - (a) intrinsic vs extrinsic and (b) modifiable vs non-modifiable. Younger age, young age of onset and severity of PD are major intrinsic non-modifiable risk factors for dyskinesia, female gender is another factor but not independent of other factors. Genetic expression and plasticity may determine pre-disposition to age of onset of PD and dyskinesia, these are currently non-modifiable factors arising due to an interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Lower initial body weight and weight loss during the course of the disease increase the risk of dyskinesia. Levodopa dose per kilogram body weight is a more significant risk factor than absolute levodopa dose. Early use of longer acting non-levodopa (i.e. dopamine agonists) medications delays the onset of dyskinesia. Interaction between body weight, levodopa dose and mode and duration of drug delivery is a significant modifiable factor. Dyskinesia in PD arises as a consequence of the interaction of intrinsic versus extrinsic and modifiable versus non-modifiable factors. Identification and manipulation of modifiable factors for an individual patient may reduce the risk and burden of dyskinesia. Adjustment of levodopa dose according to body weight during the course of the disease seems to be a significant modifiable risk factor for dyskinesia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contemporary mechanical circulatory support therapy for postcardiotomy shock.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shinichi; Takeda, Koji; Garan, Arthur Reshad; Kurlansky, Paul; Hastie, Jonathan; Naka, Yoshifumi; Takayama, Hiroo

    2016-04-01

    Significant progress has been made in the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS), particularly in the clinical success in durable left ventricular assist device. Short-term MCS has also advanced in the form of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, external centrifugal VADs as well as percutaneous VADs. Postcardiotomy shock (PCS) is a rare clinical entity associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. It is characterized by heart failure that either results in an inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass or that occurs in the immediate postoperative period, accounting for the most common indication for MCS. The reported in-hospital mortality of the PCS patients remains high, consistently over 50%, despite ongoing refinements of MCS technology. The optimization of selection criteria and the prompt institution of MCS are likely the keys to improving this persistently high mortality rate. Unfortunately, the lack of a clear definition for PCS in the literature limits scientific analyses and comparison of the existing evidence. To establish the treatment strategy and appropriately manage this challenging disease, substantial and fundamental effort by the cardiovascular society is imperative.

  14. A coupled biventricular finite element and lumped-parameter circulatory system model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Potter, D Dean; Wallace, Arthur W; Tseng, Elaine; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2013-01-01

    Numerical modelling of the cardiovascular system is becoming an important tool for assessing the influence of heart disease and treatment therapies. In the current study, we present an approach for modelling the interaction between the heart and the circulatory system. This was accomplished by creating animal-specific biventricular finite element (FE) models, which characterise the mechanical response of the heart, and by coupling them to a lumped-parameter model that represents the systemic and pulmonic circulatory system. In order to minimise computation time, the coupling was enforced in a weak (one-way) manner, where the ventricular pressure-volume relationships were generated by the FE models and then passed into the circulatory system model to ensure volume conservation and physiological pressure changes. The models were first validated by tuning the parameters, such that the output of the models matched experimentally measured pressures and volumes. Then the models were used to examine cardiac function and the myofibre stress in a healthy canine heart and a canine heart with dilated cardiomyopathy. The results showed good agreement with experimental measurements. The stress in the case of cardiomyopathy was found to increase significantly, while the pump function was decreased, compared to the healthy case. The total runtime of the simulations is lesser than that of many fully coupled models presented in the literature. This will allow for a much quicker evaluation of possible treatment strategies for combating the effects of heart failure, especially in optimisation schemes that require numerous FE simulations.

  15. Respiratory and circulatory effects of parietal pleural afferent stimulation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Yves; Delpierre, Stéphane

    2006-05-01

    Respiratory symptoms accompanying pleural diseases combine dyspnea, tachypnea, rapid shallow breathing, and sometimes hypotension. There are no experimental data on the changes in respiratory and circulatory functions elicited by the activation of pleural afferents. After removal of all muscles covering the 5th to 10th intercostal spaces, we investigated in paralyzed, vagotomized rabbits the changes in phrenic discharge, transpulmonary pressure, and systemic arterial pressure in response to an outwardly directed force exerted on the parietal pleura or the local application of solutions containing lactic acid or inflammatory mediators. Mechanical stimulation of the pleura induced an immediate decrease in both integrated phrenic discharge and arterial blood pressure, the responses being positively correlated with the magnitude of force applied on the pleura. No accompanying changes in ventilatory timing, transpulmonary pressure, or heart rate were measured. Lactic acid solution also elicited an inhibition of phrenic activity and a fall in blood pressure. Section of the internal intercostal nerves supplying the stimulated intercostal spaces totally abolished the responses to mechanical stimulation or lactic acid. An inflammatory mixture elicited only modest respiratory and circulatory effects. We concluded that an acute mechanical distension of the parietal pleura as well as its chemical stimulation by lactic acid elicit a marked inhibition of phrenic motoneurons combined to a reduction of the sympathetic outflow to the circulatory system.

  16. Mechanical Circulatory Support of the Critically Ill Child Awaiting Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Gandhi, Sanjiv K; C Canter, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The majority of children awaiting heart transplantation require inotropic support, mechanical ventilation, and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. Unfortunately, due to the limited pool of organs, many of these children do not survive to transplant. Mechanical circulatory support of the failing heart in pediatrics is a new and rapidly developing field world-wide. It is utilized in children with acute congestive heart failure associated with congenital heart disease, cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, both as a bridge to transplantation and as a bridge to myocardial recovery. The current arsenal of mechanical assist devices available for children is limited to ECMO, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, centrifugal pump ventricular assist devices, the DeBakey ventricular assist device Child; the Thoratec ventricular assist device; and the Berlin Heart. In the spring of 2004, five contracts were awarded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to support preclinical development for a range of pediatric ventricular assist devices and similar circulatory support systems. The support of early development efforts provided by this program is expected to yield several devices that will be ready for clinical trials within the next few years. Our work reviews the current international experience with mechanical circulatory support in children and summarizes our own experience since 2005 with the Berlin Heart, comparing the indications for use, length of support, and outcome between these modalities. PMID:21286278

  17. Risk for coronary artery disease and morbid preeclampsia: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Ness, Roberta B; Hubel, Carl A

    2005-10-01

    A predisposition to coronary artery disease (CAD) may put women at risk for preeclampsia. Morbid preeclampsia (early, severe, recurrent, and with neonatal morbidity) represents the subset of preeclampsia of greatest public health concern. We review here the published links between preeclampsia and CAD. Many risk factors are common to both CAD and preeclampsia. These include obesity; elevated blood pressure; dyslipidemia; insulin resistance; and hyperglycemia, together termed "Syndrome X"; as well as endothelial dysfunction; hyperuricemia; hyperhomocysteinemia; and abnormalities of inflammation, thrombosis, and angiogenesis. After pregnancy, women with preeclampsia are more likely to experience later life CAD. Both the association between CAD risk factors and preeclampsia and the association between preeclampsia and later CAD appears to be more pronounced among the subset of women with morbid preeclampsia. Thus, women at elevated risk for CAD may be at particularly high risk for morbid preeclampsia and women with morbid preeclampsia may be those at highest risk for later life CAD.

  18. Risk disclosure and preclinical Alzheimer's disease clinical trial enrollment.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Karlawish, Jason; Elashoff, David; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2013-05-01

    To identify the facilitators and barriers to preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trial recruitment, 50 cognitively normal participants were interviewed after being randomized to one of two hypothetical AD risk scenarios: (1) the general age-related risk for AD, or (2) being at 50% increased risk for AD. Participants provided uncued barriers and facilitators to the hypothetical decision of whether they would enroll. Thirteen themes of facilitators and five themes of barriers were identified. The most common barrier was fear related to taking study drug. Those randomized to being at increased risk for AD more frequently cited lowering personal risk as a facilitator (P = .01) and less frequently cited time as a barrier to enrollment (P = .02). These results suggest potential challenges to preclinical AD clinical trial recruitment and that disclosing risk information may enhance enrollment. Copyright © 2013 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Parental history of atopic disease: disease pattern and risk of pediatric atopy in offspring.

    PubMed

    Alford, Sharon Hensley; Zoratti, Edward; Peterson, Edward L; Maliarik, Mary; Ownby, Dennis R; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2004-11-01

    Family history is an important risk factor for atopic disease. However, most studies assess only limited information on family history. Because atopic disease can exhibit transient or persistent patterns, it may be useful to assess information on patterns of disease within families. This approach has been applied in other diseases, such as cancer, to discriminate between predominantly inherited versus environmentally caused (sporadic) cases. In a cohort of children who were followed from birth until age 6 to 7 years, we examined the relationship between parental onset (ie, childhood and adulthood) and duration of atopic disease (ie, persistent disease) and the risk of pediatric atopic disease. Our hypothesis was that different parental disease patterns would be important to pediatric risk of disease. Data from 476 families in the ongoing Childhood Allergy Study in Detroit, Mich, were analyzed by using logistic regression. We examined the association between parental patterns of disease and disease onset in their children. Results Father's disease history, particularly asthma history, was more strongly related to pediatric outcomes than mother's history. Asthma status in the fathers, whether it was childhood-only, adulthood-only, or persistent, was associated with current asthma in the children. Childhood-only and persistent asthma in fathers conferred a higher risk of atopy in the study children, whereas adulthood-only disease did not. There was also a significant relationship between persistent allergy in the father and atopy in the study children. Our data support the hypothesis that there are complex inheritance patterns for allergy and asthma. Therefore, a detailed family history of atopy, including childhood and adulthood experiences, is critical to identifying and classifying risk and disease phenotypes.

  20. Genetic Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease.

    PubMed

    Khera, Amit V; Emdin, Connor A; Drake, Isabel; Natarajan, Pradeep; Bick, Alexander G; Cook, Nancy R; Chasman, Daniel I; Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Rader, Daniel J; Fuster, Valentin; Boerwinkle, Eric; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Ridker, Paul M; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-12-15

    Background Both genetic and lifestyle factors contribute to individual-level risk of coronary artery disease. The extent to which increased genetic risk can be offset by a healthy lifestyle is unknown. Methods Using a polygenic score of DNA sequence polymorphisms, we quantified genetic risk for coronary artery disease in three prospective cohorts - 7814 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, 21,222 in the Women's Genome Health Study (WGHS), and 22,389 in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS) - and in 4260 participants in the cross-sectional BioImage Study for whom genotype and covariate data were available. We also determined adherence to a healthy lifestyle among the participants using a scoring system consisting of four factors: no current smoking, no obesity, regular physical activity, and a healthy diet. Results The relative risk of incident coronary events was 91% higher among participants at high genetic risk (top quintile of polygenic scores) than among those at low genetic risk (bottom quintile of polygenic scores) (hazard ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75 to 2.09). A favorable lifestyle (defined as at least three of the four healthy lifestyle factors) was associated with a substantially lower risk of coronary events than an unfavorable lifestyle (defined as no or only one healthy lifestyle factor), regardless of the genetic risk category. Among participants at high genetic risk, a favorable lifestyle was associated with a 46% lower relative risk of coronary events than an unfavorable lifestyle (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.63). This finding corresponded to a reduction in the standardized 10-year incidence of coronary events from 10.7% for an unfavorable lifestyle to 5.1% for a favorable lifestyle in ARIC, from 4.6% to 2.0% in WGHS, and from 8.2% to 5.3% in MDCS. In the BioImage Study, a favorable lifestyle was associated with significantly less coronary-artery calcification within each genetic risk

  1. Hematologic diseases: High risk of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Myong Ki; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Dong-Gun; Park, Yeon Joon; Lee, Jong Wook

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence and clinical outcome of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) associated diarrhea (CDAD) in patients with hematologic disease. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent C. difficile testing in a tertiary hospital in 2011. The incidence and risk factors for CDAD and its clinical course including recurrence and mortality were assessed in patients with hematologic disease and compared with those in patients with nonhematologic disease. RESULTS: About 320 patients were diagnosed with CDAD (144 patients with hematologic disease; 176 with nonhematologic disease). The incidence of CDAD in patients with hematologic disease was estimated to be 36.7 cases/10000 patient hospital days, which was higher than the 5.4 cases/10000 patient hospital days in patients with nonhematologic disease. Recurrence of CDAD was more frequent in patients with hematologic disease compared to those with nonhematologic disease (18.8% vs 8.5%, P < 0.01), which was associated with higher re-use of causative antibiotics for CDAD. Mortality due to CDAD did not differ between the two groups. Multivariate analysis showed that intravenous immunoglobulin was the only significant factor associated with a lower rate of recurrence of CDAD in patients with hematologic disease. CONCLUSION: The incidence and recurrence of CDAD was higher in patients with hematologic disease than in those with nonhematologic disease. PMID:24914383

  2. Cardiovascular disease risk in a semirural community in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chia Yook; Pengal, Srinivas

    2009-10-01

    It has been argued that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is not very prevalent in developing countries, particularly in a rural community. This study examined the prevalence of CVD risk of a semirural community in Malaysia through an epidemiological survey. Subjects were invited to a free health screening service carried out over a period of 6 weeks. Then, a follow-up study of the initial nonresponders was done in the villages that showed a poorer response. The survey was conducted using a standardized questionnaire. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure > or =140/90 mm Hg. The Framingham Coronary Disease Risk Prediction Score (FRS) was used as a measure of CVD risk. A total of 1417 subjects participated in this survey. The response rate was 56%. A follow-up survey of the nonresponders did not show any differences from the initial responders in any systematic way. The prevalence of CVD risk factors was high in both men and women. The mean (+/-SD) FRS was 9.4 (+/-2.5) and 11.3 (+/-4.1) for men and women, respectively. The mean predicted coronary heart disease (CHD) risk was high at 20% to 25% for men and medium at 11% to 13% for women. Overall, 55.8% of the men had >20% risk of having a CHD event in the next 10 years whereas women's risk was lower, with 15.1% having a risk of > or =20%. The prevalence of CVD risk even in a semirural community of a developing country is high. Every effort should be made to lower these risk factors.

  3. Causal beliefs and perceptions of risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, The Netherlands, 2007.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Liesbeth; Henneman, Lidewij; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline; Marteau, Theresa; Timmermans, Danielle

    2011-11-01

    Understanding people's perceptions of disease risk and how these perceptions compare with actual risk models may improve the effectiveness of risk communication. This study examined perceived disease risk and causal beliefs for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), the relationship between self-reported risk factors and perceived disease risk, and the influence of causal beliefs on perceived disease risk in people at increased risk. The sample (n = 255) consisted of people who were at increased risk for diabetes and CVD (aged 57-79 y). Participants completed a postal questionnaire assessing risk factors, perceived risk, and causal beliefs for diabetes and CVD. We used regression analyses to examine the relationship between risk factors and perceived disease risk and to explore how causal beliefs affect the relationship between risk factors and perceived disease risk. Associations between risk factors and perceived diabetes and CVD risks were weak. Perceived risk, causal beliefs, and explained variance of risk factors on perceived risk were lower for diabetes than for CVD. Stronger beliefs concerning 1) overweight as a cause of diabetes and 2) smoking as a cause of CVD strengthened the association between these risk factors and perceived disease risk. Although participants seemed to have some understanding of disease causation, they only partially translated their risk factors into accurate perceptions of risk. To improve understanding of risk information, health professionals may need to educate patients on how personal risk factors can contribute to the development of diabetes and CVD.

  4. Aluminum as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pricilla Costa; Piai, Kamila de Almeida; Takayanagui, Angela Maria Magosso; Segura-Muñoz, Susana Inés

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to condense existing scientific evidence about the relation between aluminum (Al) exposure and risk for the development of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), evaluating its long-term effects on the population's health. A systematic literature review was carried out in two databases, MEDLINE and LILACS, between 1990 and 2005, using the uniterms: "Aluminum exposure and Alzheimer Disease" and "Aluminum and risk for Alzheimer Disease". After application of the Relevance Test, 34 studies were selected, among which 68% established a relation between Al and AD, 23.5% were inconclusive and 8.5% did not establish a relation between Al and AD. Results showed that Al is associated to several neurophysiologic processes that are responsible for the characteristic degeneration of AD. In spite of existing polemics all over the world about the role of Al as a risk factor for AD, in recent years, scientific evidence has demonstrated that Al is associated with the development of AD.

  5. Risk factors and risk index of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Huang, Tao-Tao; Lin, Jian-Hua

    2012-10-01

    Pregnant women with heart disease are at high risk. Studies of risk factors of these patients are of great significance to improve maternal and fetal outcomes. In this paper, we try to discuss the main risk factors of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease and to establish a risk assessment system. A retrospective analysis was carried out for pregnancies in 1741 women with heart disease who delivered in Shanghai Obstetrical Cardiology Intensive Care Center between January 1993 and September 2010. A Logistic regression model was used to identify independent risk factors of cardiac events and calculate the risk index in pregnant women with heart disease. The composition of heart disease in pregnant women was arrhythmia (n = 662, 38.00%), congenital heart disease (CHD; n = 529, 30.40%), cardiomyopathy (n = 327, 18.80%), rheumatic heart disease (RHD; n = 151, 8.70%), and cardiopathy induced by pre-eclampsia (n = 53, 3.00%). Main cardiac events were heart failure (n = 110, 6.32%), symptomatic arrhythmia needing medication (n = 43, 2.47%), cardiac arrest (n = 2, 0.11%), syncope (n = 3, 0.17%), and maternal death (n = 10, 0.57%). Six independent risk factors to predict cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease were cardiac events before pregnancy (heart failure, severe arrhythmia, cardiac shock, etc., P = 0.000), New York Heart Association (NYHA) class > II (P = 0.000), oxygen saturation < 90% (P = 0.018), pulmonary artery hypertention (PAH) > 50 mmHg (P = 0.025), cyanotic heart disease without surgical correction (P = 0.015), and reduced left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction < 40%, P = 0.003). Every risk factor was calculated as 1 score. The incidence of cardiac events in patients with scores 0, 1, 2, 3, and ≥ 4 was 2.10%, 31.61%, 61.25%, 68.97%, and 100.00% respectively. Pregnancy with heart disease could lead to undesirable pregnancy outcomes. The risk of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease could be assessed by

  6. Association of atopic dermatitis with cardiovascular risk factors and diseases.

    PubMed

    Standl, Marie; Tesch, Falko; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Rodríguez, Elke; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Gieger, Christian; Peters, Annette; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; Kronenberg, Florian; Schulz, Holger; Koletzko, Sibylle; Schikowski, Tamara; von Berg, Andrea; Lehmann, Irina; Berdel, Dietrich; Heinrich, Joachim; Schmitt, Jochen; Weidinger, Stephan

    2016-12-20

    Epidemiological studies suggested an association between atopic dermatitis (AD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, we investigate associations and potential underlying pathways of AD and CVD in large cohort studies: the AOK PLUS cohort (n=1.2Mio), the GINIplus/LISAplus birth cohorts (n=2286), and the KORA F4 cohort (n=2990). Additionally, metabolomics in KORA F4 and established cardiovascular risk loci in genome-wide data on 10,788 AD cases and 30,047 controls were analyzed. Longitudinal analysis of AD patients in AOK PLUS showed slightly increased risk for incident angina pectoris (AP) (adjusted risk ratio 1.17; 95%-confidence interval 1.12-1.23), hypertension (1.04 (1.02-1.06)) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (1.15 (1.11-1.19)) but not for myocardial infarction (MI) (1.05 (0.99-1.12) and stroke (1.02 (0.98-1.07)). In KORA F4 and GINIplus/LISAplus, AD was not associated with cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) and no differences in metabolite levels were detected. There was no robust evidence for shared genetic risk variants of AD and CVD. This study indicates only a marginally increased risk for AP, hypertension and PAD and no increased risk for MI or stroke in AD patients. Relevant associations of AD with CVRFs reported in US-populations could not be confirmed. Likewise, AD patients did not have increased genetic risk factors for CVD.

  7. Evolving experience with mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed Central

    Kormos, R L; Borovetz, H S; Armitage, J M; Hardesty, R L; Marrone, G C; Griffith, B P

    1991-01-01

    Since 1985 total mechanical circulatory support for mortally ill transplant candidates has been progressively integrated into the authors' program. During this period 379 patients underwent transplantation. Of this group of patients, 62 required some form of mechanical support other than the intra-aortic balloon pump. Because intra-aortic balloon pump assist was limited in therapeutic effect and was associated with patient immobility and line-related sepsis, the next logical step toward support was the artificial heart. Of 20 patients implanted with the Jarvik heart, 17 underwent transplantation, but only 9 of these survived to discharge. In 1988, the authors abandoned the preferential use of the total artificial heart because of excessive cumulative probability of death from wound infection. They began to use the Novacor electrical assist device with the percutaneous power cord because they believed that univentricular support would be adequate for most patients, because its heterotopic position would reduce the likelihood of infection, and because it had the potential for chronic implantation. Twenty-three patients with biventricular failure (right ventricular ejection fraction less than 20%, 18/23) received the electrical assist device for an average of 50.4 days (range 1-193 days). All 17 transplanted patients survived until discharge. Only one of the five deaths that occurred after implantation, but without transplantation, was due to infection (candidiasis). Remarkably, all patients who survived the perioperative period ultimately survived with univentricular support alone. Based on this experience, survival of mechanically supported patients is now comparable to that of those less mortally ill. Images Fig. 3. PMID:1953099

  8. Is moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion superior to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in elective aortic arch surgery?

    PubMed

    Poon, Shi Sum; Estrera, Anthony; Oo, Aung; Field, Mark

    2016-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether moderate hypothermia circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) is more beneficial than deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in elective aortic arch surgery. Altogether, 1028 papers were found using the reported search, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. There were four retrospective observational studies, one prospective randomized controlled trial and one meta-analysis study. There were no local or neuromuscular complications related to axillary arterial cannulation reported. In the elective setting, four studies showed that the in-hospital mortality for moderate hypothermia is consistently low, ranging from 1.0 to 4.3%. In a large series of hemiarch replacement comparing 682 cases of deep hypothermia with 94 cases of moderate hypothermia with SACP, 20 cases (2.8%) of permanent neurological deficit were reported, compared to 3 cases (3.2%) in moderate hypothermia. Three observational studies and a meta-analysis study did not identify an increased risk of postoperative renal failure and dialysis following either deep or moderate hypothermia although a higher incidence of stroke was reported in the meta-analysis study with deep hypothermia (12.7 vs 7.3%). Longer cardiopulmonary bypass time and circulatory arrest time were reported in four studies for deep hypothermia, suggesting an increased time required for systemic cooling and rewarming in that group. Overall, these findings suggested that in elective aortic arch surgery, moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion adapted to the duration of circulatory arrest can be performed safely with acceptable mortality and morbidity outcomes. The risk of spinal cord

  9. Celiac disease and the risk of kidney diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Thongprayoon, Charat; Panjawatanan, Panadeekarn; Thamcharoen, Natanong; Pachariyanon, Pavida; Nakkala, Kiran; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit

    2016-12-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies attempting to demonstrate the risk of kidney diseases among patients with celiac disease (CD) have yielded inconsistent results. This meta-analysis was conducted with the aims to summarize all available evidence. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to May 2016. Studies that provided relative risks, odd ratios, or hazard ratios examining the risk of kidney diseases among patients with CD versus individuals without CD were included. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Eight studies met our eligibility criteria and were included in our analysis. A pooled RR of overall kidney diseases in patients with CD was 2.01 (95% CI, 1.44-2.81, I(2)=76%). The pooled RR of end-stage renal disease in patients with CD was 2.57 (95% CI, 2.03-3.24). Subgroup analyses showed that significant risks were increased for diabetic nephropathy (pooled RR of 1.49, 95% CI, 1.09-2.02) and IgA nephropathy (pooled RR of 2.62, 95% CI, 1.27-5.42) in patients with CD. Our study demonstrates a significantly increased risk of kidney diseases among patients with CD. These findings may influence clinical management and primary prevention of kidney diseases in patients with CD. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical Fitness in Adolescence and Subsequent Inflammatory Bowel Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Melinder, Carren; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Hussein, Oula; Halfvarson, Jonas; Ekbom, Anders; Montgomery, Scott

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Physical fitness may reduce systemic inflammation levels relevant to the risk of symptomatic Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC); we assessed if fitness in adolescence is associated with subsequent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) risk, independent of markers of risk and prodromal disease activity. METHODS: Swedish registers provided information on a cohort of 240,984 men (after exclusions) who underwent military conscription assessments in late adolescence (1969–1976). Follow-up started at least 4 years after the conscription assessment until 31 December 2009 (up to age 57 years). Cox's regression assessed the association of physical fitness with CD (n=986) and UC (n=1,878) in separate models, with adjustment including: socioeconomic conditions in childhood; physical fitness, height, body mass index, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in adolescence; and subsequent diagnoses of IBD. RESULTS: Low fitness was associated with a raised risk of IBD, with unadjusted hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 1.62 (1.31–2.00) for CD and 1.36 (1.17–1.59) for UC. The results were attenuated by adjustment, particularly for markers of prodromal disease activity to 1.32 (1.05–1.66) and 1.25 (1.06–1.48), respectively. Raised ESR in adolescence was associated with increased risks for subsequent CD (5.95 (4.47–7.92)) and UC (1.92 (1.46–2.52)). CONCLUSIONS: The inverse association of physical fitness with IBD risk is consistent with a protective role for exercise. However, evidence of disease activity before diagnosis was already present in adolescence, suggesting that some or all of the association between fitness and IBD may be due to prodromal disease activity reducing exercise capacity and therefore fitness. PMID:26540026

  11. Hormonal contraception and risk of cardiovascular disease. An international perspective.

    PubMed

    Farley, T M; Collins, J; Schlesselman, J J

    1998-03-01

    The most frequent major adverse effect of hormonal contraception is an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The effect on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and myocardial infarction (MI) differs and is strongly influenced by smoking and the presence of other cardiovascular risks factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The incidence of each disease rises with age and there are differences in risk among hormonal contraceptive preparations. This article provides a framework within which to assess the balance of risks among types of hormonal contraceptives according to individual circumstances. Data on cardiovascular disease mortality rates in women of reproductive age in different countries of the world were compiled from nationally reported statistics and supplemented where possible with reported disease incidence rates. Risks associated with current use of hormonal contraception were compiled from the most recent publications on the cardiovascular effects of steroid hormone contraception. These were combined to estimate the total cardiovascular incidence and mortality according to baseline cardiovascular risk and individual characteristics. Mortality rates for cardiovascular diseases are very low in women of reproductive age. Myocardial infarction mortality rates rise from < 0.4 per 100,000 woman-years at age 15-24 years to the range 2 to 7 per 100,000 woman-years at age 35-44 years. Stroke mortality rates similarly rise steeply with age and are between 3 and 5 times higher than those for MI. VTE mortality rates rise less steeply with age and are approximately one-tenth the MI mortality rates at age 35-44 years. The adverse effect of oral contraceptives (OC) on the risk of VTE is the most important contributor to the total number of cardiovascular cases attributable to OC use. The increased risk of stroke and MI dominate the patterns of mortality in OC users and smokers. The additional risks attributable to

  12. Predicting Stroke Risk in Hypertensive Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Antonio; Messerli, Franz H.; Benetos, Athanase; Zhou, Qian; Champion, Annette; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Pepine, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Our understanding of factors influencing stroke risk among patients with coronary artery disease is incomplete. Accordingly, factors predicting stroke risk in hypertensive, clinically stable coronary artery disease patients were determined with data from the INternational VErapamil SR-trandolapril STudy (INVEST). Methods The effect of baseline characteristics and on-treatment blood pressure (BP) were analyzed to determine the risk of stroke (fatal or nonfatal) among the 22 576 patients enrolled. Cox proportional-hazards models (unadjusted, adjusted, and time dependent) were used to identify predictors of stroke among subgroups with these characteristics present at entry and on-treatment BP. Results Excellent BP control (at 24 months, >70% <140/90 mm Hg) was achieved during 61 835 patient-years of follow-up, as 377 patients had a stroke (6.1 strokes/1000 patient-years) and 28% of those patients had a fatal stroke. Increased age, black race, US residency, and history of prior myocardial infarction, smoking, stroke/transient ischemic attack, arrhythmia, diabetes, and coronary bypass surgery were associated with an increased risk of stroke. Achieving a systolic BP <140 mm Hg and a diastolic BP <90 mm Hg was associated with a decreased risk of stroke. There was no statistically significant difference in stroke risk comparing the verapamil SR–based with the atenolol-based treatment strategy (adjusted hazard ratio=0.87; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.06; P=0.17). Conclusions Among hypertensive patients with chronic coronary artery disease, stroke was an important complication associated with significant mortality. Black race, US residency, and conditions associated with increased vascular disease severity and arrhythmia predicted increased stroke risk, whereas achieving a BP <140/90 mm Hg on treatment predicted a reduced stroke risk. PMID:18162623

  13. [Update on fracture risk in life style-related diseases].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toru; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) enhance fracture risk mainly by deteriorating bone quality. Vertebral fracture on X-ray films and hip fracture in past history in subjects of 50 years old or more are hallmarks to start medication for osteoporosis. Patients with diabetes or CKD who have no fracture could undergo drug treatments if their bone mineral density is osteopenic, considering the established link between these disorders and fracture risk.

  14. Periodontal disease pathogenesis: genetic risk factors and paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Beth M; Roberts, Frank A

    2005-03-01

    Periodontitis is a widespread disease caused by oral bacteria and their interaction with lifestyle and genetic risk factors. The focus of periodontal research has expanded over the past few years to include significant progress in the understanding of genetic processes provided by the Human Genome Project. This presentation summarizes recent views on periodontal pathogenesis and the genetic risk factors involved in the disease. Additionally, it describes the paradigm shift in periodontal care, which is evolving from a repair-based to a wellness-based model.

  15. Cardiovascular Disease in CKD in Children: Update on Risk Factors, Risk Assessment, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Amy C; Mitsnefes, Mark M

    2009-01-01

    In young adults with onset of chronic kidney disease in childhood, cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death. The likely reason for increased cardiovascular disease in these patients is high prevalence of traditional and uremia-related cardiovascular disease risk factors during childhood chronic kidney disease. Early markers of cardiomyopathy, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction and early markers of atherosclerosis, such as increased carotid artery intima-media thickness, carotid arterial wall stiffness and coronary artery calcification are frequently found in this patient population. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of recent advances in the understanding and management of cardiovascular disease risks in this population. PMID:19619845

  16. Cancer risk in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and cancer have a profound yet ambiguous relationship. Inflammation - especially chronic inflammation - has protumorigenic effects, but inflammatory cells also mediate an immune response against the tumor and immunosuppression is known to increase the risk for certain tumors. This article reviews current literature on the role of inflammation in cancer and the cancer risk in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). We discuss the effect on cancer risk of different drug classes used in the treatment of IMIDs treatment, including biologicals such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Overall cancer incidence and mortality risk are similar to the general population in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and slightly increased for rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, with risk profiles differing for different tumor types. Increased risk for non-melanoma skin cancer is associated with thiopurine treatment in IBD, with the combination of anti-TNF and methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis and with PUVA, cyclosporine and anti-TNF treatment in psoriasis. Data on the safety of using biologic or immunosuppressant therapy in IMID patients with a history of cancer are scarce. This review provides clinicians with a solid background to help them in making decisions about treatment of immune-mediated diseases in patients with a tumor history. This article is related to another review article in Molecular Cancer: http://www.molecular-cancer.com/content/12/1/86. PMID:23987103

  17. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  18. Risk factor medicalization, hubris, and the obesity disease.

    PubMed

    Sadler, John Z

    2014-01-01

    The essays on obesity in this issue frequently refer to the recent American Medical Association (AMA) declaration of obesity as a disease. In response to these essays, I describe and explore the significance of 'risk-factor medicalization' and how negative unintended consequences with this approach to disease modeling are exemplified in many of the essays. I also relate the essays' content to the issue of physician hubris in the face of their own helplessness in aiding the obese patient.

  19. The relationship of vitamin D status to risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality.

    PubMed

    Skaaby, Tea

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D is essential for bone mineralisation, but a growing body of evidence points at a broader role; vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with mortality and several diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to autoimmune diseases and liver diseases. The evidence is, however, inconclusive and the possible pathways remain unresolved. The aims of the thesis were to investigate the association of vitamin D status to 5-year changes in cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure, lipid profile, the metabolic syndrome and urine albumin creatinine ratio (UACR); the association of a known genetic determinant of vitamin D status to cardiovascular risk factors; the association of vitamin D status to the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality; and the association of vitamin D status to cause-specific mortality. Data from the 3 population-based studies Monica10 (n = 2,656, 1993-94), Inter99 (n = 6,794, 1999-2001) and Health2006 (n = 3,471, 2006-2008) conducted at the Research Centre for Prevention and Health were used. The studies included questionnaires, physical examinations, and blood tests. Vitamin D status was measured at baseline. Participants were genotyped for the most frequent filaggrin mutations. Registry-based diagnoses and causes of death were obtained from The Danish National Patient Register and the Danish Registry of Causes of Death, respectively. Linear, logistic, Cox and instrumental variable regressions were used to model the associations between vitamin D status and cardiovascular risk factors, disease and mortality. With a 10 year mean follow-up time, we found a significant association between vitamin D status and all-cause mortality with a HR=0.95 (p = 0.005) per 10 nmol/l higher vitamin D level. We found no association between vitamin D status and incidence of ischaemic heart disease or stroke (HR = 1.01, p = 0.442 and HR = 1.00, p = 0.920, respectively). We found a baseline level of vitamin D that

  20. Forecasting disease risk for increased epidemic preparedness in public health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, M. F.; Rogers, D. J.; Cox, J.; Flahault, A.; Hay, S. I.

    2000-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases pose a growing threat to human populations. Many of the world's epidemic diseases (particularly those transmitted by intermediate hosts) are known to be highly sensitive to long-term changes in climate and short-term fluctuations in the weather. The application of environmental data to the study of disease offers the capability to demonstrate vector-environment relationships and potentially forecast the risk of disease outbreaks or epidemics. Accurate disease forecasting models would markedly improve epidemic prevention and control capabilities. This chapter examines the potential for epidemic forecasting and discusses the issues associated with the development of global networks for surveillance and prediction. Existing global systems for epidemic preparedness focus on disease surveillance using either expert knowledge or statistical modelling of disease activity and thresholds to identify times and areas of risk. Predictive health information systems would use monitored environmental variables, linked to a disease system, to be observed and provide prior information of outbreaks. The components and varieties of forecasting systems are discussed with selected examples, along with issues relating to further development.

  1. Forecasting Disease Risk for Increased Epidemic Preparedness in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M.F.; Rogers, D.J.; Cox, J.; Flahault, A.; Hay, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases pose a growing threat to human populations. Many of the world’s epidemic diseases (particularly those transmitted by intermediate hosts) are known to be highly sensitive to long-term changes in climate and short-term fluctuations in the weather. The application of environmental data to the study of disease offers the capability to demonstrate vector–environment relationships and potentially forecast the risk of disease outbreaks or epidemics. Accurate disease forecasting models would markedly improve epidemic prevention and control capabilities. This chapter examines the potential for epidemic forecasting and discusses the issues associated with the development of global networks for surveillance and prediction. Existing global systems for epidemic preparedness focus on disease surveillance using either expert knowledge or statistical modelling of disease activity and thresholds to identify times and areas of risk. Predictive health information systems would use monitored environmental variables, linked to a disease system, to be observed and provide prior information of outbreaks. The components and varieties of forecasting systems are discussed with selected examples, along with issues relating to further development. PMID:10997211

  2. Forecasting disease risk for increased epidemic preparedness in public health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, M. F.; Rogers, D. J.; Cox, J.; Flahault, A.; Hay, S. I.

    2000-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases pose a growing threat to human populations. Many of the world's epidemic diseases (particularly those transmitted by intermediate hosts) are known to be highly sensitive to long-term changes in climate and short-term fluctuations in the weather. The application of environmental data to the study of disease offers the capability to demonstrate vector-environment relationships and potentially forecast the risk of disease outbreaks or epidemics. Accurate disease forecasting models would markedly improve epidemic prevention and control capabilities. This chapter examines the potential for epidemic forecasting and discusses the issues associated with the development of global networks for surveillance and prediction. Existing global systems for epidemic preparedness focus on disease surveillance using either expert knowledge or statistical modelling of disease activity and thresholds to identify times and areas of risk. Predictive health information systems would use monitored environmental variables, linked to a disease system, to be observed and provide prior information of outbreaks. The components and varieties of forecasting systems are discussed with selected examples, along with issues relating to further development.

  3. Increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease after diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Norelle R; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Green, Peter H R; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2015-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common cause of chronic liver disease. Celiac disease alters intestinal permeability and treatment with a gluten-free diet often causes weight gain, but so far there are few reports of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with celiac disease. Population-based cohort study. We compared the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease diagnosed from 1997 to 2009 in individuals with celiac disease (n = 26,816) to matched reference individuals (n = 130,051). Patients with any liver disease prior to celiac disease were excluded, as were individuals with a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol-related disorder to minimize misclassification of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were determined. During 246,559 person-years of follow-up, 53 individuals with celiac disease had a diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (21/100,000 person-years). In comparison, we identified 85 reference individuals diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease during 1,488,413 person-years (6/100,000 person-years). This corresponded to a hazard ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 2.0-3.8), with the highest risk estimates seen in children (HR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.3-9.1). The risk increase in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis was 13.3 (95% CI 3.5-50.3) but remained significantly elevated even beyond 15 years after the diagnosis of celiac disease (HR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.0-5.9). Individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease compared to the general population. Excess risks were highest in the first year after celiac disease diagnosis, but persisted through 15 years after diagnosis with celiac disease. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of health-risk appraisals in disease management.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Laurel R; Pope, James E

    2006-02-01

    Managed care organizations and disease management vendors often find themselves in the position of responding to employers who want to administer a health-risk appraisal (HRA) without committing to implementation of a comprehensive health promotion program. The assumption appears to be that information on health risks is sufficient to motivate employees to change their health behaviors in order to reduce estimated health risks. A review of the relevant literature does not substantiate the efficacy of a stand-alone HRA for motivating behavior change. The challenge is to engage employers in informed conversations on what works in health promotion and achieve cost-effective benefits.

  5. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Richelin V.; Miller, Karen J.; Singer, Elyse J.; Levine, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a significant amount of research investigating the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with regards to neurodegenerative disease. Here, we review basic science studies, randomized clinical trials, and epidemiological studies, and discuss the putative neuroprotective effects of HRT in the context of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Findings to date suggest a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease and improved cognitive functioning of postmenopausal women who use 17β-estradiol. With regards to Parkinson's disease, there is consistent evidence from basic science studies for a neuroprotective effect of 17β-estradiol; however, results of clinical and epidemiological studies are inconclusive at this time, and there is a paucity of research examining the association between HRT and Parkinson's-related neurocognitive impairment. Even less understood are the effects of HRT on risk for frontotemporal dementia and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Limits to the existing research are discussed, along with proposed future directions for the investigation of HRT and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22548198

  6. Leukocyte Telomere Length in Relation to 17 Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease Risk: A Cross-Sectional Study of US Adults.

    PubMed

    Rehkopf, David H; Needham, Belinda L; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Zota, Ami R; Wojcicki, Janet M; Epel, Elissa S

    2016-11-01

    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is a putative biological marker of immune system age, and there are demonstrated associations between LTL and cardiovascular disease. This may be due in part to the relationship of LTL with other biomarkers associated with cardiovascular disease risk. However, the strength of associations between LTL and adiposity, metabolic, proinflammatory, and cardiovascular biomarkers has not been systematically evaluated in a United States nationally representative population. We examined associations between LTL and 17 cardiovascular biomarkers, including lipoproteins, blood sugar, circulatory pressure, proinflammatory markers, kidney function, and adiposity measures, in adults ages 20 to 84 from the cross-sectional US nationally representative 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (n = 7,252), statistically adjusting for immune cell type distributions. We also examine whether these associations differed systematically by age, race/ethnicity, gender, education, and income. We found that a one unit difference in the following biomarkers were associated with kilobase pair differences in LTL: BMI -0.00478 (95% CI -0.00749--0.00206), waist circumference -0.00211 (95% CI -0.00325--0.000969), percentage of body fat -0.00516 (95% CI -0.00761--0.0027), high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol 0.00179 (95% CI 0.000571-0.00301), triglycerides -0.000285 (95% CI -0.000555--0.0000158), pulse rate -0.00194 (95% CI -0.00317--0.000705), C-reactive protein -0.0363 (95% CI 0.0601--0.0124), cystatin C -0.0391 (95% CI -0.0772--0.00107). When using clinical cut-points we additionally found associations between LTL and insulin resistance -0.0412 (95% CI -0.0685--0.0139), systolic blood pressure 0.0455 (95% CI 0.00137-0.0897), and diastolic blood pressure -0.0674 (95% CI -0.126--0.00889). These associations were 10%-15% greater without controlling for leukocyte cell types. There were very few differences in the associations by age

  7. Blood donations, iron stores, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, Giancarlo; Chen, Honglei; Wing, Al; Ascherio, Alberto

    2006-06-01

    Iron overload and systemic iron stores may be important in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). We therefore examined the association between blood donations, which reduce body iron stores, and risk of PD in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a large cohort investigation of U.S. men. Our hypothesis was that blood donation reduces the risk of PD by lowering systemic iron stores. Although the number of blood donations was inversely related to the ferritin levels in a subsample of the study population, no association was found between the number of blood donations and risk of PD (P for trend = 0.6). Unexpectedly, the risk of PD was higher among men who reported recent multiple blood donations (P for trend = 0.05). The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that reduced systemic iron stores lower the risk of PD.

  8. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  9. Bone imaging and fracture risk assessment in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Sophie A; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    Fractures are more common and are associated with greater morbidity and morality in patients with kidney disease than in members of the general population. Thus, it is troubling that in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients there has been a paradoxical increase in fracture rates over the past 20 years compared to the general population. Increased fracture incidence in CKD patients may be driven in part by the lack of screening for fracture risk. In the general population, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the clinical standard to stratify fracture risk, and its use has contributed to decreases in fracture incidence. In contrast, in CKD, fracture risk screening with DXA has been uncommon due to its unclear efficacy in predicting fracture and its inability to predict type of renal osteodystrophy. Recently, several prospective studies conducted in patients across the spectrum of kidney disease have demonstrated that bone mineral density measured by DXA predicts future fracture risk and that clinically relevant information regarding fracture risk is provided by application of the World Health Organization cutoffs for osteopenia and osteoporosis to DXA measures. Furthermore, novel high-resolution imaging tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), have been used to elucidate the effects of kidney disease on cortical and trabecular microarchitecture and bone strength and to identify potential targets for strategies that protect against fractures. This review will discuss the updated epidemiology of fractures in CKD, fracture risk screening by DXA, and the utility of state-of-the art imaging methods to uncover the effects of kidney disease on the skeleton.

  10. Meta-analysis of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Tan, Lan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Lin; Zhao, Qing-Fei; Li, Jie-Qiong; Wang, Jun; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-12-01

    The aetiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is believed to involve environmental exposure and genetic susceptibility. The aim of our present systematic review and meta-analysis was to roundly evaluate the association between AD and its modifiable risk factors. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception to July 2014, and the references of retrieved relevant articles. We included prospective cohort studies and retrospective case-control studies. 16,906 articles were identified of which 323 with 93 factors met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. Among factors with relatively strong evidence (pooled population >5000) in our meta-analysis, we found grade I evidence for 4 medical exposures (oestrogen, statin, antihypertensive medications and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy) as well as 4 dietary exposures (folate, vitamin E/C and coffee) as protective factors of AD. We found grade I evidence showing that one biochemical exposure (hyperhomocysteine) and one psychological condition (depression) significantly increase risk of developing AD. We also found grade I evidence indicative of complex roles of pre-existing disease (frailty, carotid atherosclerosis, hypertension, low diastolic blood pressure, type 2 diabetes mellitus (Asian population) increasing risk whereas history of arthritis, heart disease, metabolic syndrome and cancer decreasing risk) and lifestyle (low education, high body mass index (BMI) in mid-life and low BMI increasing the risk whereas cognitive activity, current smoking (Western population), light-to-moderate drinking, stress, high BMI in late-life decreasing the risk) in influencing AD risk. We identified no evidence suggestive of significant association with occupational exposures. Effective interventions in diet, medications, biochemical exposures, psychological condition, pre-existing disease and lifestyle may decrease new incidence of AD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  11. Unemployment risk among individuals undergoing medical treatment for chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, N; Nakamura, T; Tsuchiya, N; Tsuji, I; Hozawa, A; Tomita, H

    2016-03-01

    Chronic diseases increase the risk of unemployment even in non-disaster settings; therefore, in post-disaster settings, special attention needs to be paid to the employment status of those suffering from chronic diseases. To examine the association between chronic disease and the risk of unemployment in a disaster area. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Shichigahama Town, Miyagi, north-eastern Japan, where had been severely inundated by the 2011 tsunami. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between undergoing medical treatment for a combination of chronic diseases (stroke, cancer, myocardial infarction and angina) and unemployment risk. Confounders such as psychological distress and levels of daily life activity were considered. Among the 2588 individuals studied, there was a statistically significant association between undergoing medical treatment for chronic disease and the risk of unemployment [odds ratio (OR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-2.7, P < 0.05]. In participants with a lower degree of psychological distress and better levels of daily life activity (n = 1967), no significant associations were observed (OR = 1.1, 95% CI 0.6-2.1). Conversely, in 536 participants with a higher degree of psychological distress and/or poorer levels of daily life activity, statistically significant associations were found (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.01-6.6, P < 0.05). The association between undergoing medical treatment for chronic disease and unemployment risk was observed only in participants with a higher degree of psychological distress and/or poorer levels of daily life activity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Common polygenic variation enhances risk prediction for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Sims, Rebecca; Bannister, Christian; Harold, Denise; Vronskaya, Maria; Majounie, Elisa; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Morgan, Kevin; Passmore, Peter; Holmes, Clive; Powell, John; Brayne, Carol; Gill, Michael; Mead, Simon; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos; Lambert, Jean-Charles; van Duijn, Cornelia; Maier, Wolfgang; Ramirez, Alfredo; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Hardy, John; Seshadri, Sudha; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe; Williams, Julie

    2015-12-01

    The identification of subjects at high risk for Alzheimer's disease is important for prognosis and early intervention. We investigated the polygenic architecture of Alzheimer's disease and the accuracy of Alzheimer's disease prediction models, including and excluding the polygenic component in the model. This study used genotype data from the powerful dataset comprising 17 008 cases and 37 154 controls obtained from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP). Polygenic score analysis tested whether the alleles identified to associate with disease in one sample set were significantly enriched in the cases relative to the controls in an independent sample. The disease prediction accuracy was investigated in a subset of the IGAP data, a sample of 3049 cases and 1554 controls (for whom APOE genotype data were available) by means of sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and positive and negative predictive values. We observed significant evidence for a polygenic component enriched in Alzheimer's disease (P = 4.9 × 10(-26)). This enrichment remained significant after APOE and other genome-wide associated regions were excluded (P = 3.4 × 10(-19)). The best prediction accuracy AUC = 78.2% (95% confidence interval 77-80%) was achieved by a logistic regression model with APOE, the polygenic score, sex and age as predictors. In conclusion, Alzheimer's disease has a significant polygenic component, which has predictive utility for Alzheimer's disease risk and could be a valuable research tool complementing experimental designs, including preventative clinical trials, stem cell selection and high/low risk clinical studies. In modelling a range of sample disease prevalences, we found that polygenic scores almost doubles case prediction from chance with increased prediction at polygenic extremes.

  13. Patients’ Perceptions of Cholesterol, Cardiovascular Disease Risk, and Risk Communication Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Roberta E.; Parker, Donna R.; Eaton, Charles B.; Borkan, Jeffrey M.; Gramling, Robert; Cover, Rebecca T.; Ahern, David K.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite some recent improvement in knowledge about cholesterol in the United States, patient adherence to cholesterol treatment recommendations remains suboptimal. We undertook a qualitative study that explored patients’ perceptions of cholesterol and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and their reactions to 3 strategies for communicating CVD risk. METHODS We conducted 7 focus groups in New England using open-ended questions and visual risk communication prompts. The multidisciplinary study team performed qualitative content analysis through immersion/crystallization processes and analyzing coded reports using NVivo qualitative coding software. RESULTS All participants were aware that “high cholesterol” levels adversely affect health. Many had, however, inadequate knowledge about hypercholesterolemia and CVD risk, and few knew their cholesterol numbers. Many assumed they had been tested and their cholesterol concentrations were healthy, even if their physicians had not mentioned it. Standard visual representations showing statistical probabilities of risk were assessed as confusing and uninspiring. A strategy that provides a cardiovascular risk-adjusted age was evaluated as clear, memorable, relevant, and potentially capable of motivating people to make healthful changes. A few participants in each focus group were concerned that a cardiovascular risk-adjusted age that was greater than chronological age would frighten patients. CONCLUSIONS Complex explanations about cholesterol and CVD risk appear to be insufficient for motivating behavior change. A cardiovascular risk-adjusted age calculator is one strategy that may engage patients in recognizing their CVD risk and, when accompanied by information about risk reduction, may be helpful in communicating risk to patients. PMID:16735521

  14. Obstetric and Neonatal Risks Among Obese Women Without Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Soo; Zhu, Yeyi; Grantz, Katherine L; Hinkle, Stefanie N; Chen, Zhen; Wallace, Maeve E; Smarr, Melissa M; Epps, Nikira M; Mendola, Pauline

    2016-07-01

    To investigate whether prepregnancy obesity is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes among women without chronic disease. Singleton deliveries (N=112,309) among mothers without chronic diseases in the Consortium on Safe Labor, a retrospective U.S. cohort, were analyzed using Poisson regression with robust variance estimation. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) estimated perinatal risks in relation to prepregnancy obesity status adjusted for age, race-ethnicity, parity, insurance, smoking and alcohol use during pregnancy, and study site. Obstetric risks were variably (and mostly marginally) increased as body mass index (BMI) category and obesity class increased. In particular, the risk of gestational hypertensive disorders, gestational diabetes, cesarean delivery, and induction increased in a dose-response fashion. For example, the percentage of gestational diabetes among obese class III women was 14.6% in contrast to 2.8% among women with normal BMIs (corresponding relative risks [95% CI] 1.99 [1.86-2.13], 2.94 [2.73-3.18], 3.97 [3.61-4.36], and 5.47 [4.96-6.04] for overweight, obese class I, obese class II, and obese class III women, respectively) compared with women with normal BMIs. Similarly, neonatal risks increased in a dose-response fashion with maternal BMI status including preterm birth at less than 32 weeks of gestation, large for gestational age (LGA), transient tachypnea, sepsis, and intensive care unit admission. The percentage of LGA neonates increased from 7.9% among women with normal BMIs to 17.3% among obese class III women and relative risks increased to 1.52 (1.45-1.58), 1.74 (1.65-1.83), 1.93 (1.79-2.07), and 2.32 (2.14-2.52) as BMI category increased. Prepregnancy obesity is associated with increased risks of a wide range of adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes among women without chronic diseases.

  15. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Methods Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn’s disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine. Results Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn’s disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p < 0.019). Levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer, protein C, factor VIII, total homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn’s disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Conclusions Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease. PMID:27942288

  16. Expression of Alzheimer's disease risk genes in ischemic brain degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-01

    We review the Alzheimer-related expression of genes following brain ischemia as risk factors for late-onset of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and their role in Alzheimer's disease ischemia-reperfusion pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding ischemic etiology of Alzheimer's disease have revealed dysregulation of Alzheimer-associated genes including amyloid protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin 1 and 2, autophagy, mitophagy and apoptosis. We review the relationship between these genes dysregulated by brain ischemia and the cellular and neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here we summarize the latest studies supporting the theory that Alzheimer-related genes play an important role in ischemic brain injury and that ischemia is a needful and leading supplier to the onset and progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of ischemic dependent neurodegenerative disease and neuronal susceptibility finally are unknown, a downregulated expression of neuronal defense genes like alfa-secretase in the ischemic brain makes the neurons less able to resist injury. The recent challenge is to find ways to raise the adaptive reserve of the brain to overcome such ischemic-associated deficits and support and/or promote neuronal survival. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for Alzheimer's disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date.

  17. Lyme disease risk in dogs in New Brunswick

    PubMed Central

    Bjurman, Natalie K.; Bradet, Gina; Lloyd, Vett K.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the seroprevalence of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in New Brunswick dogs. Testing of 699 serum samples from dogs across the province revealed a 6% province-wide seropositivity, more than 6 times higher than that found in 2008. The rapid increase in seropositivity indicates increased Lyme disease risk to both canine and human health. PMID:27587892

  18. Teachers' Risk Perception and Needs in Addressing Infectious Disease Outbreak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Emmy M. Y.; Cheng, May M. H.; Lo, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The outbreak of the Influenza A (H1N1) virus has led to numerous precautionary school closures in several countries. No research is available on the school teachers' perceptions as a health protective resource in controlling communicable disease outbreaks. The purposes of this study were to examine the risk perception, the perceived understanding…

  19. Teachers' Risk Perception and Needs in Addressing Infectious Disease Outbreak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Emmy M. Y.; Cheng, May M. H.; Lo, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The outbreak of the Influenza A (H1N1) virus has led to numerous precautionary school closures in several countries. No research is available on the school teachers' perceptions as a health protective resource in controlling communicable disease outbreaks. The purposes of this study were to examine the risk perception, the perceived understanding…

  20. [Nonconventional risk factors in some psychosomatic diseases in police officers].

    PubMed

    Shogenov, A G; Murtazov, A M

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with topical problems of improving methods of medical and psychological diagnosis and prevention of health state in police officers, in accordance with prophylactic medicine concept. The authors describe topical aspects of occupational medicine and influence of nonconventional risk factors on occurrence and course of some psychosomatic diseases.

  1. Elevated Protein Level Increases Blacks' Risk of Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166903.html Elevated Protein Level Increases Blacks' Risk of Kidney Disease Scientists find enhanced protein level is required to trigger ...

  2. Issues of fish consumption for cardiovascular disease risk reduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing fish consumption is recommended for intake of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids and to confer benefits for the risk reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most Americans are not achieving intake levels that comply with current recommendations. It is the goal of this review to provide an overv...

  3. Dietary Risk Factors and Their Modification in Cardiovascular Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of dietary risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including diet sodium intake for hypertension and dietary fat and cholesterol for hypercholesterolemia, exacerbation of these conditions by obesity, and intervention strategies for their modification. Describes clinical strategies for modifying diet: education, skills…

  4. Dietary Risk Factors and Their Modification in Cardiovascular Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of dietary